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Sample records for probe set filtering

  1. CRYSTAL FILTER TEST SET

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL FILTERS, *HIGH FREQUENCY, *RADIOFREQUENCY FILTERS, AMPLIFIERS, ELECTRIC POTENTIAL, FREQUENCY, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , INSTRUMENTATION, RADIOFREQUENCY, RADIOFREQUENCY AMPLIFIERS, TEST EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS

  2. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Attitude Estimation Filter Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    2005-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) spacecraft was launched in June of 2001. The sensor complement of WMAP consists of two Autonomous Star Trackers (ASTs), two Fine Sun Sensors (FSSs), and a gyro package which contains redundancy about one of the WMAP body axes. The onboard attitude estimation filter consists of an extended Kalman filter (EKF) solving for attitude and gyro bias errors which are then resolved into a spacecraft attitude quaternion and gyro bias. A pseudo-linear Kalman filter has been developed which directly estimates the spacecraft attitude quaternion, rate, and gyro bias. In this paper, the performance of the two filters is compared for the two major control modes of WMAP: inertial mode and observation mode.

  3. Effect of ECG filter settings on J-waves.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mikiko; Tsunemitsu, Chie; Katoh, Sayo; Kamiyama, Yukari; Sano, Nario; Ezaki, Kaori; Miyazaki, Hiroko; Teshima, Yasushi; Yufu, Kunio; Takahashi, Naohiko; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2014-01-01

    While J-waves were observed in healthy populations, variations in their reported incidence may be partly explicable by the ECG filter setting. We obtained resting 12-lead ECG recordings in 665 consecutive patients and enrolled 112 (56 men, 56 women, mean age 59.3±16.1years) who manifested J-waves on ECGs acquired with a 150-Hz low-pass filter. We then studied the J-waves on individual ECGs to look for morphological changes when 25-, 35-, 75-, 100-, and 150Hz filters were used. The notching observed with the 150-Hz filter changed to slurring (42%) or was eliminated (28%) with the 25-Hz filter. Similarly, the slurring seen with the 150-Hz filter was eliminated on 71% of ECGs recorded with the 25-Hz filter. The amplitude of J-waves was significantly lower with 25- and 35-Hz than 75-, 100-, and 150-Hz filters (p<0.0001). The ECG filter setting significantly affects the J-wave morphology. © 2013.

  4. Calibration of the HAO standard opal filter set. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Streete, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    Solar radiation attenuators called opal filters have been used for several decades to calibrate photographic film in instruments used to measure the brightness of the solar corona. The primary component used in fabricating these filters is opal glass. New measurements of the transmittance of the HAO fundamental standard set of opal filters were begun in September, 1988. Since nearly two decades had passed from the time of the last calibration measurements, there was concern that the transmittance of the filters might have changed. Another motivation for recalibrating the opal filters was the desire to know the transmittance values in spectral regions above and below those used in 1970. The spectral regions chosen were 450 nm, 550 nm, 650 nm and 800 nm. Comparisons of transmittance are made with the previous values, and new transmittance values are given.

  5. A high-throughput Raman notch filter set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppels, G. J.; Huizinga, A.; Krabbe, H. W.; de Boer, H. A.; Gijsbers, G.; de Mul, F. F. M.

    1990-12-01

    A chevron-type Raman notch filter (RNF) set is described. lt combines a high signal throughput (up to 90% around 1600 cm-1 and ≳80% between and 700 and 2700 cm-1) with a laser line suppression of 108-109. The filter set can be used to replace the first two dispersion stages in triple-stage Raman monochromators commonly employed in multichannel detection systems. This yields a gain in intensity of the detected Raman signal of a factor of 4. It is shown that in Raman spectrometers with a backscatter geometry, the filter set can also be used to optically couple the microscope and the spectrometer. This leads to a further increase in signal intensity of a factor of 3-4 as compared to the situation where a beam splitter is used. Additional advantages of the RNF set are the fact that signal throughput is almost polarization independent over a large spectral interval and that it offers the possibility to simultaneously record Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra.

  6. Experimental validation of a method characterizing bow tie filters in CT scanners using a real-time dose probe

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Nosratieh, Anita; Gelskey, Dale; Yang Kai; Huang Shinying; Chen Lin; Boone, John M.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Beam-shaping or ''bow tie'' (BT) filters are used to spatially modulate the x-ray beam in a CT scanner, but the conventional method of step-and-shoot measurement to characterize a beam's profile is tedious and time-consuming. The theory for characterization of bow tie relative attenuation (COBRA) method, which relies on a real-time dosimeter to address the issues of conventional measurement techniques, was previously demonstrated using computer simulations. In this study, the feasibility of the COBRA theory is further validated experimentally through the employment of a prototype real-time radiation meter and a known BT filter. Methods: The COBRA method consisted of four basic steps: (1) The probe was placed at the edge of a scanner's field of view; (2) a real-time signal train was collected as the scanner's gantry rotated with the x-ray beam on; (3) the signal train, without a BT filter, was modeled using peak values measured in the signal train of step 2; and (4) the relative attenuation of the BT filter was estimated from filtered and unfiltered data sets. The prototype probe was first verified to have an isotropic and linear response to incident x-rays. The COBRA method was then tested on a dedicated breast CT scanner with a custom-designed BT filter and compared to the conventional step-and-shoot characterization of the BT filter. Using basis decomposition of dual energy signal data, the thickness of the filter was estimated and compared to the BT filter's manufacturing specifications. The COBRA method was also demonstrated with a clinical whole body CT scanner using the body BT filter. The relative attenuation was calculated at four discrete x-ray tube potentials and used to estimate the thickness of the BT filter. Results: The prototype probe was found to have a linear and isotropic response to x-rays. The relative attenuation produced from the COBRA method fell within the error of the relative attenuation measured with the step-and-shoot method

  7. A Level Set Filter for Speckle Reduction in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongga; Huang, Bo; Huang, Xiaoxia

    2010-12-01

    Despite much effort and significant progress in recent years, speckle removal for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image still is a challenging problem in image processing. Unlike the traditional noise filters, which are mainly based on local neighborhood statistical average or frequencies transform, in this paper, we propose a speckle reduction method based on the theory of level set, one form of curvature flow propagation. Firstly, based on partial differential equation, the Lee filter can be cast as a formulation of anisotropic diffusion function; furthermore, we continued to deduce it into a level set formulation. Level set flow into the method allows the front interface to propagate naturally with topological changes, where the speed is proportional to the curvature of the intensity contours in an image. Hence, small speckle will disappear quickly, while large scale interfaces will be slow to evolve. Secondly, for preserving finer detailed structures in images when smoothing the speckle, the evolution is switched between minimum or maximum curvature speed depending on the scale of speckle. The proposed method has been illustrated by experiments on simulation image and ERS-2 SAR images under different circumstances. Its advantages over the traditional speckle reduction filter approaches have also been demonstrated.

  8. Point Set Registration via Particle Filtering and Stochastic Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Romeil; Dambreville, Samuel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a particle filtering approach for the problem of registering two point sets that differ by a rigid body transformation. Typically, registration algorithms compute the transformation parameters by maximizing a metric given an estimate of the correspondence between points across the two sets of interest. This can be viewed as a posterior estimation problem, in which the corresponding distribution can naturally be estimated using a particle filter. In this work, we treat motion as a local variation in pose parameters obtained by running a few iterations of a certain local optimizer. Employing this idea, we introduce stochastic motion dynamics to widen the narrow band of convergence often found in local optimizer approaches for registration. Thus, the novelty of our method is threefold: First, we employ a particle filtering scheme to drive the point set registration process. Second, we present a local optimizer that is motivated by the correlation measure. Third, we increase the robustness of the registration performance by introducing a dynamic model of uncertainty for the transformation parameters. In contrast with other techniques, our approach requires no annealing schedule, which results in a reduction in computational complexity (with respect to particle size) as well as maintains the temporal coherency of the state (no loss of information). Also unlike some alternative approaches for point set registration, we make no geometric assumptions on the two data sets. Experimental results are provided that demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm to initialization, noise, missing structures, and/or differing point densities in each set, on several challenging 2D and 3D registration scenarios. PMID:20558877

  9. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  10. An Effective Filter for IBD Detection in Large Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Bercovici, Sivan; Rodriguez, Jesse M.; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2014-01-01

    Identity by descent (IBD) inference is the task of computationally detecting genomic segments that are shared between individuals by means of common familial descent. Accurate IBD detection plays an important role in various genomic studies, ranging from mapping disease genes to exploring ancient population histories. The majority of recent work in the field has focused on improving the accuracy of inference, targeting shorter genomic segments that originate from a more ancient common ancestor. The accuracy of these methods, however, is achieved at the expense of high computational cost, resulting in a prohibitively long running time when applied to large cohorts. To enable the study of large cohorts, we introduce SpeeDB, a method that facilitates fast IBD detection in large unphased genotype data sets. Given a target individual and a database of individuals that potentially share IBD segments with the target, SpeeDB applies an efficient opposite-homozygous filter, which excludes chromosomal segments from the database that are highly unlikely to be IBD with the corresponding segments from the target individual. The remaining segments can then be evaluated by any IBD detection method of choice. When examining simulated individuals sharing 4 cM IBD regions, SpeeDB filtered out 99.5% of genomic regions from consideration while retaining 99% of the true IBD segments. Applying the SpeeDB filter prior to detecting IBD in simulated fourth cousins resulted in an overall running time that was 10,000x faster than inferring IBD without the filter and retained 99% of the true IBD segments in the output. PMID:24667521

  11. Resolution enhancement of pump-probe microscopy with an inverse-annular spatial filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kawasumi, K.; Miyazaki, J.; Nakata, K.

    2016-12-01

    We have introduced a pupil filter, an inverse-annular pupil filter in a pump-probe photothermal microscope, which provides resolution enhancement in three dimensions. The resolution is probed to be improved in lateral and axial resolution by imaging experiment using 20 nm gold nanoparticles. The improvement in X (perpendicular to the common pump and probe polarization direction), Y (parallel to the polarization direction), and Z (axial direction) are by 15±6, 8±8, and 21±2 % from the resolution without a pupil filter. The resolution enhancement is even better than the calculation using vector field, which predicts the corresponding enhancement of 11, 8, and 6 %. The discussion is made to explain the unexpected results. We also demonstrate the photothermal imaging of thick biological samples (cells from rabbit intestine and kidney) stained with hematoxylin and eosin dye with the inverse-annular filter.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic mode identification from magnetic probe signals via a matched filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dana H.; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bogatu, Ioan N.; Humphreys, David A.; Turnbull, Alan D.

    2002-04-01

    A matched filter analysis has been developed to identify the amplitude and phase of magnetohydrodynamic modes in DIII-D tokamak plasmas using magnetic probe signals (δBp). As opposed to conventional Fourier spatial analysis of toroidally spaced probes, this analysis includes data from both toroidally and poloidally spaced magnetic probe arrays. Using additional probes both improves the statistics of the analysis and more importantly incorporates poloidal information into the mode analysis. The matched filter is a numeric filter that matches signals from the magnetic probes with numerically predicted signals for the mode. The numerical predictions are developed using EFIT equilibrium reconstruction data as input to the stability code GATO and the vacuum field code VACUUM. Changes is the plasma equilibrium that occur on the same time scale as the mode are taken into account by modeling simple matched filter vectors corresponding to changes in total plasma current, plus vertical and horizontal plasma shifts. The matched filter method works well when there is good understanding of a mode and good modeling of its structure. Matched filter analysis results for a fast growing ideal kink mode, where equilibrium change effects are minimal, show the effectiveness of this method. A slow growing resistive-wall mode (RWM) is also analyzed using the matched filter method. The method gives good results for identifying the amplitude and phase of the RWM but the simple equilibrium vectors are insufficient for complete elimination of equilibrium changes on this time scale. An analysis of the computational requirements of the scheme indicates that real-time application of the matched filter for RWM identification will be possible.

  13. Detection of RTX toxin genes in gram-negative bacteria with a set of specific probes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, P; Heyberger-Meyer, B; Burnens, A P; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1997-01-01

    The family of RTX (RTX representing repeats in the structural toxin) toxins is composed of several protein toxins with a characteristic nonapeptide glycine-rich repeat motif. Most of its members were shown to have cytolytic activity. By comparing the genetic relationships of the RTX toxin genes we established a set of 10 gene probes to be used for screening as-yet-unknown RTX toxin genes in bacterial species. The probes include parts of apxIA, apxIIA, and apxIIIA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, cyaA from Bordetella pertusis, frpA from Neisseria meningitidis, prtC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, hlyA and elyA from Escherichia coli, aaltA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and lktA from Pasteurella haemolytica. A panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic gram-negative bacteria were investigated for the presence of RTX toxin genes. The probes detected all known genes for RTX toxins. Moreover, we found potential RTX toxin genes in several pathogenic bacterial species for which no such toxins are known yet. This indicates that RTX or RTX-like toxins are widely distributed among pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. The probes generated by PCR and the hybridization method were optimized to allow broad-range screening for RTX toxin genes in one step. This included the binding of unlabelled probes to a nylon filter and subsequent hybridization of the filter with labelled genomic DNA of the strain to be tested. The method constitutes a powerful tool for the assessment of the potential pathogenicity of poorly characterized strains intended to be used in biotechnological applications. Moreover, it is useful for the detection of already-known or new RTX toxin genes in bacteria of medical importance. PMID:9172345

  14. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  15. Lazy collaborative filtering for data sets with missing values.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongli; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Wanlei

    2013-12-01

    As one of the biggest challenges in research on recommender systems, the data sparsity issue is mainly caused by the fact that users tend to rate a small proportion of items from the huge number of available items. This issue becomes even more problematic for the neighborhood-based collaborative filtering (CF) methods, as there are even lower numbers of ratings available in the neighborhood of the query item. In this paper, we aim to address the data sparsity issue in the context of neighborhood-based CF. For a given query (user, item), a set of key ratings is first identified by taking the historical information of both the user and the item into account. Then, an auto-adaptive imputation (AutAI) method is proposed to impute the missing values in the set of key ratings. We present a theoretical analysis to show that the proposed imputation method effectively improves the performance of the conventional neighborhood-based CF methods. The experimental results show that our new method of CF with AutAI outperforms six existing recommendation methods in terms of accuracy.

  16. Design and fabrication of an optical probe with a phase filter for extended depth of focus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jingchao; Kim, Junyoung; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-01-25

    The trade-off between spot size and depth of focus (DOF) often limits the performance of optical systems, such as optical coherence tomography and optical tweezers. Although researchers have proposed various methods to extend the DOF in free-space optics, many are difficult to implement in miniaturized optical probes due to space limitations. In this study, we present an optical probe with an extended DOF using a binary phase spatial filter (BPSF). The BPSF pattern was fabricated on the distal tip of an optical probe with a diameter of 1 mm by replica molding soft lithography, which can be easily implemented in a miniaturized optical probe due to its simple configuration. We optimized the BPSF pattern to enhance DOF, spot diameter, and light efficiency. To evaluate the fabricated endoscopic optical probe, we measured the three-dimensional point spread function of the BPSF probe and compared it with a probe without BPSF. The BPSF probe has a spot diameter of 3.56 μm and a DOF of 199.7 μm, while the probe without BPSF has a spot diameter of 3.69 μm and a DOF of 73.9 μm, representing a DOF gain of 2.7. We anticipate that this optical probe can be used in biomedical applications, including optical imaging and optical trapping techniques.

  17. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  18. Probing meaningfulness of oscillatory EEG components with bootstrapping, label noise and reduced training sets.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Meinel, Andreas; Dähne, Sven; Tangermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As oscillatory components of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) and other electrophysiological signals may co-modulate in power with a target variable of interest (e.g. reaction time), data-driven supervised methods have been developed to automatically identify such components based on labeled example trials. Under conditions of challenging signal-to-noise ratio, high-dimensional data and small training sets, however, these methods may overfit to meaningless solutions. Examples are spatial filtering methods like Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and Source Power Comodulation (SPoC). It is difficult for the practitioner to tell apart meaningful from arbitrary, random components. We propose three approaches to probe the robustness of extracted oscillatory components and show their application to both, simulated and EEG data recorded during a visually cued hand motor reaction time task.

  19. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: •A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed.•Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method.

  20. Data Reduction in the Gravity Probe B Experiment: Optimal Estimation and Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifetz, M. I.; Keiser, G. M.; Silbergleit, A. S.

    2003-05-01

    Data analysis is one of the most essential components of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) experiment. We discuss three main problems that need to be resolve in the data reduction: 1)direct observation of the GP-B gyroscope's precession angle; 2)precise estimation of the gyroscope's geodetic and frame-draggig average drift rates; 3)gyroscope-telescope matching: elimination of the reference direction pointing error. We formulate these problems from the point of view of the modern control theory and describe our approach to the GP-B data analysis as the "bank" of filters that estimate the model-dependent system state vectors and calculate corresponding covariance matrices. For the problems 1), 2), and 3) estimation recursive algorithms are obtained based on the two-step nonlinear filtering approach and these filters will be used in the GP-B data reduction.

  1. Level set methods for modelling field evaporation in atom probe.

    PubMed

    Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P; Smith, George D W

    2013-12-01

    Atom probe is a nanoscale technique for creating three-dimensional spatially and chemically resolved point datasets, primarily of metallic or semiconductor materials. While atom probe can achieve local high-level resolution, the spatial coherence of the technique is highly dependent upon the evaporative physics in the material and can often result in large geometric distortions in experimental results. The distortions originate from uncertainties in the projection function between the field evaporating specimen and the ion detector. Here we explore the possibility of continuum numerical approximations to the evaporative behavior during an atom probe experiment, and the subsequent propagation of ions to the detector, with particular emphasis placed on the solution of axisymmetric systems, such as isolated particles and multilayer systems. Ultimately, this method may prove critical in rapid modeling of tip shape evolution in atom probe tomography, which itself is a key factor in the rapid generation of spatially accurate reconstructions in atom probe datasets.

  2. An Independent Filter for Gene Set Testing Based on Spectral Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Frost, H Robert; Li, Zhigang; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Gene set testing has become an indispensable tool for the analysis of high-dimensional genomic data. An important motivation for testing gene sets, rather than individual genomic variables, is to improve statistical power by reducing the number of tested hypotheses. Given the dramatic growth in common gene set collections, however, testing is often performed with nearly as many gene sets as underlying genomic variables. To address the challenge to statistical power posed by large gene set collections, we have developed spectral gene set filtering (SGSF), a novel technique for independent filtering of gene set collections prior to gene set testing. The SGSF method uses as a filter statistic the p-value measuring the statistical significance of the association between each gene set and the sample principal components (PCs), taking into account the significance of the associated eigenvalues. Because this filter statistic is independent of standard gene set test statistics under the null hypothesis but dependent under the alternative, the proportion of enriched gene sets is increased without impacting the type I error rate. As shown using simulated and real gene expression data, the SGSF algorithm accurately filters gene sets unrelated to the experimental outcome resulting in significantly increased gene set testing power.

  3. Organic and Elemental Carbon Filter Sets: Preparation Method and Interlaboratory Results

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ming; Birch, M. Eileen; Deye, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in climate, visibility, air quality, and human health effects, and they have been routinely monitored in workplace and environmental settings. Different thermal analysis methods have been applied to determine the carbon content of carbonaceous aerosols. Good agreement between results for total carbon (TC) generally has been found, but the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) fractions determined by different methods often disagree. Measurement uncertainty is mainly due to pyrolysis and charring of OC sample components. Lack of reference materials has impeded progress on method standardization and understanding method biases. A relatively simple method for generating matched filter sets having known OC–EC contents is reported. After generation and analysis of each set to confirm agreement between filters, the filter sets were distributed to six laboratories for an interlaboratory comparison. Analytical results indicate a uniform carbon distribution for the filter sets and good agreement between the participating laboratories. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for mean TC (OC + EC), OC, and EC results for seven laboratories were <10, 11, and 12% (respectively). Except for one EC result (RSD = 16%), RSDs reported by individual laboratories for TC, OC, and EC were <12%. The method of filter generation is generally applicable and reproducible. Depending on the application, different filter loadings and types of OC materials can be employed. Matched filter sets prepared by the described approach can be used for determining the accuracy of OC–EC methods and thereby contribute to method standardization. PMID:22459320

  4. Organic and elemental carbon filter sets: preparation method and interlaboratory results.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ming; Birch, M Eileen; Deye, Greg

    2012-10-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in climate, visibility, air quality, and human health effects, and they have been routinely monitored in workplace and environmental settings. Different thermal analysis methods have been applied to determine the carbon content of carbonaceous aerosols. Good agreement between results for total carbon (TC) generally has been found, but the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) fractions determined by different methods often disagree. Measurement uncertainty is mainly due to pyrolysis and charring of OC sample components. Lack of reference materials has impeded progress on method standardization and understanding method biases. A relatively simple method for generating matched filter sets having known OC-EC contents is reported. After generation and analysis of each set to confirm agreement between filters, the filter sets were distributed to six laboratories for an interlaboratory comparison. Analytical results indicate a uniform carbon distribution for the filter sets and good agreement between the participating laboratories. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for mean TC (OC + EC), OC, and EC results for seven laboratories were <10, 11, and 12% (respectively). Except for one EC result (RSD = 16%), RSDs reported by individual laboratories for TC, OC, and EC were <12%. The method of filter generation is generally applicable and reproducible. Depending on the application, different filter loadings and types of OC materials can be employed. Matched filter sets prepared by the described approach can be used for determining the accuracy of OC-EC methods and thereby contribute to method standardization.

  5. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  6. Selective Measurement of Calcium and Sodium Ion Conductance Using Sub-Micropipette Probes with Ion Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao Long; Takami, Tomohide; Son, Jong Wan; Kawai, Tomoji; Park, Bae Ho

    2012-02-01

    Selective ion currents in aqueous calcium chloride and sodium chloride solutions with concentrations of up to 1.0 M were observed with sub-micropipettes in which poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films containing ionophores selectively filtered cations. Calcium bis[4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl] phosphate (HDOPP-Ca) and bis[(12-crown-4)methyl]-2-dodecyl-2-methylmalonate [bis(12-crown-4)] were used as the ionophores to filter calcium and sodium ions, respectively. The selective ion current was observed using a low-current detection system developed from scanning tunneling microscopy. The approximate linear relationship between the ion concentration and ion current suggests that the sub-micropipette probe can be used to detect the intracellular local concentration of a specific ion up to 1.0 M.

  7. Assessment of the 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-07-16

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

  8. Assessment of the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-07-16

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

  9. Investigation of filter sets for supervised pixel classification of cephalometric landmarks by spatial spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, D J; Coggins, J M; Moon, H

    1997-12-01

    The diagnostic process of orthodontics requires the analysis of a cephalometric radiograph. Image landmarks on this two-dimensional lateral projection image of the patient's head are manually identified and spatial relationships are evaluated. This method is very time consuming. A reliable method for automatic computer landmark identification does not exist. Spatial Spectroscopy is a proposed method of automatic landmark identification on cephalometric radiographs, that decomposes an image by convolving it with a set of filters followed by a statistical decision process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test appropriate filter sets for the application of Spatial Spectroscopy for automatic identification of cephalometric radiographic landmarks. This study evaluated two different filter sets with 15 landmarks on fourteen images. Spatial Spectroscopy was able to consistently locate landmarks on all 14 cephalometric radiographs tested. The mean landmark identification error of 0.841 +/- 1.253 pixels for a Multiscale Derivative filter set and 0.912 +/- 1.364 pixels for an Offset Gaussian filter set was not significantly different. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between identification of individual landmarks for the Multiscale Derivative and the Offset Gaussian filter set (P > 0.05). These results suggest that Spatial Spectroscopy may be useful in landmark identification tasks.

  10. Accuracy of jitter estimates using different filter settings on Visi-Pitch: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Perry, C K; Ingrisano, D R; Scott, S R

    1996-12-01

    Preliminary findings are presented regarding Visi-Pitch settings in relation to automatically derived perturbation values (jitter). Jitter values were estimated from sustained phonation of /a/ at each of four filter settings for three subjects using Visi-Pitch. Data were compared to values obtained by hand measuring the same signals and employing Koike's formula. Results indicated that the magnitude of difference between jitter estimated by Visi-Pitch and hand measurement was small. Findings support the use of the manufacturer's recommended filter settings as opposed to alternative settings suggested by Karnell.

  11. Switching between filter settings reduces the efficient utilization of visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Jost, Kerstin; Mayr, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The capacity limitation of working memory requires that only relevant information gains access to the workspace, while irrelevant information is kept out. Thus, the ability to use attention to filter out irrelevant information is an important factor in how efficiently the limited storage space is used. Here, we examined to what degree the requirement to flexibly change filter settings affects filtering efficiency. Participants were presented with visual objects in different colors, and a cue presented in advance indicated which objects had to be stored. The contralateral delay activity, an event-related brain potential that reflects working-memory load was used to assess filtering efficiency during the retention interval. The data of two experiments showed that when filter settings had to be adjusted on a trial-by-trial basis, more irrelevant information passed the gate to working memory. Moreover, this switching-induced filtering deficit was restricted to those items that matched the previous, but currently irrelevant, filter settings. Thus, lingering effects of the selection history seem to counteract goal-directed encoding, and thus constitute an important attentional limitation for the efficient utilization of our limited workspace.

  12. Adaptive filter based two-probe noise suppression system for transient evoked otoacoustic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Subotić, Miško; Šarić, Zoran; Jovičić, Slobodan T

    2012-03-01

    Transient otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) is a method widely used in clinical practice for assessment of hearing quality. The main problem in TEOAE detection is its much lower level than the level of environmental and biological noise. While the environmental noise level can be controlled, the biological noise can be only reduced by appropriate signal processing. This paper presents a new two-probe preprocessing TEOAE system for suppression of the biological noise by adaptive filtering. The system records biological noises in both ears and applies a specific adaptive filtering approach for suppression of biological noise in the ear canal with TEOAE. The adaptive filtering approach includes robust sign error LMS algorithm, stimuli response summation according to the derived non-linear response (DNLR) technique, subtraction of the estimated TEOAE signal and residual noise suppression. The proposed TEOAE detection system is tested by three quality measures: signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), reproducibility of TEOAE, and measurement time. The maximal TEOAE detection improvement is dependent on the coherence function between biological noise in left and right ears. The experimental results show maximal improvement of 7 dB in S/N, improvement in reproducibility near 40% and reduction in duration of TEOAE measurement of over 30%.

  13. Segmentation of ventricles in Alzheimer mr images using anisotropic diffusion filtering and level set method.

    PubMed

    Anandh, K R; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Ventricle enlargement is a useful structural biomarker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). This devastating neurodegenerative disorder results in progression of dementia. Although AD results in the passive increment of ventricle volume, there exists a large overlap in the volume measurements of AD and normal subjects. Hence, shape based analysis of ventricle dilation is appropriate to detect the subtle morphological changes among these two groups. In this work, segmentation of ventricle in Alzheimer MR images is employed using level set method and anisotropic based diffusion filtering. Images considered for this study are preprocessed using filters. Anisotropic based diffusion filtering is employed to extract the edge map. This filtering performs region specific smoothing process using the diffusion coefficient as a function of image gradient. Filtered images are subjected to level set method which employs an improved diffusion rate equation for the level set evolution. Geometric features are extracted from the segmented ventricles. Results show that the diffusion filter could extract edge map with sharp region boundaries. The modified level set method is able to extract the morphological changes in ventricles. The observed morphological changes are distinct for normal and AD subjects (p < 0.0001). It is also observed that the sizes of ventricle in the AD subjects are noticeably enlarged when compared to normal subjects. Features obtained from the segmented ventricles are also clearly distinct and demonstrate the differences in the AD subjects. As ventricle volume and its morphometry are significant biomarkers, this study seems to be clinically relevant.

  14. Comparison of two accelerometer filter settings in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wallén, Martin Benka; Nero, Håkan; Franzén, Erika; Hagströmer, Maria

    2014-11-01

    This study compared common free-living physical activity (PA) outcomes, assessed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer and processed with two different filter settings, in a sample of elderly individuals with Parkinson´s disease (PD). Sixty-six individuals (73.1  ±  5.8 years) with mild to moderate idiopathic PD carried an accelerometer for 7 d. Data were processed with the default filter setting and a low frequency extension filter (LFE). Significantly larger values were obtained with the LFE for mean counts and steps per day, and for minutes per day in low intensity- and lifestyle activities at moderate intensity, but not for moderate-to vigorous intensity ambulatory activities. The largest difference was observed for mean ± SD steps per day (default = 4730  ±  3210; LFE = 11 117  ±  4553). Intraclass correlation confidence intervals and limits of agreement were generally wide, indicating poor agreement. A sub-study, in which 15 individuals with PD performed a self-paced 3 min walk, demonstrated that neither filter setting differed from video-recorded steps (p ≥ 0.05). This suggests that the LFE might overestimate PA-outcomes in free-living conditions. Until new evidence supporting an extension of the lower filter-band is presented, it is recommended that the default filter setting be used when assessing PA in elderly individuals with PD.

  15. Optimizing the Choice of Filter Sets for Space Based Imaging Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Rachel E.; Farrah, Duncan; Petty, Sara M.; Harris, Kathryn Amy

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the challenge of selecting a limited number of filters for space based imaging instruments such that they are able to address multiple heterogeneous science goals. The number of available filter slots for a mission is bounded by factors such as instrument size and cost. We explore methods used to extract the optimal group of filters such that they complement each other most effectively. We focus on three approaches; maximizing the separation of objects in two-dimensional color planes, SED fitting to select those filter sets that give the finest resolution in fitted physical parameters, and maximizing the orthogonality of physical parameter vectors in N-dimensional color-color space. These techniques are applied to a test-case, a UV/optical imager with space for five filters, with the goal of measuring the properties of local stars through to distant galaxies.

  16. Protein Adsorption to In-Line Filters of Intravenous Administration Sets.

    PubMed

    Besheer, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring compatibility of administered therapeutic proteins with intravenous administration sets is an important regulatory requirement. A low-dose recovery during administration of low protein concentrations is among the commonly observed incompatibilities, and it is mainly due to adsorption to in-line filters. To better understand this phenomenon, we studied the adsorption of 4 different therapeutic proteins (2 IgG1s, 1 IgG4, and 1 Fc fusion protein) diluted to 0.01 mg/mL in 5% glucose (B. Braun EcoFlac; B. Braun Melsungen AG, Melsungen, Germany) or 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl; Freeflex; Fresenius Kabi, Friedberg, Germany) solutions to 8 in-line filters (5 positively charged and 3 neutral filters made of different polymers and by different suppliers). The results show certain patterns of protein adsorption, which depend to a large extent on the dilution solution and filter material, and to a much lower extent on the proteins' biophysical properties. Investigation of the filter membranes' zeta potential showed a correlation between the observed adsorption pattern in 5% glucose solution and the filter's surface charge, with higher protein adsorption for the strongly negatively charged membranes. In 0.9% NaCl solution, the surface charges are masked, leading to different adsorption patterns. These results contribute to the general understanding of the protein adsorption to IV infusion filters and allow the design of more efficient compatibility studies. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of the Building 3430 Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-04-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Pathway Stack . The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20°, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Pathway stack. Therefore, this new system also meets the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliance to the requirements.

  18. Assessment of the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-07-16

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20°, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow -angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The 3430 stack was tested in both January and May of 2010 to document the results of several changes that were made to the exhaust system after the January tests. The 3430 stack meets the qualification criteria given in the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliancewith the requirements.

  19. Amplification and Temporal Filtering during Gradient Sensing by Nerve Growth Cones Probed with a Microfluidic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mathieu; Shynkar, Vasyl; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Dupin, Isabelle; Bouzigues, Cedric; Studer, Vincent; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth cones (GCs) are chemical sensors that convert graded extracellular cues into oriented axonal motion. To ensure a sensitive and robust response to directional signals in complex and dynamic chemical landscapes, GCs are presumably able to amplify and filter external information. How these processing tasks are performed remains however poorly known. Here, we probe the signal-processing capabilities of single GCs during γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) directional sensing with a shear-free microfluidic assay that enables systematic measurements of the GC output response to variable input gradients. By measuring at the single molecule level the polarization of GABAA chemoreceptors at the GC membrane, as a function of the external GABA gradient, we find that GCs act as i), signal amplifiers over a narrow range of concentrations, and ii), low-pass temporal filters with a cutoff frequency independent of stimuli conditions. With computational modeling, we determine that these systems-level properties arise at a molecular level from the saturable occupancy response and the lateral dynamics of GABAA receptors. PMID:23083707

  20. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-10-01

    An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as "fuzzy," so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better.

  1. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set

    PubMed Central

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as “fuzzy,” so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better. PMID:26702406

  2. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular Flow—The average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20°. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5% for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air Velocity—The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ≤ 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3

  3. Engineering of apodizer filters in the optical imaging using a set of phase plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palillero-Sandoval, Omar; Márquez-Aguilar, Pedro Antonio; Berriel-Valdos, Luis Raul

    2016-10-01

    A numerical study of the performance of a set of phase masks and apodizer filters, which are able to extend the depth of field (DOF) in the imaging system, are presented using a test object with different levels of gray. The ambiguity function is used to display which of these filters, placed in the pupil function, can increase the DOF. The intensity quasi-point spread functions (IQPSFs) show invariance in the central spot of the IQPSF when the apodizer is placed in the optical system. This approach minimizes the replicas of the object that appears in the background of the restored images produced by the numerical processing when in the pupil function these phase filters are used simultaneously. The correlation coefficient criteria and minimum squares differences were used to evaluate the quality of the restoration process.

  4. An Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) for Adaptive Filters in Neural Prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yao; Li, Will X Y; Zhang, Zhaorui; Cheung, Ray C C; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    Neural coding is an essential process for neuroprosthetic design, in which adaptive filters have been widely utilized. In a practical application, it is needed to switch between different filters, which could be based on continuous observations or point process, when the neuron models, conditions, or system requirements have changed. As candidates of coding chip for neural prostheses, low-power general purpose processors are not computationally efficient especially for large scale neural population coding. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) do not have flexibility to switch between different adaptive filters while the cost for design and fabrication is formidable. In this research work, we explore an application specific instruction set processor (ASIP) for adaptive filters in neural decoding activity. The proposed architecture focuses on efficient computation for the most time-consuming matrix/vector operations among commonly used adaptive filters, being able to provide both flexibility and throughput. Evaluation and implementation results are provided to demonstrate that the proposed ASIP design is area-efficient while being competitive to commercial CPUs in computational performance.

  5. Vascular tree segmentation in medical images using Hessian-based multiscale filtering and level set method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiaoying; Yang, Linjun; Zhang, Xuming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Vascular segmentation plays an important role in medical image analysis. A novel technique for the automatic extraction of vascular trees from 2D medical images is presented, which combines Hessian-based multiscale filtering and a modified level set method. In the proposed algorithm, the morphological top-hat transformation is firstly adopted to attenuate background. Then Hessian-based multiscale filtering is used to enhance vascular structures by combining Hessian matrix with Gaussian convolution to tune the filtering response to the specific scales. Because Gaussian convolution tends to blur vessel boundaries, which makes scale selection inaccurate, an improved level set method is finally proposed to extract vascular structures by introducing an external constrained term related to the standard deviation of Gaussian function into the traditional level set. Our approach was tested on synthetic images with vascular-like structures and 2D slices extracted from real 3D abdomen magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images along the coronal plane. The segmentation rates for synthetic images are above 95%. The results for MRA images demonstrate that the proposed method can extract most of the vascular structures successfully and accurately in visualization. Therefore, the proposed method is effective for the vascular tree extraction in medical images.

  6. Vascular Tree Segmentation in Medical Images Using Hessian-Based Multiscale Filtering and Level Set Method

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiaoying; Yang, Linjun; Zhang, Xuming

    2013-01-01

    Vascular segmentation plays an important role in medical image analysis. A novel technique for the automatic extraction of vascular trees from 2D medical images is presented, which combines Hessian-based multiscale filtering and a modified level set method. In the proposed algorithm, the morphological top-hat transformation is firstly adopted to attenuate background. Then Hessian-based multiscale filtering is used to enhance vascular structures by combining Hessian matrix with Gaussian convolution to tune the filtering response to the specific scales. Because Gaussian convolution tends to blur vessel boundaries, which makes scale selection inaccurate, an improved level set method is finally proposed to extract vascular structures by introducing an external constrained term related to the standard deviation of Gaussian function into the traditional level set. Our approach was tested on synthetic images with vascular-like structures and 2D slices extracted from real 3D abdomen magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images along the coronal plane. The segmentation rates for synthetic images are above 95%. The results for MRA images demonstrate that the proposed method can extract most of the vascular structures successfully and accurately in visualization. Therefore, the proposed method is effective for the vascular tree extraction in medical images. PMID:24348738

  7. Effect of the spatial filtering and alignment error of hot-wire probes in a wall-bounded turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, A.; Cimarelli, A.; Rüedi, J.-D.; De Angelis, E.; Talamelli, A.

    2011-10-01

    The effort to describe velocity fluctuation distributions in wall-bounded turbulent flows has raised different questions concerning the accuracy of hot-wire measurement techniques close to the wall and more specifically the effect of spatial averaging resulting from the finite size of the wire. Here, an analytical model which describes the effect of the spatial filtering and misalignment of hot-wire probes on the main statistical moments in turbulent wall-bounded flows is presented. The model, which is based on the two-point velocity correlation function, shows that the filtering is directly related to the transverse Taylor micro-scale. By means of turbulent channel flow DNS data, the capacity of the model to accurately describe the probe response is established. At the same time, the filtering effect is appraised for different wire lengths and for a range of misalignment angles which can be expected from good experimental practice. Effects of the second-order terms in the model equations are also taken into account and discussed. In order to use the model in a practical situation, the Taylor micro-scale distribution at least should be provided. A simple scaling law based on classic turbulence theory is therefore introduced and finally employed to estimate the filtering effect for different wire lengths.

  8. Basin-scale runoff prediction: An Ensemble Kalman Filter framework based on global hydrometeorological data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Christof; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Devaraju, Balaji; Sneeuw, Nico; Kunstmann, Harald

    2015-10-01

    In order to cope with the steady decline of the number of in situ gauges worldwide, there is a growing need for alternative methods to estimate runoff. We present an Ensemble Kalman Filter based approach that allows us to conclude on runoff for poorly or irregularly gauged basins. The approach focuses on the application of publicly available global hydrometeorological data sets for precipitation (GPCC, GPCP, CRU, UDEL), evapotranspiration (MODIS, FLUXNET, GLEAM, ERA interim, GLDAS), and water storage changes (GRACE, WGHM, GLDAS, MERRA LAND). Furthermore, runoff data from the GRDC and satellite altimetry derived estimates are used. We follow a least squares prediction that exploits the joint temporal and spatial auto- and cross-covariance structures of precipitation, evapotranspiration, water storage changes and runoff. We further consider time-dependent uncertainty estimates derived from all data sets. Our in-depth analysis comprises of 29 large river basins of different climate regions, with which runoff is predicted for a subset of 16 basins. Six configurations are analyzed: the Ensemble Kalman Filter (Smoother) and the hard (soft) Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter (Smoother). Comparing the predictions to observed monthly runoff shows correlations larger than 0.5, percentage biases lower than ± 20%, and NSE-values larger than 0.5. A modified NSE-metric, stressing the difference to the mean annual cycle, shows an improvement of runoff predictions for 14 of the 16 basins. The proposed method is able to provide runoff estimates for nearly 100 poorly gauged basins covering an area of more than 11,500,000 km2 with a freshwater discharge, in volume, of more than 125,000 m3/s.

  9. Basin-scale runoff prediction: An Ensemble Kalman Filter framework based on global hydrometeorological data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, Harald; Lorenz, Christof; Tourian, Mohammad; Devaraju, Balaji; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    In order to cope with the steady decline of the number of in situ gauges worldwide, there is a growing need for alternative methods to estimate runoff. We present an Ensemble Kalman Filter based approach that allows us to conclude on runoff for poorly or irregularly gauged basins. The approach focuses on the application of publicly available global hydrometeorological data sets for precipitation (GPCC, GPCP, CRU, UDEL), evapotranspiration (MODIS, FLUXNET, GLEAM, ERA interim, GLDAS), and water storage changes (GRACE, WGHM, GLDAS, MERRA LAND). Furthermore, runoff data from the GRDC and satellite altimetry derived estimates are used. We follow a least squares prediction that exploits the joint temporal and spatial auto- and cross-covariance structures of precipitation, evapotranspiration, water storage changes and runoff. We further consider time-dependent uncertainty estimates derived from all data sets. Our in-depth analysis comprises of 29 large river basins of different climate regions, with which runoff is predicted for a subset of 16 basins. Six configurations are analyzed: the Ensemble Kalman Filter (Smoother) and the hard (soft) Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter (Smoother). Comparing the predictions to observed monthly runoff shows correlations larger than 0.5, percentage biases lower than ± 20%, and NSE-values larger than 0.5. A modified NSE-metric, stressing the difference to the mean annual cycle, shows an improvement of runoff predictions for 14 of the 16 basins. The proposed method is able to provide runoff estimates for nearly 100 poorly gauged basins covering an area of more than 11,500,000 km2 with a freshwater discharge, in volume, of more than 125,000 m3/s.

  10. Variational B-spline level-set: a linear filtering approach for fast deformable model evolution.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis; Thévenaz, Philippe; Unser, Michael

    2009-06-01

    In the field of image segmentation, most level-set-based active-contour approaches take advantage of a discrete representation of the associated implicit function. We present in this paper a different formulation where the implicit function is modeled as a continuous parametric function expressed on a B-spline basis. Starting from the active-contour energy functional, we show that this formulation allows us to compute the solution as a restriction of the variational problem on the space spanned by the B-splines. As a consequence, the minimization of the functional is directly obtained in terms of the B-spline coefficients. We also show that each step of this minimization may be expressed through a convolution operation. Because the B-spline functions are separable, this convolution may in turn be performed as a sequence of simple 1-D convolutions, which yields an efficient algorithm. As a further consequence, each step of the level-set evolution may be interpreted as a filtering operation with a B-spline kernel. Such filtering induces an intrinsic smoothing in the algorithm, which can be controlled explicitly via the degree and the scale of the chosen B-spline kernel. We illustrate the behavior of this approach on simulated as well as experimental images from various fields.

  11. Random Finite Set Based Bayesian Filtering with OpenCL in a Heterogeneous Platform

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao; Sharif, Uzair; Koner, Rajat; Chen, Guang; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Feihu; Stechele, Walter; Knoll, Alois

    2017-01-01

    While most filtering approaches based on random finite sets have focused on improving performance, in this paper, we argue that computation times are very important in order to enable real-time applications such as pedestrian detection. Towards this goal, this paper investigates the use of OpenCL to accelerate the computation of random finite set-based Bayesian filtering in a heterogeneous system. In detail, we developed an efficient and fully-functional pedestrian-tracking system implementation, which can run under real-time constraints, meanwhile offering decent tracking accuracy. An extensive evaluation analysis was carried out to ensure the fulfillment of sufficient accuracy requirements. This was followed by extensive profiling analysis to spot the potential bottlenecks in terms of execution performance, which were then targeted to come up with an OpenCL accelerated application. Video-throughput improvements from roughly 15 fps to 100 fps (6×) were observed on average while processing typical MOT benchmark videos. Moreover, the worst-case frame processing yielded an 18× advantage from nearly 2 fps to 36 fps, thereby comfortably meeting the real-time constraints. Our implementation is released as open-source code. PMID:28417906

  12. Random Finite Set Based Bayesian Filtering with OpenCL in a Heterogeneous Platform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao; Sharif, Uzair; Koner, Rajat; Chen, Guang; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Feihu; Stechele, Walter; Knoll, Alois

    2017-04-12

    While most filtering approaches based on random finite sets have focused on improving performance, in this paper, we argue that computation times are very important in order to enable real-time applications such as pedestrian detection. Towards this goal, this paper investigates the use of OpenCL to accelerate the computation of random finite set-based Bayesian filtering in a heterogeneous system. In detail, we developed an efficient and fully-functional pedestrian-tracking system implementation, which can run under real-time constraints, meanwhile offering decent tracking accuracy. An extensive evaluation analysis was carried out to ensure the fulfillment of sufficient accuracy requirements. This was followed by extensive profiling analysis to spot the potential bottlenecks in terms of execution performance, which were then targeted to come up with an OpenCL accelerated application. Video-throughput improvements from roughly 15 fps to 100 fps (6×) were observed on average while processing typical MOT benchmark videos. Moreover, the worst-case frame processing yielded an 18× advantage from nearly 2 fps to 36 fps, thereby comfortably meeting the real-time constraints. Our implementation is released as open-source code.

  13. Halling 4-marker LAVysion lung cancer probe set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    This panel is comprised of the commercially available LAVysion probe set, Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL. This panel was used by Halling, et al, to compare conventional cytology to FISH in the detection of centrally and peripherally located early and late stage lung cancers in bronchial brushing and washing specimens obtained from patients undergoing bronchoscopy for suspected lung cancer. The panel is comprised of 5p15, 7p12 (EGFR), 8q24 (C-MYC), and CEP6.

  14. Estimation of geosynchronous space objects using finite set statistics filtering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehly, Steve

    The use of near Earth space has increased dramatically in the past few decades, and operational satellites are an integral part of modern society. The increased presence in space has led to an increase in the amount of orbital debris, which poses a growing threat to current and future space missions. Characterization of the debris environment is crucial to our continued use of high value orbit regimes such as the geosynchronous (GEO) belt. Objects in GEO pose unique challenges, by virtue of being densely spaced and tracked by a limited number of sensors in short observation windows. This research examines the use of a new class of multitarget filters to approach the problem of orbit determination for the large number of objects present. The filters make use of a recently developed mathematical toolbox derived from point process theory known as Finite Set Statistics (FISST). Details of implementing FISST-derived filters are discussed, and a qualitative and quantitative comparison between FISST and traditional multitarget estimators demonstrates the suitability of the new methods for space object estimation. Specific challenges in the areas of sensor allocation and initial orbit determination are addressed in the framework. The sensor allocation scheme makes use of information gain functionals as formulated for FISST to efficiently collect measurements on the full multitarget system. Results from a simulated network of three ground stations tracking a large catalog of geosynchronous objects demonstrate improved performance as compared to simpler, non-information theoretic tasking schemes. Further studies incorporate an initial orbit determination technique to initiate new tracks in the multitarget filter. Together with a sensor allocation scheme designed to search for new targets and maintain knowledge of the existing catalog, the method comprises a solution to the search-detect-track problem. Simulation results for a single sensor case show that the problem can be

  15. A high-accuracy roundness measurement for cylindrical components by a morphological filter considering eccentricity, probe offset, tip head radius and tilt error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuanzhi; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Tong; Kuang, Ye

    2016-08-01

    A morphological filter is proposed to obtain a high-accuracy roundness measurement based on the four-parameter roundness measurement model, which takes into account eccentricity, probe offset, probe tip head radius and tilt error. This paper analyses the sample angle deviations caused by the four systematic errors to design a morphological filter based on the distribution of the sample angle. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through simulations and experiments performed with a roundness measuring machine. Compared to the morphological filter with the uniform sample angle, the accuracy of the roundness measurement can be increased by approximately 0.09 μm using the morphological filter with a non-uniform sample angle based on the four-parameter roundness measurement model, when eccentricity is above 16 μm, probe offset is approximately 1000 μm, tilt error is approximately 1″, the probe tip head radius is 1 mm and the cylindrical component radius is approximately 37 mm. The accuracy and reliability of roundness measurements are improved by using the proposed method for cylindrical components with a small radius, especially if the eccentricity and probe offset are large, and the tilt error and probe tip head radius are small. The proposed morphological filter method can be used for precision and ultra-precision roundness measurements, especially for functional assessments of roundness profiles.

  16. Filtering in the Diffeomorphism Group and the Registration of Point Sets

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The registration of a pair of point sets as well as the estimation of their pointwise correspondences is a challenging and important task in computer vision. In this paper, we present a method to estimate the diffeomorphic deformation, together with the pointwise correspondences, between a pair of point sets. Many of the registration problems are iteratively solved by estimating the correspondence, locally optimizing certain cost functionals over the rigid or similarity or affine transformation group, then estimating the correspondence again, and so on. This type of approach, however, is well-known to be susceptible to suboptimal local solutions. In this paper, we first adopt the perspective of treating the registration as a posterior estimation optimization problem and solve it accordingly via a particle-filtering framework. Second, within such a framework, the diffeomorphic registration is performed to correct the nonlinear deformation of the points. In doing so, we provide a solution less susceptible to local minima. We provide the experimental results, which include challenging medical data sets where the two point sets differ by 180° rotation as well as local deformations, to highlight the algorithm’s capability of robustly finding the more globally optimal solution for the registration task. PMID:22752129

  17. Developing core outcome measurement sets for clinical trials: OMERACT filter 2.0.

    PubMed

    Boers, Maarten; Kirwan, John R; Wells, George; Beaton, Dorcas; Gossec, Laure; d'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Conaghan, Philip G; Bingham, Clifton O; Brooks, Peter; Landewé, Robert; March, Lyn; Simon, Lee S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Strand, Vibeke; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Lack of standardization of outcome measures limits the usefulness of clinical trial evidence to inform health care decisions. This can be addressed by agreeing on a minimum core set of outcome measures per health condition, containing measures relevant to patients and decision makers. Since 1992, the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) consensus initiative has successfully developed core sets for many rheumatologic conditions, actively involving patients since 2002. Its expanding scope required an explicit formulation of its underlying conceptual framework and process. Literature searches and iterative consensus process (surveys and group meetings) of stakeholders including patients, health professionals, and methodologists within and outside rheumatology. To comprehensively sample patient-centered and intervention-specific outcomes, a framework emerged that comprises three core "Areas," namely Death, Life Impact, and Pathophysiological Manifestations; and one strongly recommended Resource Use. Through literature review and consensus process, core set development for any specific health condition starts by identifying at least one core "Domain" within each of the Areas to formulate the "Core Domain Set." Next, at least one applicable measurement instrument for each core Domain is identified to formulate a "Core Outcome Measurement Set." Each instrument must prove to be truthful (valid), discriminative, and feasible. In 2012, 96% of the voting participants (n=125) at the OMERACT 11 consensus conference endorsed this model and process. The OMERACT Filter 2.0 explicitly describes a comprehensive conceptual framework and a recommended process to develop core outcome measurement sets for rheumatology likely to be useful as a template in other areas of health care. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of a membrane drinking water filter in an emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Jeroen H J; Bastable, Andy; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-06-01

    The performance and acceptability of the Nerox(TM) membrane drinking water filter were evaluated among an internally displaced population in Pakistan. The membrane filter and a control ceramic candle filter were distributed to over 3,000 households. Following a 6-month period, 230 households were visited and filter performance and use were assessed. Only 6% of the visited households still had a functioning filter, and the removal performance ranged from 80 to 93%. High turbidity in source water (irrigation canals), together with high temperatures and large family size were likely to have contributed to poor performance and uptake of the filters.

  19. Wide spectral range imaging acousto-optic turnable filter used in outer space probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zehong; Wang, Liangqiu; He, Xiaoliang; Zhou, Yong

    2014-02-01

    This article introduces a wide spectral range imaging acousto-optic turnable filter made of two transducers. "Mismatch rate" was firstly put forward to represent the degree to which the impedance mismatch and a three stage matching circuit was designed for the filter to improve its spectral range and operating bandwidth. Now the spectral range is from 0.4μm to 1.1μm, the overall operating bandwidth reaches 1.14 octave, the diffraction efficiency over 60%, spectral resolution from 1.3nm to 7.5nm. To get rid of " tin pest", alloy material was used to make bonding layer material instead of pure tin, making the storage temperature of the acousto-optic turnable filter ranges from -65 °C to 85 °C, and the operating temperature from -35 °C to 70 °C.

  20. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; Puc, Bernard; Standley, Clive; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Kral, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  1. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  2. Design of a set of probes with high potential for influenza virus epidemiological surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Carreño-Durán, Luis R; Larios-Serrato, V; Jaimes-Díaz, Hueman; Pérez-Cervantes, Hilda; Zepeda-López, Héctor; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela Edith; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Rogelio; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    An Influenza Probe Set (IPS) consisting in 1,249 9-mer probes for genomic fingerprinting of closely and distantly related Influenza Virus strains was designed and tested in silico. The IPS was derived from alignments of Influenza genomes. The RNA segments of 5,133 influenza strains having diverse degree of relatedness were concatenated and aligned. After alignment, 9-mer sites having high Shannon entropy were searched. Additional criteria such as: G+C content between 35 to 65%, absence of dimer or trimer consecutive repeats, a minimum of 2 differences between 9mers and selecting only sequences with Tm values between 34.5 and 36.5oC were applied for selecting probes with high sequential entropy. Virtual Hybridization was used to predict Genomic Fingerprints to assess the capability of the IPS to discriminate between influenza and related strains. Distance scores between pairs of Influenza Genomic Fingerprints were calculated, and used for estimating Taxonomic Trees. Visual examination of both Genomic Fingerprints and Taxonomic Trees suggest that the IPS is able to discriminate between distant and closely related Influenza strains. It is proposed that the IPS can be used to investigate, by virtual or experimental hybridization, any new, and potentially virulent, strain. PMID:23750091

  3. Optimal real-time Q-ball imaging using regularized Kalman filtering with incremental orientation sets.

    PubMed

    Deriche, Rachid; Calder, Jeff; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2009-08-01

    Diffusion MRI has become an established research tool for the investigation of tissue structure and orientation. Since its inception, Diffusion MRI has expanded considerably to include a number of variations such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) and Q-ball imaging (QBI). The acquisition and analysis of such data is very challenging due to its complexity. Recently, an exciting new Kalman filtering framework has been proposed for DTI and QBI reconstructions in real-time during the repetition time (TR) of the acquisition sequence. In this article, we first revisit and thoroughly analyze this approach and show it is actually sub-optimal and not recursively minimizing the intended criterion due to the Laplace-Beltrami regularization term. Then, we propose a new approach that implements the QBI reconstruction algorithm in real-time using a fast and robust Laplace-Beltrami regularization without sacrificing the optimality of the Kalman filter. We demonstrate that our method solves the correct minimization problem at each iteration and recursively provides the optimal QBI solution. We validate with real QBI data that our proposed real-time method is equivalent in terms of QBI estimation accuracy to the standard offline processing techniques and outperforms the existing solution. Last, we propose a fast algorithm to recursively compute gradient orientation sets whose partial subsets are almost uniform and show that it can also be applied to the problem of efficiently ordering an existing point-set of any size. This work enables a clinician to start an acquisition with just the minimum number of gradient directions and an initial estimate of the orientation distribution functions (ODF) and then the next gradient directions and ODF estimates can be recursively and optimally determined, allowing the acquisition to be stopped as soon as desired or at any iteration with the optimal ODF estimates. This opens new and interesting opportunities for

  4. A fully automated approach to prostate biopsy segmentation based on level-set and mean filtering

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Juan; Bueno, Gloria; Galeotti, John; García-Rojo, Marcial; Relea, Fernanda; Déniz, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    With modern automated microscopes and digital cameras, pathologists no longer have to examine samples looking through microscope binoculars. Instead, the slide is digitized to an image, which can then be examined on a screen. This creates the possibility for computers to analyze the image. In this work, a fully automated approach to region of interest (ROI) segmentation in prostate biopsy images is proposed. This will allow the pathologists to focus on the most important areas of the image. The method proposed is based on level-set and mean filtering techniques for lumen centered expansion and cell density localization respectively. The novelty of the technique lies in the ability to detect complete ROIs, where a ROI is composed by the conjunction of three different structures, that is, lumen, cytoplasm, and cells, as well as regions with a high density of cells. The method is capable of dealing with full biopsies digitized at different magnifications. In this paper, results are shown with a set of 100 H and E slides, digitized at 5×, and ranging from 12 MB to 500 MB. The tests carried out show an average specificity above 99% across the board and average sensitivities of 95% and 80%, respectively, for the lumen centered expansion and cell density localization. The algorithms were also tested with images at 10× magnification (up to 1228 MB) obtaining similar results. PMID:22811961

  5. Coherent matched filter signal-processing algorithms for probing the ionosphere using broadband RF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.; Fletcher, A.; Dunham, M.; Linscott, I.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new method for extracting ionospheric parameters from broadband RF data collected in low-Earth orbit using coherent matched filters. The coherent matched filter uses the full time series of the electric field and matches the Fourier transform of these data with an ionospheric transfer function. This approach was applied to both lightning and human-made data transmitted on or near the ground and collected on-board the FORTE satellite, which is a low-Earth orbiting satellite with a broadband RF VHF receiver. We show that this approach allows us to discriminate natural (i.e., lightning) from human-made signals and provides a more accurate estimate of the total electron content (TEC) compared to the quasi-longitudinal approach applied to low VHF data. A comparison of TEC retrieval methods and sensitivity is described herein.

  6. Production of a filtered and standardized surface flux data set for FIFE 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, Mark D.; Sellers, Piers J.

    1995-12-01

    A filtered and standardized surface heat flux data set, which includes net radiation (Rn), latent heat flux (λE), sensible heat flux (H), and ground heat flux (G), was produced from an analysis of field measurements taken by a network of 16 Bowen ratio and 6 eddy correlation instruments deployed during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment in 1987 (FIFE 1987). The objective was to produce time series of flux data that could be used for studies involving surface-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) models operating in the inverse mode (see Sellers et al. 1992b). To be useful for this work, erroneous flux data had to be identified and systematic instrument-related differences between the net radiation values reported by flux stations had to be accounted for. The following procedures were carried out on the original data sets as contributed by individual FIFE scientists: (1) A flag (IDATA) was assigned to unreliable flux data as defined by the presence of anomalies ("spikes") in the sensible and latent heat flux time series, discontinuities generated when the temperature and humidity profiles crossed over at dawn and dusk, and data points isolated by the erasure of neighboring unreliable data. In addition, Bowen ratio data were also considered to be unreliable whenever the surface energy budget was reported as nonzero (Rn + λE + H + G ≠ 0). (2) A simple procedure was used to adjust the net radiation values reported by two of the Bowen ratio stations to appear as if they were using the same type of net radiometer as most of the other Bowen ratio stations deployed in FIFE 1987. Corresponding changes were made to the associated sensible and latent heat fluxes for these two stations; the ground heat fluxes were left unchanged. At one eddy correlation site (site 26), the sensible and latent heat fluxes were suspected to be systematically underestimated; these were proportionately increased to match the site net

  7. Finding unique filter sets in PLATO: a precursor to efficient interaction analysis in GWAS data.

    PubMed

    Grady, Benjamin J; Torstenson, Eric; Dudek, Scott M; Giles, Justin; Sexton, David; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2010-01-01

    The methods to detect gene-gene interactions between variants in genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets have not been well developed thus far. PLATO, the Platform for the Analysis, Translation and Organization of large-scale data, is a filter-based method bringing together many analytical methods simultaneously in an effort to solve this problem. PLATO filters a large, genomic dataset down to a subset of genetic variants, which may be useful for interaction analysis. As a precursor to the use of PLATO for the detection of gene-gene interactions, the implementation of a variety of single locus filters was completed and evaluated as a proof of concept. To streamline PLATO for efficient epistasis analysis, we determined which of 24 analytical filters produced redundant results. Using a kappa score to identify agreement between filters, we grouped the analytical filters into 4 filter classes; thus all further analyses employed four filters. We then tested the MAX statistic put forth by Sladek et al. (1) in simulated data exploring a number of genetic models of modest effect size. To find the MAX statistic, the four filters were run on each SNP in each dataset and the smallest p-value among the four results was taken as the final result. Permutation testing was performed to empirically determine the p-value. The power of the MAX statistic to detect each of the simulated effects was determined in addition to the Type 1 error and false positive rates. The results of this simulation study demonstrates that PLATO using the four filters incorporating the MAX statistic has higher power on average to find multiple types of effects and a lower false positive rate than any of the individual filters alone. In the future we will extend PLATO with the MAX statistic to interaction analyses for large-scale genomic datasets.

  8. Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics reveal predation by protozoa drives E. coli removal in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Haig, Sarah-Jane; Schirmer, Melanie; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Gibbs, Joseph; Davies, Robert L; Collins, Gavin; Quince, Christopher

    2015-03-17

    Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics were applied to study samples taken from laboratory-scale slow sand filters 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after challenging with (13)C-labelled Escherichia coli to determine the mechanisms and organisms responsible for coliform removal. Before spiking, the filters had been continuously operated for 7 weeks using water from the River Kelvin, Glasgow as their influent source. Direct counts and quantitative PCR assays revealed a clear predator-prey response between protozoa and E. coli. The importance of top-down trophic-interactions was confirmed by metagenomic analysis, identifying several protozoan and viral species connected to E. coli attrition, with protozoan grazing responsible for the majority of the removal. In addition to top-down mechanisms, indirect mechanisms, such as algal reactive oxygen species-induced lysis, and mutualistic interactions between algae and fungi, were also associated with coliform removal. The findings significantly further our understanding of the processes and trophic interactions underpinning E. coli removal. This study provides an example for similar studies, and the opportunity to better understand, manage and enhance E. coli removal by allowing the creation of more complex trophic interaction models.

  9. Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics reveal predation by protozoa drives E. coli removal in slow sand filters

    PubMed Central

    Haig, Sarah-Jane; Schirmer, Melanie; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Gibbs, Joseph; Davies, Robert L; Collins, Gavin; Quince, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics were applied to study samples taken from laboratory-scale slow sand filters 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after challenging with 13C-labelled Escherichia coli to determine the mechanisms and organisms responsible for coliform removal. Before spiking, the filters had been continuously operated for 7 weeks using water from the River Kelvin, Glasgow as their influent source. Direct counts and quantitative PCR assays revealed a clear predator–prey response between protozoa and E. coli. The importance of top-down trophic-interactions was confirmed by metagenomic analysis, identifying several protozoan and viral species connected to E. coli attrition, with protozoan grazing responsible for the majority of the removal. In addition to top-down mechanisms, indirect mechanisms, such as algal reactive oxygen species-induced lysis, and mutualistic interactions between algae and fungi, were also associated with coliform removal. The findings significantly further our understanding of the processes and trophic interactions underpinning E. coli removal. This study provides an example for similar studies, and the opportunity to better understand, manage and enhance E. coli removal by allowing the creation of more complex trophic interaction models. PMID:25279786

  10. A set of external reference controls/probes that enable quality assurance between different microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hideo; Ueda, Yoji; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ooshima, Hiroyuki; Ishizawa, Yohei; Kitahiro, Koji; Miyagawa, Isao; Watanabe, Kazufumi; Nakamura, Takazumi; Tanaka, Ritsuka; Yamamoto, Nobuko; Nakae, Hiroki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Matoba, Ryo

    2015-03-01

    RNA external standards, although important to ensure equivalence across many microarray platforms, have yet to be fully implemented in the research community. In this article, a set of unique RNA external standards (or RNA standards) and probe pairs that were added to total RNA in the samples before amplification and labeling are described. Concentration-response curves of RNA external standards were used across multiple commercial DNA microarray platforms and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and next-generation sequencing to identify problematic assays and potential sources of variation in the analytical process. A variety of standards can be added in a range of concentrations spanning high and low abundances, thereby enabling the evaluation of assay performance across the expected range of concentrations found in a clinical sample. Using this approach, we show that we are able to confirm the dynamic range and the limit of detection for each DNA microarray platform, RT-PCR protocol, and next-generation sequencer. In addition, the combination of a series of standards and their probes was investigated on each platform, demonstrating that multiplatform calibration and validation is possible.

  11. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  12. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  13. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  14. Characteristics of flattening filter free beams at low monitor unit settings

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Ota, Seiichi; Inoue, Shinichi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Sumida, Iori; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Isohashi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Newer linear accelerators (linacs) have been equipped to deliver flattening filter free (FFF) beams. When FFF beams are used for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the stability of delivery of small numbers of monitor units (MU) is important. The authors developed automatic measurement techniques to evaluate the stability of the dose profile, dose linearity, and consistency. Here, the authors report the performance of the Artiste™ accelerator (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) in delivering low-MU FFF beams.Methods: A 6 MV flattened beam (6X) with 300 MU/min dose rate and FFF beams of 7 (7XU) and 11 MV (11XU), each with a 500 MU/min dose rate, were measured at 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 MU settings. For the 2000 MU/min dose rate, the 7 (7XUH) and 11 MV (11XUH) beams were set at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 MU because of the limits of the minimum MU settings. Beams with 20 × 20 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were alternately measured ten times in intensity modulated (IM) mode, with which Siemens linacs regulate beam delivery for step-and-shoot IMRT. The in- and crossplane beam profiles were measured using a Profiler™ Model 1170 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in multiframe mode. The frames of 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} beams were identified at the off-axis profile. The 6X beam profile was normalized at the central axis. The 7 and 11 MV FFF beam profiles were rescaled to set the dose at the central axis at 145% and 170%, respectively. Point doses were also measured using a Farmer-type ionization chamber and water-equivalent solid phantom to evaluate the linearity and consistency of low-MU beam delivery. The values displayed on the electrometer were recognized with a USB-type camera and read with open-source optical character recognition software.Results: The symmetry measurements of the 6X, 7XU, and 11XU beam profiles were better than 2% for beams ≥2 MU and improved with increasing MU. The variations in flatness of FFF beams ≥2 MU were

  15. Characteristics of flattening filter free beams at low monitor unit settings.

    PubMed

    Akino, Yuichi; Ota, Seiichi; Inoue, Shinichi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Sumida, Iori; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Newer linear accelerators (linacs) have been equipped to deliver flattening filter free (FFF) beams. When FFF beams are used for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the stability of delivery of small numbers of monitor units (MU) is important. The authors developed automatic measurement techniques to evaluate the stability of the dose profile, dose linearity, and consistency. Here, the authors report the performance of the Artiste™ accelerator (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) in delivering low-MU FFF beams. A 6 MV flattened beam (6X) with 300 MU/min dose rate and FFF beams of 7 (7XU) and 11 MV (11XU), each with a 500 MU/min dose rate, were measured at 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 MU settings. For the 2000 MU/min dose rate, the 7 (7XUH) and 11 MV (11XUH) beams were set at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 MU because of the limits of the minimum MU settings. Beams with 20 × 20 and 10 × 10 cm(2) field sizes were alternately measured ten times in intensity modulated (IM) mode, with which Siemens linacs regulate beam delivery for step-and-shoot IMRT. The in- and crossplane beam profiles were measured using a Profiler™ Model 1170 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in multiframe mode. The frames of 20 × 20 cm(2) beams were identified at the off-axis profile. The 6X beam profile was normalized at the central axis. The 7 and 11 MV FFF beam profiles were rescaled to set the dose at the central axis at 145% and 170%, respectively. Point doses were also measured using a Farmer-type ionization chamber and water-equivalent solid phantom to evaluate the linearity and consistency of low-MU beam delivery. The values displayed on the electrometer were recognized with a USB-type camera and read with open-source optical character recognition software. The symmetry measurements of the 6X, 7XU, and 11XU beam profiles were better than 2% for beams ≥ 2 MU and improved with increasing MU. The variations in flatness of FFF beams ≥ 2 MU were ± 5%. The standard deviation

  16. Distributed Event-Based Set-Membership Filtering for a Class of Nonlinear Systems With Sensor Saturations Over Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lifeng; Wang, Zidong; Lam, Hak-Keung; Kyriakoulis, Nikos

    2016-07-07

    In this paper, the distributed set-membership filtering problem is investigated for a class of discrete time-varying system with an event-based communication mechanism over sensor networks. The system under consideration is subject to sector-bounded nonlinearity, unknown but bounded noises and sensor saturations. Each intelligent sensing node transmits the data to its neighbors only when certain triggering condition is violated. By means of a set of recursive matrix inequalities, sufficient conditions are derived for the existence of the desired distributed event-based filter which is capable of confining the system state in certain ellipsoidal regions centered at the estimates. Within the established theoretical framework, two additional optimization problems are formulated: one is to seek the minimal ellipsoids (in the sense of matrix trace) for the best filtering performance, and the other is to maximize the triggering threshold so as to reduce the triggering frequency with satisfactory filtering performance. A numerically attractive chaos algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problems. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed algorithm.

  17. A nonlinear training set superposition filter derived by neural network training methods for implementation in a shift-invariant optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kypraios, Ioannis; Young, Rupert C. D.; Birch, Philip M.; Chatwin, Christopher R.

    2003-08-01

    The various types of synthetic discriminant function (sdf) filter result in a weighted linear superposition of the training set images. Neural network training procedures result in a non-linear superposition of the training set images or, effectively, a feature extraction process, which leads to better interpolation properties than achievable with the sdf filter. However, generally, shift invariance is lost since a data dependant non-linear weighting function is incorporated in the input data window. As a compromise, we train a non-linear superposition filter via neural network methods with the constraint of a linear input to allow for shift invariance. The filter can then be used in a frequency domain based optical correlator. Simulation results are presented that demonstrate the improved training set interpolation achieved by the non-linear filter as compared to a linear superposition filter.

  18. Comparison of active-set method deconvolution and matched-filtering for derivation of an ultrasound transit time spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wille, M-L; Zapf, M; Ruiter, N V; Gemmeke, H; Langton, C M

    2015-06-21

    The quality of ultrasound computed tomography imaging is primarily determined by the accuracy of ultrasound transit time measurement. A major problem in analysis is the overlap of signals making it difficult to detect the correct transit time. The current standard is to apply a matched-filtering approach to the input and output signals. This study compares the matched-filtering technique with active set deconvolution to derive a transit time spectrum from a coded excitation chirp signal and the measured output signal. The ultrasound wave travels in a direct and a reflected path to the receiver, resulting in an overlap in the recorded output signal. The matched-filtering and deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the transit times associated with the two signal paths. Both techniques were able to detect the two different transit times; while matched-filtering has a better accuracy (0.13 μs versus 0.18 μs standard deviations), deconvolution has a 3.5 times improved side-lobe to main-lobe ratio. A higher side-lobe suppression is important to further improve image fidelity. These results suggest that a future combination of both techniques would provide improved signal detection and hence improved image fidelity.

  19. Studies of new two-photon fluorescent probes suitable for multiphoton microscopy in biological settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishi, Raz; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi; Krief, Pnina; Shapiro, Lev; Klug, Jacob T.; Skorka, Jacqueline; Khodorkovsky, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    Multi-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM) requires efficient two-photon absorbing fluorescent (TPF) probes. In particular, probes exhibiting bio-functionality are very attractive for MPLSM studies of biological samples. We have synthesized and studied a new class of TPF probes capable of caging metal ions, such as Ca+2 and Na+, which play an important role in neuronal mechanisms. The TPF probes are based on a tetraketo derivative with a symmetric Donor-Acceptor-Donor (D-A-D) structure. The donor is an azacrown moiety, which also serves as a metal ion-caging unit. We studied the linear and the non-linear spectroscopic properties of these TPF probes as a function of conjugation length and the size of the crown ring. We find that this new class of TPF probes possesses very large two-photon excitation cross-section coefficients (~1000GM) at near IR wavelengths as well as affinity to metal ions. In the presence of changing sodium ion concentration the dye spectra reveals four distinguishable forms and the TPF efficiency changes strongly. We therefore conclude that the dye can perform as a sensitive metal ion TPF probe.

  20. Positively charged polymer brush-functionalized filter paper for DNA sequence determination following Dot blot hybridization employing a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Laopa, Praethong S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Hoven, Voravee P

    2013-01-07

    As inspired by the Dot blot analysis, a well known technique in molecular biology and genetics for detecting biomolecules, a new paper-based platform for colorimetric detection of specific DNA sequences employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe has been developed. In this particular study, a pyrrolidinyl PNA bearing a conformationally rigid d-prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) was used as a probe. The filter paper was modified to be positively charged with grafted polymer brushes of quaternized poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (QPDMAEMA) prepared by surface-initiated polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate from the filter paper via ARGET ATRP followed by quaternization with methyl iodide. Following the Dot blot format, a DNA target was first immobilized via electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the QPDMAEMA brushes and negative charges of the phosphate backbone of DNA. Upon hybridization with the biotinylated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) probe, the immobilized DNA can be detected by naked eye observation of the yellow product generated by the enzymatic reaction employing HRP-labeled streptavidin. It has been demonstrated that this newly developed assay was capable of discriminating between complementary and single base mismatch targets at a detection limit of at least 10 fmol. In addition, the QPDMAEMA-grafted filter paper exhibited a superior performance to the commercial membranes, namely Nylon 66 and nitrocellulose.

  1. Transnasal TOE: An alternate approach in the setting of difficult probe placement for seated spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Michael G; Kamdar, Brinda; Eyvazzadeh, Johnica; Heidi, B

    2010-01-01

    Transnasal transoesophageal echocardiography may be an effective alternative approach when difficulty is encountered while placing a probe for patients with severe kyphoscoliosis. We describe a successful approach in a patient presenting for orthopaedic fixation and review the current literature.

  2. How to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints in small and large derivative chromosomes--a new probe set.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed B; Kreskowski, Katharina; Weise, Anja; Kosayakova, Nadezda; Mrasek, Kristin; Voigt, Martin; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Wagner, Rebecca; Hardekopf, David; Pekova, Sona; Karamysheva, Tatyana; Liehr, Thomas; Klein, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Here a new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-) based probe set is presented and its possible applications are highlighted in 34 exemplary clinical cases. The so-called pericentric-ladder-FISH (PCL-FISH) probe set enables a characterization of chromosomal breakpoints especially in small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC), but can also be applied successfully in large inborn or acquired derivative chromosomes. PCL-FISH was established as 24 different chromosome-specific probe sets and can be used in two- up multicolor-FISH approaches. PCL-FISH enables the determination of a chromosomal breakpoint with a resolution between 1 and ∼10 megabasepairs and is based on locus-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Results obtained on 29 sSMC cases and five larger derivative chromosomes are presented and discussed. To confirm the reliability of PCL-FISH, eight of the 29 sSMC cases were studied by array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); the used sSMC-specific DNA was obtained by glass-needle based microdissection and DOP-PCR-amplification. Overall, PCL-FISH leads to a better resolution than most FISH-banding approaches and is a good tool to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints.

  3. Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring Using Rapid Re-Excitation of NMR Probe Sets.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-06-01

    MRI relies on static and spatially varying dynamic magnetic fields of high accuracy. NMR field probes permit the direct observation of spatiotemporal field dynamics for diverse purposes such as data correction, field control, sequence validation, and hardware characterization. However, due to probe signal decay and dephasing existing field cameras are limited in terms of readout duration and the extent of k -space that can be covered. The present work aims to overcome these limitations by the transition to short-lived NMR probes and rapid re-excitation. The proposed approach uses probes with T 2 so short that thermal relaxation dominates signal decay even in the presence of strongest gradients. They are integrated with transmit, receive and sequencing electronics that permit high-rate re-excitation with optional probe alternation as well as complementary RF pulse recording. The system is demonstrated by monitoring of sample MRI sequences with long readouts and large gradient moments. It is compared with the conventional long-lived probe concept and characterized in terms of net sensitivity and sources of systematic error. Continuous k -space trajectory mapping is demonstrated and validated by trajectory-based image reconstruction.

  4. [Measurement set-up for estimation of colour discrimination thresholds of colour vision deficiencies and while wearing coloured filters].

    PubMed

    Schürer, M; Walter, A; Eppig, T; Brünner, H; Langenbucher, A

    2009-07-01

    In clinical practice, several techniques for the evaluation of colour vision deficiencies are well established. Most of them are designed for the detection of congenital or pathological changes. Due to the narrow-banded light sources, used in monitors or anomaloscopes, the human gamut can be addressed only in part. With these set-ups, the impact of coloured filters on colour vision such as blue light filtering intraocular lenses cannot be investigated precisely. The technique is based on the visual matching of colour differences between two halves of a test field. The colours are generated by mixing seven types of LEDs. A transparent, vertically divided circular test field is retro-illuminated with this light using optical fibres and projection optics. An ocular optic assures the unaccommodated sight of the subject on the test field (size 2 degrees). The developed set-up presents freely adjustable colours in the form of continuous light spectra to examine the influence of filter materials on colour discrimination. A colour space can be generated which corresponds to that of human perception. The saturation and brightness of the light is adjustable. The subject has to decide if he can discriminate between the colours in the test field halves or not. Before the next colours are shown the subject is neutrally adapted by a neutral hue to provide different adaptation levels. The luminescence of the test field can be varied up to 1500 cd/m(2). The adaptive algorithm of the sequence is based on the SIAM method described by Kaernbach. Based on reference measurements, including 4 subjects with a congenital deficiency, it was shown that the discrimination thresholds at the characteristic confusing axes are significantly different than those with normal colour vision. Also, the impact of green laser goggles on the colour perception was determined. Due to the filter the thresholds in the vicinity of yellow (x = 0.4664; y = 0.4525) are reduced in the yellow-orange and cyan

  5. Design of PID controllers in double feedback loops for SISO systems with set-point filters.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V; Panda, Rames C

    2012-07-01

    A PID controller is widely used to control industrial processes that are mostly open loop stable or unstable. Selection of proper feedback structure and controller tuning helps to improve the performance of the loop. In this paper a double-feedback loop/method is used to achieve stability and better performance of the process. The internal feedback is used for stabilizing the process and the outer loop is used for good setpoint tracking. An internal model controller (IMC) based PID method is used for tuning the outer loop controller. Autotuning based on relay feedback or the Ziegler-Nichols method can be used for tuning an inner loop controller. A tuning parameter (λ) that is used to tune IMC-PID is used as a time constant of a setpoint filter that is used for reducing the peak overshoot. The method has been tested successfully on many low order processes.

  6. Analysis of multicrystal pump-probe data sets. I. Expressions for the RATIO model.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Bertrand; Coppens, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The RATIO method in time-resolved crystallography [Coppens et al. (2009). J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 226-230] was developed for use with Laue pump-probe diffraction data to avoid complex corrections due to wavelength dependence of the intensities. The application of the RATIO method in processing/analysis prior to structure refinement requires an appropriate ratio model for modeling the light response. The assessment of the accuracy of pump-probe time-resolved structure refinements based on the observed ratios was discussed in a previous paper. In the current paper, a detailed ratio model is discussed, taking into account both geometric and thermal light-induced changes.

  7. SU-E-T-145: Beam Characteristics of Flattening Filter Free Beams Including Low Dose Rate Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, K; Ogata, T; Nakayama, M; Shinji, T; Nishimura, H; Masutani, T; Ishihara, T; Ejima, Y; Sasaki, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In commissioning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), it is necessary to evaluate the beam characteristics of various dose rate settings with potential to use. The aim of this study is to evaluate the beam characteristics of flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) including low dose rate setting. Methods: We used a Varian TrueBeam with Millennium 120 MLC. Both 6 and 10 MV beams with or without flattening filter were used for this study. To evaluate low-dose rate FFF beams, specially-designed leaf sequence files control out-of-field MLC leaf pair at constant dose rate ranging from 80 to 400 MU/min. For dose rate from 80 MU/min to the maximum usable value of all energies, beam output were measured using ionization chamber (CC04, IBA). The ionization chamber was inserted into water equivalent phantom (RT3000-New, R-tech), and the phantom was set with SAD of 100cm. The beam profiles were performed using the 2D diode array (Profiler2, Sun Nuclear). The SSD was set to 90cm and a combined 30cmx30cmx9cm phantom which consisted of solid water slabs was put on the device. All measurement were made using 100MU irradiation for 10cmx10cm jaw-defined field size with a gantry angle of 0°. Results: In all energies, the dose rate dependences with beam output and variation coefficient were within 0.2% and 0.07%, respectively. The flatness and symmetry exhibited small variations (flatness ≤0.1 point and symmetry≤0.3 point at absolute difference). Conclusion: We had studied the characteristics of flattened and FFF beam over the 80 MU/min. Our results indicated that the beam output and profiles of FFF of TrueBeam linac were highly stable at low dose rate setting.

  8. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-05-07

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergytrade mark linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central "target zone" and a partially attenuated beam for an outer "set-up zone". Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error.

  9. Kalman filter based glucose control at small set points during fed-batch cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael; Hitzmann, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    A glucose control system is presented, which is able to control cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae even at low glucose concentrations. Glucose concentrations are determined using a special flow injection analysis (FIA) system, which does not require a sampling module. An extended Kalman filter is employed for smoothing the glucose measurements as well as for the prediction of glucose and biomass concentration, the maximum specific growth rate, and the volume of the culture broth. The predicted values are utilized for feedforward/feedback control of the glucose concentration at set points of 0.08 and 0.05 g/L. The controller established well-defined conditions over several hours up to biomass concentrations of 13.5 and 20.7 g/L, respectively. The specific glucose uptake rates at both set points were 1.04 and 0.68 g/g/h, respectively. It is demonstrated that during fed-batch cultivation an overall pure oxidative metabolism of glucose is maintained at the lower set point and a specific ethanol production rate of 0.18 g/g/h at the higher set point.

  10. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-01-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera. Images PMID:1901711

  11. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-02-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera.

  12. Disinfection of transvaginal ultrasound probes in a clinical setting: comparative performance of automated and manual reprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Buescher, D L; Möllers, M; Falkenberg, M K; Amler, S; Kipp, F; Burdach, J; Klockenbusch, W; Schmitz, R

    2016-05-01

    Transvaginal and intracavitary ultrasound probes are a possible source of cross-contamination with microorganisms and thus a risk to patients' health. Therefore appropriate methods for reprocessing are needed. This study was designed to compare the standard disinfection method for transvaginal ultrasound probes in Germany with an automated disinfection method in a clinical setting. This was a prospective randomized controlled clinical study of two groups. In each group, 120 microbial samples were collected from ultrasound transducers before and after disinfection with either an automated method (Trophon EPR®) or a manual method (Mikrozid Sensitive® wipes). Samples were then analyzed for microbial growth and isolates were identified to species level. Automated disinfection had a statistically significantly higher success rate of 91.4% (106/116) compared with 78.8% (89/113) for manual disinfection (P = 0.009). The risk of contamination was increased by 2.9-fold when disinfection was performed manually (odds ratio, 2.9 (95% CI, 1.3-6.3)). Before disinfection, bacterial contamination was observed on 98.8% of probes. Microbial analysis revealed 36 different species of bacteria, including skin and environmental bacteria as well as pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp. Considering the high number of contaminated probes and bacterial species found, disinfection of the ultrasound probe's body and handle should be performed after each use to decrease the risk of cross-contamination. This study favored automated disinfection owing to its significantly higher efficacy compared with a manual method. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Filtered sunlight, solar powered phototherapy and other strategies for managing neonatal jaundice in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Slusher, Tina M; Day, Louise Tina; Ogundele, Tolulope; Woolfield, Nick; Owa, Joseph Aderinsola

    2017-09-15

    Challenges in treating severe neonatal jaundice in low and middle-income country settings still exist at many levels. These include: a lack of awareness of causes and prevention by families, communities and even sometimes health care professionals; insufficient, ineffective, high quality affordable diagnostic and therapeutic options; limited availability of rehabilitation provision for kernicterus. Collectively these challenges lead to an unacceptably high global morbidity and mortality from severe neonatal jaundice. In the past decade, there has been an explosion of innovations addressing some of these issues and these are increasingly available for scale up. Scientists, healthcare providers, and communities are joining hands to explore educational tools, low cost screening and diagnostic options including at point-of-care and treatment modalities including filtered sunlight and solar powered phototherapy. For the first time, the possibility of eliminating the tragedy of preventable morbidity and mortality from severe NNJ is on the horizon, for all. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Segmentation and Analysis of Corpus Callosum in Alzheimer MR Images using Total Variation Based Diffusion Filter and Level Set Method.

    PubMed

    Anandh, K R; Sujatha, C M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a common form of dementia that affects gray and white matter structures of brain. Manifestation of AD leads to cognitive deficits such as memory impairment problems, ability to think and difficulties in performing day to day activities. Although the etiology of this disease is unclear, imaging biomarkers are highly useful in the early diagnosis of AD. Magnetic resonance imaging is an indispensible non-invasive imaging modality that reflects both the geometry and pathology of the brain. Corpus Callosum (CC) is the largest white matter structure as well as the main inter-hemispheric fiber connection that undergoes regional alterations due to AD. Therefore, segmentation and feature extraction are predominantly essential to characterize the CC atrophy. In this work, an attempt has been made to segment CC using edge based level set method. Prior to segmentation, the images are pre-processed using Total Variation (TV) based diffusion filtering to enhance the edge information. Shape based geometric features are extracted from the segmented CC images to analyze the CC atrophy. Results show that the edge based level set method is able to segment CC in both the normal and AD images. TV based diffusion filtering has performed uniform region specific smoothing thereby preserving the texture and small scale details of the image. Consequently, the edge map of CC in both the normal and AD are apparently sharp and distinct with continuous boundaries. This facilitates the final contour to correctly segment CC from the nearby structures. The extracted geometric features such as area, perimeter and minor axis are found to have the percentage difference of 5.97%, 22.22% and 9.52% respectively in the demarcation of AD subjects. As callosal atrophy is significant in the diagnosis of AD, this study seems to be clinically useful.

  15. Analysis of the LOS gravity data set from cycle 4 of the Magellan probe around Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Balmino, Georges

    1994-11-01

    The new line-of-sight (LOS) gravity data set from cycle 4 of the Magellan spacecraft around Venus is analyzed, and its usefulness for geodetic and geophysical purposes is assessed. These data contain large low-frequency biases, which are estimated by comparison with synthetic data computed from a harmonic model of the gravity field. With the corrected data set, the noncentral part of the radial gravity field at the surface over Eistla Regio and the west part of Aphrodite Terra, with a 1 deg x 1 deg resolution, is calculated.

  16. New BAC probe set to narrow down chromosomal breakpoints in small and large derivative chromosomes, especially suited for mosaic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed B; Fan, Xiaobo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Radhakrishnan, Gopakumar; Liehr, Thomas; Karamysheva, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed after initial banding cytogenetics is still the gold standard for detection of chromosomal rearrangements. Although aCGH provides a higher resolution, FISH has two main advantages over the array-based approaches: (1) it can be applied to characterize balanced as well as unbalanced rearrangements, whereas aCGH is restricted to unbalanced ones, and (2) chromosomal aberrations present in low level or complex mosaics can be characterized by FISH without any problems, while aCGH requires presence of over 50 % of aberrant cells in the sample for detection. Recently, a new FISH-based probe set was presented: the so-called pericentric-ladder-FISH (PCL-FISH) that enables characterization of chromosomal breakpoints especially in mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC). It can also be applied on large inborn or acquired derivative chromosomes. The main feature of this set is that the probes are applied in a chromosome-specific manner and they align along the chromosome in average intervals of ten megabasepairs. Hence PCL-FISH provides denser coverage and a more precise anchorage on the human DNA-sequence than most other FISH-banding approaches.

  17. Comparison of the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter DNA probe method and the Health Protection Branch standard method for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Malik, M N; Peterkin, P I; Sharpe, A N

    1996-07-01

    The standard Health Protection Branch (HPB) method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in foods involves lengthy enrichment, selection and biochemical testing, requiring up to 8 days to complete. A hydrophobic grid-membrane filter (HGMF) method employing a digoxigenin-labelled listeriolysin O probe required 5 days to complete, and included an image-analysis system for electronic data acquisition. A total of 200 food samples encompassing 8 high-risk food groups (soft and semi-soft cheeses, packaged raw vegetables, frozen cooked shrimp, ground poultry, ground pork, ground beef, jellied meats, and pâté) were screened for the presence of L. monocytogenes by the two methods. Overall, 32 (16%) and 30 (15%) of the naturally-contaminated food samples tested positive for L. monocytogenes by the HPB and DNA methods, respectively. The DNA probe method was highly specific in discriminating L. monocytogenes from other Listeria spp. present in 50 of the samples tested. Results showed 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity between the two methods. The HGMF DNA probe method is an efficient and reliable alternative to the HPB standard method for detecting L. monocytogenes in foods.

  18. Accuracy, reproducibility, and uncertainty analysis of thyroid-probe-based activity measurements for determination of dose calibrator settings.

    PubMed

    Esquinas, Pedro L; Tanguay, Jesse; Gonzalez, Marjorie; Vuckovic, Milan; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Häfeli, Urs O; Celler, Anna

    2016-12-01

    In the nuclear medicine department, the activity of radiopharmaceuticals is measured using dose calibrators (DCs) prior to patient injection. The DC consists of an ionization chamber that measures current generated by ionizing radiation (emitted from the radiotracer). In order to obtain an activity reading, the current is converted into units of activity by applying an appropriate calibration factor (also referred to as DC dial setting). Accurate determination of DC dial settings is crucial to ensure that patients receive the appropriate dose in diagnostic scans or radionuclide therapies. The goals of this study were (1) to describe a practical method to experimentally determine dose calibrator settings using a thyroid-probe (TP) and (2) to investigate the accuracy, reproducibility, and uncertainties of the method. As an illustration, the TP method was applied to determine (188)Re dial settings for two dose calibrator models: Atomlab 100plus and Capintec CRC-55tR. Using the TP to determine dose calibrator settings involved three measurements. First, the energy-dependent efficiency of the TP was determined from energy spectra measurements of two calibration sources ((152)Eu and (22)Na). Second, the gamma emissions from the investigated isotope ((188)Re) were measured using the TP and its activity was determined using γ-ray spectroscopy methods. Ambient background, scatter, and source-geometry corrections were applied during the efficiency and activity determination steps. Third, the TP-based (188)Re activity was used to determine the dose calibrator settings following the calibration curve method [B. E. Zimmerman et al., J. Nucl. Med. 40, 1508-1516 (1999)]. The interobserver reproducibility of TP measurements was determined by the coefficient of variation (COV) and uncertainties associated to each step of the measuring process were estimated. The accuracy of activity measurements using the proposed method was evaluated by comparing the TP activity estimates of (99m

  19. Simulation of Heterogeneous Atom Probe Tip Shapes Evolution during Field Evaporation Using a Level Set Method and Different Evaporation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Xu, Wei; Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Geiser, B. P.; Larson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), accurate reconstruction of the spatial positions of field evaporated ions from measured detector patterns depends upon a correct understanding of the dynamic tip shape evolution and evaporation laws of component atoms. Artifacts in APT reconstructions of heterogeneous materials can be attributed to the assumption of homogeneous evaporation of all the elements in the material in addition to the assumption of a steady state hemispherical dynamic tip shape evolution. A level set method based specimen shape evolution model is developed in this study to simulate the evaporation of synthetic layered-structured APT tips. The simulation results of the shape evolution by the level set model qualitatively agree with the finite element method and the literature data using the finite difference method. The asymmetric evolving shape predicted by the level set model demonstrates the complex evaporation behavior of heterogeneous tip and the interface curvature can potentially lead to the artifacts in the APT reconstruction of such materials. Compared with other APT simulation methods, the new method provides smoother interface representation with the aid of the intrinsic sub-grid accuracy. Two evaporation models (linear and exponential evaporation laws) are implemented in the level set simulations and the effect of evaporation laws on the tip shape evolution is also presented.

  20. The Vena Tech LP Permanent Caval Filter: Effectiveness and Safety in the Clinical Setting in Three Chinese Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuxian; Li, Dajun; Liu, Jianlong; Zhang, Huan

    2015-07-01

    The effectiveness, safety, and patient outcomes after Vena Tech LP caval filter placement were evaluated retrospectively in China. From January 2002 to January 2013, 1,200 patients received Tech LP caval filters to prevent PE at three Beijing University medical centers. The patients' general condition, reasons for DVT formation, filter placement method, indication for filter placement, complications, safety of the filter, treatment post-filter, and follow-up were recorded. The patients' mean age was 65 (range, 19-87) years, and 840 were males. Before filter placement, all had ultrasonic-diagnosed DVT, 84% (1008/1200) were assessed for PE, and 73% (736/1008) had PE. Filters were placed via the femoral or jugular vein, with 62 placements at the SVC and 1,138 at the IVC. Filter placement via various venous access routes was 100% successful. Anticoagulation therapy was continued in 88% patients (n=1056) for ≥6 months after filter placement. Follow-up was accomplished in 80% (n=960) of patients for an average of 6 years (range, 3 months to 10 years). The patency rate of the vena cava was 90% at 5 years. The morbidity was 2% and the mortality was 0.5% during 30 days post-filter placement. After 30 days, the mortality rate was 2.4%, no PE reoccurred, and there were no other clinical adverse events. Vena Tech LP caval filter placement was effective and safe, with demonstrated stability and a good long-term patency rate at the IVC and SVC in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Event-based distributed set-membership filtering for a class of time-varying non-linear systems over sensor networks with saturation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guoliang; Liu, Shuai; Wang, Licheng; Wang, Yongxiong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the event-triggered mechanism, the problem of distributed set-membership filtering is concerned for a class of time-varying non-linear systems over sensor networks subject to saturation effects. Different from the traditional periodic sample-data approach, the filter is updated only when the predefined event is satisfied, which the event is defined according to the measurement output. For each node, the proposed novel event-triggered mechanism can reduce the unnecessary information transmission between sensors and filters. The purpose of the addressed problem is to design a series of distributed set-membership filters, for all the admissible unknown but bounded noises, non-linearities and sensor saturation, such that the set of all possible states can be determined. The desired filter parameters are obtained by solving a recursive linear matrix inequality that can be computed recursively using the available MATLAB toolbox. Finally, a simulation example is exploited to show the effectiveness of the proposed design approach in this paper.

  2. Using point-to-set correlations to probe unjamming of frictionless grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailman, M.; Chakraborty, B.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the unjamming transition in 2D frictionless disk packings using a static correlation function that has been widely used to study disordered systems. We show that this point-to-set (PTS) correlation function exhibits a dominant length scale that diverges as the unjamming transition is approached through decompression. In addition, we identify deviations from mean-field predictions, and present detailed analysis of the origin of non-mean-field behavior. A mean-field bulk-surface argument is reviewed. Corrections to this argument are identified, which lead to a change in the functional form of the critical PTS boundary size R0. An entropic description of the origin of the correlations is presented, and simple rigidity assumptions are shown to predict the functional form of R0 as a function of the pressure P.

  3. Identification of Gene Markers Associated with Aggressive Meningioma by Filtering across Multiple Sets of Gene Expression Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jourdan E.; Lusis, Eriks A.; Scheck, Adrienne C.; Coons, Stephen W.; Lal, Anita; Perry, Arie; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomasare common intracranial tumors but relatively little is known about the genetic events responsible for their clinical diversity. While recent genomic studies have provided clues, the genes identified often differ among publications. We used microarray expression profiling to identify genes that are differentially expressed, with at least a 4-fold change, between grade I and grade III meningiomas. We filtered this initial set of potential biomarkers through a second cohort of meningiomas and then verified the remaining genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction followed by examination using a third microarray expression cohort. Using this approach, we identified 9 overexpressed (TPX2, RRM2, TOP2A, PI3, BIRC5, CDC2, NUSAP1, DLG7, SOX11) and 2 underexpressed (TIMP3, KCNMA1) genes in grade III vs. grade I meningiomas. As a further validation step, we analyzed these genes in a fourth cohort and found that patients with grade II meningiomas with high topoisomerase 2-α protein expression (greater than 5% labeling-index) had shorter times to death than patients with low expression. We believe that this multistep, multi-cohort approach provides a robust method for reducing false positives while generating a list of reproducible candidate genes that are associated with clinically aggressive meningioma and are suitable for analysis for their potential prognostic value. PMID:21157382

  4. AN ACCURATE NEW METHOD OF CALCULATING ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES AND K-CORRECTIONS APPLIED TO THE SLOAN FILTER SET

    SciTech Connect

    Beare, Richard; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2014-12-20

    We describe an accurate new method for determining absolute magnitudes, and hence also K-corrections, that is simpler than most previous methods, being based on a quadratic function of just one suitably chosen observed color. The method relies on the extensive and accurate new set of 129 empirical galaxy template spectral energy distributions from Brown et al. A key advantage of our method is that we can reliably estimate random errors in computed absolute magnitudes due to galaxy diversity, photometric error and redshift error. We derive K-corrections for the five Sloan Digital Sky Survey filters and provide parameter tables for use by the astronomical community. Using the New York Value-Added Galaxy Catalog, we compare our K-corrections with those from kcorrect. Our K-corrections produce absolute magnitudes that are generally in good agreement with kcorrect. Absolute griz magnitudes differ by less than 0.02 mag and those in the u band by ∼0.04 mag. The evolution of rest-frame colors as a function of redshift is better behaved using our method, with relatively few galaxies being assigned anomalously red colors and a tight red sequence being observed across the whole 0.0 < z < 0.5 redshift range.

  5. Assimilation of multiple data sets with the ensemble Kalman filter to improve forecasts of forest carbon dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Wang, Han; Weng, Ensheng; Lakshmivarahan, S; Zhang, Yanfen; Luo, Yiqi

    2011-07-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been used in weather forecasting to assimilate observations into weather models. In this study, we examine how effectively forecasts of a forest carbon cycle can be improved by assimilating observations with the EnKF. We used the EnKF to assimilate into the terrestrial ecosystem (TECO) model eight data sets collected at the Duke Forest between 1996 and 2004 (foliage biomass, fine root biomass, woody biomass, litterfall, microbial biomass, forest floor carbon, soil carbon, and soil respiration). We then used the trained model to forecast changes in carbon pools from 2004 to 2012. Our daily analysis of parameters indicated that all the exit rates were well constrained by the EnKF, with the exception of the exit rates controlling the loss of metabolic litter and passive soil organic matter. The poor constraint of these two parameters resulted from the low sensitivity of TECO predictions to their values and the poor correlation between these parameters and the observed variables. Using the estimated parameters, the model predictions and observations were in agreement. Model forecasts indicate 15 380-15 660 g C/ m2 stored in Duke Forest by 2012 (a 27% increase since 2004). Parameter uncertainties decreased as data were sequentially assimilated into the model using the EnKF. Uncertainties in forecast carbon sinks increased over time for the long-term carbon pools (woody biomass, structure litter, slow and passive SOM) but remained constant over time for the short-term carbon pools (foliage, fine root, metabolic litter, and microbial carbon). Overall, EnKF can effectively assimilate multiple data sets into an ecosystem model to constrain parameters, forecast dynamics of state variables, and evaluate uncertainty.

  6. 2D harmonic filtering of MR phase images in multicenter clinical setting: toward a magnetic signature of cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Kaaouana, Takoua; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Samaille, Thomas; Thiery, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; Chupin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) have emerged as a new imaging marker of small vessel disease. Composed of hemosiderin, CMBs are paramagnetic and can be detected with MRI sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility (typically, gradient recalled echo T2* weighted images). Nevertheless, their identification remains challenging on T2* magnitude images because of confounding structures and lesions. In this context, T2* phase image may play a key role in better characterizing CMBs because of its direct relationship with local magnetic field variations due to magnetic susceptibility difference. To address this issue, susceptibility-based imaging techniques were proposed, such as Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). But these techniques have not yet been validated for 2D clinical data in multicenter settings. Here, we introduce 2DHF, a fast 2D phase processing technique embedding both unwrapping and harmonic filtering designed for data acquired in 2D, even with slice-to-slice inconsistencies. This method results in internal field maps which reveal local field details due to magnetic inhomogeneity within the region of interest only. This technique is based on the physical properties of the induced magnetic field and should yield consistent results. A synthetic phantom was created for numerical simulations. It simulates paramagnetic and diamagnetic lesions within a 'brain-like' tissue, within a background. The method was evaluated on both this synthetic phantom and multicenter 2D datasets acquired in standardized clinical setting, and compared with two state-of-the-art methods. It proved to yield consistent results on synthetic images and to be applicable and robust on patient data. As a proof-of-concept, we finally illustrate that it is possible to find a magnetic signature of CMBs and CMCs on internal field maps generated with 2DHF on 2D clinical datasets that give consistent results with CT-scans in a subsample of 10 subjects

  7. Silicone discs as disposable enrichment probes for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of UV filters in water samples.

    PubMed

    Negreira, N; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2011-04-01

    This work describes an effective, low solvent consumption and affordable sample preparation approach for the determination of eight UV filters in surface and wastewater samples. It involves sorptive extraction of target analytes in a disposable, technical grade silicone disc (5 mm diameter × 0.6 mm thickness) followed by organic solvent desorption, large volume injection (LVI), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. Final working conditions involved overnight extraction of 100-mL samples, containing 10% of methanol, followed by analytes desorption with 0.2 mL of ethyl acetate. The method provides linear responses between the limits of quantification (from 0.003 to 0.040 ng mL(-1)) and 10 ng mL(-1), an intra-day precision below 13%, and low matrix effects for surface, swimming pool, and treated sewage water samples. Moreover, the extraction yields provided by silicone discs were in excellent agreement with those achieved using polydimethylsiloxane-covered stir bars. Several UV filters were found in surface and sewage water samples, with the maximum concentrations corresponding to octocrylene.

  8. Commentary Considerations for Recommending Extended Use and Limited Reuse of Filtering Facepiece Respirators in Health Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward M.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Public health organizations, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are increasingly recommending the use of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) in health care settings. For infection control purposes, the usual practice is to discard FFRs after close contact with a patient (“single use”). However, in some situations, such as during contact with tuberculosis patients, limited FFR reuse (i.e., repeated donning and doffing of the same FFR by the same person) is practiced. A related practice, extended use, involves wearing the same FFR for multiple patient encounters without doffing. Extended use and limited FFR reuse have been recommended during infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics to conserve FFR supplies. This commentary examines CDC recommendations related to FFR extended use and limited reuse and analyzes available data from the literature to provide a relative estimate of the risks of these practices compared to single use. Analysis of the available data and the use of disease transmission models indicate that decisions regarding whether FFR extended use or reuse should be recommended should continue to be pathogen- and event-specific. Factors to be included in developing the recommendations are the potential for the pathogen to spread via contact transmission, the potential that the event could result in or is currently causing a FFR shortage, the protection provided by FFR use, human factors, potential for self-inoculation, the potential for secondary exposures, and government policies and regulations. While recent findings largely support the previous recommendations for extended use and limited reuse in certain situations, some new cautions and limitations should be considered before issuing recommendations in the future. In general, extended use of FFRs is preferred over limited FFR reuse. Limited FFR reuse would allow the user a brief respite from extended wear times, but increases the risk of self-inoculation and

  9. Rocket noise filtering system using digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauritzen, David

    1990-01-01

    A set of digital filters is designed to filter rocket noise to various bandwidths. The filters are designed to have constant group delay and are implemented in software on a general purpose computer. The Parks-McClellan algorithm is used. Preliminary tests are performed to verify the design and implementation. An analog filter which was previously employed is also simulated.

  10. Development of a group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probe set for the identification of Marinobacter by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Luke J.; Gutierrez, Tony; Teske, Andreas P.

    2016-07-01

    Members of the Marinobacter genus play an important role in hydrocarbon degradation in the ocean - a topic of special significance in light of the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010. The Marinobacter group has thus far lacked a genus level phylogenetic probe that would allow in situ identification of representative members. Here, we developed two new 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (Mrb-0625-a and Mrb-0625-b) to enumerate Marinobacter species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In silico analysis of this probe set demonstrated 80% coverage of the Marinobacter genus. A competitor probe was developed to block hybridization by Mrb-0625-a to six Halomonas species with which it shared a one base pair mismatch. The probe set was optimized using pure cultures, and then used in an enrichment experiment with a deep sea oil plume water sample collected from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Marinobacter cells rapidly increased as a significant fraction of total microbial abundance in all incubations of original contaminated seawater as well as those amended with n-hexadecane, suggesting this group may be among the first microbial responders to oil pollution in the marine environment. The new probe set will provide a reliable tool for quantifying Marinobacter in the marine environment, particularly at contaminated sites where these organisms can play an important role in the biodegradation of oil pollutants.

  11. Detection and measurement of rheumatoid bone and joint lesions of fingers by tomosynthesis: a phantom study for reconstruction filter setting optimization.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yohei; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Yasojima, Nobutoshi; Tamura, Kenichi; Tsutsumi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease that is caused by autoimmunity. RA causes synovial proliferation, which may result in bone erosion and joint space narrowing in the affected joint. Tomosynthesis is a promising modality which may detect early bone lesions such as small bone erosion and slight joint space narrowing. Nevertheless, so far, the optimal reconstruction filter for detection of early bone lesions of fingers on tomosynthesis has not yet been known. Our purpose in this study was to determine an optimal reconstruction filter setting by using a bone phantom. We obtained images of a cylindrical phantom with holes simulating bone erosions (diameters of 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.4 mm) and joint spaces by aligning two phantoms (space widths from 0.5 to 5.0 mm with 0.5 mm intervals), examining six reconstruction filters by using tomosynthesis. We carried out an accuracy test of the bone erosion size and joint space width, done by one radiological technologist, and a test to assess the visibility of bone erosion, done by five radiological technologists. No statistically significant difference was observed in the measured bone erosion size and joint space width among all of the reconstruction filters. In the visibility assessment test, reconstruction filters of Thickness+- and Thickness-- were among the best statistically in all characteristics except the signal-to-noise ratio. The Thickness+- and Thickness-- reconstruction filter may be optimal for evaluation of RA bone lesions of small joints in tomosynthesis.

  12. A new set-up for in-situ probing of radiation effects in materials and electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, M.; Felizardo, M.; Catarino, N.; Alves, L.C.; Cruz, C.; Alves, E.; Lorenz, K.

    2015-07-01

    The micro-probe facility installed at the Van de Graff accelerator at CTN/IST permits simultaneous measurements of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Iono-Luminescence (IL). Here we present a recent up-grade of the measurement chamber allowing improved optical sensitivity in IL measurements and opening the possibility to perform simultaneously electrical measurements. Combinations of all these characterization techniques make this setup a powerful tool to characterize and modify different materials with spatial resolution. In particular, it can be used to study radiation effects in different materials and electronic devices in-situ. IL is a luminescence technique that uses the ion beam as the excitation source. Compared with other luminescence techniques with spatial resolution like Cathodoluminescence, this technique has the advantage to probe deeper regions of the sample, several microns below the surface. The same ion beam used to produce luminescence, can create a high density of defects, in a controllable way and the new set-up allows monitoring optical and electrical properties in realtime. In this work we combine IL with I-V curve measurements to assess the response of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN to proton irradiation. Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN are emerging materials for applications in high power electronics and are considered for radiation resistant electronics. We will present a systematic study of the changes in IL and conductivity in Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN samples with the energy of the ion beam and with the time of exposure. In particular, it was observed that during the irradiation some luminescence bands related with intrinsic point defects decrease while other new bands appear. Simulations using the SRIM code were used to determine the depth profiles of ionization and displacement events, helping to correlate the optical and electrical response of the materials with certain radiation effects

  13. Anisotropic diffusion filter based edge enhancement for the segmentation of carotid intima-media layer in ultrasound images using variational level set method without re-initialisation.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, K; Anandh, K R; Mahesh, V; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    In this work an attempt has been made to enhance the edges and segment the boundary of intima-media layer of Common Carotid Artery (CCA) using anisotropic diffusion filter and level set method. Ultrasound B mode longitudinal images of normal and abnormal images of common carotid arteries are used in this study. The images are subjected to anisotropic diffusion filter to generate edge map. This edge map is used as a stopping boundary in variational level set method without re-initialisation to segment the intima-media layer. Geometric features are extracted from this layer and analyzed statistically. Results show that anisotropic diffusion filtering is able to extract the edges in both normal and abnormal images. The obtained edge maps are found to have high contrast and sharp edges. The edge based variational level set method is able to segment the intima-media layer precisely from common carotid artery. The extracted geometrical features such as major axis and extent are found to be statistically significant in differentiating normal and abnormal images. Thus this study seems to be clinically useful in diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Chromosomal mapping of human genes by radioactive hybridization of cDNAs to Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme humain high density gridded filter sets.

    PubMed

    Claas, A; Savelyeva, L; Pillmann, A; Schwab, M

    2000-08-01

    Chromosomal assignment of human transcribed sequences has been done mainly by high throughput genome analysis in specialized genome centres and, in a more classical fashion, by fluorescence in-site hybridization (FISH) analysis. Not every laboratory has the ability to map cDNAs by FISH analysis. We here report a rapid mapping approach that is based on the hybridization of cDNA probes to high density gridded Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain filters followed by subsequent computational analysis by database searches in the internet. Not only transcribed sequences but also genomic DNA could be subjected to this mapping approach. The presented approach allows to map human transcribed and genomic DNAs within 1-3 days and with a high level of resolution that will constantly increase in line with the incorporation of data deriving from high throughput genome mapping.

  15. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets.

  16. Development of real-time PCR primer and probe sets for detecting degenerated and non-degenerated forms of the butanol-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Cho, Min Ok; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2010-05-01

    Degeneration is one of the limiting factors in butanol fermentation, and it must be monitored and prevented for stable butanol production. In Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, the most well-known butanol-producing microorganism, degeneration is caused by the loss of the pSOL1 plasmid that carries essential genes involved in solvent production. In this study, we designed two specific primer and probe sets for real-time qPCR (RT-qPCR) detection of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the C. aceto set) and pSOL1-possessing C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (the DGS set). Specific primer and probe sets were designed on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequence and pSOL1 sequence. The number of degenerated C. acetobutylicum could be quantified by subtracting the number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 containing pSOL1 from the total number of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The primer and probe sets permitted the specific detection and quantification of degenerated C. acetobutylicum and total butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum by RT-qPCR.

  17. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  18. An optimized solution of multi-criteria evaluation analysis of landslide susceptibility using fuzzy sets and Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsevski, Pece V.; Jankowski, Piotr

    2010-08-01

    The Kalman recursive algorithm has been very widely used for integrating navigation sensor data to achieve optimal system performances. This paper explores the use of the Kalman filter to extend the aggregation of spatial multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) and to find optimal solutions with respect to a decision strategy space where a possible decision rule falls. The approach was tested in a case study in the Clearwater National Forest in central Idaho, using existing landslide datasets from roaded and roadless areas and terrain attributes. In this approach, fuzzy membership functions were used to standardize terrain attributes and develop criteria, while the aggregation of the criteria was achieved by the use of a Kalman filter. The approach presented here offers advantages over the classical MCE theory because the final solution includes both the aggregated solution and the areas of uncertainty expressed in terms of standard deviation. A comparison of this methodology with similar approaches suggested that this approach is promising for predicting landslide susceptibility and further application as a spatial decision support system.

  19. Gold nanoclusters as switch-off fluorescent probe for detection of uric acid based on the inner filter effect of hydrogen peroxide-mediated enlargement of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Li, Hongchang; Guo, Bin; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Youyu

    2017-05-15

    Herein we report a novel switch-off fluorescent probe for highly selective determination of uric acid (UA) based on the inner filter effect (IFE), by using poly-(vinylpyrrolidone)-protected gold nanoparticles (PVP-AuNPs) and chondroitin sulfate-stabilized gold nanoclusters (CS-AuNCs) as the IFE absorber/fluorophore pair. In this IFE-based fluorometric assay, the newly designed CS-AuNCs were explored as an original fluorophore and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) -driven formed PVP-AuNPs can be a powerful absorber to influence the excitation of the fluorophore, due to the complementary overlap between the absorption band of PVP-AuNPs and the emission band of CS-AuNCs. Under the optimized conditions, the extent of the signal quenching depends linearly on the H2O2 concentration in the range of 1-100μM (R(2) =0.995) with a detection limit down to 0.3μM. Based on the H2O2-dependent fluorescence IFE principle, we further developed a new assay strategy to enable selective sensing of UA by using a specific uricase-catalyzed UA oxidation as the in situ H2O2 generator. The proposed uricase-linked IFE-based assay exhibited excellent analytical performance for measuring UA over the concentration ranging from 5 to 100μM (R(2)=0.991), and can be successfully applied to detection of UA as low as 1.7μM (3σ) in diluted human serum samples.

  20. Sets of RNA Repeated Tags and Hybridization-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes for Distinct Images of RNA in a Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2010-01-01

    Background Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. Methodology/Principal Findings Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO) probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3′-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag–probe pairs. Conclusions/Significance A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging. PMID:20885944

  1. Technical Evaluation of the Prototype ORNL Alpha Radiation Detector/Probe with the AN/PDR-77 Radiac Set

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    V, \\\\ -CAI K 00I c. Pteadings for Source C:I-AC le j 19~ ’A-1 IIV-- A V- t𔃽 IA). K d. Readigs forag oue D:r’t e a b r 16. Divide average count rate...activity of source A: 29 DAM SHr (Cotinued T~ype Test: RANGE (Continued). MM: 13 MAIZ q 15. Repeat procedure with instrument in cou~nt rate mode: Probe...micrometers. Silver-activated zinc sulfide possesses 15 desirable qualities as an alpha-sensitive nedtie and Ven utilized in the body 24, enhances the

  2. A low false negative filter for detecting rare bird species from short video segments using a probable observation data set-based EKF method.

    PubMed

    Song, Dezhen; Xu, Yiliang

    2010-09-01

    We report a new filter to assist the search for rare bird species. Since a rare bird only appears in front of a camera with very low occurrence (e.g., less than ten times per year) for very short duration (e.g., less than a fraction of a second), our algorithm must have a very low false negative rate. We verify the bird body axis information with the known bird flying dynamics from the short video segment. Since a regular extended Kalman filter (EKF) cannot converge due to high measurement error and limited data, we develop a novel probable observation data set (PODS)-based EKF method. The new PODS-EKF searches the measurement error range for all probable observation data that ensures the convergence of the corresponding EKF in short time frame. The algorithm has been extensively tested using both simulated inputs and real video data of four representative bird species. In the physical experiments, our algorithm has been tested on rock pigeons and red-tailed hawks with 119 motion sequences. The area under the ROC curve is 95.0%. During the one-year search of ivory-billed woodpeckers, the system reduces the raw video data of 29.41 TB to only 146.7 MB (reduction rate 99.9995%).

  3. Differential profiling of volatile organic compound biomarker signatures utilizing a logical statistical filter-set and novel hybrid evolutionary classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, Claude C.; Zmuda, Michael A.; Boone, Derek W.; Highlander, Tyler C.; Kramer, Ryan M.; Rizki, Mateen M.

    2012-06-01

    A growing body of discoveries in molecular signatures has revealed that volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the small molecules associated with an individual's odor and breath, can be monitored to reveal the identity and presence of a unique individual, as well their overall physiological status. Given the analysis requirements for differential VOC profiling via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, our group has developed a novel informatics platform, Metabolite Differentiation and Discovery Lab (MeDDL). In its current version, MeDDL is a comprehensive tool for time-series spectral registration and alignment, visualization, comparative analysis, and machine learning to facilitate the efficient analysis of multiple, large-scale biomarker discovery studies. The MeDDL toolset can therefore identify a large differential subset of registered peaks, where their corresponding intensities can be used as features for classification. This initial screening of peaks yields results sets that are typically too large for incorporation into a portable, electronic nose based system in addition to including VOCs that are not amenable to classification; consequently, it is also important to identify an optimal subset of these peaks to increase classification accuracy and to decrease the cost of the final system. MeDDL's learning tools include a classifier similar to a K-nearest neighbor classifier used in conjunction with a genetic algorithm (GA) that simultaneously optimizes the classifier and subset of features. The GA uses ROC curves to produce classifiers having maximal area under their ROC curve. Experimental results on over a dozen recognition problems show many examples of classifiers and feature sets that produce perfect ROC curves.

  4. SET and RESET states of As2Se3 doped GeTe4 bulk glasses probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumlianmunga, Ramesh, K.

    2016-12-01

    Te based chalcogenide glasses are being explored for non-volatile memory applications. We report the electrical switching studies on bulk Ge0.20Te0.80 glass alloyed with As0.40Se0.60 in different proportions. The addition of As0.40Se0.60 increases the electrical resistivity and the threshold voltage of (As0.4Se0.6)x(Ge0.2Te0.8)1-x glasses in the composition range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.40. Glasses in the range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10 are found to exhibit memory switching, whereas glasses with x ≥ 0.15 exhibit threshold switching. The memory (SET) state can be brought back to RESET state by passing a current of 3-5 mA. Particularly, the glass with x = 0.10 is identified to be very stable, and it can be cycled between the SET and RESET state consistently with 3 mA current. The Raman spectra of SET and RESET states indicate that the SET sample has GeTe and Te crystalline units while the structure of RESET state is analogous to the as-quenched glass. Interestingly, the variation in the local structure is minimal for SET and RESET states for x = 0.10. And also the resistance of the SET state is relatively high. So they can be set to RESET state with less current and can be explored for low power phase change memory applications.

  5. EvoOligo: oligonucleotide probe design with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Young-Min; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-12-01

    Probe design is one of the most important tasks in successful deoxyribonucleic acid microarray experiments. We propose a multiobjective evolutionary optimization method for oligonucleotide probe design based on the multiobjective nature of the probe design problem. The proposed multiobjective evolutionary approach has several distinguished features, compared with previous methods. First, the evolutionary approach can find better probe sets than existing simple filtering methods with fixed threshold values. Second, the multiobjective approach can easily incorporate the user's custom criteria or change the existing criteria. Third, our approach tries to optimize the combination of probes for the given set of genes, in contrast to other tools that independently search each gene for qualifying probes. Lastly, the multiobjective optimization method provides various sets of probe combinations, among which the user can choose, depending on the target application. The proposed method is implemented as a platform called EvoOligo and is available for service on the web. We test the performance of EvoOligo by designing probe sets for 19 types of Human Papillomavirus and 52 genes in the Arabidopsis Calmodulin multigene family. The design results from EvoOligo are proven to be superior to those from well-known existing probe design tools, such as OligoArray and OligoWiz.

  6. Non-amplified Quantitative Detection of Nucleic Acid Sequences Using a Gold Nanoparticle Probe Set and Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyonchol Kim,; Atsushi Kira,; Kenji Yasuda,

    2010-06-01

    For the precise detection of the number of expressed biomarkers at the single-cell level, we have developed a method of quantifying and specifying target DNA fragments by using a set of gold nanoparticles as labels and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to measure the number and sizes of gold nanoparticles attached to target samples. One or more target DNAs on a substrate were labeled with a set of different-sized gold nanoparticle probes having complementary sequences to different target candidates. The type and number of the target DNAs having a specific sequence were identified by counting the attached nanoparticles of a specific size in FE-SEM images. The results evaluated using a DNA microarray showed high specificity and sensitivity, and a linear correlation between the number of attached particles and the target DNA concentration, indicating the feasibility of quantitative detection in the femtomolar to nanomolar concentration range.

  7. Superconducting quantum interference devices based set-up for probing current noise and correlations in three-terminal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, A. H.; Kaviraj, B.; Coupiac, O.; Lefloch, F.

    2012-11-15

    We have implemented a new experimental set-up for precise measurements of current fluctuations in three-terminal devices. The system operates at very low temperatures (30 mK) and is equipped with three superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as low noise current amplifiers. A SQUID input coil is connected to each terminal of a sample allowing the acquisition of time-dependent current everywhere in the circuit. From these traces, we can measure the current mean value, the noise, and cross-correlations between different branches of a device. In this paper, we present calibration results of noise and cross-correlations obtained using low impedance macroscopic resistors. From these results, we can extract the noise level of the set-up and show that there are no intrinsic correlations due to the measurement scheme. We also studied noise and correlations as a function of a dc current and estimated the electronic temperature of various macroscopic resistors.

  8. Time to stabilization in single leg drop jump landings: an examination of calculation methods and assessment of differences in sample rate, filter settings and trial length on outcome values.

    PubMed

    Fransz, Duncan P; Huurnink, Arnold; de Boode, Vosse A; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-01

    Time to stabilization (TTS) is the time it takes for an individual to return to a baseline or stable state following a jump or hop landing. A large variety exists in methods to calculate the TTS. These methods can be described based on four aspects: (1) the input signal used (vertical, anteroposterior, or mediolateral ground reaction force) (2) signal processing (smoothed by sequential averaging, a moving root-mean-square window, or fitting an unbounded third order polynomial), (3) the stable state (threshold), and (4) the definition of when the (processed) signal is considered stable. Furthermore, differences exist with regard to the sample rate, filter settings and trial length. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed ten 'single leg drop jump landing' trials. For each trial, TTS was calculated according to 18 previously reported methods. Additionally, the effects of sample rate (1000, 500, 200 and 100 samples/s), filter settings (no filter, 40, 15 and 10 Hz), and trial length (20, 14, 10, 7, 5 and 3s) were assessed. The TTS values varied considerably across the calculation methods. The maximum effect of alterations in the processing settings, averaged over calculation methods, were 2.8% (SD 3.3%) for sample rate, 8.8% (SD 7.7%) for filter settings, and 100.5% (SD 100.9%) for trial length. Differences in TTS calculation methods are affected differently by sample rate, filter settings and trial length. The effects of differences in sample rate and filter settings are generally small, while trial length has a large effect on TTS values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Filter quality of pleated filter cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wan; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Chiang, Che-Ming; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2008-04-01

    The performance of dust cartridge filters commonly used in dust masks and in room ventilation depends both on the collection efficiency of the filter material and the pressure drop across the filter. Currently, the optimization of filter design is based only on minimizing the pressure drop at a set velocity chosen by the manufacturer. The collection efficiency, an equally important factor, is rarely considered in the optimization process. In this work, a filter quality factor, which combines the collection efficiency and the pressure drop, is used as the optimization criterion for filter evaluation. Most respirator manufacturers pleat the filter to various extents to increase the filtration area in the limit space within the dust cartridge. Six sizes of filter holders were fabricated to hold just one pleat of filter, simulating six different pleat counts, ranging from 0.5 to 3.33 pleats cm(-1). The possible electrostatic charges on the filter were removed by dipping in isopropyl alcohol, and the air velocity is fixed at 100 cm s(-1). Liquid dicotylphthalate particles generated by a constant output atomizer were used as challenge aerosols to minimize particle loading effects. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure the challenge aerosol number concentrations and size distributions upstream and downstream of the pleated filter. The pressure drop across the filter was monitored by using a calibrated pressure transducer. The results showed that the performance of pleated filters depend not only on the size of the particle but also on the pleat count of the pleated filter. Based on filter quality factor, the optimal pleat count (OPC) is always higher than that based on pressure drop by about 0.3-0.5 pleats cm(-1). For example, the OPC is 2.15 pleats cm(-1) from the standpoint of pressure drop, but for the highest filter quality factor, the pleated filter needed to have a pleat count of 2.65 pleats cm(-1) at particle diameter of 122 nm. From the aspect of

  10. An XMM-Newton Set of Long Observations of NGC 1365: Probing AGN Structure and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, Guido

    Our project is mainly based on an approved XMM-Newton large program consisting of a 500 ks monitoring campaign of the obscured AGN in NGC 1365, a source which stands as the Rosetta stone among Seyfert galaxies, for its exceptional set of observational properties allowing unique and precise tests of AGN structure and general relativistic effects. A new method developed by our group, based on time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy, revealed that X-ray absorption variability is common in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN): the gas clouds orbiting around the supermassive black hole quite often cover the X-ray source, with typical occultation times from a few hours to days. Our early work on a few selected targets demonstrates that through these AGN eclipses we have the chance of making some of the most important and long-sought measurements in black hole physics: 1) occultation times provide a direct estimate of the size of the X-ray source. This allows to check whether this emission truly originates from a few gravitational radii from the black hole, thus setting a direct, observational limit of the black hole size; 2) X-raying the obscuring clouds allows for the first time an observational (not model-based) measurement of the physical and geometrical properties of the clouds, a key step forward in order to understand the AGN line emission region; 3) X-ray occultations may provide a direct, decisive check of general relativity (GR) effects in X-ray spectra of AGNs. In particular, an X-ray eclipse allows to perform an accretion disk tomography experiment: since the relativistic effect on the line strongly depends on the disk element emitting the line, we expect peculiar profile changes during eclipses. The detection of these changes would be an unambiguous proof of GR effects. In this context, NGC 1365 is a truly unique source, due to the frequency of appearance of the occultations: so far, in several past observations with various X-ray observatories, eclipses with durations of

  11. Nonlinear Attitude Filtering Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Crassidis, John L.; Cheng, Yang

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of modern nonlinear filtering methods for attitude estimation. Early applications relied mostly on the extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation. Since these applications, several new approaches have been developed that have proven to be superior to the extended Kalman filter. Several of these approaches maintain the basic structure of the extended Kalman filter, but employ various modifications in order to provide better convergence or improve other performance characteristics. Examples of such approaches include: filter QUEST, extended QUEST, the super-iterated extended Kalman filter, the interlaced extended Kalman filter, and the second-order Kalman filter. Filters that propagate and update a discrete set of sigma points rather than using linearized equations for the mean and covariance are also reviewed. A two-step approach is discussed with a first-step state that linearizes the measurement model and an iterative second step to recover the desired attitude states. These approaches are all based on the Gaussian assumption that the probability density function is adequately specified by its mean and covariance. Other approaches that do not require this assumption are reviewed, including particle filters and a Bayesian filter based on a non-Gaussian, finite-parameter probability density function on SO(3). Finally, the predictive filter, nonlinear observers and adaptive approaches are shown. The strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches are discussed.

  12. Rocket exhaust probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a rocket exhaust probe for collecting particulates from a rocket exhaust plume. The probe comprises a tungsten nose tip, a tip holder, a probe body, and a tail section. Rocket exhaust gas enters the probe at the nose tip inlet and passes into a mixing chamber where the exhaust gas mixes with an inert cooling gas that cools and decelerates the exhaust gas. The mixture of exhaust gas and inert gas then passes into a diffusion chamber where it further cools and decelerates before passsing through a submicron particle collection filter.

  13. Non-specific filtering of beta-distributed data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Laird, Peter W; Hinoue, Toshinori; Groshen, Susan; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2014-06-19

    Non-specific feature selection is a dimension reduction procedure performed prior to cluster analysis of high dimensional molecular data. Not all measured features are expected to show biological variation, so only the most varying are selected for analysis. In DNA methylation studies, DNA methylation is measured as a proportion, bounded between 0 and 1, with variance a function of the mean. Filtering on standard deviation biases the selection of probes to those with mean values near 0.5. We explore the effect this has on clustering, and develop alternate filter methods that utilize a variance stabilizing transformation for Beta distributed data and do not share this bias. We compared results for 11 different non-specific filters on eight Infinium HumanMethylation data sets, selected to span a variety of biological conditions. We found that for data sets having a small fraction of samples showing abnormal methylation of a subset of normally unmethylated CpGs, a characteristic of the CpG island methylator phenotype in cancer, a novel filter statistic that utilized a variance-stabilizing transformation for Beta distributed data outperformed the common filter of using standard deviation of the DNA methylation proportion, or its log-transformed M-value, in its ability to detect the cancer subtype in a cluster analysis. However, the standard deviation filter always performed among the best for distinguishing subgroups of normal tissue. The novel filter and standard deviation filter tended to favour features in different genome contexts; for the same data set, the novel filter always selected more features from CpG island promoters and the standard deviation filter always selected more features from non-CpG island intergenic regions. Interestingly, despite selecting largely non-overlapping sets of features, the two filters did find sample subsets that overlapped for some real data sets. We found two different filter statistics that tended to prioritize features with

  14. Use of zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D T; Callahan, M T; Ferguson, S; Hoover, D G; Chiu, P C; Shelton, D R; Millner, P D; Camp, M J; Patel, J R; Kniel, K E; Sharma, M

    2012-03-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filters may provide an efficient method to mitigate the contamination of produce crops through irrigation water. A field-scale system was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of a biosand filter (S), a biosand filter with ZVI incorporated (ZVI) and a control (C, no treatment) in decontaminating irrigation water. An inoculum of c.8·5log CFU100ml(-1) of Escherichia coli O157:H12 was introduced to all three column treatments in 20-l doses. Filtered waters were subsequently overhead irrigated to 'Tyee' spinach plants. Water, spinach plant and soil samples were obtained on days 0, 1, 4, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 15 and analysed for E. coli O157:H12 populations. ZVI filters inactivated c.6logCFU100ml(-1) E. coli O157:H12 during filtration on day 0, significantly (P<0·05) more than S filter (0·49CFU100ml(-1)) when compared to control on day 0 (8·3log CFU100ml(-1)). On day 0, spinach plants irrigated with ZVI-filtered water had significantly lower E. coli O157 counts (0·13logCFUg(-1)) than spinach irrigated with either S-filtered (4·37logCFUg(-1)) or control (5·23logCFUg(-1)) water. Soils irrigated with ZVI-filtered water contained E. coli O157:H12 populations below the detection limit (2logCFUg(-1)), while those irrigated with S-filtered water (3·56logCFUg(-1)) were significantly lower than those irrigated with control (4·64logCFUg(-1)). ZVI biosand filters were more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H12 populations in irrigation water than sand filters. Zero-valent ion treatment may be a cost-effective mitigation step to help small farmers reduce risk of foodborne E. coli infections associated with contamination of leafy greens. © 2011 No claim to US Government works. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  16. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  17. Filter arrays

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  18. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  19. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  20. Edge-Aware BMA Filters.

    PubMed

    Guang Deng

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous research in edge-aware filters which have found many applications in computer vision and image processing. In this paper, we propose a principled-approach for the development of edge-aware filters. The proposed approach is based on two well-established principles: 1) optimal parameter estimation and 2) Bayesian model averaging (BMA). Using this approach, we formulate the problem of filtering a pixel in a local pixel patch as an optimal estimation problem. Since a pixel belongs to multiple local patches, there are multiple estimates of the same pixel. We combine these estimates into a final estimate using BMA. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by developing a family of BMA filters based on different settings of cost functions and log-likelihood and log-prior functions. We also present a new interpretation of the guided filter and develop a BMA guided filter which includes the guided filter as a special case. We show that BMA filters can produce similar smoothing results as those of the state-of-the-art edge-aware filters. Two BMA filters are computationally as efficient as the guided filter which is one of the fastest edge-aware filters. We also demonstrate that the BMA guided filter is better than the guided filter in preserving sharp edges. A new feature of the BMA guided filter is that the filtered image is similar to that produced by a clustering process.

  1. Investigation of the practical aspects of an additional 0.1 mm copper x-ray spectral filter for cine acquisition mode imaging in a clinical care setting.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth A

    2010-11-01

    Minimizing the x-ray radiation dose is an important aspect of patient safety during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. This work investigates the practical aspects of an additional 0.1 mm Cu x-ray beam spectral filter applied to cine acquisition mode imaging on patient dose and image quality. Measurements were acquired using clinical interventional imaging systems. Acquisition images of Solid Water phantoms (15-40 cm) were acquired using x-ray beams with the x-ray tube inherent filtration and using an additional 0.1 mm Cu x-ray beam spectral filter. The skin entrance air kerma (dose) rate was measured and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) of an iodine target embedded into the phantom was calculated to assess image quality. X-ray beam parameters were recorded and analyzed and a primary x-ray beam simulation was performed to assess additional x-ray tube burden attributable to the Cu filter. For all phantom thicknesses, the 0.1 mm Cu filter resulted in a 40% reduction in the entrance air kerma rate to the phantoms and a 9% reduction in the SDNR of the iodine phantom. The expected additional tube load required by the 0.1 mm Cu filter ranged from 11% for a 120 kVp x-ray beam to 43% for a 60 kVp beam. For these clinical systems, use of the 0.1 mm Cu filter resulted in a favorable compromise between reduced skin dose rate and image quality and increased x-ray tube burden.

  2. Functional optical probing of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit in vitro: network dynamics, filter properties, and polysynaptic induction of CA1 LTP.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Jens; Dine, Julien; Eder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Decades of brain research have identified various parallel loops linking the hippocampus with neocortical areas, enabling the acquisition of spatial and episodic memories. Especially the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit [entorhinal cortex layer II → dentate gyrus (DG) → cornu ammonis (CA)-3 → CA1] was studied in great detail because of its seemingly simple connectivity and characteristic structures that are experimentally well accessible. While numerous researchers focused on functional aspects, obtained from a limited number of cells in distinct hippocampal subregions, little is known about the neuronal network dynamics which drive information across multiple synapses for subsequent long-term storage. Fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging in vitro allows real-time recording of activity patterns in large/meso-scale neuronal networks with high spatial resolution. In this way, we recently found that entorhinal theta-frequency input to the DG most effectively passes filter mechanisms of the trisynaptic circuit network, generating activity waves which propagate across the entire DG-CA axis. These "trisynaptic circuit waves" involve high-frequency firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a rapid induction of classical NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 synapses (CA1 LTP). CA1 LTP has been substantially evidenced to be essential for some forms of explicit learning in mammals. Here, we review data with particular reference to whole network-level approaches, illustrating how activity propagation can take place within the trisynaptic circuit to drive formation of CA1 LTP.

  3. Benzimidazole covalent probes and the gastric H+/K+-ATPase as a model system for protein labeling in a copper-free setting

    PubMed Central

    Paresi, Chelsea J.; Liu, Qi; Li, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Affinity probes are useful tools for determining molecular targets and elucidating mechanism of action for novel, bioactive compounds. In the case of covalent inhibitors, activity based probes are particularly valuable for ensuring acceptable selectivity margins. However, there is a variety of bioorthogonalchemisty reactions available for modifying compounds of interest with clickable tags. Here, we describe a direct comparison of tetrazine ligation and strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition using benzimidazole based probes to bind their known target, the gastric proton pump, ATP4A. This study validates the use of chemical probes for target identification and illustrates the superior efficiency of tetrazine ligation for copper-free click systems. In addition, we have identified several novel binding partners of benzimidazole probes: Isoform 2 of deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) and three uncharacterized proteins. PMID:26952080

  4. Use of zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filters may provide an efficient method to mitigate the contamination of produce crops through irrigation water. Purpose: To evaluate the use of ZVI-filtration in decontaminating E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water and on spinach plants in a small, field-scale...

  5. Functional optical probing of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit in vitro: network dynamics, filter properties, and polysynaptic induction of CA1 LTP

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Jens; Dine, Julien; Eder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Decades of brain research have identified various parallel loops linking the hippocampus with neocortical areas, enabling the acquisition of spatial and episodic memories. Especially the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit [entorhinal cortex layer II → dentate gyrus (DG) → cornu ammonis (CA)-3 → CA1] was studied in great detail because of its seemingly simple connectivity and characteristic structures that are experimentally well accessible. While numerous researchers focused on functional aspects, obtained from a limited number of cells in distinct hippocampal subregions, little is known about the neuronal network dynamics which drive information across multiple synapses for subsequent long-term storage. Fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging in vitro allows real-time recording of activity patterns in large/meso-scale neuronal networks with high spatial resolution. In this way, we recently found that entorhinal theta-frequency input to the DG most effectively passes filter mechanisms of the trisynaptic circuit network, generating activity waves which propagate across the entire DG-CA axis. These “trisynaptic circuit waves” involve high-frequency firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a rapid induction of classical NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at CA3-CA1 synapses (CA1 LTP). CA1 LTP has been substantially evidenced to be essential for some forms of explicit learning in mammals. Here, we review data with particular reference to whole network-level approaches, illustrating how activity propagation can take place within the trisynaptic circuit to drive formation of CA1 LTP. PMID:25999809

  6. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aquaspace H2OME Guardian Water Filter, available through Western Water International, Inc., reduces lead in water supplies. The filter is mounted on the faucet and the filter cartridge is placed in the "dead space" between sink and wall. This filter is one of several new filtration devices using the Aquaspace compound filter media, which combines company developed and NASA technology. Aquaspace filters are used in industrial, commercial, residential, and recreational environments as well as by developing nations where water is highly contaminated.

  7. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Use of oligodeoxynucleotide signature probes for identification of physiological groups of methylotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, H.C.; Bratina, B.J.; Tsuji, K.; Hanson, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that uniquely complemented 16S rRNAs of each group of methylotrophs were synthesized and used as hybridization probes for the identification of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine and ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathways for formaldehyde fixation. The specificity of the probes was determined by hybridizing radiolabeled probes with slot-blotted RNAs of methylotrophs and other eubacteria followed by autoradiography. The washing temperature was determined experimentally to be 50 and 52{degrees}C for 9-{alpha} (serine pathway) and 10-{gamma} (RuMP pathway) probes, respectively. RNAs isolated from serine pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 9-{alpha}, and RNAs from RuMP pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 10-{gamma}. Nonmethylotrophic eubacterial RNAs did not bind to either probe. The probes were also labeled with fluorescent dyes. Cells fixed to microscope slides were hybridized with these probes, washed, and examined in a fluorescence microscope equipped with appropriate filter sets. Cells of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine or RuMP pathway specifically bind probes designed for each group. Samples with a mixture of cells of type I and II methanotrophs were detected and differentiated with single probes or mixed probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes, which enabled the detection of both types of cells in the same microscopic field.

  10. Filter validation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    Validation of a sterilizing filtration process is critical since it is impossible with currently available technology to measure the sterility of each filled container; therefore, sterility assurance of the filtered product must be achieved through validation of the filtration process. Validating a pharmaceutical sterile filtration process involves three things: determining the effect of the liquid on the filter, determining the effect of the filter on the liquid, and demonstrating that the filter removes all microorganisms from the liquid under actual processing conditions.

  11. Metallic Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Filtration technology originated in a mid 1960's NASA study. The results were distributed to the filter industry, an HR Textron responded, using the study as a departure for the development of 421 Filter Media. The HR system is composed of ultrafine steel fibers metallurgically bonded and compressed so that the pore structure is locked in place. The filters are used to filter polyesters, plastics, to remove hydrocarbon streams, etc. Several major companies use the product in chemical applications, pollution control, etc.

  12. FILTER TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, J.B.; Torrey, J.V.P.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for reconditioning fused alumina filters which have become clogged by the accretion of bismuth phosphate in the filter pores, The method consists in contacting such filters with faming sulfuric acid, and maintaining such contact for a substantial period of time.

  13. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  14. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  15. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  16. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  17. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  18. Comparison of 3 assay systems using a common probe substrate, calcein AM, for studying P-gp using a selected set of compounds.

    PubMed

    Szerémy, Péter; Pál, Akos; Méhn, Dóra; Tóth, Beáta; Fülöp, Ferenc; Krajcsi, Péter; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina

    2011-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) transporter is the most abundantly investigated adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter protein. Multiple assay systems were developed to study MDR1-mediated transport and possible drug-drug interactions. Yet, as different probe substrates are used in these assays, it is difficult to directly compare the results. In this study, a common probe substrate was applied in 3 assay systems developed to study MDR1: the cellular dye efflux assay, the ATPase assay, and the vesicular transport assay. This probe substrate is calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein AM), the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of the fluorescent dye, calcein. Using a common probe allows the investigation of the effect of passive permeability on the result obtained by testing various compounds. In this study, 22 compounds with different logP values were tested in the above-mentioned 3 assay systems. The vesicular transport assay proved most sensitive, detecting 18 of 22 interactions with the protein. The ATPase assay detected 15 interactions, whereas the cellular dye efflux assay was the least sensitive with only 10 hits. A correlation was found between the hydrophobicity of the compound and the ratio of cellular and vesicular transport IC(50) values, indicating the effect of passive permeability on the result. Based on hydrophobicity, the current study provides guidelines on applying the most correct tool for studying MDR1 interactions.

  19. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, G.B.; Dilmore, W.J.

    1992-09-01

    A vertical vessel is described having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas. 18 figs.

  20. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, Gaurang B.; Dilmore, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A vertical vessel having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas.

  1. Noise filtering via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taek; Bae, In-Ho; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-01-01

    We report on the intensity-noise reduction of pseudo-thermal light via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the Λ-type system of the 5S1/2-5P1/2 transition in 87Rb. Noise filtering of the pseudo-thermal probe light was achieved via an EIT filter and measured according to the degree of intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light. Reductions in the intensity and spectral noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light with the EIT filter were observed using the direct intensity fluctuation and heterodyne detection technique, respectively. Comparison of the intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light before and after passing through the EIT filter revealed a significant reduction in the intensity noise.

  2. Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Toole, Jr., William R.; Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

  3. Interactive Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Gerd; Cane, Mark A.

    1994-04-01

    Data assimilation via the extended Kaiman filter can become problematic when the assimilating model is strongly nonlinear, primarily in connection with sharp, "switchlike" changes between different regimes of the system. The filter seems too inert to follow those switches quickly enough, a fact that can lead to a complete failure when the switches occur often enough. In this paper we replace the key feature of the filter, the use of local linearity for the error model update, with a principle that uses a more global approach through the utilization of a set of preselected regimes. The method uses all regime error models simultaneously. Being mutually incompatible, a compromise between the different error models is found through the use of a weighting function that reflects the `closeness' of the error model to the correct model. To test the interactive Kaiman filter a series of numerical experiments is performed using the double-well system and the well-known Lorenz system, and the results are compared to the extended Kaiman filter. It turns out that, depending on the set of preselected regimes, the performance is worse than, comparable to, or better than that of the extended Kaiman filter.

  4. Measurement of Bioelectric Current with a Vibrating Probe

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2011-01-01

    Electric fields, generated by active transport of ions, are present in many biological systems and often serve important functions in tissues and organs. For example, they play an important role in directing cell migration during wound healing. Here we describe the manufacture and use of ultrasensitive vibrating probes for measuring extracellular electric currents. The probe is an insulated, sharpened metal wire with a small platinum-black tip (30-35 μm), which can detect ionic currents in the μA/cm2 range in physiological saline. The probe is vibrated at about 200 Hz by a piezoelectric bender. In the presence of an ionic current, the probe detects a voltage difference between the extremes of its movement. A lock-in amplifier filters out extraneous noise by locking on to the probe's frequency of vibration. Data are recorded onto computer. The probe is calibrated at the start and end of experiments in appropriate saline, using a chamber which applies a current of exactly 1.5 μA/cm2. We describe how to make the probes, set up the system and calibrate. We also demonstrate the technique of cornea measurement, and show some representative results from different specimens (cornea, skin, brain). PMID:21248695

  5. Ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Shaath, Nadim A

    2010-04-01

    The chemistry, photostability and mechanism of action of ultraviolet filters are reviewed. The worldwide regulatory status of the 55 approved ultraviolet filters and their optical properties are documented. The photostabilty of butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (avobenzone) is considered and methods to stabilize it in cosmetic formulations are presented.

  6. Measurements of SO2 Degassing from Popocatépetl Volcano by an Ultraviolet Camera and a Set of Different Bandpass Filters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavo, B.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.; Campion, R.; Rivera, C. I.; Inguaggiato, S.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of monitoring and the time series of volcanic gas emissions is described and proven by many scientific studies. A time series of the Popocatépetl volcano will allow us to detect the volcanic gas as well as anomalies in volcanic processes and help to estimate the total emission flux of SO2 to improve our understanding of the atmospheric composition and balance. Monitoring of the activity of the Popocatépetl volcano is even more important because of the population in the closest proximity around the volcano and due its location of only 50 km south east of Mexico City and its airport. The images captured with the camera require a correction for different optical and environmental effects. In the contribution we present an SO2 camera system based on a Quantum Scientific Imaging (QSI) UV camara with automatic filterwheel, and describe how the main instrumental properties of the optical system can be characterized. Dark current, vignetting and filter characterization represent the instrumental part of a proper image correction, which is fairly constant and independent of the ambient conditions. However, other effects like "flattening" and the simplification of the radiative transfer dependence on environmental conditions need to be corrected as well to reduce the errors in the results. Images of volcanic SO2 plumes from the active Popocatépetl volcano in Mexico are presented, showing persistent passive degassing. The measurment are taken from the Altzomoni Atmospheric Observatory (19.12N, -98.65W, 3,985 m.a.s.l.), which forms part of the RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx) and NDACC (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/irwg) networks. It is located north of the crater at 11 km distance. The data to calculate SO2 slant column densities (molec/cm2 or ppm*m) were recorded with the QSI UV camera and processed using Python scripts.

  7. System and Apparatus for Filtering Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H. (Inventor); Vijayakumar, Rajagopal (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular pre-filtration apparatus may be beneficial to extend the life of a filter. The apparatus may include an impactor that can collect a first set of particles in the air, and a scroll filter that can collect a second set of particles in the air. A filter may follow the pre-filtration apparatus, thus causing the life of the filter to be increased.

  8. Fast GPU based adaptive filtering of 4D echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Broxvall, Mathias; Emilsson, Kent; Thunberg, Per

    2012-06-01

    Time resolved three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography generates four-dimensional (3D+time) data sets that bring new possibilities in clinical practice. Image quality of four-dimensional (4D) echocardiography is however regarded as poorer compared to conventional echocardiography where time-resolved 2D imaging is used. Advanced image processing filtering methods can be used to achieve image improvements but to the cost of heavy data processing. The recent development of graphics processing unit (GPUs) enables highly parallel general purpose computations, that considerably reduces the computational time of advanced image filtering methods. In this study multidimensional adaptive filtering of 4D echocardiography was performed using GPUs. Filtering was done using multiple kernels implemented in OpenCL (open computing language) working on multiple subsets of the data. Our results show a substantial speed increase of up to 74 times, resulting in a total filtering time less than 30 s on a common desktop. This implies that advanced adaptive image processing can be accomplished in conjunction with a clinical examination. Since the presented GPU processor method scales linearly with the number of processing elements, we expect it to continue scaling with the expected future increases in number of processing elements. This should be contrasted with the increases in data set sizes in the near future following the further improvements in ultrasound probes and measuring devices. It is concluded that GPUs facilitate the use of demanding adaptive image filtering techniques that in turn enhance 4D echocardiographic data sets. The presented general methodology of implementing parallelism using GPUs is also applicable for other medical modalities that generate multidimensional data.

  9. Full information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Somnath, Suhas

    2017-04-04

    Apparatus and methods are described for scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy based on acquisition of full probe response. The full probe response contains valuable information about the probe-sample interaction that is lost in traditional scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy methods. The full probe response is analyzed post data acquisition using fast Fourier transform and adaptive filtering, as well as multivariate analysis. The full response data is further compressed to retain only statistically significant components before being permanently stored.

  10. D-alpha Probe Investigation on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; James, Royce; Sherman, Justin; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Stutzman, Brook; Duke-Tenson, Omar; Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) we are starting to set up a spectral probes to help verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes will utilize movable filters, ccd cameras and diodes, to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Data collected will be used to investigate the plasma's structure and behavior during experiments. The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic fields to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time. A d-alpha filter will allow for the collection of neutral density fluctuations for different plasma behaviors. In d-alpha mode, the probe may also provide some information on the internal plasma structure and perhaps reveal some global plasma interactions. The spectral probe will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the construction of the probe will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  11. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  12. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is an engineering test {described in SMOV4 Activity Description NICMOS-04} to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in SMOV4. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal operating temperature.Addition of visits G0 - G9 {9/9/09}: Ten visits copied from proposal 11868 {visits 20, 30, ..., 90, A0, B0}. Each visit moves two filter positions, takes lamp ON/OFF exposures and then moves back to the blank position. Visits G0, G1 and G2 will leave the filter wheels disabled. The remaining visits will leave the filter wheels enabled. There are sufficient in between times to allow for data download and analysis. In the case of problem is encountered, the filter wheels will be disabled through a real time command. The in between times are all set to 22-50 hours. It is preferable to have as short as possible in between time.

  13. Technical evaluation of the prototype ORNL alpha radiation detector/probe with the AN/PDR-77 RADIAC set. Technical report, Nov 91-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, M.J.; Kaplowitz, I.A.

    1992-06-01

    A new alpha particle detector, designed and fabricated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was procured and technically evaluated by the U.S. Army. Two of the three detectors procured were tested under guidelines obtained from U.S. Army requirements for an alpha detector probe. The probes represent the state-of-the-art in alpha particle detector design and fabrication affording ruggedness in design, accuracy at low count rates(+ or - 10%) below 30 CPM, excellent operating temperature (-30 to 60 deg C), and insensitivity to gamma rays (CS-137) up to 2 R/hr. Its unique feature centers on the solid state construction of the alpha detector which is composed of a transparent epoxy having embedded silver actuated zinc sulfide as the scintillator. A flat light pipe coupled to a photomultiplier tube provides the light sensing design. Test results indicate a drop in response as one approaches the edge of the detector face due to the geometry of a flat light pipe design, suggesting a redesign from a flat geometry to one having a cone shape.

  14. Numerical simulation of large fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Kovařík, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Fabric filters are used in the wide range of industrial technologies for cleaning of incoming or exhaust gases. To achieve maximal efficiency of the discrete phase separation and long lifetime of the filter hoses, it is necessary to ensure uniform load on filter surface and to avoid impacts of heavy particles with high velocities to the filter hoses. The paper deals with numerical simulation of two phase flow field in a large fabric filter. The filter is composed of six chambers with approx. 1600 filter hoses in total. The model was simplified to one half of the filter, the filter hoses walls were substituted by porous zones. The model settings were based on experimental data, especially on the filter pressure drop. Unsteady simulations with different turbulence models were done. Flow field together with particles trajectories were analyzed. The results were compared with experimental observations.

  15. The 2-global flash mfERG in glaucoma: attempting to increase sensitivity by reducing the focal flash luminance and changing filter settings.

    PubMed

    Kramer, S A; Ledolter, A A; Todorova, M G; Schötzau, A; Orgül, S; Palmowski-Wolfe, A M

    2013-02-01

    To test a new 2-flash multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) paradigm in glaucoma using a reduced light intensity of the m-frame flash as opposed to the global flash, as it has been suggested that this may increase the responses induced by the global flash, which has been the part of the mfERG response where most changes have been noted in glaucoma. A mfERG was recorded from one eye of 22 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients [16 normal tension glaucoma (NTG), 6 high tension glaucoma (HTG)] and 20 control subjects. A binary m-sequence (2^13-1, Lmax 100 cd/m2, Lmin<1 cd/m2), followed by two global flashes (Lmax 200 cd/m2) at an interval of 26 ms (VERIS 6.0™, FMSIII), was used. The stimulus array consisted of 103 hexagons. Retinal signals were amplified (gain=50 K) and bandpass filtered at 1-300 Hz. For each focal response, the root mean square was calculated. We analyzed 5 larger response averages (central 15° and 4 adjoining quadrants) as well as 8 smaller response averages (central 10° and 7 surrounding response averages of approximately 7° radius each). Three epochs were analyzed: the direct component at 15-45 ms (DC) and the following two components induced by the effects of the preceding focal flash on the response to the global flashes at 45-75 ms (IC-1) and at 75-105 ms (IC-2). Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed effects models adjusted for age. Responses differed significantly between POAG patients and controls in all central response averages. This difference was larger for the central 10° than for the response average of the central 15°. While these observations held true for all response epochs analyzed, the DC differed least and the IC-1 most when POAG was compared to control. For POAG, the most sensitive differential measure was IC-1 of the central 10° with an area under the ROC curve of 0.78. With a cutoff value of 12.52 nV/deg2, 80% of the POAG patients (100% HTG, 69% NTG) were correctly classified as abnormal, while 77

  16. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  17. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  18. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Seeking to find a more effective method of filtering potable water that was highly contaminated, Mike Pedersen, founder of Western Water International, learned that NASA had conducted extensive research in methods of purifying water on board manned spacecraft. The key is Aquaspace Compound, a proprietary WWI formula that scientifically blends various types of glandular activated charcoal with other active and inert ingredients. Aquaspace systems remove some substances; chlorine, by atomic adsorption, other types of organic chemicals by mechanical filtration and still others by catalytic reaction. Aquaspace filters are finding wide acceptance in industrial, commercial, residential and recreational applications in the U.S. and abroad.

  19. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, D.P.; Singletary, B.H.; Evans, J.H.

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  20. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, Daniel P.; Singletary, B. Huston; Evans, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  1. Sigma Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balgovind, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The GLA Fourth-Order model is needed to smooth the topography. This is to remove the Gibbs phenomenon. The Gibbs phenomenon occurs whenever we truncate a Fourier Series. The Sigma factors were introduced to reduce the Gibbs phenomenon. It is found that the smooth Fourier series is nothing but the original Fourier series with its coefficients multiplied by corresponding sigma factors. This operator can be applied many times to obtain high order sigma filtered field and is easily applicable using FFT. It is found that this filter is beneficial in deriving the topography.

  2. Applications of profile filtering in the dimensional metrology of fuel cell plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishnan, Bala; Ren, Wei; Stanfield, Eric; Everett, Dennis; Zheng, Alan; Doiron, Ted

    2013-06-01

    We describe the application of several surface profile filters as an enabling tool in the dimensional measurements of an engineering artifact, namely, a fuel cell plate. We recently reported work on the development of a non-contact system for dimensional metrology of bipolar fuel cell plates. That system comprises two laser spot triangulation probes that acquire profile data across a plate. While the non-contact system provides rapid measurements (measurement speed of 100 mm s-1 to 500 mm s-1), the data are noisy and cannot be used directly to obtain features of interest such as channel depth and width. In this paper, we show how different surface profile filters such as the spline, morphological, and robust filters, can be employed to identify and suppress outliers and to produce a mean line that serves as a substitute geometry from which we can determine features of interest. Further, we compare the non-contact probe data against contact probe measurements made using a coordinate measuring machine. Surface profile filters are again useful in correcting the reference data for tip size and also in removing any free form deformation in both data sets prior to parameter evaluation and comparison.

  3. Suppression of perturbed free-induction decay and noise in experimental ultrafast pump-probe data.

    PubMed

    Nuernberger, Patrick; Lee, Kevin F; Bonvalet, Adeline; Polack, Thomas; Vos, Marten H; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Joffre, Manuel

    2009-10-15

    We apply a Fourier filtering technique for the global removal of coherent contributions, like perturbed free-induction decay, and noise, to experimental pump-probe spectra. A further filtering scheme gains access to spectra otherwise only recordable by scanning the probe's center frequency with adjustable spectral resolution. These methods cleanse pump-probe data and allow improved visualization and simpler analysis of the contained dynamics. We demonstrate these filters using visible pump/mid-infrared probe spectroscopy of ligand dissociation in carboxyhemoglobin.

  4. Notch filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, G. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A notch filter for the selective attenuation of a narrow band of frequencies out of a larger band was developed. A helical resonator is connected to an input circuit and an output circuit through discrete and equal capacitors, and a resistor is connected between the input and the output circuits.

  5. Filters for HST Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Brown, T.; Boucarut, R.; Figer, D.; Hartig, G.; Kimble, R.; MacKenty, J.; Robberto, M.; Telfer, R.; Kim-Quijano, J.; Quijada, M.; Allen, G.; Arsenovic, P.; Hilbert, B.; Lupie, O.; Townsend, J.

    2006-06-01

    Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has been built for installation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. The WFC3 instrument consists of both a UVIS and an IR channel, each with its own complement of filters. On the UVIS side, a selectable optical filter assembly (SOFA) contains a set of 12 wheels that house 48 elements (42 full-frame filters, 5 quadrant filters, and 1 UV grism). The IR channel has one filter wheel which houses 17 elements (15 filters and 2 grisms). While the majority of UVIS filters exhibited excellent performance during ground testing, a subset of filters showed filter ghosting; improved replacements for these filters have been procured and installed. No filter ghosting was found in any of the IR filters; however, the new IR detector for WFC3 will have significantly more response blueward of 800 nm than the original detector, requiring that two filters originally constructed on a fused silica substrate be remade to block any visible light transmission. This paper summarizes the characterization of the final complement of the WFC3 UVIS and IR filters, highlighting improvements in the replacement filters and the projected benefit to science observations.

  6. Gaussian particle flow implementation of PHD filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Wang, Junjie; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Particle filter and Gaussian mixture implementations of random finite set filters have been proposed to tackle the issue of jointly estimating the number of targets and their states. The Gaussian mixture PHD (GM-PHD) filter has a closed-form expression for the PHD for linear and Gaussian target models, and extensions using the extended Kalman filter or unscented Kalman Filter have been developed to allow the GM-PHD filter to accommodate mildly nonlinear dynamics. Errors resulting from linearization or model mismatch are unavoidable. A particle filter implementation of the PHD filter (PF-PHD) is more suitable for nonlinear and non-Gaussian target models. The particle filter implementations are much more computationally expensive and performance can suffer when the proposal distribution is not a good match to the posterior. In this paper, we propose a novel implementation of the PHD filter named the Gaussian particle flow PHD filter (GPF-PHD). It employs a bank of particle flow filters to approximate the PHD; these play the same role as the Gaussian components in the GM-PHD filter but are better suited to non-linear dynamics and measurement equations. Using the particle flow filter allows the GPF-PHD filter to migrate particles to the dense regions of the posterior, which leads to higher efficiency than the PF-PHD. We explore the performance of the new algorithm through numerical simulations.

  7. Digital smoothing of the Langmuir probe I-V characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2008-07-15

    Electrostatic probes or Langmuir probes are the most common diagnostic tools in plasma discharges. The second derivative of the Langmuir probe I-V characteristic is proportional to the electron energy distribution function. Determining the second derivative accurately requires some method of noise suppression. We compare the Savitzky-Golay filter, the Gaussian filter, and polynomial fitting to the Blackman filter for digitally smoothing simulated and measured I-V characteristics. We find that the Blackman filter achieves the most smoothing with minimal distortion for noisy data.

  8. Novel Nonlinear Hybrid Filters for Image Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    Image noise removal and enhancement are important subjects in image processing. Nonlinear techniques for image enhancement and noise reduction challenge the linear techniques by improving image quality while removing noise. The purpose of this thesis is devoted to systematically unifying theory and techniques for mixed noise removal and image enhancement, and to developing new techniques for removing large amounts of mixed Gaussian and impulsive noise while preserving image details. In this thesis, we introduce three new hybrid filters which combine linear and nonlinear filters to produce new hybrid filters capable of removing large amounts of mixed noise. To efficiently use the ambiguous information in an image, both fuzzy set concepts and fuzzy logic operating rules are utilized in the filter design techniques. The three new filters include the single level trained fuzzy filter (SLTF), the multi-level adaptive fuzzy filter (MLAF), and the decision directed window adaptive hybrid filter (DDWAH). The SLTF filter is designed to remove large amounts of mixed noise by combining an impulse filter with a fuzzy filter. The efficiency of the SLTF filter in removing large amounts of mixed noise while preserving image edges is demonstrated. The MLAF filter is an adaptive SLTF filter which uses the local variance of image gray scales to adapt the weights used in the linear portion of the filter to local image statistics. The MLAF filter provides improved visual performance compared to the SLTF filter. The adaptive DDWAH filter uses local statistics to adapt the window size of the filter to local statistics. This approach prevents distortion of small objects in the image, and removes noise more effectively than non-adaptive filters. The experimental results clearly show the improved noise removal performance and good edge preservation properties. Theoretical analysis verifies the measured results.

  9. SRBF: Speckle reducing bilateral filtering.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Gatta, Carlo; Pujol, Oriol; Mauri, Josepa; Radeva, Petia

    2010-08-01

    Speckle noise negatively affects medical ultrasound image shape interpretation and boundary detection. Speckle removal filters are widely used to selectively remove speckle noise without destroying important image features to enhance object boundaries. In this article, a fully automatic bilateral filter tailored to ultrasound images is proposed. The edge preservation property is obtained by embedding noise statistics in the filter framework. Consequently, the filter is able to tackle the multiplicative behavior modulating the smoothing strength with respect to local statistics. The in silico experiments clearly showed that the speckle reducing bilateral filter (SRBF) has superior performances to most of the state of the art filtering methods. The filter is tested on 50 in vivo US images and its influence on a segmentation task is quantified. The results using SRBF filtered data sets show a superior performance to using oriented anisotropic diffusion filtered images. This improvement is due to the adaptive support of SRBF and the embedded noise statistics, yielding a more homogeneous smoothing. SRBF results in a fully automatic, fast and flexible algorithm potentially suitable in wide ranges of speckle noise sizes, for different medical applications (IVUS, B-mode, 3-D matrix array US).

  10. Filter selection using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Devesh

    1996-03-01

    Convolution operators act as matched filters for certain types of variations found in images and have been extensively used in the analysis of images. However, filtering through a bank of N filters generates N filtered images, consequently increasing the amount of data considerably. Moreover, not all these filters have the same discriminatory capabilities for the individual images, thus making the task of any classifier difficult. In this paper, we use genetic algorithms to select a subset of relevant filters. Genetic algorithms represent a class of adaptive search techniques where the processes are similar to natural selection of biological evolution. The steady state model (GENITOR) has been used in this paper. The reduction of filters improves the performance of the classifier (which in this paper is the multi-layer perceptron neural network) and furthermore reduces the computational requirement. In this study we use the Laws filters which were proposed for the analysis of texture images. Our aim is to recognize the different textures on the images using the reduced filter set.

  11. Derivation of tropospheric column ozone from the Earth Probe TOMS/GOES co-located data sets using the cloud slicing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C.; Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-07-01

    A recently developed technique called cloud slicing used for deriving upper tropospheric ozone from the Nimbus 7 total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument combined with temperature-humidity and infrared radiometer (THIR) is not applicable to the Earth Probe TOMS (EP TOMS) because this satellite platform does not have an instrument to measure cloud-top temperatures. For continuing monitoring of tropospheric ozone between 200 and 500hPa and testing the feasibility of this technique across spacecrafts, EP TOMS data are co-located in time and space with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 infrared data for year 2001 and early 2002, covering most of North and South America (45°S-45°N and 120°W-30°W). Results show that the maximum column amounts for the mid-latitudinal sites of the northern hemisphere are found in the March-May season. For the mid-latitudinal sites in the southern hemisphere, the highest column amounts are found in the September-November season with overall seasonal variability smaller than that in the northern hemisphere. The tropical sites show weaker seasonal variability compared to higher latitudes. The derived results for selected sites are cross-validated qualitatively with the seasonality of ozonesonde observations and the results from THIR analyses over the 1979-1984 time period. These comparisons show a reasonably good agreement among THIR, ozonesonde observations, and cloud slicing-derived column ozone. Cloud slicing measurements from TOMS coincide with large-scale convection events, especially in regions of the tropospheric wind jets (around +/-30° latitude). In these cases they may not be representative of typical conditions in the atmosphere. Two new variant approaches, high-low cloud slicing and ozone profile derivation from cloud slicing are introduced to estimate column ozone amounts using the entire cloud information in the troposphere. A future satellite platform such as the earth observing

  12. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  13. Water Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water sterilizer available through Ambassador Marketing, generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in water flow system. The silver ions serve as an effective bactericide/deodorizer. Tap water passes through filtering element of silver that has been chemically plated onto activated carbon. The silver inhibits bacterial growth and the activated carbon removes objectionable tastes and odors caused by addition of chlorine and other chemicals in municipal water supply. The three models available are a kitchen unit, a "Tourister" unit for portable use while traveling and a refrigerator unit that attaches to the ice cube water line. A filter will treat 5,000 to 10,000 gallons of water.

  14. Plasmonic filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Passmore, Brandon Scott; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Metal films perforated with subwavelength hole arrays have been show to demonstrate an effect known as Extraordinary Transmission (EOT). In EOT devices, optical transmission passbands arise that can have up to 90% transmission and a bandwidth that is only a few percent of the designed center wavelength. By placing a tunable dielectric in proximity to the EOT mesh, one can tune the center frequency of the passband. We have demonstrated over 1 micron of passive tuning in structures designed for an 11 micron center wavelength. If a suitable midwave (3-5 micron) tunable dielectric (perhaps BaTiO{sub 3}) were integrated with an EOT mesh designed for midwave operation, it is possible that a fast, voltage tunable, low temperature filter solution could be demonstrated with a several hundred nanometer passband. Such an element could, for example, replace certain components in a filter wheel solution.

  15. Nonlinear Filtering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    agree to say four places by successive choices of finer subdivisions of the grid. The accuracy obtained by this method Is rot quite unexpected—see for...iltering, " R~v . Francais d’ ~•_!o:n~ti~, ~. l ’J73 , 3-54. ( 2L ; H. S . U•JLy , "Pedliza tion of nonlinear filters," ~!:Q~-·-~..c!.5E£...... .Q

  16. Eyeglass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's suntiger lenses eliminate more than 99% of harmful light wavelengths. NASA derived lenses make scenes more vivid in color and also increase the wearer's visual acuity. Distant objects, even on hazy days, appear crisp and clear; mountains seem closer, glare is greatly reduced, clouds stand out. Daytime use protects the retina from bleaching in bright light, thus improving night vision. Filtering helps prevent a variety of eye disorders, in particular cataracts and age related macular degeneration.

  17. Optimal filters for detecting cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, J. D.; Feeney, S. M.; Johnson, M. C.; Peiris, H. V.

    2012-05-01

    A number of well-motivated extensions of the ΛCDM concordance cosmological model postulate the existence of a population of sources embedded in the cosmic microwave background. One such example is the signature of cosmic bubble collisions which arise in models of eternal inflation. The most unambiguous way to test these scenarios is to evaluate the full posterior probability distribution of the global parameters defining the theory; however, a direct evaluation is computationally impractical on large datasets, such as those obtained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck. A method to approximate the full posterior has been developed recently, which requires as an input a set of candidate sources which are most likely to give the largest contribution to the likelihood. In this article, we present an improved algorithm for detecting candidate sources using optimal filters, and apply it to detect candidate bubble collision signatures in WMAP 7-year observations. We show both theoretically and through simulations that this algorithm provides an enhancement in sensitivity over previous methods by a factor of approximately two. Moreover, no other filter-based approach can provide a superior enhancement of these signatures. Applying our algorithm to WMAP 7-year observations, we detect eight new candidate bubble collision signatures for follow-up analysis.

  18. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  19. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  20. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOEpatents

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza; Bloom, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  1. Probing the lithium-response pathway in hiPSCs implicates the phosphoregulatory set-point for a cytoskeletal modulator in bipolar pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Brian T. D.; Crain, Andrew M.; Winquist, Alicia M.; Calabrese, Barbara; Makihara, Hiroko; Zhao, Wen-ning; Lalonde, Jasmin; Nakamura, Haruko; Konopaske, Glenn; Sidor, Michelle; Pernia, Cameron D.; Yamashita, Naoya; Wada, Moyuka; Inoue, Yuuka; Nakamura, Fumio; Sheridan, Steven D.; Logan, Ryan W.; Brandel, Michael; Wu, Dongmei; Hunsberger, Joshua; Dorsett, Laurel; Duerr, Cordulla; Basa, Ranor C. B.; McCarthy, Michael J.; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Mertins, Philipp; Carr, Steven A.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Mastrangelo, Lina; Li, Jianxue; Gutierrez, Gustavo J.; Brill, Laurence M.; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Chen, Guang; Nye, Jeffrey S.; Manji, Husseini; Price, Jeffrey H.; McClung, Colleen A.; Akiskal, Hagop S.; Chuang, De-Maw M.; Coyle, Joseph T.; Liu, Yang; Teng, Yang D.; Ohshima, Toshio; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Sidman, Richard L.; Halpain, Shelley; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Goshima, Yoshio; Snyder, Evan Y.

    2017-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BPD) is poorly understood. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to unravel such mechanisms in polygenic diseases is generally challenging. However, hiPSCs from BPD patients responsive to lithium offered unique opportunities to discern lithium's target and hence gain molecular insight into BPD. By profiling the proteomics of BDP–hiPSC-derived neurons, we found that lithium alters the phosphorylation state of collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2). Active nonphosphorylated CRMP2, which binds cytoskeleton, is present throughout the neuron; inactive phosphorylated CRMP2, which dissociates from cytoskeleton, exits dendritic spines. CRMP2 elimination yields aberrant dendritogenesis with diminished spine density and lost lithium responsiveness (LiR). The “set-point” for the ratio of pCRMP2:CRMP2 is elevated uniquely in hiPSC-derived neurons from LiR BPD patients, but not with other psychiatric (including lithium-nonresponsive BPD) and neurological disorders. Lithium (and other pathway modulators) lowers pCRMP2, increasing spine area and density. Human BPD brains show similarly elevated ratios and diminished spine densities; lithium therapy normalizes the ratios and spines. Consistent with such “spine-opathies,” human LiR BPD neurons with abnormal ratios evince abnormally steep slopes for calcium flux; lithium normalizes both. Behaviorally, transgenic mice that reproduce lithium's postulated site-of-action in dephosphorylating CRMP2 emulate LiR in BPD. These data suggest that the “lithium response pathway” in BPD governs CRMP2's phosphorylation, which regulates cytoskeletal organization, particularly in spines, modulating neural networks. Aberrations in the posttranslational regulation of this developmentally critical molecule may underlie LiR BPD pathogenesis. Instructively, examining the proteomic profile in hiPSCs of a functional agent—even one whose mechanism-of-action is unknown

  2. Probing the lithium-response pathway in hiPSCs implicates the phosphoregulatory set-point for a cytoskeletal modulator in bipolar pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Crain, Andrew M; Winquist, Alicia M; Calabrese, Barbara; Makihara, Hiroko; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Lalonde, Jasmin; Nakamura, Haruko; Konopaske, Glenn; Sidor, Michelle; Pernia, Cameron D; Yamashita, Naoya; Wada, Moyuka; Inoue, Yuuka; Nakamura, Fumio; Sheridan, Steven D; Logan, Ryan W; Brandel, Michael; Wu, Dongmei; Hunsberger, Joshua; Dorsett, Laurel; Duerr, Cordulla; Basa, Ranor C B; McCarthy, Michael J; Udeshi, Namrata D; Mertins, Philipp; Carr, Steven A; Rouleau, Guy A; Mastrangelo, Lina; Li, Jianxue; Gutierrez, Gustavo J; Brill, Laurence M; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Chen, Guang; Nye, Jeffrey S; Manji, Husseini; Price, Jeffrey H; McClung, Colleen A; Akiskal, Hagop S; Alda, Martin; Chuang, De-Maw M; Coyle, Joseph T; Liu, Yang; Teng, Yang D; Ohshima, Toshio; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Sidman, Richard L; Halpain, Shelley; Haggarty, Stephen J; Goshima, Yoshio; Snyder, Evan Y

    2017-05-30

    The molecular pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BPD) is poorly understood. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to unravel such mechanisms in polygenic diseases is generally challenging. However, hiPSCs from BPD patients responsive to lithium offered unique opportunities to discern lithium's target and hence gain molecular insight into BPD. By profiling the proteomics of BDP-hiPSC-derived neurons, we found that lithium alters the phosphorylation state of collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2). Active nonphosphorylated CRMP2, which binds cytoskeleton, is present throughout the neuron; inactive phosphorylated CRMP2, which dissociates from cytoskeleton, exits dendritic spines. CRMP2 elimination yields aberrant dendritogenesis with diminished spine density and lost lithium responsiveness (LiR). The "set-point" for the ratio of pCRMP2:CRMP2 is elevated uniquely in hiPSC-derived neurons from LiR BPD patients, but not with other psychiatric (including lithium-nonresponsive BPD) and neurological disorders. Lithium (and other pathway modulators) lowers pCRMP2, increasing spine area and density. Human BPD brains show similarly elevated ratios and diminished spine densities; lithium therapy normalizes the ratios and spines. Consistent with such "spine-opathies," human LiR BPD neurons with abnormal ratios evince abnormally steep slopes for calcium flux; lithium normalizes both. Behaviorally, transgenic mice that reproduce lithium's postulated site-of-action in dephosphorylating CRMP2 emulate LiR in BPD. These data suggest that the "lithium response pathway" in BPD governs CRMP2's phosphorylation, which regulates cytoskeletal organization, particularly in spines, modulating neural networks. Aberrations in the posttranslational regulation of this developmentally critical molecule may underlie LiR BPD pathogenesis. Instructively, examining the proteomic profile in hiPSCs of a functional agent-even one whose mechanism-of-action is unknown-might reveal

  3. PAUCam filter interchange system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, F.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; de Vicente, J.; Fernández, E.; Gaztañaga, E.; Grañena, F.; Jiménez, J.; Maiorino, M.; Martí, P.; Miquel, R.; Sánchez, E.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla, I.; Tonello, N.

    2010-07-01

    The Physics of the Accelerating Universe (PAU) is a new project whose main goal is to study dark energy surveying the galaxy distribution. For that purpose we need to determine the galaxy redshifts. The most accurate way to determine the redshift of a galaxy and measure its spectral energy distribution (SED) is achieved with spectrographs. The PAU collaboration is building an instrument (PAUCam) devoted to perform a large area survey for cosmological studies using an alternative approach. SEDs are sampled and redshifts determined using narrow band filter photometry. For efficiency and manufacturability considerations, the filters need to be placed close to the CCD detector surfaces on segmented filter trays. The most innovative element of PAUCam is a set of 16 different exchangeable trays to support the filters arranged in a jukebox-like changing mechanism inside the cryostat. The device is designed to operate within the range of temperatures from 150K to 300K at the absolute pressure of 10-8mbar, being class-100 compliant.

  4. Filter for third order phase locked loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.; Tausworthe, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Filters for third-order phase-locked loops are used in receivers to acquire and track carrier signals, particularly signals subject to high doppler-rate changes in frequency. A loop filter with an open-loop transfer function and set of loop constants, setting the damping factor equal to unity are provided.

  5. Scalar gain interpretation of large order filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    A technique is developed which demonstrates how to interpret a large fully-populated filter gain matrix as a set of scalar gains. The inverse problem is also solved, namely, how to develop a large-order filter gain matrix from a specified set of scalar gains. Examples are given to illustrate the method.

  6. Image Filtering via Generalized Scale

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Andre; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-01-01

    In medical imaging, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and/or contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) often cause many image processing algorithms to perform poorly. Postacquisition image filtering is an important off-line image processing approach widely employed to enhance the SNR and CNR. A major drawback of many filtering techniques is image degradation by diffusing/blurring edges and/or fine structures. In this paper, we introduce a scale-based filtering method that employs scale-dependent diffusion conductance to perform filtering. This approach utilizes novel object scale information via a concept called generalized scale, which imposes no shape, size, or anisotropic constraints unlike previously published ball scale-based filtering strategies. The object scale allows us to better control the filtering process by constraining smoothing in regions with fine details and in the vicinity of boundaries while permitting effective smoothing in the interior of homogeneous regions. A new quantitative evaluation strategy that captures the SNR to CNR trade-off behavior of filtering methods is presented. The evaluations based on the Brainweb data sets show superior performance of generalized scale-based diffusive filtering over two existing methods, namely, ball scale-based and nonlinear complex diffusion processes. Qualitative experiments based on both phantom and patient magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the generalized scale-based approach leads to better preservation of fine details and edges. PMID:17827051

  7. Filtered or Unfiltered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Ann; Haycock, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Discusses results of a survey questionnaire of public and school libraries that investigated the use of Internet filtering software. Considers filter alternatives; reasons for filtering or not filtering; brand names; satisfaction with site blocking; satisfaction with the decision to install filter software; and guidelines for considering filters.…

  8. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  9. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  10. SigReannot-mart: a query environment for expression microarray probe re-annotations

    PubMed Central

    Moreews, François; Rauffet, Gaelle; Dehais, Patrice; Klopp, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Expression microarrays are commonly used to study transcriptomes. Most of the arrays are now based on oligo-nucleotide probes. Probe design being a tedious task, it often takes place once at the beginning of the project. The oligo set is then used for several years. During this time period, the knowledge gathered by the community on the genome and the transcriptome increases and gets more precise. Therefore re-annotating the set is essential to supply the biologists with up-to-date annotations. SigReannot-mart is a query environment populated with regularly updated annotations for different oligo sets. It stores the results of the SigReannot pipeline that has mainly been used on farm and aquaculture species. It permits easy extraction in different formats using filters. It is used to compare probe sets on different criteria, to choose the set for a given experiment to mix probe sets in order to create a new one. Database URL: http://sigreannot-mart.toulouse.inra.fr/ PMID:21930501

  11. Exact reconstruction analysis/synthesis filter banks with time-varying filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrowood, J. L., Jr.; Smith, M. J. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines some of the analysis/synthesis issues associated with FIR time-varying filter banks where the filter bank coefficients are allowed to change in response to the input signal. Several issues are identified as being important in order to realize performance gains from time-varying filter banks in image coding applications. These issues relate to the behavior of the filters as transition from one set of filter banks to another occurs. Lattice structure formulations for the time varying filter bank problem are introduced and discussed in terms of their properties and transition characteristics.

  12. Analog filtering of large solvent signals for improved dynamic range in high-resolution NMR.

    PubMed

    Redfield, A G; Kunz, S D

    1998-01-01

    The large solvent signal from samples in H2O solvent still challenges the dynamic range capability of any spectrometer. The solvent signal can be largely removed with a pair of simple resistor-capacitor (RC) high-pass filters when the solvent frequency is set at center band (zero frequency) using quadrature detection, with RC approximately 0.5 ms. However, an approximately 0.5-ms transient remains at initial time, which we reduce fourfold for a short time only, just before the A/D converter, by means of a variable-gain amplifier, and later restore with software. This modification can result in a nearly fourfold increase in dynamic range. When we converted to a frequency-shifted mode (A. G. Redfield and S. D. Kunz, 1994, J. Magn. Reson. A 108, 234-237) we replaced the RC high-pass filter with a quadrature feedback notch filter tuned to the solvent frequency (5.06 kHz). This filter is an example of a class of two-input/two-output filters which maintain the spectral integrity (image-free character) of quadrature signals. Digital filters of the same type are also considered briefly. We discuss the implications of these ideas for spectrometer input design, including schemes for elimination of radiation damping, and effects of probe bandwidth on extreme oversampling.

  13. Analog Filtering of Large Solvent Signals for Improved Dynamic Range in High-Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, A. G.; Kunz, S. D.

    1998-01-01

    The large solvent signal from samples in H2O solvent still challenges the dynamic range capability of any spectrometer. The solvent signal can be largely removed with a pair of simple resistor-capacitor (RC) high-pass filters when the solvent frequency is set at center band (zero frequency) using quadrature detection, withRC∼ 0.5 ms. However, an ∼0.5-ms transient remains at initial time, which we reduce fourfold for a short time only, just before the A/D converter, by means of a variable-gain amplifier, and later restore with software. This modification can result in a nearly fourfold increase in dynamic range. When we converted to a frequency-shifted mode (A. G. Redfield and S. D. Kunz, 1994,J. Magn. Reson. A108, 234-237) we replaced theRChigh-pass filter with a quadrature feedback notch filter tuned to the solvent frequency (5.06 kHz). This filter is an example of a class of two-input/two-output filters which maintain the spectral integrity (image-free character) of quadrature signals. Digital filters of the same type are also considered briefly. We discuss the implications of these ideas for spectrometer input design, including schemes for elimination of radiation damping, and effects of probe bandwidth on extreme oversampling.

  14. FPGA design and implementation of Gaussian filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhou, Gang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper , we choose four different variances of 1,3,6 and 12 to conduct FPGA design with three kinds of Gaussian filtering algorithm ,they are implementing Gaussian filter with a Gaussian filter template, Gaussian filter approximation with mean filtering and Gaussian filter approximation with IIR filtering. By waveform simulation and synthesis, we get the processing results on the experimental image and the consumption of FPGA resources of the three methods. We set the result of Gaussian filter used in matlab as standard to get the result error. By comparing the FPGA resources and the error of FPGA implementation methods, we get the best FPGA design to achieve a Gaussian filter. Conclusions can be drawn based on the results we have already got. When the variance is small, the FPGA resources is enough for the algorithm to implement Gaussian filter with a Gaussian filter template which is the best choice. But when the variance is so large that there is no more FPGA resources, we can chose the mean to approximate Gaussian filter with IIR filtering.

  15. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  16. Topology optimization of microwave waveguide filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aage, N.; Egede Johansen, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present a density based topology optimization approach for the design of metallic microwave insert filters. A two-phase optimization procedure is proposed in which we, starting from a uniform design, first optimize to obtain a set of spectral varying resonators followed by a band gap optimization for the desired filter characteristics. This is illustrated through numerical experiments and comparison to a standard band pass filter design. It is seen that the carefully optimized topologies can sharpen the filter characteristics and improve performance. Furthermore, the obtained designs share little resemblance to standard filter layouts and hence the proposed design method offers a new design tool in microwave engineering.

  17. Extended tradeoff parameters for composite correlation filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Daniel W.

    2005-03-01

    Composite correlation filters have been demonstrated in many automatic target recognition (ATR) applications because of their ability for class recognition and distortion-tolerance with shift invariance. Both the optimal tradeoff synthetic discriminant function (OTSDF) filters and optimal tradeoff distance classifier correlation filter (OTDCCF) approaches use parameters to combine multiple characteristics. Usually a set of filters is grouped into a bank for recognizing multiple targets across multiple geometric distortions. We extend these approaches to use independent tradeoff parameters in the filter synthesis for each class and grouping bin to improve classification. A method for determining the extended parameters is presented. Test results using the public SAR imagery MSTAR database are shown.

  18. Tunable birefringent filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Rosenberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the types and capabilities of birefringent filters. The general operating principles of Lyot (perfect polarizers), partial polarizing, and Solc (no internal polarizers) filters are introduced. Appropriate techniques for tuning each filter type are presented. Field of view of birefringent filters is discussed and is compared to Fabry-Perot and interference filters. The transmission and throughput advantages of birefringent filters are shown. Finally, the current state of the art in practical filters is reviewed.

  19. Structured filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granade, Christopher; Wiebe, Nathan

    2017-08-01

    A major challenge facing existing sequential Monte Carlo methods for parameter estimation in physics stems from the inability of existing approaches to robustly deal with experiments that have different mechanisms that yield the results with equivalent probability. We address this problem here by proposing a form of particle filtering that clusters the particles that comprise the sequential Monte Carlo approximation to the posterior before applying a resampler. Through a new graphical approach to thinking about such models, we are able to devise an artificial-intelligence based strategy that automatically learns the shape and number of the clusters in the support of the posterior. We demonstrate the power of our approach by applying it to randomized gap estimation and a form of low circuit-depth phase estimation where existing methods from the physics literature either exhibit much worse performance or even fail completely.

  20. Portable LED-induced autofluorescence imager with a probe of L shape for oral cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Wei; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Nai-Lun; Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The difference of spectral distribution between lesions of epithelial cells and normal cells after excited fluorescence is one of methods for the cancer diagnosis. In our previous work, we developed a portable LED Induced autofluorescence (LIAF) imager contained the multiple wavelength of LED excitation light and multiple filters to capture ex-vivo oral tissue autofluorescence images. Our portable system for detection of oral cancer has a probe in front of the lens for fixing the object distance. The shape of the probe is cone, and it is not convenient for doctor to capture the oral image under an appropriate view angle in front of the probe. Therefore, a probe of L shape containing a mirror is proposed for doctors to capture the images with the right angles, and the subjects do not need to open their mouse constrainedly. Besides, a glass plate is placed in probe to prevent the liquid entering in the body, but the light reflected from the glass plate directly causes the light spots inside the images. We set the glass plate in front of LED to avoiding the light spots. When the distance between the glasses plate and the LED model plane is less than the critical value, then we can prevent the light spots caused from the glasses plate. The experiments show that the image captured with the new probe that the glasses plate placed in the back-end of the probe has no light spots inside the image.

  1. Flow-through, viral co-infection assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Cretich, Marina; Torrisi, Marcello; Daminelli, Serena; Gagni, Paola; Plavisch, Lauren; Chiari, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a new and rapid immunofiltration assay for simultaneous detection of HIV p24 and hepatitis B virus antigens. The assay platform is composed of a 13 mm nitrocellulose filter spotted with capturing bioprobes and inserted in a Swinnex(®) syringe filter holder. Samples and reagents are flown through the nitrocellulose filter by manual pressure on the syringe. A colorimetric detection allows for naked eye results interpretation. The assay provides sensitivity in the picomolar range in just 5 min, even using low volumes of sample in complex matrix. Probe deposition by spotting allows for flexible combinations of different capturing agents and multiple diagnoses; furthermore, the very simple and inexpensive set-up makes the syringe-based immunoassay on paper microarray a suitable diagnostic system for resource-limited settings.

  2. Nanophotonic filters for digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Kirsty

    There has been an increasing demand for low cost, portable CMOS image sensors because of increased integration, and new applications in the automotive, mobile communication and medical industries, amongst others. Colour reproduction remains imperfect in conventional digital image sensors, due to the limitations of the dye-based filters. Further improvement is required if the full potential of digital imaging is to be realised. In alternative systems, where accurate colour reproduction is a priority, existing equipment is too bulky for anything but specialist use. In this work both these issues are addressed by exploiting nanophotonic techniques to create enhanced trichromatic filters, and multispectral filters, all of which can be fabricated on-chip, i.e. integrated into a conventional digital image sensor, to create compact, low cost, mass produceable imaging systems with accurate colour reproduction. The trichromatic filters are based on plasmonic structures. They exploit the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in arrays of subwavelength holes in metal films to filter light. The currently-known analytical expressions are inadequate for optimising all relevant parameters of a plasmonic structure. In order to obtain arbitrary filter characteristics, an automated design procedure was developed that integrated a genetic algorithm and 3D finite-difference time-domain tool. The optimisation procedure's efficacy is demonstrated by designing a set of plasmonic filters that replicate the CIE (1931) colour matching functions, which themselves mimic the human eye's daytime colour response.

  3. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  4. Filter selection based on light source for multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Xu, Haisong

    2016-07-01

    In multispectral imaging, it is necessary to select a reduced number of filters to balance the imaging efficiency and spectral reflectance recovery accuracy. Due to the combined effect of filters and light source on reflectance recovery, the optimal filters are influenced by the employed light source in the multispectral imaging system. By casting the filter selection as an optimization issue, the selection of optimal filters corresponding to the employed light source proceeds with respect to a set of target samples utilizing one kind of genetic algorithms, regardless of the detailed spectral characteristics of the light source, filters, and sensor. Under three light sources with distinct spectral power distributions, the proposed filter selection method was evaluated on a filter-wheel based multispectral device with a set of interference filters. It was verified that the filters derived by the proposed method achieve better spectral and colorimetric accuracy of reflectance recovery than the conventional one under different light sources.

  5. Filtering Applications on Seismogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.

    2004-12-01

    Useful data extraction from registered signals is an everyday problem. Seismogram filtering can be used to enhance the earthquake signal, especially, knowing that period range is strongly amplified by the seismograph itself. The goal of this project was to estimate tradeoffs between noise reduction and the sharpness of the filtered earthquake signal. The different filter bands were applied on the seismograms from different epicentral distances, including both local and regional earthquakes, in order to see the quality of the data. During the seismogram analysis we had two approaches: reading the wave phase (arrival time, amplitude, period) and spectral analysis, since frequency filtering is essential. The well-known set of Fourier orthogonal basis functions was used for spectral analysis. The main purpose of filtering was to remove the noise from the seismograms and to get as much possible information from the record. Practical application was obtained using custom made "Analysis" software. We processed 5 earthquake signals; four local and one distant earthquake. The data came from Djerdap Seismological Station, Serbia. Filtering was based on a band-pass filter with frequency cut-offs from 0.2Hz to 10Hz. Every record was filtered with five filters (10-1Hz,10-2.5Hz, 2.5-1Hz, 1-0.2Hz). The manipulation with different filter bands allowed us to define precisely the beginning of the earthquakes and first arrivals of different wave phases. The best result for the 45km epicentral distance earthquake was obtained using window 0.1-0.5sec, where very clear Pg and Sg arrivals could be distinguished. The distant earthquake showed the advantages of filtering seismograms to enhance the long period energy. The lowest frequency band-pass filter (1-0.2Hz) was the most successful. The results of the experiment were with very clear Pg and Sg arrivals when the right bands were used for filtering. This improved the quality of the original signals by emphasizing the temporal and

  6. UV filters for lighting of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Doehring, T.; Koefferlein, M.; Thiel, S.; Seidlitz, H.K.; Payer, H.D.

    1994-12-31

    Different filter glasses are available which provide absorption properties suitable for gradual changes of the spectral UV-B illumination of artificial lighting. Using a distinct set of lamps and filter glasses an acceptable simulation of the UV-B part of natural global radiation can be achieved. The ageing of these and other filter materials under the extreme UV radiation in the lamphouse of a solar simulator is presently unavoidable. This instability can be dealt with only by a precise spectral monitoring and by replacing the filters accordingly. For this reason attempts would be useful to develop real ozone filters which can replace glass filters. In any case chamber experiments require a careful selection of the filter material used and must be accompanied by a continuous UV-B monitoring.

  7. An RC active filter design handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    The design of filters is described. Emphasis is placed on simplified procedures that can be used by the reader who has minimum knowledge about circuit design and little acquaintance with filter theory. The handbook has three main parts. The first part is a review of some information that is essential for work with filters. The second part includes design information for specific types of filter circuitry and describes simple procedures for obtaining the component values for a filter that will have a desired set of characteristics. Pertinent information relating to actual performance is given. The third part (appendix) is a review of certain topics in filter theory and is intended to provide some basic understanding of how filters are designed.

  8. Development of birefringent filters for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Pope, T. P.; Ramsey, H. E.; Schoolman, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    The critical problem for flight of a birefringent filter is the shock mounting of the calcite. The design presented here bonds the calcite block with silicon rubbers to the calcite holder. The calcite together with its all necessary polarizers and rotating achromatic plates are mounted together in units called a filter module. By using a set of modules containing calcite crystals of differing lengths, a filter can be produced. A description of the modules is given. Also described is a container for the filter modules, which can be used both to hermetically seal the system or contain an index matching oil. The response of a filter element while being controlled by the Lockheed Temperature Control is described and the determination of the wavelength sensitivity to temperature of calcite is explained. Operation of the filter using a software control algorithm instead of a hardware temperature controller is shown. Some radiation considerations of filter systems are given.

  9. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  10. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  11. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, Hakon; Law, Kody J. H.; Tempone, Raul

    2016-06-14

    This study embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the setting of finite dimensional signal evolution and noisy discrete-time observations. The signal dynamics is assumed to be governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE), and a hierarchy of time grids is introduced for multilevel numerical integration of that SDE. Finally, the resulting multilevel EnKF is proved to asymptotically outperform EnKF in terms of computational cost versus approximation accuracy. The theoretical results are illustrated numerically.

  12. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    DOE PAGES

    Hoel, Hakon; Law, Kody J. H.; Tempone, Raul

    2016-06-14

    This study embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the setting of finite dimensional signal evolution and noisy discrete-time observations. The signal dynamics is assumed to be governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE), and a hierarchy of time grids is introduced for multilevel numerical integration of that SDE. Finally, the resulting multilevel EnKF is proved to asymptotically outperform EnKF in terms of computational cost versus approximation accuracy. The theoretical results are illustrated numerically.

  13. Electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  14. Volume reconstruction of freehand three-dimensional ultrasound using median filters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2008-07-01

    This paper aims to apply median filters for reducing interpolation error and improving the quality of 3D images in a freehand 3D ultrasound (US) system. Freehand 3D US imaging has been playing an important role in obtaining the entire 3D impression of tissues and organs. Reconstructing a sequence of irregularly located 2D US images (B-scans) into a 3D data set is one of the key procedures for visualization and data analysis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using median filters for the reconstruction of 3D images in a freehand 3D US system. The B-scans were collected using a 7.5 MHz ultrasound probe. Four algorithms including the standard median (SM), Gaussian weighted median (GWM) and two types of distance-weighted median (DWM) filters were proposed to filter noises and compute voxel intensities. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons were made among the results of different methods based on the image set captured in freehand from the forearm of a healthy subject. A leave-one-out approach was used to demonstrate the performance of the median filters for predicting the removed B-scan pixels. Compared with the voxel nearest-neighbourhood (VNN) and distance-weighted (DW) interpolation methods, the four median filters reduced the interpolation error by 8.0-24.0% and 1.2-21.8%, respectively, when 1/4 to 5 B-scans was removed from the raw B-scan sequence. In summary, the median filters can improve the quality of volume reconstruction by reducing the interpolation errors and facilitate the following image analyses in clinical applications.

  15. Local fringe density determination by adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; Quiroga, J Antonio; Belenguer, T

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to easily and quickly determine the local fringe density map of a fringe pattern. The method is based on an isotropic adaptive bandpass filter that is tuned at different frequencies. The modulation map after applying a specific bandpass frequencies filter presents a maximum response in the regions where the bandpass filter and fringe frequencies coincide. We show a set of simulations and experimental results that prove the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, BANDPASS FILTERS, TUNED CIRCUITS, NETWORKS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , LOW PASS FILTERS, MULTIPLEXING, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, WAVEGUIDE FILTERS, WAVEGUIDE COUPLERS.

  17. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  18. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  19. Concrete ensemble Kalman filters with rigorous catastrophic filter divergence.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David; Majda, Andrew J; Tong, Xin T

    2015-08-25

    The ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble square root filters are data assimilation methods used to combine high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamical models with observed data. Ensemble methods are indispensable tools in science and engineering and have enjoyed great success in geophysical sciences, because they allow for computationally cheap low-ensemble-state approximation for extremely high-dimensional turbulent forecast models. From a theoretical perspective, the dynamical properties of these methods are poorly understood. One of the central mysteries is the numerical phenomenon known as catastrophic filter divergence, whereby ensemble-state estimates explode to machine infinity, despite the true state remaining in a bounded region. In this article we provide a breakthrough insight into the phenomenon, by introducing a simple and natural forecast model that transparently exhibits catastrophic filter divergence under all ensemble methods and a large set of initializations. For this model, catastrophic filter divergence is not an artifact of numerical instability, but rather a true dynamical property of the filter. The divergence is not only validated numerically but also proven rigorously. The model cleanly illustrates mechanisms that give rise to catastrophic divergence and confirms intuitive accounts of the phenomena given in past literature.

  20. Concrete ensemble Kalman filters with rigorous catastrophic filter divergence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, David; Majda, Andrew J.; Tong, Xin T.

    2015-01-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble square root filters are data assimilation methods used to combine high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamical models with observed data. Ensemble methods are indispensable tools in science and engineering and have enjoyed great success in geophysical sciences, because they allow for computationally cheap low-ensemble-state approximation for extremely high-dimensional turbulent forecast models. From a theoretical perspective, the dynamical properties of these methods are poorly understood. One of the central mysteries is the numerical phenomenon known as catastrophic filter divergence, whereby ensemble-state estimates explode to machine infinity, despite the true state remaining in a bounded region. In this article we provide a breakthrough insight into the phenomenon, by introducing a simple and natural forecast model that transparently exhibits catastrophic filter divergence under all ensemble methods and a large set of initializations. For this model, catastrophic filter divergence is not an artifact of numerical instability, but rather a true dynamical property of the filter. The divergence is not only validated numerically but also proven rigorously. The model cleanly illustrates mechanisms that give rise to catastrophic divergence and confirms intuitive accounts of the phenomena given in past literature. PMID:26261335

  1. A P-band SAR interference filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Victor B.

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interference filter is an adaptive filter designed to reduce the effects of interference while minimizing the introduction of undesirable side effects. The author examines the adaptive spectral filter and the improvement in processed SAR imagery using this filter for Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) data. The quality of these improvements is determined through several data fidelity criteria, such as point-target impulse response, equivalent number of looks, SNR, and polarization signatures. These parameters are used to characterize two data sets, both before and after filtering. The first data set consists of data with the interference present in the original signal, and the second set consists of clean data which has been coherently injected with interference acquired from another scene.

  2. Nonsingular Attitude Filtering Using Modified Rodrigues Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2009-10-01

    A method to estimate the general rigid body attitude using a minimal modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP) coordinate set is presented. The singularity avoidance technique is based on the stereographic projection properties of the MRP set, and makes use of a simple mapping relationship between MRP representations. Previous work has used the MRP duality to avoid singular attitude descriptions but has ignored the associated covariance transformation. This article presents a mapping to transform the state covariance matrix between these two representations as the attitude description is mapped between the two possible MRP sets. Second-order covariance transformations suitable for divided difference filtering are also provided. The MRP filter formulation based on extended Kalman filtering and divided difference filtering is compared with a standard multiplicative quaternion Kalman filter in an example problem.

  3. Nonlinear image filtering within IDP++

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S.K.; Wieting, M.G.; Brase, J.M.

    1995-02-09

    IDP++, image and data processing in C++, is a set of a signal processing libraries written in C++. It is a multi-dimension (up to four dimensions), multi-data type (implemented through templates) signal processing extension to C++. IDP++ takes advantage of the object-oriented compiler technology to provide ``information hiding.`` Users need only know C, not C++. Signals or data sets are treated like any other variable with a defined set of operators and functions. We here some examples of the nonlinear filter library within IDP++. Specifically, the results of MIN, MAX median, {alpha}-trimmed mean, and edge-trimmed mean filters as applied to a real aperture radar (RR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data set.

  4. Design of dissipative linear phase filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phares, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Set of design curves eliminates work involved in designing linear phase filters by being normalized in such a way as to apply to low, band, and high-pass filters of any bandwidth. Similar curves for any number of poles are plotted by solving a system of simultaneous equations.

  5. Two-frame algorithm to design quadrature filters in phase shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mosiño, J F; Gutiérrez-García, J C; Gutiérrez-García, T A; Macías-Preza, J M

    2010-11-22

    The main purpose of this paper is to present a method to design tunable quadrature filters in phase shifting interferometry. From a general tunable two-frame algorithm introduced, a set of individual filters corresponding to each quadrature conditions of the filter is obtained. Then, through a convolution algorithm of this set of filters the desired symmetric quadrature filter is recovered. Finally, the method is applied to obtain several tunable filters, like four and five-frame algorithms.

  6. Particle Filter with Nudging in Soil Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, D.; Bauser, H. H.; Roth, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is widely employed in soil hydrology but is challenged by the characteristics of the processes there. These are highly nonlinear and state variables occasionally show sharp fronts and discontinuities across layer boundaries. This leads to sometimes strongly non-gaussian probability distributions, which is at odds with the EnFK's basic assumption. Therefore, we explore particle filters, which are able to handle such situations. However, standard particle filters with resampling suffer from the curse of dimensionality. They are thus not applicable to high-dimensional systems as they are encountered with soil water dynamics. A particle filter that may be able to lift this curse was proposed by van Leeuwen (2010). He introduced a nudging term based on the freedom of the proposal density. This particle filter has been applied in oceanography and showed promising results. While oceanography focuses on state estimation, soil hydrology in addition aims at parameter estimation. Therefore, we test the applicability of this filter for a one-dimensional test case, where we estimate states and parameters simultaneously. We generate synthetic data that correspond to water content measurements as they would be available from time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes. The results are compared with the true parameters and water contents. Finally, the performance of this filter (with different nudging terms) is compared with an EnKF and a particle filter without nudging.

  7. Evaluation of a morphological filter in mean cardiac output determination: application to left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael Charles; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Mason, David Glen

    2013-08-01

    A morphological filter (MF) is presented for the determination of beat-to-beat mean rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) flow rate, measured using an implanted flow probe. The performance of this non-linear filter was assessed using LVAD flow rate (QLVAD) data sets obtained from in silico and in vivo sources. The MF was compared with a third-order Butterworth filter (BWF) and a 10-s moving average filter (MAF). Performance was assessed by calculating the response time and steady state error across a range of heart rates and levels of noise. The response time of the MF was 3.5 times faster than the MAF, 0.5 s slower than the BWF, and had a steady state error of 2.61 %. It completely removed pulsatile signal components caused by residual ventricular function, and tracked sharp transient changes in QLVAD better than the BWF. The use of a two-stage MF improved the noise immunity compared to the single-stage MF. This study showed that the good performance characteristics of the non-linear MF make it a more suitable candidate for embedded real-time processing of QLVAD than linear filters.

  8. Digital filter design for radar image formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John W.; Nelson, Jeffrey E.; Banh, N. D.; Moncada, John J.; Bayma, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Novel weighted-least-squares approaches to the design of digital filters for SAR applications are presented. The filters belong to three different categories according to their combinations of minimax passband, least-squares stopband, minimax stopband, and maximally-flat passband. For real-time applications, it is important to design the sets of digital filter coefficient tables in an offline environment; the appropriate precomputed filter is then selected for each SAR signal-processing function, as a function of both mode and mapping geometry during real-time processing.

  9. Solc filters in a reflective geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaadi, Abdelghafour; Vargas, Asticio; Sánchez-López, María M.; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Kula, Przemysław; Bennis, Noureddine; Moreno, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    We present the realization of a bulk optics birefringent Solc filter in a reflective geometry. This geometry reduces by half the number of required retarders, ensures the same spectral retardance function in pairs of retarders, and helps to make more compact filters. The key element is a quarter-wave Fresnel rhomb located in between the set of retarders and a mirror. Two cases are considered: the first Solc filter uses multiple-order quartz retarders, and the second one uses two liquid-crystal retarders. The latter has the advantage of being tunable via an applied voltage. Experimental results show how to filter the spectral content of a supercontinuum laser.

  10. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  11. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  12. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  13. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  14. Secondary air filter assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ortonville, A.J.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes a filter cartridge assembly used for filtering air of a crankcase ventilating system of an internal combustion engine. It comprises: first (108) and second (110) air permeable filter platforms; vertical support columns; leg members; and a filter retainer.

  15. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  16. CHAMP - Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, G. S.; Beegle, L. W.; Boynton, J.; Sepulveda, C. A.; Balzer, M. A.; Sobel, H. R.; Fisher, T. A.; Deans, M.; Lee, P.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe) is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As an arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo-imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision range-finding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. Currently designed with a filter wheel with 4 different filters, so that color and black and white images can be obtained over the entire Field-of-View, future designs will increase the number of filter positions to include 8 different filters. Finally, CHAMP incorporates controlled white and UV illumination so that images can be obtained regardless of sun position, and any potential fluorescent species can be identified so the most astrobiologically interesting samples can be identified.

  17. Spectral Filter Array for Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chuan

    Conventional multispectral imaging (MSI) is achieved by utilizing a spectral filter array -- a set of predetermined narrowband spectral filters spatially multiplexed over an array of pixel sensors, which necessitates different filters to be designed for each application. In this dissertation, we propose a fundamentally different approach to multispectral imaging known as the Fourier Multispectral Imaging (Fourier MSI). The proposed method utilizes broadband multichroic filters with sinusoidally varying transmittance as a function of wavenumber. Unlike narrowband measurements, these sinusoidal filter measurements largely avoid aliasing that contaminates the spectra while undersampling with narrowband filters. Because of this, Fourier MSI provides a better recovery from discrete filter measurements and preserves the spectra features over the entire detecting wavelength range. We designed and fabricated these sinusoidal filters in both bulk and pixel formats, built up multispectral imaging system with the manufactured filters and made spectral imaging measurements with numerous targets like multispectral LED array, color checker, etc. The measurements show that spectral features such as reflection and absorption peaks are well preserved with this technique. Compared to multispectral systems based on narrowband filters, the Fourier MSI system generalizes well to applications where we lack a priori knowledge of the expected spectral content, which makes it a versatile technique for a wide range of multispectral imaging applications.

  18. Evaluation of the Quadrox-I neonatal oxygenator with an integrated arterial filter.

    PubMed

    Salavitabar, Arash; Qiu, Feng; Kunselman, Allen; Ündar, Akif

    2010-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can be a potential cause of morbidity in patients for several reasons, including significantly higher gaseous microemboli (GME) formation than extracorporeal life support (ECLS) and physiological circulation, diverted blood flow from the patient via an open purge line of the arterial filter, and pressure drop across the oxygenator that is used in the circuit. Using a combined oxygenator and arterial filter may minimize these harmful factors and can effectively reduce the chances for postoperative morbidity. This study investigated the new QUADROX-i Neonatal Oxygenator (D-72145, Maquet, Hirrlingen, Germany) with an integrated arterial filter in terms of the hemodynamic properties and ability to clear GME in response to hypothermic versus normothermic conditions, open versus closed arterial filter purge line, and varying flow rates in a simulated CPB circuit identical to that of the clinical setting. A flow probe, pressure transducer, and Emboli Detection and Classification (EDAC) quantifier transducer were placed upstream and downstream to the oxygenator to measure changes in each parameter. The circuit was primed with fresh human blood with an hematocrit (Hct) of 26% diluted with Ringer's lactate solution. Five milliliters of air were injected proximal to the venous cardiotomy reservoir, under non-pulsatile perfusion, with flow rates of 500 ml/min, 750 ml/min, and 1000 ml/min. A total of 8 air bolus injections were made at each individual set of conditions for a total of 96 injections. Results showed that the QUADROX-i Neonatal Oxygenator with an integrated filter has excellent hemodynamic properties with extremely low pressure drops and blood flow diverted from the patient, as well as high rates of GME capturing. The arterial filter purge line has a significant effect on the degree of blood flow diverted from the patient (p < 0.001), but does not affect pressure drop across the oxygenator.

  19. Finessing filter scarcity problem in face recognition via multi-fold filter convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Cheng-Yaw; Teoh, Andrew Beng-Jin

    2017-06-01

    The deep convolutional neural networks for face recognition, from DeepFace to the recent FaceNet, demand a sufficiently large volume of filters for feature extraction, in addition to being deep. The shallow filter-bank approaches, e.g., principal component analysis network (PCANet), binarized statistical image features (BSIF), and other analogous variants, endure the filter scarcity problem that not all PCA and ICA filters available are discriminative to abstract noise-free features. This paper extends our previous work on multi-fold filter convolution (ℳ-FFC), where the pre-learned PCA and ICA filter sets are exponentially diversified by ℳ folds to instantiate PCA, ICA, and PCA-ICA offspring. The experimental results unveil that the 2-FFC operation solves the filter scarcity state. The 2-FFC descriptors are also evidenced to be superior to that of PCANet, BSIF, and other face descriptors, in terms of rank-1 identification rate (%).

  20. Matching pursuit filters applied to face identification.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P J

    1998-01-01

    We present a face identification algorithm that automatically processes an unknown image by locating and identifying the face. The heart of the algorithm is the use of pursuit filters. A matching pursuit filter is an adapted wavelet expansion, where the expansion is adapted to both the data and the pattern recognition problem being addressed. For identification, the filters find the features that differentiate among faces, whereas, for detection, the filters encode the similarities among faces. The filters are designed though a simultaneous decomposition of a training set into a two-dimensional (2-D) wavelet expansion. This yields a representation that is explicitly 2-D and encodes information locally. The algorithm uses coarse to fine processing to locate a small set of key facial features, which are restricted to the nose and eye regions of the Face. The result is an algorithm that is robust to variations in facial expression, hair style, and the surrounding environment. Based on the locations of the facial features, the identification module searches the data base for the identity of the unknown face using matching pursuit filters to make the identification. The algorithm was demonstrated on three sets of images. The first set was images from the FERET data base. The second set was infrared and visible images of the same people. This demonstration was done to compare performance on infrared and visible images individually, and on fusing the results from both modalities. The third set was mugshot data from a law enforcement application.

  1. ARRANGEMENT FOR REPLACING FILTERS

    DOEpatents

    Blomgren, R.A.; Bohlin, N.J.C.

    1957-08-27

    An improved filtered air exhaust system which may be continually operated during the replacement of the filters without the escape of unfiltered air is described. This is accomplished by hermetically sealing the box like filter containers in a rectangular tunnel with neoprene covered sponge rubber sealing rings coated with a silicone impregnated pneumatic grease. The tunnel through which the filters are pushed is normal to the exhaust air duct. A number of unused filters are in line behind the filters in use, and are moved by a hydraulic ram so that a fresh filter is positioned in the air duct. The used filter is pushed into a waiting receptacle and is suitably disposed. This device permits a rapid and safe replacement of a radiation contaminated filter without interruption to the normal flow of exhaust air.

  2. Method of securing filter elements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Erik P.; Haslam, Jeffery L.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-10-04

    A filter securing system including a filter unit body housing; at least one tubular filter element positioned in the filter unit body housing, the tubular filter element having a closed top and an open bottom; a dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element; and a socket in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element that receives the dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element to secure the tubular filter element to the filter unit body housing.

  3. Optical add/drop filter for wavelength division multiplexed systems

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Strand, Oliver T.; Garrett, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    An optical add/drop filter for wavelength division multiplexed systems and construction methods are disclosed. The add/drop filter includes a first ferrule having a first pre-formed opening for receiving a first optical fiber; an interference filter oriented to pass a first set of wavelengths along the first optical fiber and reflect a second set of wavelengths; and, a second ferrule having a second pre-formed opening for receiving the second optical fiber, and the reflected second set of wavelengths. A method for constructing the optical add/drop filter consists of the steps of forming a first set of openings in a first ferrule; inserting a first set of optical fibers into the first set of openings; forming a first set of guide pin openings in the first ferrule; dividing the first ferrule into a first ferrule portion and a second ferrule portion; forming an interference filter on the first ferrule portion; inserting guide pins through the first set of guide pin openings in the first ferrule portion and second ferrule portion to passively align the first set of optical fibers; removing material such that light reflected from the interference filter from the first set of optical fibers is accessible; forming a second set of openings in a second ferrule; inserting a second set of optical fibers into the second set of openings; and positioning the second ferrule with respect to the first ferrule such that the second set of optical fibers receive the light reflected from the interference filter.

  4. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-13

    In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to remove the soft shipping cover from the Gravity Probe B experiment. Immediate processing includes setting up mechanical and electrical ground support equipment, making necessary connections and conditioning the spacecraft battery. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-11

    Workers in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base get ready to begin processing the Gravity Probe B experiment, including setting up mechanical and electrical ground support equipment, making necessary connections and conditioning the spacecraft battery. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  6. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-11

    Workers in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base get ready to begin processing the Gravity Probe B experiment. Mechanical and electrical ground support equipment will be set up and necessary connections made with the spacecraft. Spacecraft battery conditioning will also begin. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  8. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, H.S.; Thompson, R.C.; Hubbard, C.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1997-03-25

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, where after the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant. 5 figs.

  9. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, Harry S.; Thompson, Robert C.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Perkins, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, whereafter the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant.

  10. Generalized Hampel Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ronald K.; Neuvo, Yrjö; Astola, Jaakko; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2016-12-01

    The standard median filter based on a symmetric moving window has only one tuning parameter: the window width. Despite this limitation, this filter has proven extremely useful and has motivated a number of extensions: weighted median filters, recursive median filters, and various cascade structures. The Hampel filter is a member of the class of decsion filters that replaces the central value in the data window with the median if it lies far enough from the median to be deemed an outlier. This filter depends on both the window width and an additional tuning parameter t, reducing to the median filter when t=0, so it may be regarded as another median filter extension. This paper adopts this view, defining and exploring the class of generalized Hampel filters obtained by applying the median filter extensions listed above: weighted Hampel filters, recursive Hampel filters, and their cascades. An important concept introduced here is that of an implosion sequence, a signal for which generalized Hampel filter performance is independent of the threshold parameter t. These sequences are important because the added flexibility of the generalized Hampel filters offers no practical advantage for implosion sequences. Partial characterization results are presented for these sequences, as are useful relationships between root sequences for generalized Hampel filters and their median-based counterparts. To illustrate the performance of this filter class, two examples are considered: one is simulation-based, providing a basis for quantitative evaluation of signal recovery performance as a function of t, while the other is a sequence of monthly Italian industrial production index values that exhibits glaring outliers.

  11. UpSet: Visualization of Intersecting Sets

    PubMed Central

    Lex, Alexander; Gehlenborg, Nils; Strobelt, Hendrik; Vuillemot, Romain; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Understanding relationships between sets is an important analysis task that has received widespread attention in the visualization community. The major challenge in this context is the combinatorial explosion of the number of set intersections if the number of sets exceeds a trivial threshold. In this paper we introduce UpSet, a novel visualization technique for the quantitative analysis of sets, their intersections, and aggregates of intersections. UpSet is focused on creating task-driven aggregates, communicating the size and properties of aggregates and intersections, and a duality between the visualization of the elements in a dataset and their set membership. UpSet visualizes set intersections in a matrix layout and introduces aggregates based on groupings and queries. The matrix layout enables the effective representation of associated data, such as the number of elements in the aggregates and intersections, as well as additional summary statistics derived from subset or element attributes. Sorting according to various measures enables a task-driven analysis of relevant intersections and aggregates. The elements represented in the sets and their associated attributes are visualized in a separate view. Queries based on containment in specific intersections, aggregates or driven by attribute filters are propagated between both views. We also introduce several advanced visual encodings and interaction methods to overcome the problems of varying scales and to address scalability. UpSet is web-based and open source. We demonstrate its general utility in multiple use cases from various domains. PMID:26356912

  12. Counting digital filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S.

    1977-01-01

    Overall design of filter combines radix converter with ADC in single functional unit that directly converts analog input to its negative binary representation. Four basic elements of filter are fixed register, shift register, counter, and accumulator.

  13. Bag filters for TPP

    SciTech Connect

    L.V. Chekalov; Yu.I. Gromov; V.V. Chekalov

    2007-05-15

    Cleaning of TPP flue gases with bag filters capable of pulsed regeneration is examined. A new filtering element with a three-dimensional filtering material formed from a needle-broached cloth in which the filtration area, as compared with a conventional smooth bag, is increased by more than two times, is proposed. The design of a new FRMI type of modular filter is also proposed. A standard series of FRMI filters with a filtration area ranging from 800 to 16,000 m{sup 2} is designed for an output more than 1 million m{sub 3}/h of with respect to cleaned gas. The new bag filter permits dry collection of sulfur oxides from waste gases at TPP operating on high-sulfur coals. The design of the filter makes it possible to replace filter elements without taking the entire unit out of service.

  14. Novel Backup Filter Device for Candle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R.; Dunham, G.; Henderson, A.

    2002-09-18

    The currently preferred means of particulate removal from process or combustion gas generated by advanced coal-based power production processes is filtration with candle filters. However, candle filters have not shown the requisite reliability to be commercially viable for hot gas clean up for either integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) or pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) processes. Even a single candle failure can lead to unacceptable ash breakthrough, which can result in (a) damage to highly sensitive and expensive downstream equipment, (b) unacceptably low system on-stream factor, and (c) unplanned outages. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need to have fail-safe devices installed within or downstream from candle filters. In addition to CeraMem, DOE has contracted with Siemens-Westinghouse, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, and the Southern Research Institute (SRI) to develop novel fail-safe devices. Siemens-Westinghouse is evaluating honeycomb-based filter devices on the clean-side of the candle filter that can operate up to 870 C. The EERC is developing a highly porous ceramic disk with a sticky yet temperature-stable coating that will trap dust in the event of filter failure. SRI is developing the Full-Flow Mechanical Safeguard Device that provides a positive seal for the candle filter. Operation of the SRI device is triggered by the higher-than-normal gas flow from a broken candle. The CeraMem approach is similar to that of Siemens-Westinghouse and involves the development of honeycomb-based filters that operate on the clean-side of a candle filter. The overall objective of this project is to fabricate and test silicon carbide-based honeycomb failsafe filters for protection of downstream equipment in advanced coal conversion processes. The fail-safe filter, installed directly downstream of a candle filter, should have the capability for stopping essentially all particulate

  15. MST Filterability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Burket, P. R.; Duignan, M. R.

    2015-03-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The low filter flux through the ARP has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Recent filter flux has averaged approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Salt Batch 6 has had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. In addition, at the time the testing started, SRR was assessing the impact of replacing the 0.1 micron filter with a 0.5 micron filter. This report describes testing of MST filterability to investigate the impact of filter pore size and MST particle size on filter flux and testing of filter enhancers to attempt to increase filter flux. The authors constructed a laboratory-scale crossflow filter apparatus with two crossflow filters operating in parallel. One filter was a 0.1 micron Mott sintered SS filter and the other was a 0.5 micron Mott sintered SS filter. The authors also constructed a dead-end filtration apparatus to conduct screening tests with potential filter aids and body feeds, referred to as filter enhancers. The original baseline for ARP was 5.6 M sodium salt solution with a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 1.7 M.3 ARP has been operating with a sodium concentration of approximately 6.4 M and a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 2.5 M. SRNL conducted tests varying the concentration of sodium and free hydroxide to determine whether those changes had a significant effect on filter flux. The feed slurries for the MST filterability tests were composed of simple salts (NaOH, NaNO2, and NaNO3) and MST (0.2 – 4.8 g/L). The feed slurry for the filter enhancer tests contained simulated salt batch 6 supernate, MST, and filter enhancers.

  16. Change Detection via Selective Guided Contrasting Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Rubis, A. Y.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Change detection scheme based on guided contrasting was previously proposed. Guided contrasting filter takes two images (test and sample) as input and forms the output as filtered version of test image. Such filter preserves the similar details and smooths the non-similar details of test image with respect to sample image. Due to this the difference between test image and its filtered version (difference map) could be a basis for robust change detection. Guided contrasting is performed in two steps: at the first step some smoothing operator (SO) is applied for elimination of test image details; at the second step all matched details are restored with local contrast proportional to the value of some local similarity coefficient (LSC). The guided contrasting filter was proposed based on local average smoothing as SO and local linear correlation as LSC. In this paper we propose and implement new set of selective guided contrasting filters based on different combinations of various SO and thresholded LSC. Linear average and Gaussian smoothing, nonlinear median filtering, morphological opening and closing are considered as SO. Local linear correlation coefficient, morphological correlation coefficient (MCC), mutual information, mean square MCC and geometrical correlation coefficients are applied as LSC. Thresholding of LSC allows operating with non-normalized LSC and enhancing the selective properties of guided contrasting filters: details are either totally recovered or not recovered at all after the smoothing. These different guided contrasting filters are tested as a part of previously proposed change detection pipeline, which contains following stages: guided contrasting filtering on image pyramid, calculation of difference map, binarization, extraction of change proposals and testing change proposals using local MCC. Experiments on real and simulated image bases demonstrate the applicability of all proposed selective guided contrasting filters. All implemented

  17. Survey of digital filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, H. T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A three part survey is made of the state-of-the-art in digital filtering. Part one presents background material including sampled data transformations and the discrete Fourier transform. Part two, digital filter theory, gives an in-depth coverage of filter categories, transfer function synthesis, quantization and other nonlinear errors, filter structures and computer aided design. Part three presents hardware mechanization techniques. Implementations by general purpose, mini-, and special-purpose computers are presented.

  18. Multiple-measurement beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Grant, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Particle accelerators are becoming smaller and are producing more intense beams; therefore, it is critical that beam-diagnostic instrumentation provide accelerator operators and automated control systems with a complete set of beam information. Traditionally, these beam data were collected and processed using limited-bandwidth interceptive techniques. For the new-generation accelerators, we are developing a multiple-measurement microstrip probe to obtain broadband beam data from inside a drift tube without perturbing the beam. The cylindrical probe's dimensions are 6-cm OD by 1.0 m long, and the probe is mounted inside a drift tube. The probe (and its associated electronics) monitors bunched-beam current, energy, and transverse position by sensing the beam's electromagnetic fields through the annular opening in the drift tube. The electrical impedance is tightly controlled through the full length of the probe and transmission lines to maintain beam-induced signal fidelity. The probe's small, cylindrical structure is matched to beam-bunch characteristics at specific beamline locations so that signal-to-noise ratios are optimized. Surrounding the probe, a mechanical structure attaches to the drift-tube interior and the quadrupole magnets; thus, the entire assembly's mechanical and electrical centers can be aligned and calibrated with respect to the rest of the linac.

  19. Filtering by nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Campos Cantón, E; González Salas, J S; Urías, J

    2008-12-01

    Synchronization of nonlinear systems forced by external signals is formalized as the response of a nonlinear filter. Sufficient conditions for a nonlinear system to behave as a filter are given. Some examples of generalized chaos synchronization are shown to actually be special cases of nonlinear filtering.

  20. Practical Active Capacitor Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described that filters an electrical signal. The filtering uses a capacitor multiplier circuit where the capacitor multiplier circuit uses at least one amplifier circuit and at least one capacitor. A filtered electrical signal results from a direct connection from an output of the at least one amplifier circuit.

  1. Filter service system

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Cheryl L.; Nordyke, Daniel S.; Crandell, Richard A.; Tomlins, Gregory; Fei, Dong; Panov, Alexander; Lane, William H.; Habeger, Craig F.

    2008-12-09

    According to an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure, a system for removing matter from a filtering device includes a gas pressurization assembly. An element of the assembly is removably attachable to a first orifice of the filtering device. The system also includes a vacuum source fluidly connected to a second orifice of the filtering device.

  2. The Ribosome Filter Redux

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Vincent P.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  3. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  4. Near-field hyperspectral quantum probing of multimodal plasmonic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuche, A.; Berthel, M.; Kumar, U.; Colas des Francs, G.; Huant, S.; Dujardin, E.; Girard, C.; Drezet, A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum systems, excited by an external source of photons, display a photodynamics that is ruled by a subtle balance between radiative or nonradiative energy channels when interacting with metallic nanostructures. We apply and generalize this concept to achieve a quantum probing of multimodal plasmonic resonators by collecting and filtering the broad emission spectra generated by a nanodiamond (ND) hosting a small set of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers attached at the apex of an optical tip. Spatially and spectrally resolved information on the photonic local density of states (ph-LDOS) can be recorded with this technique in the immediate vicinity of plasmonic resonators, paving the way for a complete near-field optical characterization of any kind of nanoresonators in the single photon regime.

  5. Image Filtering Driven by Level Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, Ajit; Banerjee, Arunava; Rangarajan, Anand

    This paper presents an approach to image filtering that is driven by the properties of the iso-valued level curves of the image and their relationship with one another. We explore the relationship of our algorithm to existing probabilistically driven filtering methods such as those based on kernel density estimation, local-mode finding and mean-shift. Extensive experimental results on filtering gray-scale images, color images, gray-scale video and chromaticity fields are presented. In contrast to existing probabilistic methods, in our approach, the selection of the parameter that prevents diffusion across the edge is robustly decoupled from the smoothing of the density itself. Furthermore, our method is observed to produce better filtering results for the same settings of parameters for the filter window size and the edge definition.

  6. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  7. Viability of bacteria in unused air filter media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, R.; Goppelsröder, A.; Umhauer, H.

    Different experimental techniques were applied to determine the effects of different air filter media on the viability of bacteria. Rinse suspensions of unused filter media were employed in standard inhibition tests to determine the effects of filter ingredients on bacterial growth under ideal nutritional conditions. Furthermore, a new test procedure was proposed and validated to determine the survival of viable microorganisms in fibrous air filters as a function of different parameters. Samples of filter media were challenged with microbial aerosols in an experimental set-up designed for measuring the collection efficiencies of fibrous filters. The loaded filter samples were then challenged with clean air under controlled conditions for a definite time span and numbers of viable microorganisms in the filter media were determined as colony forming units. The filter samples were retrieved from unused filter media usually employed in common air conditioning and ventilation systems. Under ideal nutritional and moisture conditions, growth of investigated microorganisms in nutrient broth and on nutrient agar was not inhibited by the inclusion of filter samples or rinse solutions of different filters in the growth medium with one exception. M. luteus and E. coli collected in air filter media and exposed to low air humidity (RH = 30-60%) showed a decline in their viability as a function of time (within 1 h). The decline rate was dependent on the type of bacteria employed and also the filter material itself.

  8. Regenerative particulate filter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Boex, M. W.; Hussey, M. W.; Larson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Development, design, and fabrication of a prototype filter regeneration unit for regenerating clean fluid particle filter elements by using a backflush/jet impingement technique are reported. Development tests were also conducted on a vortex particle separator designed for use in zero gravity environment. A maintainable filter was designed, fabricated and tested that allows filter element replacement without any leakage or spillage of system fluid. Also described are spacecraft fluid system design and filter maintenance techniques with respect to inflight maintenance for the space shuttle and space station.

  9. A unified Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Allen R.

    2017-01-01

    When considering problems of linear sequential estimation, two versions of the Kalman filter, the continuous-time version and the discrete-time version, are often used. (A hybrid filter also exists.) In many applications in which the Kalman filter is used, the system to which the filter is applied is a linear continuous-time system, but the Kalman filter is implemented on a digital computer, a discrete-time device. The two general approaches for developing a discrete-time filter for implementation on a digital computer are: (1) approximate the continuous-time system by a discrete-time system (called discretization of the continuous-time system) and develop a filter for the discrete-time approximation; and (2) develop a continuous-time filter for the system and then discretize the continuous-time filter. Generally, the two discrete-time filters will be different, that is, it can be said that discretization and filter generation are not, in general, commutative operations. As a result, any relationship between the discrete-time and continuous-time versions of the filter for the same continuous-time system is often obfuscated. This is particularly true when an attempt is made to generate the continuous-time version of the Kalman filter through a simple limiting process (the sample period going to zero) applied to the discrete-time version. The correct result is, generally, not obtained. In a 1961 research report, Kalman showed that the continuous-time Kalman filter can be obtained from the discrete-time Kalman filter by taking limits as the sample period goes to zero if the white noise process for the continuous-time version is appropriately defined. Using this basic concept, a discrete-time Kalman filter can be developed for a continuous-time system as follows: (1) discretize the continuous-time system using Kalman's technique; and (2) develop a discrete-time Kalman filter for that discrete-time system. Kalman's results show that the discrete-time filter generated in

  10. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  11. Interval Filter: A Locality-Aware Alternative to Bloom Filters for Hardware Membership Queries by Interval Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quislant, Ricardo; Gutierrez, Eladio; Plata, Oscar; Zapata, Emilio L.

    Bloom filters are data structures that can efficiently represent a set of elements providing operations of insertion and membership testing. Nevertheless, these filters may yield false positive results when testing for elements that have not been previously inserted. In general, higher false positive rates are expected for sets with larger cardinality with constant filter size. This paper shows that for sets where a distance metric can be defined, reducing the false positive rate is possible if elements to be inserted exhibit locality according to this metric. In this way, a hardware alternative to Bloom filters able to extract spatial locality features is proposed and analyzed.

  12. MINACE-filter-based facial pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.; Patnaik, Rohit

    2005-03-01

    A facial pose estimation system is presented that functions with illumination variations present. Pose estimation is a useful first stage in a face recognition system. A separate minimum noise and correlation energy (MINACE) filter is synthesized for each pose. To select the MINACE parameter c for the filter for a pose, a training set of illumination differences of several faces at that pose, and a validation set of other poses (illumination differences of several faces at a few other poses) is used in the automated filter-synthesis step. However, the filter for each pose is a combination of faces at only that pose. The pose estimation system is evaluated using images from the CMU Pose, Illumination and Expression (PIE) database. The classification performance (PC) scores are presented for several pose estimation tests. The pose estimate will be used for a subsequent image transformation of a test face to a reference pose for face identification.

  13. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  14. Probe Lasso: a novel method to rope in differentially methylated regions with 450K DNA methylation data.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan

    2015-01-15

    The speed and resolution at which we can scour the genome for DNA methylation changes has improved immeasurably in the last 10years and the advent of the Illumina 450K BeadChip has made epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) a reality. The resulting datasets are conveniently formatted to allow easy alignment of significant hits to genes and genetic features, however; methods that parse significant hits into discreet differentially methylated regions (DMRs) remain a challenge to implement. In this paper we present details of a novel DMR caller, the Probe Lasso: a flexible window based approach that gathers neighbouring significant-signals to define clear DMR boundaries for subsequent in-depth analysis. The method is implemented in the R package ChAMP (Morris et al., 2014) and returns sets of DMRs according to user-tuned levels of probe filtering (e.g., inclusion of sex chromosomes, polymorphisms) and probe-lasso size distribution. Using a sub-sample of colon cancer- and healthy colon-samples from TCGA we show that Probe Lasso shifts DMR calling away from just probe-dense regions, and calls a range of DMR sizes ranging from tens-of-bases to tens-of-kilobases in scale. Moreover, using TCGA data we show that Probe Lasso leverages more information from the array and highlights a potential role of hypomethylated transcription factor binding motifs not discoverable using a basic, fixed-window approach.

  15. Probe Lasso: A novel method to rope in differentially methylated regions with 450K DNA methylation data

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Lee M.; Beck, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The speed and resolution at which we can scour the genome for DNA methylation changes has improved immeasurably in the last 10 years and the advent of the Illumina 450K BeadChip has made epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) a reality. The resulting datasets are conveniently formatted to allow easy alignment of significant hits to genes and genetic features, however; methods that parse significant hits into discreet differentially methylated regions (DMRs) remain a challenge to implement. In this paper we present details of a novel DMR caller, the Probe Lasso: a flexible window based approach that gathers neighbouring significant-signals to define clear DMR boundaries for subsequent in-depth analysis. The method is implemented in the R package ChAMP (Morris et al., 2014) and returns sets of DMRs according to user-tuned levels of probe filtering (e.g., inclusion of sex chromosomes, polymorphisms) and probe-lasso size distribution. Using a sub-sample of colon cancer- and healthy colon-samples from TCGA we show that Probe Lasso shifts DMR calling away from just probe-dense regions, and calls a range of DMR sizes ranging from tens-of-bases to tens-of-kilobases in scale. Moreover, using TCGA data we show that Probe Lasso leverages more information from the array and highlights a potential role of hypomethylated transcription factor binding motifs not discoverable using a basic, fixed-window approach. PMID:25461817

  16. A semblance-guided median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.C. ); Toksoz, M.N. ); Purdy, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A slowness selective median filter based on information from a local set of traces is described and implemented. The filter is constructed in two steps, the first being an estimation of a preferred slowness and the second, the selection of a median or trimmed mean value to replace the original data point. A symmetric window of traces defining the filter aperture is selected about each trace to be filtered and the filter applied repeatedly to each time point. The preferred slowness is determined by scanning a range of linear moveouts within the user-specified slowness passband. Semblance is computed for each trial slowness and the preferred slowness selected from the peak semblance value. Data points collected along this preferred slowness are then sorted from lowest to highest and in the case of a pure median filter, the middle point(s) selected to replace the original data point. This approach may be sued as a velocity filter to estimate coherent signal within a specified slowness passband and reject coherent energy outside this range. For applications of this type, other velocity estimators may be used in place of the authors semblance measure to provide improved velocity estimation and better filter performance. The filter aperture may also be extended to provide increased velocity estimation, but will result in additional lateral smearing of signal. The authors show that, in addition to a velocity filter, their approach may be used to improve signal-to-noise ratios in noisy data. The median filter tends to suppress the amplitude of random background noise and semblance weighting may be used to reduce the amplitude of background noise further while enhancing coherent signal.

  17. Essentially nonoscillatory postprocessing filtering methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, F.; Osher, S.

    1992-01-01

    High order accurate centered flux approximations used in the computation of numerical solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations produce large oscillations in regions of sharp transitions. Here, we present a new class of filtering methods denoted by Essentially Nonoscillatory Least Squares (ENOLS), which constructs an upgraded filtered solution that is close to the physically correct weak solution of the original evolution equation. Our method relies on the evaluation of a least squares polynomial approximation to oscillatory data using a set of points which is determined via the ENO network. Numerical results are given in one and two space dimensions for both scalar and systems of hyperbolic conservation laws. Computational running time, efficiency, and robustness of method are illustrated in various examples such as Riemann initial data for both Burgers' and Euler's equations of gas dynamics. In all standard cases, the filtered solution appears to converge numerically to the correct solution of the original problem. Some interesting results based on nonstandard central difference schemes, which exactly preserve entropy, and have been recently shown generally not to be weakly convergent to a solution of the conservation law, are also obtained using our filters.

  18. Efficient Workload Classification based on Ignored Auditory Probes: A Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Raphaëlle N.; Bonnet, Stéphane; Charbonnier, Sylvie; Campagne, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Mental workload is a mental state that is currently one of the main research focuses in neuroergonomics. It can notably be estimated using measurements in electroencephalography (EEG), a method that allows for direct mental state assessment. Auditory probes can be used to elicit event-related potentials (ERPs) that are modulated by workload. Although, some papers do report ERP modulations due to workload using attended or ignored probes, to our knowledge there is no literature regarding effective workload classification based on ignored auditory probes. In this paper, in order to efficiently estimate workload, we advocate for the use of such ignored auditory probes in a single-stimulus paradigm and a signal processing chain that includes a spatial filtering step. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated on data acquired from participants that performed the Multi-Attribute Task Battery – II. They carried out this task during two 10-min blocks. Each block corresponded to a workload condition that was pseudorandomly assigned. The easy condition consisted of two monitoring tasks performed in parallel, and the difficult one consisted of those two tasks with an additional plane driving task. Infrequent auditory probes were presented during the tasks and the participants were asked to ignore them. The EEG data were denoised and the probes’ ERPs were extracted and spatially filtered using a canonical correlation analysis. Next, binary classification was performed using a Fisher LDA and a fivefold cross-validation procedure. Our method allowed for a very high estimation performance with a classification accuracy above 80% for every participant, and minimal intrusiveness thanks to the use of a single-stimulus paradigm. Therefore, this study paves the way to the efficient use of ERPs for mental state monitoring in close to real-life settings and contributes toward the development of adaptive user interfaces. PMID:27790109

  19. Three-zone pupil filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Campos, Juan; Escalera, Juan C.; Ledesma, Silvia

    2008-07-01

    The performance of pupil filters consisting of three zones each of constant complex amplitude transmittance is investigated. For filters where the transmittance is real, different classes of potentially useful filter are identified. These include leaky filters with an inner zone of low amplitude transmittance, pure phase filters with phase change of π, and equal area filters.

  20. Focusing attention on objects of interest using multiple matched filters.

    PubMed

    Stough, T M; Brodley, C E

    2001-01-01

    In order to be of use to scientists, large image databases need to be analyzed to create a catalog of the objects of interest. One approach is to apply a multiple tiered search algorithm that uses reduction techniques of increasing computational complexity to select the desired objects from the database. The first tier of this type of algorithm, often called a focus of attention (FOA) algorithm, selects candidate regions from the image data and passes them to the next tier of the algorithm. In this paper we present a new approach to FOA that employs multiple matched filters (MMF), one for each object prototype, to detect the regions of interest. The MMFs are formed using k-means clustering on a set of image patches identified by domain experts as positive examples of objects of interest. An innovation of the approach is to radically reduce the dimensionality of the feature space, used by the k-means algorithm, by taking block averages (spoiling) the sample image patches. The process of spoiling is analyzed and its applicability to other domains is discussed. The combination of the output of the MMFs is achieved through the projection of the detections back into an empty image and then thresholding. This research was motivated by the need to detect small volcanos in the Magellan probe data from Venus. An empirical evaluation of the approach illustrates that a combination of the MMF plus the average filter results in a higher likelihood of 100% detection of the objects of interest at a lower false positive rate than a single matched filter alone.

  1. Wavelet filtering for data recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.

    2013-09-01

    In case of electrical wave measurements in space instruments, digital filtering and data compression on board can significantly enhance the signal and reduce the amount of data to be transferred to Earth. While often the instrument's transfer function is well known making the application of an optimized wavelet algorithm feasible the computational power requirements may be prohibitive as normally complex floating point operations are needed. This article presents a simplified possibility implemented in low-power 16-bit integer processors used for plasma wave measurements in the SPEDE instrument on SMART-1 and for the Permittivity Probe measurements of the SESAME/PP instrument in Rosetta's Philae Lander on its way to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

  2. A Method to Detect Differential Gene Expression in Cross-Species Hybridization Experiments at Gene and Probe Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Rebekah; Felton, James; Rocke, David M.; Chakicherla, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Whole genome microarrays are increasingly becoming the method of choice to study responses in model organisms to disease, stressors or other stimuli. However, whole genome sequences are available for only some model organisms, and there are still many species whose genome sequences are not yet available. Cross-species studies, where arrays developed for one species are used to study gene expression in a closely related species, have been used to address this gap, with some promising results. Current analytical methods have included filtration of some probes or genes that showed low hybridization activities. But consensus filtration schemes are still not available. Results A novel masking procedure is proposed based on currently available target species sequences to filter out probes and study a cross-species data set using this masking procedure and gene-set analysis. Gene-set analysis evaluates the association of some priori defined gene groups with a phenotype of interest. Two methods, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Test of Test Statistics (ToTS) were investigated. The results showed that masking procedure together with ToTS method worked well in our data set. The results from an alternative way to study cross-species hybridization experiments without masking are also presented. We hypothesize that the multi-probes structure of Affymetrix microarrays makes it possible to aggregate the effects of both well-hybridized and poorly-hybridized probes to study a group of genes. The principles of gene-set analysis were applied to the probe-level data instead of gene-level data. The results showed that ToTS can give valuable information and thus can be used as a powerful technique for analyzing cross-species hybridization experiments. Availability Software in the form of R code is available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html Supplementary Data Supplementary data are available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html PMID

  3. A Method to Detect Differential Gene expression in Cross-Species Hybridization Experiments at Gene and Probe Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wu, Rebekah; Felton, James; Rocke, David M.; Chakicherla, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Whole genome microarrays are increasingly becoming the method of choice to study responses in model organisms to disease, stressors or other stimuli. However, whole genome sequences are available for only some model organisms, and there are still many species whose genome sequences are not yet available. Cross-species studies, where arrays developed for one species are used to study gene expression in a closely related species, have been used to address this gap, with some promising results. Current analytical methods have included filtration of some probes or genes that showed low hybridization activities. But consensus filtration schemes are still not available. Results A novel masking procedure is proposed based on currently available target species sequences to filter out probes and study a cross-species data set using this masking procedure and gene-set analysis. Gene-set analysis evaluates the association of some priori defined gene groups with a phenotype of interest. Two methods, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Test of Test Statistics (ToTS) were investigated. The results showed that masking procedure together with ToTS method worked well in our data set. The results from an alternative way to study cross-species hybridization experiments without masking are also presented. We hypothesize that the multi-probes structure of Affymetrix microarrays makes it possible to aggregate the effects of both well-hybridized and poorly-hybridized probes to study a group of genes. The principles of gene-set analysis were applied to the probe-level data instead of gene-level data. The results showed that ToTS can give valuable information and thus can be used as a powerful technique for analyzing cross-species hybridization experiments. Availability Software in the form of R code is available at http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~ychen/cross-species.html PMID:20798791

  4. Generic Kalman Filter Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E., II; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2005-01-01

    The Generic Kalman Filter (GKF) software provides a standard basis for the development of application-specific Kalman-filter programs. Historically, Kalman filters have been implemented by customized programs that must be written, coded, and debugged anew for each unique application, then tested and tuned with simulated or actual measurement data. Total development times for typical Kalman-filter application programs have ranged from months to weeks. The GKF software can simplify the development process and reduce the development time by eliminating the need to re-create the fundamental implementation of the Kalman filter for each new application. The GKF software is written in the ANSI C programming language. It contains a generic Kalman-filter-development directory that, in turn, contains a code for a generic Kalman filter function; more specifically, it contains a generically designed and generically coded implementation of linear, linearized, and extended Kalman filtering algorithms, including algorithms for state- and covariance-update and -propagation functions. The mathematical theory that underlies the algorithms is well known and has been reported extensively in the open technical literature. Also contained in the directory are a header file that defines generic Kalman-filter data structures and prototype functions and template versions of application-specific subfunction and calling navigation/estimation routine code and headers. Once the user has provided a calling routine and the required application-specific subfunctions, the application-specific Kalman-filter software can be compiled and executed immediately. During execution, the generic Kalman-filter function is called from a higher-level navigation or estimation routine that preprocesses measurement data and post-processes output data. The generic Kalman-filter function uses the aforementioned data structures and five implementation- specific subfunctions, which have been developed by the user on

  5. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  6. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  7. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, D.

    1988-06-30

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream is described. The filter includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. A cover screen isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of porous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses. 6 figs.

  8. Adaptive filtering for color filter array demosaicking.

    PubMed

    Lian, Nai-Xiang; Chang, Lanlan; Tan, Yap-Peng; Zagorodnov, Vitali

    2007-10-01

    Most digital still cameras acquire imagery with a color filter array (CFA), sampling only one color value for each pixel and interpolating the other two color values afterwards. The interpolation process is commonly known as demosaicking. In general, a good demosaicking method should preserve the high-frequency information of imagery as much as possible, since such information is essential for image visual quality. We discuss in this paper two key observations for preserving high-frequency information in CFA demosaicking: (1) the high frequencies are similar across three color components, and (2) the high frequencies along the horizontal and vertical axes are essential for image quality. Our frequency analysis of CFA samples indicates that filtering a CFA image can better preserve high frequencies than filtering each color component separately. This motivates us to design an efficient filter for estimating the luminance at green pixels of the CFA image and devise an adaptive filtering approach to estimating the luminance at red and blue pixels. Experimental results on simulated CFA images, as well as raw CFA data, verify that the proposed method outperforms the existing state-of-the-art methods both visually and in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, at a notably lower computational cost.

  9. Total Variation Electrocardiogram Filtering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    hand, the TV smoothing is still a low pass filter, which effectively filters out high-frequency noise. Results We compared the performance of the TV...resulting signal to make the ECG samples positive and to amplify the high-frequency components. Finally, in the last stage, it uses a low -pass filter to...collected during the study on glycemic control in young adults performed at the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Center. The study has been approved by

  10. Filter vapor trap

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  11. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  12. Smart Filter Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    polarity relative to phase-state polarity . It was found that zero-state leakage (about 3% in intensity as mentioned) limited useful TPAF performance to...resources. Our first efforts used polar formatted filters having 32 sectors, of which only 16 were independent since the filter was trained as a... polar plane. One common choice for the angle of this line, for example, corresponds to thresholding on the real part of the transform. Fourier filters

  13. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  14. Analysis and Design of Time-Varying Filter Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodagar, Iraj

    Analysis-synthesis filter banks have been studied extensively and a wide range of theoretical problems have been subsequently addressed. However, almost all the research activity has been concentrated on time-invariant filter banks whose components are fixed and do not change in time. The objective of this thesis is to develop analysis and design techniques for time-varying FIR analysis-synthesis filter banks that are perfect reconstructing (PR). In such systems, the analysis and/or synthesis filters, the down-up sampling rates, or even the number of bands can change in time. The underlying idea is that by adapting the basis functions of the filter bank transform to the signal properties, one can represent the relevant information of the signal more efficiently. For analysis purposes, we derive the time-varying impulse response of the filter bank in terms of the analysis and synthesis filter coefficients. We are able to represent this impulse response in terms of the product of the analysis and synthesis matrix transforms. Our approach to the PR time-varying filter bank design is to change the analysis -synthesis filter bank among a set of time-invariant filter banks. The analysis filter banks are switched instantaneously. To eliminate the distortion during switching, a new time-varying synthesis section is designed for each transition. Three design techniques are developed for the time-varying filter bank design. The first technique uses the least squares synthesis filters. This method improves the reconstruction quality significantly, but does not usually achieve the perfect reconstruction. Using the second technique, one can design PR time-varying systems by redesigning the analysis filters. The drawback is that this method requires numerical optimizations. The third technique introduces a new structure for exactly reconstructing time-varying filter banks. This structure consists of the conventional filter bank followed by a time-varying post filter. The post

  15. Nanofiber Filters Eliminate Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With support from Phase I and II SBIR funding from Johnson Space Center, Argonide Corporation of Sanford, Florida tested and developed its proprietary nanofiber water filter media. Capable of removing more than 99.99 percent of dangerous particles like bacteria, viruses, and parasites, the media was incorporated into the company's commercial NanoCeram water filter, an inductee into the Space Foundation's Space Technology Hall of Fame. In addition to its drinking water filters, Argonide now produces large-scale nanofiber filters used as part of the reverse osmosis process for industrial water purification.

  16. Inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Duffett, L; Carrier, M

    2017-01-01

    Use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters has increased dramatically in recent decades, despite a lack of evidence that their use has impacted venous thromboembolism (VTE)-related mortality. This increased use appears to be primarily driven by the insertion of retrievable filters for prophylactic indications. A growing body of evidence, however, suggests that IVC filters are frequently associated with clinically important adverse events, prompting a closer look at their role. We sought to narratively review the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of IVC filter placements. Inferior vena cava filters remain the only treatment option for patients with an acute (within 2-4 weeks) proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism and an absolute contraindication to anticoagulation. In such patients, anticoagulation should be resumed and IVC filters removed as soon as the contraindication has passed. For all other indications, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of IVC filters and high-quality trials are required. In patients where an IVC filter remains, regular follow-up to reassess removal and screen for filter-related complications should occur. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Birefringent filter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Clayton H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A birefringent filter is provided for tuning the wavelength of a broad band emission laser. The filter comprises thin plates of a birefringent material having thicknesses which are non-unity, integral multiples of the difference between the thicknesses of the two thinnest plates. The resulting wavelength selectivity is substantially equivalent to the wavelength selectivity of a conventional filter which has a thinnest plate having a thickness equal to this thickness difference. The present invention obtains an acceptable tuning of the wavelength while avoiding a decrease in optical quality associated with conventional filters wherein the respective plate thicknesses are integral multiples of the thinnest plate.

  18. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  19. UV filters for lighting of plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehring, T.; Koefferlein, M.; Thiel, S.; Seidlitz, H. K.; Payer, H. D.

    1994-03-01

    The wavelength dependent interaction of biological systems with radiation is commonly described by appropriate action spectra. Particularly effective plant responses are obtained for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Excess shortwave UV-B radiation will induce genetic defects and plant damage. Besides the ecological discussion of the deleterious effects of the excess UV radiation there is increasing interest in horticultural applications of this spectral region. Several metabolic pathways leading to valuable secondary plant products like colors, odors, taste, or resulting in mechanical strength and vitality are triggered by UV radiation. Thus, in ecologically as well as in economically oriented experiments the exact generation and knowledge of the spectral irradiance, particularly near the UV absorption edge, is essential. The ideal filter 'material' to control the UV absorption edge would be ozone itself. However, due to problems in controlling the toxic and chemically aggressive, instable gas, only rather 'small ozone filters' have been realized so far. In artificial plant lighting conventional solid filter materials such as glass sheets and plastic foils (celluloseacetate or cellulosetriacetate) which can be easily handled have been used to absorb the UV-C and the excess shortwave UV-B radiation of the lamp emissions. Different filter glasses are available which provide absorption properties suitable for gradual changes of the spectral UV-B illumination of artificial lighting. Using a distinct set of lamps and filter glasses an acceptable simulation of the UV-B part of natural global radiation can be achieved. The aging of these and other filter materials under the extreme UV radiation in the lamphouse of a solar simulator is presently unavoidable. This instability can be dealt with only by a precise spectral monitoring and by replacing the filters accordingly. For this reason attempts would be useful to develop real ozone filters which can replace glass filters. In

  20. UV filters for lighting of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doehring, T.; Koefferlein, M.; Thiel, S.; Seidlitz, H. K.; Payer, H. D.

    1994-01-01

    The wavelength dependent interaction of biological systems with radiation is commonly described by appropriate action spectra. Particularly effective plant responses are obtained for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Excess shortwave UV-B radiation will induce genetic defects and plant damage. Besides the ecological discussion of the deleterious effects of the excess UV radiation there is increasing interest in horticultural applications of this spectral region. Several metabolic pathways leading to valuable secondary plant products like colors, odors, taste, or resulting in mechanical strength and vitality are triggered by UV radiation. Thus, in ecologically as well as in economically oriented experiments the exact generation and knowledge of the spectral irradiance, particularly near the UV absorption edge, is essential. The ideal filter 'material' to control the UV absorption edge would be ozone itself. However, due to problems in controlling the toxic and chemically aggressive, instable gas, only rather 'small ozone filters' have been realized so far. In artificial plant lighting conventional solid filter materials such as glass sheets and plastic foils (celluloseacetate or cellulosetriacetate) which can be easily handled have been used to absorb the UV-C and the excess shortwave UV-B radiation of the lamp emissions. Different filter glasses are available which provide absorption properties suitable for gradual changes of the spectral UV-B illumination of artificial lighting. Using a distinct set of lamps and filter glasses an acceptable simulation of the UV-B part of natural global radiation can be achieved. The aging of these and other filter materials under the extreme UV radiation in the lamphouse of a solar simulator is presently unavoidable. This instability can be dealt with only by a precise spectral monitoring and by replacing the filters accordingly. For this reason attempts would be useful to develop real ozone filters which can replace glass filters. In

  1. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  2. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RICHARD A. WAGNER

    1998-09-04

    This report describes the fabrication and testing of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) based hot gas filters. The fabrication approach utilized a modified filament winding method that combined both continuous and chopped fibers into a novel microstructure. The work was divided into five primary tasks. In the first task, a preliminary set of compositions was fabricated in the form of open end tubes and characterized. The results of this task were used to identify the most promising compositions for sub-scale filter element fabrication and testing. In addition to laboratory measurements of permeability and strength, exposure testing in a coal combustion environment was performed to asses the thermo-chemical stability of the CFCC materials. Four candidate compositions were fabricated into sub-scale filter elements with integral flange and a closed end. Following the 250 hour exposure test in a circulating fluid bed combustor, the retained strength ranged from 70 t 145 percent of the as-fabricated strength. The post-test samples exhibited non-catastrophic failure behavior in contrast to the brittle failure exhibited by monolithic materials. Filter fabrication development continued in a filter improvement and cost reduction task that resulted in an improved fiber architecture, the production of a net shape flange, and an improved low cost bond. These modifications were incorporated into the process and used to fabricate 50 full-sized filter elements for testing in demonstration facilities in Karhula, Finland and at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. After 581 hours of testing in the Karhula facility, the elements retained approximately 87 percent of their as-fabricated strength. In addition, mechanical response testing at Virginia Tech provided a further demonstration of the high level of strain tolerance of the vacuum wound filter elements. Additional testing in the M. W. Kellogg unit at the PSDF has accumulated over 1800 hours of

  3. Numerical study on self-cleaning canister filter with modified filter cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Akmal Nizam; Zolkhaely, Mohd Hafiz; Sahrudin, Mohd Sahrizan; Razali, Mohd Azahari; Sapit, Azwan; Hushim, Mohd Faisal

    2017-04-01

    Air filtration system plays an important role in getting good quality air into turbo machinery such as gas turbine. The filtration system and filters improve the quality of air and protect the gas turbine parts from contaminants which could bring damage. This paper is focused on the configuration of the self-cleaning canister filter in order to obtain the minimal pressure drop along the filter. The configuration includes a modified canister filter cap that is based on the basic geometry that conforms to industry standard. This paper describes the use of CFD to simulate and analyze the flow through the filter. This tool is also used to monitor variables such as pressure and velocity along the filter and to visualize them in the form of contours, vectors and streamlines. In this study, the main parameter varied is the inlet velocity set in the boundary condition during simulations, which are 0.032, 0.063, 0.094 and 0.126 m/s respectively. The data obtained from simulations are then validated with reference data sourced from the industry, and comparisons have subsequently been made for these two filters. As a result, the improvement of the pressure drop for the modified filter is found to be 11.47% to 14.82% compared to the basic filter at the inlet velocity from 0.032 to 0.126 m/s. the total pressure drop produced is 292.3 Pa by the basic filter and 251.11 Pa for modified filter. The pressure drop reduction is 41.19 Pa, which is 14.1% from the basic filter.

  4. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  5. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  6. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  7. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly are disclosed for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut. 9 figs.

  8. Optimized multichannel decomposition for texture segmentation using Gabor filter bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamoddini-Kachouie, Nezamoddin; Alirezaie, Javad

    2004-05-01

    Texture segmentation and analysis is an important aspect of pattern recognition and digital image processing. Previous approaches to texture analysis and segmentation perform multi-channel filtering by applying a set of filters to the image. In this paper we describe a texture segmentation algorithm based on multi-channel filtering that is optimized using diagonal high frequency residual. Gabor band pass filters with different radial spatial frequencies and different orientations have optimum resolution in time and frequency domain. The image is decomposed by a set of Gabor filters into a number of filtered images; each one contains variation of intensity on a sub-band frequency and orientation. The features extracted by Gabor filters have been applied for image segmentation and analysis. There are some important considerations about filter parameters and filter bank coverage in frequency domain. This filter bank does not completely cover the corners of the frequency domain along the diagonals. In our method we optimize the spatial implementation for the Gabor filter bank considering the diagonal high frequency residual. Segmentation is accomplished by a feedforward backpropagation multi-layer perceptron that is trained by optimized extracted features. After MLP is trained the input image is segmented and each pixel is assigned to the proper class.

  9. Notched spectrum: from probing waveforms to receive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Gianelli, Christopher D.

    2013-05-01

    The increasing demand for wireless data services and communications is expanding the frequency footprint of both civilian and military wireless networks, and hence encroaches upon spectrum traditionally reserved for radar systems. To maximize spectral efficiency, it is desirable for a modern radar system to use waveforms with the ability to fit into tightly controlled spectral regions, which requires the formation of nulls with required notching levels on prescribed frequency stop-bands. Additionally, the waveform should posses a low peak-to-average ratio (PAR), and have good auto-correlation performance. In this work, we propose a novel method for the design of such a waveform using alternating convex optimization. The core module of the proposed algorithm is a fast Fourier transform, which makes the algorithm quite efficient and can handle waveform designs with up to 105 samples. Moreover, our algorithm can achieve a flexible tradeoff between PAR and reduced pass band ripple. A simple application in synthetic aperture radar is considered to highlight the performance of the design algorithm.

  10. The correct estimate of the probability of false detection of the matched filter in weak-signal detection problems . II. Further results with application to a set of ALMA and ATCA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vio, R.; Vergès, C.; Andreani, P.

    2017-08-01

    The matched filter (MF) is one of the most popular and reliable techniques to the detect signals of known structure and amplitude smaller than the level of the contaminating noise. Under the assumption of stationary Gaussian noise, MF maximizes the probability of detection subject to a constant probability of false detection or false alarm (PFA). This property relies upon a priori knowledge of the position of the searched signals, which is usually not available. Recently, it has been shown that when applied in its standard form, MF may severely underestimate the PFA. As a consequence the statistical significance of features that belong to noise is overestimated and the resulting detections are actually spurious. For this reason, an alternative method of computing the PFA has been proposed that is based on the probability density function (PDF) of the peaks of an isotropic Gaussian random field. In this paper we further develop this method. In particular, we discuss the statistical meaning of the PFA and show that, although useful as a preliminary step in a detection procedure, it is not able to quantify the actual reliability of a specific detection. For this reason, a new quantity is introduced called the specific probability of false alarm (SPFA), which is able to carry out this computation. We show how this method works in targeted simulations and apply it to a few interferometric maps taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We select a few potential new point sources and assign an accurate detection reliability to these sources.

  11. VSP wave separation by adaptive masking filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-06-01

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data processing, the first step might be to separate the down-going wavefield from the up-going wavefield. When using a masking filter for VSP wave separation, there are difficulties associated with two termination ends of the up-going waves. A critical challenge is how the masking filter can restore the energy tails, the edge effect associated with these terminations uniquely exist in VSP data. An effective strategy is to implement masking filters in both τ-p and f-k domain sequentially. Meanwhile it uses a median filter, producing a clean but smooth version of the down-going wavefield, used as a reference data set for designing the masking filter. The masking filter is implemented adaptively and iteratively, gradually restoring the energy tails cut-out by any surgical mute. While the τ-p and the f-k domain masking filters target different depth ranges of VSP, this combination strategy can accurately perform in wave separation from field VSP data.

  12. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  13. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-12-31

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  14. Tunable acoustical optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Solid state filter with active crystal element increases sensitivity and resolution of passive and active spectrometers. Filter is capable of ranging through infrared and visible spectra, can be built as portable device for field use, and is suitable for ecological surveying, for pollution detection, and for pollutant classification.

  15. Durability of ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Tressler, R.E.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating systems have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life.

  16. Extended range harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A. J.; Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of filters, leaky-wall and open-guide, are combined into single component. Combination gives 10 db or greater additional attenuation to fourth and higher harmonics, at expense of increasing loss of fundamental frequency by perhaps 0.05 to 0.08 db. Filter is applicable to all high power microwave transmitters, but is especially desirable for satellite transmitters.

  17. Holographic nonspatial filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludman, Jacques E.; Riccobono, Juanita R.; Reingand, Nadya O.; Semenova, Irina V.; Korzinin, Yuri L.; Shahriar, M. S.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper deals with new results ont he development of a holographic nonspatial filter to be used for laser beam clean up. An analysis of thick holographic materials suitable for recording of such elements is carried out. The experimental setups for hologram recording and evaluation are described. The results on measurements of angular selectivity contour of such holographic filters are presented.

  18. Recognition of Probe Ptolemaic Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Maw-Shang; Hung, Ling-Ju

    Let G denote a graph class. An undirected graph G is called a probe G graph if one can make G a graph in G by adding edges between vertices in some independent set of G. By definition graph class G is a subclass of probe G graphs. Ptolemaic graphs are chordal and induced gem free. They form a subclass of both chordal graphs and distance-hereditary graphs. Many problems NP-hard on chordal graphs can be solved in polynomial time on ptolemaic graphs. We proposed an O(nm)-time algorithm to recognize probe ptolemaic graphs where n and m are the numbers of vertices and edges of the input graph respectively.

  19. A hybrid method for optimization of the adaptive Goldstein filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Ding, Xiaoli; Tian, Xin; Malhotra, Rakesh; Kong, Weixue

    2014-12-01

    The Goldstein filter is a well-known filter for interferometric filtering in the frequency domain. The main parameter of this filter, alpha, is set as a power of the filtering function. Depending on it, considered areas are strongly or weakly filtered. Several variants have been developed to adaptively determine alpha using different indicators such as the coherence, and phase standard deviation. The common objective of these methods is to prevent areas with low noise from being over filtered while simultaneously allowing stronger filtering over areas with high noise. However, the estimators of these indicators are biased in the real world and the optimal model to accurately determine the functional relationship between the indicators and alpha is also not clear. As a result, the filter always under- or over-filters and is rarely correct. The study presented in this paper aims to achieve accurate alpha estimation by correcting the biased estimator using homogeneous pixel selection and bootstrapping algorithms, and by developing an optimal nonlinear model to determine alpha. In addition, an iteration is also merged into the filtering procedure to suppress the high noise over incoherent areas. The experimental results from synthetic and real data show that the new filter works well under a variety of conditions and offers better and more reliable performance when compared to existing approaches.

  20. Mars Exploration Rovers orbit determination filter strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElrath, Timothy P.; Watkins, Michael M.; Portock, Brian M.; Graat, Eric J; Baird, Darren T; Wawrzyniak, Geoffrey G.; Attiyah, Amy A.; Guinn, Joseph R.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Baalke, Ronald C.; hide

    2004-01-01

    The successful delivery of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landers to well within the boundaries of their surface target areas in January of 2004 was the culmination of years of orbit determination analysis. The process began with a careful consideration of the filter parameters used for pre-launch covariance studies, and continued with the refinement of the filter after launch based on operational experience. At the same time, tools were developed to run a plethora of variations around the nominal filter and analyze the results in ways that had never been previously attempted for an interplanetary mission. In addition to achieving sub-kilometer Mars-relative orbit determination knowledge, the filter strategy and process detected unexpected error sources, while at the same time proving robust by indicating thecorrect solution. Consequently, MER orbit determination set a new standard for interplanetary navigation.

  1. Sintered composite filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1986-05-02

    A particulate filter medium formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers is described. Preferred composition is about 40 vol.% quartz and about 60 vol.% stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100/sup 0/C to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550/sup 0/C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  2. Implicit Kalman filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skliar, M.; Ramirez, W. F.

    1997-01-01

    For an implicitly defined discrete system, a new algorithm for Kalman filtering is developed and an efficient numerical implementation scheme is proposed. Unlike the traditional explicit approach, the implicit filter can be readily applied to ill-conditioned systems and allows for generalization to descriptor systems. The implementation of the implicit filter depends on the solution of the congruence matrix equation (A1)(Px)(AT1) = Py. We develop a general iterative method for the solution of this equation, and prove necessary and sufficient conditions for convergence. It is shown that when the system matrices of an implicit system are sparse, the implicit Kalman filter requires significantly less computer time and storage to implement as compared to the traditional explicit Kalman filter. Simulation results are presented to illustrate and substantiate the theoretical developments.

  3. Sub-micron filter

    DOEpatents

    Tepper, Frederick [Sanford, FL; Kaledin, Leonid [Port Orange, FL

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  4. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  5. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V C; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  6. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-04-15

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  7. Nonlinear response of a superconducting filter to a wide band excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkola, M. I.

    2006-02-01

    Passive superconducting filters are inherently nonlinear devices that distort information-bearing signals and give rise to spectral broadening. Wide band signals efficiently probe both the causes and effects of filter nonlinearities. In particular, a coherent pulse may evaluate the power spectrum of a distortion signal and the nonlinear transmission coefficient in a single measurement. The nonlinear response depends on the bandwidth of the probing signal and implicitly on the data rate.

  8. Processing of noisy magnetotelluric data using digital filters and additional data selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, S. L.; Harinarayana, T.; Dawes, G. J. K.; Hutton, V. R. S.

    1988-10-01

    Although the magnetotelluric (MT) method is known to be effective and fast in probing the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth at crustal depths, the results are often degraded by industrial and cultural noise. To obtain reliable processed results for modelling, it is first necessary to extract or select the natural signals from the contaminated time series. Various noise-reduction techniques based on digital filters are discussed with special reference to persistent noise signals, e.g. from power lines, DC-operated railways and electrical fences. Both previously suggested techniques (delay-line and notch filtering) and two other procedures (maximum entropy extension and deconvolution filtering) are applied to both synthetic data and to field observations from southern Scotland and the Italian Alps. Better quality data sets and more geophysically acceptable Earth models are shown to result. Noise of a more intermittent nature has recently been observed in MT observations near the development site of the geothermal power station on Milos, Greece. Large highly coherent electromagnetic field signals were observed to coincide with the opening and closure of the valves on the test wells. In this case, meaningful apparent resistivity curves could be obtained from an undisturbed subset of the previously accepted data, which had been selected mainly on the basis of signal power. Delay-line filtering is shown to be superior to notch filtering in eliminating non-sinusoidal noise, while both the MEM extension and the window deconvolution techniques are found to be useful in spike removal. These studies illustrate that use of an automatic data selection procedure should only be undertaken with great care in areas where the cultural noise is high. In such cases, continuous time-domain monitoring of the MT signals is recommended. The appropriate techniques of noise reduction can then be applied.

  9. Spinning Spacecraft Attitude Estimation Using Markley Variables: Filter Implementation And Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Attitude estimation is often more difficult for spinning spacecraft than for three-axis stabilized platforms due to the need to follow rapidly-varying state vector elements and the lack of three-axis rate measurements from gyros. The estimation problem simplifies when torques are negligible and nutation has damped out, but the general case requires a sequential filter with dynamics propagation. This paper describes the implementation and test results for an extended Kalman filter for spinning spacecraft attitude and rate estimation based on a novel set of variables suggested in a paper by Markley [AAS93-3301 (referred to hereafter as Markley variables). Markley has demonstrated that the new set of variables provides a superior parameterization for numerical integration of the attitude dynamics for spinning or momentum-biased spacecraft. The advantage is that the Markley variables have fewer rapidly-varying elements than other representations such as the attitude quaternion and rate vector. A filter based on these variables was expected to show improved performance due to the more accurate numerical state propagation. However, for a variety of test cases, it has been found that the new filter, as currently implemented, does not perform significantly better than a quaternion-based filter that was developed and tested in parallel. This paper reviews the mathematical background for a filter based on Markley variables. It also describes some features of the implementation and presents test results. The test cases are based on a mission using magnetometer and Sun sensor data and gyro measurements on two axes normal to the spin axis. The orbit and attitude scenarios and spacecraft parameters are modeled after one of the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) probes. Several tests are presented that demonstrate the filter accuracy and convergence properties. The tests include torque-free motion with various nutation angles, large

  10. Face verification and rejection with illumination variations using MINACE filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Rohit; Casasent, David P.

    2004-04-01

    A face verification system based on the use of a minimum noise and average correlation energy (MINACE) filter for each person is presented that functions with illumination variations present. A separate filter is used for each person; it is a combination of different training images of only that person. The system is tested using both unregistered and registered images from the CMU Pose, Illumination and Expression (PIE) database. The number of correct (PC) and the number of false alarm (PFA) scores are compared for the two cases. Rather than using the same parameters for the filter of each person, an automated iterative filter training and synthesis method is used. A validation set of several other faces is used to achieve parameter selection for good rejection performance. For filter-evaluation, all filters are tested against all images, but the same peak threshold is used for each filter to determine verification and rejection.

  11. Calibrating the PAU Survey's 46 Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Castander, F.; Gaztañaga, E.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla, N.; Tonello, N.; PAU Team

    2016-05-01

    The Physics of the Accelerating Universe (PAU) Survey, being carried out by several Spanish institutions, will image an area of 100-200 square degrees in 6 broad and 40 narrow band optical filters. The team is building a camera (PAUCam) with 18 CCDs, which will be installed in the 4 meter William Herschel Telescope at La Palma in 2013. The narrow band filters will each cover 100Å, with the set spanning 4500-8500Å. The broad band set will consist of standard ugriZy filters. The narrow band filters will provide low-resolution (R˜50) photometric "spectra" for all objects observed in the survey, which will reach a depth of ˜24 mag in the broad bands and ˜22.5 mag (AB) in the narrow bands. Such precision will allow for galaxy photometric redshift errors of 0.0035(1+z), which will facilitate the measurement of cosmological parameters with precision comparable to much larger spectroscopic and photometric surveys. Accurate photometric calibration of the PAU data is vital to the survey's science goals, and is not straightforward due to the large and unusual filter set. We outline the data management pipelines being developed for the survey, both for nightly data reduction and coaddition of multiple epochs, with emphasis on the photometric calibration strategies. We also describe the tools we are developing to test the quality of the reduction and calibration.

  12. Electronic filters, repeated signal charge conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  13. Verification of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification probes in the absence of positive samples.

    PubMed

    Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Vaughn, Cecily; Chou, Lan-Szu; Lewis, Tracey; Sumner, Kelli; Procter, Melinda; Gedge, Friederike; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Lyon, Elaine; Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve

    2011-11-01

    Deletions and duplications of single or multiple exons in specific genes are associated with human diseases. Multiplex ligation-dependant probe amplification (MLPA), a technique recently introduced to clinical laboratories, can detect deletions or duplications at the exon level. MLPA kits have a high multiplexing capability containing mixtures of exon-specific probes that target the gene of interest and control probes that hybridize to other genomic areas before PCR amplification. To verify each probe set, known positive samples with a single-exon deletion or duplication and normal samples are ideally used. Often, positive samples do not exist for each exon and normal samples are not suited to verify the identity of each probe set. We designed a straightforward approach using mixes of exon-specific PCR products as template to unequivocally verify each probe set in MLPA kits. This method can be used to verify the identity of MLPA probes for exons when positive samples are unavailable. Exon-specific probes from 15 MLPA kits were shown to hybridize to the targeted exons of interest. In one kit, this method identified probes that also bind a pseudogene, making them unreliable for clinical analysis. Incorporating this methodology in the analytical validation process will help ensure that MLPA results are interpreted correctly.

  14. Smoke and pollutant filtering device

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.; Kapp, N.J.

    1983-05-10

    A smoke and pollutant filtering device comprising a mask having a filter composed of a series of contiguous, serial layers of filtering material. The filter consists of front and rear gas permeable covers, a first filter layer of pressed vegetable matter, a second filter layer comprising a layer of activated charcoal adjacent a layer of aqua filter floss, a third filter comprising a gas permeable cloth situated between layers of pressed vegetable matter, and a fourth filter layer comprising an aqua filter floss. The first through fourth filter layers are sandwiched between the front and rear gas permeable covers. The filtering device is stitched together and mounted within a fireretardant hood shaped to fit over a human head. Elastic bands are included in the hood to maintain the hood snugly about the head when worn.

  15. A monolithic polarization-independent frequency-filter system for filtering of photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlrichs, Andreas; Berkemeier, Christoph; Sprenger, Benjamin; Benson, Oliver

    2013-12-09

    We set up a long-term stable filtering system that consists of cascaded monolithic Fabry-Pérot filters to enhance the suppression and free spectral range. An effective free spectral range of hundreds of GHz allows the system to be used as a high resolution monochromator, with a linewidth of 192 MHz. As an important application a single mode is filtered from photon pairs generated by a parametric down-conversion source, and their indistinguishability is proven by measuring the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect with a visibility of 96%. We report that undesired birefringence, which is often encountered with monolithic cavities, can be avoided by stress-free mounting.

  16. Fourier plane filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Aldrich, R. E.; Krol, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    An electrically addressed liquid crystal Fourier plane filter capable of real time optical image processing is described. The filter consists of two parts: a wedge filter having forty 9 deg segments and a ring filter having twenty concentric rings in a one inch diameter active area. Transmission of the filter in the off (transparent) state exceeds fifty percent. By using polarizing optics, contrast as high as 10,000:1 can be achieved at voltages compatible with FET switching technology. A phenomenological model for the dynamic scattering is presented for this special case. The filter is designed to be operated from a computer and is addressed by a seven bit binary word which includes an on or off command and selects any one of the twenty rings or twenty wedge pairs. The overall system uses addressable latches so that once an element is in a specified state, it will remain there until a change of state command is received. The drive for the liquid crystal filter is ? 30 V peak at 30 Hz to 70 Hz. These parameters give a rise time for the scattering of 20 msec and a decay time of 80 to 100 msec.

  17. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  18. Properties of Ceramic Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of advanced power systems, the filter components sustain thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down, and of process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, the elements must also survive operating temperature of 1650{degrees}F for three years. Objectives of the testing conducted were as follows: (1) measure basic physical, mechanical and thermal properties of candle filter materials and relate these properties to in-service performance, (2) perform post-exposure testing of candle-filter materials after service at Tidd and Karhula and compare post-exposure results to as-manufactured results to evaluate property degradation, (3) based on measured properties and in-service performance, develop an understanding of material requirements for candle-filter materials and help establish property goals, and (4) establish a test protocol for evaluation of candle filter materials.

  19. [In vitro evaluation of Dibie-Musset vena caval filter].

    PubMed

    Dibie, A; Kareco, T; Musset, D; Dufaux, J; Counord, J L; Laborde, F; Flaud, P

    1994-01-01

    The Dibie-Musset (DM) vena caval filter was evaluated on a hydraulic test bench reproducing flow conditions in the inferior vena cava: pressure, flow, viscosity, diameter and elasticity of the conduit. The results were compared with those obtained with the Greenfield filter (GF). In addition to classical measurements (captation and loss of load) we measured the velocity profile with a Doppler ultrasonic probe proximal and distal to the filter to study flow conditions before and after embolisation of clots. In order to circumvent the difficulties encountered with the use of real thrombi, chemical gels with visco-elastic properties, evaluated by viscosimetry, similar to those of blood clots, were used. Clots 45 mm long and 4 mm diameter were injected in several series of measurements. The DM filter was stable and did not migrate. In the horizontal position (flexible conduit) the DM filter was significantly more effective than the GF for less than 5 clots injected successively. The filtration capacity of both filters decreased with the number of clots captured. In the vertical position (rigid conduit), when there are less than 5 clots injected the two devices were perfectly effective. There was no significant difference between the two filters when 10 clots were injected. The loss of load resulting from the presence of the filter and clots was greater with the DM filter because of the greater captation capacity. However, the velocity profile distal to the filter was less disturbed with the DM filter because there was a more uniform distribution of the clots captured over the surface of the filter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. High performance 3D adaptive filtering for DSP based portable medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenbach, Olivier; Ali, Murtaza; Wainwright, Ian; Nadeski, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Portable medical imaging devices have proven valuable for emergency medical services both in the field and hospital environments and are becoming more prevalent in clinical settings where the use of larger imaging machines is impractical. Despite their constraints on power, size and cost, portable imaging devices must still deliver high quality images. 3D adaptive filtering is one of the most advanced techniques aimed at noise reduction and feature enhancement, but is computationally very demanding and hence often cannot be run with sufficient performance on a portable platform. In recent years, advanced multicore digital signal processors (DSP) have been developed that attain high processing performance while maintaining low levels of power dissipation. These processors enable the implementation of complex algorithms on a portable platform. In this study, the performance of a 3D adaptive filtering algorithm on a DSP is investigated. The performance is assessed by filtering a volume of size 512x256x128 voxels sampled at a pace of 10 MVoxels/sec with an Ultrasound 3D probe. Relative performance and power is addressed between a reference PC (Quad Core CPU) and a TMS320C6678 DSP from Texas Instruments.

  1. Adaptive filtering of microarray gene expression data based on Gaussian mixture decomposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used for discovery of genes expressed differentially between various biological conditions. In microarray experiments the number of analyzed samples is often much lower than the number of genes (probe sets) which leads to many false discoveries. Multiple testing correction methods control the number of false discoveries but decrease the sensitivity of discovering differentially expressed genes. Concerning this problem, filtering methods for improving the power of detection of differentially expressed genes were proposed in earlier papers. These techniques are two-step procedures, where in the first step some pool of non-informative genes is removed and in the second step only the pool of the retained genes is used for searching for differentially expressed genes. Results A very important parameter to choose is the proportion between the sizes of the pools of removed and retained genes. A new method, which we propose, allow to determine close to optimal threshold values for sample means and sample variances for gene filtering. The method is adaptive and based on the decomposition of the histogram of gene expression means or variances into mixture of Gaussian components. Conclusions By performing analyses of several publicly available datasets and simulated datasets we demonstrate that our adaptive method increases sensitivity of finding differentially expressed genes compared to previous methods of filtering microarray data based on using fixed threshold values. PMID:23510016

  2. The first on-site evaluation of a new filter optimized for TARC and developer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Toru; Ishibashi, Takeo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ide, Junichi; Nagano, Masaru; Omura, Koichi; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Numaguchi, Toru

    2008-11-01

    In previous studies, we identified filter properties that have a strong effect on microbubble formation on the downstream side of the filter membrane. A new Highly Asymmetric Polyarylsulfone (HAPAS) filter was developed based on the findings. In the current study, we evaluated newly-developed HAPAS filter in environmentally preferred non-PFOS TARC in a laboratory setting. Test results confirmed that microbubble counts downstream of the filter were lower than those of a conventional HDPE filter. Further testing in a manufacturing environment confirmed that HAPAS filtration of TARC at point of use was able to reduce defectivity caused by microbubbles on both unpatterned and patterned wafers, compared with a HDPE filter.

  3. Multilevel filtering elliptic preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. C. Jay; Chan, Tony F.; Tong, Charles

    1989-01-01

    A class of preconditioners is presented for elliptic problems built on ideas borrowed from the digital filtering theory and implemented on a multilevel grid structure. They are designed to be both rapidly convergent and highly parallelizable. The digital filtering viewpoint allows the use of filter design techniques for constructing elliptic preconditioners and also provides an alternative framework for understanding several other recently proposed multilevel preconditioners. Numerical results are presented to assess the convergence behavior of the new methods and to compare them with other preconditioners of multilevel type, including the usual multigrid method as preconditioner, the hierarchical basis method and a recent method proposed by Bramble-Pasciak-Xu.

  4. Solc filter engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, W. J.; Title, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Solc (1965) filter configuration is presented which is both tunable and spectrally variable, since it possesses an adjustable bandwidth, and which although less efficient than a Lyot filter is attractive because of its spectral versatility. The lossless design, using only an entrance and exit polarizer, improves throughput generally and especially in the IR, where polarizers are less convenient than dichroic sheet polarizers. Attention is given to the transmission profiles of Solc filters with different numbers of elements and split elements, as well as their mechanical design features.

  5. Characterization of three maize bacterial artificial chromosome libraries toward anchoring of the physical map to the genetic map using high-density bacterial artificial chromosome filter hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yim, Young-Sun; Davis, Georgia L; Duru, Ngozi A; Musket, Theresa A; Linton, Eric W; Messing, Joachim W; McMullen, Michael D; Soderlund, Carol A; Polacco, Mary L; Gardiner, Jack M; Coe, Edward H

    2002-12-01

    Three maize (Zea mays) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from inbred line B73. High-density filter sets from all three libraries, made using different restriction enzymes (HindIII, EcoRI, and MboI, respectively), were evaluated with a set of complex probes including the 185-bp knob repeat, ribosomal DNA, two telomere-associated repeat sequences, four centromere repeats, the mitochondrial genome, a multifragment chloroplast DNA probe, and bacteriophage lambda. The results indicate that the libraries are of high quality with low contamination by organellar and lambda-sequences. The use of libraries from multiple enzymes increased the chance of recovering each region of the genome. Ninety maize restriction fragment-length polymorphism core markers were hybridized to filters of the HindIII library, representing 6x coverage of the genome, to initiate development of a framework for anchoring BAC contigs to the intermated B73 x Mo17 genetic map and to mark the bin boundaries on the physical map. All of the clones used as hybridization probes detected at least three BACs. Twenty-two single-copy number core markers identified an average of 7.4 +/- 3.3 positive clones, consistent with the expectation of six clones. This information is integrated into fingerprinting data generated by the Arizona Genomics Institute to assemble the BAC contigs using fingerprint contig and contributed to the process of physical map construction.

  6. Automated synthesis of distortion-invariant filters: AutoMinace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David; Patnaik, Rohit

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents our automated filter-synthesis algorithm for the minimum noise and correlation energy (MINACE) distortion-invariant filter (DIF). We discuss use of this autoMinace filter in face recognition and automatic target recognition (ATR), in which we consider both true-class object classification and rejection of non-database objects (impostors in face recognition and confusers in ATR). We use at least one Minace filter per object class to be recognized; a separate Minace filter or a set of Minace filters is synthesized for each object class. The Minace parameter c trades-off distortion-tolerance (recognition) versus discrimination (impostor/confuser/clutter rejection) performance. Our automated Minace filter-synthesis algorithm (autoMinace) automatically selects the Minace filter parameter c and selects the training set images to be included in the filter, so that we achieve both good recognition and good impostor/confuser and clutter rejection performance; this is achieved using a training and validation set. No impostor/confuser, clutter or test set data is present in the training or validation sets. Use of the peak-to-correlation energy (PCE) ratio is found to perform better than the correlation peak height metric. The use of circular versus linear correlations is addressed; circular correlations require less storage and fewer online computations and are thus preferable. Representative test results for three different databases - visual face, IR ATR, and SAR ATR - are presented. We also discuss an efficient implementation of Minace filters for detection applications, where the filter template is much smaller than the input target scene.

  7. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTRIC FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY), (*MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC FILTERS), CIRCUITS, CAPACITORS, COILS, RESONATORS, STRIP TRANSMISSION LINES, WAVEGUIDES, TUNING DEVICES, PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIERS, FREQUENCY CONVERTERS .

  8. Fast algorithm for calculating optical binary amplitude filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, Jerome; Matalgah, Mustafa M.

    1995-08-01

    A new geometric viewpoint is presented for optimizing a binary amplitude filter based on finding an ordered set of phasors, the uncoiled phasor set (UPS), from the filter object's discrete Fourier transform that determines a convex polygon. The maximum distance across the polygon determines the value of the correlation peak and the set of frequencies that the optimal filter should pass. Algorithms are presented for finding the UPS and the maximum distance across the polygon that are competititve with optimization approaches that use the binning (Farn and Goodman). The new viewpoint provides a simple way to establish a bound on binning error.

  9. Design of Ternary Correlation Filters to Reduce Probability of Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of designing ternary phase and amplitude filters (TPAF's) that reduce the probability of image misclassification for a two-class image set is studied. The Fisher ratio is used as a measure of the correct classification rate, and an attempt is made to maximize this quantity in the filter designs. Given the nonanalytical nature of the design problem, a simulated annealing optimization technique is employed. Computer simulation results are presented for several cases including single in-class and out-of-class image sets and multiple image sets corresponding to the design of synthetic discriminant function filters. Significant improvements are found in expected rates of correct classification in comparison to binary phase-only filters and other TPAF designs. Approaches to accelerate the filter design process are also discussed.

  10. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    HajjHassan, Mohamad; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultra-long multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies. PMID:27873894

  11. Clinical tests of an ultrasonic periodontal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Lynch, John E.; McCombs, Gayle B.

    2002-05-01

    A new ultrasonic periodontal probe has been developed that offers the potential for earlier detection of periodontal disease activity, non-invasive diagnosis, and greater reliability of measurement. A comparison study of the ultrasonic probe to both a manual probe, and a controlled-force probe was conducted to evaluate its clinical effectiveness. Twelve patients enrolled into this study. Two half-month examinations were conducted on each patient, scheduled one hour apart. A one-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results for the three sets of probing depth measurements, followed by a repeated measures analysis to assess the reproducibility of the different probing techniques. These preliminary findings indicate that manual and ultrasonic probing measure different features of the pocket. Therefore, it is not obvious how the two depth measurements correspond to each other. However, both methods exhibited a similar tendency toward increasing pocket depths as Gingival Index scores increased. Based on the small sample size, further studies need to be conducted using a larger population of patients exhibiting a wider range of disease activity. In addition, studies that allow histological examination of the pocket after probing will help further evaluate the clinical effectiveness the ultrasonic probe. Future studies will also aid in the development of more effective automated feature recognition algorithms that convert the ultrasonic echoes into pocket depth readings.

  12. Choosing and using methodological search filters: searchers' views.

    PubMed

    Beale, Sophie; Duffy, Steven; Glanville, Julie; Lefebvre, Carol; Wright, Dianne; McCool, Rachael; Varley, Danielle; Boachie, Charles; Fraser, Cynthia; Harbour, Jenny; Smith, Lynne

    2014-06-01

    Search filters or hedges are search strategies developed to assist information specialists and librarians to retrieve different types of evidence from bibliographic databases. The objectives of this project were to learn about searchers' filter use, how searchers choose search filters and what information they would like to receive to inform their choices. Interviews with information specialists working in, or for, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) were conducted. An online questionnaire survey was also conducted and advertised via a range of email lists. Sixteen interviews were undertaken and 90 completed questionnaires were received. The use of search filters tends to be linked to reducing a large amount of literature, introducing focus and assisting with searches that are based on a single study type. Respondents use numerous ways to identify search filters and can find choosing between different filters problematic because of knowledge gaps and lack of time. Search filters are used mainly for reducing large result sets (introducing focus) and assisting with searches focused on a single study type. Features that would help with choosing filters include making information about filters less technical, offering ratings and providing more detail about filter validation strategies and filter provenance. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Hot-wire probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulla, V.

    1976-01-01

    High-temperature platinum probe measures turbulence and Reynolds shear stresses in high-temperature compressible flows. Probe does not vibrate at high velocities and does not react like strain gage on warmup.

  14. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  15. Compact photonic spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Yachao; Zhou, Junxiao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact photonic spin filter formed by integrating a Pancharatnam-Berry phase lens (focal length of ±f ) into a conventional plano-concave lens (focal length of -f). By choosing the input port of the filter, photons with a desired spin state, such as the right-handed component or the left-handed one, propagate alone its original propagation direction, while the unwanted spin component is quickly diverged after passing through the filter. One application of the filter, sorting the spin-dependent components of vector vortex beams on higher-order Poincaré sphere, is also demonstrated. Our scheme provides a simple method to manipulate light, and thereby enables potential applications for photonic devices.

  16. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  17. Locomotive oil filter

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a locomotive lube oil filter comprised of means for filtering lube oil sufficient for locomotive engine use without filter swelling or plugging due to water in the lube oil. It includes a filter medium having a substantial portion of lignin-containing fiber pulp derived from the disc refining of wood chips having a ligning content of at least about 10 percent under steam pressures in the range of about 90 psig to about 120 psig, at temperatures in the range of from about 330/sup 0/F to about 350/sup 0/F, and using energy levels in the range of from about 8 to about 35 HPD/ADT.

  18. Improved optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Filter includes partial polarizer between birefrigent elements. Plastic film on partial polarizer compensates for any polarization rotation by partial polarizer. Two quarter-wave plates change incident, linearly polarized light into elliptically polarized light.

  19. Westinghouse filter update

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    Hot gas filters have been implemented and operated in four different test facilities: Subpilot scale entrained gasifier, located at the Texaco Montebello Research facilities in California, Foster Wheeler Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion pilot plant facilities, located in Livingston, New Jersey, Slipstream of the American Electric Power (AEP) 70 MW (electric) Tidd-PFBC, located in Brilliant, Ohio, and in the Ahlstrom 10 MW (thermal) Circulating PFBC facility, located in Karhula, Finland. Candle filter testing has occurred at all four facilities; cross flow filter testing has occurred at the Texaco and Foster Wheeler facilities. Table 1 identifies and summarizes the key operating characteristics of these facilities and the type and scale of filter unit tested. A brief description of each project is given.

  20. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  1. Anti-Glare Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Glare from CRT screens has been blamed for blurred vision, eyestrain, headaches, etc. Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. (OCLI) manufactures a coating to reduce glare which was used to coat the windows on the Gemini and Apollo spacecraft. In addition, OCLI offers anti-glare filters (Glare Guard) utilizing the same thin film coating technology. The coating minimizes brightness, provides enhanced contrast and improves readability. The filters are OCLI's first consumer product.

  2. Altered attentional filters in subjects with graded levels of sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bester, Christofer W; Robertson, Donald; Taljaard, Dunay; Hammond, Geoff

    2017-08-01

    Near-threshold tones (targets) in noise that are preceded by cues of the same frequency or occur with a high probability are detected better than tones of other frequencies that may occur with a lower probability (probes); the better detection of targets than probes defines the attentional filter. We measured attentional filters using a cued probe-signal procedure with a two-interval forced-choice (2IFC) method in normal-hearing subjects (N = 15) and subjects with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL; N = 14) with a range of hearing levels. Attentional filters were altered in SNHL subjects, who detected low-frequency probes as well as targets at all hearing levels and who detected high-frequency probes increasingly well with increasing hearing level. These effects were present in both intervals of the 2IFC procedure. As auditory filters measured psychophysically are typically asymmetric in subjects with SNHL, these results suggest that the signal frequencies affected by the attentional filter are governed by the shapes of the auditory filters at and around the cue frequency. The normal-hearing subjects showed the expected attentional filters in the first interval and shallower filters in the second interval, suggesting that the cue-evoked attentional process is transient. In the first interval, both low- and high-frequency probes were detected better as hearing level increased over a narrow range (from -5 to 10 dB at the target frequency), with a resultant loss of attentional filtering. This finding adds to observations of variable auditory function in individuals with clinically normal hearing thresholds established by audiometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Maurice J.; Zaladonis, Larry A.

    1988-09-27

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge using an overhead crane. The filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station.

  4. Alternating minimisation for glottal inverse filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo Bleyer, Ismael; Lybeck, Lasse; Auvinen, Harri; Airaksinen, Manu; Alku, Paavo; Siltanen, Samuli

    2017-06-01

    A new method is proposed for solving the glottal inverse filtering (GIF) problem. The goal of GIF is to separate an acoustical speech signal into two parts: the glottal airflow excitation and the vocal tract filter. To recover such information one has to deal with a blind deconvolution problem. This ill-posed inverse problem is solved under a deterministic setting, considering unknowns on both sides of the underlying operator equation. A stable reconstruction is obtained using a double regularization strategy, alternating between fixing either the glottal source signal or the vocal tract filter. This enables not only splitting the nonlinear and nonconvex problem into two linear and convex problems, but also allows the use of the best parameters and constraints to recover each variable at a time. This new technique, called alternating minimization glottal inverse filtering (AM-GIF), is compared with two other approaches: Markov chain Monte Carlo glottal inverse filtering (MCMC-GIF), and iterative adaptive inverse filtering (IAIF), using synthetic speech signals. The recent MCMC-GIF has good reconstruction quality but high computational cost. The state-of-the-art IAIF method is computationally fast but its accuracy deteriorates, particularly for speech signals of high fundamental frequency (F0). The results show the competitive performance of the new method: With high F0, the reconstruction quality is better than that of IAIF and close to MCMC-GIF while reducing the computational complexity by two orders of magnitude.

  5. Dynamics of polarization buildup by spin filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttimore, N. H.; O'Brien, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much recent research into polarizing an antiproton beam, instigated by the recent proposal from the PAX (Polarized Antiproton eXperiment) project at GSI Darmstadt. It plans to polarize an antiproton beam by repeated interaction with a polarized internal target in a storage ring. The method of polarization by spin filtering requires many of the beam particles to remain within the ring after scattering off the polarized internal target via electromagnetic and hadronic interactions. We present and solve sets of differential equations which describe the buildup of polarization by spin filtering in many different scenarios of interest to projects planning to produce high-intensity polarized beams. These scenarios are: 1) spin filtering of a fully stored beam; 2) spin filtering while the beam is being accumulated, i.e. unpolarized particles are continuously being fed into the beam; 3) the particle input rate is equal to the rate at which particles are being lost due to scattering beyond the ring acceptance angle, the beam intensity remaining constant; 4) increasing the initial polarization of a stored beam by spin filtering; 5) the input of particles into the beam is stopped after a certain amount of time, but spin filtering continues. The rate of depolarization of a stored polarized beam on passing through an electron cooler is also shown to be negligible.

  6. Development and Behavior of Metallic Filter Element and Numerical Simulation of Transport Phenomena during Filter Regeneration Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.; Zhang, J.; Wang, F.; Chen, J.

    2002-09-19

    Ceramic filters have revealed to have good thermal resistance and chemical corrosion resistance, but they are brittle and lack of toughness, and liable to rupture under large temperature swings. Metallic filters with their high strength and toughness and good heat conduction ability have showed good thermal shock resistance, 310S and FeAl intermetallic filter elements have exhibited additionally good chemical corrosion resistance in oxidizing and sulfidizing atmosphere( Sawada 1999 and Sunil et al. 1999). The behavior of metallic filter elements at high temperature was investigated and the filtration efficiency of the filter units for hot gas from a coal gasifier unit was tested. Pulse-jet cleaning of filter elements is a key component in the operation of the filtration unit. The pulse-jet is introduced into the filter element cavities from the clean side, and the dust cakes on the outer surfaces of the filter elements are detached and fall into the filter vessel. Sequential on-line cleaning of filter element groups yields a filter operation with no shutdown for filter regeneration. Development of advanced technologies in the design and operation of the pulse cleaning is one of the important tasks in order to increase the system reliability, to improve the filter life and to increase the filtering performance. The regeneration of filter element in gas filtration at high temperature plays a very important role for the operation of the process. Based on experimental observation and field operation, a numerical model is set up to numerically simulate the momentum and heat transport phenomena in the regeneration process, which is essential for understanding of the process, the optimization of process parameters and improvement of the design of the structure of venturi nozzle and the configuration of the apparatus.

  7. A Magnetoresistance Measuring Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The in line four point probe, commonly used for measuring the sheet resistance in a conductor, cannot measure the anisotropic ferromagnetic magnetoresistance. However, the addition of two contact points that are not collinear with the current contacts give the probe the ability to non-destructively measure the anistropic magnetoresistance. Keywords: Magnetoresistance; Anisotropic; Thin-Film; Permalloy; Four Point Probe; Anisotropic Resistance.

  8. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  9. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, David

    1989-01-01

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. The housing further includes a gas inlet means, a gas outlet means, and means for moving a body of granular material through the zone. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. Disposed on the upstream face of the filter element is a cover screen which isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed and collects a portion of the particulates so as to form a dust cake having openings small enough to exclude the granular material, yet large enough to receive the dust particles. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of prous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses.

  10. Digital filter design approach for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.C.; Ribeiro, P.C.

    1988-04-15

    A review of the traditional method for designing gradiometers is made. A nonrecursive digital filter model for the gradiometer is presented, giving a new set of parameters for the gradiometer identification. Some designs are analyzed using the proposed set. As an example, a true differentiator is designed to be used as the SQUID input coil. It is shown that the differentiator has the same noise rejection as the conventional gradiometer but provides more signal sensitivity.

  11. Kalman filter based control for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Cyril; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Conan, Jean-Marc; Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Fusco, Thierry

    2004-12-01

    Classical Adaptive Optics suffer from a limitation of the corrected Field Of View. This drawback has lead to the development of MultiConjugated Adaptive Optics. While the first MCAO experimental set-ups are presently under construction, little attention has been paid to the control loop. This is however a key element in the optimization process especially for MCAO systems. Different approaches have been proposed in recent articles for astronomical applications : simple integrator, Optimized Modal Gain Integrator and Kalman filtering. We study here Kalman filtering which seems a very promising solution. Following the work of Brice Leroux, we focus on a frequential characterization of kalman filters, computing a transfer matrix. The result brings much information about their behaviour and allows comparisons with classical controllers. It also appears that straightforward improvements of the system models can lead to static aberrations and vibrations filtering. Simulation results are proposed and analysed thanks to our frequential characterization. Related problems such as model errors, aliasing effect reduction or experimental implementation and testing of Kalman filter control loop on a simplified MCAO experimental set-up could be then discussed.

  12. Root-Raised Cosine Filter Implementation That Uses Canonical Signed Digits for High-Speed Digital Filter Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heechul

    1997-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Communications Division has been investigating high-speed digital filters that can operate at a higher speed than those in current use for a digital modulator and demodulator (modem). Using the Canonical Signed Digits (CSD) number representation for filter coefficients is a very effective way to increase the filter's speed while reducing complexity in the digital filter hardware design. This approach is a good alternative to using an expensive parallel-processing design technique or custom, application-specific integrated circuits. Such integrated circuits may not be suitable for applications that require filter speeds faster than what application-specific integrated circuits digital signal processors can offer for a dedicated channel. When a communication channel is a dedicated, multiplication process--a costly, time-consuming process--it can be greatly simplified by a replacement of the filter coefficients with CSD numbers. A computer code written with the MATLAB software package runs the program and generates CSD-represented filter coefficients that are based on minimizing minimum mean square errors. Also, the Alta Group of Cadence's Signal Processing Workstation is used to simulate and analyze the CSD filter responses. The impulse response of the root-raised cosine filter that is used as a base model is defined. From this filter, a set of coefficients is sampled and stored in a file. For the all coefficients, the optimal CSD number for each coefficient is searched on the basis of the minimum-mean-square-errors criterion. Because the distribution of CSD numbers is not uniform, quantization errors tend to be bigger for coefficients greater than 1/2. To offset errors that occur in a region of coefficients between 1/2 to 1 and to better represent fractions with CSD numbers, an extra nonzero digit is allowed for any coefficients exceeding 1/2. This will greatly improve frequency response as well as intersymbol interference at the

  13. Optimized Multichannel Filter Bank with Flat Frequency Response for Texture Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachouie, Nezamoddin N.; Alirezaie, Javad

    2005-12-01

    Previous approaches to texture analysis and segmentation use multichannel filtering by applying a set of filters in the frequency domain or a set of masks in the spatial domain. This paper presents two new texture segmentation algorithms based on multichannel filtering in conjunction with neural networks for feature extraction and segmentation. The features extracted by Gabor filters have been applied for image segmentation and analysis. Suitable choices of filter parameters and filter bank coverage in the frequency domain to optimize the filters are discussed. Here we introduce two methods to optimize Gabor filter bank. First, a Gabor filter bank with a flat response is implemented and the optimal feature dimension is extracted by competitive networks. Second, a subset of Gabor filter bank is selected to compose the best discriminative filters, so that each filter in this small set can discriminate a pair of textures in a given image. In both approaches, multilayer perceptrons are employed to segment the extracted features. The comparisons of segmentation results generated using the proposed methods and previous research using Gabor, discrete cosine transform (DCT), and Laws filters are presented. Finally, the segmentation results generated by applying the optimized filter banks to textured images are presented and discussed.

  14. Small rocket tornado probe

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A (less than 1 lb.) paper rock tornado probe was developed and deployed in an attempt to measure the pressure, temperature, ionization, and electric field variations along a trajectory penetrating a tornado funnel. The requirements of weight and materials were set by federal regulations and a one-meter resolution at a penetration velocity of close to Mach 1 was desired. These requirements were achieved by telemetering a strain gage transducer for pressure, micro size thermister and electric field, and ionization sensors via a pulse time telemetry to a receiver on board an aircraft that digitizes a signal and presents it to a Z80 microcomputer for recording on mini-floppy disk. Recording rate was 2 ms for 8 channels of information that also includes telemetry rf field strength, magnetic field for orientation on the rocket, zero reference voltage for the sensor op amps as well as the previously mentioned items also. The absolute pressure was recorded. Tactically, over 120 h were flown in a Cessna 210 in April and May 1981, and one tornado was encountered. Four rockets were fired at this tornado, missed, and there were many equipment problems. The equipment needs to be hardened and engineered to a significant degree, but it is believed that the feasibility of the probe, tactics, and launch platform for future tornado work has been proven. The logistics of thunderstorm chasing from a remote base in New Mexico is a major difficulty and reliability of the equipment another. Over 50 dummy rockets have been fired to prove trajectories, stability, and photographic capability. Over 25 electronically equipped rockets have been fired to prove sensors transmission, breakaway connections, etc. The pressure recovery factor was calibrated in the Air Force Academy blow-down tunnel. There is a need for more refined engineering and more logistic support.

  15. Facial landmark detection in real-time with correlation filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Viridiana; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    An algorithm for facial landmark detection based on template matched filtering is presented. The algorithm is able to detect and estimate the position of a set of prespecified landmarks by employing a bank of linear filters. Each filter in the bank is trained to detect a single landmark that is located in a small region of the input face image. The filter bank is implemented in parallel on a graphics processing unit to perform facial landmark detection in real-time. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed algorithm are presented and discussed in terms of detection rate, accuracy of landmark location estimation, and real-time efficiency.

  16. Study of the use of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter on pilot control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a filter on the pilot's control output could improve the performance of the pilot-aircraft system. What is needed is a filter with a sharp high frequency cut-off, no resonance peak, and a minimum of lag at low frequencies. The present investigation studies the usefulness of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter in performing the needed function. The nonlinear filter is compared with a linear, first order filter, and no filter. An analytical study using pilot models and a simulation study using experienced test pilots was performed. The results showed that the nonlinear filter does promote quick, steady maneuvering. It is shown that the nonlinear filter attenuates the high frequency remnant and adds less phase lag to the low frequency signal than does the linear filter. It is also shown that the rate limit in the nonlinear filter can be set to be too restrictive, causing an unstable pilot-aircraft system response.

  17. Filter and method of fabricating

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    2006-02-14

    A method of making a filter includes the steps of: providing a substrate having a porous surface; applying to the porous surface a coating of dry powder comprising particles to form a filter preform; and heating the filter preform to bind the substrate and the particles together to form a filter.

  18. Combined diplexer and harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    By using two directional filters having circular waveguide filter cavities, diplexing and harmonic filtering functions can be combined into a more compact integrated waveguide assembly. Device is filter which passes power within its pass band limits, but also has a directional characteristic so power transmitted into two-port output waveguide will travel in only one direction.

  19. DDP-116 general digital filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Graham, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The methods are described for calibrating, selecting filter weights, filtering, and computing filter response functions. These methods are computed on a statistical analyzer (STAN) system with a Honeywell DDP-116 central processor. The following filter types are computed: all pass, low pass, high pass, band pass, band rejection, and derivative.

  20. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  1. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  2. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  3. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  4. Electrostatic Probe with Shielded Probe Insulator Tube for Low Disturbing Plasma Measurements in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2003-07-10

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters of the quasi-neutral plasma in Hall thrusters and similar ExB electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In Hall thrusters, probe-induced perturbations can produce changes in the discharge current and plasma parameters on the order of their steady state values. These perturbations are explored by varying the material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. A possible cause of these perturbations appears to be the secondary electron emission, induced by energetic plasma electrons, from insulator ceramic tubes in which the probe wire is inserted. A new probe in which a low secondary electron emission material, such as metal, shields the probe ceramic tube, is shown to function without producing such large perturbations. A segmentation of this shield further prevents probe -induced perturbations, by not shortening the plasma through the conductive shield. In a set of experiments with a segmented shield probe, the thruster was operated in the input power range of 500-2.5 kW and discharge voltages of 200-500 V, while the probe-induced perturbations of the discharge current were below 4% of its steady state value in the region in which 90% of the voltage drop takes place.

  5. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Testing of Returned Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2017-01-01

    The air revitalization system aboard the International Space Station (ISS) provides the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation due to the microgravity environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Adsorption (HEPA) media filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Segment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. These filters see a replacement interval, as part of maintenance, of 2-5 years dependent on location in the ISS. In this work, we present particulate removal efficiency, pressure drop, and leak test results for a sample set of 8 BFEs returned from the ISS after filter replacement. The results can potentially be utilized by the ISS Program to ascertain whether the present replacement interval can be maintained or extended to balance the on-ground filter inventory with extension of the lifetime of ISS beyond 2024. These results can also provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  6. Anti-clogging filter system

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.

    2015-05-19

    An anti-clogging filter system for filtering a fluid containing large particles and small particles includes an enclosure with at least one individual elongated tubular filter element in the enclosure. The individual elongated tubular filter element has an internal passage, a closed end, an open end, and a filtering material in or on the individual elongated tubular filter element. The fluid travels through the open end of the elongated tubular element and through the internal passage and through the filtering material. An anti-clogging element is positioned on or adjacent the individual elongated tubular filter element and provides a fluid curtain that preferentially directs the larger particulates to one area of the filter material allowing the remainder of the filter material to remain more efficient.

  7. Two-zone pupil filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Campos, Juan; Escalera, Juan C.; Ledesma, Silvia

    2008-03-01

    The performance of pupil filters consisting of two zones each of constant complex amplitude transmittance is investigated. For filters where the transmittance is real, different classes of potentially useful filter are identified and optimized. These include leaky filters with an inner zone of low amplitude transmittance, pure phase filters with phase change of π, and equal area filters. The first of these minimizes the relative power in the outer rings for a given axial resolution, the second maximizes the Strehl ratio for a given transverse resolution, and the third minimizes the relative power in the outer rings for a given transverse resolution. Complex filters can give an axially shifted maximum in intensity: the performance parameters calculated relative to the true focus are investigated for some different classes of filter, but filters with phase change not equal to π are found to give inferior performance to the real value filters.

  8. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.J.; Zaladonis, L.A.

    1987-07-22

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station. 6 figs.

  9. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  10. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  11. Variable flexure-based fluid filter

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steve B.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Marshall, Graham; Wolcott, Duane

    2007-03-13

    An apparatus and method for filtering particles from a fluid comprises a fluid inlet, a fluid outlet, a variable size passage between the fluid inlet and the fluid outlet, and means for adjusting the size of the variable size passage for filtering the particles from the fluid. An inlet fluid flow stream is introduced to a fixture with a variable size passage. The size of the variable size passage is set so that the fluid passes through the variable size passage but the particles do not pass through the variable size passage.

  12. Enhanced adaptive loop filter for motion compensated frame.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Joe; Seo, Chan-Won; Han, Jong-Ki; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2011-08-01

    We propose an adaptive loop filter to remove the redundancy between current and motion compensated frames so that the residual signal is minimized, thus coding efficiency increases. The loop filter coefficients and offset are optimized for each frame or a set of blocks to minimize the total energy of the residual signal resulting from motion estimation and compensation. The optimized loop filter with offset is applied for the set of blocks where the filtering process gives coding gain based upon rate-distortion cost. The proposed loop filter is used for the motion compensated frame whereas the conventional adaptive interpolation filter (AIF) is applied to the reference frames to interpolate the subpixel values. Another conventional scheme adaptive loop filter (ALF), is used after deblocking filtering to enhance quality of reconstructed frames, not to minimize energy of residual signal. The proposed loop filter can be used in combination with the AIF and ALF. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm provides the averaged bit reduction of 8% compared to conventional H.264/AVC scheme. When the proposed scheme is combined with AIF and ALF, the coding gain increases even further.

  13. Filter component assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.W.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide a more ruggedized filter system that utilizes porous ceramic filters which have improved resistance to damage resulting from crack propagation, thermal fatigue and/or thermal excursions during plant or process transient conditions, and/or mechanical ash bridging events within the candle filter array. As part of the current Phase 1, Task 1, effort of this program, Westinghouse is evaluating the filtration characteristics, mechanical integrity, and corrosion resistance of the following advanced or second generation candle filters for use in advanced coal-fired process applications: 3M CVI-SiC composite--chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide into an aluminosilicate Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber preform; DuPont PRD-66--filament wound candle filter structure containing corundum, cordierite, cristobalite, and mullite; DuPont SiC-SiC--chemical infiltration of silicon carbide into a silicon carbide Nicalon{trademark} fiber mat or felt preform; and IF and P Fibrosic{trademark}--vacuum infiltrated oxide-based chopped fibrous matrix. Results to date are presented.

  14. Filter cake characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.

    1995-11-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to provide gas turbine protection. The ILEC system is a ceramic barrier hot gas filter (HGF) that removes particulate while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur, alkali, and potentially other contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure fuel gases, or combustion gases. The gas-phase contaminant removal is performed by sorbent particles injected into the HGF. The overall objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the technical feasibility of the ILEC concept for multi-contaminant control, and to provide test data applicable to the design of subsequent field tests. The program has conducted ceramic barrier filter testing under simulated PFBC conditions to resolve issues relating to filter cake permeability, pulse cleaning, and filter cake additive performance. ILEC testing has also been performed to assess the potential for in-filter sulfur and alkali removal.

  15. Logical structural filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Edward R.; Chen, Yidong

    1998-06-01

    Binary granulometric filters are formed from unions of parameterized openings, a point passing the filter if and only if a translate of at least one structuring element fits in the image and contains the point. A granulometry induces a reconstructive granulometry by passing any image component not eliminated by the granulometry. As historically studied in the context of Matheron's granulometric theory, reconstructive granulometries appear as unions of reconstructive parameterized openings. The theory is extended to a much wider class of filters: a logical structural filter (LSF) is formed as a union of intersections of both reconstructive and complementary reconstructive openings. A reconstructive opening passes a component if and only if at least one translate of the structuring element fits inside; a complementary reconstructive opening passes a component if and only if no translate of the structuring element fits inside. The original reconstructive granulometries form the special class of disjunctive LSFs. Complement-free LSFs form granulometries in a slightly more general sense; LSFs containing complements are not increasing and therefore not openings. Along with the relevant algebraic representations for LSFs, the theories of optimal and adaptive granulometric filters are extended to LSFs, a systematic formulation of adaptive transitions is given, transition probabilities for adaptation are found, and two applications to biological imaging are presented.

  16. Ceramic filter material issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.W.; Brown, J.J.; Brown, N.R.

    1993-06-01

    The development of advanced power production processes such as pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is important to assure the energy future of the United States. These power producing processes can potentially produce electric power at competitive prices in an environmentally benign manner. The use of high temperature filters is required in these processes to assure high operating efficiency. However, high temperature filters have not proven to be durable in these applications. The objective of the effort is to identify and investigate the filter material degradation mechanisms. The filter materials examined under this project are silicon carbide based ceramic candle filters from two manufactures: Schumacher and Refractron. Specifically, the Schumacher Diaschumalith F40 and the Refractron 70/3 with 442-T binder were subjected to a series of tests which examined their ability to withstand thermal fatigue and chemical corrosion from steam and alkali. Both these candles are composed to silicon carbide grains in an alumina/silica based binder. There are differences in binder formulation between the two candles and each manufacturer has a different approach to forming the filtration membrane on the candle surface.

  17. Filters for Submillimeter Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    New manufacturing process produces filters strong, yet have small, precise dimensions and smooth surface finish essential for dichroic filtering at submillimeter wavelengths. Many filters, each one essentially wafer containing fine metal grid made at same time. Stacked square wires plated, fused, and etched to form arrays of holes. Grid of nickel and tin held in brass ring. Wall thickness, thickness of filter (hole depth) and lateral hole dimensions all depend upon operating frequency and filter characteristics.

  18. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  19. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.; Starrett, H.S.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this program have been: (1) the post-test evaluation of candle filters, (2) to measure the material properties of current filter materials, destructively and non-destructively, and to relate these properties and behaviors to in-service performance, (3) to develop an understanding of the material requirements for hot gas filter elements, (4) to develop material property goals for filter materials, and (5) to establish test matrices and a protocol to evaluate candidate filter materials.

  20. DOE HEPA filter test program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This standard establishes essential elements of a Department of Energy (DOE) program for testing HEPA filters to be installed in DOE nuclear facilities or used in DOE-contracted activities. A key element is the testing of HEPA filters for performance at a DOE Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. Other key elements are (1) providing for a DOE HEPA filter procurement program, and (2) verifying that HEPA filters to be installed in nuclear facilities appear on a Qualified Products List (QPL).

  1. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  2. Implementation of the GAUSSIAN 78 programs on the NYU VAX/11-780: a probe into basis set and correlation effects on the structure of molecular complexes. [Complexes of p- and m-hydroxylaniline with formamidinium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Topiol, S; Moskowitz, J W; Osman, R; Weinstein, H

    1980-04-01

    The program package is used in a theoretical study of molecular complexes that serve as models of drug receptor interactions. The complexes are of para-hydroxyaniline and meta-hydroxyaniline with formamidinium cation. Results indicate that the description of the nature of interaction obtained at the STO-3G SCF level does not change when the basis set is extended to the 4-31G level or when correlation effects are included to second order in a Moeller-Plesset formulation. 5 figures, 4 tables. (DLC)

  3. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, Kelly; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Cimon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. Methods The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. Results For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%–87%) than for drugs (88%–93%) in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%–81%) than in MEDLINE (67%–87%) for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. Conclusions In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs. PMID:27366123

  4. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Kelly; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Cimon, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%-87%) than for drugs (88%-93%) in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%-81%) than in MEDLINE (67%-87%) for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs.

  5. Tunable blocking filter for laser bigarmonic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    The tunable blocking filter for the laser bigarmonic spectrometer is described. The filter prevents damage of the photoreciever CCD cells by the power optical beam. The calibration of the filter is performed by the automated procedure that speed - up the process and give the ability to check the adjustement of the interferometer of the filter avoiding it"s disassembling from the optical installation of the spectrometer. A group of laser spectroscopy specialists of the Institute of Atmospheric Optics has developed a laser spectrometer with a bigarmonic source for experimental investigation of the responce of molecular media exitied by bigarmonic optical field and verification of the hypothese about generation an optical field in these media. The spectrometer consists of: a) tunable laser based on two alumoittrium heads and frequency multiplicators, b) optical installation and gas probing cell, c) diffraction spectrograph (symbols available in paper) and linear CCD photoreceiver ILX-511, d) CAMAC modules, the computer and proper software. Peculiarity of described scheme consist in the necessity to register reemission coaxial with the pumping field. The wavelength of investigated reemission signal is close of the halfsum of the wavelength of the pumping bigarmonic. To avoid falling intense light on CCD device, which can physically damage photorecieving cells or, as minimum, completely mask usefull signal, it is necessary to mount an blocking optical filter into optical installation of the spectrometer. The filter have to provide continiuous blocking (when laser emitter tunes in diapasone of Δλ1,2 ≈ 18526 +/- 4 cm-1) of the baffled components of the bigarmonic pumping. The present work is aimed to developing, preparing and testing such tunable rejecting filter. The Fabri - Perout interferometer was choosed as base element of the optical filter. The interferometer must be tuned to place next transmission maximum near the frequency of the investigating signal. In

  6. Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2012-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

  7. Software Would Largely Automate Design of Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Jason C. H.; Negast, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Embedded Navigation Filter Automatic Designer (ENFAD) is a computer program being developed to automate the most difficult tasks in designing embedded software to implement a Kalman filter in a navigation system. The most difficult tasks are selection of error states of the filter and tuning of filter parameters, which are timeconsuming trial-and-error tasks that require expertise and rarely yield optimum results. An optimum selection of error states and filter parameters depends on navigation-sensor and vehicle characteristics, and on filter processing time. ENFAD would include a simulation module that would incorporate all possible error states with respect to a given set of vehicle and sensor characteristics. The first of two iterative optimization loops would vary the selection of error states until the best filter performance was achieved in Monte Carlo simulations. For a fixed selection of error states, the second loop would vary the filter parameter values until an optimal performance value was obtained. Design constraints would be satisfied in the optimization loops. Users would supply vehicle and sensor test data that would be used to refine digital models in ENFAD. Filter processing time and filter accuracy would be computed by ENFAD.

  8. The effect of biased plates on transport of vacuum arc plasma through rectangular curved magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, W. Y.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Zhao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Filtered cathode vacuum arc deposition can remove the macroparticles produced from the cathode. Positively biasing the whole filter or inserting a biased plate in the filter can increase the plasma transport efficiency. We developed a curved magnetic filter with rectangular cross-section to improve the coating efficiency. In this study, the effect of biased plates at outer-wall and inner-wall on the transport efficiency of vacuum arc plasma through rectangular curved magnetic filter was investigated. A Langmuir probe system is used to measure the distribution properties of the filtered plasma at 15 places in the outlet plane of the filter. The results showed that a positively biased plate at inner-wall would increase the output ion current density and make the plasma concentrate to the middle of the outlet plane.

  9. Retrievable Filter Update: The Denali Vena Cava Filter.

    PubMed

    Hahn, David

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a gradual evolution of the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, as the indications for caval filtration have expanded since the first such filters came into use. However, the particular design of retrievable or optional filters has introduced a subset of both symptomatic and asymptomatic device failures that have prompted a reassessment in the approach to patient selection as well as a new lexicon of technical considerations when considering retrieval. The Denali Vena Cava Filter (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc., Tempe, AZ) represents one of the latest filters to come to market that specifically addresses the various issues of its predecessors. While the body of published experience with this filter is still relatively sparse, the incidence of filter tilt, strut perforation, strut fracture, and filter migration appears acceptably low and the filters remain relatively easy to retrieve even after long dwell times.

  10. Retrievable Filter Update: The Denali Vena Cava Filter

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, David

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a gradual evolution of the retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, as the indications for caval filtration have expanded since the first such filters came into use. However, the particular design of retrievable or optional filters has introduced a subset of both symptomatic and asymptomatic device failures that have prompted a reassessment in the approach to patient selection as well as a new lexicon of technical considerations when considering retrieval. The Denali Vena Cava Filter (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc., Tempe, AZ) represents one of the latest filters to come to market that specifically addresses the various issues of its predecessors. While the body of published experience with this filter is still relatively sparse, the incidence of filter tilt, strut perforation, strut fracture, and filter migration appears acceptably low and the filters remain relatively easy to retrieve even after long dwell times. PMID:26622101

  11. Measuring Redshifts of Emission-line Galaxies Using Ramp Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ryan William; Bohman, John; McNeff, Mathew; Holden, Marcus; Moody, Joseph; Joner, Michael D.; Barnes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Photometric redshifts are routinely obtained for galaxies without emission using broadband photometry. It is possible in theory to derive reasonably accurate (< 200 km/sec) photometric redshift values for emission-line objects using "ramp" filters with a linearly increasing/decreasing transmission through the bandpass. To test this idea we have obtained a set of filters tuned for isolating H-alpha at a redshift range of 0-10,000 km/sec. These filters consist of two that vary close to linearly in transmission, have opposite slope, and cover the wavelength range from 655nm - 685nm, plus a Stromgren y and 697nm filter to measure the continuum. Redshifts are derived from the ratio of the ramp filters indices after the continuum has been subtracted out. We are finishing the process of obtaining photometric data on a set of about 100 galaxies with known redshift to calibrate the technique and will report on our results.

  12. Silica dust exposure: Effect of filter size to compliance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Suhaily; Latif, Mohd Talib; Khan, Md Firoz; Leman, Abdul Mutalib; Goh, Eric; Jaafar, Shoffian Amin

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring of respirable dust was performed using a set of integrated sampling system consisting of sampling pump attached with filter media and separating device such as cyclone or special cassette. Based on selected method, filter sizes are either 25 mm or 37 mm poly vinyl chloride (PVC) filter. The aim of this study was to compare performance of two types of filter during personal respirable dust sampling for silica dust under field condition. The comparison strategy focused on the final compliance judgment based on both dataset. Eight hour parallel sampling of personal respirable dust exposure was performed among 30 crusher operators at six quarries. Each crusher operator was attached with parallel set of integrated sampling train containing either 25 mm or 37 mm PVC filter. Each set consisted of standard flow SKC sampler, attached with SKC GS3 cyclone and 2 pieces cassette loaded with 5.0 µm of PVC filter. Samples were analyzed by gravimetric technique. Personal respirable dust exposure between the two types of filters indicated significant positive correlation (p < 0.05) with moderate relationship (r2 = 0.6431). Personal exposure based on 25 mm PVC filter indicated 0.1% non-compliance to overall data while 37 mm PVC filter indicated similar findings at 0.4 %. Both data showed similar arithmetic mean(AM) and geometric mean(GM). In overall we concluded that personal respirable dust exposure either based on 25mm or 37mm PVC filter will give similar compliance determination. Both filters are reliable to be used in respirable dust monitoring for silica dust related exposure.

  13. Kalman filter modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation of appropriate state-space models for Kalman filtering applications is studied. The so-called model is completely specified by four matrix parameters and the initial conditions of the recursive equations. Once these are determined, the die is cast, and the way in which the measurements are weighted is determined foreverafter. Thus, finding a model that fits the physical situation at hand is all important. Also, it is often the most difficult aspect of designing a Kalman filter. Formulation of discrete state models from the spectral density and ARMA random process descriptions is discussed. Finally, it is pointed out that many common processes encountered in applied work (such as band-limited white noise) simply do not lend themselves very well to Kalman filter modeling.

  14. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  15. Fixation-based filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Thomas J.; Lockwood, Robert J.

    1992-11-01

    Fixation and visual attention are central themes in active vision research, and are closely related. In this paper we discuss one of several ways in which they interact. We describe filtering methods that allow an agent to selectively extract features of the object it is fixating and suppress features of foreground and background objects. The methods are essentially depth filters; they use disparity or motion information to suppress image features that are far from the fixation point in depth. They share a simple computational structure based on the Laplacian pyramid, and are readily amenable to hardware implementation. We present the filters and the properties of fixation geometry that allow them to work, and discuss their behavior. We present methods of implementing them in real time and describe ways of extending them to other features besides depth.

  16. Optical Resonators and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Hermann A.; Popović, Miloš A.; Watts, Michael R.; Manolatou, Christina; Little, Brent E.; Chu, Sai T.

    Dielectric optical resonators of small size are considered for densely-integrated optical components. High-index-contrast microresonators of low Q are shown, using microwave design principles, to permit wavelength-sized, low-loss, reflectionless waveguide bends and low-crosstalk waveguide crossings. The analysis and synthesis of high Q high-order microring- and racetrack-resonator channel add/drop filters are reviewed, supplemented by simulation examples. Standing-wave, distributed Bragg resonator filters are also described. The study is unified by a coupled-mode theory approach. Rigorous numerical simulations are justified for the design of high-index-contrast optical "circuits". Integrated-optical components are described within a polarization-diversity scheme that circumvents the inherent polarization dependence of high-index-contrast devices. Filters fabricated in academic and commercial research, and a review of microring resonator technology, advances and applications are presented.

  17. Generalized Hofmann quantum process fidelity bounds for quantum filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Fiurášek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    We propose and investigate bounds on the quantum process fidelity of quantum filters, i.e., probabilistic quantum operations represented by a single Kraus operator K . These bounds generalize the Hofmann bounds on the quantum process fidelity of unitary operations [H. F. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160504 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.160504] and are based on probing the quantum filter with pure states forming two mutually unbiased bases. Determination of these bounds therefore requires far fewer measurements than full quantum process tomography. We find that it is particularly suitable to construct one of the probe bases from the right eigenstates of K , because in this case the bounds are tight in the sense that if the actual filter coincides with the ideal one, then both the lower and the upper bounds are equal to 1. We theoretically investigate the application of these bounds to a two-qubit optical quantum filter formed by the interference of two photons on a partially polarizing beam splitter. For an experimentally convenient choice of factorized input states and measurements we study the tightness of the bounds. We show that more stringent bounds can be obtained by more sophisticated processing of the data using convex optimization and we compare our methods for different choices of the input probe states.

  18. Geometric Effects When Measuring Small Holes With Micro Contact Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Sahay, Chittaranjan

    2011-01-01

    A coordinate measuring machine with a suitably small probe can be used to measure micro-features such as the diameter and form of small holes (often about 100 μm in diameter). When measuring small holes, the clearance between the probe tip and the part is sometimes nearly as small as other characteristic lengths (such as probe deflection or form errors) associated with the measurement. Under these circumstances, the basic geometry of the measurement is much different than it is for the measurement of a macroscopic object. Various geometric errors are greatly magnified, and consequently sources of error that are totally irrelevant when measuring macroscopic artifacts can become important. In this article we discuss errors associated with misalignment or non-orthogonality of the probe axes, probe-tip radius compensation, and mechanical filtering. PMID:26989585

  19. Groundspeed filtering for CTAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Ground speed is one of the radar observables which is obtained along with position and heading from NASA Ames Center radar. Within the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS), groundspeed is converted into airspeed using the wind speeds which CTAS obtains from the NOAA weather grid. This airspeed is then used in the trajectory synthesis logic which computes the trajectory for each individual aircraft. The time history of the typical radar groundspeed data is generally quite noisy, with high frequency variations on the order of five knots, and occasional 'outliers' which can be significantly different from the probable true speed. To try to smooth out these speeds and make the ETA estimate less erratic, filtering of the ground speed is done within CTAS. In its base form, the CTAS filter is a 'moving average' filter which averages the last ten radar values. In addition, there is separate logic to detect and correct for 'outliers', and acceleration logic which limits the groundspeed change in adjacent time samples. As will be shown, these additional modifications do cause significant changes in the actual groundspeed filter output. The conclusion is that the current ground speed filter logic is unable to track accurately the speed variations observed on many aircraft. The Kalman filter logic however, appears to be an improvement to the current algorithm used to smooth ground speed variations, while being simpler and more efficient to implement. Additional logic which can test for true 'outliers' can easily be added by looking at the difference in the a priori and post priori Kalman estimates, and not updating if the difference in these quantities is too large.

  20. Filtering with State-Observation Examples via Kernel Monte Carlo Filter.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Motonobu; Nishiyama, Yu; Gretton, Arthur; Fukumizu, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    This letter addresses the problem of filtering with a state-space model. Standard approaches for filtering assume that a probabilistic model for observations (i.e., the observation model) is given explicitly or at least parametrically. We consider a setting where this assumption is not satisfied; we assume that the knowledge of the observation model is provided only by examples of state-observation pairs. This setting is important and appears when state variables are defined as quantities that are very different from the observations. We propose kernel Monte Carlo filter, a novel filtering method that is focused on this setting. Our approach is based on the framework of kernel mean embeddings, which enables nonparametric posterior inference using the state-observation examples. The proposed method represents state distributions as weighted samples, propagates these samples by sampling, estimates the state posteriors by kernel Bayes' rule, and resamples by kernel herding. In particular, the sampling and resampling procedures are novel in being expressed using kernel mean embeddings, so we theoretically analyze their behaviors. We reveal the following properties, which are similar to those of corresponding procedures in particle methods: the performance of sampling can degrade if the effective sample size of a weighted sample is small, and resampling improves the sampling performance by increasing the effective sample size. We first demonstrate these theoretical findings by synthetic experiments. Then we show the effectiveness of the proposed filter by artificial and real data experiments, which include vision-based mobile robot localization.

  1. The design of matching pursuit filters.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P J

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents a new technique for creating efficient and compact models from data, called matching pursuit filters. The design of a matching pursuit filter is based on an adapted wavelet expansion, where the expansion is adapted to both the data and the pattern recognition problem being addressed. This contrasts with most adaptation schemes, where the representation is a function of the data, but not of the problem to be solved. This approach does not decompose the images in the training set individually, but rather determines the expansion by simultaneously decomposing all the images. Because it uses two-dimensional wavelets as the building blocks for the decomposition, the representation is explicitly two-dimensional and is composed of local information. Matching pursuit filters can be trained to detect, recognize, or identify objects and have been applied to recognizing faces and detecting objects in infrared imagery.

  2. Optical Kalman filtering for missile guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Neuman, C. P.; Lycas, J.

    1984-01-01

    Optical systolic array processors constitute a powerful and general-purpose set of optical architectures with high computational rates. In this paper, Kalman filtering, a novel application for these architectures, is investigated. All required operations are detailed; their realization by optical and special-purpose analog electronics are specified; and the processing time of the system is quantified. The specific Kalman filter application chosen is for an air-to-air missile guidance controller. The architecture realized in this paper meets the design goal of a fully adaptive Kalman filter which processes a measurement every 1 msec. The vital issue of flow and pipelining of data and operations in a systolic array processor is addressed. The approach is sufficiently general and can be realized on an optical or digital systolic array processor.

  3. Spin Filtering Studies at COSY and AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    The high physics potential of experiments with stored high-energy polarized antiprotons led to the proposal of PAX (Polarized Antiproton eXperiment) [1] for the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR at GSI (Darmstadt/Germany). It is proposed to polarize a stored antiproton beam by means of spin filtering with a polarized H (D) gas target. The feasibility of spin filtering has been demonstrated in the FILTEX experiment. The current interpretation foresees a self-cancellation of the electron contribution to the filtering process and only the hadronic contribution is effective. Several experimental studies with protons (at COSY/Jülich) as well as antiprotons (at AD/CERN) will be carried out to test the principle and measure p¯p⃗ and p¯d⃗ cross sections. A polarized internal gas target (PIT) with surrounding Silicon detectors immersed into a low-β section has to be set up.

  4. Comparing Cognitive Interviewing and Online Probing: Do They Find Similar Results?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meitinger, Katharina; Behr, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the application of probing techniques in cognitive interviewing (CI) and online probing (OP). Even though the probing is similar, the methods differ regarding typical mode setting, sample size, level of interactivity, and goals. We analyzed probing answers to the International Social Survey Programme item battery on specific…

  5. Analyzing subcellular structure with optical Fourier filtering based on Gabor filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.; Sierra, Heidy

    2013-02-01

    Label-free measurement of subcellular morphology can be used to track dynamically cellular function under various conditions and has important applications in cellular monitoring and in vitro cell assays. We show that optical filtering of scattered light by two-dimensional Gabor filters allows for direct and highly sensitive measurement of sample structure. The Gabor filters, which are defined by their spatial frequency, orientation and Gaussian envelope, can be used to track locally and in situ the characteristic size and orientation of structures within the sample. Our method consists of sequentially implementing a set of Gabor filters via a spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate Fourier plane during optical imaging and identifying the filters that yield maximum signal. Using this setup, we show that Gabor filtering of light forward-scattered by spheres yields an optical response which varies linearly with diameter between 100nm and 2000nm. The optical filtering sensitivity to changes in diameter is on the order of 20nm and can be achieved at low image resolution. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate that this linear response can be predicted from scatter theory and does not vary significantly with changes in refractive index ratio. By applying this Fourier filtering method in samples consisting of diatoms and cells, we generate false-color images of the object that encode at each pixel the size of the local structures within the object. The resolution of these encoded size maps in on the order of 0.36μm. The pixel histograms of these encoded images directly provide 20nm resolved "size spectra", depicting the size distribution of structures within the analyzed object. We use these size spectra to differentiate the morphology of apoptosis-competent and bax/bak null apoptosis-resistant cells during cell death. We also utilize the sensitivity of the Gabor filters to object orientation to track changes in organelle morphology, and detect mitochondrial

  6. Electronically tuned optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, J. A.; Pasierb, E. F.; Oh, C. S.; Mccaffrey, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed account is given of efforts to develop a three layer, polychromic filter that can be tuned electronically. The operation of the filter is based on the cooperative alignment of pleochroic dye molecules by nematic liquid crystals activated by electric fields. This orientation produces changes in the optical density of the material and thus changes in the color of light transmitted through the medium. In addition, attempts to improve materials and devices which employ field induced changes of a cholesteric to a nematic liquid crystal are presented.

  7. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2003-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in August 2003. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  8. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    PubMed

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  9. How gradients in porosity can make a better filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Ian; Bruna, Maria; Dalwadi, Mohit

    2015-11-01

    Depth filters are a common device for removing contaminants from fluid. Porosity-graded filters, whose porosities decrease with depth, have been shown experimentally to offer improved filtration efficiency over filters with uniform porosity, by allowing contaminants to be trapped more evenly within the filter media. However, experiments are unable to probe the microscopic behavior, and so the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for this improved filtration are unclear. We use homogenization theory to derive a macroscopic model for the fluid flow and particle trapping within a porosity-graded depth filter. We find that gradients in porosity induce a macroscale particle advection in the direction of reducing porosity and show how particle trapping is more evenly spread through the filter for a decreasing porosity compared with a uniform porosity. By quantifying the removal rate, we show how a given operating regime can be fine-tuned to improve filter efficiency. The talk is accompanied by an online demonstration of MEMFI, a software package in which audience members may explore for themselves the effect of porosity gradients in user-specified operating regimes.

  10. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  11. Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper

    SciTech Connect

    Grames, J M; Benesch, J F; Clark, J; Hansknecht, J; Kazimi, R; Machie, D; Poelker, M; Stutzman, M L; Suleiman, R; Zhang, Y

    2011-03-01

    A new 4pi spin manipulator composed of two Wien filters oriented orthogonally and separated by two solenoids has been installed at the CEBAF/Jefferson Lab photoinjector. The new spin manipulator is used to precisely set the electron spin direction at an experiment in any direction (in or out of plane of the accelerator) and provides the means to reverse, or flip, the helicity of the electron beam on a daily basis. This reversal is being employed to suppress systematic false asymmetries that can jeopardize challenging parity violation experiments that strive to measure increasingly small physics asymmetries [*,**,***]. The spin manipulator is part of the ultra-high vacuum polarized electron source beam line and has been successfully operated with 100keV and 130keV electron beam at high current (>100 microAmps). A unique feature of the device is that spin-flipping requires only the polarity of one solenoid magnet be changed. Performance characteristics of the Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper will be summarized.

  12. Saturn Science from Entry Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Coustenis, Athena; Lunine, Jonathan; Simon-Miller, Amy; Atreya, Sushil; Brinckerhoff, William; Colaprete, Anthony; Guillot, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul; Reh, Kim; Spilker, Linda; Spilker, Tom; Webster, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Data from atmospheric entry probe missions at the giant planets could uniquely discriminate between competing theories of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres, providing for valuable comparative studies of giant planets as well as providing a laboratory for studying the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, and interiors of all the planets including Earth. The giant planets also represent a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems. For these reasons, a Saturn Probe mission with a shallow probe is ranked by the recent U.S. Planetary Science Decadal Survey as a high priority for a New Frontiers class mission. Atmospheric constituents needed to constrain theories of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of the giant planets could be accessed and sampled by shallow entry probes. Many important constituents are either spectrally inactive or are beneath an atmospheric overburden that is optically thick at useful wavelengths and are therefore not remotely accessible by flyby or orbiting spacecraft. A small, scientifically focused shallow entry probe mission could make critical abundance measurements of key constituents, and could measure profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at a vertical resolution that is significantly higher than could be achieved by remote sensing techniques. The Galileo mission began the detailed study of the solar system's two gas giants by dropping an entry probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter and deploying an orbiter around Jupiter. In 2016-2017 the Juno mission will make measurements of Jupiter's deep oxygen abundance, and gravitational and magnetic fields. In the same epoch, the Cassini orbiter is planned to pursue a set of Juno-like orbits to make comparable gravitational and magnetic field measurements of Saturn. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe would complete the quartet of missions needed for a comparative study of the two gas giants, leading to improved

  13. Overview of the Galileo Probe Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.; Smith, M. A.; Sobeck, C. K.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995, for the first time directly sampling the atmosphere of one of the outer planets. The entry was the most difficult ever attempted in terms of heat and deceleration loads. The probe and all scientific instruments functioned successfully, and returned data on composition, clouds, thermal structure, winds, energy balance, lightning, and inner radiation belts. A probe mission overview is presented, highlighting the key mission events and major science objectives. The purpose of the overview is to set the stage for the following papers which describe findings from the probe scientific investigations and discuss implications of the probe results.

  14. Aberration extraction in the hartmann test by use of spatial filters.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Sánchez, C; Camacho-Basilio, G; Jaramillo-Núñez, A; Gale, D

    1999-06-01

    Using a computer, we generated a set of filters to aid in the retrieval of aberration functions from Hartmanngrams. These filters consist of discrete two-dimensional data points, like the Hartmanngrams themselves, and are orthogonalized by the Gram-Schmidt procedure. The aberration coefficients are obtained by calculation of the scalar product of the Hartmanngram and each orthogonal filter.

  15. Multipressure and Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    Aerodynamic probe is a small cylinder tube holding a network of tiny tubes leading to various ports. Six parameters are recorded simultaneously with little interference with aerodynamic flow. Two tubes connected by a hot-wire tungsten probe sense steady and fluctuating components of total and static pressures; the feedbacks from these tubes are input into differential-pressure sensors to measure fluctuating components of the pressures. Data are recorded by instruments at the back end of the probe.

  16. Microwave photonic filter with multiple taps based on single semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Enming; Zhou, Lina; Yu, Yuan; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2010-08-01

    A novel technique to implement a microwave photonic filter structure with multiple taps and arbitrary frequency response is presented. The proposed filter is based on Four-Wave Mixing (FWM) and Cross-Gain Modulation (XGM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Two-tap notch filter and three-tap bandpass filter with arbitrary bipolar tap generation, high rejection ratio, and widely tunability are successfully demonstrated in the experiment. Extensions to this concept by adding new probe light to provide more taps and improve the bandwidth to high frequency regime are also discussed.

  17. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  18. Rotary probe traversing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenson, Gustave J.

    1985-04-01

    A simple mechanical device is presented which allows a probe to scan a plane in space without translating the probe support. The mechanism relies on the rotation of two shafts, one of which rotates the probe through space and the other controls the probe offset from the axis of rotation. The characteristic width of the area swept out is four times the characteristic width of the device. A simple ratcheting gear allows adjacent planes to be scanned for the purpose of obtaining gradients. Computerized control of the shafts rotations also allows noncircular domains to be scanned.

  19. Transient internal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Mattick, Arthur T.

    1993-12-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas that are inaccessible with ordinary stationary probes. A small probe of magneto-optic (Verdet) material is fired through a plasma at speeds of several km/sec, illuminated by a laser beam. The beam's polarization is rotated in the probe by the local magnetic field and retroreflection back to a polarimetry detector allows determination of the B-field profile across the diameter of a plasma at a spatial resolution of better than 1-cm and an absolute B-field resolution of a few tens of Gauss. The principal components of a TIP diagnostic system were developed and tested. A two-stage light gas gun was constructed that accelerates 30-caliber projectiles to 3 km/sec, and methods were examined for stripping a lexan sabot from a probe prior to entry into a plasma. Probes of CdMnTe and FR-5 Verdet glass were fabricated, and a polarimetry system was constructed for resolving polarization to within 0.25 deg. The diagnostic was validated by measuring a static B-field with a moving (dropped) TIP probe, and finding agreement with Hall-probe measurements to within experimental accuracy (40 Gauss).

  20. Automatic sets and Delone sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbé, A.; von Haeseler, F.

    2004-04-01

    Automatic sets D\\subset{\\bb Z}^m are characterized by having a finite number of decimations. They are equivalently generated by fixed points of certain substitution systems, or by certain finite automata. As examples, two-dimensional versions of the Thue-Morse, Baum-Sweet, Rudin-Shapiro and paperfolding sequences are presented. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for an automatic set D\\subset{\\bb Z}^m to be a Delone set in {\\bb R}^m . The result is then extended to automatic sets that are defined as fixed points of certain substitutions. The morphology of automatic sets is discussed by means of examples.

  1. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  2. Digital hum filtering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, R.W.; Anderson, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    Data may be overprinted by a steady-state cyclical noise (hum). Steady-state indicates that the noise is invariant with time; its attributes, frequency, amplitude, and phase, do not change with time. Hum recorded on seismic data usually is powerline noise and associated higher harmonics; leakage from full-waveform rectified cathodic protection devices that contain the odd higher harmonics of powerline frequencies; or vibrational noise from mechanical devices. The fundamental frequency of powerline hum may be removed during data acquisition with the use of notch filters. Unfortunately, notch filters do not discriminate signal and noise, attenuating both. They also distort adjacent frequencies by phase shifting. Finally, they attenuate only the fundamental mode of the powerline noise; higher harmonics and frequencies other than that of powerlines are not removed. Digital notch filters, applied during processing, have many of the same problems as analog filters applied in the field. The method described here removes hum of a particular frequency. Hum attributes are measured by discrete Fourier analysis, and the hum is canceled from the data by subtraction. Errors are slight and the result of the presence of (random) noise in the window or asynchrony of the hum and data sampling. Error is minimized by increasing window size or by resampling to a finer interval. Errors affect the degree of hum attenuation, not the signal. The residual is steady-state hum of the same frequency. ?? 1994.

  3. Filter Sensing Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Sappok, Alex; Herman, Andrew; Parks, Jim; Prikhodko, Vitaly

    2016-10-19

    Leaders from Filter Sensing Technologies, CTS Corporation, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory discuss how a small business developed an award-winning diesel emissions control sensor with support from the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and researchers at ORNL’s National Transportation Research Center.

  4. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  5. Filter Sensing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Sappok, Alex; Herman, Andrew; Parks, Jim; Prikhodko, Vitaly

    2016-07-21

    Leaders from Filter Sensing Technologies, CTS Corporation, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory discuss how a small business developed an award-winning diesel emissions control sensor with support from the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and researchers at ORNL’s National Transportation Research Center.

  6. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  8. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  9. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  10. The microstrip wideband filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodenkov, S. A.; Belyaev, B. A.; Balva, Ya F.; Aplesnin, S. S.; Bandurina, O. N.

    2016-11-01

    The filter of high frequency-selective properties is developed. The central six-mode resonator of the design which can be used in the aerospace equipment is electromagnetically connected with six single-mode resonators. The good agreement of the calculated data in comparison with the data received on the experimental model of a design is shown.

  11. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  12. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  13. Designing manufacturable filters for a 16-band plenoptic camera using differential evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doster, Timothy; Olson, Colin C.; Fleet, Erin; Yetzbacher, Michael; Kanaev, Andrey; Lebow, Paul; Leathers, Robert

    2017-05-01

    A 16-band plenoptic camera allows for the rapid exchange of filter sets via a 4x4 filter array on the lens's front aperture. This ability to change out filters allows for an operator to quickly adapt to different locales or threat intelligence. Typically, such a system incorporates a default set of 16 equally spaced at-topped filters. Knowing the operating theater or the likely targets of interest it becomes advantageous to tune the filters. We propose using a modified beta distribution to parameterize the different possible filters and differential evolution (DE) to search over the space of possible filter designs. The modified beta distribution allows us to jointly optimize the width, taper and wavelength center of each single- or multi-pass filter in the set over a number of evolutionary steps. Further, by constraining the function parameters we can develop solutions which are not just theoretical but manufacturable. We examine two independent tasks: general spectral sensing and target detection. In the general spectral sensing task we utilize the theory of compressive sensing (CS) and find filters that generate codings which minimize the CS reconstruction error based on a fixed spectral dictionary of endmembers. For the target detection task and a set of known targets, we train the filters to optimize the separation of the background and target signature. We compare our results to the default 16 at-topped non-overlapping filter set which comes with the plenoptic camera and full hyperspectral resolution data which was previously acquired.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  15. Filter assembly for metallic and intermetallic tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Lippert, Thomas E.; Bruck, Gerald J.; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    2001-01-01

    A filter assembly (60) for holding a filter element (28) within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel is provided, containing: a filter housing (62), said filter housing having a certain axial length and having a peripheral sidewall, said sidewall defining an interior chamber (66); a one piece, all metal, fail-safe/regenerator device (68) within the interior chamber (66) of the filter housing (62) and/or extending beyond the axial length of the filter housing, said device containing an outward extending radial flange (71) within the filter housing for seating an essential seal (70), the device also having heat transfer media (72) disposed inside and screens (80) for particulate removal; one compliant gasket (70) positioned next to and above the outward extending radial flange of the fail-safe/regenerator device; and a porous metallic corrosion resistant superalloy type filter element body welded at the bottom of the metal fail-safe/regenerator device.

  16. INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT AND SEPARATE BICARBONATE FROM AMMONIONATED BRINE. DISCHARGE FROM STRIPPER COLUMNS (SOLVAY COLUMNS). - Solvay Process Company, SA Wetside Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenue, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  18. Summary of Martian Dust Filtering Challenges and Current Filter Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, W. J.

    2017-06-01

    Precursor and manned mission ISRU systems, habitat and rover ECLS systems, and airlock systems will include dust filtering in their design. This paper summarizes the challenges of filter development, and the status of the progress made in this area.

  19. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Hubble, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.

    1999-01-19

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  20. Optically bistable interference filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiting

    1990-07-01

    In general the temperature dependence of refractive index of coating materials is usually small. The most notable exception being the lead telluride. Thinfilm filters made of PbTe possess anomalously high nortlinearily in refractive index. We have investigated the phenomenon theoretically and experimexitally. 2 . BISTABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERFERENCE FILTERS It can be proved that the transmittance and reflectance of a twin-cavity NLIF which consists of two F-B filters coupled by a single low-index are given by 2 a(1r1 )(1-r0) T --i. -. (1) -d (1r01) (1r12) (1-i-Fsin 4)(1+sin p) where a r01 F . Te phase change of the cavity 0 IS 2r0dnAI0D (2) 2k5dT 1k where the absorbtance A 00 the initial detunning of fresonance and the first term on the right side of the equation(1)-(2) the output characteristics of the NLIF can be calculated. 3 . EXPERIMENTAL CASE The interference filters suggested to be used in my research will be made by vacuum deposition with a thermal source. The filters will be made according to the prescripti The dominant mechanism responsible for d(nhl) must be the change in the refractive index. A low limit on the OB switch-on time is found to be O. 35us and switch-off time is 5. 5us. 4. REFERENCES 1. W. T. Feng " Temperature effects on properties of zinc selenide and lead telluride" to be published in Infrared Physics. 2. H. S. Carslaw Conduction

  1. Problems in the use of interference filters for spectrophotometric determination of total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basher, R. E.; Matthews, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the use of ultraviolet narrow-band interference filters for total ozone determination is given with reference to the New Zealand filter spectrophotometer under the headings of filter monochromaticity, temperature dependence, orientation dependence, aging, and specification tolerances and nonuniformity. Quantitative details of each problem are given, together with the means used to overcome them in the New Zealand instrument. The tuning of the instrument's filter center wavelengths to a common set of values by tilting the filters is also described, along with a simple calibration method used to adjust and set these center wavelengths.

  2. Accuracy Maximization Analysis for Sensory-Perceptual Tasks: Computational Improvements, Filter Robustness, and Coding Advantages for Scaled Additive Noise

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Accuracy Maximization Analysis (AMA) is a recently developed Bayesian ideal observer method for task-specific dimensionality reduction. Given a training set of proximal stimuli (e.g. retinal images), a response noise model, and a cost function, AMA returns the filters (i.e. receptive fields) that extract the most useful stimulus features for estimating a user-specified latent variable from those stimuli. Here, we first contribute two technical advances that significantly reduce AMA’s compute time: we derive gradients of cost functions for which two popular estimators are appropriate, and we implement a stochastic gradient descent (AMA-SGD) routine for filter learning. Next, we show how the method can be used to simultaneously probe the impact on neural encoding of natural stimulus variability, the prior over the latent variable, noise power, and the choice of cost function. Then, we examine the geometry of AMA’s unique combination of properties that distinguish it from better-known statistical methods. Using binocular disparity estimation as a concrete test case, we develop insights that have general implications for understanding neural encoding and decoding in a broad class of fundamental sensory-perceptual tasks connected to the energy model. Specifically, we find that non-orthogonal (partially redundant) filters with scaled additive noise tend to outperform orthogonal filters with constant additive noise; non-orthogonal filters and scaled additive noise can interact to sculpt noise-induced stimulus encoding uncertainty to match task-irrelevant stimulus variability. Thus, we show that some properties of neural response thought to be biophysical nuisances can confer coding advantages to neural systems. Finally, we speculate that, if repurposed for the problem of neural systems identification, AMA may be able to overcome a fundamental limitation of standard subunit model estimation. As natural stimuli become more widely used in the study of psychophysical and

  3. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukac, Rastislav; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Smolka, Bogdan; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03) in Grado, Italy.

  4. Text Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 30 titles grouped in text sets. Defines a text set as five to ten books on a particular topic or theme. Discusses books on the following topics: living creatures; pirates; physical appearance; natural disasters; and the Irish potato famine. (SG)

  5. Text Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 30 titles grouped in text sets. Defines a text set as five to ten books on a particular topic or theme. Discusses books on the following topics: living creatures; pirates; physical appearance; natural disasters; and the Irish potato famine. (SG)

  6. Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2010-04-20

    Large genomes contain families of highly similar genes that cannot be individually identified by microarray probes. This limitation is due to thermodynamic restrictions and cannot be resolved by any computational method. Since gene annotations are updated more frequently than microarrays, another common issue facing microarray users is that existing microarrays must be routinely reanalyzed to determine probes that are still useful with respect to the updated annotations. PICKY 2.0 can design shared probes for sets of genes that cannot be individually identified using unique probes. PICKY 2.0 uses novel algorithms to track sharable regions among genes and to strictly distinguish them from other highly similar but nontarget regions during thermodynamic comparisons. Therefore, PICKY does not sacrifice the quality of shared probes when choosing them. The latest PICKY 2.1 includes the new capability to reanalyze existing microarray probes against updated gene sets to determine probes that are still valid to use. In addition, more precise nonlinear salt effect estimates and other improvements are added, making PICKY 2.1 more versatile to microarray users. Shared probes allow expressed gene family members to be detected; this capability is generally more desirable than not knowing anything about these genes. Shared probes also enable the design of cross-genome microarrays, which facilitate multiple species identification in environmental samples. The new nonlinear salt effect calculation significantly increases the precision of probes at a lower buffer salt concentration, and the probe reanalysis function improves existing microarray result interpretations.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF ADVANCED FILTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Newby; M.A. Alvin; G.J. Bruck; T.E. Lippert; E.E. Smeltzer; M.E. Stampahar

    2002-06-30

    Two advanced, hot gas, barrier filter system concepts have been proposed by the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation to improve the reliability and availability of barrier filter systems in applications such as PFBC and IGCC power generation. The two hot gas, barrier filter system concepts, the inverted candle filter system and the sheet filter system, were the focus of bench-scale testing, data evaluations, and commercial cost evaluations to assess their feasibility as viable barrier filter systems. The program results show that the inverted candle filter system has high potential to be a highly reliable, commercially successful, hot gas, barrier filter system. Some types of thin-walled, standard candle filter elements can be used directly as inverted candle filter elements, and the development of a new type of filter element is not a requirement of this technology. Six types of inverted candle filter elements were procured and assessed in the program in cold flow and high-temperature test campaigns. The thin-walled McDermott 610 CFCC inverted candle filter elements, and the thin-walled Pall iron aluminide inverted candle filter elements are the best candidates for demonstration of the technology. Although the capital cost of the inverted candle filter system is estimated to range from about 0 to 15% greater than the capital cost of the standard candle filter system, the operating cost and life-cycle cost of the inverted candle filter system is expected to be superior to that of the standard candle filter system. Improved hot gas, barrier filter system availability will result in improved overall power plant economics. The inverted candle filter system is recommended for continued development through larger-scale testing in a coal-fueled test facility, and inverted candle containment equipment has been fabricated and shipped to a gasifier development site for potential future testing. Two types of sheet filter elements were procured and assessed in the program

  8. Filtering through the data on retrievable inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Ido; Drachman, Douglas E

    2015-10-01

    Technical success rates with implantation and retrieval of retrievable inferior vena cava filters are high Inferior vena cava filters are being used for a wide range of indications Systems should be put in place to ensure prompt and effective retrieval of inferior vena cava filters once these are no longer needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Filtered-X Affine Projection Algorithms for Active Noise Control Using Volterra Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Alberto; Sicuranza, Giovanni L.

    2004-12-01

    We consider the use of adaptive Volterra filters, implemented in the form of multichannel filter banks, as nonlinear active noise controllers. In particular, we discuss the derivation of filtered-X affine projection algorithms for homogeneous quadratic filters. According to the multichannel approach, it is then easy to pass from these algorithms to those of a generic Volterra filter. It is shown in the paper that the AP technique offers better convergence and tracking capabilities than the classical LMS and NLMS algorithms usually applied in nonlinear active noise controllers, with a limited complexity increase. This paper extends in two ways the content of a previous contribution published in Proc. IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03), Grado, Italy, June 2003. First of all, a general adaptation algorithm valid for any order [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] of affine projections is presented. Secondly, a more complete set of experiments is reported. In particular, the effects of using multichannel filter banks with a reduced number of channels are investigated and relevant results are shown.

  10. Principal Component Noise Filtering for NAST-I Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed- Interferometer (NAST-I) instrument is a high-resolution scanning interferometer that measures emitted thermal radiation between 3.3 and 18 microns. The NAST-I radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient and hot temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes a principal component (PC) noise filter to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, further improve the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy. To test the procedure and estimate the PC filter noise performance, we form dependent and independent test samples using odd and even sets of blackbody spectra. To determine the optimal number of eigenvectors, the PC filter algorithm is applied to both dependent and independent blackbody spectra with a varying number of eigenvectors. The optimal number of PCs is selected so that the total root-mean-square (RMS) error is minimized. To estimate the filter noise performance, we examine four different scenarios: apply PC filtering to both dependent and independent datasets, apply PC filtering to dependent calibration data only, apply PC filtering to independent data only, and no PC filters. The independent blackbody radiances are predicted for each case and comparisons are made. The results show significant reduction in noise in the final calibrated radiances with the implementation of the PC filtering algorithm.

  11. Filtering Medline for a clinical discipline: diagnostic test assessment framework

    PubMed Central

    Iansavichus, Arthur V; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Kastner, Monika; Baier, Leslie A; Shariff, Salimah Z; Rehman, Faisal; Weir, Matthew; McKibbon, K Ann; Haynes, R Brian

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a Medline filter that allows clinicians to search for articles within a clinical discipline, rather than searching the entire Medline database. Design Diagnostic test assessment framework with development and validation phases. Setting Sample of 4657 articles published in 2006 from 40 journals. Reviews Each article was manually reviewed, and 19.8% contained information relevant to the discipline of nephrology. The performance of 1 155 087 unique renal filters was compared with the manual review. Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of each filter. Results The best renal filters combined two to 14 terms or phrases and included the terms “kidney” with multiple endings (that is, truncation), “renal replacement therapy”, “renal dialysis”, “kidney function tests”, “renal”, “nephr” truncated, “glomerul” truncated, and “proteinuria”. These filters achieved peak sensitivities of 97.8% and specificities of 98.5%. Performance of filters remained excellent in the validation phase. Conclusions Medline can be filtered for the discipline of nephrology in a reliable manner. Storing these high performance renal filters in PubMed could help clinicians with their everyday searching. Filters can also be developed for other clinical disciplines by using similar methods. PMID:19767336

  12. Experimental study on vibrations of a nonwoven fabric cylindrical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, M.; Kawahara, T.; Michiue, S.; Shintani, Y.

    2011-11-01

    Unexpected vibrations on a cylindrical filter made of nonwoven fabrics were clarified experimentally. Two types of filter with length L=1.8 m and 3.7 m, both 45 cm in diameter and 1.08 mm in thickness, were used. This is a new type of aeroelastic vibration phenomenon because the filter is a closed cylindrical vessel. In addition, the flow velocity of inner air was very slow and inner air flowed out slowly from the filter surface. The velocity distribution of air flow from a fan duct as well as the frequency and amplitude of the filter vibration were measured for two types of filter. By setting up a roll core panel at the outlet of the fan duct, we could rectify the outflow and suppressed the vibration of the shorter filter with L=1.8 m. However, this method was not adequate for the longer filter with L=3.7 m, and we could suppress the vibration by shielding the inner surface of the filter at the top region.

  13. Distributed SLAM Using Improved Particle Filter for Mobile Robot Localization

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Fujun; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Simin

    2014-01-01

    The distributed SLAM system has a similar estimation performance and requires only one-fifth of the computation time compared with centralized particle filter. However, particle impoverishment is inevitably because of the random particles prediction and resampling applied in generic particle filter, especially in SLAM problem that involves a large number of dimensions. In this paper, particle filter use in distributed SLAM was improved in two aspects. First, we improved the important function of the local filters in particle filter. The adaptive values were used to replace a set of constants in the computational process of importance function, which improved the robustness of the particle filter. Second, an information fusion method was proposed by mixing the innovation method and the number of effective particles method, which combined the advantages of these two methods. And this paper extends the previously known convergence results for particle filter to prove that improved particle filter converges to the optimal filter in mean square as the number of particles goes to infinity. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm improved the virtue of the DPF-SLAM system in isolate faults and enabled the system to have a better tolerance and robustness. PMID:24883362

  14. Distributed SLAM using improved particle filter for mobile robot localization.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fujun; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Simin

    2014-01-01

    The distributed SLAM system has a similar estimation performance and requires only one-fifth of the computation time compared with centralized particle filter. However, particle impoverishment is inevitably because of the random particles prediction and resampling applied in generic particle filter, especially in SLAM problem that involves a large number of dimensions. In this paper, particle filter use in distributed SLAM was improved in two aspects. First, we improved the important function of the local filters in particle filter. The adaptive values were used to replace a set of constants in the computational process of importance function, which improved the robustness of the particle filter. Second, an information fusion method was proposed by mixing the innovation method and the number of effective particles method, which combined the advantages of these two methods. And this paper extends the previously known convergence results for particle filter to prove that improved particle filter converges to the optimal filter in mean square as the number of particles goes to infinity. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm improved the virtue of the DPF-SLAM system in isolate faults and enabled the system to have a better tolerance and robustness.

  15. Multicomponent seismic noise attenuation with multivariate order statistic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Yun; Wang, Xiaokai; Xun, Chao

    2016-10-01

    The vector relationship between multicomponent seismic data is highly important for multicomponent processing and interpretation, but this vector relationship could be damaged when each component is processed individually. To overcome the drawback of standard component-by-component filtering, multivariate order statistic filters are introduced and extended to attenuate the noise of multicomponent seismic data by treating such dataset as a vector wavefield rather than a set of scalar fields. According to the characteristics of seismic signals, we implement this type of multivariate filtering along local events. First, the optimal local events are recognized according to the similarity between the vector signals which are windowed from neighbouring seismic traces with a sliding time window along each trial trajectory. An efficient strategy is used to reduce the computational cost of similarity measurement for vector signals. Next, one vector sample each from the neighbouring traces are extracted along the optimal local event as the input data for a multivariate filter. Different multivariate filters are optimal for different noise. The multichannel modified trimmed mean (MTM) filter, as one of the multivariate order statistic filters, is applied to synthetic and field multicomponent seismic data to test its performance for attenuating white Gaussian noise. The results indicate that the multichannel MTM filter can attenuate noise while preserving the relative amplitude information of multicomponent seismic data more effectively than a single-channel filter.

  16. Images and Spectral Performance of WFC3 Interference Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Boucarut, R.; Telfer, R.; Baggett, S.; Quijano, J. Kim; Allen, George; Arsenovic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a panchromatic imager that will be deployed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The mission of the WFC3 is to enhance HST1s imaging capability in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Together with a wavelength coverage spanning 2000A to 1.7 micron, the WFC3 high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and large field-of-view provide the astronomer with an unprecedented set of tools for exploring all types of exciting astrophysical terrain and for addressing many key questions in astronomy today. The filter compliment, which includes broad, medium, and narrow band filters, naturally reflects the diversity of astronomical programs to be targeted with WFC3. The WFC3 holds 61 UVIS filters elements, 14 IR filters, and 3 dispersive elements. During ground testing, the majority of the UVIS filters were found to exhibit excellent performance consistent with or exceeding expectations; however, a subset of filters showed considerable ghost images; some with relative intensity as high as 10-15%. Replacement filters with band-defining coatings that substantially reduce these ghost images were designed and procured. A state-of-the-art characterization setup was developed to measured the intensity of ghost images, focal shift, wedge direction , transmitted uniformity and surface feature of filters that could effect uniform flat field images. We will report on this new filter characterization methods, as well as the spectral performance measurements of the in-band transmittance and blocking.

  17. Probing Skills for Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Beryl E.

    The Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services (OASIS) at the University of California at San Diego sponsors a workshop that teaches tutors to use five types of probing skills. The use of the skills is fundamental to the student learner's acquisition of complex relationships and problem solving skills. The five types of probes are:…

  18. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  19. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  20. Energy-Filtered Scanning Tunneling Microscopy using a Semiconductor Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, P.; Zahl, P.; Sutter, E.; Bernard, J. E.

    2003-04-01

    The use of cleaved, [111]-oriented monocrystalline InAs probe tips enables state-specific imaging in constant-current filled-state scanning tunneling microscopy. On Si(111)-(7×7), the adatom or rest-atom dangling-bond states can thus be mapped selectively at different tip-sample bias. This state-selective imaging is made possible by energy gaps in the projected bulk band structure of the semiconductor probe. The lack of extended bulk states in these gaps gives rise to efficient energy filtering of the tunneling current, to which only sample states not aligned with a gap contribute significantly.