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Sample records for probing exotic nuclear

  1. Fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction: probing exotic nuclear structure using GEANIE at LANCE/WNR

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L

    2000-02-25

    The initial goal of this project was to study the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction by testing the fundamental theory of nuclear structure, the shell model, for nuclei between {sup 8}Zr and {sup 100}Sn. The shell model predicts that nuclei with ''magic'' (2,8,20,28,40,50, and 82) numbers of protons or neutrons form closed shells in the same fashion as noble gas atoms [may49]. A ''doubly magic'' nucleus with a closed shell of both protons and neutrons has an extremely simple structure and is therefore ideal for studying the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The shell model predicts that doubly magic nuclei will be spherical and that they will have large first-excited-state energies ({approx} 1 to 3 MeV). Although the first four doubly-magic nuclei exhibit this behavior, the N = Z = 40 nucleus, {sup 80}Zr, has a very low first-excited-state energy (290 keV) and appears to be highly deformed. This breakdown is attributed to the small size of the shell gap at N = Z = 40. If this description is accurate, then the N = Z = 50 doubly magic nucleus, {sup 100}Sn, will exhibit ''normal'' closed-shell behavior. The unique insight provided by doubly-magic nuclei from {sup 80}Zr to {sup 100}Sn has made them the focus of tremendous interest in the nuclear structure community. However, doubly-magic nuclei heavier than {sup 56}Ni become increasingly difficult to form due to the coulomb repulsion between the protons which favors the formation of neutron-rich nuclei. The coulomb repulsion creates a ''proton drip-line'' beyond which the addition of any additional bound protons is energetically impossible. The drip line renders the traditional experimental technique used in their formation, the heavy-ion reaction, less than ideal as a method of forming doubly-magic nuclei beyond {sup 80}Zr. The result has been a lack of an new spectroscopic information on doubly magic nuclei in more than a decade [lis87]. Furthermore, uncertainties in reaction dynamics modeling made it difficult for the

  2. Exotic States of Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Umberto; Baldo, Marcello; Burgio, Fiorella; Schulze, Hans-Josef

    2008-02-01

    pt. A. Theory of nuclear matter EOS and symmetry energy. Constraining the nuclear equation of state from astrophysics and heavy ion reactions / C. Fuchs. In-medium hadronic interactions and the nuclear equation of state / F. Sammarruca. EOS and single-particle properties of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter within the Brueckner theory / W. Zuo, U. Lombardo & H.-J. Schulze. Thermodynamics of correlated nuclear matter / A. Polls ... [et al.]. The validity of the LOCV formalism and neutron star properties / H. R. Moshfegh ... [et al.]. Ferromagnetic instabilities of neutron matter: microscopic versus phenomenological approaches / I. Vidaã. Sigma meson and nuclear matter saturation / A. B. Santra & U. Lombardo. Ramifications of the nuclear symmetry energy for neutron stars, nuclei and heavy-ion collisions / A. W. Steiner, B.-A. Li & M. Prakash. The symmetry energy in nuclei and nuclear matter / A. E. L. Dieperink. Probing the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities / M. Di Toro et al. Investigation of low-density symmetry energy via nucleon and fragment observables / H. H. Wolter et al. Instability against cluster formation in nuclear and compact-star matter / C. Ducoin ... [et al.]. Microscopic optical potentials of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering / Z.-Y. Ma, J. Rong & Y.-Q. Ma -- pt. B. The neutron star crust: structure, formation and dynamics. Neutron star crust beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation / N. Chamel. The inner crust of a neutron star within the Wigner-Seitz method with pairing: from drip point to the bottom / E. E. Saperstein, M. Baldo & S. V. Tolokonnikov. Nuclear superfluidity and thermal properties of neutron stars / N. Sandulescu. Collective excitations: from exotic nuclei to the crust of neutron stars / E. Khan, M. Grasso & J. Margueron. Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear medium: fermi gases, nuclei and the role of Pauli potentials / M. A. Pérez-García. Low-density instabilities in relativistic hadronic models / C. Provid

  3. Exotic Nuclear Shapes:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.; Dubray, N.; Góźdź, A.

    After recalling some in principle known but seldom mentioned facts about variety of concepts/notions of the nuclear shapes, we briefly summarize the results of the recent microscopic calculations predicting the existence of the large-elongation (hyper-deformed) nuclear configurations — as well as another series of calculations predicting that some nuclei should exhibit high-rank symmetries: the tetrahedral and the octahedral ones. The latter are associated with 48- and 96- symmetry elements, respectively, of the nuclear mean-field Hamiltonian. Obviously the physics motivations behind the hyper-deformation and the high-rank symmetry studies are not the observations of the new geometrical forms as such; in our opinion these motivations are much deeper and are given in the text.

  4. Probing the exotic structure of 8B by its elastic scattering and breakup reaction on nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Spasova, K.

    2017-02-01

    The structure of the exotic 8B nucleus is studied by means of elastic scattering, as well as its breakup on nuclear targets. We present microscopic calculations of the optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of 8B on 12C, 58Ni, and 208Pb targets at energies 20 < E < 170 MeV. The density distributions of 8B obtained within the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) model and the three-cluster model (3CM) are used to construct the potentials. The real part of the hybrid OP is calculated using the folding model with the direct and exchange terms included, while the imaginary part is obtained on the base of the high-energy approximation (HEA) and also taken to be equal to the microscopic real part of the OP. In this model the only free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts of OP obtained by fitting the elastic scattering experimental data. A dependence of their values on the model density of 8 B is found. In addition, the cluster model, in which 8B consists of a p-halo and the 7 Be core, is applied to calculate the breakup cross sections of the 8B nucleus on 9Be, 12C, and 197Au targets, as well as momentum distributions of 7Be fragments, and a comparison with the existing experimental data is made.

  5. Unified approach to nuclear densities from exotic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2009-09-01

    Parameters of nuclear density distributions are derived from least-squares fits to strong interaction observables in exotic atoms. Global analyses of antiprotonic and pionic atoms show reasonably good agreement between the two types of probes regarding the average behaviour of root-mean-square radii of the neutron distributions. Apparent conflict regarding the shape of the neutron distribution is attributed to different radial sensitivities of these two probes.

  6. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  7. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, G.; Togo, V.

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: (i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. (ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ˜1,000 m2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4 × 10-16 cm-2 s-1 sr-1for 4 ×10-5<β<1. The SLIM experiment at the high altitude Chacaltaya lab (5,230 m a.s.l.), using 427 m2 of CR39 detectors exposed for 4.22 years, gave an upper limit for IMMs of ˜1.3 × 10-15 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The experiments yielded interesting upper limits also on the fluxes of the other mentioned exotic particles. (iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  8. Searches for exotic interactions in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O.

    2016-07-07

    This contribution presents current efforts in the search for exotic interactions in nuclear β decay using a calorimetric technique for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape. We describe the criteria for the choice of sensitive candidates in Gamow-Teller transitions and present the status of measurements performed in {sup 6}He and {sup 20}F decay.

  9. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium

  10. Present status and future of the shell model
  11. Effective interaction theories
  12. Experimental results and perspectives
  13. Few-body methods including ab initio calculations
  14. Advancements of mean-fieeld models
  15. Transition between shell and cluster structure
  16. Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure
  17. Particle physics and the shell model
  18. Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  19. Probing the Evolution of the Shell Structures in Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis, Giacomo

    2008-11-11

    Magic numbers are a key feature in finite Fermion systems since they are strongly related to the underlying mean field. The size of the shell gaps and their evolution far from stability can be linked to the shape and symmetry of the nuclear mean field. Moreover the study of nuclei with large neutron/proton ratio allow to probe the density dependence of the effective interaction. Changes of the nuclear density and size in nuclei with increasing N/Z ratios are expected to lead to different nuclear symmetries and excitations. In this contribution I will discuss some selected examples which show the big potential of stable beams and of binary reactions for the study of the properties of the neutron-rich nuclear many body systems.

  20. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  21. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces.

    PubMed

    Wienholtz, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-06-20

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes (40)Ca and (48)Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of (51)Ca and (52)Ca have been validated by direct measurements, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes (53)Ca and (54)Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our theoretical calculations. These results increase our understanding of neutron-rich matter and pin down the subtle components of nuclear forces that are at the forefront of theoretical developments constrained by quantum chromodynamics.

  22. Study of Exotic Nuclear Structures via Total Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takechi, Maya

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear radius is one of the most basic physical quantities to study unknown exotic nuclei. A number of radii for unstable nuclei were studied through measurements of interaction cross sections (σI) at high energies, using the Glauber-type calculation (Optical-Limit approximation (OLA) of Glauber theory) to investigate halo and skin structures of exotic nuclei. On the other hand, it was indicated that reaction cross sections (σR) at intermediate energies (from several tens to hundreds of MeV/nucleon) were more sensitive to dilute nucleon density distribution owing to large nucleon-nucleon total cross sections (σNN) compared to high-energy region. Recently, we developed a new method to deduce nucleon density distributions from the energy dependences of σ R, through the precise measurements of σ R for various nuclei and some modifications of Glauber-type calculation. Using this method, we studied nucleon density distributions of light nuclei by measuring σ R for those nuclei at HIMAC (Heavy ion Medical Accelerator in CHIBA), NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). And very recently, we deduced nuclear radii of neutron-rich Ne isotopes (^28-32Ne) which are in the island-of-inversion region by measuring σI using BigRIPS at RIBF (RI Beam Factory) to study nuclear structures of those isotopes using our method. In this workshop, results of nucleon density distributions obtained at HIMAC and results of the studies of Ne isotopes at RIBF will be introduced and discussed.

  23. Nuclear-structure studies of exotic nuclei with MINIBALL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.; Cederkall, J.; Reiter, P.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy has been established at ISOLDE for nuclear-structure and nuclear-reaction studies with reaccelerated radioactive ion beams provided by the REX-ISOLDE facility. The MINIBALL spectrometer comprises 24 six-fold segmented, encapsulated high-purity germanium crystals. It was specially designed for highest γ-ray detection efficiency which is advantageous for low-intensity radioactive ion beams. The MINIBALL array has been used in numerous Coulomb-excitation and transfer-reaction experiments with exotic ion beams of energies up to 3 MeV A–1. The physics case covers a wide range of topics which are addressed with beams ranging from neutron-rich magnesium isotopes up to heavy radium isotopes. In the future the HIE-ISOLDE will allow the in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy program to proceed with higher secondary-beam intensity, higher beam energy and better beam quality.

  24. Use of exotic nuclear beams for nuclear structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, K.

    1984-10-01

    Possible experiments are discussed for nuclear structure studies using, as secondary beams, projectile fragments produced by high-energy heavy-ion collisions. They are, specifically, (a) determination of nuclear sizes from measurements of the total interaction cross sections of nucleus-nucleus collisions, and (b) determination of static electromagnetic moments, ..mu..'s and Q's, of short-lived ..beta..-radioactive nuclei. 9 references.

  25. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (anasen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H. E.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Mondello, L. L.; Baby, L.; Johnson, E.; Koshchiy, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bardayan, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Experimental information about most reactions involving short-lived nuclei is limited. New facilities aim to provide wider access to unstable isotopes, but the limited intensities require more efficient and selective techniques and devices. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array designed primarily for studies of reactions important in the αp- and rp- processes with proton-rich exotic nuclei. The array consists of 40 silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators. The detectors cover an area of about 1300 cm2 providing essentially complete solid angle coverage for the reactions of interest with good energy and position resolution. ANASEN also includes a position-sensitive annular gas proportional counter that allows it to be used as an active gas target/detector. ANASEN is designed for direct measurement of (α,p) re-actions in inverse kinematics as well as for studies of proton elastic and inelastic scattering, (p, γ) reactions and transfer reactions. The array is being developed by Louisiana State University and Florida State University. Presently it is located at the RESOLUT radioacitve ion beam facility at FSU, where the first experiments are being performed. In the future, the array will be used at the ReA3 facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  26. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, N.; Sahoo, B. K.; Yoshinaga, N.; Sato, T.; Asahi, K.; Das, B. P.

    2017-03-01

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested.

  27. PREFACE: International Symposium on Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Utsuno, Yutaka; Shimizu, Noritaka

    2013-07-01

    The International Symposium on 'Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN2012)' was held at the Koshiba Hall, the University of Tokyo, Japan, from October 10th to 12th, 2012. This symposium was supported by RIKEN Nishina Center (RNC) and the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. This symposium was devoted to discussing recent achievement and perspectives in the structure of exotic nuclei from the viewpoint of the nuclear force. The following subjects were covered in this symposium from both theoretical and experimental sides: Evolution of shell structure and collectivity in exotic nuclei Ab-initio theory and its application to exotic nuclei Advancement in large-scale nuclear-structure calculations Effective Hamiltonian and energy density functional Spin-isospin responses New aspects of two- and three-body forces Impact on nuclear astrophysics Emphasis was placed on the development of large-scale nuclear-structure calculations and the new experimental information on exotic nuclei. Around 80 participants attended this symposium and we enjoyed 37 excellent invited talks and 9 selected oral presentations. A special talk was presented to celebrate the 60th birthday of professor Takaharu Otsuka, who has made invaluable contribution to the progress in the fields covered in this symposium. The organizing committee consisted of T Abe (Tokyo), M Honma (Aizu; chair), N Itagaki (YITP, Kyoto), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Nakatsukasa (RIKEN), H Sakurai (Tokyo/RIKEN), N Shimizu (CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary), S Shimoura (CNS, Tokyo), Y Utsuno (JAEA/CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful. Michio Honma, Yutaka Utsuno and Noritaka Shimizu Editors Tokyo, April 2013 Sponsors logo1 Sponsors logo2 The PDF also contains the conference program.

  28. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, V.

    2003-09-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  29. Nuclear structure and weak probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2017-06-01

    Weak interaction in nuclei represents a well-known venue for testing many of the fundamental symmetries of the Standard Model. Analysis of these processes requires nuclear structure information, including nuclear data, and some theoretical approaches to describe it. Here we make an introduction into basic nuclear structure concepts, using the existing nuclear data and some simple mean-field and shell model approaches. Some applications to beta decays and double beta decays are presented.

  1. Lifetime Measurements of Tagged Exotic- and Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-11-30

    A new Differential Plunger device for measuring pico-second lifetimes of Unbound Nuclear States (DPUNS) is being built at The University of Manchester. DPUNS has been designed to work with alpha-, beta- and isomer-tagging methods using the existing JUROGAM II--RITU--GREAT infrastructure at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. The importance of proton emission from nuclei is that it provides valuable nuclear-structure information as direct input to nuclear models beyond the drip line. New experimental data beyond the drip line can provide new extensions to these models especially with the possible coupling of weakly bound and unbound states to the continuum. The results of the first experiments to measure lifetimes of unbound nuclear states with this method was discussed along with possible future experiments which can be addressed with DPUNS using proton-, isomer- and alpha-tagging.

  2. Studies of exotic nuclear reactions at the RESOLUT facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    The RESOLUT facility at Florida State University's accelerator laboratory produces beams of short-lived nuclei using the in-flight method. Beams such as 6He, 7Be, 8Li, 8B, 17F, 19O, 18Ne and 25Al have been successfully used in experiments. The facility has been used to develop innovative experimental techniques, such as the low-energy neutron detector RESONEUT, and the active-target detector ANASEN, which has been developed as a collaboration between FSU and LSU. These detectors have been employed in direct and indirect reaction measurements with impact on astrophysics. An Indiana-University led campaign studying fusion cross sections of exotic nuclei at RESOLUT has also been successful. The results from these three recent RIB campaigns at RESOLUT will be summarized. This work was supported by NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1401574, PHY-0820941 and PHY-1126345 and by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG02-02ER41220, DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and DE-FG02-96ER40978.

  3. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S.

    2014-05-05

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a fundamental theory and efficient computational tools to describe dynamic processes between nuclei and to use such tools toward supporting several DOE milestones by: 1) performing predictive calculations of difficult-to-measure landmark reactions for nuclear astrophysics, such as those driving the neutrino signature of our sun; 2) improving our understanding of the structure of nuclei near the neutron drip line, which will be the focus of the DOE’s Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University; but also 3) helping to reveal the true nature of the nuclear force. Furthermore, these theoretical developments will support plasma diagnostic efforts at facilities dedicated to the development of terrestrial fusion energy.

  4. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  5. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  6. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  7. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  8. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  9. Periodic orbit bifurcations and local symmetry restorations in exotic-shape nuclear mean fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    The semiclassical origins of the enhancement of shell effects in exotic-shape mean-field potentials are investigated by focusing attention on the roles of the local symmetries associated with the periodic-orbit bifurcations. The deformed shell structures for four types of pure octupole shapes in the nuclear mean-field model having a realistic radial dependence are analyzed. Remarkable shell effects are shown for a large Y 32 deformation having tetrahedral symmetry. Much stronger shell effects found in the shape parametrization smoothly connecting the sphere and the tetrahedron are investigated from the view-point of the classical-quantum correspondence. The local dynamical symmetries associated with the bridge orbit bifurcations are shown to have significant roles in the emergence of exotic deformed shell structures for certain combinations of the surface diffuseness and the tetrahedral deformation parameters.

  10. The influence of nuclear deformations on the exotic cluster decay half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, A.; Bayrak, O.; Evlice, S.

    2015-04-01

    We systematically study the investigation of the influence of nuclear deformations of the cluster and daughter nuclei on the exotic cluster decay half-lives of heavy nuclei by the WKB method and the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. Even if the deformations of both cluster and daughter in the half-live values of cluster decays improve the results, considering the deformation of clusters is more efficient than the deformation of daughter for the heavy cluster decay half-live calculations. Moreover, taking into account of angle orientations of daughter and cluster provides a positive contributions to the results as well. The results would be useful for experimental researches in half-lives of exotic decays of some heavy nuclei and radium isotopes.

  11. Probing nuclear matter with jet conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Fries, R. J.

    2008-05-15

    We discuss the flavor of leading jet partons as a valuable probe of nuclear matter. We point out that the coupling of jets to nuclear matter naturally leads to an alteration of jet chemistry even at high transverse momentum p{sub T}. In particular, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) jets coupling to a chemically equilibrated quark gluon plasma in nuclear collisions will lead to hadron ratios at high transverse momentum p{sub T} that can differ significantly from their counterparts in p+p collisions. Flavor measurements could complement energy loss as a way to study interactions of hard QCD jets with nuclear matter. Roughly speaking they probe the inverse mean free path 1/{lambda} while energy loss probes the average squared momentum transfer {mu}{sup 2}/{lambda}. We present some estimates for the rate of jet conversions in a consistent Fokker-Planck framework and their impact on future high-p{sub T} identified hadron measurements at RHIC and LHC. We also suggest some novel observables to test flavor effects.

  12. Charge radii of exotic nuclei: nuclear results versus isotopic shift calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaselli, M.; Liu, L. C.; Fritzsche, S.; Kühl, T.; Ursescu, D.; Neumayer, P.; Wojtaszek, A.

    2004-12-01

    We study the charge radii of exotic nuclei through nuclear calculations and isotopic-shift evaluations. The computations are performed in the framework of the dynamic-correlation model DCM for nuclei with an odd number of valence particles and in the boson dynamic-correlation model (BCDM) for those with an even number of valence particles. These nuclear models take fully into consideration the correlation between valence particles as well as between valence and core particles. Consequently, these computations may reveal feature physics which is associated to the strong correlation between the valence and the core polarized states. Moreover,we propose to analyze the obtained charge radii within the isotopic shift theory in which the electronic transitions for lithium and lithium-like ions are calculated by considering the three correlated electrons described by a method similar to the nuclear DCM model.

  13. 21 CFR 892.1320 - Nuclear uptake probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear uptake probe. 892.1320 Section 892.1320...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1320 Nuclear uptake probe. (a) Identification. A nuclear uptake probe is a device intended to measure the amount of radionuclide taken up by...

  14. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova Data Combined With Other Cosmological Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tamara M.; Mortsell, E.; Sollerman, J.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Kirshner, R.P.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; Schmidt, B.P.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Chile U., Catolica /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Fermilab /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Harvard U. /Inst. Astron., Honolulu

    2007-01-25

    The first cosmological results from the ESSENCE supernova survey (Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) are extended to a wider range of cosmological models including dynamical dark energy and non-standard cosmological models. We fold in a greater number of external data sets such as the recent Higher-z release of high-redshift supernovae (Riess et al. 2007) as well as several complementary cosmological probes. Model comparison statistics such as the Bayesian and Akaike information criteria are applied to gauge the worth of models. These statistics favor models that give a good fit with fewer parameters. Based on this analysis, the preferred cosmological model is the flat cosmological constant model, where the expansion history of the universe can be adequately described with only one free parameter describing the energy content of the universe. Amongst the more exotic models that provide good fits to the data, we note a preference for models whose best-fit parameters reduce them to the cosmological constant model.

  15. Nuclear Incompressibility and the Asymmetry Term: Implications for Astrophysics and Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.

    2010-06-01

    The compressional-mode giant resonances, the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), in various isotopes have been investigated using inelastic scattering of 400-MeV alpha-particles at extremely forward angles, including 0 deg. Recently, the centroid energies of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) in the Sn isotope region are found to be significantly lower than the theoretical predictions. In addition, based on the GMR results, the asymmetry-term in the nuclear incompressibility has been determined as K{sub t}au = -550+-100 MeV. Constraints on interactions employed in nuclear structure calculations are discussed on the basis of the experimentally values for K{sub i}nfinity and K{sub t}au. The combination of these two values gives stringent constraints on the interactions used for nuclear structure calculations and for formations of equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter. A short review of the current status of the experimental studies on the compressional-mode giant resonances is given, and a possible new experiment for astrophysics and physics with exotic nuclei is suggested.

  16. ANASEN: The array for nuclear astrophysics and structure with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshchiy, E.; Blackmon, J. C.; Rogachev, G. V.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Baby, L.; Barber, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Belarge, J.; Caussyn, D.; Johnson, E. D.; Kemper, K.; Kuchera, A. N.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Matoš, M.; Rasco, B. S.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2017-10-01

    An active target detector array, ANASEN, has been developed for nuclear reaction studies with rare isotope beams at low energies. It aims at measurements of the excitation functions for proton and α- particle elastic and inelastic scattering and direct measurements of (α, p) reactions with exotic nuclei in inverse kinematics. ANASEN is composed of three types of charged particle detectors. The length of the active area is 340 mm and the total covered area is 1300 cm2 (almost 3 π steradian solid angle coverage) providing high efficiency for experiments with low intensity radioactive beams. A mix of 78 conventional electronics channels (for Proportional Counter and CsI-detectors) and 480 dedicated high-density ASICs electronics channels for the silicon detector are used for readout.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1320 - Nuclear uptake probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear uptake probe. 892.1320 Section 892.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1320 Nuclear uptake probe. (a) Identification...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1320 - Nuclear uptake probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear uptake probe. 892.1320 Section 892.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1320 Nuclear uptake probe. (a) Identification...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1320 - Nuclear uptake probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear uptake probe. 892.1320 Section 892.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1320 Nuclear uptake probe. (a) Identification...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1320 - Nuclear uptake probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear uptake probe. 892.1320 Section 892.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1320 Nuclear uptake probe. (a) Identification...

  1. Universal correlations of nuclear observables and the structure of exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. |||

    1996-12-31

    Despite the apparent complexity of nuclear structural evolution, recent work has shown a remarkable underlying simplicity that is unexpected, global, and which leads to new signatures for structure based on the easiest-to-obtain data. As such they will be extremely valuable for use in the experiments with low intensity radioactive beams. Beautiful correlations based either on extrinsic variables such as N{sub p}N{sub n} or the P-factor or correlations between collective observables themselves have been discovered. Examples to be discussed include a tri-partite classification of structural evolution, leading to a new paradigm that discloses certain specific classes of nuclei, universal trajectories for B(E2: w{sub 1}{sup +} {r_arrow} 0{sub 1}{sup +}) values and their use in extracting hexadecapole deformations from this observable alone, the use of these B(E2) values to identify shell gaps and magic numbers in exotic nuclei, the relationship of {beta} and {gamma} deformations, and single nucleon separation energies. Predictions for nuclei far off stability by interpolation will also be discussed.

  2. Short-range, spin-dependent interactions of electrons: a sensitive probe for exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrano, William; Adelberger, Eric; Lee, John; Heckel, Blayne

    2016-03-01

    We used a torsion pendulum and rotating attractor with 20-pole electron-spin distributions to probe dipole-dipole interactions mediated by exotic pseudo-Goldstone bosons with mbc2 <= 500 μ eV and coupling strengths up to 14 orders of magnitude weaker than electromagnetism. Our 95% confidence result indicates that any hidden global symmetry involving electrons must have a symmetry-breaking scale F >= 70 TeV, the highest reached in any laboratory experiment. We used an attractor with a 20-pole unpolarized mass distribution to improve laboratory bounds on CP -violating monopole-dipole forces with 1 . 5 μ eV

  3. LHC as an Axion Factory: Probing an Axion Explanation for (g -2 )μ with Exotic Higgs Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Neubert, Matthias; Thamm, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    We argue that a large region of so-far unconstrained parameter space for axionlike particles (ALPs), where their couplings to the standard model are of order (0.01 - 1 ) TeV-1 , can be explored by searches for the exotic Higgs decays h →Z a and h →a a in run 2 of the LHC. Almost the complete region in which ALPs can explain the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon can be probed by searches for these decays with subsequent decay a →γ γ , even if the relevant couplings are loop suppressed and the a →γ γ branching ratio is less than 1.

  4. Simulation of nuclear quadrupole resonance for sensor probe optimization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Junichiro; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Itozaki, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    A simulation method to estimate the detection efficiency of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was proposed for optimizing a sensing probe operating at radio frequencies (RFs). It first calculates the transmitted magnetic field from the probe coil to the target sample. The nuclei make quadrupole resonance by it. We considered this nonlinear reaction to estimate NQR emission by the nuclei. Then the received NQR signal intensity from the sample at the probe coil. We calculated the efficiency by testing two different probe types (solenoid and gradiometer) and by changing the relative positions of the probe and sample. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. A novel probe of chiral restoration in nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Kunihiro, Teiji; Lee, Su Houng

    2017-04-01

    We propose measuring the mass shift and width broadening of the f1 (1285) meson together with those of the ω from a nuclear target as a means to experimentally probe the partial restoration of chiral symmetry inside the nuclear matter. The relation between the order parameter of chiral symmetry and the difference in the correlation functions of the f1 (1285) current and the ω current is discussed in the limit where the disconnected diagrams are neglected. A QCD sum rule analysis of the f1 (1285) meson mass leads to about 100 MeV attraction in nuclear matter, which can be probed in future experiments.

  6. Nuclear structure studies with intermediate energy probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear structure studies with pions are reviewed. Results from a recent study of 1 p-shell nuclei using (e,e{prime}), ({pi}, {pi}{prime}), and ({gamma},{pi}) reactions are reported. Future nuclear structure studies with GeV electrons at CEBAF are also briefly discussed.

  7. Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}

    2010-01-01

    Current experimental developments on the study of exotic nuclei far from the valley of stability are discussed. I start with general aspects related to the production of radioactive beams followed by the description of some of the experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in reaction spectroscopy, nuclear structure research and nuclear applications with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved. I discuss some of the common challenges faced in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science.

  8. Nuclear probes and intraoperative gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sherman; Zanzonico, Pat

    2011-05-01

    Gamma probes are now an important, well-established technology in the management of cancer, particularly in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative sentinel lymph node as well as tumor detection may be improved under some circumstances by the use of beta (negatron or positron), rather than gamma detection, because the very short range (∼ 1 mm or less) of such particulate radiations eliminates the contribution of confounding counts from activity other than in the immediate vicinity of the detector. This has led to the development of intraoperative beta probes. Gamma camera imaging also benefits from short source-to-detector distances and minimal overlying tissue, and intraoperative small field-of-view gamma cameras have therefore been developed as well. Radiation detectors for intraoperative probes can generally be characterized as either scintillation or ionization detectors. Scintillators used in scintillation-detector probes include thallium-doped sodium iodide, thallium- and sodium-doped cesium iodide, and cerium-doped lutecium orthooxysilicate. Alternatives to inorganic scintillators are plastic scintillators, solutions of organic scintillation compounds dissolved in an organic solvent that is subsequently polymerized to form a solid. Their combined high counting efficiency for beta particles and low counting efficiency for 511-keV annihilation γ-rays make plastic scintillators well-suited as intraoperative beta probes in general and positron probes in particular Semiconductors used in ionization-detector probes include cadmium telluride, cadmium zinc telluride, and mercuric iodide. Clinical studies directly comparing scintillation and semiconductor intraoperative probes have not provided a clear choice between scintillation and ionization detector-based probes. The earliest small field-of-view intraoperative gamma camera systems were hand-held devices having fields of view of only 1.5-2.5 cm in diameter that used conventional thallium

  9. Exotic and Stable Nuclear Beam Neutron Spectroscopy without Time-of-Flight: A DSP-Based Deuterated Scintillator Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbraro, Michael; Becchetti, Frederick; Torres-Isea, Ramon; Howard, Alan; Roberts, Amy; Kolata, Jim

    2012-10-01

    Due to the limited beam intensity and other factors associated with exotic, short-lived secondary radioactive nuclear beams (RNB), we have developed a multi-element deuterated liquid scintillator array for the study of reactions involving neutrons. The system is well suited for RNB experiments involving neutrons such as the study of (p,n), (d,n), and (3He, n) reactions with neutron energy above 5 MeV and well separated states of interest. Because time-of-flight (ToF) is not necessary [1], the detectors can be located in close proximity to the reaction chamber allowing for good angular coverage and absolute detector efficiency compared to traditional ToF systems. The use of Digital Pulse Shape Discrimination (DPSD) for neutron spectroscopy experiments without ToF has been demonstrated and preliminary results from stable and exotic beam testing conducted at the UM-UND Twin-Sol LE-RNB facility lat UND will be reported. In addition, preliminary results from the new hydrogen-plastic scintillator Eljen-399 capable of neutron/gamma discrimination will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY 0969456. [4pt] [1] ``Evaluation of Large Deuterated Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection ....,'' M. Ojaruega, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A652 (2011) 397-399.

  10. Probing nuclear structure of {sup 124}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.; Dewald, A.; Moeller, O.; Peusquens, R.; Jessen, K.; Fitzler, A.; Klug, T.; Tonev, D.; Brentano, P. von; Jolie, J.; Gall, B.J.P.; Petkov, P.

    2004-09-01

    Excited states in {sup 124}Xe were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 110}Pd({sup 18}O,4n){sup 124}Xe at a beam energy of 80 MeV. A recoil distance measurement using the Euroball spectrometer in Strasbourg and the Cologne plunger was performed. Altogether 19 lifetimes of excited states in six different bands were determined using gated spectra only, in order to avoid problems related to feeding. The measured B(E2) values were used to derive the nuclear deformation of {sup 124}Xe and the interaction of the ground state band with two s bands. Two sd-IBM-1 calculations with two Hamiltonians of different complexities were performed, which show a good agreement with the measured B(E2) values in the ground state band and the quasi-{gamma} band. The deduced B(M1) values for the regular M1 band show the behavior expected for magnetic rotation. However, it is also shown that these experimental B(M1) values can be described on the basis of a rotational band as well.

  11. Probing nuclear structure of 124 Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Dewald, A.; Möller, O.; Peusquens, R.; Jessen, K.; Fitzler, A.; Klug, T.; Tonev, D.; Brentano, P. Von; Jolie, J.; Gall, B. J.; Petkov, P.

    2004-09-01

    Excited states in 124 Xe were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 110 Pd ( 18 O,4 n ) 124 Xe at a beam energy of 80 MeV . A recoil distance measurement using the Euroball spectrometer in Strasbourg and the Cologne plunger was performed. Altogether 19 lifetimes of excited states in six different bands were determined using gated spectra only, in order to avoid problems related to feeding. The measured B(E2) values were used to derive the nuclear deformation of 124 Xe and the interaction of the ground state band with two s bands. Two sd-IBM-1 calculations with two Hamiltonians of different complexities were performed, which show a good agreement with the measured B(E2) values in the ground state band and the quasi- γ band. The deduced B(M1) values for the regular M1 band show the behavior expected for magnetic rotation. However, it is also shown that these experimental B(M1) values can be described on the basis of a rotational band as well.

  12. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  13. Prompt Fission Neutrons as Probes to Nuclear Configurations at Scission

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Bonneau, L.

    2008-04-17

    Prompt fission neutrons and gamma-rays emitted by excited primary fission fragments are indirect probes to the nuclear configurations present near the scission point. By studying detailed characteristics of these quantities, it is shown that one can discriminate between various assumptions regarding the sharing of the free energy at scission among the two fragments. The case of low-energy neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U is studied and interpreted in terms of fission modes.

  14. Exotic neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei with realistic nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Otsuka, Takaharu; Shimizu, Noritaka; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    We present the first application of the newly developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa (EKK) theory of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction to shell-model studies of exotic nuclei, including those where conventional approaches with fitted interactions encounter difficulties. This EKK theory enables us to derive an interaction that is suitable for several major shells (s d +p f in this work). By using such an effective interaction obtained from the Entem-Machleidt QCD-based χ N3LO interaction and the Fujita-Miyazawa three-body force, the energies, E 2 properties, and spectroscopic factors of low-lying states of neutron-rich Ne, Mg, and Si isotopes are nicely described, as the first shell-model description of the "island of inversion" without fit of the interaction. The long-standing question as to how particle-hole excitations occur across the s d -p f magic gap is clarified with distinct differences from the conventional approaches. The shell evolution is shown to appear similarly to earlier studies.

  15. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, Jeff Allen

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  16. Development of a Tracking System of Exotic Nuclear Beams for FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, B.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Pancin, J.; Drouart, A.; Kebbiri, M.; Riallot, M.

    2010-04-26

    New accelerators like SPIRAL2 (GANIL, France) or FAIR (GSI, Germany) will be soon constructed, and they will be able to produce radioactive ion beams (RIB) with high intensities of current (>=10{sup 6} pps). These beams, at low energy, lower than 20 MeV/n, usually have high emittance, which imposes the use of tracking detectors before the target in order to reconstruct the trajectory of the ions. The group of Nuclear Physics at CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores), is in charge of developing a tracking system for the low energy branch of FAIR (the HISPEC/DESPEC project). A collaboration with CEA-SACLAY was established, with the aim of developing, building and testing low pressure Secondary electron Detectors (SeD). Within this proposal we have projected and constructed a new Nuclear Physics Line in the CNA in order to be able to receive any kind of detector tests and the associated nuclear instruments.

  17. Development of a Tracking System of Exotic Nuclear Beams for FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Pancin, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Drouart, A.; Kebbiri, M.; Riallot, M.

    2010-04-01

    New accelerators like SPIRAL2 (GANIL, France) or FAIR (GSI, Germany) will be soon constructed, and they will be able to produce radioactive ion beams (RIB) with high intensities of current (⩾106 pps). These beams, at low energy, lower than 20 MeV/n, usually have high emittance, which imposes the use of tracking detectors before the target in order to reconstruct the trajectory of the ions. The group of Nuclear Physics at CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores), is in charge of developing a tracking system for the low energy branch of FAIR (the HISPEC/DESPEC project). A collaboration with CEA-SACLAY was established, with the aim of developing, building and testing low pressure Secondary electron Detectors (SeD). Within this proposal we have projected and constructed a new Nuclear Physics Line in the CNA in order to be able to receive any kind of detector tests and the associated nuclear instruments.

  18. Nuclear properties of the exotic high-spin isomer 178Hfm2 from collinear laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, N.; Le Blanc, F.; Krieg, M.; Pinard, J.; Huber, G.; Lunney, M. D.; Le Du, D.; Meunier, R.; Hussonnois, M.; Constantinescu, O.; Kim, J. B.; Briançon, Ch.; Crawford, J. E.; Duong, H. T.; Gangrski, Y. P.; Kühl, T.; Markov, B. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Quentin, P.; Roussière, B.; Sauvage, J.

    1994-04-01

    The complete hyperfine spectrum in the optical transition 5d26s2 3P2-->5d6s26p 1P1 of 178Hfm2 was recorded by collinear laser spectroscopy using nanogram amounts of samples. The quadrupole moment and isomer shift were determined for the first time as well as a precise value and the sign of the magnetic dipole moment. The change in nuclear mean-square charge radius between the isomeric state 178Hfm2 and the ground state 178Hfg was evaluated as δ178.178m2=-0.059(9) fm2. From the hyperfine A and B factors the magnetic moment μ178m2I=+8.16(4) nuclear magnetons and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment Q178m2s=+6.00(7) b were were extracted.

  19. Surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei: A source for studying the nuclear symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Antonov, A. N.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2011-09-15

    We study the correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy for isotopic chains of even-even Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF + BCS method. The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure, and the asymmetric compressibility in finite nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy density functional. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron-skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. A correlation between the parameters of the equation of state (symmetry energy and its density slope) and the neutron skin is suggested in the isotopic chains of Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei.

  20. Study of nuclear matter density distributions using hadronic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-06

    We briefly review our formula for a proton-nucleus total reaction cross section, {sigma}{sub R}, constructed in the black-sphere approximation of nuclei, in which a nucleus is viewed as a 'black' sphere of radius 'a'. Some years ago, using the Glauber model, one of the authors (A.K.) and his collaborators performed numerical simulations to examine the possibility to probe the nuclear matter density distributions of neutron-rich unstable nuclei from proton elastic scatterings 'model-independently'. The present study is another attempt to seek a 'model-independent' framework for systematically analyzing scattering data for studying the matter density distributions of atomic nuclei.

  1. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Olszewski, W.; Satuła, D.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Kalska-Szostko, B.

    2017-02-01

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, 57Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  2. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques.

    PubMed

    Szymański, K; Olszewski, W; Satuła, D; Gawryluk, D J; Krzton-Maziopa, A; Kalska-Szostko, B

    2017-02-15

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, (57)Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  3. Concluding Remarks on the International Symposium on Exotic Nuclear Systems ENS'05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.

    2005-11-01

    In nuclear phyiscs within Europe we observe a strong concentration onto a few large-scale facilities like FAIR, ALICE and EURISOL, which at the same time results in a strong focus of all resources towards these facilities. My personal belief is, that we need in Europe in addition a broad network of smaller institutes with local nuclear physics for a healthy structure of our science. I propose two fields of nuclear science onto which these smaller institutes may focus: (i) Fundamental Physics, studying physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision measurements at low energies and (ii) joining Advanced Photon Science, where new high energy photon and particle beams become available in compact devices at low cost. While such networks are planned or exist already among different universities in Germany for these two subjects, I propose to extend these towards a European networks within the 7th framework. A first starting point could be associations with the German networks, funded by the German Science Foundation DFG.

  4. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes. [Northwestern Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Kamal K.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications. (RWR)

  5. Precision Nuclear Beta Spectroscopy as a Probe for BSM Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    The shape of nuclear beta decay spectra is sensitive to new physics such as scalar and tensor currents, and weak magnetism. By selecting an appropriate nuclear species, it is possible to disentangle these effects. 45Ca, which undergoes a predominantly Gamow-Teller transition with an end-point energy of 256 keV, is an excellent probe for tensor couplings. Recently, the 45Ca beta decay spectrum was measured in the Caltech/UCNA 4 π magnetic spectrometer instrumented with large, highly-pixelated Si detectors at the Los Alamos National Laboratory UCN facility. This detection system, in conjunction with an extremely thin foil source preparation, allows for a full reconstruction of events to build a precise spectrum. Preliminary results of the analysis of this data will be presented.

  6. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Cherepanov, E. A.

    Methods of production of light exotic nuclei and study of their ptoperties -- Superheavy elements. Syhnthesis and properties -- Nuclear fission -- Nuclear reactions -- rare processes, decay and nuclear structure -- Experimental set-ups and future projects -- Radioactive beams. Production and research programmes -- Public relations.

  7. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  8. Strange exotic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    1998-08-01

    Exotic atoms of K- and Σ- are analyzed using density-dependent optical potentials constrained by a low-density limit. Emphasis is placed on radial sensitivities of the real potential. A potential depth of 180MeV inside nuclei is confirmed for K-. For Σ- a shallow attractive potential outside the nuclear surface becomes repulsive in the interior. The information content of limited data sets is demonstrated.

  9. Detection of tricuspid insufficiency by portable nuclear probe monitoring over the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Schulman, P.; Smith, V.E.; Karimeddini, M.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    A case is presented in which a portable nuclear scintillation probe was used to detect tricuspid regurgitation. An electrocardiographically-gated scintigraphic collection obtained over the liver was correlated with findings from contrast echocardiography and jugular venous pulse tracings. The nuclear probe may provide a simple means for the detection of tricuspid insufficiency. It remains to be determined if quantification of severity will be possible.

  10. Exotic power and propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion.

  11. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  12. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Felix

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  13. Probing strongly hybridized nuclear-electronic states in a model quantum ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, I.; Babkevich, P.; Jeong, M.; Piatek, J. O.; Boero, G.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present direct local-probe evidence for strongly hybridized nuclear-electronic spin states of an Ising ferromagnet LiHoF4 in a transverse magnetic field. The nuclear-electronic states are addressed via a magnetic resonance in the GHz frequency range using coplanar resonators and a vector network analyzer. The magnetic resonance spectrum is successfully traced over the entire field-temperature phase diagram, which is remarkably well reproduced by mean-field calculations. Our method can be directly applied to a broad class of materials containing rare-earth ions for probing the substantially mixed nature of the nuclear and electronic moments.

  14. Double-resonance 14N nuclear-magnetic-resonance probe for single-crystal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Akira; McDowell, Charles A.

    1989-06-01

    A double-resonance 14N nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) probe suitable for single-crystal studies is described. The 14N and 1H sample coils are wound as coaxial solenoids and used instead of a doubly tuned single coil to tune over the required frequency range of the 14N channel. The choice of materials for the probe body and the wire size for the sample and impedance matching coils were chosen carefully to minimize spurious ringing phenomena, which is troublesome in probe designs for solid-state NMR. The probe has a very accurate goniometer since the resolution of 14N NMR signals is high.

  15. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  16. Nuclear research with the electromagnetic probe. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meziani, Z.E.

    1994-10-01

    This is the final report on the research carried at Stanford University under contract DE-FG03-88ER40439. All the work accomplished under this grant is reported in the publications listed as part of the Principal Investigator bibliography at the end of this report. In the last few years our research was directed at some of the forefront questions in nuclear physics. We investigated the nuclear medium effects on the intrinsic properties of bound nucleons, specifically the ectromagnetic form factors. For these studies we performed a number of specialized electron scattering experiments with specific sensitivity to nuclear medium effects. At the next level of structure, elementary constituents of matter are quarks and gluons. Defining the energy regime where the quark-gluon description of nuclear systems becomes more relevant than the nucleon-meson description is of great importance in thoroughly understanding the nuclear structure. To explore this transition region, we studied the scaling region in the disintegration of the deuteron, the simplest nuclear system with high energy photons. Finally we focused on the investigation of the nucleon internal spin structure along with the test of the Bjoerken sum rule a fundamental sum rule of QCD.

  17. Is the Dispersion Relation Applicable for Exotic Nuclear Systems? The Abnormal Threshold Anomaly in the He 6 +Bi 209 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Wang, D. X.; Ma, N. R.; Sun, L. J.; Yang, F.; Xu, X. X.; Wu, Z. D.; Zhang, H. Q.; Liu, Z. H.

    2017-07-01

    The threshold anomaly of the phenomenological potential has been known for a long time in nuclear reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier, where the connection between the real and imaginary potentials is well described by the dispersion relation. However, this connection is not clear yet for some weakly bound nuclear systems, especially for reactions induced by exotic radioactive nuclei. In this study, precise optical potentials of the halo nuclear system He 6 +Bi 209 were extracted via Pb 208 (Li 7 ,He 6 ) transfer reactions with energies measured downward to the extremely sub-barrier region. The real potential presents a bell-like shape around the barrier as a normal threshold anomaly in tightly bound nuclear systems. However, the imaginary potential shows an abnormal behavior: it increases first with energy decreasing below the barrier and then falls quickly down to 0. It is the first time the threshold of the imaginary potential has been determined in an exotic nuclear system. Moreover, experimental results show the dispersion relation is not applicable for this system, which may be a common phenomenon for exotic nuclear systems. We discuss possible explanations for such a peculiar behavior, but further study is still desired for the underlying physics.

  18. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  19. Searches for Exotic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David Lee

    This research encompasses two quite distinct searches for exotic matter. The first half concerns exotic matter on the scale of elementary particles. In this chapter, I consider the production of gluinos, the supersymmetric partner of the gluon, in models where the gluino is very light. Cross sections are calculated for electroproduction and hadroproduction of gluinos and the results indicate that existing accelerators are capable of probing the region of gluino masses between 1.0 and 2.0GeV with lifetimes between 10-10 and 10-6 seconds. Such experiments could find a light gluino if it exists, or to close this unexplored mass-lifetime window. The second half concerns the search for exotic forms of matter on the macroscopic scale, namely the search for stable strange quark matter. If stable strange matter exists, then all neutron stars may in fact be strange stars. I examine a recent proposal that strange star oscillations may result in a detectable millimeter-wave radio signal. The effects of rotation on this signal are calculated with the motivation of providing a more distinctive signature for the detection of strange matter stars.

  20. Probing nuclear bubble structure via neutron star asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    We consider torsional oscillations that are trapped in a layer of spherical-hole (bubble) nuclear structure, which is expected to occur in the deepest region of the inner crust of a neutron star. Because this layer intervenes between the phase of slab nuclei and the outer core of uniform nuclear matter, torsional oscillations in the bubble phase can be excited separately from usual crustal torsional oscillations. We find from eigenmode analyses for various models of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter that the fundamental frequencies of such oscillations are almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, but strongly depend on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy L. Although the frequencies are also sensitive to the entrainment effect, i.e. what portion of nucleons outside bubbles contribute to the oscillations, by having such a portion fixed, we can successfully fit the calculated fundamental frequencies of torsional oscillations in the bubble phase inside a star of specific mass and radius as a function of L. By comparing the resultant fitting formula to the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed from the soft-gamma repeaters, we find that each of the observed low-frequency QPOs can be identified either as a torsional oscillation in the bubble phase or as a usual crustal oscillation, given generally accepted values of L for all the stellar models are considered here.

  1. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R.

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  2. Exotic Atoms and Muonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, D.

    In exotic atoms, one of the atomic electrons is replaced by a negatively charged particle, whereas muonium consists of a positive muon and an electron. After a general review of the theoretical and experimental aspects, the present knowledge of this field is summarized. These include muonium and the application of the muon spin resonance method in solid-state physics and chemistry, muonic hydrogen atoms, muonic molecules and muon-catalyzed fusion, pionic hydrogen atoms and their use in chemistry, testing quantum electrodynamics on heavy muonic atoms, measuring particle and nuclear properties using hadronic atoms, and testing basic symmetry principles with antiprotonic helium atoms and antihydrogen.

  3. Application of a portable nuclear magnetic resonance surface probe to porous media.

    PubMed

    Marko, Andriy; Wolter, Bernd; Arnold, Walter

    2007-03-01

    A portable nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface probe was used to determine the time-dependent self-diffusion coefficient D(t) of water molecules in two fluid-filled porous media. The measuring equipment and the inhomogeneous magnetic fields in the sensitive volume of the probe are described. It is discussed how to evaluate D(t) using a surface probe from the primary and stimulated echoes generated in three-pulse experiments. Furthermore, the evaluation of D(t) allows one to determine the geometrical structure of porous materials.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization studies on deuterated nitroxyl spin probes.

    PubMed

    David Jebaraj, D; Utsumi, Hideo; Milton Franklin Benial, A

    2017-10-01

    Detailed dynamic nuclear polarization and electron spin resonance studies were carried out for 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl, 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl,3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethy pyrolidine-1-oxyl nitroxyl radicals and their corresponding deuterated nitroxyl radicals, used in Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the first time. The dynamic nuclear polarization parameters such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) factor, longitudinal relaxivity, saturation parameter, leakage factor and coupling factor were estimated for deuterated nitroxyl radicals. DNP enhancement increases with agent concentration up to 3 mm and decreases above 3 mm. The proton spin-lattice relaxation time and the longitudinal relaxivity parameters were estimated. The leakage factor increases with increasing agent concentration up to 3 mm and reaches plateau in the region 3-5 mm. The coupling parameter shows the interaction between the electron and nuclear spins to be mainly dipolar in origin. DNP spectrum exhibits that the full width at half maximum values are higher for undeuterated nitroxyl radicals compared with deuterated nitroxyl radicals, which leads to the increase in DNP enhancement. The ESR parameters such as, the line width, line shape, signal intensity ratio, rotational correlation time, hyperfine coupling constant and g-factor were calculated. The narrow line width was observed for deuterated nitroxyl radicals compared with undeuterated nitroxyl radicals, which leads to the higher saturation parameter value and DNP enhancement. The novelty of the work permits clear understanding of the DNP parameters determining the higher DNP enhancement compared with the undeuterated nitroxyl radicals. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The K sup + as a probe of nuclear medium effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the K+ total cross sections on a wide range of nuclei has revealed important modifications of the free-space K+ -nucleon interaction when the nucleon is embedded in a nucleus. In addition to the previously published data on carbon and deuterium we report here the extension of such measurements to lithium, silicon, and calcium. We demonstrate that the previous reported medium modifications for carbon occur quite generally. The results are discussed as evidence for partial quark deconfinement at nuclear densities.

  6. Probing nuclear pore complex architecture with proximity-dependent biotinylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae In; Birendra, K C; Zhu, Wenhong; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Doye, Valérie; Roux, Kyle J

    2014-06-17

    Proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) is a method for identifying protein associations that occur in vivo. By fusing a promiscuous biotin ligase to a protein of interest expressed in living cells, BioID permits the labeling of proximate proteins during a defined labeling period. In this study we used BioID to study the human nuclear pore complex (NPC), one of the largest macromolecular assemblies in eukaryotes. Anchored within the nuclear envelope, NPCs mediate the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of numerous cellular components. We applied BioID to constituents of the Nup107-160 complex and the Nup93 complex, two conserved NPC subcomplexes. A strikingly different set of NPC constituents was detected depending on the position of these BioID-fusion proteins within the NPC. By applying BioID to several constituents located throughout the extremely stable Nup107-160 subcomplex, we refined our understanding of this highly conserved subcomplex, in part by demonstrating a direct interaction of Nup43 with Nup85. Furthermore, by using the extremely stable Nup107-160 structure as a molecular ruler, we defined the practical labeling radius of BioID. These studies further our understanding of human NPC organization and demonstrate that BioID is a valuable tool for exploring the constituency and organization of large protein assemblies in living cells.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance probes of membrane biophysics: Structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftin, Avigdor

    The phospholipid membrane is a self-assembled, dynamic molecular system that may exist alone in association with only water, or in complex systems comprised of multiple lipid types and proteins. In this dissertation the intra- and inter-molecular forces responsible for the atomistic, molecular and collective equilibrium structure and dynamics are studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The multinuclear NMR measurements and various experimental techniques are able to provide data that enable the characterization of the hierarchical spatio-temporal organization of the phospholipid membrane. The experimental and theoretical studies conducted target membrane interactions ranging from model systems composed of only water and lipids, to multiple component domain forming membranes that are in association with peripheral and trans-membrane proteins. These measurements consisit of frequency spectrum lineshapes and nuclear-spin relaxation rates obtained using 2H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR and 1H NMR. The changes of these experimental observables are interpreted within a statistical thermodynamic framework that allows the membrane structure, activation energies, and correlation times of motion to be determined. The cases presented demonstrate how fundamental principles of NMR spectroscopy may be applied to a host of membranes, leading to the biophysical characterization of membrane structure and dynamics.

  8. Double-tuned single coil probe for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    A double-tuned single coil probe for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved sensitivity is described comprising a double-tuned circuit means in which the low frequency irradiation is fed to a transmission line through an inductor means. The double-tuned circuit means of the invention may be remotely disposed from the magnetic field which results in greater sensitivity.

  9. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Augustine, M.P.; Pines, A.; Clarke, J. |

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 {Omega}. Low-field, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies {lt}1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Augustine, Matthew P.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 Ω. Low-field, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies <1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200.

  11. Isospin effects on neutrons as a probe of nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2009-03-15

    Based on a dynamical Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model, we calculate the excess of the precision neutron multiplicity of the heavy nuclei {sup 240}Cf, {sup 246}Cf, {sup 252}Cf, and {sup 240}U over that predicted by the standard statistical model as a function of the postsaddle dissipation strength. We find that with increasing isospin of the system, the sensitivity of the excess to the dissipation strength decreases substantially. Moreover, for {sup 240}U, this excess is no longer sensitive to the nuclear dissipation. These results suggest that, on the experimental side, to accurately obtain information of the postsaddle dissipation strength by measuring the neutron multiplicity evaporated during the fission process of heavy nuclei, it is best to populate those compound systems with low isospin.

  12. Monopole strength as a probe of nuclear shape mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.

    1987-08-17

    The monopole strength, MS, within a single set of nuclear shape excitations is compared with the MS between different shapes. After misconceptions are pointed out concerning the spin dependence of B(E2) values, MS properties are juxtaposed with gamma-ray and beta-decay properties of /sup 70/Se, /sup 96/Zr, /sup 102/Pd, and the N = 60 isotones to illustrate the utility of combined investigations and evidence is given for the observation of a two-phonon octupole multiplet. Finally, consideration is given to the dominance of the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ force in producing deformation in the N > 50 1g nuclei. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Exotic atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. H.; Maruhn, J. A.

    1986-07-01

    From the study of nuclei with abundances of neutrons and protons (N numbers and Z numbers) quite different from those found in nature, it has been possible to gain new views of motions and structures within nuclear matter. Based on the spherical shell model of the nucleus proposed by Mayer and Jensen in 1949 and the collective model of nuclear deformation proposed in 1952 by Bohr and Mottelson, it has come to be possible to decide what shape or shapes a nucleus must have for a given set of N and Z numbers. It turns out that not only spherical nuclei are possible but also prolate and oblate spheroids (football and discus shaped), triaxial (like a partially deflated football), and even pear- or peanut-shaped. A significant experimental tool in such studies is the ISOL or Isotope-Separator, On-Line, which makes possible the construction of energy level diagrams from the study of exotic nuclei created when particles from accelerators strike various kinds of foil. The significance of magic numbers and super-magic numbers (particular combinations of N and Z) for the stability of various exotic nuclei is considered. International facilities engaged in such studies are noted.

  14. Antinucleon as a probe of nuclear spin and isospin excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, C. B.; Sainio, M. E.; Walker, G. E.

    1983-12-01

    Using two models for the antinucleon-nucleon (N¯N) interaction, we obtain complex, energy dependent N¯N transition operators t appropriate for (N¯, N¯') inelastic scattering studies on complex nuclei. It is shown that the spin-isospin dependence of the N¯N annihilation potential plays an important role in determining the dominant spin-isospin modes in the nuclear response. In particular, for the most realistic of our N¯N models, a large spin dependent component tσ is obtained, leading to the strong excitation of isoscalar spin-flip states; this term is suppressed in the corresponding NN t matrix. The central spin and isospin independent term, tc0, is large for N¯N, at all relevant momentum transfers q. At high q the isoscalar spin-orbit (tLS0) and isovector tensor (tTτ) components are important. Cross section and analyzing power predictions for N¯ inelastic scattering as well as corrections due to energy and density dependence are discussed.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear spin relaxation in AlAs quantum well probed by ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetilnikov, A. V.; Frolov, D. D.; Nefyodov, Yu. A.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Smirnov, D. S.; Tiemann, L.; Reichl, C.; Dietsche, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    The study of nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation was conducted in an asymmetrically doped to n ˜1.8 ×1011cm-2 16 nm AlAs quantum well grown in the [001 ] direction. The dynamic polarization of nuclear spins due to a hyperfine interaction resulted in the so-called Overhauser shift of two-dimensional conduction electron spin resonance. The maximum shifts achieved in the experiments are several orders of magnitude smaller than in GaAs-based heterostructures, indicating that the hyperfine interaction is weak. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time extracted from the decay of the Overhauser shift over time turned out to depend on the filling factor of the two-dimensional electron system. This observation indicates that nuclear spin-lattice relaxation is mostly due to the interaction between electron and nuclear spins. The Overhauser shift diminishes resonantly when the rf radiation of certain frequencies was applied to the sample. This effect served as an indirect, yet powerful, method for nuclear magnetic resonance detection: NMR quadrupole splitting of 75As nuclei was clearly resolved. Theoretical calculations performed describe well these experimental findings.

  16. Fragmentation in isotopic and isobaric systems as probe of density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Gautam, Sakshi; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2016-11-01

    We probe the density-dependent behavior of symmetry energy using the yield of various fragments in central collisions of various isotopic and isobaric colliding pairs. We calculate the yields of free nucleons, light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments in neutron-rich colliding systems as well as the ratio of relative yields of above fragments and free nucleons. Our findings reveal that the ratio of relative yield of light charged particles poses better candidate to probe the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

  17. Probing the nucleoporin FG repeat network defines structural and functional features of the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Philipp; Kunze, Ruth; Fischer, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the organization of the FG repeat meshwork that forms the active transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is key to understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this paper, we develop a tool to probe the FG repeat network in living cells by modifying FG nucleoporins (Nups) with a binding motif (engineered dynein light chain–interacting domain) that can drag several copies of an interfering protein, Dyn2, into the FG network to plug the pore and stop nucleocytoplasmic transport. Our method allows us to specifically probe FG Nups in vivo, which provides insight into the organization and function of the NPC transport channel. PMID:21987633

  18. Probing the nucleoporin FG repeat network defines structural and functional features of the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Philipp; Kunze, Ruth; Fischer, Jessica; Hurt, Ed

    2011-10-17

    Unraveling the organization of the FG repeat meshwork that forms the active transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is key to understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this paper, we develop a tool to probe the FG repeat network in living cells by modifying FG nucleoporins (Nups) with a binding motif (engineered dynein light chain-interacting domain) that can drag several copies of an interfering protein, Dyn2, into the FG network to plug the pore and stop nucleocytoplasmic transport. Our method allows us to specifically probe FG Nups in vivo, which provides insight into the organization and function of the NPC transport channel.

  19. Significant role of fissility in evaporation residue cross sections as a probe of presaddle nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2010-01-15

    Using a Langevin model, we explore the role of fissility in probing presaddle nuclear dissipation by calculating the excess of the evaporation residue cross section over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for nuclei {sup 190}Os and {sup 210}Po, which are taken as two representatives that have the same neutron-to-proton ratio (N/Z) but have a difference in fissility. We find that a large fissility not only amplifies the dissipation effects on the excess of evaporation residues, but also significantly increases the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. The results suggest that in experiments, to obtain a more accurate information of nuclear dissipation inside the saddle point by measuring evaporation residue cross sections, it is best to populate among the various compound systems with equal N/Z those with high fissility.

  20. Decoherence and fluctuation dynamics of the quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, Evgeny A.

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of nuclear spin decoherence and nuclear spin flip-flops in self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots are studied experimentally using optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Nuclear spin-echo decay times are found to be in the range 1-4 ms. This is a factor of ~3 longer than in strain-free GaAs/AlGaAs structures and is shown to result from strain-induced quadrupolar effects that suppress nuclear spin flip-flops. The correlation times of the flip-flops are examined using a novel frequency-comb NMR technique and are found to exceed 1 s, a factor of ~1000 longer than in strain-free structures. These findings complement recent studies of electron spin coherence and reveal the paradoxical dual role of the quadrupolar effects in self-assembled quantum dots: large increase of the nuclear spin bath coherence and at the same time significant reduction of the electron spin-qubit coherence. Approaches to increasing electron spin coherence are discussed. In particular the nanohole filled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots are an attractive option: while their optical quality matches the self-assembled dots the quadrupolar effects measured in NMR spectra are a factor of 1000 smaller.

  1. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  2. Probing the N=32 Shell Closure below the Magic Proton Number Z=20: Mass Measurements of the Exotic Isotopes ^{52,53}K.

    PubMed

    Rosenbusch, M; Ascher, P; Atanasov, D; Barbieri, C; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Cipollone, A; George, S; Herfurth, F; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Navrátil, P; Neidherr, D; Schweikhard, L; Somà, V; Stanja, J; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2015-05-22

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N=32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z=20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes (52,53)K, the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N=32, slightly lower than for 52Ca, highlighting the doubly magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect.

  3. Simulation of electromagnetic and strange probes of dense nuclear matter at NICA/MPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, A.; Kolesnikov, V.; Vasendina, V.

    2016-01-01

    The main task of the NICA/MPD physics program is a study of the properties of nuclear matter under extreme conditions achieved in collisions of heavy ions. These properties can reveal themselves through different probes, the most promising among those being the lepton-antilepton pairs and strange hadrons. In this paper the MPD performance for measuring the electron-positron pairs and strange hyperons in central Au+Au collisions at NICA energies is presented.

  4. A broadband single-chip transceiver for multi-nuclear NMR probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grisi, Marco Gualco, Gabriele; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present an integrated broadband complementary metal-oxide semiconductor single-chip transceiver suitable for the realization of multi-nuclear pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes. The realized single-chip transceiver can be interfaced with on-chip integrated microcoils or external LC resonators operating in the range from 1 MHz to 1 GHz. The dimension of the chip is about 1 mm{sup 2}. It consists of a radio-frequency (RF) power amplifier, a low-noise RF preamplifier, a frequency mixer, an audio-frequency amplifier, and fully integrated transmit-receive switches. As specific example, we show its use for multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. With an integrated coil of about 150 μm external diameter, a {sup 1}H spin sensitivity of about 1.5 × 10{sup 13} spins/Hz{sup 1/2} is achieved at 7 T.

  5. A broadband single-chip transceiver for multi-nuclear NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisi, Marco; Gualco, Gabriele; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we present an integrated broadband complementary metal-oxide semiconductor single-chip transceiver suitable for the realization of multi-nuclear pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes. The realized single-chip transceiver can be interfaced with on-chip integrated microcoils or external LC resonators operating in the range from 1 MHz to 1 GHz. The dimension of the chip is about 1 mm2. It consists of a radio-frequency (RF) power amplifier, a low-noise RF preamplifier, a frequency mixer, an audio-frequency amplifier, and fully integrated transmit-receive switches. As specific example, we show its use for multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. With an integrated coil of about 150 μm external diameter, a 1H spin sensitivity of about 1.5 × 1013 spins/Hz1/2 is achieved at 7 T.

  6. Effect of nuclear motion on molecular high order harmonic pump probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bredtmann, Timm; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D

    2012-11-26

    We study pump-probe schemes for the real time observation of electronic motion on attosecond time scale in the molecular ion H(2)(+) and its heavier isotope T(2)(+) while these molecules dissociate on femtosecond time scale by solving numerically the non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The UV pump laser pulse prepares a coherent superposition of the three lowest lying quantum states and the time-delayed mid-infrared, intense few-femtosecond probe pulse subsequently generates molecular high-order harmonics (MHOHG) from this coherent electron-nuclear wavepacket (CENWP). Varying the pump-probe time delay by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude. Due to nuclear movement, the coherence of these two upper states and the ground state is lost after a few femtoseconds and the MHOHG intensity variations as function of pump-probe delay time are shown to be equal to the period of electron oscillation in the coherent superposition of the two upper dissociative quantum states. Although this electron oscillation period and hence the periodicity of the harmonic spectra are quite constant over a wide range of internuclear distances, a strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the actual shapes and ways in which these spectra change as a function of pump-probe delay time, which is illustrated by comparison of the MHOHG spectra generated by the two isotopes H(2)(+) and T(2)(+). Two different regimes corresponding roughly to internuclear distances R < 4a(0) and R > 4a(0) are identified: For R < 4a(0), the intensity of a whole range of frequencies in the plateau region is decreased by orders of magnitude when the delay time is changed by a few hundred attoseconds whereas in the cutoff region the peaks in the MHOHG spectra are red-shifted with increasing pump-probe time delay. For R > 4a(0), on the other hand, the peaks both in the cutoff and plateau region are red-shifted with increasing delay times

  7. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-05-09

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  8. Exotic dancing and health.

    PubMed

    Maticka-Tyndale, E; Lewis, J; Clark, J P; Zubick, J; Young, S

    2000-01-01

    The health and safety of women who work as exotic dancers are firmly embedded within the social organization of the strip club and the broader social, economic and political context of the work of exotic dancing. Exotic dancers in this study expressed health concerns associated with: the effects of costuming and appearance requirements; dirty work environments; problems due to stigmatization, sexual harassment and assault; and police disinterest or victim blaming. The balance between benefits and hazards related to exotic dancing is influenced not only by the personal choices made by dancers, but also by the organization of the strip club and the broader context within which exotic dancing takes place.

  9. Electromagnetic radiation as a probe of the initial state and of viscous dynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujanovic, Gojko; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Luzum, Matthew; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The penetrating nature of electromagnetic signals makes them suitable probes to explore the properties of the strongly interacting medium created in relativistic nuclear collisions. We examine the effects of the initial conditions and shear relaxation time on the spectra and flow coefficients of electromagnetic probes, using an event-by-event 3+1-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic simulation (music).

  10. A highly sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe for the detection of cytoplasmic and nuclear hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ying; Liu, Keyin; Yang, Huiran; Li, Yi; Lan, Haichuang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xinyu; Yi, Tao

    2014-10-07

    As a marker for oxidative stress and a second messenger in signal transduction, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role in living systems. It is thus critical to monitor the changes in H2O2 in cells and tissues. Here, we developed a highly sensitive and versatile ratiometric H2O2 fluorescent probe (NP1) based on 1,8-naphthalimide and boric acid ester. In response to H2O2, the ratio of its fluorescent intensities at 555 and 403 nm changed 1020-fold within 200 min. The detecting limit of NP1 toward H2O2 is estimated as 0.17 μM. It was capable of imaging endogenous H2O2 generated in live RAW 264.7 macrophages as a cellular inflammation response, and especially, it was able to detect H2O2 produced as a signaling molecule in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells through stimulation by epidermal growth factor. This probe contains an azide group and thus has the potential to be linked to various molecules via the click reaction. After binding to a Nuclear Localization Signal peptide, the peptide-based combination probe (pep-NP1) was successfully targeted to nuclei and was capable of ratiometrically detecting nuclear H2O2 in living cells. These results indicated that NP1 was a highly sensitive ratiometric H2O2 dye with promising biological applications.

  11. Probing nuclear dynamics in jet production with a global event shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Liu, Xiaohui; Mantry, Sonny; Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2013-10-01

    We study single jet production in electron-nucleus collisions e-+NA→J+X, using the 1-jettiness (τ1) global event shape. It inclusively quantifies the pattern of radiation in the final state, gives enhanced sensitivity to soft radiation at wide angles from the nuclear beam and final-state jet, and facilitates the resummation of large Sudakov logarithms associated with the veto on additional jets. Through their effect on the observed pattern of radiation, 1-jettiness can be a useful probe of nuclear parton distribution functions and power corrections from dynamical effects in the nuclear medium. This formalism allows for the standard jet shape analysis while simultaneously providing sensitivity to soft radiation at wide angles from the jet. We use a factorization framework for cross-sections differential in τ1 and the transverse momentum (PJT) and rapidity (y) of the jet, in the region τ1≪PJT. The restriction τ1≪PJT allows only soft radiation between the nuclear beam and jet directions, thereby acting as a veto on additional jets. This region is also insensitive to the details of the jet algorithm, allowing for better theoretical control over resummation, while providing enhanced sensitivity to nuclear medium effects. We give numerical results at leading twist, with resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level of accuracy, for a variety of nuclear targets. Such studies would be ideal for the electron-ion collider and the LHeC proposals for a future electron-ion collider, where a range of nuclear targets are planned.

  12. Low temperature probe for dynamic nuclear polarization and multiple-pulse solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Cho, HyungJoon; Baugh, Jonathan; Ryan, Colm A; Cory, David G; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    2007-08-01

    Here, we describe the design and performance characteristics of a low temperature probe for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments, which is compatible with demanding multiple-pulse experiments. The competing goals of a high-Q microwave cavity to achieve large DNP enhancements and a high efficiency NMR circuit for multiple-pulse control lead to inevitable engineering tradeoffs. We have designed two probes-one with a single-resonance RF circuit and a horn-mirror cavity configuration for the microwaves and a second with a double-resonance RF circuit and a double-horn cavity configuration. The advantage of the design is that the sample is in vacuum, the RF circuits are locally tuned, and the microwave resonator has a large internal volume that is compatible with the use of RF and gradient coils.

  13. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  14. Probing nuclear effects using single-transverse kinematic imbalance with MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X. -G.; Betancourt, M.

    2016-08-15

    Kinematic imbalance of the final-state particles in the plane transverse to the neutrino direction provides a sensitive probe of nuclear effects. In this contribution, we report the MINERvA measurement of the single-transverse kinematic imbalance in neutrino charged-current quasielastic-like events on CH targets. To improve the momentum measurements of the final-state particles, we develop a method to select elastically scattering contained (ESC) protons and a general procedure to correct the transverse momentum scales.

  15. Probing nuclear effects using single-transverse kinematic imbalance with MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.-G.; Betancourt, M.; MINERvA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Kinematic imbalance of the final-state particles in the plane transverse to the neutrino direction provides a sensitive probe of nuclear effects. In this contribution, we report the MINERvA measurement of the single-transverse kinematic imbalance in neutrino charged-current quasielastic-like events on CH targets. To improve the momentum measurements of the final-state particles, we develop a method to select elastically scattering contained (ESC) protons and a general procedure to correct the transverse momentum scales.

  16. Defect-induced magnetism in SiC probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Dmytriieva, D.; Molatta, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Wang, Yutian; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H.

    2017-02-01

    We give evidence for intrinsic defect-induced bulk paramagnetism in SiC by means of 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the internal dipole-field distribution, probed by the spin part of the NMR Knight shift and the spectral linewidth, follows the Curie law and scales very well with the macroscopic dc susceptibility. In order to quantitatively analyze the NMR spectra, a microscopic model based on dipole-dipole interactions was developed. The very good agreement between these simulations and the NMR data establishes a direct relation between the frequency distribution of the spectral intensity and the corresponding real-space volumes of nuclear spins. The presented approach by NMR can be applied to a variety of similar materials and, thus, opens a new avenue for the microscopic exploration and exploitation of diluted bulk magnetism in semiconductors.

  17. Probing an NV Center's Nuclear Spin Environment with Coherent Population Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levonian, David; Goldman, Michael; Singh, Swati; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as a versatile atom-like system, finding diverse applications in metrology and quantum information science, but interaction between the NV center's electronic spin and its nuclear spin environment represent a major source of decoherence. We use optical techniques to monitor and control the nuclear bath surrounding an NV center. Specifically, we create an optical Λ-system using the | +/- 1 > components of the NV center's spin-triplet ground state. When the Zeeman splitting between the two states is equal to the two-photon detuning between the lasers, population is trapped in the resulting dark state. Measuring the rate at which the NV center escapes from the dark state therefore gives information on how spin bath dynamics change the effective magnetic field experienced by the NV center. By monitoring statistics of the emitted photons, we plan to probe non-equilibrium dynamics of the bath.

  18. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Pulse Sequences and Probes to Study Biomacromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Krishnan, V V; Maxwell, R

    2001-02-26

    The determination of the three dimensional structures at high resolution of biomolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, enables us to understand their function at the molecular level. At the present time, there are only two methods available for determining such structures, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared to well-established X-ray diffraction techniques, NMR methodology is relatively new and has many areas in which improvement can still be attained. In this project, we focused on the development of new NMR probes and pulse sequences that were tailored to tackle specific problems that are not adequately addressed by current technology. Probes are the hardware that contain the radio frequency (RF) circuitry used to both excite and detect the NMR signals. Pulse sequences are composed of a series of RF pulses and delays, which are applied to the sample held within the magnetic field by the probe, so as to manipulate the nuclear spins. Typically, a probe is developed for a specific set of nuclei and types of experiments and the pulse sequences are then written to use the probe in an optimal manner. In addition, the inter-development of instrumentation and methods are determined by the specific biological question to be examined. Thus our efforts focused on addressing an area of importance in NMR Structural Biology namely more effective ways to use the phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nucleus. Phosphorus is a very important biological element that is strategically located in nucleic acids, where it imparts negative charge and flexibility to RNA and DNA. It is also a component of the cellular membrane and thus interacts with membrane proteins. It is used in mechanisms to signal, activate or deactivate enzymes; and participates in energy storage and release. However, the phosphorus nucleus exhibits certain properties, such as poor spectral dispersion, low sensitivity of detection, and fast relaxation, which limit its effective use

  19. Heavy exotic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+- binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb+(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  20. Heavy exotic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  1. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  2. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Derocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here-which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole-circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100K which shows 30 Hz linewidths.

  3. Attosecond Probing of Nuclear Dynamics with Trajectory-Resolved High-Harmonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Pengfei; Ruhmann, Marc; He, Lixin; Zhai, Chunyang; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhou, Yueming; Li, Min; Lein, Manfred; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-07-01

    We report attosecond-scale probing of the laser-induced dynamics in molecules. We apply the method of high-harmonic spectroscopy, where laser-driven recolliding electrons on various trajectories record the motion of their parent ion. Based on the transient phase-matching mechanism of high-order harmonic generation, short and long trajectories contributing to the same harmonic order are distinguishable in both the spatial and frequency domains, giving rise to a one-to-one map between time and photon energy for each trajectory. The short and long trajectories in H2 and D2 are used simultaneously to retrieve the nuclear dynamics on the attosecond and ångström scale. Compared to using only short trajectories, this extends the temporal range of the measurement to one optical cycle. The experiment is also applied to methane and ammonia molecules.

  4. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  5. Significant role of deformation in probing postsaddle nuclear dissipation with light particle emission

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2010-05-15

    Using a one-dimensional Langevin model, we study the effects of deformation on the multiplicities of postsaddle neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and giant dipole resonance (GDR) gamma rays of a heavy fissioning system {sup 240}Cf as probes of postsaddle nuclear dissipation (beta). It is shown that postsaddle dissipation effects on these light particles have a significant deformation dependence. Furthermore, we find that the role of deformation depends on the type of the particle. It reduces the sensitive influence of beta on protons, alpha particles, and GDR gamma rays substantially, whereas it enhances the sensitivity of neutrons to beta. The results suggest that to accurately extract the postsaddle friction strength by comparing measured prescission particle multiplicities of heavy nuclei with calculations based on statistical models or stochastic equations like Langevin equations, it is important to take into account the deformation effects. The influence of model dimensionality is discussed.

  6. Reacting to nuclear power systems in space: American public protests over outer planetary probes since the 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2014-03-01

    The United States has pioneered the use of nuclear power systems for outer planetary space probes since the 1970s. These systems have enabled the Viking landings to reach the surface of Mars and both Pioneers 10 and 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 to travel to the limits of the solar system. Although the American public has long been concerned about safety of these systems, in the 1980s a reaction to nuclear accidents - especially the Soviet Cosmos 954 spacecraft destruction and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accidents - heightened awareness about the hazards of nuclear power and every spacecraft launch since that time has been contested by opponents of nuclear energy. This has led to a debate over the appropriateness of the use of nuclear power systems for spacecraft. It has also refocused attention on the need for strict systems of control and rigorous checks and balances to assure safety. This essay describes the history of space radioisotope power systems, the struggles to ensure safe operations, and the political confrontation over whether or not to allow the launch the Galileo and Cassini space probes to the outer planets. Effectively, these efforts have led to the successful flights of 12 deep space planetary probes, two-thirds of them operated since the accidents of Cosmos 954, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl.

  7. D(s) meson as a quantitative probe of diffusion and hadronization in nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Fries, Rainer J; Rapp, Ralf

    2013-03-15

    The modifications of D(s)-meson spectra in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are identified as a quantitative probe of key properties of the hot nuclear medium. The unique valence-quark content of the D(s)=cs̄ couples the well-known strangeness enhancement with the collective-flow pattern of primordially produced charm quarks. This idea is illustrated utilizing a consistent strong-coupling treatment with hydrodynamic bulk evolution and nonperturbative T-matrix interactions for both heavy-quark diffusion and hadronization in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). A large enhancement of the D(s) nuclear modification factor at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is predicted, with a maximum of ∼1.5-1.8 at transverse momenta around 2  GeV/c. This is a direct consequence of the strong coupling of the heavy quarks to the QGP and their hadronization via coalescence with strange quarks. We furthermore introduce the effects of diffusion in the hadronic phase and suggest that an increase of the D-meson elliptic flow compared to the D(s) can disentangle the transport properties of hadronic and QGP liquids.

  8. Serum Albumin Binding Inhibits Nuclear Uptake of Luminescent Metal-Complex-Based DNA Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; McKenzie, Luke; Glover, Caroline; Mowll, Rachel; Weinstein, Julia A; Su, Xiaodi; Smythe, Carl; Thomas, Jim A

    2015-08-10

    The DNA binding and cellular localization properties of a new luminescent heterobimetallic Ir(III) Ru(II) tetrapyridophenazine complex are reported. Surprisingly, in standard cell media, in which its tetracationic, isostructural Ru(II) Ru(II) analogue is localized in the nucleus, the new tricationic complex is poorly taken up by live cells and demonstrates no nuclear staining. Consequent cell-free studies reveal that the Ir(III) Ru(II) complex binds bovine serum albumin, BSA, in Sudlow's Site I with a similar increase in emission and binding affinity to that observed with DNA. Contrastingly, in serum-free conditions the complex is rapidly internalized by live cells, where it localizes in cell nuclei and functions as a DNA imaging agent. The absence of serum proteins also greatly alters the cytotoxicity of the complex, where high levels of oncosis/necrosis are observed due to this enhanced uptake. This suggests that simply increasing the lipophilicity of a DNA imaging probe to enhance cellular uptake can be counterproductive as, due to increased binding to serum albumin protein, this strategy can actually disrupt nuclear targeting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Energetic M1 transitions as a probe of nuclear collectivity at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1987-01-01

    At ORNL, we have recently utilized the Spin Spectrometer setup to investigate the differential effects of increasing spin and excitation energy on nuclear shape and collectivity in /sup 158/Yb. Along the yrast line of this and other N = 88 nuclei, weakly prolate shapes gradually give way to triaxial, and then finally to non-collective oblate shapes as the spin approaches 40 h-bar. However, above the yrast line, large deformation and collectivity once again sets in. This is evidenced by the emergence of a broad quadrupole structure (E/sub ..gamma../ approx. = 1.2 MeV) in the continuum gamma-ray spectra that grows with increasing temperature. The short (sub ps) lifetimes of these transitions attest to the collective nature of these structures. The emergence and growth of the quadrupole structure at high excitation energies is closely correlated with the appearance of energetic (E/sub ..gamma../ approx. = 2.5 MeV), fast M1 transitions which form another broad structure in the continuum spectra. From the centroid of the M1 bump, a quadrupole deformation parameter of 0.35 is inferred. Because of this sensitivity, these energetic M1 transitions provide a unique probe of nuclear shape in the excitation energy range of approx. = 3 to 10 MeV. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  11. Exotic nuclei from a theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W. ||

    1998-11-01

    One of the main frontiers of nuclear structure today is the physics of radioactive nuclear beams. Experiments with radioactive beams will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. What makes this subject both exciting and difficult is: (i) the weak binding and corresponding closeness of the particle continuum, implying a large diffuseness of the nuclear surface and extreme spatial dimensions characterizing the outermost nucleons, and (ii) access to the exotic combinations of proton and neutron numbers which offer prospects for completely new structural phenomena.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, M.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.

    2010-08-01

    Heavy ion collisions (HICs) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this review we present a selection of new reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state (Iso-EoS). We will first discuss the isospin equilibration dynamics. At low energies this manifests via the recently observed dynamical dipole radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation with the symmetry term acting as a restoring force. At higher beam energies Iso-EoS effects will be seen in an isospin diffusion mechanism, via imbalance ratio measurements, in particular from correlations to the total kinetic energy loss. For fragmentation reactions in central events we suggest to look at the coupling between isospin distillation and radial flow. In neck fragmentation reactions important Iso-EoS information can be obtained from the fragment isospin content, velocity and alignment correlations. The high-density symmetry term can be probed from isospin effects on heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies (few A GeV range), in particular for high transverse momentum selections of the reaction products. Rather isospin sensitive observables are proposed from nucleon/cluster emissions, collective flows and meson production. The possibility of shedding light on the controversial neutron/proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric matter is also suggested. A large symmetry repulsion at high baryon density will also lead to an 'earlier' hadron-deconfinement transition in n-rich matter. The binodal transition line of the (T, ρB) diagram is lowered to a region accessible through heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned facilities, e.g. the FAIR/NICA projects. Some observable effects of the formation of a mixed phase are suggested, in particular a neutron trapping mechanism. The dependence of the results on a suitable treatment of the isovector

  13. Exotic statistics of leapfrogging vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Antti J

    2005-04-01

    The leapfrogging motion of vortex rings is a three-dimensional version of the motion that in two dimensions leads to exotic exchange statistics. The statistical phase factor can be computed using the hydrodynamical Euler equation, which suggests that three-dimensional exotic exchange statistics is a common property of vortex rings in a variety of quantum liquids and gases. Potential applications range from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases, metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases, and maybe even nuclear matter in extreme conditions.

  14. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  15. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of novel phenotypic probes targeting the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Paul M; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Sessions, E Hampton; Divlianska, Daniela B; Correa, Ricardo G; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Reed, John C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and related upstream signal transduction pathways have long been associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases and has recently been implicated in the onset of cancer. This report provides a synthetic and compound-based property summary of five pathway-related small-molecule chemical probes identified and optimized within the National Institutes of Health-Molecular Libraries Probe Center Network (NIH-MLPCN) initiative. The chemical probes discussed herein represent first-in-class, non-kinase-based modulators of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which were identified and optimized through either cellular phenotypic or specific protein-target-based screening strategies. Accordingly, the resulting new chemical probes may allow for better fundamental understanding of this highly complex biochemical signaling network and could advance future therapeutic translation toward the clinical setting. PMID:23766805

  17. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT.

  18. A Nuclear Receptor Ligand-based Probe Enables Temporal Control of C. elegans Development

    PubMed Central

    Judkins, Joshua C.; Mahanti, Parag; Hoffman, Jacob; Yim, Isaiah; Antebi, Adam; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans development and lifespan are controlled by the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, an important model for vertebrate vitamin D and liver-X receptors. Similar to its mammalian homologs, DAF-12 function is regulated by bile acid-like steroidal ligands, the dafachronic acids; however, tools for investigating their biosynthesis and function in vivo are lacking. We report a flexible synthesis for DAF-12 ligands and masked ligand derivatives that enable precise temporal control of DAF-12 function. For ligand masking, we introduce photocleavable amides of 5-methoxy-N-methyl-2-nitroaniline (MMNA). MMNA-masked ligands are bioavailable and after incorporation into the worm can be used to trigger expression of DAF-12 target genes and initiate development from dauer larvae to adults by brief, innocuous UV-irradiation. In-vivo release of DAF-12 ligands and other small-molecule signals using MMNA-based probes will enable functional studies with precise spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24453122

  19. Probing a Structural Model of the Nuclear Pore Complex Channel through Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lingling; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The central pore of a nuclear pore complex (NPC) is filled with unstructured proteins that contain many FG-repeats separated by hydrophilic regions. An example of such protein is nsp1. By simulating an array of nsp1 segments, we identified, in an earlier study, a spontaneously formed brushlike structure that promises to explain selective transport in the NPC channel. Here we report four (350,000 atom, 200 ns) simulations probing this structure via its interaction with transport receptor NTF2 as well as with an inert protein. NTF2 dimers are observed to gradually enter the brush, but the inert protein is not. Both NTF2 and the inert protein are found to bind to FG-repeats, but binding periods lasted more briefly for the inert protein. A simulation also investigated the behavior of a brush made of mutant nsp1 that is known to be less effective in NPC-selective transport, finding that this brush does not attract NTF2. PMID:20409487

  20. 33S nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biological samples obtained with a laboratory model 33S cryogenic probe.

    PubMed

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Saito, Yuta; Sato, Naoki; Takao, Tomoaki; Koshiba, Seizo; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-05-01

    (33)S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is limited by inherently low NMR sensitivity because of the quadrupolar moment and low gyromagnetic ratio of the (33)S nucleus. We have developed a 10 mm (33)S cryogenic NMR probe, which is operated at 9-26 K with a cold preamplifier and a cold rf switch operated at 60 K. The (33)S NMR sensitivity of the cryogenic probe is as large as 9.8 times that of a conventional 5 mm broadband NMR probe. The (33)S cryogenic probe was applied to biological samples such as human urine, bile, chondroitin sulfate, and scallop tissue. We demonstrated that the system can detect and determine sulfur compounds having SO(4)(2-) anions and -SO(3)(-) groups using the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these groups are in highly symmetric environments. The NMR signals for other common sulfur compounds such as cysteine are still undetectable by the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these compounds are in asymmetric environments. If we shorten the rf pulse width or decrease the rf coil diameter, we should be able to detect the NMR signals for these compounds.

  1. Supplements for exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe with a cryogenic detection system for sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takashi; Hioka, Katsuya; Fujioka, Koji; Takegoshi, K

    2008-04-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high-resolution solid-state NMR has been developed. In this probe, temperature of the detection coil is kept at cryogenic temperature (approximately 12 K) for sensitivity enhancement, which is achieved not only by suppression of thermal noise but also by increment of a Q factor of the coil. A marked feature of this probe is that a sample rotating at magic angle is thermally isolated from the cryogenic system in order to realize high-resolution solid-state NMR measurement at various sample temperatures. We call this system as cryocoil magic-angle spinning (cryocoil MAS). (1)H MAS NMR with the coil temperature of approximately 20 K was successfully observed for solid adamantane rotating at room temperature, and signal-to-noise increment due to this cryocoil approach was confirmed.

  3. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  4. Probing and Exploiting the Interplay between Nuclear and Electronic Motion in Charge Transfer Processes.

    PubMed

    Delor, Milan; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-04-21

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation refers to the assumption that the nuclear and electronic wave functions describing a molecular system evolve and can be determined independently. It is now well-known that this approximation often breaks down and that nuclear-electronic (vibronic) coupling contributes greatly to the ultrafast photophysics and photochemistry observed in many systems ranging from simple molecules to biological organisms. In order to probe vibronic coupling in a time-dependent manner, one must use spectroscopic tools capable of correlating the motions of electrons and nuclei on an ultrafast time scale. Recent developments in nonlinear multidimensional electronic and vibrational spectroscopies allow monitoring both electronic and structural factors with unprecedented time and spatial resolution. In this Account, we present recent studies from our group that make use of different variants of frequency-domain transient two-dimensional infrared (T-2DIR) spectroscopy, a pulse sequence combining electronic and vibrational excitations in the form of a UV-visible pump, a narrowband (12 cm(-1)) IR pump, and a broadband (400 cm(-1)) IR probe. In the first example, T-2DIR is used to directly compare vibrational dynamics in the ground and relaxed electronic excited states of Re(Cl)(CO)3(4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine) and Ru(4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine)2(NCS)2, prototypical charge transfer complexes used in photocatalytic CO2 reduction and electron injection in dye-sensitized solar cells. The experiments show that intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) are up to an order of magnitude faster in the triplet charge transfer excited state than in the ground state. These results show the influence of electronic arrangement on vibrational coupling patterns, with direct implications for vibronic coupling mechanisms in charge transfer excited states. In the second example, we show unambiguously that electronic and

  5. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300 MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ≤ 20 dB between 90-145 MHz and 74.5-99.5 MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20 dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  6. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  7. Exotic nonrelativistic string

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-12-15

    We construct a classical nonrelativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the noncommutative structure of the model. Under double-dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic nonrelativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  8. Light Exotic Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, Paul

    2016-03-01

    tudies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as hybrids, exotics, multi-quarks, and glueballs. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of light quark exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV . Recent Lattice QCD calculations of the light-quark meson spectrum indicate a constituent gluon-like excitation contributing an additional JPC =1+- and mass 1 - 1 . 5 GeV resulting in the lightest hybrid nonets with masses near 2 . 0 GeV . High statistical yields from recent experiments along with new advances in analysis techniques have shed a new light towards the understanding the latest experimental exotic candidates. Recent results from hadro-production and photo-production will be presented followed by an overview of ongoing and future efforts to search for light exotic mesons.

  9. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-09-25

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates.

  10. Cusps and exotic charmonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    A simple, causal and analytic model of final state rescattering is used to describe all available data on the exotic resonances Zc(3900) and Zc(4025). The model provides a compelling and accurate representation of experiment with no need for poles in the scattering matrix.

  11. Exotic invasive plants

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Shapes and collectivity of exotic nuclei via low-energy Coulomb excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgen, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    The way in which an atomic nucleus responds to excitations, whether by promoting individual nucleons into higher shells or by collective rotation or vibration, reveals many details of the underlying nuclear structure. The response of the nucleus is closely related to its macroscopic shape. Low-energy Coulomb excitation provides a well-understood means of exciting atomic nuclei, allowing the measurement of static and dynamic electromagnetic moments as a probe of the nuclear wavefunctions. Owing to the availability of radioactive heavy-ion beams with energies near the Coulomb barrier, it is now possible to study the shape and collectivity of short-lived nuclei far from β stability (the so-called exotic nuclei), providing a particularly stringent test of modern theoretical nuclear structure models. This review gives an introduction to the experimental techniques related to low-energy Coulomb excitation with radioactive ion beams and summarizes the results that were obtained over the last 10 years for a wide variety of exotic nuclei at various laboratories employing the isotope separation on-line technique.

  13. Exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix

    Many models of physics beyond the Standard Model include an extended Higgs sector, responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, and predict the existence of additional Higgs bosons. The Type II Two-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) is a particularly well motivated scenario and a suitable framework for phenomenological studies of extended Higgs sectors. Its low energy spectrum includes two CP-even Higgses h and H, one CP-odd Higgs A, and a pair of charged Higgses H +/-. We study the implication of the LHC Higgs search re- sults on the Type II 2HDM and identify regions of parameter space which are consistent with all experimental and theoretical constraints and can accommo- date the observed 125 GeV Higgs signal. This includes parameter space with a distinctive mass hierarchy which permit a sizable mass splitting between the undiscovered non-Standard Model Higgs states. If this mass splitting is large enough, exotic Higgs decay channels into either a Higgs plus a Standard Model gauge boson or two lighter Higgses open up. This can significantly weaken the reach of the conventional Higgs decay channels into Standard Model particles but also provide the additional opportunity to search for exotic Higgs decay channels. We provide benchmark planes to explore exotic Higgs decay scenar- ios and perform detailed collider analyses to study the exotic decay channels H/A → AZ/HZ and H+/- → AW/HW. We find that these exotic decays offer complementary discovery channels to the conventional modes for both neutral and charged Higgs searches and permit exclusion and discovery in large regions of parameter space.

  14. Few-second-long correlation times in a quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by frequency-comb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeber, A. M.; Hopkinson, M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Nilsson, J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Bennett, A. J.; Shields, A. J.; Burkard, G.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    One of the key challenges in spectroscopy is the inhomogeneous broadening that masks the homogeneous spectral lineshape and the underlying coherent dynamics. Techniques such as four-wave mixing and spectral hole-burning are used in optical spectroscopy, and spin-echo in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the high-power pulses used in spin-echo and other sequences often create spurious dynamics obscuring the subtle spin correlations important for quantum technologies. Here we develop NMR techniques to probe the correlation times of the fluctuations in a nuclear spin bath of individual quantum dots, using frequency-comb excitation, allowing for the homogeneous NMR lineshapes to be measured without high-power pulses. We find nuclear spin correlation times exceeding one second in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots--four orders of magnitude longer than in strain-free III-V semiconductors. This observed freezing of the nuclear spin fluctuations suggests ways of designing quantum dot spin qubits with a well-understood, highly stable nuclear spin bath.

  15. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries.

  16. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) Method and Probe for Generating RF Magnetic Fields in Different Directions to Distinguish NQR from Acoustic Ringing Induced in a Sample

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    77,719 TITLE OF THE INVENTION NUCLEAR QUADRUPOLE RESONANCE ( NQR ) METHOD AND PROBE FOR GENERATING RF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS TO...DISTINGUISH NQR FROM ACOUSTIC RINGING INDUCED IN A SAMPLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a...nuclear quadrupole 15 resonance ( NQR ) method and probe for generating RF magnetic fields in different directions towards a sample. More specifically

  17. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.

    1995-02-01

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMs) have been developed for sampling of radionuclides from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the U.S. EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMs. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) anisokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  18. Probing the nuclear and circumnuclear activity of NGC 1365 in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Esquej, P.; García-Burillo, S.; Castillo, M.; González-Martín, O.; Levenson, N.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Pović, M.; Packham, C.; Pérez-García, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    We present new far-infrared (70-500 μm) Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) imaging observations as well as new mid-IR Gemini/Thermal-Region Camera Spectrograph imaging (8.7 and 18.3 μm) and spectroscopy of the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) region (R < 2.5 kpc) of the spiral galaxy NGC 1365. We complemented these observations with archival Spitzer imaging and spectral mapping observations. The ILR region of NGC 1365 contains a Seyfert 1.5 nucleus and a ring of star formation with an approximate diameter of 2 kpc. The strong star formation activity in the ring is resolved by the Herschel/PACS imaging data, as well as by the Spitzer 24 μm continuum emission, [Ne II] 12.81 μm line emission, and 6.2 and 11.3 μm PAH emission. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) is the brightest source in the central regions up to λ ˜ 24 μm, but it becomes increasingly fainter in the far-infrared when compared to the emission originating in the infrared clusters (or groups of them) located in the ring. We modelled the AGN unresolved infrared emission with the clumpy torus models and estimated that the AGN contributes only to a small fraction (˜5 per cent) of the infrared emission produced in the inner ˜5 kpc. We fitted the non-AGN 24-500 μm spectral energy distribution of the ILR region and found that the dust temperatures and mass are similar to those of other nuclear and circumnuclear starburst regions. Finally we showed that within the ILR region of NGC 1365, most of the ongoing star formation activity is taking place in dusty regions as probed by the 24 μm emission. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Augusto González Linares Senior Research Fellow.

  19. Slow Molecular Motions in Ionic Liquids Probed by Cross-Relaxation of Nuclear Spins During Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Dey, Arnab; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2016-11-14

    Solution-state Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) at moderate fields, performed by saturating the electron spin resonance (ESR) of a free radical added to the sample of interest, is well known to lead to significant NMR signal enhancements in the steady state, owing to electron-nuclear cross-relaxation. Here it is shown that under conditions which limit radical access to the molecules of interest, the time course of establishment of ODNP can provide a unique window into internuclear cross-relaxation, and reflects relatively slow molecular motions. This behavior, modeled mathematically by a three-spin version of the Solomon equations (one unpaired electron and two nuclear spins), is demonstrated experimentally on the (19) F/(1) H system in ionic liquids. Bulky radicals in these viscous environments turn out to be just the right setting to exploit these effects. Compared to standard nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) work, the present experiment offers significant improvement in dynamic range and sensitivity, retains usable chemical shift information, and reports on molecular motions in the sub-megahertz (MHz) to tens of MHz range-motions which are not accessed at high fields. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  1. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells. PMID:25984833

  2. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  3. Probing the low and high density nuclear matter by hadron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, S. M.; Kosmachev, O. S.

    2017-03-01

    The subject of this report is connected with the widely discussed manifestation of in-medium effect in nuclear collisions. At present, the medium modification of hadron properties in the normal and in a dense nuclear matter is one of the fundamental questions of strong interaction physics. A new Glauber Monte Carlo model for hadron-nuclei interaction at intermediate energy is proposed. We utilized the principal assumptions as in the approaches of other authors describing nuclear collisions at high energy in the framework of the models without QGP. Yet, a number of new ingredients (noneikonal corrections, correlations of nucleons, in the nuclei, the nuclear Fermi motion, etc.) are introduced.

  4. Probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities using pion, kaon, eta and photon productions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi-Gang; Yong, Gao-Chan; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Xu, Nu

    2014-02-01

    The high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich matter. Its accurate determination has significant ramifications in understanding not only the reaction dynamics of heavy-ion reactions, especially those induced by radioactive beams, but also many interesting phenomena in astrophysics, such as the explosion mechanism of supernova and the properties of neutron stars. The heavy-ion physics community has devoted much effort during the last few years to constrain the high-density symmetry using various probes. In particular, the / ratio has been most extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. All models have consistently predicted qualitatively that the / ratio is a sensitive probe of the high-density symmetry energy especially with beam energies near the pion production threshold. However, the predicted values of the / ratio are still quite model dependent mostly because of the complexity of modeling pion production and reabsorption dynamics in heavy-ion collisions, leading to currently still controversial conclusions regarding the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy from comparing various model calculations with available experimental data. As more / data become available and a deeper understanding about the pion dynamics in heavy-ion reactions is obtained, more penetrating probes, such as the K +/ K 0 ratio, meson and high-energy photons are also being investigated or planned at several facilities. Here, we review some of our recent contributions to the community effort of constraining the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the status of some worldwide experiments for studying the high-density symmetry energy, including the HIRFL-CSR external target experiment (CEE) are briefly introduced.

  5. Electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) probes: State of the art and developments for application in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Salzburger, H.J.; Huebschen, G.; Kroening, M.

    1994-12-31

    The excitation and detection of ultrasound by conventional piezoelectric techniques doesn`t provide the full range of elastic wave modes which can be used for NDT. Besides this there is a limitation of the temperature range. This gap can be filled up using alternative techniques for the ultrasonic transduction. One of the most far developed alternative techniques is the electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) excitation and detection. EMUS-probes work free of liquid couplants; hence they can be applied for inspection and measurements at higher temperatures. The transduction of Shear waves with horizontal polarization (SH-)waves can be more reliably performed by EMUS-probes for practical applications than by piezoelectric shear wave transducers using Y-cut quartz. The contribution presents the performance of Phased-Array angle-probes. The application of these probe-type for the ISI of austenitic and dissimilar welds using SH-waves will be shortly highlighted. For the continuous monitoring of the liquid level in the vessels of BWR`s from outside at temperatures of 300 C SV-wave angle probes are used. Their performance for operation in the mentioned temperature range and the principle of measurement of the liquid level will be described. Ongoing development work to enlarge the frequency range of EMUS-probes and for the automatic control of the lift-off will be shortly described.

  6. Investigation of a MMP-2 Activity-Dependent Anchoring Probe for Nuclear Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yonezawa, Aki; Kondo, Naoya; Sano, Kohei; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important marker of tumor malignancy, we developed an original drug design strategy, MMP-2 activity dependent anchoring probes (MDAP), for use in MMP-2 activity imaging, and evaluated the usefulness of this probe in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We designed and synthesized MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000, which consist of 4 independent moieties: RI unit (111In hydrophilic chelate), MMP-2 substrate unit (short peptide), anchoring unit (alkyl chain), and anchoring inhibition unit (polyethylene glycol (PEGn; where n represents the approximate molecular weight, n = 1000, 3000, and 5000). Probe cleavage was evaluated by chromatography after MMP-2 treatment. Cellular uptake of the probes was then measured. Radioactivity accumulation in tumor xenografts was evaluated after intravenous injection of the probes, and probe cleavage was evaluated in tumor homogenates. Results MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000 were cleaved by MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. MDAP3000 pretreated with MMP-2 showed higher accumulation in tumor cells, and was completely blocked by additional treatment with an MMP inhibitor. MDAP3000 exhibited rapid blood clearance and a high tumor accumulation after intravenous injection in a rodent model. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that MDAP3000 exhibited a considerably slow washout rate from tumors to blood. A certain fraction of cleaved MDAP3000 existed in tumor xenografts in vivo. Conclusions The results indicate the possible usefulness of our MDAP strategy for tumor imaging. PMID:25010662

  7. Probes of the quark-gluon plasma as it might be produced in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    1984-01-01

    The energy densities which might be achieved in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions are discussed. Using these estimates, promising probes of a quark-gluon plasma as it might be produced in such collisions are reviewed. I discuss in detail the emission of photons and di-leptons. The consequences of hydrodynamic expansion and a first order phase transition are explored for the transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons. Fluctuations in the rapidity distribution of hadrons are also discussed as a possible signal for a first order phase transition. The possibility that copious production of strange particles may signal the production of a quark-gluon plasma is also critically assessed. 24 references.

  8. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  9. Promoting the exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Don J

    2005-09-01

    The marketing and promotion of an exotic pet veterinary practice allows the use of strategies that are not necessarily available in other veterinary disciplines. The advantage that an exotics practice enjoys is that it is able to capitalize not only on the unique nature of the species being attended but also on the specialized features of the hospital itself that make it specifically appropriate in caring for exotic pets. Before marketing, however, comes the responsibility that the practice live up to the claims made in promotional materials. A practice cannot ethically be presented as an "exotics" practice if it is nothing more than a dog and cat facility that is willing to attend to exotic pets. It is the competence of the veterinary staff and the appropriateness of the facility that determines the suitability of the practice for exotics management.

  10. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Hsin -Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; ...

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ~ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of themore » model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. As a result, depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ~ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.« less

  11. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsin -Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ~ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. As a result, depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ~ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  12. Electron-nuclear spin dynamics of Ga2 + paramagnetic centers probed by spin-dependent recombination: A master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Sierra, V. G.; Sandoval-Santana, J. C.; Azaizia, S.; Carrère, H.; Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Kalevich, V. K.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Balocchi, A.; Kunold, A.

    2017-05-01

    Similar to nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and impurity atoms in silicon, interstitial gallium deep paramagnetic centers in GaAsN have been proven to have useful characteristics for the development of spintronic devices. Among other interesting properties, under circularly polarized light, gallium centers act as spin filters that dynamically polarize free and bound electrons reaching record spin polarizations (close to 100%). Furthermore, the recent observation of the amplification of the spin filtering effect under a Faraday configuration magnetic field has suggested that the hyperfine interaction that couples bound electrons and nuclei permits the optical manipulation of the nuclear spin polarization. Even though the mechanisms behind the nuclear spin polarization in gallium centers are fairly well understood, the origin of nuclear spin relaxation and the formation of an Overhauser-like magnetic field remain elusive. In this work we develop a model based on the master equation approach to describe the evolution of electronic and nuclear spin polarizations of gallium centers interacting with free electrons and holes. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental observations. In particular, we are able to reproduce the amplification of the spin filtering effect under a circularly polarized excitation in a Faraday configuration magnetic field. In regard to the nuclear spin relaxation, the roles of nuclear dipolar and quadrupolar interactions are discussed. Our findings show that, besides the hyperfine interaction, the spin relaxation mechanisms are key to understand the amplification of the spin filtering effect and the appearance of the Overhauser-like magnetic field. To gain a deeper insight in the interplay of the hyperfine interaction and the relaxation mechanisms, we have also performed calculations in the pulsed excitation regime. Our model's results allow us to propose an experimental protocol based on time-resolved spectroscopy. It

  13. Probing nuclear dynamics of oriented HeH+ with odd-even high-order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Yu, S. J.; Wang, S.; Chen, Y. J.

    2016-11-01

    We study the electron-nuclear coupled dynamics for oriented HeH+ molecules in strong laser fields numerically and analytically. At small orientation angles, the asymmetric molecule tends to stretch to distances larger than the equilibrium separation and strong even harmonics are emitted. We show that the permanent dipole of the system plays an important role in the vibrational dynamics of the nuclear wave packet. The nuclear motion and the molecular structure can be read from the spectra and ellipticity of odd-even high harmonics. Our results also have implications for strong-field ionization of the asymmetric system.

  14. Nuclear responses for double-beta decays by hadron, photon, and neutrino probes and MOON experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2006-05-01

    Neutrino-less double-beta decays (0νββ) with the mass sensitivities of the solar and atmospheric ν masses are of great interest for studying the Majorana nature of neutrinos and the absolute mass spectrum as suggested by recent ν oscillation experiments. Here nuclear responses (nuclear matrix elements) for 0νββ are crucial. They are well studied experimentally by using charge-exchange, photo-nuclear and neutrino reactions. MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) is a high sensitivity 0νβ β experiment with the mass sensitivity of an order of 30 meV. Experimental studies of the nuclear responses and the present status of MOON are briefly discussed.

  15. Probing the Strength of Nuclear-Plasma Interactions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Cassata, W. S.; London, R.; Velsko, C. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Goldblum, B. L.; Siem, S.; Weideking, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electron-mediated interactions between nuclei and plasma are expected to affect nuclear reaction cross sections in High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDPs), which are the environment in which stellar nucleosynthesis occurs. However, attempts to measure the strength of these Nuclear Plasma Interactions (NPIs) have been hindered by the extreme narrowness of the nuclear transition (Γ <= 1 μeV). We report on the planned effort to measure the strength of this effect in HEDPs to be produced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by inducing NPIs on highly-excited (1-5 MeV) nuclear states of 133Xe produced in the (n,2n) reaction with 134Xe in the NIF target. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Beta-delayed two-proton emission as a nuclear probe

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.; Reiff, J.E.; Robertson, J.D.; Lang, T.F.; Cerny, J.

    1987-09-01

    A brief history of beta-delayed two-proton emission is given. Speculations about future experiments which would enhance our knowledge about both nuclear spectroscopy and this relatively unique decay mode are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.; Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Lachman, A.B.; Zaret, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients.

  18. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radio-labeled multimodality molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we report a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA) for chelating a radionuclide, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes are separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 is radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence is quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay shows that LS498 is readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55+/-0.01 s-1 and 1.12+/-0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 is ten-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in-vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent five-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement is observed, but radioactivity remains identical in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes.

  19. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radiolabeled multimodality molecular probe

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we have developed a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of DOTA for chelating a radionuclide, a near infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes were separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 was radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence was quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay showed that LS498 was readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55 ± 0.01 s−1 and 1.12 ± 0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 was 10-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent 5-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement was observed but radioactivity was the same in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes. PMID:19725712

  20. Exotic plants as ecosystem dominants

    Treesearch

    Julie S. Denslow; R. Flint Hughes

    2004-01-01

    Dominant species have long been appreciated for their role in determining ecosystem attributes such as vegetation structure, successional patterns, soil characteristics, hydrology, and productivity. Exotic species may reach such high densities that they become community dominants, and it is in this role that exotics pose the greatest threat to native ecosystems. Four...

  1. The Exotic Pest Plant Council

    Treesearch

    Brian. Bowen

    1998-01-01

    The Exotic Pest Plant Council (EPPC) is a proactive organization established to raise awareness about the threat posed by invasive exotic pest plants in natural areas and acts to stop the continued spread of invasive species. EPPC provides fora for sharing information and provides networking opportunities regarding all matters concerning this issue. EPPC was first...

  2. Design of a triple resonance magic angle sample spinning probe for high field solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Paulson, Eric K.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Standard design and construction practices used in building nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes for the study of solid state samples become difficult if not entirely impractical to implement as the 1H resonance frequency approaches the self resonance frequency of commercial capacitors. We describe an approach that utilizes short variable transmission line segments as tunable reactances. Such an approach effectively controls stray reactances and provides a higher Q alternative to ceramic chip capacitors. The particular probe described is built to accommodate a 2.5 mm magic angle spinning rotor system, and is triply tuned to 13C, 15N, and 1H frequencies for use at 18.8 T (200, 80, and 800 MHz, respectively). Isolation of the three radio frequency (rf) channels is achieved using both a rejection trap and a transmission line notch filter. The compact geometry of this design allows three channels with high power handling capability to fit in a medium bore (63 mm) magnet. Extended time variable temperature operation is integral to the mechanical design, enabling the temperature control necessary for investigation of biological macromolecules. Accurate measurement of the air temperature near the sample rotor is achieved using a fiber optic thermometer, which does not interfere with the rf electronics. We also demonstrate that acceptable line shapes are only readily achieved using zero magnetic susceptibility wire in construction of the sample coil. Computer simulation of the circuit aided in the physical design of the probe. Representative data illustrating the efficiency, rf homogeneity, and signal to noise factor of the probe are presented.

  3. Probing the equation of state of nuclear matter via neutron star asteroseismology.

    PubMed

    Sotani, Hajime; Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-18

    We general-relativistically calculate the frequency of fundamental torsional oscillations of neutron star crusts, where we focus on the crystalline properties obtained from macroscopic nuclear models in a way that is dependent on the equation of state of nuclear matter. We find that the calculated frequency is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, but almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter. By identifying the lowest-frequency quasiperiodic oscillation in giant flares observed from soft gamma-ray repeaters as the fundamental torsional mode and allowing for the dependence of the calculated frequency on stellar models, we provide a lower limit of the density derivative of the symmetry energy as L≃50  MeV.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization studies of nitroxyl spin probes in agarose gel using Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Meenakumari, V; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A; Milton Franklin Benial, A

    2017-11-01

    Agarose is a tissue-equivalent material and its imaging characteristics similar to those of real tissues. Hence, the dynamic nuclear polarization studies of 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (carboxy-PROXYL) in agarose gel were carried out. The dynamic nuclear polarization parameters such as spin lattice relaxation time, longitudinal relaxivity, leakage factor, saturation parameter and coupling parameter were estimated for 2 mM carboxy-PROXYL in phosphate-buffered saline solution and water/agarose mixture (99 : 1). From these results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2 mM, and the reduction in enhancement was observed for carboxy-PROXYL in water/agarose mixture (99 : 1) compared with phosphate-buffered saline solution. Phantom imaging was also performed with 2 mM concentration of carboxy-PROXYL in various concentrations of agarose gel at various radio frequency power levels. The results from the dynamic nuclear polarization measurements agree well with the phantom imaging results. These results pave the way for designing model system for human tissues suited to the biological applications of electron spin resonance/Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Temperature dependence of X-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra: probing quantum vibrations of light elements in oxides.

    PubMed

    Nemausat, Ruidy; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Trcera, Nicolas; Bordage, Amélie; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Florian, Pierre; Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Errea, Ion; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Cabaret, Delphine

    2017-02-22

    A combined experimental-theoretical study on the temperature dependence of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of periclase (MgO), spinel (MgAl2O4), corundum (α-Al2O3), berlinite (α-AlPO4), stishovite and α-quartz (SiO2) is reported. Predictive calculations are presented when experimental data are not available. For these light-element oxides, both experimental techniques detect systematic effects related to quantum thermal vibrations which are well reproduced by density-functional theory simulations. In calculations, thermal fluctuations of the nuclei are included by considering nonequilibrium configurations according to finite-temperature quantum statistics at the quasiharmonic level. The influence of nuclear quantum fluctuations on XANES and NMR spectroscopies is particularly sensitive to the coordination number of the probed cation. Furthermore, the relative importance of nuclear dynamics and thermal expansion is quantified over a large range of temperatures.

  6. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  7. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-01

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV /u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  8. γ production as a probe for early state dynamics in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Baoyi; Xu, Nu; ...

    2011-02-01

    γ production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energy is investigated. While the transverse momentum spectra of the ground state γ(1s) are controlled by the initial state Cronin effect, the excited bb⁻ states are characterized by the competition between the cold and hot nuclear matter effects and sensitive to the dissociation temperatures determined by the heavy quark potential. We emphasize that it is necessary to measure the excited heavy quark states in order to extract the early stage information in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC.

  9. THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR SYMMETRY ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PASTA

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An; Murphy, Kyleah

    2013-12-10

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal ''nuclear pasta''. Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L ≲ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M ≳ 1.65 M {sub ☉}, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 ≲ L ≲ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L ≲ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii ≲ 11 km.

  10. The Cooling of the Cassiopeia A Neutron Star as a Probe of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy and Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, William G.; Murphy, Kyleah; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An

    2013-12-01

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal "nuclear pasta." Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L <~ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M >~ 1.65 M ⊙, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 <~ L <~ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L <~ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii <~ 11 km.

  11. Discovering uncolored naturalness in exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum. This is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at the LHC and a potential future 100TeV collider. Our findings indicate that mirror glueballs are the smoking gun signature of natural FS and QLH type theories, in analogy to tree-level Higgs coupling shifts for the TH. We show that glueball masses in the ˜ 10-60 GeV mass range are theoretically preferred. Careful treatment of lifetime, mirror-hadronization and non-perturbative uncertainties is required to perform meaningful collider studies. We outline several new search strategies for exotic Higgs decays of the form h → XX → 4 f at the LHC, with X having lifetimes in the 10 μm to km range. We find that FS stops can be probed with masses up to 600 (1100) GeV at the LHC with 300 (3000) fb-1 of data, and TH top partners could be accessible with masses up to 900 (1500) GeV. This makes exotic Higgs decays the prime discovery channel for uncolored naturalness at the LHC.

  12. Nuclear Resonance Scattering of Synchrotron Radiation as a Unique Electronic, Structural, and Thermodynamic Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    Discovery of Mössbauer effect [1] in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. Thus, Mössbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Mössbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Mössbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or "in-beam" Mössbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Mössbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time.

  13. Dissipative Dynamics with Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.; Ferini, G.; Rizzo, C.; Rizzo, J.; Baran, V.; Wolter, H. H.; Zielinska-Pfabe, M.

    2008-04-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation and at high nucleon momenta. In this report we present a selection of reaction observables particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e. to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS) At low and Fermi energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. Predictions are shown for fusion, deep-inelastic and fragmentation collisions induced by neutron rich projectiles. At all energies the isospin transport data are supplying valuable information on value and slope of the symmetry term below saturation. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams in this energy range is finally stressed.

  14. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    DOE PAGES

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonancemore » can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.« less

  15. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

  16. Probing nuclear motion by frequency modulation of molecular high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, André D

    2014-11-07

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) in a non-Born-Oppenheimer treatment of H(2)(+), D(2)(+), is investigated by numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equations in full dimensions. As opposed to previous studies on amplitude modulation of intracycle dynamics in MHOHG, we demonstrate redshifts as frequency modulation (FM) of intercycle dynamics in MHOHG. The FM is induced by nuclear motion using intense laser pulses. Compared to fixed-nuclei approximations, the intensity of MHOHG is much higher due to the dependence of enhanced ionization on the internuclear distance. The width and symmetry of the spectrum of each harmonic in MHOHG encode rich information on the dissociation process of molecules at the rising and falling parts of the laser pulses, which can be used to retrieve the nuclear dynamics. Isotope effects are studied to confirm the FM mechanism.

  17. The line-emitting gas in active galaxies - A probe of the nuclear engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic questions regarding the structure of the engine powering active galactic nuclei (AGN), the nature of the interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy, and the origin and evolution of AGN. The study of the dynamics and physical characteristics of the line-emitting gas in these objects has proven fruitful in addressing many of these issues. Recent advances in optical and infrared detector technology combined with the development of superior ground-based instruments have produced efficient new tools for the study of the line-emitting gas on nuclear and Galactic scales. Programs which take advantage of two of these new techniques, Fabry-Perot imaging spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, are described in this paper. The origin of nuclear activity in galaxies is also addressed in a third project which aims at determining the nature of luminous infrared galaxies.

  18. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe.

    PubMed

    Mkhitaryan, V V; Jelezko, F; Dobrovitski, V V

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10-100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. The method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

  19. Disappearance of flow as a probe of the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Krofcheck, D.; Bauer, W.; Crawley, G.M.; Howden, S.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K. ); Tickle, R.S. ); Djalali, C. ); Gale, C. )

    1992-10-01

    The disappearance of directed, collective nuclear motion ( flow'') away from the interaction region of heavy-ion collisions has been observed using the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Streamer Chamber. We find that flow vanishes at a beam energy near 50 MeV/nucleon for the {sup 139}La+{sup 139}La system and near 60 MeV/nucleon for the {sup 93}Nb+{sup 93}Nb system. The disappearance of flow may be understood as resulting from a balance between attractive and repulsive scattering strengths. Full calculations with the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model show that the disappearance of flow is sensitive to the assumed nuclear equation of state (EOS) and to the in-medium scattering cross section ({sigma}{sub {ital N}{ital N}}). Also, in the {sup 93}Nb+{sup 93}Nb system, the purely attractive contribution to the reduced flow does not appear to be strongly sensitive to the EOS assumptions.

  20. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  1. Excitation energy and nuclear dissipation probed with evaporation-residue cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2011-04-15

    Using a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model, we calculate the excess of evaporation-residue cross sections over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for {sup 200}Hg compound nuclei (CNs) under two distinct types of initial conditions for populated CNs: (i) high excitation energy but low angular momentum (produced via proton-induced spallation reactions at GeV energies and via peripheral heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies) and (ii) high angular momentum but low excitation energy (produced through fusion mechanisms). We find that the conditions of case (ii) not only amplify the effect of dissipation on the evaporation residues, but also substantially increase the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. These results suggest that, in experiments, to obtain accurate information of presaddle nuclear dissipation strength by measuring evaporation-residue cross sections, it is best to choose the heavy-ion-induced fusion reaction approach to yield excited compound nuclei.

  2. Proposal of physics with exotic beams at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I-Yang.

    1991-01-01

    A facility to produce proton-rich radioactive beams for nuclear structure and astrophysics experiments is proposed. This Oak Ridge Exotic Beam (OREB) facility is based on two existing accelerators. Beams of mass up to 80 can be accelerated to energies of about 5 MeV/nucleon. It will provide opportunities to study new areas in nuclear physics and astrophysics that are not available with the use of stable beams. 3 figs.

  3. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single particle versus collectivity, shapes of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In this article some selected topics of nuclear structure research will be discussed as illustration of the progress reached in this field during the last thirty years. These examples evidence the improvement of our understanding of the atomic nucleus reached on the basis of countless experiments, performed to study both exotic nuclei (nuclei far-off the valley of stability) as well as nuclei under exotic conditions (high excitation energy/temperature or large angular momentum/rotational frequency), using stable and radioactive ion beams. The experimental progress, in parallel to the advancement of modern theoretical descriptions, led us to a much richer view of this fundamental many-body system.

  5. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  6. Sulfonamide derivative targeting carbonic anhydrase IX as a nuclear imaging probe for colorectal cancer detection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Siao-Syun; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Ho, Ai-Sheng; Wang, Chia-Chi; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Liao, Tse-Zung; Chang, Jungshan; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic microenvironment is a common situation in solid tumors. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is one of the reliable cellular biomarkers of hypoxia. The role of CA9 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be clarified. CA9 inhibitor such as sulfonamides is known to block CA9 activation and reduce tumor growth consequently. Here, we aimed to investigate the CA9 expression in serum and tumor from different stages of CRC patients and utilize sulfonamide derivative with indium-111 labeling as a probe for CRC nuclear imaging detection in vivo. The serum CA9 was correlated with the tumor CA9 levels in different stages of CRC patients. Hypoxia increased cell viability and CA9 expression in colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Sulfonamide derivative 5-(2-aminoethyl)thiophene-2-sulfonamide (ATS) could bind with CA9 in vitro under hypoxia. Moreover, tumor tissues in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice possessed higher hypoxic fluorescence signal as compared with other organs. We also found that the radioisotope signal of indium-111 labeled ATS, which was utilized for CRC detection in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice, was markedly enhanced in tumors as compared with non-ATS control. Taken together, these findings suggest that CA9 is a potential hypoxic CRC biomarker and measurement of serum CA9 can be as a potential tool for diagnosing CA9 expressions in CRC clinical practice. The radioisotope-labeled sulfonamide derivative (ATS) may be useful to apply in CRC patients for nuclear medicine imaging. PMID:26447758

  7. The 68mCu/68Cu isotope as a new probe for hyperfine studies: The nuclear moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenta, A. S.; Pallada, S.; Correia, J. G.; Stachura, M.; Johnston, K.; Gottberg, A.; Mokhles Gerami, A.; Röder, J.; Grawe, H.; Brown, B. A.; Köster, U.; Mendonça, T. M.; Ramos, J. P.; Marsh, B. A.; Day Goodacre, T.; Amaral, V. S.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Borge, M. J. G.; Haas, H.

    2016-09-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation of γ-rays (TDPAC) experiments were performed for the first time in the decay of 68m Cu (6-, 721 \\text{keV}, 3.75 \\text{min}) produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Due to the short half-life of the source isotope, the measurements were carried out online. The intermediate state (2+, 84.1 \\text{keV}, 7.84 \\text{ns}) offers the unique opportunity to study the electromagnetic fields acting at a copper probe in condensed matter via hyperfine interactions. The present work allowed determination of the nuclear moments for this state. The electric quadrupole moment |Q(2+,84.1 \\text{keV})|=0.110(3) \\text{b} was obtained from an experiment performed in Cu2O and the magnetic dipole moment |μ|=2.857(6) μ_\\text{N} from measurements in cobalt and nickel foils. The results are discussed in the framework of shell model calculations and the additivity rule for nuclear moments with respect to the robustness of the N = 40 sub-shell.

  8. Sulfonamide derivative targeting carbonic anhydrase IX as a nuclear imaging probe for colorectal cancer detection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guan, Siao-Syun; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Ho, Ai-Sheng; Wang, Chia-Chi; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Liao, Tse-Zung; Chang, Jungshan; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2015-11-03

    Hypoxic microenvironment is a common situation in solid tumors. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is one of the reliable cellular biomarkers of hypoxia. The role of CA9 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be clarified. CA9 inhibitor such as sulfonamides is known to block CA9 activation and reduce tumor growth consequently. Here, we aimed to investigate the CA9 expression in serum and tumor from different stages of CRC patients and utilize sulfonamide derivative with indium-111 labeling as a probe for CRC nuclear imaging detection in vivo. The serum CA9 was correlated with the tumor CA9 levels in different stages of CRC patients. Hypoxia increased cell viability and CA9 expression in colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Sulfonamide derivative 5-(2-aminoethyl)thiophene-2-sulfonamide (ATS) could bind with CA9 in vitro under hypoxia. Moreover, tumor tissues in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice possessed higher hypoxic fluorescence signal as compared with other organs. We also found that the radioisotope signal of indium-111 labeled ATS, which was utilized for CRC detection in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice, was markedly enhanced in tumors as compared with non-ATS control. Taken together, these findings suggest that CA9 is a potential hypoxic CRC biomarker and measurement of serum CA9 can be as a potential tool for diagnosing CA9 expressions in CRC clinical practice. The radioisotope-labeled sulfonamide derivative (ATS) may be useful to apply in CRC patients for nuclear medicine imaging.

  9. Probing the Symmetry Term of the Nuclear Equation of State at High Baryonic Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kupny, S.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, QF; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the ASY-EOS experiment flows of neutrons and light charged particles were measured for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon, in order to investigate the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. By comparing the experimental data with the UrQMD transport model predictions, we have extracted a new constraint in agreement with the moderately soft to linear density dependence obtained in the former analysis on FOPI-LAND data, but reducing the associated uncertainty by a factor ∼ 2.

  10. The K{sup +} as a probe of nuclear medium effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the K+ total cross sections on a wide range of nuclei has revealed important modifications of the free-space K+ -nucleon interaction when the nucleon is embedded in a nucleus. In addition to the previously published data on carbon and deuterium we report here the extension of such measurements to lithium, silicon, and calcium. We demonstrate that the previous reported medium modifications for carbon occur quite generally. The results are discussed as evidence for partial quark deconfinement at nuclear densities.

  11. Isospin effects on light charged particles as probes of nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2009-07-15

    The multiplicities of postsaddle protons and {alpha} particles of the heavy systems {sup 234}Cf, {sup 240}Cf, {sup 246}Cf, and {sup 240}U as functions of the postsaddle dissipation strength are calculated in the framework of a dynamical Langevin model coupled with a statistical decay model. It is found that with increasing isospin of the Cf system, the sensitivity of the postsaddle proton and {alpha}-particle multiplicity to the dissipation strength decreases substantially, and it disappears for the {sup 240}U system. We suggest that on the experimental side, to accurately probe the postsaddle dissipation strength by measuring the prescission proton and {alpha}-particle multiplicity, it is best to populate heavy compound systems with low isospin.

  12. Probing hydrogen in ZnO nanorods using solid-state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Yao, Chunhua; Pederson, Larry R.; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a low-temperature reflux method to synthesize large quantities of well-dispersed free-standing ZnO nanorods using a simple and mild aqueous solution route. In this approach, different surfactants were used to control nanostructure morphologies. Bound proton states in these ZnO nanorods were characterized for the first time by high resolution solid-state 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In contrast to commercially available ZnO nano- or micro-particles, our uniform ZnO nanorods show a surprisingly sharp 1H NMR resonance. The feature is maintained upon heating to 500 oC, which suggests that an unusually stable proton species exists, most likely associated with lattice defects within the ZnO framework. Work here has demonstrated a new approach for probing a small amount of proton species associated with defects in nano-crystalline solids using high resolution solid-state 1H MAS NMR.

  13. Clinical nutrition of exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, S; Langenberg, J

    1994-10-01

    Successful nutritional management requires knowledge of the natural history of exotic pets, nutrient contents of foods, and roles of water, calories, and nutrients in optimal health. Unestablished dietary requirements, lack of balanced commercial diets and mismanagement by owners cause nutritional problems that affect health and recovery from illness and trauma. When presented with a sick exotic pet, veterinarians should check for provision of appropriate wholesome water and food in optimal amounts. Malnutrition and dehydration are common in exotic pets and often result from mismanagement. Starvation is common in carnivores eating whole vertebrate prey, whereas specific nutrient deficiencies are more common in herbivores and insectivores. The more common nutritional deficiencies are calcium and vitamin D3, vitamin A, thiamin, and vitamin E. When treating sick exotic pets, nutrition and fluid support may be critical to recovery.

  14. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  15. Nuclear Reaction Recoil Fragments as Probes of Electronic Structure in Condensed Matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Judith Lance

    Ambiguities in the stopping powers of many solids are frequently observed. When the cross-sections for constituent atoms are reliable, the deviations can be discussed meaningfully. This work measures cross-sections for boron, hexagonal boron -nitride, cubic boron-nitride (borazon) and cubic boron -phosphide and suggests that these samples may provide reasonable atomic cross-sections. Intermolecular deviations may exist, but molecular deviations appear to be absent. The method used for measuring cross-sections is based on information obtained from radiating Li('7) projectiles, whose motion and internal excitation are initiated by the thermal nuclear reaction ('10)B(n,(alpha))('7)Li* These projectiles have well defined initial momentum and spend their entire lives confined to the stopping medium.

  16. Nuclear-reaction recoil fragments as probes of electronic structure in condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ambiguities in the stopping powers of many solids are frequently observed. When the cross-sections for constituent atoms are reliable, the deviations can be discussed meaningfully. This work measures cross-sections for boron, hexagonal boron-nitride, cubic boron-nitride (borazon) and cubic boron-phosphide and suggests that these samples may provide reasonable atomic cross-sections. Intermolecular deviations may exist, but molecular deviations appear to be absent. The method used for measuring cross-sections is based on information obtained from radiating Li{sup 7} projectiles, whose motion and internal excitation are initiated by the thermal nuclear reaction {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li{sup *}. These projectiles have well defined initial momentum and spend their entire lives confined to the stopping medium.

  17. Role of nuclear analytical probe techniques in biological trace element research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Pounds, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Many biomedical experiments require the qualitative and quantitative localization of trace elements with high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. The feasibility of measuring the chemical form of the elements, the time course of trace elements metabolism, and of conducting experiments in living biological systems are also important requirements for biological trace element research. Nuclear analytical techniques that employ ion or photon beams have grown in importance in the past decade and have led to several new experimental approaches. Some of the important features of these methods are reviewed here along with their role in trace element research, and examples of their use are given to illustrate potential for new research directions. It is emphasized that the effective application of these methods necessitates a closely integrated multidisciplinary scientific team. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Physics of Exotic Nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2014-09-01

    ``Exotic nuclei'' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in the universe. Efforts have been made to produce and investigate such exotic nuclei at the accelerator facilities in the world. One of the facilities, the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) facility at RIKEN, Japan has delivered intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams since 2007. In US, the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is being constructed to start around 2020. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, the RIBF facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The Super-conducting Ring Cyclotron delivers a 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. An inflight separator BigRIPS was designed to collect about 50% of fission fragments produced at the target and separate nuclei of interest. The RI beams produced at BigRIPS are then delivered to several experimental devices. Large-scale international collaborations have been formed at three spectrometers to conduct unique programs for the investigation of decay properties single particle orbits, collective motions, nucleon correlation, and the equation-of-state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Nuclear binding energy will be measured at a newly constructed ring for the r-process path, and charge distribution of exotic nuclei will be examined at a unique setup of an RI target section in an electron storage ring. Ultra slow RI beams available at a gas catcher system will be utilized for table-top and high precision measurements. In this talk, I would give a facility overview of RIBF, and introduce objectives at RIBF. Special emphasis would be given to selected recent highlights

  19. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  20. Multimodal super-resolution optical microscopy using a transition metal-based probe provides unprecedented capabilities for imaging both nucle-ar chromatin and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Sreejesh; Gill, Martin; Garcia, Esther; Saeed, Hiwa K; Robinson, Darren; Byrne, Aisling; Cadby, Ashley James; Keyes, Tia E; Smythe, Carl G W; Pellett, Patrina; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Thomas, Jim Antony

    2017-10-04

    Detailed studies on the live cell uptake properties of a dinuclear membrane permeable permeable RuII cell probe show that, at low concentrations, the complex localizes and images mitochondria. At concentrations above ~20 μM the complex images nuclear DNA. Since the complex is extremely photostable, has a large Stokes shift, and displays intrinsic subcellular targeting, its compatibility with super-resolution techniques was investigated. It was found to be very well suited to image mitochondria and nuclear chromatin in two col-our, 2C-SIM; and STED and 3D-STED both in fixed and live cell. In particular, due to its vastly improved photostability compared to conventional SR probes, it can provide images of nuclear DNA at unprecedented resolution.

  1. Probing the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy via heavy-residue isoscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Shetty, D. V.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E.; Jandel, M.; Veselsky, M.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-10-01

    The isoscaling properties of isotopically resolved projectile residues from semi-peripheral collisions of ^86Kr(25MeV/nucleon) and ^64Ni(25MeV/nucleon) beams on a variety of target pairs are employed to probe the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The measurements were perfromed with beams from the K500 Superconducting Cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A University. The reactions of ^86Kr with ^64,58Ni and ^124,112Sn were studied with the MARS recoil separator. Their general isoscaling properties have already been presented [1]. The reactions of ^64Ni with ^64,58Ni and ^124,112Sn, as well as ^208PB, ^232Th were studied with the recently commissioned Superconducting Solenoid (BigSol) Line. In the present study, special attention was given to the heavy projectile fragments produced in semiperipheral collisions near the onset of multifragment emission. For these fragments, the measured velocities were used to extract excitation energies. Subsequently, the excitation energies were used to infer the density of the fragmenting quasiprojectiles using the experimental systematics of [2]. Under the scenario of an expanding Fermi gas at a given excitation energy, the value of the symmetry energy was obtained from the measured isoscaling parameter "alpha". A correlation of the symmetry energy with density was thus obtained and compared with existing parametrizations and model predictions. Implications of this study, comparisons with parallel studies of central collisions [3] and, finally, plans for further detailed studies will be discussed. [1] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Rev. C 68 024605 (2003). [2] J.B. Natowitz et al., Phys. Rev. C 66 031601 (2002). [3] D.V. Shetty et al., Phys. Rev. C in press, nucl-ex/0406008.

  2. Probing the folding intermediate of Bacillus subtilis RNase P protein by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chu; Franch, William R; Oas, Terrence G

    2010-11-09

    Protein folding intermediates are often imperative for overall folding processes and consequent biological functions. However, the low population and transient nature of the intermediate states often hinder their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Previous studies have demonstrated that Bacillus subtilis ribonuclease P protein (P protein) is conformationally heterogeneous and folds with multiphasic kinetics, indicating the presence of an equilibrium and kinetic intermediate in its folding mechanism. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the ensemble corresponding to this intermediate (I). The results indicate that the N-terminal and C-terminal helical regions are mostly unfolded in I. 1H−15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR spectra collected as a function of pH suggest that the protonation of His 22 may play a major role in the energetics of the equilibria among the unfolded, intermediate, and folded state ensembles of P protein. NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments were also used to locate the small anion binding sites in both the intermediate and folded ensembles. The results for the folded protein are consistent with the previously modeled binding regions. These structural insights suggest a possible role for I in the RNase P holoenzyme assembly process.

  3. Probing the Disordered Domain of the Nuclear Pore Complex through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami, Ali; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of disordered proteins (FG-nups) that line the transport channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is investigated by means of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A one-bead-per-amino-acid model is presented that accounts for the hydrophobic/hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions between different amino acids, polarity of the solvent, and screening of free ions. The results indicate that the interaction of the FG-nups forms a high-density, doughnut-like distribution inside the NPC, which is rich in FG-repeats. We show that the obtained distribution is encoded in the amino-acid sequence of the FG-nups and is driven by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. To explore the relation between structure and function, we have systematically removed different combinations of FG-nups from the pore to simulate inviable and viable NPCs that were previously studied experimentally. The obtained density distributions show that the maximum density of the FG-nups inside the pore does not exceed 185 mg/mL in the inviable NPCs, whereas for the wild-type and viable NPCs, this value increases to 300 mg/mL. Interestingly, this maximum density is not correlated to the total mass of the FG-nups, but depends sensitively on the specific combination of essential Nups located in the central plane of the NPC. PMID:25229147

  4. Multiparticle Correlation Functions: A probe for the High Energy Density Nuclear Matter created at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, Wolf

    2002-04-01

    In a recent publication [1], the PHENIX collaboration has reported on the transverse momentum spectra for charged hadrons and for neutral pions in the range 1 < pT < 5 GeV/c. The spectra from peripheral nuclear collisions were found to be consistent with a simple scaling of the spectra from p+p collisions by the average number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions. In contrast, the spectra from central collisions appeared to be significantly suppressed when compared to that from peripheral collisions as well as to the scaled p+p expectation. These observations have been interpreted as an important signature for jet quenching( [1],[2]) in central Au + Au collisions at RHIC. Significant jet production should also lead to discernable multi-particle correlations. Thus, the study of such correlations and their possible modification due to quenching, offers a promising opportunity for the investigation and study of QGP formation at RHIC. The multiparticle correlation analysis technique will be presented in conjunction with possible results for Au + Au data (sqrt(s) = 200GeV/c) obtained with the PHENIX detector at RHIC [1] Adcox et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 022301 (2001) [2] M. Gyulassy and X.-N. Wang, Nucl. Phys. B420, 583 (1994)X.-N. Wang, M.Gyulassy and M. Pluemer, Phys. Rev. D 51, 3436 (1995)

  5. Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Don; Briggs, Christian

    2014-03-01

    For decades it has been theorized that just below nuclear saturation density matter undergoes a series of phase transitions. These phases, which are expected to exist in core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars, involve a range of exotic nuclear shapes collectively known as nuclear pasta. Recently, Jose Pons and collaborators suggested that ``the maximum period of isolated X-ray pulsars may be the first observational evidence for an amorphous inner crust, ..., possibly owing to the existence of a nuclear pasta phase.'' In this talk we present results of semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta and discuss how each phase might contribute to neutron star crust properties.

  6. Using fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the interaction of membrane-active peptides with the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Buer, Benjamin C; Chugh, Jeetender; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Marsh, E Neil G

    2010-07-13

    A variety of biologically active peptides exert their function through direct interactions with the lipid membrane of the cell. These surface interactions are generally transient and highly dynamic, making them hard to study. Here we have examined the feasibility of using solution phase (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study peptide-membrane interactions. Using the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 as a model system, we demonstrate that peptide binding to either small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) or bicelles can readily be detected by simple one-dimensional (19)F NMR experiments with peptides labeled with l-4,4,4-trifluoroethylglycine. The (19)F chemical shift associated with the peptide-membrane complex is sensitive both to the position of the trifluoromethyl reporter group (whether in the hydrophobic face or positively charged face of the amphipathic peptide) and to the curvature of the lipid bilayer (whether the peptide is bound to SUVs or bicelles). (19)F spin echo experiments using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence were used to measure the transverse relaxation (T(2)) of the nucleus and thereby examine the local mobility of the MSI-78 analogues bound to bicelles. The fluorine probe positioned in the hydrophobic face of the peptide relaxes at a rate that correlates with the tumbling of the bicelle, suggesting that it is relatively immobile, whereas the probe at the positively charged face relaxes more slowly, indicating this position is much more dynamic. These results are in accord with structural models of MSI-78 bound to lipids and point to the feasibility of using fluorine-labeled peptides to monitor peptide-membrane interactions in living cells.

  7. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  8. Investigations of ion-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear fuel with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy

    Performance in commercial light water reactors is dictated by the ability of its fuel material, uranium dioxide (UO2), to transport heat generated during the fission process. It is widely known that the service lifetime is limited by irradiation-induced microstructural changes that degrade the thermal performance of UO2. Studying the role of complex, often interacting mechanisms that occur during the early stages of microstructural evolution presents a challenge. Phenomena of particular interest are the segregation of fission products to form bubbles and their resultant effect on grain boundary (GB) mobility, and the effect of irradiation on fuel stoichiometry. Each mechanism has a profound consequence on fuel thermal conductivity. Several advanced analytical techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. have been used to study these mechanisms. However, they each have limitations and cannot individually provide the necessary information for deeper understanding. One technique that has been under utilized is atom probe tomography (APT), which has a unique ability to spatially resolve small-scale chemical variations. APT uses the principle of field ionization to evaporate surface ions for chemical analysis. For low electrical conductivity systems, a pulsed laser is used to thermally assist in the evaporation process. One factor complicating the analysis is that laser-material interactions are poorly understood for oxide materials and literature using this technique with UO2 is lacking. Therefore, an initial systematic study to identify the optimal conditions for the analysis of UO2 using laser-assisted APT was conducted. A comparative study on the evaporation behavior between CeO2 and UO2 was followed. CeO2 was chosen due to its technological relevancy and availability of comparative studies with laser-assisted APT. Dissimilar evaporation behavior between these materials was identified and attributed

  9. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials.

  10. Prospects for electron scattering on unstable, exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Toshimi; Simon, Haik

    2017-09-01

    Electron scattering off radioactive ions becomes feasible for the first time due to advances in storage ring and trapping techniques in conjunction with intense secondary beams from novel beam facilities. Using a point-like purely leptonic probe enables the investigation of charge distributions and electromagnetic excitations in β-unstable exotic nuclei with an enhanced overshoot in proton and neutron numbers and the use of QED, one of the most precisely studied theories, for describing the scattering process.

  11. Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpf, A.; Canto, F.; Bucci, D.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L.; Broquin, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    We study the miniaturisation of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6x10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 {mu}m, it detects a minimum absorbance of AU = 6 x 10{sup -5} in a probed volume of 10 pl. (authors)

  12. Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpf, A.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E.; Canto, F.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L.

    2012-08-15

    We study the miniaturization of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6 x 10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 m, it detects a minimum absorbance of K = 1.2 x 10{sup -4} in a probed volume of 14 pl. (authors)

  13. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  14. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-01

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1-hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  15. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear physics, August 24-30, 1980, Berkeley, California. Volume 1. Abstracts. [Berkeley, California, August 24-30, 1980 (abstracts only)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains all abstracts (931) received by the conference organizers before June 20, 1980. The abstracts are grouped according to the following topics: nucleon-nucleon interactions, free and in nuclei; distribution of matter, charge, and magnetism; exotic nuclei and exotic probes; giant resonances and other high-lying excitations; applications of nuclear science; nuclei with large angular momentum and deformation; heavy-ion reactions and relaxation phenomena; new techniques and instruments; pion absorption and scattering by nuclei; and miscellaneous. Some of these one-page abstracts contain data. A complete author index is provided. (RWR)

  16. Multi-MICE: Nuclear Powered Mobile Probes to Explore Deep Interiors of the Ice Sheets on Mars and the Jovian Moons

    SciTech Connect

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John; Powell, Jesse; Ludewig, Hans

    2007-01-30

    The multi-kilometer thick Polar Caps on Mars contain unique and important data about the multi-million year history of its climate, geology, meteorology, volcanology, cosmic ray and solar activity, and meteor impacts. They also may hold evidence of past life on Mars, including microbes, microfossils and biological chemicals. The objective of this paper is to describe a probe that can provide access to the data locked in the Polar Caps. The MICE (Mars Ice Cap Explorer) system would explore the Polar Cap interiors using mobile probes powered by compact, lightweight nuclear reactors. The probes would travel 100's of meters per day along melt channels in the ice sheets created by hot water jets from the 500 kW(th) nuclear reactors, ascending and descending, either vertically or at an angle to the vertical, reaching bedrock at kilometers beneath the surface. The powerful reactor will be necessary to provide sufficient hot water at high velocity to penetrate the extensive horizontal dust/sand layers that separate layers of ice in the Mars Ice Caps. MICE reactors can operate at 500 kW(th) for more than 4 years, and much longer in practice, since power level will be much lower when the probes are investigating locations in detail at low or zero speed. Multiple probes, e.g. six, would be deployed in an interactive network, continuously communicating by RF and acoustic signals with each other and with the surface lander spacecraft. In turn, the lander would continuously communicate in real time, subject to speed of light delays, with scientists on Earth to transmit data and receive instructions for the MICE probes. Samples collected by the probes could be brought to the lander, for return to the Earth at the end of the mission.

  17. Multi-MICE: Nuclear Powered Mobile Probes to Explore Deep Interiors of the Ice Sheets on Mars and the Jovian Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Powell, Jesse; Paniagua, John; Ludewig, Hans

    2007-01-01

    The multi-kilometer thick Polar Caps on Mars contain unique and important data about the multi-million year history of its climate, geology, meteorology, volcanology, cosmic ray and solar activity, and meteor impacts. They also may hold evidence of past life on Mars, including microbes, microfossils and biological chemicals. The objective of this paper is to describe a probe that can provide access to the data locked in the Polar Caps. The MICE (Mars Ice Cap Explorer) system would explore the Polar Cap interiors using mobile probes powered by compact, lightweight nuclear reactors. The probes would travel 100's of meters per day along melt channels in the ice sheets created by hot water jets from the 500 kW(th) nuclear reactors, ascending and descending, either vertically or at an angle to the vertical, reaching bedrock at kilometers beneath the surface. The powerful reactor will be necessary to provide sufficient hot water at high velocity to penetrate the extensive horizontal dust/sand layers that separate layers of ice in the Mars Ice Caps. MICE reactors can operate at 500 kW(th) for more than 4 years, and much longer in practice, since power level will be much lower when the probes are investigating locations in detail at low or zero speed. Multiple probes, e.g. six, would be deployed in an interactive network, continuously communicating by RF and acoustic signals with each other and with the surface lander spacecraft. In turn, the lander would continuously communicate in real time, subject to speed of light delays, with scientists on Earth to transmit data and receive instructions for the MICE probes. Samples collected by the probes could be brought to the lander, for return to the Earth at the end of the mission.

  18. Pentaquark implications for exotic mesons

    SciTech Connect

    T. Burns; F.E. Close; J.J. Dudek

    2004-11-01

    If the exotic baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540) is a correlated udud{bar s} with J{sup P} = 1/2{sup +}, then there should exist an exotic meson, J{sup P} = 1{sup -} {var_theta}{sup +} (S = +2) {yields} K{sup +}K{sup 0} {approx} 1.6 GeV with width {Omicron}(10-100)MeV. The {pi}{sub 1} (1400;1600) may be broad members of 10 {+-} {ovr 10} in such a picture. Vector mesons in the 1.4 - 1.7 GeV mass range are also compared with this picture.

  19. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  20. AttoPhotoChemistry. Probing ultrafast electron dynamics by the induced nuclear motion: The prompt and delayed predissociation of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskatel, B. H.; Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2014-05-01

    Quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics simulation that includes the nuclear motion exhibit a prompt, few fs, dissociation of electronically attosecond excited N2 in addition to the slow dissociation evident from spectral line broadening in well resolved spectra. The simulations show that nuclear motion can probe early times electron dynamics. The separation of time scales is mimicked by a model study fashioned like chemical kinetics of unimolecular dissociation. The physical origin of the separation into prompt and delayed decay is argued to be the same in the vibrational and the present case, namely that there are more bound than dissociative channels.

  1. Application of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for the determination of trace neodymium in spent nuclear fuel using complexation with an emissive macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylate probe.

    PubMed

    Haraga, Tomoko; Saito, Shingo; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Shiho; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Shibukawa, Masami; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    A simple and rapid method with low radiation exposure risk was developed for the determination of neodymium in spent nuclear fuel by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection using a fluorescent probe having a macrocyclic hexadentate polyaminocarboxylate structure. The concentration of Nd(III) in a spent nuclear fuel sample was determined with no interference from various matrix elements, including lanthanides and uranium (at a 200-fold excess), with 92 ± 3% recovery. This is due to high resolution based on establishing a ternary complex equilibrium during migration in which the hydroxyl ion plays an auxiliary role (log K(Ln-L-OH) = 3.9-5.3).

  2. Perspectives of Physics of Exotic Nuclei Beyond the Shell Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2015-11-01

    I present one of the possible paradigm shifts with exotic nuclei. This is the shell evolution due to nuclear forces, such as tensor, central and three-nucleon forces. I shall present major points with the N=34 magic number confirmed in 54Ca by RIBF of RIKEN very recently, after the theoretical prediction made in 2001. The shell evolution has been generalized to phenomena caused by massive particle-hole excitations, being referred to as Type II Shell Evolution. This can be found in 68,70Ni. In particular, the shape coexistence of spherical, oblate and prolate shapes is suggested theoretically. Thus, the perspectives of physics with exotic nuclei is being expanded further from single-particle aspects to shapes/deformation, changing the landscape of nuclear structure.

  3. Nuclear 111Cd probes detect a hidden symmetry change at the γ → α transition in cerium considered isostructural for 60 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvyashchenko, A. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Velichkov, A. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Fomicheva, L. N.; Ryasny, G. K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Kochetov, O. I.; Budzynski, M.

    2010-10-01

    We use the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique to study nuclear electric quadupole hyperfine interactions of probe 111Cd nuclei in cerium lattice sites at room temperature under pressures up to 8 GPa. We have found that the well known γ → α phase transition in cerium is not isostructural. In α-Ce, the probe 111Cd nuclei reveal a quadrupole electron charge density component that is absent in γ-Ce. The hidden spacial structure of electronic quadrupoles in α-Ce is triple-q antiferroquadrupolar, as was suggested in [14]. We relate our findings to the current understanding of the γ → α phase transition and also report on nuclear quadrupole interactions in other high-pressure phases of cerium: α″ ( C2/ m space symmetry) and α' (α-U structure).

  4. Nuclear {sup 111}Cd probes detect a hidden symmetry change at the {gamma} {sup {yields} {alpha}} transition in cerium considered isostructural for 60 years

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvyashchenko, A. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Velichkov, A. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Fomicheva, L. N.; Ryasny, G. K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Kochetov, O. I.; Budzynski, M.

    2010-10-15

    We use the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique to study nuclear electric quadrupole hyperfine interactions of probe {sup 111}Cd nuclei in cerium lattice sites at room temperature under pressures up to 8 GPa. We have found that the well known {gamma} {sup {yields} {alpha}} phase transition in cerium is not isostructural. In {alpha}-Ce, the probe {sup 111}Cd nuclei reveal a quadrupole electron charge density component that is absent in {gamma}-Ce. The hidden spacial structure of electronic quadrupoles in {alpha}-Ce is triple-q antiferroquadrupolar, as was suggested in [14]. We relate our findings to the current understanding of the {gamma} {sup {yields} {alpha}} phase transition and also report on nuclear quadrupole interactions in other high-pressure phases of cerium: {alpha}'' (C2/m space symmetry) and {alpha}' ({alpha}-U structure).

  5. Probing cytoskeletal pre-stress and nuclear mechanics in endothelial cells with spatiotemporally controlled (de-)adhesion kinetics on micropatterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Versaevel, Marie; Riaz, Maryam; Corne, Tobias; Grevesse, Thomas; Lantoine, Joséphine; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; De Vos, Winnok H.; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanical properties of living cells reflect their propensity to migrate and respond to external forces. Both cellular and nuclear stiffnesses are strongly influenced by the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) through reorganization of the cyto- and nucleoskeletal protein connections. Changes in this architectural continuum affect cell mechanics and underlie many pathological conditions. In this context, an accurate and combined quantification of the mechanical properties of both cells and nuclei can contribute to a better understanding of cellular (dys-)function. To address this challenge, we have established a robust method for probing cellular and nuclear deformation during spreading and detachment from micropatterned substrates. We show that (de-)adhesion kinetics of endothelial cells are modulated by substrate stiffness and rely on the actomyosin network. We combined this approach with measurements of cell stiffness by magnetic tweezers to show that relaxation dynamics can be considered as a reliable parameter of cellular pre-stress in adherent cells. During the adhesion stage, large cellular and nuclear deformations occur over a long time span (>60 min). Conversely, nuclear deformation and condensed chromatin are relaxed in a few seconds after detachment. Finally, our results show that accumulation of farnesylated prelamin leads to modifications of the nuclear viscoelastic properties, as reflected by increased nuclear relaxation times. Our method offers an original and non-intrusive way of simultaneously gauging cellular and nuclear mechanics, which can be extended to high-throughput screens of pathological conditions and potential countermeasures. PMID:27111836

  6. Magnetic and superconducting properties of a heavy-fermion CeCoIn5 epitaxial film probed by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kitagawa, Shunsaku; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibauchi, Takasada; Terashima, Takahito; Matsuda, Yuji; Ishida, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    Since the progress in the fabrication techniques of thin films of exotic materials such as strongly correlated heavy-fermion compounds, microscopic studies of the magnetic and electronic properties inside the films have been needed. Herein, we report the observation of 115In nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in an epitaxial film of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, for which the microscopic field gradient within the unit cell as well as magnetic and superconducting properties at zero field are evaluated. We find that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in the film is in excellent agreement with that of bulk crystals, whereas the NQR spectra show noticeable shifts and significant broadening indicating a change in the electric-field distribution inside the film. The analysis implies a displacement of In layers in the film, which, however, does not affect the magnetic fluctuations and superconducting pairing. This implies that inhomogeneity of the electronic field gradient in the film sample causes no pair-breaking effect.

  7. Exotic phenomena in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Thomas; Feldmeier, Hans; Roth, Robert

    2006-10-01

    In the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model the nuclear many-body system is described using Slater determinants with Gaussian wave-packets as single-particle states. The flexibility of the FMD wave functions allows for a consistent description of shell model like structures, deformed states, cluster structures as well as halos. An effective interaction derived from the realistic Argonne V18 interaction using the Unitary Correlation Operator Method is used for all nuclei. Results for nuclei in the p-shell will be presented. Halo features are present in the Helium isotopes, cluster structures are studied in Beryllium and Carbon isotopes. The interplay between shell structure and cluster structures in the ground and the Hoyle state in ^12C will be discussed.

  8. Electronic pairing in exotic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L. ); Maple, M.B. )

    1995-02-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials and high T[sub c] cuprates may involve electronic pairing with unconventional symmetries and mechanisms. Although there has been no smoking-gun proof, numerous pieces of circumstantial evidence combined with heuristic theoretical arguments make a compelling case that these materials have pairs with exotic symmetry bound by nonphonon glue. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Exotic aphid control with pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exotic aphids are invading ecosystems worldwide. The principal factors favoring establishment of these pests are their small size, parthenogenetic reproduction, short generation time, ability for long distance dispersal as winged morphs, and explosive population dynamics. In the past, attention to i...

  10. Exotic Plants are Invading Southeastern Forests

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1997-01-01

    Millions of acres of forest land in the Southeast are being occupied increasingly by non-indigenous harmful plants--exotic invasive plants. They are called exotic invasive plants, because these plants from other continents invade areas in the U.S. faster and more completely than most native species. Invasive exotic plants impede forest productivity, hinder forest-use...

  11. How Illinois kicked the exotic habit

    Treesearch

    Francis M. Harty

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of this paper, an exotic species is defined as "a plant or animal not native to North America." The history of folly surrounding the premeditated and accidental introduction of exotic animals has been well-documented. In 1963, Dr. E. Raymond Hall wrote, "Introducing exotic species of vertebrates is unscientific, economically wasteful,...

  12. Exotic pests: major threats to forest health

    Treesearch

    J. Robert Bridges

    1995-01-01

    Over 360 exotic forest insects and about 20 exotic diseases have become established in the U.S. Many of these organisms have become serious pests, causing great economic impacts and irreversible ecological harm. Despite efforts to exclude exotic species, forest insects and disease organisms continue to be introduced at a rather rapid rate. In the last few years, one...

  13. Bacterial and parasitic zoonoses of exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Souza, Marcy J

    2009-09-01

    Zoonoses are estimated to make up to 75% of today's emerging infectious diseases. Many of these diseases are carried and transmitted by exotic pets and wildlife. Exotic animal practitioners must be aware of these risks not only to protect their health but also to safeguard the health of staff and clients. This article reviews selected bacterial and parasitic zoonoses associated with exotic animals.

  14. Triton-{sup 3}He relative and differential flows as probes of the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    SciTech Connect

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Zhang Xunchao

    2009-10-15

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence afterburner, we study the triton-{sup 3}He (t-{sup 3}He) ratio with both relative and differential transverse flows in semicentral {sup 132}Sn+{sup 124}Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-proton ratios with relative and differential flows are also discussed as a reference. We find that similar to the neutron-proton pairs, the t-{sup 3}He pairs also carry interesting information regarding the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Moreover, the nuclear symmetry energy affects more strongly the t-{sup 3}He relative and differential flows than the {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} ratio in the same reaction. The t-{sup 3}He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  15. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Chu, Pinghan; Weisman, E.; Liu, C. -Y.; ...

    2015-05-26

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid-state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, nonmagnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore “monopole-dipole” forces on polarized electrons with unique ormore » unprecedented sensitivity. As a result, the solid-state, nonmagnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures could lead to a sensitivity over 10 orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.« less

  16. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Pinghan; Weisman, E.; Liu, C. -Y.; Long, J. C.

    2015-05-26

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid-state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, nonmagnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore “monopole-dipole” forces on polarized electrons with unique or unprecedented sensitivity. As a result, the solid-state, nonmagnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures could lead to a sensitivity over 10 orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.

  17. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  18. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Galatà, A; Comunian, M; Maggiore, M; Manzolaro, M; Angot, J; Lamy, T

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  19. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction−acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V. Kondo, K.; and others

    2016-04-15

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction–acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  20. Characterising exotic matter driving wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chianese, Marco; Di Grezia, Elisabetta; Manfredonia, Mattia; Miele, Gennaro

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an iterative approach to span the whole set of exotic matter models able to drive a traversable wormhole. The method, based on a Taylor expansion of metric and stress-energy tensor components in a neighbourhood of the wormhole throat, reduces the Einstein equation to an infinite set of algebraic conditions, which can be satisfied order by order. The approach easily allows the implementation of further conditions linking the stress-energy tensor components among each other, like symmetry conditions or equations of state. The method is then applied to some relevant examples of exotic matter characterised by a constant energy density and that also show an isotropic behaviour in the stress-energy tensor or obeying to a quintessence-like equation of state.

  1. Why own an exotic pet?

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ethical nature. While trade in exotic animals is certainly profitable for these who practise it, it poses great risks of varying types: ecological risks, threats to biodiversity conservation and health risks. Several introduced animal populations have gone on to establish a line in their new host country. We are just starting to measure the adverse impact this has had, in some cases on a very large scale. The veterinary profession doubtless has a major role to play in endeavouring to reform this trade in living creatures that unfortunately results in many losses.

  2. Nitrogen nuclear spin flips in nitroxide spin probes of different sizes in glassy o-terphenyl: Possible relation with α- and β-relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, N. P.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2011-09-01

    The pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) technique was employed to study nitroxide spin probes of three different sizes dissolved in glassy o-terphenyl. A microwave pulse applied to the central hyperfine structure (hfs) component of the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum was followed by two echo-detecting pulses of different microwave frequency to probe the magnetization transfer (MT) to the low-field hfs component. The MT between hfs components is readily related to flips in the nitrogen nuclear spin, which in turn are induced by molecular motion. The MT on the time scale of tens of microseconds was observed over a wide temperature range, including temperatures near and well below the glass transition. For a bulky nitroxide, it was found that MT rates approach dielectric α (primary) relaxation frequencies reported for o-terphenyl in the literature. For small nitroxides, MT rates were found to match the frequencies of dielectric β (secondary) Johari-Goldstein relaxation. The most probable motional mechanism inducing the nitrogen nuclear spin flips is large-angle angular jumps, between some orientations of unequal occupation probabilities. The pulsed ELDOR of nitroxide spin probes may provide additional insight into the nature of Johari-Goldstein relaxation in glassy media and may serve as a tool for studying this relaxation in substances consisting of non-rigid molecules (such as branched polymers) and in heterogeneous and non-polar systems (such as a core of biological membranes).

  3. Super-resolution imaging of a 2.5 kb non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome using molecular beacon probes

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yanxiang; Cao, Bo; Ma, Tszshan; Niu, Gang; Huo, Yingdong; Huang, Jiandong; Chen, Danni; Liu, Yi; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Michael Q; Niu, Hanben

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution visualization of short non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome is essential for studying looping interactions and chromatin organization in single cells. Recent advances in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Oligopaint probes have enabled super-resolution imaging of genomic domains with a resolution limit of 4.9 kb. To target shorter elements, we developed a simple FISH method that uses molecular beacon (MB) probes to facilitate the probe-target binding, while minimizing non-specific fluorescence. We used three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (3D-STORM) with optimized imaging conditions to efficiently distinguish sparsely distributed Alexa-647 from background cellular autofluorescence. Utilizing 3D-STORM and only 29–34 individual MB probes, we observed 3D fine-scale nanostructures of 2.5 kb integrated or endogenous unique DNA in situ in human or mouse genome, respectively. We demonstrated our MB-based FISH method was capable of visualizing the so far shortest non-repetitive genomic sequence in 3D at super-resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21660.001 PMID:28485713

  4. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  5. TOF Mass Measurements of Very Exotic Nuclides: an Input for Astrophysical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Stolz, A.; Aprahamian, A.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Gupta, S.; Wallace, M.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. Very exotic nuclei can be accessed by time-of- flight techniques at radioactive beam facilities. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for calculations of the r-process and processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. Description of the TOF technique, results and future plans related to nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  6. Use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as an Experimental Probe in Multiphase Systems: Determination of the Instrument Weight Function for Measurements of Liquid-Phase Volume Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneval, J. E.; McCarthy, M. J.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-11-01

    The relativist approach (Baveye and Sposito (1984)) to the interpretation of measurements in multiphase systems was proposed in order to incorporate the details of measurements into theoretical analyses of multiphase transport processes. To help establish the utility of this approach, the weight functions for actual experimental probes must be determined. In this paper we analyze the measurement of liquid-phase porosity in a model system by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We show how both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) physics and experimental technique combine to determine the weight function for the spin-warp spin-echo sequence. The analysis shows clearly what aspects of the weight function are determined by the experimental method and what aspects are determined by the system being studied. The results will help establish the utility of the relativist approach as well as improve understanding NMR measurements in multiphase systems.

  7. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  8. Anatomy of exotic Higgs decays in 2HDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix; No, Jose Miguel; Su, Shufang

    2016-09-01

    Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. a hierarchical 2HDM scenario, taking into account the theoretical and experimental constraints. We provide benchmark planes to exploit the complementarity among these searches, analyzing their potential to probe the hierarchical 2HDM parameter space during LHC Run 2.

  9. Anatomy of exotic Higgs decays in 2HDM

    DOE PAGES

    Kling, Felix; No, Jose Miguel; Su, Shufang

    2016-09-16

    Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. a hierarchical 2HDM scenario, taking into account the theoretical and experimental constraints. Here, we provide benchmark planes to exploit the complementarity among these searches, analyzing their potential to probe the hierarchical 2HDM parameter space during LHC Run 2.

  10. Anatomy of exotic Higgs decays in 2HDM

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, Felix; No, Jose Miguel; Su, Shufang

    2016-09-16

    Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. a hierarchical 2HDM scenario, taking into account the theoretical and experimental constraints. Here, we provide benchmark planes to exploit the complementarity among these searches, analyzing their potential to probe the hierarchical 2HDM parameter space during LHC Run 2.

  11. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Summary Super star clusters are groups of hundreds of thousands of very young stars packed into an unbelievably small volume. They represent the most extreme environments in which stars and planets can form. Until now, super star clusters were only known to exist very far away, mostly in pairs or groups of interacting galaxies. Now, however, a team of European astronomers [1] have used ESO's telescopes to uncover such a monster object within our own Galaxy, the Milky Way, almost, but not quite, in our own backyard! The newly found massive structure is hidden behind a large cloud of dust and gas and this is why it took so long to unveil its true nature. It is known as "Westerlund 1" and is a thousand times closer than any other super star cluster known so far. It is close enough that astronomers may now probe its structure in some detail. Westerlund 1 contains hundreds of very massive stars, some shining with a brilliance of almost one million suns and some two-thousand times larger than the Sun (as large as the orbit of Saturn)! Indeed, if the Sun were located at the heart of this remarkable cluster, our sky would be full of hundreds of stars as bright as the full Moon. Westerlund 1 is a most unique natural laboratory for the study of extreme stellar physics, helping astronomers to find out how the most massive stars in our Galaxy live and die. From their observations, the astronomers conclude that this extreme cluster most probably contains no less than 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, and all of its stars are located within a region less than 6 light-years across. Westerlund 1 thus appears to be the most massive compact young cluster yet identified in the Milky Way Galaxy. PR Photo 09a/05: The Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1 (2.2m MPG/ESO + WFI) PR Photo 09b/05: Properties of Young Massive Clusters Super Star Clusters Stars are generally born in small groups, mostly in so-called "open clusters" that typically contain a few hundred stars. From a wide range of

  12. Pentaquark spectroscopy: exotic {theta} baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, R.; Giannini, M.M.; Santopinto, E.

    2004-09-13

    We propose a collective stringlike model of q4q-bar pentaquarks with the geometry of an equilateral tetrahedron in which the four quarks are located at the four corners and the antiquark in its center. The nonplanar equilibrium configuration is a consequence of the permutation symmetry of the four quarks. In an application to the spectrum of exotic {theta} baryons, we find that the ground state pentaquark has angular momentum and parity Jp 1/2- and a small magnetic moment of 0.382 {mu}N. The decay width is suppressed by the spatial overlap with the decay products.

  13. Ectoparasites in small exotic mammals.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Michael; Koestlinger, Saskia

    2013-09-01

    Ectoparasites inhabiting the skin are responsible for significant problems in small mammals, owing to ingestion of blood, lymph, sebaceous secretions, and scavenging skin debris, as well as a hypersensitivity reaction to parasite antigen resulting in severe pruritus and subsequent self-trauma-induced lesions. In general practice, the most common diagnosis in exotic pets is an unspecified mite infestation, but other ectoparasites such as lice, fleas, insects, or even helminths may cause dermatologic diseases. If treatment with topical insecticides is planned, the small mammal should be isolated for a few hours to enable drying and spreading of the product.

  14. Mitigating exotic impacts: restoring native deer mouse populations elevated by an exotic food subsidy

    Treesearch

    Dean E. Pearson; Robert J. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    The threat posed by exotic organisms to native systems has led to extensive research on exotic invaders, yet management of invasives has progressed relatively slowly. This is partly due to poor understanding of how exotic species management influences native organisms. To address this shortfall, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of an invasives management tool...

  15. Probing the Dynamics of a Nuclear Spin Bath in Diamond through Time-Resolved Central Spin Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréau, A.; Jamonneau, P.; Gazzano, O.; Kosen, S.; Roch, J.-F.; Maze, J. R.; Jacques, V.

    2014-09-01

    Using fast electron spin resonance spectroscopy of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-time readout of the Overhauser field produced by its nuclear spin environment under ambient conditions. These measurements enable narrowing the Overhauser field distribution by postselection, corresponding to a conditional preparation of the nuclear spin bath. Correlations of the Overhauser field fluctuations are quantitatively inferred by analyzing the Allan deviation over consecutive measurements. This method allows us to extract the dynamics of weakly coupled nuclear spins of the reservoir.

  16. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  17. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  18. Studies on exotic nuclei by proton-induced direct reaction at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, O. A.

    2007-02-26

    The proton-induced direct reactions like elastic, quasi-elastic scattering and knock-out at intermediate energies and inverse kinematics are the most powerful classical methods for obtaining spectroscopic information on the structure of unstable exotic nuclei. Few elastic scattering experiments performed at GSI with the gaseous and liquid hydrogen targets provided the most precise data on a nuclear matter distribution and a halo-core structure of the neutron-rich He and Li isotopes. The measured differential cross sections have been also used for probing density distributions as predicted by various microscopic theories. The comparison of the data with the latest calculations will be shown. The description of the recent experiment with proton-rich 8B and neutron-rich Be isotopes is presented.The experimental conditions at the future facility FAIR will provide unique opportunities for nuclear structure studies on nuclei far off stability, and will allow to reach new regions in the chart of nuclides of high interest for nuclear structure and astrophysics. In particular, predicted luminosity will allow for the investigation of direct reactions with stored and cooled radioactive beams at internal H, He, etc. targets of the storage ring NESR. This technique enables high resolution measurements down to very low momentum transfer and provides a gain in luminosity from accumulation and recirculation of the radioactive beams. In order to explore the experimental conditions for measurements planned at EXL/FAIR setup, a first attempt exploring experimentally the feasibility of its concept has been recently made. A detector setup was installed at the ESR storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt. A 136Xe beam was interacting to an internal hydrogen gas-jet target. The detector setup had all the basic ingredients as foreseen by EXL collaboration. A set of scattering reactions has been studied and the overall performance of the setup demonstrated the feasibility of the EXL experimental

  19. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A; Miyadera, H; Esch, E I; Hoteling, N J; Adelmann, A; Heffner, R H; Green, A; Olsthoorn, J; Stocki, T J

    2010-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons exist long enough and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. These characteristic x-rays can be used to identify the nuclide. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fiberglass. These preliminary results show that muons can be successfully used to find shielded SNM. The safety of North Americans can be protected by the use of this technology.

  20. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  1. Naturalized Exotic Tree Species in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis; Henri A. Liogier

    1991-01-01

    Many exotic tree species have been imported into Puerto Rico for their wood, fruit, and use as coffee shade and ornamentals. Some of these trees have naturalized (reproduced without human intervention) and some have escaped into natural forests. At least 118 exotic species are reproducing in Puerto Rico. Estimates are given for the general rate of spread and future...

  2. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Treesearch

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  3. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  4. Probing composite models at the LHC with exotic quarks production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, Romain

    2017-03-01

    After the Higgs boson hunt, the LHC could be a powerful tool to unravel the mystery of which physics lies beyond the realm of the Standard Model. Different new sectors have been postulated to address naturalness: SUSY, extra dimensions and strong dynamics theories. Composite models extend EWSB to a global symmetry breaking whose pseudo-Goldstone boson is the SM Higgs boson. The resulting mass spectrum originates from a partial mixing between fundamental fermions and composite fields which creates massive states including new heavy quarks coupled preferentially to the top quark. Searches for these top partners have been carried out by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, constraining the models. Other composite contributions are expected to enhance the 4-top production, which should be observable in the next years at the LHC.

  5. Swift Probes Exotic Object: 'Kicked' Black Hole or Mega Star?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Zoom into Markarian 177 and SDSS1133 and see how they compare with a simulated galaxy collision. When the central black holes in these galaxies combine, a "kick" launches the merged black hole on a...

  6. The program at JPL to investigate the nuclear interaction of RTG's with scientific instruments on deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscello, V.

    1972-01-01

    A major concern in the integration of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) with a spacecraft designed to explore the outer planets is the effect of the emitted radiation on the normal operation of scientific instruments. The necessary techniques and tools developed to allow accurate calculation of the neutron and gamma spectrum emanating from the RTG. The specific sources of radiation were identified and quantified. Monte Carlo techniques are then employed to perform the nuclear transport calculations. The results of these studies are presented. An extensive experimental program was initiated to measure the response of a number of scientific components to the nuclear radiation.

  7. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  8. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  9. Exotic Hadrons from B Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulsom, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. One of the most important discoveries was that of an apparent four-quark particle, named X(3872). It was the first of a growing X, Y, Z alphabet of exotic hadrons, now numbering more than a dozen, found by the e + e - collider experiments. These multi-quark states represent an unusual departure from the standard description that hadronic matter consists of only two or three quarks. These discoveries have led to the emergence of a new category of physics within heavy meson spectroscopy. This talk will review some of these key experimental results, and highlight the potential of the next generation B-Factory, Belle II, as it begins operation in the coming year.

  10. Solar Neutrinos with Exotic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, João

    The possibility of unconventional neutrino scattering in the Sun via flavor changing neutral currents as a possible source of the solar neutrino deficit is investigated. If the effect is really significant, a resonant process will occur. Taking into account the neutrino deficit reported by the solar neutrino experiments (Kamiokande II, SAGE Gallex), one finds Δ2m21 = (0.6-1.4) × 10-5 eV2 with no vacuum mixing and 0.16 ≤ fex ≤ 0.34 where fex is the lepton violating coupling. Our understanding of the neutrino phenomenon in the Sun may be improved through accuracy improvements in experiments measuring νee- elastic scattering or others searching for exotic lepton decays.

  11. How exotic plants integrate into pollination networks

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Daniel B; Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Bascompte, Jordi; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is increasing world-wide concern about the impact of the introduction of exotic species on ecological communities. Since many exotic plants depend on native pollinators to successfully establish, it is of paramount importance that we understand precisely how exotic species integrate into existing plant–pollinator communities. In this manuscript, we have studied a global data base of empirical pollination networks to determine whether community, network, species or interaction characteristics can help identify invaded communities. We found that a limited number of community and network properties showed significant differences across the empirical data sets – namely networks with exotic plants present are characterized by greater total, plant and pollinator richness, as well as higher values of relative nestedness. We also observed significant differences in terms of the pollinators that interact with the exotic plants. In particular, we found that specialist pollinators that are also weak contributors to community nestedness are far more likely to interact with exotic plants than would be expected by chance alone. Synthesis. By virtue of their interactions, it appears that exotic plants may provide a key service to a community's specialist pollinators as well as fill otherwise vacant ‘coevolutionary niches’. PMID:25558089

  12. Exotic Mammals Disperse Exotic Fungi That Promote Invasion by Exotic Trees

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Martin A.; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R.; Amico, Guillermo C.; Dimarco, Romina D.; Barrios-Garcia, M. Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area. PMID:23826154

  13. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  14. Nuclear Structure Near the Drip Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-08-10

    Experiments with beams of unstable nuclei will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. Theoretically, exotic nuclei represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita.

  15. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, Richard F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; R. Pennington, M.; Peters, K.; M. Richard, J.; P. Shen, C.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; S. Swanson, E.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  16. Quasi-exotic open-flavor mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2017-06-01

    Meson states with exotic quantum numbers arise naturally in a covariant bound-state framework in QCD. We investigate the consequences of shifting quark masses such that the states are no longer restricted to certain C-parities, but only by JP. Then, a priori, one can no longer distinguish exotic or conventional states. In order to identify signatures of the different states to look for experimentally, we provide the behavior of masses, leptonic decay constants, and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition of such mesons, as well as the constellations in which they could be found. Most prominently, we consider the case of charged quasi-exotic excitations of the pion.

  17. Disulfide-Trapping Identifies a New, Effective Chemical Probe for Activating the Nuclear Receptor Human LRH-1 (NR5A2)

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Cortez, Felipe; Suzawa, Miyuki; Irvy, Sam; Bruning, John M.; Sablin, Elena; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional efforts relying on high-throughput physical and virtual screening of large compound libraries have failed to yield high-efficiency chemical probes for many of the 48 human nuclear receptors. Here, we investigated whether disulfide-trapping, an approach new to nuclear receptors, would provide effective lead compounds targeting human liver receptor homolog 1 (hLRH-1, NR5A2). Despite the fact that hLRH-1 contains a large ligand binding pocket and binds phospholipids with high affinity, existing synthetic hLRH-1 ligands are of limited utility due to poor solubility, low efficacy or significant off-target effects. Using disulfide-trapping, we identified a lead compound that conjugates with remarkably high-efficiency to a native cysteine residue (Cys346) lining the hydrophobic cavity in the ligand binding domain of hLRH-1. Guided by computational modeling and cellular assays, the lead compound was elaborated into ligands PME8 and PME9 that bind hLRH-1 reversibly (no cysteine reactivity) and increase hLRH-1 activity in cells. When compared with the existing hLRH-1 synthetic agonist RJW100, both PME8 and PME9 showed comparable induction of the LRH-1 dependent target gene CYP24A1 in human HepG2 cells, beginning as early as 3 h after drug treatment. The induction is specific as siRNA-mediated knock-down of hLRH-1 renders both PME8 and PME9 ineffective. These data show that PME8 and PME9 are potent activators of hLRH-1 and suggest that with further development this lead series may yield useful chemical probes for manipulating LRH-1 activity in vivo. PMID:27467220

  18. Disulfide-Trapping Identifies a New, Effective Chemical Probe for Activating the Nuclear Receptor Human LRH-1 (NR5A2).

    PubMed

    de Jesus Cortez, Felipe; Suzawa, Miyuki; Irvy, Sam; Bruning, John M; Sablin, Elena; Jacobson, Matthew P; Fletterick, Robert J; Ingraham, Holly A; England, Pamela M

    2016-01-01

    Conventional efforts relying on high-throughput physical and virtual screening of large compound libraries have failed to yield high-efficiency chemical probes for many of the 48 human nuclear receptors. Here, we investigated whether disulfide-trapping, an approach new to nuclear receptors, would provide effective lead compounds targeting human liver receptor homolog 1 (hLRH-1, NR5A2). Despite the fact that hLRH-1 contains a large ligand binding pocket and binds phospholipids with high affinity, existing synthetic hLRH-1 ligands are of limited utility due to poor solubility, low efficacy or significant off-target effects. Using disulfide-trapping, we identified a lead compound that conjugates with remarkably high-efficiency to a native cysteine residue (Cys346) lining the hydrophobic cavity in the ligand binding domain of hLRH-1. Guided by computational modeling and cellular assays, the lead compound was elaborated into ligands PME8 and PME9 that bind hLRH-1 reversibly (no cysteine reactivity) and increase hLRH-1 activity in cells. When compared with the existing hLRH-1 synthetic agonist RJW100, both PME8 and PME9 showed comparable induction of the LRH-1 dependent target gene CYP24A1 in human HepG2 cells, beginning as early as 3 h after drug treatment. The induction is specific as siRNA-mediated knock-down of hLRH-1 renders both PME8 and PME9 ineffective. These data show that PME8 and PME9 are potent activators of hLRH-1 and suggest that with further development this lead series may yield useful chemical probes for manipulating LRH-1 activity in vivo.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Superconductors with Exotic Symmetries FOCUS ON SUPERCONDUCTORS WITH EXOTIC SYMMETRIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. Maurice; Sigrist, Manfred; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2009-05-01

    here and a consistent theoretical description of all aspects of their superconductivity remains a formidable challenge. While the discovery of the BCS theory led, in only a few years, to the complete and consistent theoretical description of all aspects of conventional superconductivity, we are far from this goal for the exotic superconductors. Hence these superconductors continue to be the focus of most research activity in the field of superconductivity today. The papers in this special issue represent a cross section of current activity in both experiment and theory on these fascinating materials. Focus on Superconductors with Exotic Symmetries Contents Phase-sensitive-measurement determination of odd-parity, spin-triplet superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 Ying Liu Striped superconductors: how spin, charge and superconducting orders intertwine in the cuprates Erez Berg, Eduardo Fradkin, Steven A Kivelson and John M Tranquada A twisted ladder: relating the Fe superconductors to the high-Tc cuprates E Berg, S A Kivelson and D J Scalapino Fractional vortex lattice structures in spin-triplet superconductors Suk Bum Chung, Daniel F Agterberg and Eun-A Kim Momentum dependence of pseudo-gap and superconducting gap in variation theory T Watanabe, H Yokoyama, K Shigeta and M Ogata Variational ground states of the two-dimensional Hubbard model D Baeriswyl, D Eichenberger and M Menteshashvili Charge dynamics of vortex cores in layered chiral triplet superconductors M Eschrig and J A Sauls Vortices in chiral, spin-triplet superconductors and superfluids J A Sauls and M Eschrig Flux periodicities in loops of nodal superconductors Florian Loder, Arno P Kampf, Thilo Kopp and Jochen Mannhart Evidence of magnetic mechanism for cuprate superconductivity Amit Keren Wave function for odd-frequency superconductors Hari P Dahal, E Abrahams, D Mozyrsky, Y Tanaka and A V Balatsky Nernst effect as a probe of superconducting fluctuations in disordered thin films A Pourret, P Spathis, H Aubin and K

  20. Indole-based cyanine as a nuclear RNA-selective two-photon fluorescent probe for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Chan, Miu Shan; Xu, Di; Tam, Dick Yan; Bolze, Frédéric; Lo, Pik Kwan; Wong, Man Shing

    2015-05-15

    We have demonstrated that the subcellular targeting properties of the indole-based cyanines can be tuned by the functional substituent attached onto the indole moiety in which the first example of a highly RNA-selective and two-photon active fluorescent light-up probe for high contrast and brightness TPEF images of rRNA in the nucleolus of live cells has been developed. It is important to find that this cyanine binds much stronger toward RNA than DNA in a buffer solution as well as selectively stains and targets to rRNA in the nucleolus. Remarkably, the TPEF brightness (Φσmax) is dramatically increased with 11-fold enhancement in the presence of rRNA, leading to the record high Φσmax of 228 GM for RNA. This probe not only shows good biocompatibility and superior photostability but also offers general applicability to various live cell lines including HeLa, HepG2, MCF-7, and KB cells and excellent counterstaining compatibility with commercially available DNA or protein trackers.

  1. Three-nucleon forces for exotic oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason

    2013-10-01

    The oxygen isotopes, with an experimentally well established dripline (N = 16) anomalously close to the valley of stability, provide an ideal laboratory to study the structure of extreme neutron-rich nuclei at and beyond the limits of existence. The emergence of N = 14 , 16 as new magic numbers and properties of the unbound 25,26O isotopes pose particularly challenging benchmarks for models of nuclear forces and many-body methods aiming at a description of exotic medium-mass nuclei. At the heart of these efforts is three-nucleon (3N) forces, whose impact represents a current frontier in nuclear structure theory. I will discuss the first microscopic framework, based on chiral effective field theory and renormalization group methods, in which neutron-rich oxygen isotopes were explored from a systematic treatment of NN and 3N forces. In this approach we found that the repulsive effects of 3N forces were decisive in explaining why 24O is the heaviest oxygen isotope. Furthermore, 3N forces play a key role in reproducing spectra, including signatures of doubly-magic 22,24O, and unbound properties without empirical adjustments. Finally I will discuss subsequent progress in ab-initio efforts with 3N forces such as coupled cluster theory, in-medium similarity renormilazation group, and Green's function theory, where a consistent picture of the oxygen isotopic chain emerges, which is highly encouraging for first-principles calculations of exotic nuclei well into the medium mass region.

  2. Effect of neutron excess on {delta} excitations in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mahmoud A.; Vary, James P.; Lee, T.-S. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of neutron excess on the formation of {delta}(3,3) resonance states in exotic nuclei at equilibrium and under large amplitude compression have been investigated within the radial constraint spherical Hartree-Fock method. An effective Hamiltonian has been used which includes the {delta} degree of freedom explicitly. Results are presented for {sup 28}O, {sup 60}Ca, and {sup 70}Ca in a model space of seven major oscillator shells and eight {delta} orbitals. The results show that the formation of the {delta}'s depends strongly on the amount of neutron excess in the nuclear system. In contrast to previous work where we found no {delta}'s in {sup 16}O and {sup 40}Ca at equilibrium, these results show that a significant amount of {delta}'s exists at equilibrium in exotic isotopes. In addition, as the nucleus is compressed to a density of 2.5 times the ordinary nuclear density, the percentage of the {delta}'s rises to 3%, 5%, and 7% of the total number of all baryons in {sup 28}O, {sup 60}Ca, and {sup 70}Ca, respectively. This suggests a parametrization for the percentage of the {delta}'s created at 2.5 times the normal density of the form 0.25(N-Z)%. The results are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the formation of {delta} matter in neutron-rich matter at high compression. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  3. Exotic hadrons in the constituent quark model.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Institute of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Exotic hadrons are important because their existence or absence can provide important clues to understanding how QCD makes hadrons from quarks and gluons. The first experimentally confirmed exotic will be the first hadron containing both qq and {bar q}q pairs and the first hadron containing color sextet and color octet pairs. Theoretical models are not very useful because there is no accepted model for multiquark systems with color-space correlations. The constituent quark model is the only phenomenological model with predictive power that has given experimentally tested universal predictions for both mesons and baryons. This paper reviews its explanation for why there are no bound exotics and its guidance to the search for heavy-flavored exotic tetraquarks and pentaquarks. A possible supersymmetry between mesons and baryons leading to meson-baryon mass relations not easily obtained otherwise is discussed.

  4. Controlling exotic plants in your forest

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1999-01-01

    The author discusses the impacts of exotic plants and suggests control and rehabilitation measures. Trees, shrubs, and vines addressed include silk tree or mimosa, Chinese and Japanese privet, kudzu, multiflora rose, Japanese honeysuckle, and Chinese wisteria.

  5. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray / x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picon, A.; Bostedy, C.; Rudenko, A; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T; Rolles, D; Berrah, N; Bomme, C; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E.P.; Krassig, B.; March, A. M.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S.H.

    2016-07-26

    The availability at x-ray free electron lasers of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to molecular dynamics. In diatomic molecules composed of low-Z elements, K-shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wavepackets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond timescale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasi-bound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K-shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K-shell ionization, Auger decay, and time evolution of the nuclear wavepackets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasi-bound states.

  6. Exotic terranes of western California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWilliams, M.O.; Howell, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous distinct geological terranes compose the North American Cordillera1; there may be as many as 50 terranes in California alone2. Critical to deciphering the history of Cordilleran tectonic assembly is an understanding of the displacement history of individual terranes. It is therefore important to know: (1) whether a terrane has undergone significant motion with respect to the stable craton (that is, whether it is allochthonous or exotic); (2) if so, when relative motion started and stopped; (3) from where an individual terrane originated; and (4) the nature of interterrane movements. We consider here the problem of determining whether the now-juxtaposed Salinian and Stanley Mountain terranes of California became amalgamated at or near their present position with respect to cratonic North America, or if they collided at a considerable distance from their present positions and were later accreted to North America as a composite package. The palaeomagnetic data that we present indicate that the latter was the case. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Pentaquarks and doubly heavy exotic mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek

    2016-11-01

    I discuss the experimental evidence for and theoretical interpretation of the new mesons and baryons with two heavy quarks. These include doubly-heavy baryons, exotic hadronic quarkonia and most recently a manifestly exotic pentaquark-like doubly heavy baryon with a minimal quark content uudc¯ discovered by LHCb, whose mass, decay mode and width are in agreement with a prediction based on a physical picture of a deuteron-like Σc D¯* "hadronic molecule".

  8. Volume integral theorem for exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-12-15

    We answer an important question in general relativity about the volume integral theorem for exotic matter by suggesting an exact integral quantifier for matter violating Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC). It is checked against some well-known static, spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of general relativity with a sign reversed kinetic term minimally coupled scalar field. The improved quantifier is consistent with the principle that traversable wormholes can be supported by arbitrarily small quantities of exotic matter.

  9. Advances in exotic mammal clinical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle G

    2015-05-01

    It is important that veterinarians treating exotic companion mammals stay abreast of the latest developments relating to medications and drug delivery approaches for safety, efficacy and welfare issues. Sustained release formulations of commonly used drugs as well as newer routes for administration of therapeutic agents allow the veterinarian treating exotic companion mammals to reduce the stress associated with drug administration. Interactions can occur between vehicle and drugs when formulations are compounded, therefore research studies are warranted regarding potential problems associated with these formulations.

  10. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Treesearch

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  11. Search for exotic particles at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.S.

    1992-10-01

    We have searched for exotic particles in p[bar p] collisions at 1.8 TeV in data taken with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We review our published limits on W[prime] and Z[prime] masses, and on the scale of lepton-quark compositeness. We also report preliminary mass limits based on searches for leptoquarks, supersymmetric quarks and gluons, and exotic, stable colored fermions.

  12. Probing the specificity of binding to the major nuclear localization sequence-binding site of importin-alpha using oriented peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sundy N Y; Takeda, Agnes A S; Fontes, Marcos R M; Harris, Jonathan M; Jans, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2010-06-25

    Importin-alpha is the nuclear import receptor that recognizes the classic monopartite and bipartite nuclear localization sequences (cNLSs), which contain one or two clusters of basic amino acids, respectively. Different importin-alpha paralogs in a single organism are specific for distinct repertoires of cargos. Structural studies revealed that monopartite cNLSs and the C-terminal basic clusters of the bipartite cNLSs bind to the same site on importin-alpha, termed the major cNLS-binding site. We used an oriented peptide library approach with five degenerate positions to probe the specificity of the major cNLS-binding site in importin-alpha. We identified the sequences KKKRR, KKKRK, and KKRKK as the optimal sequences for binding to this site for mouse importin-alpha2, human importin-alpha1, and human importin-alpha5, respectively. The crystal structure of mouse importin-alpha2 with its optimal peptide confirmed the expected binding mode resembling the binding of simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen cNLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptides containing these sequences bound to the corresponding proteins with low nanomolar affinities. Nuclear import assays showed that the sequences acted as functional cNLSs, with specificity for particular importin-alphas. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-alpha; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of cNLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified cNLSs in novel proteins.

  13. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    DOE PAGES

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lackmore » the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner« less

  14. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner

  15. Exotic Meson Results from BNL E852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manak, Joseph J.

    1998-10-01

    Results from BNL experiment 852 on exotic (non-q\\overlineq) meson production are presented. Production of final states with J^PC = 1^-+ is observed in π^-p interactions at 18 GeV/c in the ηπ^-, ρπ^- and η^'π^- channels. Since such states are manifestly exotic if they are resonant, we describe amplitude analyses which use the interference between these states and other well known states to measure the phase behavior of the J^PC = 1^-+ amplitudes. The analyses show that, in addition to the previously reported(D.R. Thompson et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1630 (1997) evidence for an exotic meson in the ηπ^- channel, there is strong evidence for a second exotic meson decaying to ρπ^- with a mass of M=1593 ±8^+29_-47 MeV/c^2 and a width of Γ=168 ±20^+150_-12 MeV/c^2. We also show that the η^'π^- system is dominated by J^PC = 1^-+ production and we use those data to determine decay branching ratios for the exotic mesons. Such measurements are expected to be crucial in determining the constituent nature of the exotic mesons - that is, whether they are consistent with being hybrid mesons or four-quark states.

  16. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-09-27

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, signifi- cant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. Furthermore, this review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner

  17. Pathways to exotic metastable silicon allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, Bianca; Strobel, Timothy A.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2016-12-01

    The Group 14 element silicon possesses a complex free-energy landscape with many (local) minima, allowing for the formation of a variety of unusual structures, some of which may be stabilized at ambient conditions. Such exotic silicon allotropes represent a significant opportunity to address the ever-increasing demand for novel materials with tailored functionality since these exotic forms are expected to exhibit superlative properties including optimized band gaps for solar power conversion. The application of pressure is a well-recognized and uniquely powerful method to access exotic states of silicon since it promotes large changes to atomic bonding. Conventional high-pressure syntheses, however, lack the capability to access many of these local minima and only four forms of exotic silicon allotropes have been recovered over the last 50 years. However, more recently, significant advances in high pressure methodologies and the use of novel precursor materials have yielded at least three more recoverable exotic Si structures. This review aims to give an overview of these innovative methods of high-pressure application and precursor selection and the recent discoveries of new Si allotropes. The background context of the conventional pressure methods and multitude of predicted new phases are also provided. This review also offers a perspective for possible access to many further exotic functional allotropes not only of silicon but also of other materials, in a technologically feasible manner.

  18. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  19. Capillary zone electrophoresis and ion-exchange capillary electrochromatography: analytical tools for probing the Hanford nuclear site environment.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Knobel, H H; Remcho, V T

    1997-07-18

    Ion-exchange capillary electrochromatography (IE-CEC) is a relatively new separation technique based on the combination of ion-exchange chromatographic and electrophoretic separation mechanisms. IE-CEC offers both the efficiency of capillary electrophoresis and the selectivity and sample capacity of ion-exchange chromatography. The utility of the method was examined with I- and IO3-, which are common constituents of nuclear wastes at Hanford, Washington and other U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) sites, and ReO4-, a surrogate for TcO4-. The advantages and limitations of IE-CEC relative to capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) are explored. The chief advantages are increased loading capacity and an alternative selectivity to that of CZE, in addition to increased efficiency (relative to conventional ion-exchange chromatography). The run-to-run reproducibility of IE-CEC, however, was found to be a limitation of the technique.

  20. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.; Lockman, Felix J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  1. Significant role of level-density parameters in probing nuclear dissipation with light-ion-induced fission excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of the ratio of level-density parameters at saddle to that at ground-state configuration (af/an) on the sensitivity of fission cross sections (σfiss) to presaddle dissipation effects by comparing fission excitation functions measured in the 3He + 197Au (208Pb) reactions with three distinct types of model calculations: the standard Bohr-Wheeler theory with af/an = 1 (i) and af/an ≠ 1 (ii) as well as the Langevin approach with af/an ≠ 1 (iii). It is shown that both cases (i) and (ii) cannot provide a reasonable, satisfactory description of the measured σfiss. A presaddle friction strength (β) of (4-4.5) × 1021 s-1 is extracted through reproducing data with Langevin simulations. We find from the comparison of the experimental and calculated σfiss in cases (ii) and (iii) that a precise determination of β depends sensitively on af/an. The finding indicates that level-density parameters play a significant role in accurately probing presaddle friction; that is, to stringently constrain β it is important to take into account a realistic and an elaborate evaluation of af/an in theoretical calculations. We further find that high energy increases the sensitivity of σfiss to β, suggesting that in experiments, to obtain precise information of presaddle dissipation by measuring σfiss, it is best to populate a compound nucleus with high energy.

  2. Distinctive exotic flavor and aroma compounds of some exotic tropical fruits and berries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim A

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic flavor of exotic tropical fruits is one of their most attractive attributes to consumers. In this article, the enormous diversity of exotic fruit flavors is reviewed. Classifying some of the exotic fruits into two classes on the basis of whether esters or terpenes predominate in the aroma was also attempted. Indeed, as far as exotic tropical fruits are concerned, the majority of fruits have terpenes predominating in their aroma profile. Some of the fruits in this group are the Amazonian fruits such as pitanga, umbu-caja, camu-camu, garcinia, and bacuri. The ester group is made up of rambutan, durians, star fruit, snake fruit, acerola, tamarind, sapodilla, genipap, soursop, cashew, melon, jackfruit, and cupuacu respectively. Also, the role of sulphur-volatiles in some of the exotic fruits is detailed.

  3. Ab initio valence-space theory for exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in ab initio nuclear structure theory have led to groundbreaking predictions in the exotic medium-mass region, from the location of the neutron dripline to the emergence of new magic numbers far from stability. Playing a key role in this progress has been the development of sophisticated many-body techniques and chiral effective field theory, which provides a systematic basis for consistent many-nucleon forces and electroweak currents. Within the context of valence-space Hamiltonians derived from the nonperturbative in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) approach, I will discuss the importance of 3N forces in understanding and making new discoveries in the exotic sd -shell region. Beginning in oxygen, we find that the effects of 3N forces are decisive in explaining why 24O is the last bound oxygen isotope, validating first predictions of this phenomenon from several years ago. Furthermore, 3N forces play a key role in reproducing spectroscopy, including signatures of doubly magic 22,24O, and physics beyond the dripline. Similar improvements are obtained in new spectroscopic predictions for exotic fluorine and neon isotopes, where agreement with recent experimental data is competitive with state-of-the-art phenomenology. Finally, I will discuss first applications of the IM-SRG to effective valence-space operators, such as radii and E 0 transitions, as well as extensions to general operators crucial for our future understanding of electroweak processes, such as neutrinoless double-beta decay. This work was supported by NSERC and the NRC Canada.

  4. Probing the Fermi Bubbles in Ultraviolet Absorption: A Spectroscopic Signature of the Milky Way's Biconical Nuclear Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Savage, Blair D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Wakker, Bart P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hernandez, Svea; Kim, Tae-Sun; Benjamin, Robert A.; Bowen, David V.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (l, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v LSR = -235 and +250 km s-1, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of gsim900 km s-1 and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles. Based on observations taken under program 13448 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program 14B-299 of the NRAO Green Bank Telescope, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Nuclear Overhauser effect as a probe of molecular structure, dynamics and order of axially reorienting molecules in membranes.

    PubMed

    Davis, James H; Komljenović, Ivana

    2016-02-01

    The location, orientation, order and dynamics of cholesterol in model membranes have been well characterized, therefore cholesterol is an ideal molecule for developing new methods for studying structured molecules undergoing rapid axially symmetric reorientation. The use of (13)C filtering via short contact cross polarization transfer to (1)H allows the recovery of the weak cholesterol (1)H magic angle spinning NMR signals from beneath the strong phospholipid background in bicelles composed of chain perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dicaproyl phosphatidylcholine/[3,4-(13)C]-cholesterol. Measurements of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement for (1)H nuclei located in the first ring of cholesterol are interpreted in terms of a simple two motion model consisting of axial reorientation, with a correlation time τ∥, and a slower reorientation of the diffusion axis relative to the bilayer normal, with correlation time τ⊥. This approach can be extended to other molecules which undergo rapid axial reorientation such as small membrane associated peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alpha-particle and proton probes of nuclear shapes in the rare earth and mass 80 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A.; Griffin, H.C.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. To explore the possibility of a correlation between the proton emission barriers and nuclear deformation, we studied proton spectra from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S,2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction. The proton spectra were observed with the Dwarf-Ball 4{pi} CsI(Tl) array, in coincidence with 18 Compton suppressed Ge detectors operated in conjunction with the Spin Spectrometer, a 4{pi} NaI(Tl) array. We found significant changes and shifts in the proton energy spectra as we selected gating transitions from bands of different moments of inertia or transitions from states of different spin in the same band. Substantial differences were also seen as a function of the {gamma}-ray multiplicity. These results are discussed in terms of statistical model calculations incorporating deformation and structure effects of the emitting system. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  7. The characterization of phospholipid functional group probe species on respirable silicon-containing dusts by solid-state 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-03-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are reported for the interactions of probe molecules with respirable silicon-containing dusts as experimental evidence complementing computational studies reported by Snyder and Madura recently in J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 7095 (2008). The selected probe molecules represent the individual functional groups of a model lung surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC) deposited on a respirable silica and kaolin from water solution. (13)C and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopies were employed to detect chemical shift, line width, and chemical shift anisotropy, providing experimental evidence of mobility and relaxation changes describing the site and orientation of surface-associated species. NMR results confirm that only the phosphate and adjacent carbons are immobilized by surface hydroxyls on kaolin, while these and the carbons of the cationic head group are likewise immobilized by surface silanols on Miu-U-Sil 5. The phosphates in phosphoryl- and phosphatidyl-cholines were the primary interaction sites, with additional weak coordination with the trimethylammonium cation species. Covalent Al-O-P formation is not likely a factor in in vivo or in vitro toxicity mechanisms of respirable silicon-containing materials, but is rather the result of dehydration or demethoxylation reactions occurring over time or during heating or reduced pressure used in preparing materials for NMR spectroscopic study. Hydration is a critical factor in the formation and preparation for spectroscopic observation of coated dusts. Care must be taken to ensure that products formed and studied correspond to species formed in vivo under suitable concentration and hydration conditions.

  8. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  9. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  10. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-01-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as ‘pets’ including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009–2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic ‘pets’ are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004–2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients. PMID:22843648

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as a Probe of Meso-timescale Dynamics: Ion and H2O Behavior at Mineral-H2O Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, G. M.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Singer, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    One of the important meso-scales in geochemistry is the meso-timescale that is characteristic of processes too slow to probe with light spectroscopy but too fast to probe macroscopically. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the only analytical methods with dynamic sensitivity to motions with correlation times on the 10-9 to 1 s timescales and is thus a uniquely powerful probe of meso-timescale dynamic behavior. Here, we describe the results of several studies exploring the meso-timescale motion of ions and H2O at the mineral-H2O interface of hectorite, a smectite clay mineral.1-3 2H, 23Na, 39K and 43Ca NMR results show that H2O molecules associated with the interface undergo anisotropic reorientation due to proximity to the surface and surface-associated cations. This motion can be described by rotational diffusion of the H2O molecule about its C2 symmetry axis at GHz frequencies combined with hopping of the H2O molecule about the normal to the smectite surface at ~>200 kHz. This model describes well the observed 2H NMR spectra of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ hectorites over a range temperatures between -80°C and 50°C, with the specific range dependent only on the total system H2O content. At temperatures above -20°C, systems with excess H2O with respect to a two-layer hydrate (low-H2O pastes through dilute aqueous suspensions) experience additional dynamic averaging due to H2O exchange between cation hydration shells, surface-sorbed species, and bulk inter-particle water. The extent of 2H averaging due to this exchange mechanism is strongly affected by the total H2O content in the system, the identity of the charge balancing cation, and the temperature. The dynamic averaging mechanisms affecting the cationic NMR resonances in these systems become dominated by diffusional processes at progressively lower temperatures as the hydration energy of the cation increases. These interfacial cation dynamics and binding sites are strongly affected by surface

  12. Exotic few-body systems with a heavy meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Hadron as an impurity bound in nuclei causes interesting phenomena which do not emerge in normal nuclei. These effects would give us the information not only on the internal structure of the nuclei, but also on the changing properties of the impurity in the nuclear medium. The hadron-nucleus systems have been studied in the light flavor sector, especially. However, a strong attraction between a heavy meson (Dbar and B) and a nucleon, provided by the one pion exchange potential (OPEP), was suggested recently. The OPEP is enhanced by the heavy quark spin symmetry which induces the mass degeneracy between the heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The attraction motivates us to investigate the Dbar (B) nuclei having the exotic flavor structure. Hence, these bound states are stable against the strong decay. We discuss the possible existence of exotic few-body states realized as DbarNN and BNN. The OPEP between the Dbar (B) meson and the nucleon N is considered. By solving coupled channel equations for PNN and P* NN channels (P (P*) is the heavy pseudoscalar (vector) meson), we obtain new three-body bound states and resonances. In these states, the tensor force of the OPEP plays an important role to yield the attraction.

  13. Probing the water distribution in porous model sands with two immiscible fluids: A nuclear magnetic resonance micro-imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum Han; Lee, Sung Keun

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the structural heterogeneity of porous networks on the water distribution in porous media, initially saturated with immiscible fluid followed by increasing durations of water injection, remains one of the important problems in hydrology. The relationship among convergence rates (i.e., the rate of fluid saturation with varying injection time) and the macroscopic properties and structural parameters of porous media have been anticipated. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) micro-imaging to obtain images (down to ∼50 μm resolution) of the distribution of water injected for varying durations into porous networks that were initially saturated with silicone oil. We then established the relationships among the convergence rates, structural parameters, and transport properties of porous networks. The volume fraction of the water phase increases as the water injection duration increases. The 3D images of the water distributions for silica gel samples are similar to those of the glass bead samples. The changes in water saturation (and the accompanying removal of silicone oil) and the variations in the volume fraction, specific surface area, and cube-counting fractal dimension of the water phase fit well with the single-exponential recovery function { f (t) = a [ 1 -exp (- λt) ] } . The asymptotic values (a, i.e., saturated value) of the properties of the volume fraction, specific surface area, and cube-counting fractal dimension of the glass bead samples were greater than those for the silica gel samples primarily because of the intrinsic differences in the porous networks and local distribution of the pore size and connectivity. The convergence rates of all of the properties are inversely proportional to the entropy length and permeability. Despite limitations of the current study, such as insufficient resolution and uncertainty for the estimated parameters due to sparsely selected short injection times, the observed trends highlight the first

  14. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimentalmore » and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.« less

  15. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    PubMed Central

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  16. Novel chemistry of invasive exotic plants

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccino, Naomi; Arnason, J.Thor

    2006-01-01

    Of the many exotic plants that have become naturalized in North America, only a small proportion are pests capable of invading and dominating intact natural communities. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the most invasive plants are phytochemically unique in their new habitats. A comparison of exotic plant species that are highly invasive in North America with exotics that are widespread, but non-invasive revealed that the invasive plants were more likely to have potent secondary compounds that have not been reported from North American native plants. On average, the compounds found in the invasive plants were reported from fewer species, fewer genera and fewer families than those from non-invasive plants. Many of the unique phytochemicals from invasive plants have been reported to have multiple activities, including antiherbivore, antifungal, antimicrobial and allelopathic (phytotoxic) effects, which may provide the plants with several advantages in their new environments. PMID:17148359

  17. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  18. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; ...

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital,more » and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.« less

  19. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; Shen, Bing

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.

  20. ESR Study of Electron-Nuclear Dipolar Relaxation for AsO 44-Spin Probe in the Paraelectric Phase of KH 2AsO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakvin, B.; Merunka, D.

    1997-05-01

    Saturation behavior of allowed and forbidden ESR transition of AsO44-paramagnetic probe in KH2AsO4was studied in the wide temperature interval around the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition,Tc. The ratios between forbidden and allowed line intensities were employed to deduce information on the electron-nuclear dipolar (END) relaxation mechanism. It was shown that a proton END relaxation mechanism exhibits an extremal temperature behavior in the paraelectric phase around 230 K. The extremal temperature behavior was described by employing a model of proton hopping along the O-H···O bonds around the paramagnetic centers, and the correlation time of this hopping was estimated in the wide temperature range in the paraelectric phase (150-330 K). The temperature dependence of effective proton distance from the neighbor oxygens was obtained, and it was discussed in terms of a localization of the spin density on these oxygens caused by charge inbalance in the As-O bonds in the ferroelectric phase.

  1. Diamagnetic nuclear 119Sn probes in the copper chromites CuCr2X4 (X = O, S, Se) with a spinel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, T. V.; Lyubutin, I. S.; Stepin, A. S.; Dubinskaya, Yu. L.; Smirnovskaya, E. M.; Berry, F. J.; Thomas, M. F.

    2007-04-01

    The CuCr2X4 (X = O, S, Se) spinel system has been studied by the Mössbauer spectroscopy of the nuclear diamagnetic 119Sn probe at low temperatures in an external magnetic field. The hyperfine magnetic fields H Sn induced by paramagnetic ions at tin nuclei in the CuCr2S4 and CuCr2Se4 chalcogenides have giant values and are somewhat higher than those detected in the CuCr2O4 oxide. This behavior is caused by the strong covalence of the chalcogenides, which is supported by the experimentally found isomer shifts. The H Sn field is found to be mainly contributed by superexchange 90° interactions in the B-sublattice along the Cr[B]-X-Sn[B] bond chain, whose role increases in the series O-S-Se. In the oxygen CuCr2O4 spinel, the partial contributions to the H Sn field induced by the Cu2+ and Cr3+ ions are estimated. The local magnetic structure of the CuCr2O4 spinel is refined, and its total magnetization is shown to be directed along the magnetic moment of copper in the A sublattice.

  2. Hyperfine field at Mn in the intermetallic compound LaMnSi2 measured by PAC using 111Cd nuclear probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domienikan, C.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera Pasca, G. A.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic hyperfine field at Mn site has been measured in the orthorhombic intermetallic compound LaMnSi2 with PAC spectroscopy using radioactive 111In- 111Cd nuclear probe. Samples of LaMnSi2 were prepared by melting pure metallic components in stoichiometric proportion in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. The samples were sealed in a quartz tube under helium atmosphere, annealed at 1000 °C for 60 h and quenched in water. Samples were analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. 111In was introduced in the samples by thermal diffusion at 1000 °C for 60 h. PAC measurements were carried out with a six BaF2 detector spectrometer at several temperatures between 50 K and 410 K. Results show well defined quadrupole and magnetic interactions at all temperatures. The magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) measured at 50 K is 7.1(1) T. The temperature dependence of Bhf follows the normal Brillouin-like behavior expected for a simple ferromagnetic ordering. The ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) was determined to be 401(1) K.

  3. Diamagnetic nuclear {sup 119}Sn probes in the copper chromites CuCr{sub 2}X{sub 4} (X = O, S, Se) with a spinel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrieva, T. V.; Lyubutin, I. S. Stepin, A. S.; Dubinskaya, Yu. L.; Smirnovskaya, E. M.; Berry, F. J.; Thomas, M. F.

    2007-04-15

    The CuCr{sub 2}X{sub 4} (X = O, S, Se) spinel system has been studied by the Moessbauer spectroscopy of the nuclear diamagnetic {sup 119}Sn probe at low temperatures in an external magnetic field. The hyperfine magnetic fields H{sup Sn} induced by paramagnetic ions at tin nuclei in the CuCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} chalcogenides have giant values and are somewhat higher than those detected in the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide. This behavior is caused by the strong covalence of the chalcogenides, which is supported by the experimentally found isomer shifts. The H{sup Sn} field is found to be mainly contributed by superexchange 90{sup o} interactions in the B-sublattice along the Cr[B]-X-Sn[B] bond chain, whose role increases in the series O-S-Se. In the oxygen CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel, the partial contributions to the H{sup Sn} field induced by the Cu{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions are estimated. The local magnetic structure of the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is refined, and its total magnetization is shown to be directed along the magnetic moment of copper in the A sublattice.

  4. Cooling of Magnetars with Exotic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Noda, Tsuneo; Fujisawa, Kotaro; Kotake, Kei; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    Thermal evolutions of magnetars are studied concerned with effects of exotic matter. All results are shown in two spatial dimensions for comparison with observational results by NuSTAR, NICER etc. in near future. Thermal conduction of envelope/crust in magnetars is affected by the strong magnetic field, and it could be an origin of hot/cold spots, which are expressed well with the two black body fitting. This study also stresses effects of the equation of state, on which the cooling processes, the thermal conductivity, and the heat capacity strongly depend. Exotic matter changes thermal evolutions of magnetars drastically, hence the effects could be detected in observations.

  5. Detnex Project: Dispersion, Structure and Tracking of Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. G.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Espino, J. M.; Mukha, I.; Martel, I.

    2007-05-01

    Since 1970's when double-folding model, based on M3Y interaction, had to be renormalized to fit the elastic scattering of weakly bound 6,7Li and 9Be nuclei, we learned that preconceptions based on the highly successful experience of the optical model on stable nuclei could not be simply extrapolated to the scattering of exotic nuclei. Recently, we have shown some evidences of long range mechanisms in 6He induced reactions that lead to the loss of flux in the elastic channel at kinematic conditions that suggest the nuclei are well beyond the strong absorption radius [O. R. Kakuee, M. A. G. Alvarez, M. V. Andrés, S. Cherubini, T. Davinson, A. Di Pietro, W. Galster, J. Gómez-Camacho, A. M. Laird, M. Lamehi-Rachti, I. Martel, A. M. Moro, J. Rahighi, A. M. Sánchez-Benitez, A. C. Shotter, W. B. Smith, J. Vervier, P. J. Woods. Nucl. Phys. A 765, (2006) 294]. Even so, the use of nuclear reactions as an spectroscopic tool to investigate the nuclear structure of weakly bound nuclei requires a deep understanding of the reactions induced by these nuclei. Therefore, precise experimental measurements of the elastic scattering of exotic nuclei on a variety of targets, as well as the measurements of the main reaction channels are required in order to converge experimentally and theoretically to this understanding. With this aim a campaign of experiments involving different institutions and collaborations is being carefully established and going ahead at several radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities: ISOLDE (CERN), CRC (Be), GSI (Ge) and TRIUMPH (Ca). The main idea is to measure the scattering of He, Li, and Be isotopes, and perform an intensive theoretical treatment, besides promoting some necessary instrumental development. In particular we participate in the low energy branch of the FAIR project where we take part in the tracking studies and developments.

  6. New Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at the FRS-ESR Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, H.

    2009-08-26

    High accuracy mass and novel nuclear lifetime measurements have been performed with bare and few-electron ions produced via projectile fragmentation and fission, separated in flight and stored at relativistic energies. Characteristic experimental results and new developments are reviewed. A new generation of studies with exotic nuclei will be possible with the advent of the proposed international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

  7. Soil biota and exotic plant invasion.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Ragan M; Thelen, Giles C; Rodriguez, Alex; Holben, William E

    2004-02-19

    Invasive plants are an economic problem and a threat to the conservation of natural systems. Escape from natural enemies might contribute to successful invasion, with most work emphasizing the role of insect herbivores; however, microbial pathogens are attracting increased attention. Soil biota in some invaded ecosystems may promote 'exotic' invasion, and plant-soil feedback processes are also important. Thus, relatively rare species native to North America consistently demonstrate negative feedbacks with soil microbes that promote biological diversity, whereas abundant exotic and native species demonstrate positive feedbacks that reduce biological diversity. Here we report that soil microbes from the home range of the invasive exotic plant Centaurea maculosa L. have stronger inhibitory effects on its growth than soil microbes from where the weed has invaded in North America. Centaurea and soil microbes participate in different plant-soil feedback processes at home compared with outside Centaurea's home range. In native European soils, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly negative effects on the weed's growth, possibly leading to its control. But in soils from North America, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly positive effects on itself, which may contribute to the success of this exotic species in North America.

  8. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  9. Exotic scolytids of the Great Lakes region

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2001-01-01

    There are at least 44 exotic species of Scolytidae established in North America north of Mexico, of which 16 species can be found in the Great Lakes region (see Table). Scolytids occupy many niches, but the two most common groups are the true bark beetles and the ambrosia beetles (Poland and Haack 1998). Adult bark beetles, as their name implies, construct galleries...

  10. Exotic forest insects and residential property values

    Treesearch

    Thomas P. Holmes; Elizabeth A. Murphy; Kathleen P. Bell

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the economic damages to homeowners in a northern New Jersey community due to an exotic forest insect-the hemlock woolly adelgid. Hedonic property value methods are used to estimate the effect of hemlock health on property values. A statistically significant relationship between hemlock health and residential property values is...

  11. Eye Removal Surgeries in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kathryn A; McKinnon, Jo-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article covers considerations and techniques of eye removal surgeries in exotic pets. After issues including surgical indications, anesthesia, patient preparation, and instrumentation are explored, surgical techniques are described. Enucleation/exenteration and modified evisceration are discussed, with species-specific nuances of small mammals, birds, reptiles, snakes, amphibians, and fish highlighted.

  12. Phenology of cheatgrass and associated exotic weeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is an exotic, highly invasive annual grass that has dramatically changed the aspect and ecological functions of vast areas of formerly big sagebrush/bunchgrass and salt desert rangelands in the Intermountain west. Cheatgrass increases the chance of ignition, rate of spr...

  13. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings

    Treesearch

    Kerry O. Britton

    1998-01-01

    Invasive exotic pest plants, diseases, and insects, have had a dramatic impact on the health and composition of the Eastern forests for many decades. Chestnut blight was discovered in the United States in 1904. Since then, it has virtually destroyed the chestnut population, which once occupied 25 percent of the eastern forest. In the 1860's, the gypsy moth was...

  14. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Treesearch

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  15. Exotic Grass Yields Under Southern Pines

    Treesearch

    H.A. Pearson

    1975-01-01

    Kentucky 31 and Kenwell tall fescue, Pensacola bahia, and Brunswick grasses yielded nea,rly three times more forage under an established pine stand than native grasses 7 years after seeding. Introducing exotic grasses did not significantly increase total grass production but did enhance range quality since the cool-season grasses are green during winter and are higher...

  16. Emerging avenues for utilization of exotic germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breeders have been successful in increasing crop performance by exploiting genetic diversity over time. However, the reported annual yield increases are not sufficient in view of rapid human population growth and global environmental changes. Exotic germplasm such as landraces and wild relatives pos...

  17. Exotic plant invasions in tropical forests: Patterns and hypotheses

    Treesearch

    J.S. Denslow; S.J. DeWalt

    2008-01-01

    In the tropics, exotic plants have been widely introduced for industrial timber, for land reclamation and forage crops, and as ornamentals. In spite of the apparent opportunity for naturalization and spread, invasive exotic plants are scarce in many continental tropical forests. We examine several conditions under which exotic species do pose substantial threats to...

  18. Exotic annual grass alters fuel amounts, continuity and moisture content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Invasion by exotic plants are one of the most serious threats to native plant communities, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. Of particular concern are exotic plants that alter disturbance regimes. Exotic annual grasses are believed to increase wildfire frequency to the detriment of nativ...

  19. Exotic Forest Insect Pests and Their Impact on Forest Management

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    More than 4500 exotic organisms are now established in the United States, of which over 400 are insects that feed on trees and shrubs. While most exotic insects cause little or no damage, a few have become serious pests and have greatly altered native forest ecosystems. Three of the most recently introduced exotic forest pests are the pine shoot beetle, the Asian...

  20. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  1. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe.

  2. High-Sensitivity Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Giga-Pascal Pressures: A New Tool for Probing Electronic and Chemical Properties of Condensed Matter under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  3. Estimating exotic gene flow into native pine stands: zygotic vs. gametic components.

    PubMed

    Unger, G M; Vendramin, G G; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring contemporary gene flow from widespread exotic plantations is becoming an important problem in forest conservation genetics. In plants, where both seed and pollen disperse, three components of exotic gene flow with potentially unequal consequences should be, but have not been, explicitly distinguished: zygotic, male gametic and female gametic. Building on a previous model for estimating contemporary rates of zygotic and male gametic gene flow among plant populations, we present here an approach that additionally estimates the third (female gametic) gene flow component, based on a combination of uni- and biparentally inherited markers. Using this method and a combined set of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites, we estimate gene flow rates from exotic plantations into two Iberian relict stands of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Results show neither zygotic nor female gametic gene flow but moderate (6-8%) male gametic introgression for both species, implying significant dispersal of pollen, but not of seeds, from exotic plantations into native stands shortly after introduced trees reached reproductive maturity. Numerical simulation results suggest that the model yields reasonably accurate estimates for our empirical data sets, especially for larger samples. We discuss conservation management implications of observed levels of exposure to nonlocal genes and identify research needs to determine potentially associated hazards. Our approach should be useful for plant ecologists and ecosystem managers interested in the vectors of contemporary genetic connectivity among discrete plant populations.

  4. Nuclear Probing of Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Petrasso

    2007-02-14

    The object of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to compress a fuel capsule to a state with high enough density and temperature to ignite, starting a self-sustaining fusion burn that consumes much of the fuel and releases a large amount of energy. The national ICF research program is trying to reach this goal, especially through experiments at the OMEGA laser facility of the University of Rochester Laboratory of Laser Energetics (LLE), planned experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and experimental and theoretical work at other national laboratories. The work by MIT reported here has played several important roles in this national program. First, the development of new and improved charged-particle-based plasma diagnostics has allowed the gathering of new and unique diagnostic information about the implosions of fuel capsules in ICF experiments, providing new means for evaluating experiments and for studying capsule implosion dynamics. Proton spectrometers have become the standard for evaluating the mass assembly in compressed capsules in experiments at OMEGA; the measured energy downshift of either primary or secondary D3He fusion protons to determines the areal density, or ?R, of imploded capsules. The Proton Temporal Diagnostic measures the time history of fusion burn, and multiple proton emission imaging cameras reveal the 3-D spatial distribution of fusion burn. A new compact neutron spectrometer, for measuring fusion yield, is described here for the first time. And of especially high importance to future work is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), which is a neutron spectrometer that will be used to study a range of important performance parameters in future experiments at the NIF. A prototype is currently being prepared for testing at OMEGA, using a magnet funded by this grant. Second, MIT has used these diagnostic instruments to perform its own physics experiments and analysis with implosions at OMEGA, to provide essential data to other experimenters at LLE, and to work collaboratively with researchers from all the national laboratories (including LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory). Some of the implosion dynamics physics studies reported here involve the relationships between drive asymmetries and implosion asymmetries (in terms of both mass assembly and fusion burn); the time evolution of mass assembly and mass asymmetries; the behavior of shock coalescence; and the nature of fuel-shell mix. Third, the MIT program has provided unique educational and research opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students. The graduate students are deeply engaged in every aspect of our research program, and spend considerable time at OMEGA working on experiments and working with our collaborators from OMEGA and from the National Labs. Many undergraduates have gotten a taste of ICF research, sometimes making significant contributions. We believe that the introduction of energetic and gifted students to the challenging problems of this field and the excitement of the national lab environment leads naturally to the infusion of bright, talented young scientists into our field, and several PhD recipients from this group have become important forces in the field. Finally, this work has provided the foundation for continuing advances during upcoming research, with other experimental and theoretical studies of implosion dynamics. In addition to the continuing application of diagnostic instrumentation used during this grant, important contributions will be made with new diagnostics such as the MRS and with new techniques based on the knowledge obtained here, such as proton radiography.

  5. Accuracy of Reaction Cross Section for Exotic Nuclei in Glauber Model Based on MCMC Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measured reaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters such as nuclear size information for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on reaction cross-sections with values obtained using expressions of the Glauber Model. These calculations are performed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach and its dependence on k*, the power law turnover point in the discreet power spectrum of the random number sequence and on the lag-1 autocorrelation time of the random number sequence.

  6. Electron microscopy of some exotic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Just about every material has been looked at under the microscope, either out of pure inquisitiveness or the need to relate the microstructure to its properties. Some of these materials are mundane, like steels or glass or polyethylene; others are so-called advanced, such as intermetallics, silicon nitride or zirconia; yet others might be called exotic whether they be martian rocks, high temperature superconductors, fullerenes, diamonds, or the latest thin film device. Many exotic materials are important in Los Alamos, not only weapons materials such as actinides, tritium and explosives, but also civilian materials for energy applications. Here the author will report briefly on plutonium and uranium, on rhenium disilicide, and on Cu-Nb nanolayered composites.

  7. Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew N.; James, David; Hui, Lucia; Hom, Albert; Loker, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer’s itch) is caused by the penetration of human skin by cercariae of schistosome parasites that develop in and are released from snail hosts. Cercarial dermatitis is frequently acquired in freshwater habitats, and less commonly in marine or estuarine waters. To investigate reports of a dermatitis outbreak in San Francisco Bay, California, we surveyed local snails for schistosome infections during 2005–2008. We found schistosomes only in Haminoea japonica, an Asian snail first reported in San Francisco Bay in 1999. Genetic markers place this schistosome within a large clade of avian schistosomes, but do not match any species for which there are genetic data. It is the second known schistosome species to cause dermatitis in western North American coastal waters; these species are transmitted by exotic snails. Introduction of exotic hosts can support unexpected emergence of an unknown parasite with serious medical or veterinary implications. PMID:20735918

  8. History and new ideas for exotic particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2005-05-01

    Basic 1966 physics of Sakharov, Zeldovich and Nambu updated by QCD with constituent-quark quasiparticles having effective masses fits all masses and magnetic moments of ground state meson and baryons having no more than one strange or heavy quark Flavor antisymmetry explains absence of low-lying exotics and suggests diquark-triquark model and two-state model for {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark. Variational approach gives mass bounds for other pentaquarks.

  9. Legal implications of the exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2005-09-01

    The ever-growing complexity of veterinary laws compounds the problem for the exotic pet practice. Issues of possession, treatment, vaccination, and ethics shape the legal landscape for the veterinarian, and as new problems develop, new legislation will be created. Only by learning and understanding the current laws and regulations of the jurisdiction can a practitioner hope to keep abreast of the changes and additions as they occur and to minimize the risk of liability.

  10. Exotic Rotational Correlations in Quantum Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig

    2015-09-26

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  11. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    PubMed

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  12. Exotic Forms of Silicon for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. Craig

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few decades many exotic forms of carbon, such as carbon-60, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have generated novel scientific discoveries and revolutionized many important applications. Similar potentially transformative breakthroughs may be expected with exotic forms of silicon. Such structures include, but are not necessarily limited to, (1) those formed under high pressure that are metastable at ambient pressure, (2) single layers of Si (silicene), (2) clathrate Si, which has been studied for superconducting and thermoelectric properties but not in any detail for semiconductor applications, (3) nanostructured forms of Si (nanodots and nanowires), including those composed of diamond Si, (4) porous Si, and (5) any other structures that differ in their structural, optical or electronic properties from bulk diamond Si. Silicon is an abundant, non-toxic element around which an advanced technology exists for semiconducting devices based on diamond Si. One of these exotic forms of Si could form the basis for the next revolution in electronics or even opto-electronics, since some forms exhibit direct, or nearly direct, band gaps. Recent results toward producing pure and dopable semiconductors out of Si nanodots imbedded in amorphous matrices and in clathrate Si and clathrate Si-Ge alloys will be discussed. The author acknowledges important collaborations with R. T. Collins, C. A. Koh, L. Krishna, M. Lusk, and P. Stradins. DOE SUNSHOT program, under Contract DE-EE0005326 and by the NSF MRSEC program under Grant DMR-0820518.

  13. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-11-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV.

  14. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardo, A.; Verney, D.; Deloncle, I.; Péru, S.; Delafosse, C.; Roccia, S.; Matea, I.; Sotty, C.; Andreoiu, C.; Costache, C.; Delattre, M.-C.; Etilé, A.; Franchoo, S.; Gaulard, C.; Guillot, J.; Ibrahim, F.; Lebois, M.; MacCormick, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Martini, M.; Mihai, C.; Mitu, I.; Olivier, L.; Portail, C.; Qi, L.; Roussière, B.; Stan, L.; Testov, D.; Wilson, J.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2017-09-01

    The N = 5283Gaβ decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56-85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5-9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4)% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow-Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  15. Single and Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions for Nuclear Moment Studies Toward Radioactive-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeva, R. L.; Georgiev, G. P.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Fiori, E.; Gaulard, C.; Hauschilda, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Risegari, L.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.; Moschner, K.; Zell, K.-O.; Daugas, J.-M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Roig, O.; Ferraton, M.; Ibrahim, F.

    2010-04-30

    This study is a part of an experimental program to measure nuclear moments in transfer reactions. It aims to probe for a first time the nuclear -spin orientation in multi-nucleon transfer. Fist experiments were performed to measure the quadrupole moment of an isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu (I{sup p}i 6{sup -}, E{sub x} = 1154 keV, T{sub 1/2} = 595(20) ns) in single nucleon transfer and the population of mus isomers in {sup 66}Cu and {sup 63}Ni in multi-nucleon transfer. The experimentally tested methodology allows broad applications toward more exotic species and feasibility of these reactions to produce species away from stability.

  16. Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: Application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, Stephane; Ryan, Joseph V.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Cabie, M.

    2013-04-08

    Here, we report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution

  17. Probing the formation and evolution of comets via nuclear spin temperatures of C_2H_6, CH_3OH, CH_4, NH_3, and H_2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G.; Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; DiSanti, M.; Paganini, L.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Gibb, E.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are true remnants of our primordial Solar System, and provide unique clues to its formation and evolution, including the delivery of organics and water to our planet. A key indicator stored in the molecular structure of the nuclear ices is the spin temperature (T_{spin}), derived from spin-isomeric ratios (R_{spin}, e.g., ortho/para). At the time when cometary ices formed, the prevailing temperature defined the relative abundance of the different spin-isomeric species, and herewith R_{spin} and T_{spin} are normally treated as ''remnant thermometers'' probing the formation environments of cometary molecules. Radiative and collisional transitions between the ortho and para states are strongly forbidden and herewith this indicator is preserved over time. Most of our knowledge of this indicator comes from the measurements of the ortho-para ratios in water and NH_2 (a proxy for ammonia), suggesting a common T_{spin} near 30 K. This information is based on a restricted sample of comets, and the measurements are particularly sensitive to the molecular modeling technique and adopted spectral database. Here, we present new methodologies for extracting spin temperatures from ethane (C_2H_6), methane (CH_4), and methanol (CH_3OH), and advanced new models for ortho/para water (H_2O) and ammonia (NH_3). Our H_2O analysis is based on the most complete fluorescence radiative-transfer model to date, which incorporates 1,200 million transitions including those originating from high-energy levels that are activated in comets via a non-resonant cascade. In a similar fashion, we developed non-resonant fluorescence models for NH_3 and HCN, and quantum-band models for the ν_7 band of C_2H_6 and ν_3 band of CH_3OH. All models respect spin-symmetry non-conversion radiative rules, and make use of a realistic solar spectrum for the computation of fluorescence pumps. We applied these new methods to derive spin-isomeric ratios for H_2O, CH_4, C_2H_6, CH_3OH, and NH_3 from three high

  18. Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: Application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment

    DOE PAGES

    Gin, Stephane; Ryan, Joseph V.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; ...

    2013-04-08

    Here, we report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements ofmore » diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution

  19. Cosmological constraints on exotic injection of electromagnetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Lesgourgues, Julien; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2017-03-01

    We compute cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy constraints on exotic forms of energy injection in electromagnetic (e.m.) channels over a large range of timescales. We show that these constraints are very powerful around or just after recombination, although CMB keeps some sensitivity e.g. to decaying species with lifetimes as long as 1025 s. These bounds are complementary to CMB spectral distortions and primordial nucleosynthesis ones, which dominate at earlier timescales, as we also review here. For the first time, we describe the effects of the e.m. energy injection on the CMB power spectra as a function of the injection epoch, using the lifetime of a decaying particle as proxy. We also identify a suitable on-the-spot approximation, that can be used to derive accurate constraints, and describe its differences with the most up-to-date treatment. Our results are of interest not only for early universe relics constituting (a fraction of) the dark matter, but also for other exotic injection of e.m. radiation. For illustration, we apply our formalism to: i) Primordial black holes of mass 1013.5 g lesssim M lesssim 1016.8 g, showing that the constraints are comparable to the ones obtained from gamma-ray background studies and even dominate below ~ 1014 g. ii) To a peculiar mass-mixing range in the sterile neutrino parameter space, complementary to other astrophysical and laboratory probes. iii) Finally, we provide a first estimate of the room for improvement left for forthcoming 21 cm experiments, comparing it with the reach of proposed CMB spectral distortion (PiXiE) and CMB angular power spectrum (CORE) missions. We show that the best and most realistic opportunity to look for this signal (or to improve over current constraints) in the 21 cm probe is to focus on the Cosmic Dawn epoch, 15 lesssim z lesssim 30, where the qualitatively unambiguous signature of a spectrum in emission can be expected for models that evade all current constraints.

  20. GDR as a Probe of the Collective Motion in Nuclei at High Spins, Temperatures or Isospins

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Adam

    2008-11-11

    The gamma-decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), the high-frequency collective vibration of protons against neutrons, has been proven to be a basic probe for the shapes of hot nuclei, especially to study the effective shape evolution caused by the collective rotation of a nucleus. In this context an interesting question arises: what is the nuclear shape at extreme values of spin or temperatures, close to the limit impose by another collective motion--fission, and how evolves the giant dipole collective vibrations as a function of isospin. Short overview of the results from the experiments aimed to answer these questions are presented and possible perspectives of these type of studies for exotic nuclei to be obtained with the novel gamma-calorimeter PARIS and soon available intense radioactive beams are discussed.

  1. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  2. Metabolomics has great potential for clinical and nutritional care and research with exotic animals.

    PubMed

    Dove, Alistair D M

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the potential of metabolomics for exotic animal research in a zoological setting. Metabolomics is a suite of analytical tools aimed at gaining a holistic understanding of animal metabolism without prior knowledge of the compounds to be measured. These metabolic fingerprints can be used to define normal metabolism for an unstudied species, to characterize the metabolic deviation of diseased animals from the normal state over time, to identify biomarker compounds that best capture such deviations, and to measure the metabolic impact of clinical and nutritional interventions. Two approaches, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) provide large amounts of complimentary pure and applied biological data. Metabolomic methods hold great potential for researchers, clinicians, and nutritionists studying exotic and aquatic animals because they can produce a huge data return on research effort, and because they do not require much a priori knowledge of the animals' metabolism, which is so often then case in zoological settings.

  3. TOF-Bρ mass measurements of very exotic nuclides for astrophysical calculations at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Gupta, S.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements (Blaum 2006 Phys. Rep. 425 1), the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for the TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  4. Role of the cluster deformations in explaining the exotic decay half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, A.; Sert, Y.; Bayrak, O.; Boztosun, I.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the influence of nuclear deformations of the cluster and daughter nuclei on the exotic cluster decay half-lives of ensuremath 221≤ A ≤ 242 for the favored cluster decay of the radioactive nuclei by using the semiclassical WKB method and the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The results have also been presented for the spherical nuclei case in order to show clearly the effects of the deformations on the exotic decay half-lives. The half-lives become close to the experimental data when both the deformation of daughter and cluster nuclei are taken into account in the calculations. Furthermore, considering cluster deformations together with the orientation angles of daughter and cluster also provides positive contributions to the results.

  5. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constan, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Nuclei are "small": if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are "dense": the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about…

  6. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constan, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Nuclei are "small": if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are "dense": the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about…

  7. Rare and exotic processes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, Ray; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    We report recent results in CDF searches for rare and exotic processes. In a signature-based search, we examine the diphoton dataset for additional energetic objects. In a second signature-based search, we search for anomalous production of a photon, a b-tagged jet, and missing E{sub T}. Finally, we search for a Fermiophobic Higgs in the two-photon decay mode, and conclude this Higgs must have mass greater than 106 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence level.

  8. Exotic Magnetic Properties in {sup 17}C

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2008-12-15

    Magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 17}C are investigated by shell model calculations. The important role of the tensor interaction for magnetic dipole transitions in this exotic neutron-rich nucleus is pointed out. The recently observed anomalous quenching of the magnetic dipole transition in 1/2{sub 1}{sup +} {yields}3/2{sub g.s.}{sup +} is shown to be well explained by using a modified shell model Hamiltonian that takes full account of the tensor force and monopole corrections in the isospin T=1 channel. The predicted quadrupole moment of {sup 17}C is smaller than the value obtained by conventional shell model Hamiltonians.

  9. Global analysis of fermion mixing with exotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, Enrico; Roulet, Esteban; Tommasini, Daniele

    1991-01-01

    The limits are analyzed on deviation of the lepton and quark weak-couplings from their standard model values in a general class of models where the known fermions are allowed to mix with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets). These mixings appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory such as models with mirror fermions, E(sub 6) models, etc. The results update previous analyses and improve considerably the existing bounds.

  10. Monitoring two native Spodoptera species using an exotic pheromone lure developed for an exotic species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pheromone lure for the exotic species Spodoptera exempta was successful at attracting two native species, S. latifascia and S. albula. Trapping was conducted in north-central Florida and in southern Texas. Large numbers of both native species were collected throughout the season....

  11. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  12. Transport Properties in Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Matthew; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Donald; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2016-09-01

    At the base of the inner crust of neutron stars, where matter is near the nuclear saturation density, nuclear matter arranges itself into exotic shapes such as cylinders and slabs, called `nuclear pasta.' Lepton scattering from these structures may govern the transport properties of the inner crust; electron scattering from protons in the pasta determines the thermal and electrical conductivity, as well as the shear viscosity of the inner crust. These properties may vary in pasta structures which form at various densities, temperatures, and proton fractions. In this talk, we report on our calculations of lepton transport in nuclear pasta and the implication for neutron star observables.

  13. Linking economic activities to the distribution of exotic plants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brad W; Irwin, Rebecca E

    2004-12-21

    The human enterprise is flooding Earth's ecosystems with exotic species. Human population size is often correlated with species introductions, whereas more proximate mechanisms, such as economic activities, are frequently overlooked. Here we present a hypothesis that links ecology and economics to provide a causal framework for the distribution of exotic plants in the United States. We test two competing hypotheses (the population-only and population-economic models) using a national data set of exotic plants, employing a statistical framework to simultaneously model direct and indirect effects of human population and ecological and economic variables. The population-only model included direct effects of human population and ecological factors as predictors of exotics. In contrast, the population-economic model included the direct effects of economic and ecological factors and the indirect effects of human population as predictors of exotics. The explicit addition of economic activity in the population-economic model provided a better explanation for the distribution of exotics than did the population-only model. The population-economic model explained 75% of the variation in the number of exotic plants in the 50 states and provided a good description of the observed number of exotic plants in the Canadian provinces and in other nations in 85% of the cases. A specific economic activity, real estate gross state product, had the strongest positive effect on the number of exotics. The strong influence of economics on exotics demonstrates that economics matter for resolving the exotic-species problem because the underlying causes, and some of the solutions, may lie in human-economic behaviors.

  14. Linking economic activities to the distribution of exotic plants

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brad W.; Irwin, Rebecca E.

    2004-01-01

    The human enterprise is flooding Earth's ecosystems with exotic species. Human population size is often correlated with species introductions, whereas more proximate mechanisms, such as economic activities, are frequently overlooked. Here we present a hypothesis that links ecology and economics to provide a causal framework for the distribution of exotic plants in the United States. We test two competing hypotheses (the population-only and population-economic models) using a national data set of exotic plants, employing a statistical framework to simultaneously model direct and indirect effects of human population and ecological and economic variables. The population-only model included direct effects of human population and ecological factors as predictors of exotics. In contrast, the population-economic model included the direct effects of economic and ecological factors and the indirect effects of human population as predictors of exotics. The explicit addition of economic activity in the population-economic model provided a better explanation for the distribution of exotics than did the population-only model. The population-economic model explained 75% of the variation in the number of exotic plants in the 50 states and provided a good description of the observed number of exotic plants in the Canadian provinces and in other nations in 85% of the cases. A specific economic activity, real estate gross state product, had the strongest positive effect on the number of exotics. The strong influence of economics on exotics demonstrates that economics matter for resolving the exotic-species problem because the underlying causes, and some of the solutions, may lie in human-economic behaviors. PMID:15591111

  15. Lattice QCD studies of pentaquarks and exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Anthony Williams; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-09-14

    The possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark has motivated a number of studies into its nature using lattice QCD. Initial studies focused on spin-1/2 states and more recently also spin-3/2 states. Here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with both spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 using the FLIC fermion action. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e. binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the spin-1/2 channels or in the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar 3/2{sup +} channel. We also present the results of our study into exotic meson states using hybrid meson interpolators with explicit gluonic degrees of freedom. We find a candidate for the J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson which has a mass consistent with the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) experimental candidate.

  16. Exotic mesons in quenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, C.; Hetrick, J.E.; DeGrand, T.A.; Wingate, M.; DeTar, C.; McNeile, C. |; Gottlieb, S.; Heller, U.M.; Rummukainen, K.; Sugar, B.; Toussaint, D. |

    1997-12-01

    Since gluons in QCD are interacting fundamental constituents just as quarks are, we expect that in addition to mesons made from a quark and an antiquark, there should also be glueballs and hybrids (bound states of quarks, antiquarks, and gluons). In general, these states would mix strongly with the conventional {bar q}q mesons. However, they can also have exotic quantum numbers inaccessible to {bar q}q mesons. Confirmation of such states would give information on the role of {open_quotes}dynamical{close_quotes} color in low energy QCD. In the quenched approximation we present a lattice calculation of the masses of mesons with exotic quantum numbers. These hybrid mesons can mix with four quark ({bar q}{bar q}qq) states. The quenched approximation partially suppresses this mixing. Nonetheless, our hybrid interpolating fields also couple to four quark states. Using a four-quark source operator, we demonstrate this mixing for the 1{sup {minus}+} meson. Using the conventional Wilson quark action, we calculate both at reasonably light quark masses, intending to extrapolate to small quark mass, and near the charmed quark mass, where we calculate the masses of some {bar c}cg hybrid mesons. The hybrid meson masses are large {emdash} over 4 GeV for charmonium and more than twice the vector meson mass at our smallest quark mass, which is near the strange quark mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Hyperfine structure in 229gTh3+ as a probe of the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy.

    PubMed

    Beloy, K

    2014-02-14

    We identify a potential means to extract the 229gTh→ 229mTh nuclear excitation energy from precision microwave spectroscopy of the 5F(5/2,7/2) hyperfine manifolds in the ion 229gTh3+. The hyperfine interaction mixes this ground fine structure doublet with states of the nuclear isomer, introducing small but observable shifts to the hyperfine sublevels. We demonstrate how accurate atomic structure calculations may be combined with the measurement of the hyperfine intervals to quantify the effects of this mixing. Further knowledge of the magnetic dipole decay rate of the isomer, as recently reported, allows an indirect determination of the nuclear excitation energy.

  18. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with stored, highly-charged ions at FRS-ESR at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2010-08-12

    At the FRS-ESR complex of GSI a nuclear physics program with exotic nuclei has been established in last 18 years, which also addresses key questions and nuclear properties relevant in nuclear astrophysics. The paper summarizes production of exotic nuclei, lifetime studies of highly-charged ions, direct mass measurements and reactions at internal targets. A few comments on the analysis of two-body weak decays are given.

  19. The quest for novel modes of excitation in exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper provides an insight into several open problems in the quest for novel modes of excitation in nuclei with isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite-temperature characteristics in stellar environments. Major unsolved problems include the nature of pygmy dipole resonances, the quest for various multipole and spin-isospin excitations both in neutron-rich and proton drip-line nuclei mainly driven by loosely bound nucleons, excitations in unstable deformed nuclei and evolution of their properties with the shape phase transition. Exotic modes of excitation in nuclei at finite temperatures characteristic of supernova evolution present open problems with a possible impact in modeling astrophysically relevant weak interaction rates. All these issues challenge self-consistent many-body theory frameworks at the frontiers of on-going research, including nuclear energy density functionals, both phenomenological and constrained by the strong interaction physics of QCD, models based on low-momentum two-nucleon interaction Vlow-k and correlated realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction VUCOM, supplemented by three-body force, as well as two-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions derived from the chiral effective field theory. Joined theoretical and experimental efforts, including research with radioactive isotope beams, are needed to provide insight into dynamical properties of nuclei away from the valley of stability, involving the interplay of isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite temperature.

  20. Application of laser technology to exotic veterinary practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clipsham, Robert C.

    1993-07-01

    Exotic veterinary practice has evolved in connection with the importation industry, development of zoological collections and rising private pet ownership to the point that laser technology is in demand. The specific needs of the many species presented for surgical care and the expectations of owners are examined in relationship to the currently understood diseases of exotic animals.

  1. A survey of exotic plants in federal wilderness areas

    Treesearch

    Marilyn Marler

    2000-01-01

    I conducted a survey of wilderness areas to provide an overview of plant invasions in the National Wilderness Preservation System. Fifteen per cent of responding mangers reported that exotic plants were among their top 10 management concerns, either because they are actively dealing with control of exotic pest plants or have prioritized prevention of their...

  2. Exotic meson production in BNL experiment E852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, G. S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J. M.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Brown, D. S.; Cason, N. M.; Chasse, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cummings, J. P.; Danyo, K.; Demianov, A. I.; Denisov, S. P.; Dorofeev, V.; Dowd, J. P.; Eugenio, P.; Fan, X. L.; Gribushin, A. M.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hayek, M.; Hu, J.; Ivanov, E. I.; Joffe, D.; Kachaev, I.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Kodolova, O. L.; Korotkikh, V. L.; Kostin, M. A.; Krenkel, J.; Kuhn, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lo Secco, J. M.; Lu, M.; Manak, J. J.; Nozar, M.; Olchanski, C.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pedlar, T. K.; Popov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Seth, K. K.; Shenhav, N.; Shen, X.; Shephard, W. D.; Sinev, N. B.; Stienike, D. L.; Suh, J. S.; Taegar, S. A.; Tomaradze, A.; Vardanyan, I. N.; Weygand, D. P.; White, D. B.; Willutzki, H. J.; Witkowski, M.; Yershov, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The status of spin-exotic mesons is reviewed. There is now compelling evidence for at least three π1 states between one and two GeV. Preliminary results from the reaction π-p → π+π+π-π-π0p show structure in the exotic waves corresponding to IGJPC = 0-2+-.

  3. Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Throughout this article, the author argued that the attraction of the "exotic" for Gauguin was largely revealed by his response to the women of various locales and that two notions--that of the "feminine" and the "foreign" or exotic--became intertwined for him. She relied both upon the commentary of Britt Salvesen with respect to Gauguin's obvious…

  4. Diseases of Forest Trees: Consequences of Exotic Ecosystems?

    Treesearch

    William J. Otrosina

    1998-01-01

    Much attention is now given to risks and impacts of exotic pest introductions in forest ecosystems. This concern is for good reason because, once introduced, an exotic pathogen or insect encounters little resistance in the native plant population and can produce catastrophic losses in relatively short periods of time. Most native fungal pathogens of forest trees have...

  5. Exotic species patterns and function in urban landscapes

    Treesearch

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2003-01-01

    Mack et al. (2000) state "Biotic invaders are species that establish a new range in which they proliferate, spread, and persist to the detriment of the environment." This statement is true for many natural landscapes. In urban landscapes, however, exotic species are critical components of the landscape and enhance its livability. Exotic species provide...

  6. Rapid detection of exotic Lymantriids and Scolytids pilot study

    Treesearch

    Mary Ellen Dix

    2003-01-01

    Exotic invasive species, inadvertently introduced into North America through importation and travel, are threatening the integrity of North American forest ecosystems. The National Invasive Species Council in their 2001 Strategic Plan identified a collaborative program for early detection, diagnosis and response to high-risk, exotic, invasive insects, pathogens and...

  7. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Treesearch

    P.F. Hendrix; G.H. Baker; M.A. Jr. Callaham; G.A. Damoff; C. Fragoso; G. Gonzalez; S.W. James; S.L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  8. A Theory of Island Biogeography for Exotic Species.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of island biogeography has played a pivotal role in the way ecologists view communities. However, it does not account for exotic species explicitly, which limits its use as a conservation tool. Here, I present the results of a long-term study of plant communities inhabiting an archipelago of small islands off the coast of New Zealand and derive a modified version of the theory of island biogeography to predict differences in the turnover and diversity of native and exotic species. Empirical results showed that, although species richness of both native and exotic plant species increased with island area, native species consistently outnumbered exotic species. Species turnover increased with species richness in both groups. However, opposite to species-area patterns, turnover increased more rapidly with species richness in exotic species. Empirical results were consistent with the modified version of the theory of island biogeography, which distinguishes exotic species from native species by decoupling extinction rates of exotic species from island area, because they are represented by only small populations at the initial stages of invasion. Overall results illustrate how the theory of island biogeography can be modified to reflect the dynamics of exotic species as they invade archipelagos, expanding its use as a conservation tool.

  9. Investigation of the structure of light exotic nuclei by proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Dobrovolsky, A. V. Inglessi, A. G.; Korolev, G. A.; Khanzadeev, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    In order to study the spatial structure of exotic nuclei, it was proposed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) to measure the differential cross section for small-angle proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics. Several experiments in beams of 0.7-GeV/nucleon exotic nuclei were performed at the heavy-ion accelerator facility of GSI (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) by using the IKAR ionization spectrometer developed at PNPI. The IKAR ionization chamber filled with hydrogen at a pressure of 10 bar served simultaneously as a target and as a recoil-proton detector, which measured the recoil-proton energy. The beam-particle scattering angle was also measured. The results obtained for the cross sections in question were analyzed on the basis of the Glauber-Sitenko theory using phenomenological nuclear-density distributions with two free parameters. Nuclear-matter distributions and root-mean-square radii were found for the nuclei under investigation. The size of the halo in the {sup 6}He, {sup 8}He, {sup 11}Li, and {sup 14}Be nuclei was determined among other things. Information about neutron distributions in nuclei was deduced by combining the data obtained here with the known values of the radii of proton distributions. A sizable neutron skin was revealed in the {sup 8}Li, {sup 9}Li, and {sup 12}Be nuclei.

  10. Investigation of the structure of light exotic nuclei by proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Dobrovolsky, A. V.; Inglessi, A. G.; Korolev, G. A.; Khanzadeev, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the spatial structure of exotic nuclei, it was proposed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) to measure the differential cross section for small-angle proton elastic scattering in inverse kinematics. Several experiments in beams of 0.7-GeV/nucleon exotic nuclei were performed at the heavy-ion accelerator facility of GSI (Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) by using the IKAR ionization spectrometer developed at PNPI. The IKAR ionization chamber filled with hydrogen at a pressure of 10 bar served simultaneously as a target and as a recoil-proton detector, which measured the recoil-proton energy. The beam-particle scattering angle was also measured. The results obtained for the cross sections in question were analyzed on the basis of the Glauber-Sitenko theory using phenomenological nuclear-density distributions with two free parameters. Nuclear-matter distributions and root-mean-square radii were found for the nuclei under investigation. The size of the halo in the 6He, 8He, 11Li, and 14Be nuclei was determined among other things. Information about neutron distributions in nuclei was deduced by combining the data obtained here with the known values of the radii of proton distributions. A sizable neutron skin was revealed in the 8Li, 9Li, and 12Be nuclei.

  11. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  12. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  13. Skin diseases of rodents and small exotic mammals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, C; Mori, M

    2001-05-01

    Small exotic mammals and rodents are becoming popular pets in the United States. Like most other exotics, the popularity of these animals has vastly preceded the accumulation of practical husbandry and veterinary information available about them. Several dermatologic conditions have been described in most rodents and small exotic mammals; however, the practitioner can assume that more exist that have not yet been diagnosed or documented. It is not unreasonable to assume that rodents and small exotic mammals could be affected by many of the same dermatologic conditions well described in other animals. Veterinarians are encouraged always to apply the same diagnostic protocols used to work up skin problems in dogs and cats when presented with an exotic pet with a dermatologic disease.

  14. RIB in-flight production and the facility EXOTIC at LNL

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, Marco

    2014-05-09

    The production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) via the In-Flight technique is reviewed. This separation method typically employs four main production mechanisms: (i) Projectile Fragmentation; (ii) Projectile Fission; (iii) Nuclear Fusion and (iv) Direct Processes in Inverse Kinematics. We will concentrate particularly on the last mechanism, the one used by the facility EXOTIC at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) for the production of light RIBs. An extensive description of the facility and a brief overview of the most recent scientific achievements with {sup 7}Be and {sup 17}F are given.

  15. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  16. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G; Woosley, John T; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  17. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  18. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  19. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a ∕LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a∕LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus. PMID:21280890

  20. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constan, Zach

    2010-02-01

    Nuclei are small: if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are dense: the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about nuclear science. But how does one move beyond analogies like those above and offer a better understanding of the extraordinary world of the nucleus? This is the challenge faced by the outreach program at Michigan State University's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a National Science Foundation-supported facility specializing in the creation and study of rare isotopes. It was necessary to devise a model of the nucleus that students could interact with and even use to approximate the nuclear reactions that create exotic nuclei. The solution was to use magnetic marbles.

  1. Study of Isoscalar Giant Resonances in Exotic Nuclei by Means of Inverse Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in exotic nuclei can be studied using inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics. In particular, the compression modes, i.e. isoscalar giant monopole and dipole resonances, are very interesting because they can furnish information on the different terms of the nuclear incompressibility, especially if measured in long isotopic chains including nuclei far from the valley of stability. As beams of exotic nuclei have relatively low intensities thick targets have to be used in order to get a reasonable yield. However, this leads to degradation of the energy resolution and stops low-energy recoil particles. Two good alternatives exist. The first method is to use an active target, such as MAYA, which is a time-projection chamber and therefore can be used for detection of low-energy recoil particles. Furthermore, its thickness can be increased by increasing the length of the detection volume or the gas pressure without severe loss of energy resolution. The second method is to use a storage ring for storing the exotic nuclei, which then interact with target nuclei from a gas-jet target. Here, the luminosity and hence the yield are increased because the exotic nuclei circulate in the ring at a frequency of around 106 turns/s. Low-energy recoil particles traverse the gas-jet with little loss of energy and can be detected in solid-state detectors. Pioneering experiments with both methods have been performed for inelastic scattering of secondary 56Ni beam off helium nuclei. Here, preliminary results of the experiment with the active target MAYA will be presented.

  2. How exotic does an exotic information and education initiative about the impact of non-indigenous species need to be?

    Treesearch

    William F. Hammond

    1998-01-01

    Providing individuals with effective information, programs, and educational materials about "exotics" or non-indigenous species is generally not a very effective way to get people to act to control, eliminate, and restore damage from exotic species to native ecosystems. Information tends to inform the motivated and educated. Educational research and marketing...

  3. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  4. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  5. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  6. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  7. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  8. Structure models: From shell model to ab initio methods. A brief introduction to microscopic theories for exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacca, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A brief review of models to describe nuclear structure and reactions properties is presented, starting from the historical shell model picture and encompassing modern ab initio approaches. A selection of recent theoretical results on observables for exotic light and medium-mass nuclei is shown. Emphasis is given to the comparison with experiment and to what can be learned about three-body forces and continuum properties.

  9. Exotic Higgs decay h→ φ φ → 4b at the LHeC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang; Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2017-07-01

    We study the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson ( h) into a pair of light spin-0 particles (φ ) which subsequently decay and result in a 4 b final state. This channel is well motivated in models with an extended Higgs sector. Instead of searching at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which are beset by large standard model (SM) backgrounds, we investigate this decay channel at the much cleaner Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC). With some simple selection cuts this channel becomes nearly free of background at this ep machine, in sharp contrast to the situation at the (HL-)LHC. With a parton level analysis we show that for the φ mass range [20,60] {{ GeV }}, with 100 {{ fb }^{-1}} luminosity the LHeC is generally capable of constraining C_{4b}^2≡ κ V^2× {Br}(h→ φ φ )× {Br}^2(φ → b\\bar{b}) (κ V denotes the hVV(V=W,Z) coupling strength relative to the SM value) to a few percent level (95% CLs). With 1 {{ ab }^{-1}} luminosity C_{4b}^2 at a few per mille level can be probed. These sensitivities are much better than the HL-LHC performance and demonstrate the important role expected to be played by the LHeC in probing exotic Higgs decay processes, in addition to the already proposed invisible Higgs decay channel.

  10. Exotic Photon Searches at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunsin; collaboration, for the CDF

    2009-10-01

    We present recent results of searches for exotic photons at CDF II. In the first signature-based search, we search for anomalous production of two photons with additional energetic objects. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. In the second analysis, we present a signature-based search for anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy. We find no indications of non-standard model phenomena. Finally, a search for a fermiophobic Higgs in the diphoton final state is presented. Since no evidence of a resonance in the diphoton mass spectrum is observed we exclude this Higgs boson with mass below 106 GeV/c{sup 2} at a 95% confidence level.

  11. EXOTIC PARTICLE SEARCHES WITH STAR AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KANABA,S.

    2004-03-15

    We present preliminary results of the STAR experiment at RHIC on exotic particle searches in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at {radical} s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe a narrow peak at 1734 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 5 MeV in the {lambda}K{sub s}{sup 0} invariant mass with width consistent with the experimental resolution of about 6 MeV within the errors. The statistical significance can be quantified between 3 and 6 {sigma} depending on cuts and methods. If this peak corresponds to a real particle state it would be a candidate for the N{sup 0} or the {Xi}{sup 0} I = 1/2 pentaquark states.

  12. Tropical and exotic dermatoses and ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Deepani; Sinclair, Rodney

    2014-09-01

    Tropical dermatoses and ulcers, although essentially unique to tropical and subtropical areas, are occasionally seen in Australian general practice on returning travellers and migrants from endemic countries. This article will discuss important causes of tropical and exotic ulcers occasionally seen in Australia. As tropical ulcers may mimic many other causes of skin ulceration and nodules, a history of recent travel should arouse clinical suspicion. The time frame since exposure to the causative organism is an important feature in the diagnostic process. For example, pyodermas and cutaneous larva migrans present a few days after contact with the causative agents, whereas leishmaniasis, cutaneous tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial diseases (swimming pool granulomas) and tropical mycosis take weeks to months to appear.

  13. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and non-governmental organization (NGO) partners in the southwest. This project is an ongoing effort to compile and distribute regional data on the occurrence of non-native invasive plants in the southwestern United States. The database represents the known sites (represented by a point location, i.e. site) of non-native invasive plant infestations within Arizona and New Mexico, and adjacent portions of California, Colorado, Nevada and Utah. These data, collected from 1911 to 2006, represent the field observations of various state, federal, tribal and county agencies, along with some specimen data from Herbaria. The SWEMP database comprises a compilation of data submitted through 2006.

  14. Controlling the exotic diseases: 1. Isolation facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, A J; Best, H R

    1980-01-01

    The exotic diseases are highly virulent transmissible conditions that include Lassa fever, some viral hemorrhagic fevers, smallpox and plague. Any of these diseases could be brought into or diagnosed in Canada as the result of natural or laboratory acquired infection. The patients must be isolated until the presumptive diagnosis is proved. High-security isolation is necessary and needs to be backed up by high-security laboratory services. In Canada facilities for high-security isolation are generally not available; therefore, hospitals must preplan and be ready to effect the best possible isolation under the existing conditions. The plan should address construction, ventilation, filtration, temperature and humidity, together with protective measures for staff and careful handling of laboratory specimens. Materials the patient has contacted and areas or vehicles he or she has been in will have to be decontaminated, and appropriate, safe disposal of corpses must be considered. PMID:7437989

  15. Quantum nuclear pasta and nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Schuetrumpf, B.

    2017-05-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries, collectively referred to as "nuclear pasta," are expected to appear naturally in dense nuclear matter found in the crusts of neutron stars and supernovae environments. The pasta geometries depend on the average baryon density, proton fraction, and temperature and are critically important in the determination of many transport properties of matter in supernovae and the crusts of neutron stars. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals, we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0.03 ≤ρ ≤0.10 fm-3 , proton fractions 0.05 ≤Yp≤0.40 , and zero temperature. The full quantum simulations, in particular, allow us to thoroughly investigate the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on pasta configurations. We use the Sky3D code that solves the Skyrme Hartree-Fock equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. For the nuclear interaction we use the state-of-the-art UNEDF1 parametrization, which was introduced to study largely deformed nuclei, hence is suitable for studies of the nuclear pasta. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is simulated by tuning two purely isovector observables that are insensitive to the current available experimental data. We find that a minimum total number of nucleons A =2000 is necessary to prevent the results from containing spurious shell effects and to minimize finite size effects. We find that a variety of nuclear pasta geometries are present in the neutron star crust, and the result strongly depends on the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of the nuclear symmetry energy is less pronounced as the proton fractions increase. Quantum nuclear pasta calculations at T =0 MeV are shown to get easily trapped in metastable states, and possible remedies to avoid metastable solutions are discussed.

  16. The Exotic Exchange of Smoke Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, A. J.

    Smoke rings are fascinating, to humans and animals alike.Experienced cigarette smokers blow them for entertainment while dolphins play with air-filled underwater rings that they know how to puff.~Smoke ring machines can be bought from science gadget shops and Lord Kelvin explains in a paper [Lord Kelvin, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. VI (1867), p. 94; reprinted in Philos. Mag. Vol. XXXIV (1867), p.~15] how one can be constructed from a cardboard box. Even Mount Etna [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/696953.stm] and our Sun [http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast03feb_1.htm] are known to be sources of huge smoke rings. But a smoke ring is not only fun to watch. It is also an organized structure with the ability to engage in complex acts, best exemplified by the leapfrogging motion of two smoke rings. Here we propose that the leapfrogging actually encodes very important Physics: It is a direct three dimensional generalization of the motion that in the two dimensional context is responsible for exotic exchange statistics which rules the properties of structures and materials such as quantum Hall systems and high-temperature superconductors. By employing very simple and universal concepts with roots in the hydrodynamical Euler equation, the universal law that describes the properties of fluids and gases, we argue that three dimensional exotic exchange statistics is commonplace. Our observations could have far reaching consequences in fluids and gases which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, from helium supefluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases and even metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases.

  17. Exotic herbivores directly facilitate the exotic grasses they graze: mechanisms for an unexpected positive feedback between invaders.

    PubMed

    Best, Rebecca J; Arcese, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The ability of an exotic species to establish in a system may depend not only on the invasibility of the native community, but also on its interactions with other exotic species. Though examples of mutually beneficial interactions between exotic species are known, few studies have quantified these effects or identified specific mechanisms. We used the co-invasion of an endangered island ecosystem by exotic Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and nine exotic annual grasses to study the effects of an invading herbivore on the success of invading grasses. On our study islands in southwestern Canada, we found that geese fed selectively on the exotic grasses and avoided native forbs. Counter to current theory suggesting that the grasses should be limited by a selective enemy, however, the grasses increased in proportional abundance under grazing whereas forbs showed declining abundance. Testing potential mechanisms for the effects of grazing on grasses, we found that the grasses produced more stems per area when grazing reduced vegetation height and prevented litter accumulation. Forming dense mats of short stems appeared to be an efficient reproductive and competitive strategy that the Eurasian grasses have evolved in the presence of grazers, conferring a competitive advantage in a system where the native species pool has very few annual grasses and no grazers. Germination trials further demonstrated that selective herbivory by geese enables their dispersal of exotic grass seed between heavily invaded feeding areas and the small islands used for nesting. In summary, the exotic geese facilitated both the local increase and the spatial spread of exotic grasses, which in turn provided the majority of their diet. This unexpected case of positive feedback between exotic species suggests that invasion success may depend on the overall differences between the evolutionary histories of the invaders and the evolutionary history of the native community they enter.

  18. Laser Forced Nuclear Fission as a Spectroscopy tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Although it is widely understood that Heavy Isotopes of Hydrogen can be fused using Lasers (Ultraviolet Lasers, at the National Ignition Facility), it is not commonly known that Uranium and radioactive substances can be forced into Nuclear Fission using Lasers as well. It shows up in some footnotes in the literature surrounding the National Ignition Facility. This author would like to propose that it has a use in the search for Dark Matter and the ferreting out of possible alternative descriptions of Nuclear Processes and the search for the Graviton. This author has previously proposed that there may be two dimensions of time, one being the Clock time that we associate with General Relativity and the other being a Configuration time that we normally associated with Electron Spin. A powerful X-ray laser could be used to probe the composition of the farthest members of our Solar system, such as the composition of Pluto. Experiments should be able to determine if there is exotic matter present in the outer reaches of the Solar system. Further the Lasers should have enough power to more precisely analyze Nuclear Spin in an attempt to determine if it is really related to Classical Angular Momentum. It may yield a more comprehensive theory linking Classical to Quantum Theory.

  19. CORROSION MONITORING IN HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS DESIGN AND DATA FROM 241-AN-102 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    ANDA VS; EDGEMON GL; HAGENSEN AR; BOOMER KD; CAROTHERS KG

    2009-01-08

    In 2008, a new Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) was installed in double-shell tank 241-AN-102 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. Developmental design work included laboratory testing in simulated tank 241-AN-102 waste to evaluate metal performance for installation on the MPCMS as secondary metal reference electrodes. The MPCMS design includes coupon arrays as well as a wired probe which facilitates measurement of tank potential as well as corrosion rate using electrical resistance (ER) sensors. This paper presents the MPCMS design, field data obtained following installation of the MPCMS in tank 241-AN-102, and a comparison between laboratory potential data obtained using simulated waste and tank potential data obtained following field installation.

  20. Ecosystem engineers modulate exotic invasions in riparian plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corenblit, D.; Tabacchi, E.; Steiger, J.; Gonzales, E.; Planty-Tabacchi, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and invasibility of exotic plant species within different environments and at different spatial scales is still being discussed amongst scientists. In this study, patterns of native and exotic plant species richness and cover were examined in relation with ecosystem engineer effects of pioneer vegetation within the active tract of the Mediterranean gravel bed river Tech, South France. The floristic composition was characterized according to two distinct vegetation types corresponding to two habitats with contrasted conditions: (i) open and exposed alluvial bars dominated by herbaceous communities and (ii) islands and river margins partly stabilized by ecosystem engineer plants, disconnected from annual hydrogeomorphic disturbances, and covered by woody vegetation. A significant positive correlation between exotic and native plant species richness and cover was observed for the herbaceous and the woody types, indicating that both native and exotic richness benefit from the prevailing environmental conditions. However, significant differences in native and exotic specific richness and cover were found between these two vegetation types. Higher values of total species richness and Shannon diversity of native and exotic species were attained within the herbaceous vegetation type compared to the woody type. These differences may be related to changes in local exposure to hydrogeomorphic disturbances driven by engineer plant species, and to vegetation succession. A lower exotic cover within the woody vegetation type compared to the herbaceous type suggested an increase of resistance to invasion by exotic species during the biogeomorphic succession. The engineer effects of woody vegetation resulted in a decrease of alpha (α) diversity at patch scale but, in parallel, caused an increase in gamma (γ) diversity at the scale of the studied river segment. Our study corroborates recent investigations that support the theory of biotic

  1. Exotic hadron bound state production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Li, Shi-Yuan; Liu, Yan-Rui; Meng, Lu; Si, Zong-Guo; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2017-08-01

    The non-relativistic wave function framework is applied to study the production and decay of exotic hadrons, which can be effectively described as bound states of other hadrons. Employing the factorized formulation, with the help of event generators, we investigate the production of exotic hadrons in multiproduction processes at high energy hadron colliders. This study provides crucial information for the measurements of the relevant exotic hadrons. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (ZR2014AM016, ZR2016AM16) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275115, 11325525, 11635009)

  2. Causes of exotic bird establishment across oceanic islands

    PubMed Central

    Cassey, Phillip; Blackburn, Tim M; Duncan, Richard P; Gaston, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    The probability that exotic species will successfully establish viable populations varies between regions, for reasons that are currently unknown. Here, we use data for exotic bird introductions to 41 oceanic islands and archipelagos around the globe to test five hypotheses for this variation: the effects of introduction effort, competition, predation, human disturbance and habitat diversity (island biogeography). Our analyses demonstrate the primary importance of introduction effort for avian establishment success across regions, in concordance with previous analyses within regions. However, they also reveal a strong negative interaction across regions between establishment success and predation; exotic birds are more likely to fail on islands with species-rich mammalian predator assemblages. PMID:16191617

  3. The experimental set-up of the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Toniolo, N.; Torresi, D.; Tortone, G.; Anastasio, A.; Bettini, M.; Cassese, C.; Castellani, L.; Corti, D.; Costa, L.; De Fazio, B.; Galet, G.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Pontoriere, G.; Rocco, R.; Romoli, M.; Roscilli, L.; Sandoli, M.; Stroe, L.; Tessaro, M.; Zatti, P. G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the experimental set-up of the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) in-flight facility EXOTIC consisting of: (a) two position-sensitive Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs), dedicated to the event-by-event tracking of the produced RIBs and to time of flight measurements and (b) the new high-granularity compact telescope array EXPADES (EXotic PArticle DEtection System), designed for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments employing low-energy light RIBs. EXPADES consists of eight ΔE -Eres telescopes arranged in a cylindrical configuration around the target. Each telescope is made up of two Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) with a thickness of 40/60 μm and 300 μm for the ΔE and Eres layer, respectively. Additionally, eight ionization chambers were constructed to be used as an alternative ΔE stage or, in conjunction with the entire DSSSD array, to build up more complex triple telescopes. New low-noise multi-channel charge-sensitive preamplifiers and spectroscopy amplifiers, associated with constant fraction discriminators, peak-and-hold and Time to Amplitude Converter circuits were developed for the electronic readout of the ΔE stage. Application Specific Integrated Circuit-based electronics was employed for the treatment of the Eres signals. An 8-channel, 12-bit multi-sampling 50 MHz Analog to Digital Converter, a Trigger Supervisor Board for handling the trigger signals of the whole experimental set-up and an ad hoc data acquisition system were also developed. The performance of the PPACs, EXPADES and of the associated electronics was obtained offline with standard α calibration sources and in-beam by measuring the scattering process for the systems 17O+58Ni and 17O+208Pb at incident energies around their respective Coulomb barriers and, successively, during the first experimental runs with the RIBs of the EXOTIC facility.

  4. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, R. A.; Cohen, T. D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, J. J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, R. F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; Pennington, M. R.; Peters, K.; Richard, J. M.; Shen, C. P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (Cohen); the Institute of Modern Physics and Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract Y104160YQ0 and agreement No. 2015-BH-02 (Coito); the U.S. Department of Energy, for grant DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, manages and operates Jefferson Laboratory and DE-SC0006765, Early Career award (Dudek); Fermilab, operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract number DEAC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy (Eichten); BMBF, under contract No. 06GI7121, and the DAAD under contract No. 56889822 and by the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR within the LOEWE program of the State of Hesse (Fischer); the German Research Foundation DFG under contract number Collaborative Research Centre CRC-1044 (Gradl); the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq, Grant No. 305894/2009-9 and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, Grant No. 2013/01907-0 (Krein); U.S. National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1068286 and PHY-1403891 (Lebed); the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development under grant CNPq/CAPES-208188/2014-2 (Machado); U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-05ER41374

  5. Recent developments in the eikonal description of the breakup of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capel, P.; Colomer, F.; Esbensen, H.; Fukui, T.; Johnson, R. C.; Nunes, F. M.; Ogata, K.

    2016-06-01

    The study of exotic nuclear structures, such as halo nuclei, is usually performed through nuclear reactions. An accurate reaction model coupled to a realistic description of the projectile is needed to correctly interpret experimental data. In this contribution, I briefly summarise the assumptions made within the modelling of reactions involving halo nuclei. I describe briefly the Continuum-Discretised Coupled Channel method (CDCC) and the Dynamical Eikonal Approximation (DEA) in particular and present a comparison between them for the breakup of 15C on Pb at 68AMeV. I show the problem faced by the eikonal approximation at low energy and detail a correction that enables its extension down to lower beam energies. A new reaction observable is also presented. It consists of the ratio between angular distributions for two different processes, such as elastic scattering and breakup. This ratio is completely independent of the reaction mechanism and hence is more sensitive to the projectile structure than usual reaction observables, which makes it a very powerful tool to study exotic structures far from stability.

  6. Bio-Invasions: The Spread of Exotic Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Human mobility has radically increased the rate at which large numbers of living things are moving from one ecosystem to another. Discusses how ecosystems change when "exotic" species invade natural communities and notes efforts to control adverse effects. (LZ)

  7. Exotic grasslands on reclaimed midwestern coal mines: An ornithological perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.E.; Lima, S.L.

    2004-07-01

    The largest grasslands in Indiana and Illinois are on reclaimed surface coal mines, which are numerous in the Illinois Coal Basin. The reclamation goal of establishing a vegetation cover with inexpensive, hardy exotic grass species (e.g., tall fescue, smooth brome) inadvertently created persistent, large grassland bird refuges. We review research documenting the importance of these sites for native prairie birds. On mines, grassland specialist birds (restricted to grassland throughout their range) prefer sites dominated by exotic grasses to those rich in forbs, whereas nonspecialist bird species show no significant preference. Midwestern mine grasslands potentially could be converted into landscapes that include native warm-season grasses and forbs adapted to the relatively dry, poor soil conditions, in addition to the present successful exotic grass stands. A key question is whether native mixtures will resist conversion to forb-rich or woody growth over the long term, as the exotic grasses have done.

  8. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Riccioni, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond-Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana-Weyl spinor of O (D , D). Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor-spinor of O (D , D) is determined. This tensor-spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-)duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O (D , D) to GL (D), one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  9. Bio-Invasions: The Spread of Exotic Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Human mobility has radically increased the rate at which large numbers of living things are moving from one ecosystem to another. Discusses how ecosystems change when "exotic" species invade natural communities and notes efforts to control adverse effects. (LZ)

  10. Novel features of nuclear chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-03-01

    I review a number of QCD topics where the nuclear environment provides new insights into fundamental aspects of the strong interactions. The topics include novel perspectives for nuclear physics, such as the hidden color of nuclear form factors, the relation of the nuclear force at short distances to quark interchange interactions, the effects of "color transparency" on the baryon-to-meson anomaly in hard heavy-ion colisions, flavor-dependent antishadowing, novel exotic multiquark states, the anomalous nuclear dependence of quarkonium hadroproduction, flavor-dependent antishadowing, and the breakdown of sum rules for nuclear structure functions. I also briefly discuss the insights into hadron physics and color confinement that one obtains from light-front holography, including supersymmetric features of the hadron spectrum. I also note that the virtual Compton amplitude on a proton (or nucleus) can be measured for two spacelike photons q21, q22 < 0 using positronium-proton scattering [e+e-]p→ e+e-p'.

  11. Fecal shedding of Salmonella in exotic felids.

    PubMed

    Clyde, V L; Ramsay, E C; Bemis, D A

    1997-06-01

    Two collections of exotic felids were screened for the presence of Salmonella by selective fecal culture utilizing selenite broth and Hektoen enteric agar. In > 90% of the samples, Salmonella was isolated from a single culture. A commercial horsemeat-based diet was fed in both collections, and one collection also was fed raw chicken. Salmonella was cultured from the raw chicken and the horsemeat diet for both collections. Multiple Salmonella serotypes were identified, with S. typhimurium and S. typhimurium (copenhagen) isolated most frequently. Approximately half of the Salmonella isolates demonstrated multiple antibiotic resistance. The ability to harbor Salmonella as normal nonpathogenic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract may be a physiological adaptation to carnivory. The high rate of fecal shedding of Salmonella in healthy individuals clouds the interpretation of a positive fecal culture in an ill felid, or one with diarrhea. All zoo employees having contact with cat feces or raw diets have a high rate of occupational exposure to Salmonella and should exercise appropriate hygienic precautions.

  12. Exotic differentiable structures and general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brans, Carl H.; Randall, Duane

    1993-02-01

    We review recent developments in differential topology with special concern for their possible significance to physical theories, especially general relativity. In particular we are concerned here with the discovery of the existence of non-standard (“fake” or “exotic”) differentiable structures on topologically simple manifolds such asS 7, ℝ4 andS 3 X ℝ1. Because of the technical difficulties involved in the smooth case, we begin with an easily understood toy example looking at the role which the choice of complex structures plays in the formulation of two-dimensional vacuum electrostatics. We then briefly review the mathematical formalisms involved with differentiable structures on topological manifolds, diffeomorphisms and their significance for physics. We summarize the important work of Milnor, Freedman, Donaldson, and others in developing exotic differentiable structures on well known topological manifolds. Finally, we discuss some of the geometric implications of these results and propose some conjectures on possible physical implications of these new manifolds which have never before been considered as physical models.

  13. Controlling the exotic diseases: 2. Nursing management.

    PubMed Central

    Best, H R; Clayton, A J

    1980-01-01

    Advance planning can facilitate the care of a patient with an exotic disease who is admitted to a hospital that lacks facilities for high-security isolation. The Department of National Health and Welfare contingency plan for dealing with such patients lacks specific information in a number of areas of medical care, as described in this paper. Consideration must be given to the number of personnel trained and readied for employment, the criteria for selection and special preparation. The protective clothing generally used for hospital isolation procedures is inadequate. Several types of special clothing, including a respirator, are available for total protection of personnel; the clothing may be uncomfortable when worn for long periods, and does restrict movement, vision and communication. All persons entering the isolation suite must change into fully protective clothing, and double layers of clothing are required for direct patient care. All personnel must shower and change before leaving the isolation suite. Suitable facilities for dressing and showering, together with entry and exit routines, must be considered. Hand washing, daily cleaning procedures and disposal of liquid and solid wastes all require special procedures. The social and psychologic problems of patients and their families must also be considered. Preplanning is required to decrease the risks involved in monitoring vital signs and implementing emergency procedures requiring contact with the patient's blood. Images FIG. 1 PMID:7437990

  14. Exotic colored scalars at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Frugiuele, Claudia; Nir, Yosef

    2017-02-01

    We study the phenomenology of exotic color-triplet scalar particles X with charge | Q| = 2 /3 , 4 /3 , 5 /3 , 7 /3 , 8 /3 and 10 /3. If X is an SU(2) W -non-singlet, mass splitting within the multiplet allows for cascade decays of the members into the lightest state. We study examples where the lightest state, in turn, decays into a three-body W ± jj final state, and show that in such case the entire multiplet is compatible with indirect precision tests and with direct collider searches for continuum pair production of X down to m X ˜ 250 GeV. However, bound states S, made of XX † pairs at m S ≈ 2 m X , form under rather generic conditions and their decay to diphoton can be the first discovery channel of the model. Furthermore, for SU(2) W -non-singlets, the mode S → W + W - may be observable and the width of S → γγ and S → jj may appear large as a consequence of mass splittings within the X-multiplet. As an example we study in detail the case of an SU(2) W -quartet, finding that m X ≃ 450 GeV is allowed by all current searches.

  15. Highly excited and exotic meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-05-01

    I will discuss recent progress in extracting highly excited and exotic meson spectra using lattice QCD. New results in the light meson sector will be presented, where a combination of techniques have enabled us to confidently identify the spin of extracted states. Highlights include many states with exotic quantum numbers and, for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation, spin-four states. I will conclude with comments on future prospects.

  16. Pond permanence and the effects of exotic vertebrates on anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    In many permanent ponds throughout western North America, the introduction of a variety of exotic fish and bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) correlates with declines in native amphibians. Direct effects of exotics are suspected to be responsible for the rarity of some native amphibians and are one hypothesis to explain the prevalence of amphibian declines in western North America. However, the prediction that the permanent ponds occupied by exotics would be suitable for native amphibians if exotics were absent has not been tested. I used a series of enclosure experiments to test whether survival of northern red-legged frog (Rana aurora aurora) and Pacific treefrog (Hyla regilla) larvae is equal in permanent and temporary ponds in the Puget Lowlands, Washington State, USA. I also examined the direct effects of bullfrog larvae and sunfish. Survival of both species of native anuran larvae was generally lower in permanent ponds. Only one permanent pond out of six was an exception to this pattern and exhibited increased larval survival rates in the absence of direct effects by exotics. The presence of fish in enclosures reduced survival to near zero for both native species. An effect of bullfrog larvae on Pacific treefrog larval survival was not detected, but effects on red-legged frog larvae were mixed. A hypothesis that food limitation is responsible for the low survival of native larvae in some permanent ponds was not supported. My results confirm that direct negative effects of exotic vertebrates on native anurans occur but suggest that they may not be important to broad distribution patterns. Instead, habitat gradients or indirect effects of exotics appear to play major roles. I found support for the role of permanence as a structuring agent for pond communities in the Puget Lowlands, but neither permanence nor exotic vertebrates fully explained the observed variability in larval anuran survival.

  17. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  18. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-04-15

    An exotic Bañados–Teitelboim–Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are “dumb”, which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  19. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinhart, Daniel P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstone's grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  20. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinhart, D.P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstones grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  1. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-04-01

    An exotic Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are "dumb", which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  2. Rotation and shape changes in Tb151 and Pb196: Probes of nuclear structure and tunneling process in warm nuclei. I. Experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, S.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Mason, P.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchêne, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Castoldi, M.; Herskind, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Zuber, K.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2009-06-01

    The γ decay associated with the warm rotation of the superdeformed nuclei Tb151 and Pb196 has been measured with the Euroball IV array. Several experimental quantities are presented, putting strong constraints on the decay dynamics in the superdeformed well. The data are successfully reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation of the γ decay based on microscopically calculated energy levels, E2 decay probabilities, collective mass parameters, and potential energy barriers between the wells associated with normal and super deformation. This allows one to test the basic ingredients of the physical process, such as the strength of the two-body residual interaction and the potential barriers as a function of spin and excitation energy. We also show that the data probe the E1 strength function, indicating an enhancement around 1-2 MeV γ rays, which might be related to octupole vibrations.

  3. Rotation and shape changes in {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb: Probes of nuclear structure and tunneling process in warm nuclei. I. Experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Million, B.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Mason, P.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Kmiecik, M.

    2009-06-15

    The {gamma} decay associated with the warm rotation of the superdeformed nuclei {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb has been measured with the Euroball IV array. Several experimental quantities are presented, putting strong constraints on the decay dynamics in the superdeformed well. The data are successfully reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation of the {gamma} decay based on microscopically calculated energy levels, E2 decay probabilities, collective mass parameters, and potential energy barriers between the wells associated with normal and super deformation. This allows one to test the basic ingredients of the physical process, such as the strength of the two-body residual interaction and the potential barriers as a function of spin and excitation energy. We also show that the data probe the E1 strength function, indicating an enhancement around 1-2 MeV {gamma} rays, which might be related to octupole vibrations.

  4. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentration in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.

  5. 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance study of pitch-based activated carbon modified by air oxidation/pyrolysis cycles: a new approach to probe the micropore size.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin V; Py, Xavier; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Lapina, Olga B; Fraissard, Jacques

    2006-02-23

    (129)Xe NMR has been used to study a series of homologous activated carbons obtained from a KOH-activated pitch-based carbon molecular sieve modified by air oxidation/pyrolysis cycles. A clear correlation between the pore size of microporous carbons and the (129)Xe NMR of adsorbed xenon is proposed for the first time. The virial coefficient delta(Xe)(-)(Xe) arising from binary xenon collisions varied linearly with the micropore size and appeared to be a better probe of the microporosity than the chemical shift extrapolated to zero pressure. This correlation was explained by the fact that the xenon collision frequency increases with increasing micropore size. The chemical shift has been shown to vary very little with temperature (less than 9 ppm) for xenon trapped inside narrow and wide micropores. This is indicative of a smooth xenon-surface interaction potential.

  6. Search for millisecond pulsars at the GMRT and the exotic discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaswati Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati

    There are, arguably, no other astronomical object whose discovery and subsequent studies provides more insight in such a rich variety of physics and astrophysics than the millisecond pulsars (MSPs). MSPs are a small sub-class of pulsars, rotating with periods of only a few milliseconds and due to their extraordinary rotational stability, MSPs can be considered as astrophysical clocks. The search for such exotic objects will not only enhance the MSP population, but will also allow much wider probe to explore their evolutionary history. We have discovered six MSPs with much diverse characteristics at the positions of Fermi LAT unassociated sources using the GMRT. Being the first galactic disk millisecond pulsars discovered at the GMRT, these discoveries are very important scientific achievement from India and illustrate the importance of low-frequency search for nearby millisecond pulsars. The discovery of these precise astrophysical clocks demands much finer grid in search phase space, which is completely driven by the number crunching capability of the High Performance Compute engine. The discoveries of binary MSPs in exotic evolutionary phases demands complete 3-D search. For example, 7.5 Tflops of compute power is used for the discovery of a very compact binary MSP, a Black Widow pulsar. This pulsar eclipses for about 13% of its orbit by a very low-mass companion (0.017 M_{⊙}). Such Black Widow pulsars are missing link between the isolated and fully recycled pulsars, where the pulsar is ablating its companion creating significant amount of intra-binary material to obscure the pulsar emission. Radio timing ephemeris allowed us to detect the gamma-ray pulsations from this millisecond pulsar. The details of the GMRT discoveries, the interesting results from our observations and the possible scientific impact of the discoveries of such exotic systems will be illustrated in this presentation.

  7. 2 Novel DNP-NMR Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, R. A.; Hall, R. A.; Jurkiewicz, A.; Lock, H.; Maciel, G. E.

    In solids containing both unpaired electrons and nuclear spins, the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique can be applied to enhance the NMR signal. DNP requires irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency, and in this paper two probes are described to achieve this goal. Two new DNP probes were designed for electromagnets operating at a field of 1.4 T. In one probe, DNP can be combined with CPMAS. Compared to a similar probe reported previously, the main advantage of the new probe is the capability to spin vacuum-sealed samples with an improved filling factor. A second probe is based on an oversize microwave cavity. In this probe, large DNP enhancement factors can be obtained in nonlossy samples, e.g., a 1H enhancement factor of 260 for doped polystyrene.

  8. Investigation of the nuclear structure of 33Al through beta-decay of 33Mg to probe the island of inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidar, Tammy; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Away from the valley of stability, some nuclei have been found to have ground state properties that are different than those naively expected from the nuclear shell model. Around the ``island of inversion'', N = 20 closed shell nucleus 32Mg has large ground state deformations occur in association with intruder configurations from the f7 / 2 shell. The nuclear structure of transitional nuclei, in which the normal and intruder configurations compete, can be used to inform theoretical models used to explain the inversion mechanism. 32Mg is known to have a deformed ground-state configuration, while 34Si displays a normal one. In the present work we studied the intermediate 33Al through the β-decay of 33Mg to clarify conflicting previous results regarding its structure. 33Mg was delivered to the GRIFFIN high-purity germanium γ-ray spectrometer coupled with the SCEPTAR plastic scintillator β particle detector. High efficiency of the GRIFFIN detector provides new γ- γ coincidences to elucidate the excited state structure of 33Al, and its capability to detect weak transitions has provided β-decay branching ratios for the 33Mg -> 33Al -> 33Si decay chain. The Canadian Foundation for Innovation, The National Research Council of Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  9. Fluorinated vitamin b(12) analogs are cofactors of corrinoid-dependent enzymes: a f-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance probe for identifying corrinoid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kerssebaum, R; Nexø, E

    1993-02-01

    The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesized the vitamin B(12) analog phenolyl cobamide or 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide when the methanol medium of growing cells was supplemented with 10 mM phenol or 5 mM 4-fluorophenol. Phenol and, presumably, 4-fluorophenol were specifically incorporated into these cobamides, since phenol was not metabolized significantly into amino acids or into acetic acid, the product of the catabolism. The phenol-containing cobamides contributed up to 90% of the protein-bound cobamides of the 1,300 to 1,900 nmol of corrinoid per g of dry cell material formed. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide exhibited a resonance near 30 ppm. An additional signal emerged at 25 ppm when 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide was investigated as the cofactor of a corrinoid-dependent protein. The two resonances indicated distinct cofactor arrangements within the protein's active site. A 5-ppm high-field shift change suggested van der Waal's interactions between the fluorinated nucleotide of the cofactor and adjacent amino acid residues of the enzyme. Similarly, Propionibacterium freudenreichii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum synthesized 5-fluorobenzimidazolyl cobamide. The human corrinoid binders intrinsic factor, transcobalamin, and haptocorrin recognized this corrinoid like vitamin B(12). Hence, it is possible to use F-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analyses of protein-bound cobamides.

  10. Fluorinated Vitamin B12 Analogs Are Cofactors of Corrinoid-Dependent Enzymes: a 19F-Labeled Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for Identifying Corrinoid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stupperich, Erhard; Eisinger, Hans-Jürgen; Kerssebaum, Rainer; Nexø, Ebba

    1993-01-01

    The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesized the vitamin B12 analog phenolyl cobamide or 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide when the methanol medium of growing cells was supplemented with 10 mM phenol or 5 mM 4-fluorophenol. Phenol and, presumably, 4-fluorophenol were specifically incorporated into these cobamides, since phenol was not metabolized significantly into amino acids or into acetic acid, the product of the catabolism. The phenol-containing cobamides contributed up to 90% of the protein-bound cobamides of the 1,300 to 1,900 nmol of corrinoid per g of dry cell material formed. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide exhibited a resonance near 30 ppm. An additional signal emerged at 25 ppm when 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide was investigated as the cofactor of a corrinoid-dependent protein. The two resonances indicated distinct cofactor arrangements within the protein's active site. A 5-ppm high-field shift change suggested van der Waal's interactions between the fluorinated nucleotide of the cofactor and adjacent amino acid residues of the enzyme. Similarly, Propionibacterium freudenreichii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum synthesized 5-fluorobenzimidazolyl cobamide. The human corrinoid binders intrinsic factor, transcobalamin, and haptocorrin recognized this corrinoid like vitamin B12. Hence, it is possible to use 19F-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analyses of protein-bound cobamides. PMID:16348877

  11. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    PubMed

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  12. Nuclear spins, magnetic moments, and quadrupole moments of Cu isotopes from N=28 to N=46: Probes for core polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vingerhoets, P.; Avgoulea, M.; Bissell, M. L.; De Rydt, M.; Neyens, G.; Flanagan, K. T.; Billowes, J.; Cheal, B.; Mane, E.; Blaum, K.; Schug, M.; Brown, B. A.; Forest, D. H.; Tungate, G.; Geppert, Ch.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Honma, M.; Kowalska, M.; Kraemer, J.; Krieger, A.

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of the ground-state nuclear spins and magnetic and quadrupole moments of the copper isotopes from {sup 61}Cu up to {sup 75}Cu are reported. The experiments were performed at the CERN online isotope mass separator (ISOLDE) facility, using the technique of collinear laser spectroscopy. The trend in the magnetic moments between the N=28 and N=50 shell closures is reasonably reproduced by large-scale shell-model calculations starting from a {sup 56}Ni core. The quadrupole moments reveal a strong polarization of the underlying Ni core when the neutron shell is opened, which is, however, strongly reduced at N=40 due to the parity change between the pf and g orbits. No enhanced core polarization is seen beyond N=40. Deviations between measured and calculated moments are attributed to the softness of the {sup 56}Ni core and weakening of the Z=28 and N=28 shell gaps.

  13. Ultrafast photo-induced nuclear relaxation of a conformationally disordered conjugated polymer probed with transient absorption and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjian; Donohoo-Vallett, Paul J; Zhou, Jiawang; Bragg, Arthur E

    2014-07-28

    A combination of transient absorption (TAS) and femtosecond stimulated Raman (FSRS) spectroscopies were used to interrogate the photo-induced nuclear relaxation dynamics of poly(3-cyclohexyl,4-methylthiophene) (PCMT). The large difference in inter-ring dihedral angles of ground and excited-state PCMT make it an ideal candidate for studying large-amplitude vibrational relaxation associated with exciton trapping. Spectral shifting in the S1 TA spectra on sub-ps timescales (110 ± 20 and 800 ± 100 fs) is similar to spectroscopic signatures of excited-state relaxation observed with related photoexcited conjugated polymers and which have been attributed to exciton localization and a combination of resonant energy transfer and torsional relaxation, respectively. Measurements made with both techniques reveal fast PCMT S1 decay and triplet formation (τS1 = 25-32 ps), which is similar to the excited-state dynamics of short oligothiophenes and highly twisted polyconjugated molecules. On ultrafast timescales FSRS of S1 PCMT offers a new perspective on the nuclear dynamics that underlie localization of excitons in photoexcited conjugated polymers: Spectral dynamics in the C=C stretching region (1400-1600 cm(-1)) include a red-shift of the in-phase C=C stretching frequency, as well as a change in the relative intensity of in-phase and out-of-phase stretch intensities on a timescale of ∼100 fs. Both changes indicate an ultrafast vibrational distortion that increases the conjugation length in the region of the localized excitation and are consistent with exciton self-localization or trapping. Wavelength-dependent excited-state FSRS measurements further demonstrate that the C=C stretching frequency provides a useful spectroscopic handle for interrogating the degree of delocalization in excited conjugated polymers given the selectivity achieved via resonance enhancement.

  14. Ultrafast photo-induced nuclear relaxation of a conformationally disordered conjugated polymer probed with transient absorption and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenjian; Donohoo-Vallett, Paul J.; Zhou, Jiawang; Bragg, Arthur E.

    2014-07-28

    A combination of transient absorption (TAS) and femtosecond stimulated Raman (FSRS) spectroscopies were used to interrogate the photo-induced nuclear relaxation dynamics of poly(3-cyclohexyl,4-methylthiophene) (PCMT). The large difference in inter-ring dihedral angles of ground and excited-state PCMT make it an ideal candidate for studying large-amplitude vibrational relaxation associated with exciton trapping. Spectral shifting in the S{sub 1} TA spectra on sub-ps timescales (110 ± 20 and 800 ± 100 fs) is similar to spectroscopic signatures of excited-state relaxation observed with related photoexcited conjugated polymers and which have been attributed to exciton localization and a combination of resonant energy transfer and torsional relaxation, respectively. Measurements made with both techniques reveal fast PCMT S{sub 1} decay and triplet formation (τ{sub S1} = 25–32 ps), which is similar to the excited-state dynamics of short oligothiophenes and highly twisted polyconjugated molecules. On ultrafast timescales FSRS of S{sub 1} PCMT offers a new perspective on the nuclear dynamics that underlie localization of excitons in photoexcited conjugated polymers: Spectral dynamics in the C=C stretching region (1400–1600 cm{sup −1}) include a red-shift of the in-phase C=C stretching frequency, as well as a change in the relative intensity of in-phase and out-of-phase stretch intensities on a timescale of ∼100 fs. Both changes indicate an ultrafast vibrational distortion that increases the conjugation length in the region of the localized excitation and are consistent with exciton self-localization or trapping. Wavelength-dependent excited-state FSRS measurements further demonstrate that the C=C stretching frequency provides a useful spectroscopic handle for interrogating the degree of delocalization in excited conjugated polymers given the selectivity achieved via resonance enhancement.

  15. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  16. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% δ-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M 23C 6 type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  17. Coherent nuclear wavepacket motions in ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer: sub-30-fs resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline in solution.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2005-11-17

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (10-HBQ) and the associated coherent nuclear motion were investigated in solution by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Sub-picosecond transient absorption measurements revealed spectral features of the stimulated emission and absorption of the keto excited state (the product of the reaction). The stimulated emission band appeared in the 600-800-nm region, corresponding to the wavelength region of the steady-state keto fluorescence. It showed successive temporal changes with time constants of 350 fs and 8.3 ps and then disappeared with the lifetime of the keto excited state (260 ps). The spectral feature of the stimulated emission changed in the 350-fs dynamics, which was likely assignable to the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in the keto excited state. The 8.3-ps change caused a spectral blue shift and was attributed to the vibrational cooling process. The excited-state absorption was observed in the 400-600-nm region, and it also showed temporal changes characterized by the 350-fs and 8.3-ps components. To examine the coherent nuclear dynamics (nuclear wavepacket motion) in excited-state 10-HBQ, we carried out pump-probe measurements of the stimulated emission and absorption signals with time resolution as good as 27 fs. The obtained data showed substantially modulated signals due to the excited-state vibrational coherence up to a delay time of several picoseconds after photoexcitation. This means that the vibrational coherence created by photoexcitation in the enol excited state is transferred to the product. Fourier transform analysis indicated that four frequency components in the 200-700-cm(-1) region contribute to the oscillatory signal, corresponding to the coherent nuclear motions in excited-state 10-HBQ. Especially, the lowest-frequency mode at 242 cm(-1) is dephased significantly faster than the other three modes. This observation was

  18. Nuclear exoticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  19. Nuclear exoticism

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-15

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  20. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  1. Search for exotic spin-dependent interactions with a spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    DOE PAGES

    Chu, Pinghan; Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich

    2016-08-15

    We propose a novel experimental approach to explore exotic spin-dependent interactions using a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer, the most sensitive noncryogenic magnetic-field sensor. This approach studies the interactions between optically polarized electron spins located inside a vapor cell of the SERF magnetometer and unpolarized or polarized particles of external solid-state objects. The coupling of spin-dependent interactions to the polarized electron spins of the magnetometer induces the tilt of the electron spins, which can be detected with high sensitivity by a probe laser beam similarly as an external magnetic field. Lastly, we estimate that by moving unpolarized or polarized objects nextmore » to the SERF Rb vapor cell, the experimental limit to the spin-dependent interactions can be significantly improved over existing experiments, and new limits on the coupling strengths can be set in the interaction range below 10–2 m.« less

  2. Search for exotic spin-dependent interactions with a spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Pinghan; Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich

    2016-08-15

    We propose a novel experimental approach to explore exotic spin-dependent interactions using a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer, the most sensitive noncryogenic magnetic-field sensor. This approach studies the interactions between optically polarized electron spins located inside a vapor cell of the SERF magnetometer and unpolarized or polarized particles of external solid-state objects. The coupling of spin-dependent interactions to the polarized electron spins of the magnetometer induces the tilt of the electron spins, which can be detected with high sensitivity by a probe laser beam similarly as an external magnetic field. Lastly, we estimate that by moving unpolarized or polarized objects next to the SERF Rb vapor cell, the experimental limit to the spin-dependent interactions can be significantly improved over existing experiments, and new limits on the coupling strengths can be set in the interaction range below 10–2 m.

  3. Search for exotic spin-dependent interactions with a spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Pinghan; Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich

    2016-08-15

    We propose a novel experimental approach to explore exotic spin-dependent interactions using a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer, the most sensitive noncryogenic magnetic-field sensor. This approach studies the interactions between optically polarized electron spins located inside a vapor cell of the SERF magnetometer and unpolarized or polarized particles of external solid-state objects. The coupling of spin-dependent interactions to the polarized electron spins of the magnetometer induces the tilt of the electron spins, which can be detected with high sensitivity by a probe laser beam similarly as an external magnetic field. Lastly, we estimate that by moving unpolarized or polarized objects next to the SERF Rb vapor cell, the experimental limit to the spin-dependent interactions can be significantly improved over existing experiments, and new limits on the coupling strengths can be set in the interaction range below 10–2 m.

  4. Exotic Bbb R4 and quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten; Mader, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Recent work on exotic smooth Bbb R4,s, i.e. topological Bbb R4 with exotic differential structure, shows the connection of 4-exotics with the codimension-1 foliations of S3, SU(2) WZW models and twisted K-theory KH(S3), H in H3(S3,Bbb Z). These results made it possible to explicate some physical effects of exotic 4-smoothness. Here we present a relation between exotic smooth Bbb R4 and operator algebras. The correspondence uses the leaf space of the codimension-1 foliation of S3 inducing a von Neumann algebra W(S3) as description. This algebra is a type III1 factor lying at the heart of any observable algebra of QFT. By using the relation to factor II, we showed that the algebra W(S3) can be interpreted as Drinfeld-Turaev deformation quantization of the space of flat SL(2, Bbb C) connections (or holonomies). Thus, we obtain a natural relation to quantum field theory. Finally we discuss the appearance of concrete action functionals for fermions or gauge fields and its connection to quantum-field-theoretical models like the Tree QFT of Rivasseau.

  5. A Large Sample Volume Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for In-Situ Investigations with Constant Flow of Reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Sears, Jesse A.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ford, Joseph J.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Kake; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Hoyt, David W.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-02-21

    A large-sample-volume constant-flow magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR probe is reported for in-situ studies of the reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions. In our approach, the reactants are introduced into the catalyst bed using a fixed tube at one end of the MAS rotor while a second fixed tube, linked to a vacuum pump, is attached at the other end of the rotor. The pressure difference between both ends of the catalyst bed inside the sample cell space forces the reactants flowing through the catalyst bed, which improves the diffusion of the reactants and products. This design allows the use of a large sample volume for enhanced sensitivity and thus permitting in-situ 13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance. As an example of application, we show that reactants, products and reaction transition states associated with the 2-butanol dehydration reaction over a mesoporous silicalite supported heteropoly acid catalyst (HPA/meso-silicalite-1) can all be detected in a single 13C CF-MAS NMR spectrum at natural abundance. Coke products can also be detected at natural 13C abundance and under the stopped flow condition. Furthermore, 1H CF-MAS NMR is used to identify the surface functional groups of HPA/meso-silicalite-1 under the condition of in-situ drying . We also show that the reaction dynamics of 2-butanol dehydration using HPA/meso-silicalite-1 as a catalyst can be explored using 1H CF-MAS NMR.

  6. Detection of irradiation embrittlement of low-alloy steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels using a probe type eddy current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noriyoshi; Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Sugibayashi, Takuya; Kohno, Katsumi

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the results of studies made for the purpose of detecting the irradiation embrittlement of low-alloy steel used for nuclear reactor pressure vessels. For the method of using eddy current to detect material degradation, the device and the sensor employed are light in weight and compact in size, allowing testing without contact. In this study the frequency of input current to the excitation coil is changed in steps of 1 kHz. The output signal is processed by phase detection method, and displayed on a complex plane. It depicts a trajectory as the frequency is changed. To extract features of the trajectories, averaged radius and averaged phase angle are defined and plotted as function of neutron fluence or ductile-brittle transition temperature. Experiment shows that the averaged phase angle and transition temperature decrease as the neutron fluence is increased. Behavior of the averaged phase angle is interpreted employing magnetic permeability and electric conductivity of the test specimens. It becomes clear that electric conductivity decreases as the neutron fluence is increased.

  7. Highly sensitive detection of neodymium ion in small amount of spent nuclear fuel samples using novel fluorescent macrocyclic hexadentate polyaminocarboxylate probe in capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shingo; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Haraga, Tomoko; Nakano, Yuta; Asai, Shiho; Kameo, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Shibukawa, Masami

    2012-04-06

    A rapid and high-sensitive detection method for the total concentration of Nd ion (total Nd) in a small amount of a spent nuclear fuel sample is urgently required since the precise quantification of total Nd ion makes it possible for burnup (degree of fuel consumption) to be determined. In this work, a capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescent detection method (CE-LIF) is proposed for the analysis of total Nd in a spent fuel sample solution, with the use of a newly synthesized metal fluorescent probe which has a fluorescein and a macrocylic hexadentate chelating group, FTC-ABNOTA, for lanthanide (Ln) ions. Ln ions were derivatized to form a strongly fluorescent complex with the probe to suppress the quenching of the ligand-centered emission. The detection of Ln complexes in the CE-LIF indicated that the interaction between Ln ions and the FTC-ABNOTA was strong enough not to dissociate during migration. The mutual separation among the Ln-FTC-ABNOTA complexes in CE-LIF was achieved by pH control providing a dynamic ternary complexation (DTC) with hydroxide ions. Using the DTC separation mode, a high resolution of Nd from other Ln ions with high resolution of 1.3-1.9 and a theoretical plate number of 68,000, and a very low detection limit of 22 pM (3.2 ppt, 0.11 attomole amount basis) were successfully obtained. A simulated spent fuel sample containing various metal ions was examined in this method with a good quantification result of 102.1% recovery obtained even with a large excess of U.

  8. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    PubMed

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization.

  9. Probing the Residual Structure of the Low Populated Denatured State of ADA2h under Folding Conditions by Relaxation Dispersion Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pustovalova, Yulia; Kukic, Predrag; Vendruscolo, Michele; Korzhnev, Dmitry M

    2015-08-04

    The structural characterization of low populated states of proteins with accuracy comparable to that achievable for native states is important for understanding the mechanisms of protein folding and function, as well as misfolding and aggregation. Because of the transient nature of these low populated states, they are seldom detected directly under conditions that favor folding. The activation domain of human procarboxypeptidase A2 (ADA2h) is an α/β-protein that forms amyloid fibrils at low pH, presumably initiated from a denatured state with a considerable amount of residual structure. Here we used Carr-Parcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion (CPMG RD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the denatured state of the ADA2h I71V mutant under conditions that favor folding. Under these conditions, the lifetime of the denatured state of I71V ADA2h is on the order of milliseconds and its population is approximately several percent, which makes this mutant amenable to studies by CPMG RD methods. The nearly complete set of CPMG RD-derived backbone (15)N, (13)C, and (1)H NMR chemical shifts in the I71V ADA2h denatured state reveals that it retains a significant fraction (up to 50-60%) of nativelike α-helical structure, while the regions encompassing native β-strands are structured to a much lesser extent. The nativelike α-helical structure of the denatured state can bring together hydrophobic residues on the same sides of α-helices, making them available for intra- or intermolecular interactions. CPMG RD data analysis thus allowed a detailed structural characterization of the ADA2h denatured state under folding conditions not previously achieved for this protein.

  10. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of lipids: Differential line broadening due to cross-correlation effects as a probe of membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.; Adebodun, F.; Chung, J.; Montez, B.; Ki Deok Park; Hongbiao Le; Phillips, B. )

    1991-11-19

    The authors have obtained proton-coupled carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a variety of lipid-water and lipid-drug-water systems, at 11.7 T, as a function of temperature, using the 'magic-angle' sample-spinning (MAS) NMR technique. The resulting spectra show a wide range of line shapes, due to interferences between dipole-dipole and dipole-chemical shielding anisotropy interactions. The differential line-broadening effects observed are particularly large for aromatic and olefinic (sp{sup 2}) carbon atom sites. Coupled spectra of the tricyclic antidepressants desipramine and imipramine, in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophases, show well-resolved doublets having different line shapes for each of the four aromatic methine groups, due to selective averaging of the four C-H dipolar interactions due to rapid motion about the director (or drug C{sub 2}) axis. {sup 2}H NMR spectra of (2,4,6,8-{sup 2}H{sub 4})desipramine (and imipramine) in the same 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophase exhibit quadrupole splittings of {approximately}0-2 and {approximately}20 kHz, indicating an approximate magic-angle orientation of the C2-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) and C8-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) vectors with respect to an axis of motional averaging, in accord with the {sup 13}C NMR results. The good qualitative agreement between {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H NMR results suggests that useful orientational ({sup 2}H NMR like) information can be deduced from natural-abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectra of a variety of mobile solids.

  11. Probing the molecular architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell walls using two- and three-dimensional (13)C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dupree, Ray; Simmons, Thomas J; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Patel, Dharmesh; Iuga, Dinu; Brown, Steven P; Dupree, Paul

    2015-04-14

    The plant secondary cell wall is a thickened polysaccharide and phenolic structure, providing mechanical strength to cells, particularly in woody tissues. It is the main feedstock for the developing bioenergy and green chemistry industries. Despite the role that molecular architecture (the arrangement of biopolymers relative to each other, and their conformations) plays in dictating biomass properties, such as recalcitrance to breakdown, it is poorly understood. Here, unprocessed dry (13)C-labeled stems from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed by a variety of (13)C solid state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance methods, such as one-dimensional cross-polarization and direct polarization, two-dimensional refocused INADEQUATE, RFDR, PDSD, and three-dimensional DARR, demonstrating their viability for the study of native polymer arrangements in intact secondary cell walls. All carbon sites of the two main glucose environments in cellulose (previously assigned to microfibril surface and interior residues) are clearly resolved, as are carbon sites of the other major components of the secondary cell wall: xylan and lignin. The xylan carbon 4 chemical shift is markedly different from that reported previously for solution or primary cell wall xylan, indicating significant changes in the helical conformation in these dried stems. Furthermore, the shift span indicates that xylan adopts a wide range of conformations in this material, with very little in the 31 conformation typical of xylan in solution. Additionally, spatial connections of noncarbohydrate species were observed with both cellulose peaks conventionally assigned as "surface" and as "interior" cellulose environments, raising questions about the origin of these two cellulose signals.

  12. Exotic taxa less related to native species are more invasive

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Sharon Y.; Webb, Campbell O.; Salamin, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Some species introduced into new geographical areas from their native ranges wreak ecological and economic havoc in their new environment. Although many studies have searched for either species or habitat characteristics that predict invasiveness of exotic species, the match between characteristics of the invader and those of members of the existing native community may be essential to understanding invasiveness. Here, we find that one metric, the phylogenetic relatedness of an invader to the native community, provides a predictive tool for invasiveness. Using a phylogenetic supertree of all grass species in California, we show that highly invasive grass species are, on average, significantly less related to native grasses than are introduced but noninvasive grasses. The match between the invader and the existing native community may explain why exotic pest species are not uniformly noxious in all novel habitats. Relatedness of invaders to the native biota may be one useful criterion for prioritizing management efforts of exotic species. PMID:16581902

  13. On properties of the exotic hadrons from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the specific features of extracting properties of the exotic polyquark hadrons (tetraquarks, pentaquarks) compared to the usual hadrons by the QCD sum-rule approach. In the case of the ordinary hadrons, already the one-loop leading-order O(α0s) correlation functions provide the bulk of the hadron observables, e.g., of the form factor; inclusion of radiative corrections O(αs) modifies already nonzero one-loop contributions. In the case of an exotic hadron, the situation is qualitatively different: discussing strong decays of an exotic tetraquark meson, which provide the main contribution to its width, we show that the disconnected leading-order diagrams are not related to the tetraquark properties. For a proper description of the tetraquark decay width, it is mandatory to calculate specific radiative corrections which generate the connected diagrams.

  14. Exotic looped trajectories of photons in three-slit interference

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; De Leon, Israel; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Fickler, Robert; Safari, Akbar; Mick, Uwe; McIntyre, Brian; Banzer, Peter; Rodenburg, Brandon; Leuchs, Gerd; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The validity of the superposition principle and of Born's rule are well-accepted tenants of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly, it has been predicted that the intensity pattern formed in a three-slit experiment is seemingly in contradiction with the most conventional form of the superposition principle when exotic looped trajectories are taken into account. However, the probability of observing such paths is typically very small, thus rendering them extremely difficult to measure. Here we confirm the validity of Born's rule and present the first experimental observation of exotic trajectories as additional paths for the light by directly measuring their contribution to the formation of optical interference fringes. We accomplish this by enhancing the electromagnetic near-fields in the vicinity of the slits through the excitation of surface plasmons. This process increases the probability of occurrence of these exotic trajectories, demonstrating that they are related to the near-field component of the photon's wavefunction. PMID:28008907

  15. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Rachel A.; Montrose, V. Tamara; Wills, Alison P.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and often have special requirements in captivity, which many owners do not have the facilities or knowledge to provide. Keeping animals in settings to which they are poorly adapted is a threat to their welfare. Additionally, owner satisfaction with the animal may be poor due to a misalignment of expectations, which further impacts on welfare, as it may lead to repeated rehoming or neglect. We investigate a range of commonly kept exotic species in terms of their suitability as companion animals from the point of view of animal welfare and owner satisfaction, and make recommendations on the suitability of various species as pets. PMID:28629177

  16. Exotic looped trajectories of photons in three-slit interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; de Leon, Israel; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Fickler, Robert; Safari, Akbar; Mick, Uwe; McIntyre, Brian; Banzer, Peter; Rodenburg, Brandon; Leuchs, Gerd; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-12-01

    The validity of the superposition principle and of Born's rule are well-accepted tenants of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly, it has been predicted that the intensity pattern formed in a three-slit experiment is seemingly in contradiction with the most conventional form of the superposition principle when exotic looped trajectories are taken into account. However, the probability of observing such paths is typically very small, thus rendering them extremely difficult to measure. Here we confirm the validity of Born's rule and present the first experimental observation of exotic trajectories as additional paths for the light by directly measuring their contribution to the formation of optical interference fringes. We accomplish this by enhancing the electromagnetic near-fields in the vicinity of the slits through the excitation of surface plasmons. This process increases the probability of occurrence of these exotic trajectories, demonstrating that they are related to the near-field component of the photon's wavefunction.

  17. The Dynamical Dipole Radiation in Dissipative Collisions with Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Rizzo, C.; Baran, V.

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this work we present a selection of reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e. to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). At low energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. We will first discuss the recently observed Dynamical Dipole Radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation during the charge equilibration in fusion and deep-inelastic collisions. We will review in detail all the main properties, yield, spectrum, damping and angular distributions, revealing important isospin effects. Reactions induced by unstable 132Sn beams appear to be very promising tools to test the sub-saturation Isovector EoS. Predictions are also presented for deep-inelastic and fragmentation collisions induced by neutron rich projectiles. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams at low and Fermi energies is finally stressed.

  18. JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas

    2014-05-16

    The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE-FG02-06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.-based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

  19. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-07-10

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  20. More on wormholes supported by small amounts of exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2006-04-15

    Recent papers by Fewster and Roman have emphasized that wormholes supported by arbitrarily small amounts of exotic matter will have to be incredibly fine-tuned if they are to be traversable. This paper discusses a wormhole model that strikes a balance between two conflicting requirements, reducing the amount of exotic matter and fine-tuning the metric coefficients, ultimately resulting in an engineering challenge: one requirement can only be met at the expense of the other. The wormhole model is macroscopic and satisfies various traversability criteria.