Science.gov

Sample records for probing hidden sector

  1. Probing hidden sector photons through the Higgs window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the possibility that a (light) hidden sector extra photon receives its mass via spontaneous symmetry breaking of a hidden sector Higgs boson, the so-called hidden-Higgs. The hidden-photon can mix with the ordinary photon via a gauge kinetic mixing term. The hidden-Higgs can couple to the standard model Higgs via a renormalizable quartic term—sometimes called the Higgs portal. We discuss the implications of this light hidden-Higgs in the context of laser polarization and light-shining-through-the-wall experiments as well as cosmological, astrophysical, and non-Newtonian force measurements. For hidden-photons receiving their mass from a hidden-Higgs, we find in the small mass regime significantly stronger bounds than the bounds on massive hidden sector photons alone.

  2. Probing hidden sectors with Stückelberg U(1) gauge fields.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wan-Zhe; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo; Ye, Fang

    2014-08-01

    We propose a framework in which visible matter interacts with matter from a hidden sector through mass mixings of Stückelberg U(1) gauge fields. In contrast to other Z(') mediation scenarios, our setup has the added appealing features that (i) the choice of Z(')'s can be significantly broadened without necessarily introducing unwanted exotic matter and (ii) there can be sizable tree-level interactions between the visible and hidden sectors. String theory embeddings of this scenario and their phenomenological features are briefly discussed. PMID:25148316

  3. Hidden dark matter sector, dark radiation, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider theories where dark matter is composed of a thermal relic of weak scale mass, whose couplings to the standard model (SM) are however too small to give rise to the observed abundance. Instead, the abundance is set by annihilation to light hidden sector states that carry no charges under the SM gauge interactions. In such a scenario the constraints from direct and indirect detection, and from collider searches for dark matter, can easily be satisfied. The masses of such light hidden states can be protected by symmetry if they are Nambu-Goldstone bosons, fermions, or gauge bosons. These states can then contribute to the cosmic energy density as dark radiation, leading to observable signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Furthermore, depending on whether or not the light hidden sector states self-interact, the fraction of the total energy density that free-streams is either decreased or increased, leading to characteristic effects on both the scalar and tensor components of the CMB anisotropy that allows these two cases to be distinguished. The magnitude of these signals depends on the number of light degrees of freedom in the hidden sector, and on the temperature at which it kinetically decouples from the SM. We consider a simple model that realizes this scenario, based on a framework in which the SM and hidden sector are initially in thermal equilibrium through the Higgs portal, and show that the resulting signals are compatible with recent Planck results, while large enough to be detected in upcoming experiments such as CMBPol and CMB Stage-IV. Invisible decays of the Higgs into hidden sector states at colliders can offer a complementary probe of this model.

  4. Lepton mixing from the hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, P. O.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental results indicate a possible relation between the lepton and quark mixing matrices of the form UPMNS≈VCKM†UX , where UX is a matrix with special structure related to the mechanism of neutrino mass generation. We propose a framework which can realize such a relation. The main ingredients of the framework are the double seesaw mechanism, SO(10) grand unification and a hidden sector of theory. The latter is composed of singlets (fermions and bosons) of the grand unified theory (GUT) symmetry with masses between the GUT and Planck scale. The interactions in this sector obey certain symmetries Ghidden. We explore the conditions under which symmetries Ghidden can produce flavor structures in the visible sector. Here the key elements are the basis-fixing symmetry and mediators which communicate information about properties of the hidden sector to the visible one. The interplay of SO(10) symmetry, basis-fixing symmetry identified as Z2×Z2 and Ghidden can lead to the required form of UX. A different kind of new physics is responsible for generation of the CKM mixing. We present the simplest realizations of the framework which differ by nature of the mediators and by symmetries of the hidden sector.

  5. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, M.; Gies, H.; Jaeckel, J.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axionlike particles. In this paper we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of 2. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses ≲0.05eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)×10-7 times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  6. Abelian Hidden Sectors at a GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, David E.; Poland, David; Zurek, Kathryn; /Fermilab /Michigan U.

    2009-04-16

    We discuss mechanisms for naturally generating GeV-scale hidden sectors in the context of weak-scale supersymmetry. Such low mass scales can arise when hidden sectors are more weakly coupled to supersymmetry breaking than the visible sector, as happens when supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the visible sector by gauge interactions under which the hidden sector is uncharged, or if the hidden sector is sequestered from gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study these mechanisms in detail in the context of gauge and gaugino mediation, and present specific models of Abelian GeV-scale hidden sectors. In particular, we discuss kinetic mixing of a U(1){sub x} gauge force with hypercharge, singlets or bi-fundamentals which couple to both sectors, and additional loop effects. Finally, we investigate the possible relevance of such sectors for dark matter phenomenology, as well as for low- and high-energy collider searches.

  7. Grand unified hidden-sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2014-10-01

    We explore G×G unified theories with the visible and the hidden or dark sectors paired under a Z2 symmetry. Developing a system of "asymmetric symmetry breaking" we motivate such models on the basis of their ability to generate dark baryons that are confined with a mass scale just above that of the proton, as motivated by asymmetric dark matter. This difference is achieved from the distinct but related confinement scales that develop in unified theories that have the two factors of G spontaneously breaking in an asymmetric manner. We show how Higgs potentials that admit different gauge group breaking chains in each sector can be constructed, and demonstrate the capacity for generating different fermion mass scales. Lastly we discuss supersymmetric extensions of such schemes.

  8. Searching for a hidden sector in multiparticle production at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Moreno-Picot, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    A hidden sector beyond the Standard Model can show up in multiparticle production altering inclusive correlations and factorial cumulants of multiplicity distributions. In this report such a study is advocated with a special emphasis on the searches at LHC.

  9. Gauge mediation scenario with hidden sector renormalization in MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika

    2010-02-01

    We study the hidden sector effects on the mass renormalization of a simplest gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario. We point out that possible hidden sector contributions render the soft scalar masses smaller, resulting in drastically different sparticle mass spectrum at low energy. In particular, in the 5+5 minimal gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with high messenger scale (that is favored by the gravitino cold dark matter scenario), we show that a stau can be the next lightest superparticle for moderate values of hidden sector self-coupling. This provides a very simple theoretical model of long-lived charged next lightest superparticles, which imply distinctive signals in ongoing and upcoming collider experiments.

  10. Observational constraints on decoupled hidden sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikinheimo, Matti; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-09-01

    We consider an extension of the Standard Model with a singlet sector consisting of a real (pseudo)scalar and a Dirac fermion coupled with the Standard Model only via the scalar portal. We assume that the portal coupling is weak enough for the singlet sector not to thermalize with the Standard Model allowing the production of singlet particles via the freeze-in mechanism. If the singlet sector interacts with itself sufficiently strongly, it may thermalize within itself, resulting in dark matter abundance determined by the freeze-out mechanism operating within the singlet sector. We investigate this scenario in detail. In particular, we show that requiring the absence of inflationary isocurvature fluctuations provides lower bounds on the magnitude of the dark sector self-interactions and in parts of the parameter space favors sufficiently large self-couplings, supported also by the features observed in the small-scale structure formation.

  11. Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.; Vagnozzi, S.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken U(1) ‧ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength ɛ ∼10-9. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large (≳ 10%) for a wide range of parameters.

  12. Primordial black holes and a large hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, Xavier

    2010-10-15

    In this note we point out that primordial black holes could be much shorter lived than usually assumed if there is a large hidden sector of particles that only interacts gravitationally with the particles of the standard model. The observation of the explosion of one of these black holes would severely constrain the energy scale at which gravity becomes strong.

  13. Hidden sector DM models and Higgs physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  14. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV . Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  15. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2014-12-18

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV. Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  16. Novel effects in electroweak breaking from a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Jose Ramon

    2007-10-01

    The Higgs boson offers a unique window to hidden sector fields S{sub i}, singlets under the standard model gauge group, via the renormalizable interactions |H|{sup 2}S{sub i}{sup 2}. We prove that such interactions can provide new patterns for electroweak breaking, including radiative breaking by dimensional transmutation consistent with CERN LEP bounds, and trigger the strong enough first-order phase transition required by electroweak baryogenesis.

  17. Discovering hidden sectors with monophoton Z{sup '} searches

    SciTech Connect

    Gershtein, Yuri; Petriello, Frank; Quackenbush, Seth; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    In many theories of physics beyond the standard model, from extra dimensions to Hidden Valleys and models of dark matter, Z{sup '} bosons mediate between standard model particles and hidden sector states. We study the feasibility of observing such hidden states through an invisibly decaying Z{sup '} at the LHC. We focus on the process pp{yields}{gamma}Z{sup '}{yields}{gamma}XX{sup {dagger}}, where X is any neutral, (quasi-) stable particle, whether a standard model neutrino or a new state. This complements a previous study using pp{yields}ZZ{sup '}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}XX{sup {dagger}}. Only the Z{sup '} mass and two effective charges are needed to describe this process. If the Z{sup '} decays invisibly only to standard model neutrinos, then these charges are predicted by observation of the Z{sup '} through the Drell-Yan process, allowing discrimination between Z{sup '} decays to standard model {nu}'s and invisible decays to new states. We carefully discuss all backgrounds and systematic errors that affect this search. We find that hidden sector decays of a 1 TeV Z{sup '} can be observed at 5{sigma} significance with 50 fb{sup -1} at the LHC. Observation of a 1.5 TeV state requires super-LHC statistics of 1 ab{sup -1}. Control of the systematic errors, in particular, the parton distribution function uncertainty of the dominant Z{gamma} background, is crucial to maximize the LHC search reach.

  18. Scale Invariant Extension of the Standard Model with a Strongly Interacting Hidden Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Taeil; Ko, P.

    2011-04-08

    We present a scale invariant extension of the standard model with a new QCD-like strong interaction in the hidden sector. A scale {Lambda}{sub H} is dynamically generated in the hidden sector by dimensional transmutation, and chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the hidden sector. This scale is transmitted to the SM sector by a real singlet scalar messenger S and can trigger electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus all the mass scales in this model arise from the hidden sector scale {Lambda}{sub H}, which has quantum mechanical origin. Furthermore, the lightest hadrons in the hidden sector are stable by the flavor conservation of the hidden sector strong interaction, and could be the cold dark matter (CDM). We study collider phenomenology, relic density, and direct detection rates of the CDM of this model.

  19. Renormalization effects on the MSSM from a calculable model of a strongly coupled hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika

    2011-10-01

    We investigate possible renormalization effects on the low-energy mass spectrum of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), using a calculable model of strongly coupled hidden sector. We model the hidden sector by N=2 supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics with gauge group SU(2)xU(1) and N{sub f}=2 matter hypermultiplets, perturbed by a Fayet-Iliopoulos term which breaks the supersymmetry down to N=0 on a metastable vacuum. In the hidden sector the Kaehler potential is renormalized. Upon identifying a hidden sector modulus with the renormalization scale, and extrapolating to the strongly coupled regime using the Seiberg-Witten solution, the contribution from the hidden sector to the MSSM renormalization group flows is computed. For concreteness, we consider a model in which the renormalization effects are communicated to the MSSM sector via gauge mediation. In contrast to the perturbative toy examples of hidden sector renormalization studied in the literature, we find that our strongly coupled model exhibits rather intricate effects on the MSSM soft scalar mass spectrum, depending on how the hidden sector fields are coupled to the messenger fields. This model provides a concrete example in which the low-energy spectrum of MSSM particles that are expected to be accessible in collider experiments is obtained using strongly coupled hidden sector dynamics.

  20. A cavity experiment to search for hidden sector photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cavity experiment to search for low mass extra U(1) gauge bosons with gauge-kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon, so-called paraphotons. The setup consists of two microwave cavities shielded from each other. In one cavity, paraphotons are produced via photon-paraphoton oscillations. The second, resonant, cavity is then driven by the paraphotons that permeate the shielding and reconvert into photons. This setup resembles the classic "light shining through a wall" setup. However, the high quality factors achievable for microwave cavities and the good sensitivity of microwave detectors allow for a projected sensitivity for photon-paraphoton mixing of the order of χ ∼10-12-10-8, for paraphotons with masses in the μeV to meV range-exceeding the current laboratory and astrophysics-based limits by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, this experiment bears significant discovery potential for hidden sector physics.

  1. New Experimental Limit on Photon Hidden-Sector Paraphoton Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Afanasev, Andrei; Baker, O.; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Minarni, Minarni; Ramdon, Roopchan; Michelle D. Shinn; Slocum, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first results of a search for optical-wavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10^-5 and 10^-2 electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10^-7. This was a generation-regeneration experiment using the "light shining through a wall" technique in which regenerated photons are searched for downstream of an optical barrier that separates it from an upstream generation region. The new limits presented here are approximately three times more sensitive to this mixing than the best previous measurement. The present results indicate no evidence for photon-paraphoton mixing for the range of parameters investigated.

  2. Multilepton signatures of a hidden sector in rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batell, Brian; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We explore the sensitivity of flavor-changing b→s transitions to a (sub-) GeV hidden sector with generic couplings to the standard model through the Higgs, vector, and axion portals. The underlying two-body decays of B mesons, B→XsS, and B0→SS, where S denotes a generic new GeV-scale particle, may significantly enhance the yield of monochromatic lepton pairs in the final state via prompt S→ll¯ decays. Existing measurements of the charged lepton spectrum in neutral-current semileptonic B decays provide bounds on the parameters of the light sector that are significantly more stringent than the requirements of naturalness. New search modes, such as B→Xs+n(ll¯) and B0→n(ll¯) with n≥2, can provide additional sensitivity to scenarios in which both the Higgs and vector portals are active, and are accessible to (super-) B factories and hadron colliders.

  3. Multilepton signatures of a hidden sector in rare B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We explore the sensitivity of flavor-changing b{yields}s transitions to a (sub-) GeV hidden sector with generic couplings to the standard model through the Higgs, vector, and axion portals. The underlying two-body decays of B mesons, B{yields}X{sub s}S, and B{sup 0}{yields}SS, where S denotes a generic new GeV-scale particle, may significantly enhance the yield of monochromatic lepton pairs in the final state via prompt S{yields}ll decays. Existing measurements of the charged lepton spectrum in neutral-current semileptonic B decays provide bounds on the parameters of the light sector that are significantly more stringent than the requirements of naturalness. New search modes, such as B{yields}X{sub s}+n(ll) and B{sup 0}{yields}n(ll) with n{>=}2, can provide additional sensitivity to scenarios in which both the Higgs and vector portals are active, and are accessible to (super-) B factories and hadron colliders.

  4. Hidden from view: coupled dark sector physics and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Power, Chris; Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We study cluster mass dark matter (DM) haloes, their progenitors and surroundings in a coupled dark matter-dark energy (DE) model and compare it to quintessence and Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) models with adiabatic zoom simulations. When comparing cosmologies with different expansions histories, growth functions and power spectra, care must be taken to identify unambiguous signatures of alternative cosmologies. Shared cosmological parameters, such as σ8, need not be the same for optimal fits to observational data. We choose to set our parameters to ΛCDM z = 0 values. We find that in coupled models, where DM decays into DE, haloes appear remarkably similar to ΛCDM haloes despite DM experiencing an additional frictional force. Density profiles are not systematically different and the subhalo populations have similar mass, spin, and spatial distributions, although (sub)haloes are less concentrated on average in coupled cosmologies. However, given the scatter in related observables (V_max,R_{V_max}), this difference is unlikely to distinguish between coupled and uncoupled DM. Observations of satellites of Milky Way and M31 indicate a significant subpopulation reside in a plane. Coupled models do produce planar arrangements of satellites of higher statistical significance than ΛCDM models; however, in all models these planes are dynamically unstable. In general, the non-linear dynamics within and near large haloes masks the effects of a coupled dark sector. The sole environmental signature we find is that small haloes residing in the outskirts are more deficient in baryons than their ΛCDM counterparts. The lack of a pronounced signal for a coupled dark sector strongly suggests that such a phenomena would be effectively hidden from view.

  5. Contributions to the muon's anomalous magnetic moment from a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    McKeen, David

    2011-06-15

    Research Highlights: > Described scenario involving hidden and connector particles that couple to the standard model which could be relevant for dark matter. > Examined constraints on such particles in the case that the SM particle they couple to is the muon. > Found regions of couplings which could explain the discrepancy in the muon's anomalous magnetic moment which differ for different hidden and connector particles' spins. - Abstract: The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon provides a stringent test of the standard model and of any physics that lies beyond it. There is currently a deviation of 3.1{sigma} between the standard model prediction for the muon's anomalous magnetic moment and its experimental value. We calculate the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment in theories where the muon couples to a particle in a hidden sector (that is, uncharged under the standard model) and a connector (which has nontrivial standard model gauge and hidden sector quantum numbers).

  6. Chern-Simons-Higgs theory with visible and hidden sectors and its N = 2 SUSY extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Ireson, Edwin; Schaposnik, Fidel A.; Tallarita, Gianni

    2015-10-01

    We study vortex solutions in Abelian Chern-Simons-Higgs theories with visible and hidden sectors. We first consider the case in which the two sectors are connected through a BF-like gauge mixing term with no explicit interaction between the two scalars. Since first order Bogomolny equations do not exist in this case, we derive the second order field equations. We then proceed to an N = 2 supersymmetric extension including a Higgs portal mixing among the visible and hidden charged scalars. As expected, Bogomolny equations do exist in this case and we study their string-like solutions numerically.

  7. Hidden sector monopole, vector dark matter and dark radiation with Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr

    2014-10-01

    We show that the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole model in the hidden sector with Higgs portal interaction makes a viable dark matter model, where monopole and massive vector dark matter (VDM) are stable due to topological conservation and the unbroken subgroup U(1 {sub X}. We show that, even though observed CMB data requires the dark gauge coupling to be quite small, a right amount of VDM thermal relic can be obtained via s-channel resonant annihilation for the mass of VDM close to or smaller than the half of SM higgs mass, thanks to Higgs portal interaction. Monopole relic density turns out to be several orders of magnitude smaller than the observed dark matter relic density. Direct detection experiments, particularly, the projected XENON1T experiment, may probe the parameter space where the dark Higgs is lighter than ∼< 50 GeV. In addition, the dark photon associated with the unbroken U(1 {sub X} contributes to the radiation energy density at present, giving Δ N{sub eff}{sup ν} ∼ 0.1 as the extra relativistic neutrino species.

  8. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded ``hidden sector'', annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e‑ and bar p p) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  9. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded ``hidden sector'', annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e- and bar p p) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  10. Hidden sector dark matters and elusive Higgs boson(s) at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2012-07-27

    We consider two types of hidden sector dark matters (DM's), with and without QCD-like new strong interaction with confinement properties, and their interplays with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Assuming the hidden sector has only fermions (and gauge bosons in case of strongly interacting hidden sector), we have to introduce a real singlet scalar boson S as a messenger between the SM and the hidden sector dark matters. This singlet scalar will mix with the SM Higgs boson h, and we expect there are two Higgs-like scalar bosons H{sub 1} and H{sub 2}. Imposing all the relevant constraints from collider search bounds on Higgs boson, DM scattering cross section on proton and thermal relic density, we find that one of the two Higgs-like scalar bosons can easily escape the detections at the LHC. Recent results on the Higgs-like new boson with mass around with 125 GeV from the LHC will constrain this class of models, which is left for future study.

  11. Hidden-sector photon and axion searches using photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seviour, Rebecca; Bailey, Ian; Woollett, Nathan; Williams, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Many proposed extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) such as hidden-sector photons and axions, which are also of interest as dark matter candidates. In this paper we propose a novel experimental approach in which microwave photonic lattice structures form part of a ‘light shining through the wall’-type experiment to search for WISPs. We demonstrate the potential to match and exceed the sensitivities of conventional experiments operating in the microwave regime.

  12. Search for Hidden Sector and Dark Matter Particles Produced at Fermilab's NuMI Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Bambah, Bindu A.; Kasetti, Siva P.

    2014-01-01

    In the long tradition of exotic searches at fixed-target experiments, we plan to use the NuMI beam-target and the NOvA Near Detector to observe potential signatures of Hidden Sector or Dark Matter particles, either directly produced within the target or through theoretically postulated mediators. Expecting mostly scattering events on electrons or nucleons as their signatures, an example of a mediator generated scalar dark matter particles is used to discuss the target production profile of a dark matter beam. This channel explores the capabilities of the detector to observe neutral-current events from electron-neutrino scattering interactions.

  13. Stable mass hierarchies and dark matter from hidden sectors in the scale-invariant standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2010-08-01

    Scale invariance may be a classical symmetry which is broken radiatively. This provides a simple way to stabilize the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking against radiative corrections. But for such a theory to be fully realistic, it must actually incorporate a hierarchy of scales, including the Planck and the neutrino mass scales in addition to the electroweak scale. The dark matter sector and the physics responsible for baryogenesis may or may not require new scales, depending on the scenario. We develop a generic way of using hidden sectors to construct a technically-natural hierarchy of scales in the framework of classically scale-invariant theories. We then apply the method to generate the Planck mass and to solve the neutrino mass and dark matter problems through what may be termed the ''scale-invariant standard model.'' The model is perturbatively renormalizable for energy scales up to the Planck mass.

  14. 3.55 keV line from exciting dark matter without a hidden sector

    DOE PAGES

    Berlin, Asher; DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-04-24

    In this study, models in which dark matter particles can scatter into a slightly heavier state which promptly decays to the lighter state and a photon (known as eXciting Dark Matter, or XDM) have been shown to be capable of generating the 3.55 keV line observed from galaxy clusters, while suppressing the flux of such a line from smaller halos, including dwarf galaxies. In most of the XDM models discussed in the literature, this up-scattering is mediated by a new light particle, and dark matter annihilations proceed into pairs of this same light state. In these models, the dark matter andmore » the mediator effectively reside within a hidden sector, without sizable couplings to the Standard Model. In this paper, we explore a model of XDM that does not include a hidden sector. Instead, the dark matter both up-scatters and annihilates through the near resonant exchange of an O(102) GeV pseudoscalar with large Yukawa couplings to the dark matter and smaller, but non-neglibile, couplings to Standard Model fermions. The dark matter and the mediator are each mixtures of Standard Model singlets and SU(2)W doublets. We identify parameter space in which this model can simultaneously generate the 3.55 keV line and the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic center, without conflicting with constraints from colliders, direct detection experiments, or observations of dwarf galaxies.« less

  15. 3.55 keV line from exciting dark matter without a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Asher; DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-04-24

    In this study, models in which dark matter particles can scatter into a slightly heavier state which promptly decays to the lighter state and a photon (known as eXciting Dark Matter, or XDM) have been shown to be capable of generating the 3.55 keV line observed from galaxy clusters, while suppressing the flux of such a line from smaller halos, including dwarf galaxies. In most of the XDM models discussed in the literature, this up-scattering is mediated by a new light particle, and dark matter annihilations proceed into pairs of this same light state. In these models, the dark matter and the mediator effectively reside within a hidden sector, without sizable couplings to the Standard Model. In this paper, we explore a model of XDM that does not include a hidden sector. Instead, the dark matter both up-scatters and annihilates through the near resonant exchange of an O(102) GeV pseudoscalar with large Yukawa couplings to the dark matter and smaller, but non-neglibile, couplings to Standard Model fermions. The dark matter and the mediator are each mixtures of Standard Model singlets and SU(2)W doublets. We identify parameter space in which this model can simultaneously generate the 3.55 keV line and the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic center, without conflicting with constraints from colliders, direct detection experiments, or observations of dwarf galaxies.

  16. Venus Express en route to probe the planet's hidden mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Venus Express will eventually manoeuvre itself into orbit around Venus in order to perform a detailed study of the structure, chemistry and dynamics of the planet's atmosphere, which is characterised by extremely high temperatures, very high atmospheric pressure, a huge greenhouse effect and as-yet inexplicable "super-rotation" which means that it speeds around the planet in just four days. The European spacecraft will also be the first orbiter to probe the planet's surface while exploiting the "visibility windows" recently discovered in the infrared waveband. The 1240 kg mass spacecraft was developed for ESA by a European industrial team led by EADS Astrium with 25 main contractors spread across 14 countries. It lifted off onboard a Soyuz-Fregat rocket, the launch service being provided by Starsem. The lift-off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakstan this morning took place at 09:33 hours local time (04:33 Central European Time). Initial Fregat upper-stage ignition took place 9 minutes into the flight, manoeuvring the spacecraft into a low-earth parking orbit. A second firing, 1 hour 22 minutes later, boosted the spacecraft to pursue its interplanetary trajectory. Contact with Venus Express was established by ESA's European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany approximately two hours after lift-off. The spacecraft has correctly oriented itself in relation to the sun and has deployed its solar arrays. All onboard systems are operating perfectly and the orbiter is communicating with the Earth via its low-gain antenna. In three days' time, it will establish communications using its high-gain antenna. Full speed ahead for Venus Venus Express is currently distancing itself from the Earth full speed, heading on its five-month 350 million kilometre journey inside our solar system. After check-outs to ensure that its onboard equipment and instrument payload are in proper working order, the spacecraft will be mothballed, with contact with the Earth being

  17. Venus Express en route to probe the planet's hidden mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Venus Express will eventually manoeuvre itself into orbit around Venus in order to perform a detailed study of the structure, chemistry and dynamics of the planet's atmosphere, which is characterised by extremely high temperatures, very high atmospheric pressure, a huge greenhouse effect and as-yet inexplicable "super-rotation" which means that it speeds around the planet in just four days. The European spacecraft will also be the first orbiter to probe the planet's surface while exploiting the "visibility windows" recently discovered in the infrared waveband. The 1240 kg mass spacecraft was developed for ESA by a European industrial team led by EADS Astrium with 25 main contractors spread across 14 countries. It lifted off onboard a Soyuz-Fregat rocket, the launch service being provided by Starsem. The lift-off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakstan this morning took place at 09:33 hours local time (04:33 Central European Time). Initial Fregat upper-stage ignition took place 9 minutes into the flight, manoeuvring the spacecraft into a low-earth parking orbit. A second firing, 1 hour 22 minutes later, boosted the spacecraft to pursue its interplanetary trajectory. Contact with Venus Express was established by ESA's European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany approximately two hours after lift-off. The spacecraft has correctly oriented itself in relation to the sun and has deployed its solar arrays. All onboard systems are operating perfectly and the orbiter is communicating with the Earth via its low-gain antenna. In three days' time, it will establish communications using its high-gain antenna. Full speed ahead for Venus Venus Express is currently distancing itself from the Earth full speed, heading on its five-month 350 million kilometre journey inside our solar system. After check-outs to ensure that its onboard equipment and instrument payload are in proper working order, the spacecraft will be mothballed, with contact with the Earth being

  18. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 1. Radiation of standard model particles

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Hyde, Jeffrey M.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: jmhyde@asu.edu

    2014-09-01

    In hidden sector models with an extra U(1) gauge group, new fields can interact with the Standard Model only through gauge kinetic mixing and the Higgs portal. After the U(1) is spontaneously broken, these interactions couple the resultant cosmic strings to Standard Model particles. We calculate the spectrum of radiation emitted by these ''dark strings'' in the form of Higgs bosons, Z bosons, and Standard Model fermions assuming that string tension is above the TeV scale. We also calculate the scattering cross sections of Standard Model fermions on dark strings due to the Aharonov-Bohm interaction. These radiation and scattering calculations will be applied in a subsequent paper to study the cosmological evolution and observational signatures of dark strings.

  19. Fano resonance and the hidden order in URu2 Si 2 probed by quasiparticle scattering spectroscopy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, W. K.; Greene, L. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Ronning, F.; Lu, X.; Sarrao, J. L.; Thompson, J. D.

    2011-03-01

    The nature of the hidden order transition occurring at 17.5 K in URu 2 Si 2 remains puzzling despite intensive investigations over the past two and half decades. Recent experimental and theoretical developments render it a timely subject to probe the hidden order state using quasiparticle tunneling and scattering techniques. We report on the Fano resonance in pure and Rh-doped URu 2 Si 2 single crystals using point-contact spectroscopy. The conductance spectra reproducibly reveal asymmetric double peak structures slightly off-centered around zero bias with the two peaks merging well above the hidden order transition temperature. An analysis using the Fano resonance model in a Kondo lattice [1] shows that the conductance peaks arise from the hybridization gap opening. Our estimated gap size agrees well with those reported from other measurements. We will present experimental results over a wide parameter space including temperature and doping dependences and discuss their underlying physics. M. Maltseva, M. Dzero, and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 206402 (2009). * The work at UIUC is supported by the U.S. DOE under Award Nos. DE-FG02-07ER46453 and DE-AC02-98CH10886, and the work at LANL is carried out under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, Office of Science.

  20. Neutrino mixing and masses in SO(10) GUTs with hidden sector and flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of SO(10) GUTs with hidden sector consisting of fermionic and bosonic SO(10) singlets and flavor symmetries. The framework allows to disentangle the CKM physics responsible for the CKM mixing and different mass hierarchies of quarks and leptons and the neutrino new physics which produces smallness of neutrino masses and large lepton mixing. The framework leads naturally to the relation U PMNS ˜ V CKM † U 0, where structure of U 0 is determined by the flavor symmetry. The key feature of the framework is that apart from the Dirac mass matrices m D , the portal mass matrix M D and the mass matrix of singlets M S are also involved in generation of the lepton mixing. This opens up new possibilities to realize the flavor symmetries and explain the data. Using A 4 × Z 4 as the flavor group, we systematically explore the flavor structures which can be obtained in this framework depending on field content and symmetry assignments. We formulate additional conditions which lead to U 0 ˜ U TBM or U BM. They include (i) equality (in general, proportionality) of the singlet flavons couplings, (ii) equality of their VEVs; (iii) correlation between VEVs of singlets and triplet, (iv) certain VEV alignment of flavon triplet(s). These features can follow from additional symmetries or be remnants of further unification. Phenomenologically viable schemes with minimal flavon content and minimal number of couplings are constructed.

  1. Development of adapted GMR-probes for automated detection of hidden defects in thin steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelkner, Matthias; Pohl, Rainer; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Commandeur, Colin

    2016-02-01

    Thin steel sheets with a thickness of 0.3 mm and less are the base materials of many everyday life products (cans, batteries, etc.). Potential inhomogeneities such as non-metallic inclusions inside the steel can lead to a rupture of the sheets when it is formed into a product such as a beverage can. Therefore, there is a need to develop automated NDT techniques to detect hidden defects and inclusions in thin sheets during production. For this purpose Tata Steel Europe and BAM, the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany), collaborate in order to develop an automated NDT-system. Defect detection systems have to be robust against external influences, especially when used in an industrial environment. In addition, such a facility has to achieve a high sensitivity and a high spatial resolution in terms of detecting small inclusions in the μm-regime. In a first step, we carried out a feasibility study to determine which testing method is promising for detecting hidden defects and inclusions inside ferrous thin steel sheets. Therefore, two methods were investigated in more detail - magnetic flux leakage testing (MFL) using giant magneto resistance sensor arrays (GMR) as receivers [1,2] and eddy current testing (ET). The capabilities of both methods were tested with 0.2 mm-thick steel samples containing small defects with depths ranging from 5 µm up to 60 µm. Only in case of GMR-MFL-testing, we were able to detect parts of the hidden defects with a depth of 10 µm trustworthily with a SNR better than 10 dB. Here, the lift off between sensor and surface was 250 µm. On this basis, we investigated different testing scenarios including velocity tests and different lift offs. In this contribution we present the results of the feasibility study leading to first prototypes of GMR-probes which are now installed as part of a demonstrator inside a production line.

  2. Dynamically generated N* and {Lambda}* resonances in the hidden charm sector around 4.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-07-15

    The interactions of D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. A series of meson-baryon dynamically generated relatively narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are predicted around 4.3 GeV in the hidden charm sector. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for the experiment of antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) at the forthcoming GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) facility.

  3. Hidden interactions of sterile neutrinos as a probe for new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Zahra; Peres, O. L. G.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from neutrino experiments show evidence for light sterile neutrinos which do not have any Standard Model interactions. In this work, we study the hidden interaction of sterile neutrinos with an "MeV-scale" gauge boson (the νsHI model) with mass MX and leptonic coupling gl' . By performing an analysis on the νsHI model using the data of the MINOS neutrino experiment, we find that the values above GX/GF=92.4 are excluded by more than 2 σ C.L., where GF is the Fermi constant and GX is the field strength of the νsHI model. Using this model, we can also probe other new physics scenarios. We find that the region allowed by the (g -2 )μ discrepancy is entirely ruled out for MX≲100 MeV . Finally, the secret interaction of sterile neutrinos has been to solve a conflict between the sterile neutrinos and cosmology. It is shown here that such an interaction is excluded by MINOS for gs'>1.6 ×10-2 . This exclusion, however, does depend on the value of gl'.

  4. Search for Hidden-Sector Bosons in B0→K*0μ+μ- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A search is presented for hidden-sector bosons, χ , produced in the decay B0→K*(892 )0χ , with K*(892 )0→K+π- and χ →μ+μ-. The search is performed using p p -collision data corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 collected with the LHCb detector. No significant signal is observed in the accessible mass range 214 ≤m (χ )≤4350 MeV , and upper limits are placed on the branching fraction product B (B0→K*(892 )0χ )×B (χ →μ+μ-) as a function of the mass and lifetime of the χ boson. These limits are of the order of 1 0-9 for χ lifetimes less than 100 ps over most of the m (χ ) range, and place the most stringent constraints to date on many theories that predict the existence of additional low-mass bosons.

  5. Probing the hidden Higgs bosons of the Y = 0 triplet- and singlet-extended Supersymmetric Standard Model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Priyotosh; Corianò, Claudio; Costantini, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the scalar sector in an extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) containing a SU(2) Higgs triplet of zero hypercharge and a gauge singlet beside the SU(2) scalar doublets. In particular, we focus on a scenario of this model which allows a light pseudoscalar and/or a scalar below 100 GeV, consistent with the most recent data from the LHC and the earlier data from the LEP experiments. We analyze the exotic decay of the discovered Higgs ( h 125) into two light (hidden) Higgs bosons present in the extension. The latter are allowed by the uncertainties in the Higgs decay h 125 → WW ∗, h 125 → ZZ ∗ and h 125 → γγ. The study of the parameter space for such additional scalars/pseudoscalars decay of the Higgs is performed in the gluon fusion channel. The extra hidden Higgs bosons of the enlarged scalar sector, if they exist, will then decay into lighter fermion paris, i.e., boverline{b} , τ overline{τ} and μ overline{μ} via the mixing with the doublets. A detailed simulation using PYTHIA of the 2 b + 2 τ , ≥ 3 τ , 2 b + 2 μ and 2 τ + 2 μ final states is presented. From our analysis we conclude that, depending on the selected benchmark points, such decay modes can be explored with an integrated luminosity of 25 fb-1 at the LHC at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV.

  6. Black hole portal into hidden valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor

    2011-05-15

    Superradiant instability turns rotating astrophysical black holes into unique probes of light axions. We consider what happens when a light axion is coupled to a strongly coupled hidden gauge sector. In this case superradiance results in an adiabatic increase of a hidden sector CP-violating {theta} parameter in a near horizon region. This may trigger a first order phase transition in the gauge sector. As a result a significant fraction of a black hole mass is released as a cloud of hidden mesons and can be later converted into electromagnetic radiation. This results in a violent electromagnetic burst. The characteristic frequency of such bursts may range from {approx}100 eV to {approx}100 MeV.

  7. Search for Hidden-Sector Bosons in B(0)→K(*0)μ(+)μ(-) Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Ninci, D; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-10-16

    A search is presented for hidden-sector bosons, χ, produced in the decay B(0)→K*(892)(0)χ, with K*(892)(0)→K(+)π(-) and χ→μ(+)μ(-). The search is performed using pp-collision data corresponding to 3.0  fb(-1) collected with the LHCb detector. No significant signal is observed in the accessible mass range 214≤m(χ)≤4350  MeV, and upper limits are placed on the branching fraction product B(B(0)→K*(892)(0)χ)×B(χ→μ(+)μ(-)) as a function of the mass and lifetime of the χ boson. These limits are of the order of 10(-9) for χ lifetimes less than 100 ps over most of the m(χ) range, and place the most stringent constraints to date on many theories that predict the existence of additional low-mass bosons.

  8. Search for Hidden-Sector Bosons in B(0)→K(*0)μ(+)μ(-) Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Ninci, D; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-10-16

    A search is presented for hidden-sector bosons, χ, produced in the decay B(0)→K*(892)(0)χ, with K*(892)(0)→K(+)π(-) and χ→μ(+)μ(-). The search is performed using pp-collision data corresponding to 3.0  fb(-1) collected with the LHCb detector. No significant signal is observed in the accessible mass range 214≤m(χ)≤4350  MeV, and upper limits are placed on the branching fraction product B(B(0)→K*(892)(0)χ)×B(χ→μ(+)μ(-)) as a function of the mass and lifetime of the χ boson. These limits are of the order of 10(-9) for χ lifetimes less than 100 ps over most of the m(χ) range, and place the most stringent constraints to date on many theories that predict the existence of additional low-mass bosons. PMID:26550866

  9. Infrared radiation emitted due to scanning of a hot spot as a probe of hidden defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźny, Mariusz; Maś, Kinga; Prokhorenko, Serhiy; Ploch, Dariusz; Sheregii, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Specially created subsurface defects in a sample are detected using a high resolution infrared camera FLIR SC7000. A scanning hot air (about 110 °C) nozzle is applied to introduce additional energy in a researched sample. The hidden defect has an increased temperature in comparison with the surrounding area that is a result of changed emissivity and thermal diffusivity. The suggested method is compared with pulse thermography which uses a xenon lamp for excitation.

  10. AdS/QCD approach to the scale-invariant extension of the standard model with a strongly interacting hidden sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Hisaki; Jung, Dong-Won; Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we revisit a scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM) with a strongly interacting hidden sector within AdS/QCD approach. Using the AdS/QCD, we reduce the number of input parameters to three, i.e. hidden pion decay constant, hidden pion mass and tan β that is defined as the ratio of the vacuum expectation values (VEV) of the singlet scalar field and the SM Higgs boson. As a result, our model has sharp predictability. We perform the phenomenological analysis of the hidden pions which is one of the dark matter (DM) candidates in this model. With various theoretical and experimental constraints we search for the allowed parameter space and find that both resonance and non-resonance solutions are possible. Some typical correlations among various observables such as thermal relic density of hidden pions, Higgs boson signal strengths and DM-nucleon cross section are investigated. We provide some benchmark points for experimental tests.

  11. Galactic center γ-ray excess in hidden sector DM models with dark gauge symmetries: local Z{sub 3} symmetry as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong E-mail: ytang@kias.re.kr

    2015-01-01

    We show that hidden sector dark matter (DM) models with local dark gauge symmetries make a natural playground for the possible γ-ray excess from the galactic center (GC). We first discuss in detail the GC γ-ray excess in a scalar dark matter (DM) model with local Z{sub 3} symmetry which was recently proposed by the present authors. Within this model, scalar DM with mass 30–70 GeV is allowed due to the newly-opened (semi-)annihilation channels of a DM pair into dark Higgs φ and/or dark photon Z' pair, and the γ-ray spectrum from the GC can be fit within this model. Then we argue that the GC gamma ray excess can be easily accommodated within hidden sector dark matter models where DM is stabilized by local gauge symmetries, due to the presence of dark Higgs (and also dark photon for Abelian dark gauge symmetry)

  12. Galactic center γ-ray excess in hidden sector DM models with dark gauge symmetries: local Z{sub 3} symmetry as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-16

    We show that hidden sector dark matter (DM) models with local dark gauge symmetries make a natural playground for the possible γ-ray excess from the galactic center (GC). We first discuss in detail the GC γ-ray excess in a scalar dark matter (DM) model with local Z{sub 3} symmetry which was recently proposed by the present authors. Within this model, scalar DM with mass 30–70 GeV is allowed due to the newly-opened (semi-)annihilation channels of a DM pair into dark Higgs ϕ and/or dark photon Z′ pair, and the γ-ray spectrum from the GC can be fit within this model. Then we argue that the GC gamma ray excess can be easily accommodated within hidden sector dark matter models where DM is stabilized by local gauge symmetries, due to the presence of dark Higgs (and also dark photon for Abelian dark gauge symmetry)

  13. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States.

    PubMed

    An, Haipeng; Echenard, Bertrand; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-15

    A model of the dark sector where O(few  GeV) mass dark matter particles χ couple to a lighter dark force mediator V, m_{V}≪m_{χ}, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic halos. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of χ, such as 0^{-+} and 1^{--} states, η_{D} and ϒ_{D}, is an important search channel. We show that e^{+}e^{-}→η_{D}+V or ϒ_{D}+γ production at B factories for α_{D}>0.1 is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via η_{D}→2V→2(l^{+}l^{-}) and ϒ_{D}→3V→3(l^{+}l^{-}) (l=e,μ,π). The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BABAR and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, e^{+}e^{-}→χχ[over ¯]+nV, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter.

  14. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States.

    PubMed

    An, Haipeng; Echenard, Bertrand; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-15

    A model of the dark sector where O(few  GeV) mass dark matter particles χ couple to a lighter dark force mediator V, m_{V}≪m_{χ}, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic halos. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of χ, such as 0^{-+} and 1^{--} states, η_{D} and ϒ_{D}, is an important search channel. We show that e^{+}e^{-}→η_{D}+V or ϒ_{D}+γ production at B factories for α_{D}>0.1 is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via η_{D}→2V→2(l^{+}l^{-}) and ϒ_{D}→3V→3(l^{+}l^{-}) (l=e,μ,π). The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BABAR and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, e^{+}e^{-}→χχ[over ¯]+nV, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter. PMID:27127956

  15. Probing the Higgs sector of the minimal Left-Right symmetric model at future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Zhang, Yongchao

    2016-05-01

    If neutrino masses arise from a TeV-scale minimal Left-Right seesaw model, the ensuing extended Higgs sector with neutral, singly and doubly-charged scalars has a plethora of implications for new Higgs boson searches beyond the Standard Model at future hadron colliders, such as the √{s} = 14 TeV High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) and the proposed √{s} = 100 TeV collider (FCC-hh or SPPC). In this article, we provide a glimpse of this new physics in the Higgs sector. Our discussion focuses on the minimal non-supersymmetric version of the Left-Right model with high-scale parity breaking but TeV-scale SU(2) R -breaking, a property desirable to suppress the type-II seesaw contribution to neutrino masses. We analyze the masses and couplings of the physical Higgs bosons in this model, and discuss their dominant production and decay modes at hadron colliders. We identify the best discovery channels for each of the non-SM Higgs bosons and estimate the expected SM backgrounds in these channels to derive the sensitivity reaches for the new Higgs sector at future hadron colliders under discussion. Following a rather conservative approach, we estimate that the heavy Higgs sector can be effectively probed up to 15 TeV at the √{s} = 100 TeV machine. We also discuss how the LR Higgs sector can be distinguished from other extended Higgs sectors.

  16. A framework to analyze searches for gauge bosons of the hidden light sector in electron scattering fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, T.

    2013-11-07

    Electron scattering fixed target experiments are a versatile tool to probe various kinds of physics phenomena. Recently fixed target experiments in which an electron beam is scattered off a heavy nucleus and a lepton-antilepton pair is created, i.e. e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}, were utilized to search for physics beyond the standard model at modest energies. In these experiments one searches for a small, narrow resonance in the invariant mass spectrum of the lepton-antilepton pair, arising from the exchange of a new light gauge boson γ′ coupling to the dark sector as well as very weakly to standard model particles. Such a signal would appear as an enhancement over a smooth QED background. Hence a precise understanding of the background is crucial. We present a theoretical analysis of the process e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}. Therefore we have performed an analysis of the cross section, which is then used to extract exclusion limits on the parameter space of the γ′, describing the existing experimental data taken at MAMI.

  17. Hidden photons in connection to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, Sarah; Ringwald, Andreas; Goodsell, Mark D.

    2013-11-07

    Light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so called hidden photons, which reside in a hidden sector have attracted much attention since they are a well motivated feature of many scenarios beyond the Standard Model and furthermore could mediate the interaction with hidden sector dark matter. We review limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from such experiments at KEK and Orsay. In addition, we study the possibility of having dark matter in the hidden sector. A simple toy model and different supersymmetric realisations are shown to provide viable dark matter candidates in the hidden sector that are in agreement with recent direct detection limits.

  18. Strategies for probing nonminimal dark sectors at colliders: The interplay between cuts and kinematic distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Su, Shufang; Thomas, Brooks

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the strategies and prospects for distinguishing between traditional dark-matter models and models with nonminimal dark sectors—including models of Dynamical Dark Matter—at hadron colliders. For concreteness, we focus on events with two hadronic jets and large missing transverse energy at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As we discuss, simple "bump-hunting" searches are not sufficient; probing nonminimal dark sectors typically requires an analysis of the actual shapes of the distributions of relevant kinematic variables. We therefore begin by identifying those kinematic variables whose distributions are particularly suited to this task. However, as we demonstrate, this then leads to a number of additional subtleties, since cuts imposed on the data for the purpose of background reduction can at the same time have the unintended consequence of distorting these distributions in unexpected ways, thereby obscuring signals of new physics. We therefore proceed to study the correlations between several of the most popular relevant kinematic variables currently on the market, and investigate how imposing cuts on one or more of these variables can impact the distributions of others. Finally, we combine our results in order to assess the prospects for distinguishing nonminimal dark sectors in this channel at the upgraded LHC.

  19. Probing the Higgs sector of high-scale supersymmetry-breaking models at the Tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Draper, P.; Heinemeyer, S.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Weiglein, G.

    2011-03-07

    A canonical signature of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) is the presence of a neutral Higgs boson with mass bounded from above by about 135 GeV and standard model (SM)-like couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons. In this paper we investigate the reach of the Tevatron collider for the MSSM Higgs sector parameter space associated with a variety of high-scale minimal models of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, including the constrained MSSM, minimal gauge-mediated SUSY breaking, and minimal anomaly-mediated SUSY breaking. We find that the Tevatron can provide strong constraints on these models via Higgs boson searches. Considering a simple projection for the efficiency improvements in the Tevatron analyses, we find that with an integrated luminosity of 16 fb{sup -1} per detector and an efficiency improvement of 20% compared to the present situation, these models could be probed essentially over their entire ranges of validity. With 40% analysis improvements and 16 fb{sup -1}, our projection shows that evidence at the 3{sigma} level for the light Higgs boson could be expected in extended regions of parameter space.

  20. Probing the Higgs sector of high-scale supersymmetry-breaking models at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Draper, Patrick; Heinemeyer, Sven; Liu, Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.; Weiglein, Georg

    2011-03-01

    A canonical signature of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) is the presence of a neutral Higgs boson with mass bounded from above by about 135 GeV and standard model (SM)-like couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons. In this paper we investigate the reach of the Tevatron collider for the MSSM Higgs sector parameter space associated with a variety of high-scale minimal models of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, including the constrained MSSM, minimal gauge-mediated SUSY breaking, and minimal anomaly-mediated SUSY breaking. We find that the Tevatron can provide strong constraints on these models via Higgs boson searches. Considering a simple projection for the efficiency improvements in the Tevatron analyses, we find that with an integrated luminosity of 16 fb{sup -1} per detector and an efficiency improvement of 20% compared to the present situation, these models could be probed essentially over their entire ranges of validity. With 40% analysis improvements and 16 fb{sup -1}, our projection shows that evidence at the 3{sigma} level for the light Higgs boson could be expected in extended regions of parameter space.

  1. Probing the W-Z-Higgs sector of electroweak gauge theories at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.

    1986-10-01

    We review and summarize the procedures for exploring at the SSC the W-Z-Higgs sector of SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) and extended gauge theory versions thereof, including supersymmetric and left-right symmetric models.

  2. Hidden colostomy.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gordon, P H

    1993-08-01

    For the patient with an unresectable carcinoma of the rectum, establishment of a "hidden" colostomy rather than formal colostomy, provides a better interim quality of life. When necessary, the "hidden" colostomy can readily be converted to a formal colostomy without the need for a laparotomy or general anesthetic. We conclude that surgeons should remember this technique when the appropriate situation occurs. PMID:7688147

  3. STELLAR MASS-GAP AS A PROBE OF HALO ASSEMBLY HISTORY AND CONCENTRATION: YOUTH HIDDEN AMONG OLD FOSSILS

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, A. J.; Conroy, C.; Wetzel, A. R.; Tinker, J. L.

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the use of the halo mass-gap statistic—defined as the logarithmic difference in mass between the host halo and its most massive satellite subhalo—as a probe of halo age and concentration. A cosmological N-body simulation is used to study N ∼ 25, 000 group/cluster-sized halos in the mass range 10{sup 12.5} < M{sub halo}/M{sub ☉} < 10{sup 14.5}. In agreement with previous work, we find that halo mass-gap is related to halo formation time and concentration. On average, older and more highly concentrated halos have larger halo mass-gaps, and this trend is stronger than the mass-concentration relation over a similar dynamic range. However, there is a large amount of scatter owing to the transitory nature of the satellite subhalo population, which limits the use of the halo mass-gap statistic on an object-by-object basis. For example, we find that 20% of very large halo mass-gap systems (akin to {sup f}ossil groups{sup )} are young and have likely experienced a recent merger between a massive satellite subhalo and the central subhalo. We relate halo mass-gap to the observable stellar mass-gap via abundance matching. Using a galaxy group catalog constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we find that the star formation and structural properties of galaxies at fixed mass show no trend with stellar mass-gap. This is despite a variation in halo age of ≈2.5 Gyr over ≈1.2 dex in stellar mass-gap. Thus, we find no evidence to suggest that the halo formation history significantly affects galaxy properties.

  4. A MAGNIFIED GLANCE INTO THE DARK SECTOR: PROBING COSMOLOGICAL MODELS WITH STRONG LENSING IN A1689

    SciTech Connect

    Magaña, Juan; Motta, V.; Cárdenas, Victor H.; Verdugo, T.; Jullo, Eric E-mail: veronica.motta@uv.cl E-mail: tomasverdugo@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we constrain four alternative models to the late cosmic acceleration in the universe: Chevallier–Polarski–Linder (CPL), interacting dark energy (IDE), Ricci holographic dark energy (HDE), and modified polytropic Cardassian (MPC). Strong lensing (SL) images of background galaxies produced by the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 are used to test these models. To perform this analysis we modify the LENSTOOL lens modeling code. The value added by this probe is compared with other complementary probes: Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We found that the CPL constraints obtained for the SL data are consistent with those estimated using the other probes. The IDE constraints are consistent with the complementary bounds only if large errors in the SL measurements are considered. The Ricci HDE and MPC constraints are weak, but they are similar to the BAO, SN Ia, and CMB estimations. We also compute the figure of merit as a tool to quantify the goodness of fit of the data. Our results suggest that the SL method provides statistically significant constraints on the CPL parameters but is weak for those of the other models. Finally, we show that the use of the SL measurements in galaxy clusters is a promising and powerful technique to constrain cosmological models. The advantage of this method is that cosmological parameters are estimated by modeling the SL features for each underlying cosmology. These estimations could be further improved by SL constraints coming from other galaxy clusters.

  5. A Magnified Glance into the Dark Sector: Probing Cosmological Models with Strong Lensing in A1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, V. Motta ´ctor H., Vi; Verdugo, T.; Jullo, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we constrain four alternative models to the late cosmic acceleration in the universe: Chevallier–Polarski–Linder (CPL), interacting dark energy (IDE), Ricci holographic dark energy (HDE), and modified polytropic Cardassian (MPC). Strong lensing (SL) images of background galaxies produced by the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 are used to test these models. To perform this analysis we modify the LENSTOOL lens modeling code. The value added by this probe is compared with other complementary probes: Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We found that the CPL constraints obtained for the SL data are consistent with those estimated using the other probes. The IDE constraints are consistent with the complementary bounds only if large errors in the SL measurements are considered. The Ricci HDE and MPC constraints are weak, but they are similar to the BAO, SN Ia, and CMB estimations. We also compute the figure of merit as a tool to quantify the goodness of fit of the data. Our results suggest that the SL method provides statistically significant constraints on the CPL parameters but is weak for those of the other models. Finally, we show that the use of the SL measurements in galaxy clusters is a promising and powerful technique to constrain cosmological models. The advantage of this method is that cosmological parameters are estimated by modeling the SL features for each underlying cosmology. These estimations could be further improved by SL constraints coming from other galaxy clusters.

  6. Channel probe measurements for the American sector clutter experiment, January, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-05-20

    The ionospheric phenomenon called Equatorial Spread F encompasses a variety of effects associated with plasma irregularities occurring in the post-sunset and nighttime ionosphere near the magnetic equator. These irregularities can seriously degrade the performance of systems which involve either of necessity or inadvertently radio propagation through the equatorial ionosphere. One such system is Over-the-Horizon (OTH) radars which operate in the high-frequency (hf) band and use ionospheric reflection for forward and backscatter propagation to ranges of thousands of kilometers. When such radars are directed towards the equator, Spread F irregularities can cause scintillation effects which may be aliased into the ranges of interest and have the effect of causing, excess clutter in which targets may be hidden. In January, 1994 Los Alamos participated in a campaign to measure Spread F effects on OTH propagation from the United States looking towards South America in conjunction with local diagnostics in Peru. During the campaign Los Alamos fielded a 1600 km bistatic path between Piura, Peru, and Arequipa, Peru-, the one-hop reflection region for this path was near the magnetic equator, We obtained four types of measurements: an oblique ionogram between Piura and Arequipa every three minutes; Doppler spread and spatial correlation for a single frequency cw path between Piura and Arequipa; Doppler spread, time-delay spread, and spatial coherence for a 10 kHz bandwidth path between Piura and Arequipa-, and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for the one-way path between the AVA radar in New York and Arequipa, Peru. This report describes the diagnostic experiments that we carried out and gives a brief description of some of the data we obtained.

  7. Dark-matter decay as a complementary probe of multicomponent dark sectors.

    PubMed

    Dienes, Keith R; Kumar, Jason; Thomas, Brooks; Yaylali, David

    2015-02-01

    In single-component theories of dark matter, the 2→2 amplitudes for dark-matter production, annihilation, and scattering can be related to each other through various crossing symmetries. The detection techniques based on these processes are thus complementary. However, multicomponent theories exhibit an additional direction for dark-matter complementarity: the possibility of dark-matter decay from heavier to lighter components. We discuss how this new detection channel may be correlated with the others, and demonstrate that the enhanced complementarity which emerges can be an important ingredient in probing and constraining the parameter spaces of such models.

  8. Gauge extensions of supersymmetric models and hidden valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingxing; Zheng, Sibo

    2009-04-01

    Supersymmetric models with extended group structure beyond the standard model are revisited in the framework of general gauge mediation. Sum rules for sfermion masses are shown to depend genuinely on the group structure, which can serve as important probes for specific models. The left-right model and models with extra U(1) are worked out for illustrations. If the couplings of extra gauge groups are small, supersymmetric hidden valleys of the scale 10-100 GeV can be naturally constructed in companion of a TeV-scale supersymmetric visible sector.

  9. Hidden earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.S.; Yeats, R.S.

    1989-06-01

    Seismologists generally look for earthquakes to happen along visible fault lines, e.g., the San Andreas fault. The authors maintain that another source of dangerous quakes has been overlooked: the release of stress along a fault that is hidden under a fold in the earth's crust. The paper describes the differences between an earthquake which occurs on a visible fault and one which occurs under an anticline and warns that Los Angeles greatest earthquake threat may come from a small quake originating under downtown Los Angeles, rather than a larger earthquake which occurs 50 miles away at the San Andreas fault.

  10. Hidden Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.-R.

    2014-10-01

    With the acceptance of QCD as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, one of the basic problems in the analysis of nuclear phenomena became how to consistently account for the effects of the underlying quark/gluon structure of nucleons and nuclei. Besides providing more detailed understanding of conventional nuclear physics, QCD may also point to novel phenomena accessible by new or upgraded nuclear experimental facilities. We discuss a few interesting applications of QCD to nuclear physics with an emphasis on the hidden color degrees of freedom.

  11. Isovector and hidden-beauty partners of the X(3872)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgaasen, Hallstein; Kou, Emi; Richard, Jean-Marc; Sorba, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The isovector partners of the X(3872), recently found at BES III, Belle and CLEO-c were predicted in a simple model based on the chromomagnetic interaction among quarks. The extension to the hidden-beauty sector is discussed.

  12. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: H{sub 2}S as a probe of dense gas and possibly hidden luminosity toward the Orion KL hot core

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H{sub 2}S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H{sub 2} {sup 32}S, H{sub 2} {sup 34}S, and H{sub 2} {sup 33}S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H{sub 2}S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T {sub rot} = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H{sub 2}S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E {sub up} ≳ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N {sub tot}(H{sub 2} {sup 32}S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}, gas kinetic temperature, T {sub kin} = 120±{sub 10}{sup 13} K, and constrain the H{sub 2} volume density, n{sub H{sub 2}} ≳ 9 × 10 {sup 7} cm{sup –3}, for the H{sub 2}S emitting gas. These results point to an H{sub 2}S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H{sub 2}S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H{sub 2}S of <4.9 × 10 {sup –3}.

  13. Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources: H2S as a Probe of Dense Gas and Possibly Hidden Luminosity Toward the Orion KL Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H2S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H2 32S, H2 34S, and H2 33S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H2S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T rot = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H2S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E up >~ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N tot(H2 32S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 1017 cm-2, gas kinetic temperature, T kin = 120+/- ^{13}_{10} K, and constrain the H2 volume density, n_H_2 >~ 9 × 10 7 cm-3, for the H2S emitting gas. These results point to an H2S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H2S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H2S of <4.9 × 10 -3. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  14. Signatures of a hidden cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-09-26

    If there is a light Abelian gauge boson gamma' in the hidden sector its kinetic mixing with the photon can produce a hidden cosmic microwave background (HCMB). For meV masses, resonant oscillations gamma<-->gamma' happen after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) but before CMB decoupling, increasing the effective number of neutrinos Nnu(eff) and the baryon to photon ratio, and distorting the CMB blackbody spectrum. The agreement between BBN and CMB data provides new constraints. However, including Lyman-alpha data, Nnu(eff) > 3 is preferred. It is tempting to attribute this effect to the HCMB. The interesting parameter range will be tested in upcoming laboratory experiments. PMID:18851438

  15. Dark matter freeze-out in a nonrelativistic sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappadopulo, Duccio; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Trevisan, Gabriele

    2016-08-01

    A thermally decoupled hidden sector of particles, with a mass gap, generically enters a phase of cannibalism in the early Universe. The Standard Model sector becomes exponentially colder than the hidden sector. We propose the cannibal dark matter framework, where dark matter resides in a cannibalizing sector with a relic density set by 2-to-2 annihilations. Observable signals of cannibal dark matter include a boosted rate for indirect detection, new relativistic degrees of freedom, and warm dark matter.

  16. Hidden SU (N ) glueball dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Amarjit; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter candidate is from a pure non-Abelian gauge theory of the hidden sector, motivated in large part by its elegance and simplicity. The dark matter is the lightest bound state made of the confined gauge fields, the hidden glueball. We point out that this simple setup is capable of providing rich and novel phenomena in the dark sector, especially in the parameter space of large N . They include self-interacting and warm dark matter scenarios, Bose-Einstein condensation leading to massive dark stars possibly millions of times heavier than our sun giving rise to gravitational lensing effects, and indirect detections through higher dimensional operators as well as interesting collider signatures.

  17. Hidden circuits and argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Kesonen, Mikko H. P.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the relevance of DC circuits in everyday life and schools, they have been shown to cause numerous learning difficulties at various school levels. In the course of this article, we present a flexible method for teaching DC circuits at lower secondary level. The method is labelled as hidden circuits, and the essential idea underlying hidden circuits is in hiding the actual wiring of DC circuits, but to make their behaviour evident for pupils. Pupils are expected to find out the wiring of the circuit which should enhance their learning of DC circuits. We present two possible ways to utilise hidden circuits in a classroom. First, they can be used to test and enhance pupils’ conceptual understanding when pupils are expected to find out which one of the offered circuit diagram options corresponds to the actual circuit shown. This method aims to get pupils to evaluate the circuits holistically rather than locally, and as a part of that aim this method highlights any learning difficulties of pupils. Second, hidden circuits can be used to enhance pupils’ argumentation skills with the aid of argumentation sheet that illustrates the main elements of an argument. Based on the findings from our co-operating teachers and our own experiences, hidden circuits offer a flexible and motivating way to supplement teaching of DC circuits.

  18. Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

    2013-11-01

    On February 29th 2012, China published its new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CH-NAAQS) aiming at revising the standards and measurements for both gaseous pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), and also particle pollutants including PM10 and PM2.5. In order to understand the air pollution status regarding this new standard, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system was applied over Yangtze River Delta (YRD) within this study to examine the criteria gaseous pollutants listed in the new CH-NAAQS. Sensitivity simulations were also conducted to assess the responses of gaseous pollutants under 8 different sector-dependent emission reduction scenarios in order to evaluate the potential control strategies. 2006 was selected as the simulation year in order to review the air quality condition at the beginning of China’s 11th Five-Year-Plan (FYP, from 2006 to 2010), and also compared with air quality status in 2010 as the end of 11th FYP to probe into the effectiveness of the national emission control efforts. Base case simulation showed distinct seasonal variation for gaseous pollutants: SO2, and NO2 were found to have higher surface concentrations in winter while O3 was found to have higher concentrations in spring and summer than other seasons. According to the analyses focused on 3 megacities within YRD, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, we found different air quality conditions among the cities: NO2 was the primary pollutant that having the largest number of days exceeding the CH-NAAQS daily standard (80 μg/m3) in Shanghai (59 days) and Nanjing (27 days); SO2 was the primary pollutant with maximum number of days exceeding daily air quality standard (150 μg/m3) in Hangzhou (28 days), while O3 exceeding the daily maximum 8-hour standard (160 μg/m3) for relatively fewer days in all the three cities (9 days in Shanghai, 14 days in Nanjing, and 11 days in Hangzhou). Simulation results from predefined potential applicable

  19. Hidden solution to the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem in gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tuhin S.; Schmaltz, Martin

    2008-05-01

    We propose a solution to the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem in gauge mediation. The novel feature of our solution is that it uses dynamics of the hidden sector, which is often present in models with dynamical supersymmetry breaking. We give an explicit example model of gauge mediation where a very simple messenger sector generates both {mu} and B{sub {mu}} at one loop. The usual problem, that B{sub {mu}} is then too large, is solved by strong renormalization effects from the hidden sector which suppress B{sub {mu}} relative to {mu}. Our mechanism relies on an assumption about the signs of certain incalculable anomalous dimensions in the hidden sector. Making these assumptions not only allows us to solve the {mu}/B{sub {mu}} problem but also leads to a characteristic superpartner spectrum which would be a smoking gun signal for our mechanism.

  20. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  1. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  2. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  3. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  4. SU(3) breaking and hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; OConnell, H.B.

    1998-10-01

    We study the various existing implementations of SU(3) breaking in the hidden local symmetry model for the low energy hadronic sector following a mechanism originally proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki (BKY). We pay particular attention to Hermiticity and current conservation. Following this, we present a new method for including symmetry breaking effects which preserves the BKY mass relation among vector mesons. Symmetry breaking (SB) necessarily requires a transformation of the pseudoscalar fields, which, following BKY, we refer to as field renormalization. We examine the consequences of propagating this through all Lagrangian terms including the anomalous ones. We thus explore the consequences of these various SB schemes for both charged and neutral pseudoscalar decay constants as measured in weak and anomalous decays respectively. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACAP Facts for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Child Abuse - The Hidden Bruises Quick Links Facts For Families ... 5; Updated November 2014 The statistics on physical child abuse are alarming. It is estimated hundreds of thousands ...

  6. Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These gateways link the magnetic field of our...

  7. Hidden Statistics of Schroedinger Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Work was carried out in determination of the mathematical origin of randomness in quantum mechanics and creating a hidden statistics of Schr dinger equation; i.e., to expose the transitional stochastic process as a "bridge" to the quantum world. The governing equations of hidden statistics would preserve such properties of quantum physics as superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods.

  8. Supersymmetry breaking, moduli stabilization, and hidden U(1) breaking in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Torabian, Mahdi

    2011-06-15

    We calculate and explore the moduli potential for M theory compactified on G{sub 2}-manifolds in which the superpotential is dominated by a single membrane instanton term plus one from an asymptotically free hidden sector gauge interaction. We show that all moduli can be stabilized and that hidden sector gauge symmetries can be Higgsed at a high scale. We then compute the spectrum of superpartner masses at the grand unified theory scale and evolve it to the electroweak scale. We find a spectrum which is very similar to the G{sub 2}-minimal supersymmetric standard model with light gauginos - accessible at the LHC - and a neutral wino dark matter candidate.

  9. Hidden symmetries in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Peter K.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2016-07-01

    There are deep, but hidden, geometric structures within jammed systems, associated with hidden symmetries. These can be revealed by repeated transformations under which these structures lead to fixed points. These geometric structures can be found in the Voronoi tesselation of space defined by the packing. In this paper we examine two iterative processes: maximum inscribed sphere (MIS) inversion and a real-space coarsening scheme. Under repeated iterations of the MIS inversion process we find invariant systems in which every particle is equal to the maximum inscribed sphere within its Voronoi cell. Using a real-space coarsening scheme we reveal behavior in geometric order parameters which is length-scale invariant.

  10. Preschoolers Search for Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Yuping; Keen, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The issue of whether young children use spatio-temporal information (e.g., movement of objects through time and space) and/or contact-mechanical information (e.g., interaction between objects) to search for a hidden object was investigated. To determine whether one cue can have priority over the other, a dynamic event that put these cues into…

  11. The hidden dragons.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Williamson, Peter J

    2003-10-01

    Most multinational corporations are fascinated with China. Carried away by the number of potential customers and the relatively cheap labor, firms seeking a presence in China have traditionally focused on selling products, setting up manufacturing facilities, or both. But they've ignored an important development: the emergence of Chinese firms as powerful rivals--in China and also in the global market. In this article, Ming Zeng and Peter Williamson describe how Chinese companies like Haier, Legend, and Pearl River Piano have quietly managed to grab market share from older, bigger, and financially stronger rivals in Asia, Europe, and the United States. Global managers tend to offer the usual explanations for why Chinese companies don't pose a threat: They aren't big enough or profitable enough to compete overseas, the managers say, and these primarily state-owned companies are ill-financed and ill-equipped for global competition. As the government's policies about the private ownership of companies changed from forbidding the practice to encouraging it, a new breed of Chinese companies evolved. The authors outline the four types of hybrid Chinese companies that are simultaneously tackling the global market. China's national champions are using their advantages as domestic leaders to build global brands. The dedicated exporters are entering foreign markets on the strength of their economies of scale. The competitive networks have taken on world markets by bringing together small, specialized companies that operate in close proximity. And the technology upstarts are using innovations developed by China's government-owned research institutes to enter emerging sectors such as biotechnology. Zeng and Williamson identify these budding multinationals, analyze their strategies, and evaluate their weaknesses. PMID:14521101

  12. The hidden dragons.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Williamson, Peter J

    2003-10-01

    Most multinational corporations are fascinated with China. Carried away by the number of potential customers and the relatively cheap labor, firms seeking a presence in China have traditionally focused on selling products, setting up manufacturing facilities, or both. But they've ignored an important development: the emergence of Chinese firms as powerful rivals--in China and also in the global market. In this article, Ming Zeng and Peter Williamson describe how Chinese companies like Haier, Legend, and Pearl River Piano have quietly managed to grab market share from older, bigger, and financially stronger rivals in Asia, Europe, and the United States. Global managers tend to offer the usual explanations for why Chinese companies don't pose a threat: They aren't big enough or profitable enough to compete overseas, the managers say, and these primarily state-owned companies are ill-financed and ill-equipped for global competition. As the government's policies about the private ownership of companies changed from forbidding the practice to encouraging it, a new breed of Chinese companies evolved. The authors outline the four types of hybrid Chinese companies that are simultaneously tackling the global market. China's national champions are using their advantages as domestic leaders to build global brands. The dedicated exporters are entering foreign markets on the strength of their economies of scale. The competitive networks have taken on world markets by bringing together small, specialized companies that operate in close proximity. And the technology upstarts are using innovations developed by China's government-owned research institutes to enter emerging sectors such as biotechnology. Zeng and Williamson identify these budding multinationals, analyze their strategies, and evaluate their weaknesses.

  13. The Other Side of the Hidden Curriculum: Correspondence Theories and The Labor Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Michael W.

    1980-01-01

    Correspondence theories imply that there are specific characteristics, behavioral traits, and skills that an economy requires of its workers. These economic needs determine what goes on in all other sectors of society, particularly in the school. The hidden curriculum is then differentiated by economic class and economic potential. (JN)

  14. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  15. Search for dark photons from supersymmetric hidden valleys.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-08-21

    We search for a new light gauge boson, a dark photon, with the D0 experiment. In the model we consider, supersymmetric partners are pair produced and cascade to the lightest neutralinos that can decay into the hidden sector state plus either a photon or a dark photon. The dark photon decays through its mixing with a photon into fermion pairs. We therefore investigate a previously unexplored final state that contains a photon, two spatially close leptons, and large missing transverse energy. We do not observe any evidence for dark photons and set a limit on their production. PMID:19792716

  16. Mystery of the Hidden Cosmos [Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-16

    Scientists know there must be more matter in the universe than what is visible. Searches for this dark matter have focused on a single unseen particle, but decades of experiments have been unsuccessful at finding it. Exotic possibilities for dark matter are looking increasingly plausible. Rather than just one particle, dark matter could contain an entire world of particles and forces that barely interact with normal matter. Complex dark matter could form dark atoms and molecules and even clump together to make hidden galactic disks that overlap with the spiral arms of the Milky Way and other galaxies. Experiments are under way to search for evidence of such a dark sector.

  17. Diffusion of hidden charm mesons in hadronic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sukanya; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Das, Santosh K.; Sarkar, Sourav; Alam, Jan-e.

    2016-07-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of a hot hadronic medium have been evaluated by using hidden charm mesons as probes. The scattering amplitudes required for the evaluation of these coefficients are calculated using an effective theory and scattering lengths obtained from lattice QCD calculations. It is found that although the magnitude of the transport coefficients are small their temperature variation is strong. The insignificant momentum diffusion of J / ψ in the hadronic medium keeps their momentum distribution largely unaltered. Therefore, the task of characterization of quark gluon plasma by using the observed suppression of J / ψ at high momentum will be comparatively easier.

  18. On quantum algorithms for noncommutative hidden subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, M.; Hoeyer, P.

    1998-12-01

    Quantum algorithms for factoring and discrete logarithm have previously been generalized to finding hidden subgroups of finite Abelian groups. This paper explores the possibility of extending this general viewpoint to finding hidden subgroups of noncommutative groups. The authors present a quantum algorithm for the special case of dihedral groups which determines the hidden subgroup in a linear number of calls to the input function. They also explore the difficulties of developing an algorithm to process the data to explicitly calculate a generating set for the subgroup. A general framework for the noncommutative hidden subgroup problem is discussed and they indicate future research directions.

  19. Quantum computation and hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    Many physicists limit oneself to an instrumentalist description of quantum phenomena and ignore the problems of foundation and interpretation of quantum mechanics. This instrumentalist approach results to "specialization barbarism" and mass delusion concerning the problem, how a quantum computer can be made. The idea of quantum computation can be described within the limits of quantum formalism. But in order to understand how this idea can be put into practice one should realize the question: "What could the quantum formalism describe?", in spite of the absence of an universally recognized answer. Only a realization of this question and the undecided problem of quantum foundations allows to see in which quantum systems the superposition and EPR correlation could be expected. Because of the "specialization barbarism" many authors are sure that Bell proved full impossibility of any hidden-variables interpretation. Therefore it is important to emphasize that in reality Bell has restricted to validity limits of the no-hidden-variables proof and has shown that two-state quantum system can be described by hidden variables. The later means that no experimental result obtained on two-state quantum system can prove the existence of superposition and violation of the realism. One should not assume before unambiguous experimental evidence that any two-state quantum system is quantum bit. No experimental evidence of superposition of macroscopically distinct quantum states and of a quantum bit on base of superconductor structure was obtained for the present. Moreover same experimental results can not be described in the limits of the quantum formalism.

  20. Solving the "Hidden Line" Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    David Hedgley Jr., a mathematician at Dryden Flight Research Center, has developed an accurate computer program that considers whether a line in a graphic model of a three dimensional object should or should not be visible. The Hidden Line Computer Code, program automatically removes superfluous lines and permits the computer to display an object from specific viewpoints, just as the human eye would see it. Users include Rowland Institute for Science in Cambridge, MA, several departments of Lockheed Georgia Co., and Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD).

  1. Recent Progress in Search for Dark Sector Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyergiyev, Maksym

    2016-08-01

    Many difficulties are encountered when attempting to pinpoint a common origin for several observed astrophysical anomalies, and when assessing their tension with existing exclusion limits. These include systematic uncertainties affecting the operation of the detectors, our knowledge of their response, astrophysical uncertainties, and the broad range of particle couplings that can mediate interaction with a detector target. Particularly interesting astrophysical evidence has motivated a search for dark-photon, and focused our attention on a Hidden Valleys model with a GeV-scale dark sector that produces exciting signatures. Results from recent underground experiments are also considered. There is a `light' hidden sector (dark sector), present in many models of new physics beyond the Standard Model, which contains a colorful spectrum of new particles. Recently, it has been shown that this spectrum can give rise to unique signatures at colliders when the mass scale in the hidden sector is well below a TeV; as in Hidden Valleys, Stueckelberg extensions, and Unparticle models. These physics models produce unique signatures of collimated leptons at high energies. By studying these ephemeral particles we hope to trace the history of the Universe. Our present theories lead us to believe that there is something new just around the corner, which should be accessible at the energies made available by modern colliders.

  2. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Pedersen, Ulf R.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general "hidden" scale invariance of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant inverse power-law (IPL) pair interactions. However, crystal packings of several transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Hg), most post-transition metals (Ga, In, Sn, and Tl), and the metalloids Si and Ge cannot be explained by the IPL assumption. The virial-energy correlation coefficients of iron and phosphorous are shown to increase at elevated pressures. Finally, we discuss how scale invariance explains the Grüneisen equation of state and a number of well-known empirical melting and freezing rules.

  3. Dissolved gas - the hidden saboteur

    SciTech Connect

    Magorien, V.G.

    1993-12-31

    Almost all hydraulic power components, to properly perform their tasks, rely on one basic, physical property, i.e., the incompressibility of the working fluid. Unfortunately, a frequently overlooked fluid property which frustrates this requirement is its ability to absorb, i.e., dissolve, store and give off gas. The gas is, most often but not always, air. This property is a complex one because it is a function not only of the fluid`s chemical make-up but temperature, pressure, exposed area, depth and time. In its relationshiop to aircraft landing-gear, where energy is absorbed hydraulically, this multi-faceted fluid property can be detrimental in two ways: dynamically, i.e., loss of energy absorption ability and statically, i.e., improper aircraft attitude on the ground. The pupose of this paper is to bring an awareness to this property by presenting: (1) examples of these manifestations with some empirical and practical solutions to them, (2) illustrations of this normally `hidden saboteur` at work, (3) Henry`s Dissolved Gas Law, (4) room-temperature, saturated values of dissolved gas for a number of different working fluids, (5) a description of the instrument used to obtain them, (6) some `missing elements` of the Dissolved Gas Law pertaining to absoption, (7) how static and dynamic conditions effect gas absorption and (8) some recommended solutions to prevent becoming a victim of this `hidden saboteur`

  4. Hidden Variable Theories and Quantum Nonlocality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We clarify the meaning of Bell's theorem and its implications for the construction of hidden variable theories by considering an example system consisting of two entangled spin-1/2 particles. Using this example, we present a simplified version of Bell's theorem and describe several hidden variable theories that agree with the predictions of…

  5. Building Simple Hidden Markov Models. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Ng, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are widely used in bioinformatics, speech recognition and many other areas. This note presents HMMs via the framework of classical Markov chain models. A simple example is given to illustrate the model. An estimation method for the transition probabilities of the hidden states is also discussed.

  6. Heating up the Galaxy with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Hernández-Chifflet, Guzmán

    2015-12-29

    We elaborate on the dynamics of ionized interstellar medium in the presence of hidden photon dark matter. Our main focus is the ultra-light regime, where the hidden photon mass is smaller than the plasma frequency in the Milky Way. We point out that as a result of the Galactic plasma shielding direct detection of ultra-light photons in this mass range is especially challenging. However, we demonstrate that ultra-light hidden photon dark matter provides a powerful heating source for the ionized interstellar medium. This results in a strong bound on the kinetic mixing between hidden and regular photons all the way down to the hidden photon masses of order 10{sup −20} eV.

  7. Heating up the Galaxy with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Hernández-Chifflet, Guzmán E-mail: ghc236@nyu.edu

    2015-12-01

    We elaborate on the dynamics of ionized interstellar medium in the presence of hidden photon dark matter. Our main focus is the ultra-light regime, where the hidden photon mass is smaller than the plasma frequency in the Milky Way. We point out that as a result of the Galactic plasma shielding direct detection of ultra-light photons in this mass range is especially challenging. However, we demonstrate that ultra-light hidden photon dark matter provides a powerful heating source for the ionized interstellar medium. This results in a strong bound on the kinetic mixing between hidden and regular photons all the way down to the hidden photon masses of order 10{sup −20} eV.

  8. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed.

  9. Stochastic thermodynamics of hidden pumps.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Parrondo, Juan M R

    2015-05-01

    We show that a reversible pumping mechanism operating between two states of a kinetic network can give rise to Poisson transitions between these two states. An external observer, for whom the pumping mechanism is not accessible, will observe a Markov chain satisfying local detailed balance with an emerging effective force induced by the hidden pump. Due to the reversibility of the pump, the actual entropy production turns out to be lower than the coarse-grained entropy production estimated from the flows and affinities of the resulting Markov chain. Moreover, in presence of a large time scale separation between the fast-pumping dynamics and the slow-network dynamics, a finite current with zero dissipation may be produced. We make use of these general results to build a synthetase-like kinetic scheme able to reversibly produce high free-energy molecules at a finite rate and a rotatory motor achieving 100% efficiency at finite speed. PMID:26066126

  10. Baryon states with hidden charm in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, T.; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, E.

    2016-03-01

    The s -wave interaction of bar{D}Λ_c , bar{D} Σ_c , bar{D}^{ast}Λ_c , bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c and bar{D}Σ_c^{ast} , bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} , is studied within a unitary coupled channels scheme with the extended local hidden gauge approach. In addition to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term, several additional diagrams via the pion exchange are also taken into account as box potentials. Furthermore, in order to implement the full coupled channels calculation, some of the box potentials which mix the vector-baryon and pseudoscalar-baryon sectors are extended to construct the effective transition potentials. As a result, we have observed six possible states in several angular momenta. Four of them correspond to two pairs of admixture states, two of bar{D}Σ_c-bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c with J = 1/2 , and two of bar{D}Σ_c^{ast} - bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} with J = 3/2 . Moreover, we find a bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c resonance which couples to the bar{D}Λ_c channel and one spin degenerated bound state of bar{D}^{ast}Σ_c^{ast} with J = 1/2,5/2.

  11. Baryons States with Hidden Charm in the Extended Local Hidden Gauge Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Toshitaka; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, Eulogio

    The s-wave interaction of bar{D}Λ c, bar{D}Σ c, {bar{D}}nolimits*Λ c, {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c and bar{D}Σ c*, {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c*, is studied within a unitary coupled channels scheme with the extended local hidden gauge approach. In addition to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term, several additional diagrams via the pion-exchange are also taken into account as box potentials. Furthermore, in order to implement the full coupled channels calculation, some of the box potentials which mix the vector-baryon and pseudoscalar-baryon sectors are extended to construct the effective transition potentials. As a result, we have observed six possible states in several angular momenta. Four of them correspond to two pairs of admixture states, two of bar{D}Σ c - {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c with J = 1/2, and two of bar{D}Σ c* - {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c* with J = 3/2. Moreover, we find a {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c resonance which couples to the bar{D}Λ c channel and one spin degenerated bound state of {bar{D}}nolimits*Σ c* with J = 1/2,5/2.

  12. Variational Infinite Hidden Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Bousmalis, Konstantinos; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Pantic, Maja; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-09-01

    Hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs) are discriminative latent variable models which have been shown to successfully learn the hidden structure of a given classification problem. An Infinite hidden conditional random field is a hidden conditional random field with a countably infinite number of hidden states, which rids us not only of the necessity to specify a priori a fixed number of hidden states available but also of the problem of overfitting. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithms are often employed for inference in such models. However, convergence of such algorithms is rather difficult to verify, and as the complexity of the task at hand increases the computational cost of such algorithms often becomes prohibitive. These limitations can be overcome by variational techniques. In this paper, we present a generalized framework for infinite HCRF models, and a novel variational inference approach on a model based on coupled Dirichlet Process Mixtures, the HCRF-DPM. We show that the variational HCRF-DPM is able to converge to a correct number of represented hidden states, and performs as well as the best parametric HCRFs-chosen via cross-validation-for the difficult tasks of recognizing instances of agreement, disagreement, and pain in audiovisual sequences. PMID:26353136

  13. A classification of hidden-variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburger, Adam; Yanofsky, Noson

    2008-10-01

    Hidden variables are extra components added to try to banish counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics. We start with a quantum-mechanical model and describe various properties that can be asked of a hidden-variable model. We present six such properties and a Venn diagram of how they are related. With two existence theorems and three no-go theorems (EPR, Bell and Kochen-Specker), we show which properties of empirically equivalent hidden-variable models are possible and which are not. Formally, our treatment relies only on classical probability models, and physical phenomena are used only to motivate which models to choose.

  14. Finding an apprenticeship: hidden curriculum and social consequences.

    PubMed

    Goastellec, Gaële; Ruiz, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, the majority of students are oriented toward professional training after compulsory schooling. At this stage, one of the biggest challenges for them is to find an apprenticeship position. Matching supply and demand is a complex process that not only excludes some students from having direct access to professional training but also forces them to make early choices regarding their future sector of employment. So, how does one find an apprenticeship? And what do the students' descriptions of their search for apprenticeships reveal about the institutional determinants of social inequalities at play in the system? Based on 29 interviews conducted in 2014 with 23 apprentices and 6 recruiters in the Canton of Vaud, this article interrogates how the dimensions of educational and social trajectories combine to affect access to apprenticeships and are accentuated by recruiters using a "hidden curriculum" during the recruitment process. A hidden curriculum consists of knowledge and skills not taught by the educational institution but which appear decisive in obtaining an apprenticeship. By analyzing the contrasting experiences of students in their search for an apprenticeship, we identify four types of trajectories that explain different types of school-to-apprenticeship transitions. We show how these determinants are reinforced by the "hidden curriculum" of recruitment based on the soft skills of feeling, autonomy, anticipation, and reflexivity that are assessed in the context of recruitment interactions. The discussion section debates how the criteria that appear to be used to identify the "right apprentice" tend to (re)produce inequalities between students. This not only depends on their academic results but also on their social and cultural skills, their ability to anticipate their choices and, more widely, their ability to be a subject in their recruitment search. "The Subject is neither the individual, nor the self, but the work through which an

  15. Results from the Solar Hidden Photon Search (SHIPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Matthias; Knabbe, Ernst-Axel; Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas; Schneide, Magnus; Susol, Jaroslaw; Wiedemann, Günter

    2015-08-07

    We present the results of a search for transversely polarised hidden photons (HPs) with ∼3 eV energies emitted from the Sun. These hypothetical particles, known also as paraphotons or dark sector photons, are theoretically well motivated for example by string theory inspired extensions of the Standard Model. Solar HPs of sub-eV mass can convert into photons of the same energy (photon ↔ HP oscillations are similar to neutrino flavour oscillations). At SHIPS this would take place inside a long light-tight high-vacuum tube, which tracks the Sun. The generated photons would then be focused into a low-noise photomultiplier at the far end of the tube. Our analysis of 330 h of data (and 330 h of background characterisation) reveals no signal of photons from solar hidden photon conversion. We estimate the rate of newly generated photons due to this conversion to be smaller than 25 mHz/m{sup 2} at the 95% C.L. Using this and a recent model of solar HP emission, we set stringent constraints on χ, the coupling constant between HPs and photons, as a function of the HP mass.

  16. Mystery of the Hidden Cosmos [Complex Dark Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-16

    Scientists know there must be more matter in the universe than what is visible. Searches for this dark matter have focused on a single unseen particle, but decades of experiments have been unsuccessful at finding it. Exotic possibilities for dark matter are looking increasingly plausible. Rather than just one particle, dark matter could contain an entire world of particles and forces that barely interact with normal matter. Complex dark matter could form dark atoms and molecules and even clump together to make hidden galactic disks that overlap with the spiral arms of the Milky Way and other galaxies. Experiments aremore » under way to search for evidence of such a dark sector.« less

  17. Exodus: Hidden origin of dark matter and baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, James

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new framework for explaining the proximity of the baryon and dark matter relic densities ΩDM ≈ 5Ω B . The scenario assumes that the number density of the observed dark matter states is generated due to decays from a second hidden sector which simultaneously generates the baryon asymmetry. In contrast to asymmetric dark matter models, the dark matter can be a real scalar or Majorana fermion and thus presents distinct phenomenology. We discuss aspects of model building and general constraints in this framework. Moreover, we argue that this scenario circumvents several of the experimental bounds which significantly constrain typical models of asymmetric dark matter. We present a simple supersymmetric implementation of this mechanism and show that it can be used to obtain the correct dark matter relic density for a bino LSP.

  18. Fibroid Tumors in Women: A Hidden Epidemic?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Fibroid Tumors in Women: A Hidden Epidemic? Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... turn Javascript on. Dr. Cynthia Morton is seeking women who have fibroid tumors for a "sister study" ...

  19. Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nyiri, J.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Semenova, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Nonstrange and strange pentaquarks with hidden charm are considered as diquark-diquark-antiquark composite systems. Spin and isospin content of such exotic states is discussed and masses are evaluated.

  20. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  1. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  2. An acoustic microscopy technique reveals hidden morphological defenses in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Laforsch, Christian; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang; Tollrian, Ralph

    2004-11-01

    Inducible defenses are common strategies for coping with the selective force of predation in heterogeneous environments. In recent years the conspicuous and often dramatic morphological plasticity of several waterflea species of the genus Daphnia have been found to be inducible defenses activated by chemical cues released by predators. However, the exact defensive mechanisms remained mysterious. Because even some minute morphological alterations proved to be protective against predatory invertebrates, it has been suggested that the visible morphological changes are only the tip of the iceberg of the entire protective mechanisms. Here we applied a method of ultrasonic microscopy with vector contrast at 1.2 GHz to probe hidden morphological defenses. We found that induction with predator kairomones increases the stability of the carapace in two Daphnia species up to 350%. This morphological plasticity provides a major advantage for the induced morphs during predation because predatory invertebrates need to crush or puncture the carapace of their prey to consume them. Our ultrastructural analyses revealed that the internal architecture of the carapace ensures maximal rigidity with minimal material investment. Our results uncover hidden morphological plasticity and suggest a reconsideration of former classification systems in defended and undefended genotypes in Daphnia and possibly in other prey organisms as well.

  3. An acoustic microscopy technique reveals hidden morphological defenses in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Laforsch, Christian; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang; Tollrian, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Inducible defenses are common strategies for coping with the selective force of predation in heterogeneous environments. In recent years the conspicuous and often dramatic morphological plasticity of several waterflea species of the genus Daphnia have been found to be inducible defenses activated by chemical cues released by predators. However, the exact defensive mechanisms remained mysterious. Because even some minute morphological alterations proved to be protective against predatory invertebrates, it has been suggested that the visible morphological changes are only the tip of the iceberg of the entire protective mechanisms. Here we applied a method of ultrasonic microscopy with vector contrast at 1.2 GHz to probe hidden morphological defenses. We found that induction with predator kairomones increases the stability of the carapace in two Daphnia species up to 350%. This morphological plasticity provides a major advantage for the induced morphs during predation because predatory invertebrates need to crush or puncture the carapace of their prey to consume them. Our ultrastructural analyses revealed that the internal architecture of the carapace ensures maximal rigidity with minimal material investment. Our results uncover hidden morphological plasticity and suggest a reconsideration of former classification systems in defended and undefended genotypes in Daphnia and possibly in other prey organisms as well. PMID:15520396

  4. A Chaotic System with Different Families of Hidden Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Thanh; Volos, Christos; Jafari, Sajad; Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Wang, Xiong

    The presence of hidden attractors in dynamical systems has received considerable attention recently both in theory and applications. A novel three-dimensional autonomous chaotic system with hidden attractors is introduced in this paper. It is exciting that this chaotic system can exhibit two different families of hidden attractors: hidden attractors with an infinite number of equilibrium points and hidden attractors without equilibrium. Dynamical behaviors of such system are discovered through mathematical analysis, numerical simulations and circuit implementation.

  5. New hidden beauty molecules predicted by the local hidden gauge approach and heavy quark spin symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C. W.; Ozpineci, A.; Oset, E.

    2015-10-01

    Using a coupled channel unitary approach, combining the heavy quark spin symmetry and the dynamics of the local hidden gauge, we investigate the meson-meson interaction with hidden beauty. We obtain several new states of isospin I = 0: six bound states, and weakly bound six more possible states which depend on the influence of the coupled channel effects.

  6. Detecting targets hidden in random forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouritzin, Michael A.; Luo, Dandan; Newton, Fraser; Wu, Biao

    2009-05-01

    Military tanks, cargo or troop carriers, missile carriers or rocket launchers often hide themselves from detection in the forests. This plagues the detection problem of locating these hidden targets. An electro-optic camera mounted on a surveillance aircraft or unmanned aerial vehicle is used to capture the images of the forests with possible hidden targets, e.g., rocket launchers. We consider random forests of longitudinal and latitudinal correlations. Specifically, foliage coverage is encoded with a binary representation (i.e., foliage or no foliage), and is correlated in adjacent regions. We address the detection problem of camouflaged targets hidden in random forests by building memory into the observations. In particular, we propose an efficient algorithm to generate random forests, ground, and camouflage of hidden targets with two dimensional correlations. The observations are a sequence of snapshots consisting of foliage-obscured ground or target. Theoretically, detection is possible because there are subtle differences in the correlations of the ground and camouflage of the rocket launcher. However, these differences are well beyond human perception. To detect the presence of hidden targets automatically, we develop a Markov representation for these sequences and modify the classical filtering equations to allow the Markov chain observation. Particle filters are used to estimate the position of the targets in combination with a novel random weighting technique. Furthermore, we give positive proof-of-concept simulations.

  7. Show Me the Invisible: Visualizing Hidden Content.

    PubMed

    Geymayer, Thomas; Steinberger, Markus; Lex, Alexander; Streit, Marc; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Content on computer screens is often inaccessible to users because it is hidden, e.g., occluded by other windows, outside the viewport, or overlooked. In search tasks, the efficient retrieval of sought content is important. Current software, however, only provides limited support to visualize hidden occurrences and rarely supports search synchronization crossing application boundaries. To remedy this situation, we introduce two novel visualization methods to guide users to hidden content. Our first method generates awareness for occluded or out-of-viewport content using see-through visualization. For content that is either outside the screen's viewport or for data sources not opened at all, our second method shows off-screen indicators and an on-demand smart preview. To reduce the chances of overlooking content, we use visual links, i.e., visible edges, to connect the visible content or the visible representations of the hidden content. We show the validity of our methods in a user study, which demonstrates that our technique enables a faster localization of hidden content compared to traditional search functionality and thereby assists users in information retrieval tasks. PMID:25325078

  8. Dark radiation constraints on minicharged particles in models with a hidden photon

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Hendrik; Redondo, Javier E-mail: redondo@mpp.mpg.de

    2014-02-01

    We compute the thermalization of a hidden sector consisting of minicharged fermions (MCPs) and massless hidden photons in the early Universe. The precise measurement of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by Planck and the relic abundance of light nuclei produced during big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) constrain the amount of dark radiation of this hidden sector through the effective number of neutrino species, N{sub eff}. This study presents novel and accurate predictions of dark radiation in the strongly and weakly coupled regime for a wide range of model parameters. We give the value of N{sub eff} for MCP masses between ∼ 100 keV and 10 GeV and minicharges in the range 10{sup −11}−1. Our results can be used to constrain MCPs with the current data and they are also a valuable indicator for future experimental searches, should the hint for dark radiation manifest itself in the next release of Planck's data.

  9. Hidden Variables Theorems with Fewer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jay

    A Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) contradiction may be thought of as a sequence of measurements on a system of N particles, for which each may be duplicated by local hidden variables up to, but not including the last of an irreducible set. Each measurement consists of N spatially separated local measurements on individual particles. Existing contradictions require more such measurements than there are particles, the minimum number being N + 1 . By allowing successive measurements to impose incremental local constraints on the hidden variables (as opposed to global constraints associated with products of hidden variables), we derive contradictions that require fewer measurements. We have found protocols for which the number of measurements, Nm, grows more slowly than linearly with the number of particles: Asymptotically, Nm √{ 2 N } for large N if the particles are qubits, and a similar relation holds for particles of higher spins.

  10. Hidden conformal symmetry and quasinormal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang

    2010-12-01

    We provide an algebraic way to calculate the quasinormal modes of a black hole, which possesses a hidden conformal symmetry. We construct an infinite tower of quasinormal modes from the highest-weight mode, in a simple and elegant way. For the scalar, the hidden conformal symmetry manifests itself in the fact that the scalar Laplacian could be rewritten in terms of the SL(2,R) quadratic Casimir. For the vector and the tensor, the hidden conformal symmetry acts on them through Lie derivatives. We show that for three-dimensional black holes, with an appropriate combination of the components, the radial equations of the vector and the tensor could be written in terms of the Lie-induced quadratic Casimir. This makes the algebraic construction of the quasinormal modes feasible. Our results are in good agreement with the previous study.

  11. Hidden treasures - 50 km points of interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lommi, Matias; Kortelainen, Jaana

    2015-04-01

    Tampere is third largest city in Finland and a regional centre. During 70's there occurred several communal mergers. Nowadays this local area has both strong and diversed identity - from wilderness and agricultural fields to high density city living. Outside the city center there are interesting geological points unknown for modern city settlers. There is even a local proverb, "Go abroad to Teisko!". That is the area the Hidden Treasures -student project is focused on. Our school Tammerkoski Upper Secondary School (or Gymnasium) has emphasis on visual arts. We are going to offer our art students scientific and artistic experiences and knowledge about the hidden treasures of Teisko area and involve the Teisko inhabitants into this project. Hidden treasures - Precambrian subduction zone and a volcanism belt with dense bed of gold (Au) and arsenic (As), operating goldmines and quarries of minerals and metamorphic slates. - North of subduction zone a homogenic precambrian magmastone area with quarries, products known as Kuru Grey. - Former ashores of post-glasial Lake Näsijärvi and it's sediments enabled the developing agriculture and sustained settlement. Nowadays these ashores have both scenery and biodiversity values. - Old cattle sheds and dairy buildings made of local granite stones related to cultural stonebuilding inheritance. - Local active community of Kapee, about 100 inhabitants. Students will discover information of these "hidden" phenomena, and rendering this information trough Enviromental Art Method. Final form of this project will be published in several artistic and informative geocaches. These caches are achieved by a GPS-based special Hidden Treasures Cycling Route and by a website guiding people to find these hidden points of interests.

  12. The Second International Conference on Nutrition: Implications for Hidden Hunger.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) was jointly organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and was held at the FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy, from 19 to 21 November 2014. The ICN2 was a high-level intergovernmental meeting that focused global attention on addressing malnutrition in all its forms: undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, overweight, and obesity. The ICN2 was held to specifically address the persistent and unacceptably high levels of malnutrition. Despite much progress in reducing hunger globally, 795 million people remain undernourished, over 2 billion people suffer from various micronutrient deficiencies, and an estimated 161 million children under 5 years of age are stunted, 99 million underweight, and 51 million wasted. Meanwhile, more than 600 million adults are obese. Global problems require global solutions. The ICN2 brought together national policy-makers from food, agriculture, health, education, social protection and other relevant sectors to address the complex problem of malnutrition through a multi-sectoral approach. Two outcome documents - the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action - were endorsed by participating governments at the Conference, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eradicating malnutrition in all its forms and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all. The Rome Declaration on Nutrition is a political statement of 10 commitments for more effective and coordinated action to improve nutrition, while the Framework for Action is a voluntary technical guide of 60 recommendations for the implementation of the political commitments. This chapter provides information on the ICN2 and its outcomes as well as follow-up activities. Emphasis is placed on the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action, with special focus on hidden

  13. The Corporate Illiterates: The Hidden Illiterates of Silicon Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    Describes the writing and business communication problems of college-educated workers in Silicon Valley. Discusses hidden illiterates in the universities and in the workplace. Offers solutions for professors and managers faced with the problem of hidden illiterates. (PRA)

  14. Towards resolving strongly-interacting dark sectors at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Nordström, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Dark sectors with strong interactions have received considerable interest. Assuming the existence of a minimally coupled dark sector which runs to strong interactions in the infrared, we address the question whether the scaling behavior of this dark sector can be observed in missing energy signatures at present and future hadron colliders. We compare these findings to the concrete case of self-interacting dark matter and demonstrate that the energy dependence of high-momentum transfer final states can in principle be used to gain information about the UV structure of hidden sectors at future hadron colliders, subject to large improvements in systematic uncertainties, which could complement proof-of-principle lattice investigations. We also comment on the case of dark Abelian U (1 ) theories.

  15. Finding an apprenticeship: hidden curriculum and social consequences

    PubMed Central

    Goastellec, Gaële; Ruiz, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, the majority of students are oriented toward professional training after compulsory schooling. At this stage, one of the biggest challenges for them is to find an apprenticeship position. Matching supply and demand is a complex process that not only excludes some students from having direct access to professional training but also forces them to make early choices regarding their future sector of employment. So, how does one find an apprenticeship? And what do the students’ descriptions of their search for apprenticeships reveal about the institutional determinants of social inequalities at play in the system? Based on 29 interviews conducted in 2014 with 23 apprentices and 6 recruiters in the Canton of Vaud, this article interrogates how the dimensions of educational and social trajectories combine to affect access to apprenticeships and are accentuated by recruiters using a “hidden curriculum” during the recruitment process. A hidden curriculum consists of knowledge and skills not taught by the educational institution but which appear decisive in obtaining an apprenticeship. By analyzing the contrasting experiences of students in their search for an apprenticeship, we identify four types of trajectories that explain different types of school-to-apprenticeship transitions. We show how these determinants are reinforced by the “hidden curriculum” of recruitment based on the soft skills of feeling, autonomy, anticipation, and reflexivity that are assessed in the context of recruitment interactions. The discussion section debates how the criteria that appear to be used to identify the “right apprentice” tend to (re)produce inequalities between students. This not only depends on their academic results but also on their social and cultural skills, their ability to anticipate their choices and, more widely, their ability to be a subject in their recruitment search. “The Subject is neither the individual, nor the self, but the work through

  16. The Hidden Curriculum of Doctoral Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding-DeKam, Jenni L.; Hamilton, Boni; Loyd, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hidden curriculum of doctoral advising by conceptualizing the advisor as a teacher. Using autoethnographic methods in this case study, we simultaneously explored both sides of the advisor-student relationship. The constructivist paradigm permeated all aspects of the research: data collection, analysis, and interpretation. The…

  17. Hidden Messages: Instructional Materials for Investigating Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Barbara, Ed.; Eder, Elizabeth K., Ed.

    This book, intended to be used in the middle and high school classroom, provides teachers with unique ideas and lesson plans for exploring culture and adding a multicultural perspective to diverse subjects. "Hidden messages" are the messages of culture that are entwined in everyday lives, but which are seldom recognized or appreciated for the…

  18. The Hidden Labour Market of the Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhelo, Anne

    Finding employment as an academic is becoming increasingly challenging for several reasons, including the tightening employment market and increases in the qualifications demanded of jobseekers and the pool of academically trained job seekers. A two-round Delphi study was therefore conducted to identify recruitment channels in the hidden labor…

  19. Discovering Hidden Treasures with GPS Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Paul; Palmer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    "I found it!" Addison proudly proclaimed, as she used an iPhone and Global Positioning System (GPS) software to find the hidden geocache along the riverbank. Others in Lisa Bostick's fourth grade class were jealous, but there would be other geocaches to find. With the excitement of movies like "Pirates of the Caribbean"…

  20. Registration of 'Hidden Valley' meadow fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Hidden Valley' (Reg. No. CV-xxxx, PI xxxxxx) meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.; syn. Festuca pratensis Huds.; syn. Lolium pratense (Huds.) Darbysh.] is a synthetic population originating from 561 parental genotypes. The original germplasm is of unknown central or northern Europ...

  1. Hidden Transcripts of Flight Attendant Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Alexandra G.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes (using flight attendants) hidden transcripts--interactions, stories, myths, and rituals in which employees participate beyond direct observation--to provide an avenue to identify resistance and change in the organizing process. Challenges the outdated ideal of transmissional meaning, questions organizational power by including the…

  2. A Hidden Minority Amidst White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    2008-01-01

    It seems rather amusing to say that the author belongs to a minority, no less a hidden minority. After all, at first glance, she appears to be just another white girl (or woman). She grew up in the mid-west in a predominantly white community, middle class, and well educated. The paradox comes in their definition of minority. Today, as they seek to…

  3. Taking Impressions of Hidden Cavity Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, D.; Mayer, W.

    1987-01-01

    Lightweight, portable internal-molding device makes it possible to measure radii of, or examine contours of, passageways in hidden or complicated cavities. With device, measurements made in field, without returning assemblies to shop or laboratory for inspection. Molding head expands when compressed air applied. Inflatable tubes around head perform dual sealing and aligning function.

  4. Subtleties of Hidden Quantifiers in Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical conjectures and theorems are most often of the form P(x) ? Q(x), meaning ?x,P(x) ? Q(x). The hidden quantifier ?x is crucial in understanding the implication as a statement with a truth value. Here P(x) and Q(x) alone are only predicates, without truth values, since they contain unquantified variables. But standard textbook…

  5. Hidden supersymmetry in quantum bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Francisco Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2007-10-15

    We show that some simple well-studied quantum mechanical systems without fermion (spin) degrees of freedom display, surprisingly, a hidden supersymmetry. The list includes the bound state Aharonov-Bohm, the Dirac delta and the Poeschl-Teller potential problems, in which the unbroken and broken N = 2 supersymmetry of linear and nonlinear (polynomial) forms is revealed.

  6. The connection between spin-charge separation and hidden order in Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Ian; Kruis, Herman; Nussinov, Zohar; Zaanen, Jan

    2004-03-01

    We demonstrate that Luttinger liquids are characterized by a form of hidden order which is similar, but distinct in some crucial regards, to the hidden order characterizing spin-1 Heisenberg chains. Following on from the well-known Ogata-Shiba factorization of the wavefunction of the strong coupling limit of the Hubbard model into pure charge (effective spinless fermions) and spin (spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet) parts, we show that the essential geometrical construct, namely the 'squeezed space' belonging to the spin degrees of freedom, is unversal and exists even in the non-interacting fermion gas. We construct string correlation functions that probe directly the squeezed space, thereby showing how the two-point correlators factorize into spin-only and charge-only components.

  7. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  8. Hidden penis release: adjunctive suprapubic lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Horton, C E; Vorstman, B; Teasley, D; Winslow, B

    1987-08-01

    We believe the hidden penis may be caused and concealed by a prominent suprapubic fat pad in addition to the restrictive fibrous bands of the dartos fascia fixing the shaft of the penis proximally while loose skin folds prolapse distally over the phallus. A penis of inadequate length or appearance may affect body image. Patients with this problem often require psychological support. Hidden penis may be distinguished from micropenis by palpating adequate corpora and showing a stretched penile length within 2 SD of normal. Excision of suprapubic fat with sectioning of the tethering dartos bands will release and increase the length of the penis. Suprapubic fat pad resection may also be helpful to elongate a short penis in cases of adult microphallus, or after partial penectomy because of trauma or cancer. Circumcision is contraindicated.

  9. Biofortification for combating 'hidden hunger' for iron.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Irene; Arosio, Paolo; Tarantino, Delia; Soave, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are responsible for so-called 'hidden undernutrition'. In particular, iron (Fe) deficiency adversely affects growth, immune function and can cause anaemia. However, supplementation of iron can exacerbate infectious diseases and current policies of iron therapy carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of these interventions. Here we review the approaches of biofortification of valuable crops for reducing 'hidden undernutrition' of iron in the light of the latest nutritional and medical advances. The increase of iron and prebiotics in edible parts of plants is expected to improve health, whereas the reduction of phytic acid concentration, in crops valuable for human diet, might be less beneficial for the developed countries, or for the developing countries exposed to endemic infections. PMID:22093370

  10. Hidden variables and nonlocality in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmick, Douglas Lloyd

    1997-05-01

    Most physicists hold a skeptical attitude toward a 'hidden variables' interpretation of quantum theory, despite David Bohm's successful construction of such a theory and John S. Bell's strong arguments in favor of the idea. The first reason for doubt concerns certain mathematical theorems (von Neumann's, Gleason's, Kochen and Specker's, and Bell's) which can be applied to the hidden variables issue. These theorems are often credited with proving that hidden variables are indeed 'impossible', in the sense that they cannot replicate the predictions of quantum mechanics. Many who do not draw such a strong conclusion nevertheless accept that hidden variables have been shown to exhibit prohibitively complicated features. The second concern is that the most sophisticated example of a hidden variables theory-that of David Bohm-exhibits non-locality, i.e., consequences of events at one place can propagate to other places instantaneously. However, neither the mathematical theorems in question nor the attribute of nonlocality detract from the importance of a hidden variables interpretation of quantum theory. Nonlocality is present in quantum mechanics itself, and is a required characteristic of any theory that agrees with the quantum mechanical predictions. We first discuss the earliest analysis of hidden variables-that of von Neumann's theorem-and review John S. Bell's refutation of von Neumann's 'impossibility proof'. We recall and elaborate on Bell's arguments regarding the theorems of Gleason, and Kochen and Specker. According to Bell, these latter theorems do not imply that hidden variables interpretations are untenable, but instead that such theories must exhibit contextuality, i.e., they must allow for the dependence of measurement results on the characteristics of both measured system and measuring apparatus. We demonstrate a new way to understand the implications of both Gleason's theorem and Kochen and Specker's theorem by noting that they prove a result we call

  11. Estimating Neuronal Ageing with Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Pham, Tuan D.

    2011-06-01

    Neuronal degeneration is widely observed in normal ageing, meanwhile the neurode-generative disease like Alzheimer's disease effects neuronal degeneration in a faster way which is considered as faster ageing. Early intervention of such disease could benefit subjects with potentials of positive clinical outcome, therefore, early detection of disease related brain structural alteration is required. In this paper, we propose a computational approach for modelling the MRI-based structure alteration with ageing using hidden Markov model. The proposed hidden Markov model based brain structural model encodes intracortical tissue/fluid distribution using discrete wavelet transformation and vector quantization. Further, it captures gray matter volume loss, which is capable of reflecting subtle intracortical changes with ageing. Experiments were carried out on healthy subjects to validate its accuracy and robustness. Results have shown its ability of predicting the brain age with prediction error of 1.98 years without training data, which shows better result than other age predition methods.

  12. Multiple alignment using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    A simulated annealing method is described for training hidden Markov models and producing multiple sequence alignments from initially unaligned protein or DNA sequences. Simulated annealing in turn uses a dynamic programming algorithm for correctly sampling suboptimal multiple alignments according to their probability and a Boltzmann temperature factor. The quality of simulated annealing alignments is evaluated on structural alignments of ten different protein families, and compared to the performance of other HMM training methods and the ClustalW program. Simulated annealing is better able to find near-global optima in the multiple alignment probability landscape than the other tested HMM training methods. Neither ClustalW nor simulated annealing produce consistently better alignments compared to each other. Examination of the specific cases in which ClustalW outperforms simulated annealing, and vice versa, provides insight into the strengths and weaknesses of current hidden Maxkov model approaches.

  13. Models of single-molecule experiments with periodic perturbations reveal hidden dynamics in RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Qu, Xiaohui; Ma, Ao; Smith, Glenna J; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2009-05-28

    Traditionally, microscopic fluctuations of molecules have been probed by measuring responses of an ensemble to perturbations. Now, single-molecule experiments are capable of following fluctuations without introducing perturbations. However, dynamics not readily sampled at equilibrium should be accessible to nonequilibrium single-molecule measurements. In a recent study [Qu, X. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008, 105, 6602-6607], the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between probes on the L18 loop and 3' terminus of the 260 nucleotide RNase P RNA from Bacillus stearothermophilus was found to exhibit complex kinetics that depended on the (periodically alternating) concentration of magnesium ions ([Mg2+]) in solution. Specifically, this time series was found to exhibit a quasi-periodic response to a square-wave pattern of [Mg2+] changes. Because these experiments directly probe only one of the many degrees of freedom in the macromolecule, models are needed to interpret these data. We find that Hidden Markov Models are inadequate for describing the nonequilibrium dynamics, but they serve as starting points for the construction of models in which a discrete observable degree of freedom is coupled to a continuously evolving (hidden) variable. Consideration of several models of this general form indicates that the quasi-periodic response in the nonequilibrium experiments results from the switching (back and forth) in positions of the minima of the effective potential for the hidden variable. This switching drives oscillation of that variable and synchronizes the population to the changing [Mg2+]. We set the models in the context of earlier theoretical and experimental studies and conclude that single-molecule experiments with periodic peturbations can indeed yield qualitatively new information beyond that obtained at equilibrium. PMID:19415919

  14. Hydraulic-Leak Detector for Hidden Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Loo, S.

    1986-01-01

    Slow leakage of fluid made obvious. Indicator consists of wick wrapped at one end around joint to be monitored. Wick absorbs hydraulic fluid leaking from joint and transmits to opposite end, located outside cover plate and visible to inspector. Leakage manifested as discoloration of outside end of wick. Indicator reveals leaks in hidden fittings on hydraulic lines. Fast inspection of joints without disassembly. Used in aerospace, petroleum, chemical, nuclear, and other industries where removing covers for inspection impossible, difficult, or time-consuming.

  15. The Hidden Gifts of Quiet Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trierweiler, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    The author relates that she was an introvert child. It has always taken her time and energy to find her place in a group. As a grown-up, she still needed quiet time to regroup during a busy day. In this article, the author presents an interview with Marti Olsen Laney, author of "The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child." During the interview,…

  16. Extracting hidden messages in steganographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-07-17

    The eventual goal of steganalytic forensic is to extract the hidden messages embedded in steganographic images. A promising technique that addresses this problem partially is steganographic payload location, an approach to reveal the message bits, but not their logical order. It works by finding modified pixels, or residuals, as an artifact of the embedding process. This technique is successful against simple least-significant bit steganography and group-parity steganography. The actual messages, however, remain hidden as no logical order can be inferred from the located payload. This paper establishes an important result addressing this shortcoming: we show that the expected mean residuals contain enough information to logically order the located payload provided that the size of the payload in each stego image is not fixed. The located payload can be ordered as prescribed by the mean residuals to obtain the hidden messages without knowledge of the embedding key, exposing the vulnerability of these embedding algorithms. We provide experimental results to support our analysis.

  17. Hidden Markov Model Analysis of Multichromophore Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Troy C.; Kim, Hiyun; Giurleo, Jason T.; Talaga, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of single-molecule measurements is greatly complicated by the presence of multiple fluorescent labels. However, many molecular systems of interest consist of multiple interacting components. We investigate this issue using multiply labeled dextran polymers that we intentionally photobleach to the background on a single-molecule basis. Hidden Markov models allow for unsupervised analysis of the data to determine the number of fluorescent subunits involved in the fluorescence intermittency of the 6-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine labels by counting the discrete steps in fluorescence intensity. The Bayes information criterion allows us to distinguish between hidden Markov models that differ by the number of states, that is, the number of fluorescent molecules. We determine information-theoretical limits and show via Monte Carlo simulations that the hidden Markov model analysis approaches these theoretical limits. This technique has resolving power of one fluorescing unit up to as many as 30 fluorescent dyes with the appropriate choice of dye and adequate detection capability. We discuss the general utility of this method for determining aggregation-state distributions as could appear in many biologically important systems and its adaptability to general photometric experiments. PMID:16913765

  18. Extracting hidden messages in steganographic images

    DOE PAGES

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-07-17

    The eventual goal of steganalytic forensic is to extract the hidden messages embedded in steganographic images. A promising technique that addresses this problem partially is steganographic payload location, an approach to reveal the message bits, but not their logical order. It works by finding modified pixels, or residuals, as an artifact of the embedding process. This technique is successful against simple least-significant bit steganography and group-parity steganography. The actual messages, however, remain hidden as no logical order can be inferred from the located payload. This paper establishes an important result addressing this shortcoming: we show that the expected mean residualsmore » contain enough information to logically order the located payload provided that the size of the payload in each stego image is not fixed. The located payload can be ordered as prescribed by the mean residuals to obtain the hidden messages without knowledge of the embedding key, exposing the vulnerability of these embedding algorithms. We provide experimental results to support our analysis.« less

  19. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Non-statistically populated autoionizing levels of Li-like carbon: Hidden-crossings

    SciTech Connect

    Deveney, E.F.; Krause, H.F.; Jones, N.L.

    1995-12-31

    The intensities of the Auger-electron lines from autoionizing (AI) states of Li-like (1s2s2l) configurations excited in ion-atom collisions vary as functions of the collision parameters such as, for example, the collision velocity. A statistical population of the three-electron levels is at best incomplete and underscores the intricate dynamical development of the electronic states. The authors compare several experimental studies to calculations using ``hidden-crossing`` techniques to explore some of the details of these Auger-electron intensity variation phenomena. The investigations show promising results suggesting that Auger-electron intensity variations can be used to probe collision dynamics.

  1. Hidden extra U(1) at the electroweak/TeV scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, B. N.; Rai, Santosh Kumar; McElrath, B.; Nandi, S.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a simple extension of the standard model (SM) by adding an extra U(1) symmetry which is hidden from the SM sector. Such a hidden U(1) has not been considered before, and its existence at the TeV scale can be explored at the LHC. This hidden U(1) does not couple directly to the SM particles, and couples only to new SU(2){sub L} singlet exotic quarks and singlet Higgs bosons, and is broken at the TeV scale. The dominant signals at the high-energy hadron colliders are multilepton and multi-b-jet final states with or without missing energy. We calculate the signal rates as well as the corresponding standard model background for these final states. A very distinctive signal is 6 high p{sub T} b-jets in the final state with no missing energy. For a wide range of the exotic quarks masses the signals are observable above the background at the LHC.

  2. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  3. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  4. Hidden gauged U (1 ) model: Unifying scotogenic neutrino and flavor dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2016-06-01

    In both scotogenic neutrino and flavor dark matter models, the dark sector communicates with the standard model fermions via Yukawa portal couplings. We propose an economic scenario where the scotogenic neutrino and a flavored mediator share the same inert Higgs doublet and all are charged under a hidden gauged U (1 ) symmetry. The dark Z2 symmetry in the dark sector is regarded as the remnant of this hidden U (1 ) symmetry breaking. In particular, we investigate a dark U (1 )D [and also U (1 )B-L] model which unifies the scotogenic neutrino and top-flavored mediator. Thus dark tops and dark neutrinos are the standard model fermion partners, and the dark matter could be the inert Higgs or the lightest dark neutrino. We note that this model has rich collider signatures on dark tops, the inert Higgs and the Z' gauge boson. Moreover, the scalar associated to the U (1 )D [and also U (1 )B -L ] symmetry breaking could explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS recently.

  5. Zipf exponent of trajectory distribution in the hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, V. V.; Lerner, E. Yu

    2014-03-01

    This paper is the first step of generalization of the previously obtained full classification of the asymptotic behavior of the probability for Markov chain trajectories for the case of hidden Markov models. The main goal is to study the power (Zipf) and nonpower asymptotics of the frequency list of trajectories of hidden Markov frequencys and to obtain explicit formulae for the exponent of the power asymptotics. We consider several simple classes of hidden Markov models. We prove that the asymptotics for a hidden Markov model and for the corresponding Markov chain can be essentially different.

  6. Hidden Markov models for stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John

    2015-07-01

    The formalism of state estimation and hidden Markov models can simplify and clarify the discussion of stochastic thermodynamics in the presence of feedback and measurement errors. After reviewing the basic formalism, we use it to shed light on a recent discussion of phase transitions in the optimized response of an information engine, for which measurement noise serves as a control parameter. The HMM formalism also shows that the value of additional information displays a maximum at intermediate signal-to-noise ratios. Finally, we discuss how systems open to information flow can apparently violate causality; the HMM formalism can quantify the performance gains due to such violations.

  7. Diphoton signals from colorless hidden quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Sho; Lee, Gabriel; Shadmi, Yael; Ziegler, Robert

    2016-07-01

    We show that quarkonialike states of a hidden SU (N ) gauge group can account for the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed by ATLAS and CMS, even with constituents carrying standard model hypercharge only. The required hypercharge is modest, varying between about 1.3-1.6 for strong SU (N ) coupling to 2-3 for weak SU (N ) coupling, for N =3 , 4. This scenario predicts a variety of diphoton and multiphoton resonances, as well as photons from continuum pair production, and possibly exotic decays into standard model fermions, with no significant multijet resonances.

  8. Diphoton excess as a hidden monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    We provide a theory with a monopole of a strongly-interacting hidden U(1) gauge symmetry that can explain the 750-GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS. The excess results from the resonance of monopole, which is produced via gluon fusion and decays into two photons. In the low energy, there are only mesons and a monopole in our model because any baryons cannot be gauge invariant in terms of strongly interacting Abelian symmetry. This is advantageous of our model because there is no unwanted relics around the BBN epoch.

  9. Dual technicolor with hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    We consider a dual description of the technicolor-like gauge theory within the D4/D8-brane configuration with varying confinement and electroweak symmetry breaking scales. Constructing an effective truncated model valid below a certain cutoff, we identify the particle spectrum with Kaluza-Klein modes of the model in a manner consistent with the hidden local symmetry. Integrating out heavy states, we find that the low-energy action receives nontrivial corrections stemming from the mixing between standard model and heavy gauge bosons, which results in reduction of oblique parameters.

  10. Learning Heterogeneous Hidden Markov Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Chunming; Burnside, Elizabeth; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs) are conventionally assumed to be homogeneous in the sense that the potential functions are invariant across different sites. However in some biological applications, it is desirable to make HMRFs heterogeneous, especially when there exists some background knowledge about how the potential functions vary. We formally define heterogeneous HMRFs and propose an EM algorithm whose M-step combines a contrastive divergence learner with a kernel smoothing step to incorporate the background knowledge. Simulations show that our algorithm is effective for learning heterogeneous HMRFs and outperforms alternative binning methods. We learn a heterogeneous HMRF in a real-world study. PMID:25404989

  11. A Hidden Markov Model for Urban-Scale Traffic Estimation Using Floating Car Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Peng, Ling; Chi, Tianhe; Li, Mengzhu; Yao, Xiaojing; Shao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Urban-scale traffic monitoring plays a vital role in reducing traffic congestion. Owing to its low cost and wide coverage, floating car data (FCD) serves as a novel approach to collecting traffic data. However, sparse probe data represents the vast majority of the data available on arterial roads in most urban environments. In order to overcome the problem of data sparseness, this paper proposes a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based traffic estimation model, in which the traffic condition on a road segment is considered as a hidden state that can be estimated according to the conditions of road segments having similar traffic characteristics. An algorithm based on clustering and pattern mining rather than on adjacency relationships is proposed to find clusters with road segments having similar traffic characteristics. A multi-clustering strategy is adopted to achieve a trade-off between clustering accuracy and coverage. Finally, the proposed model is designed and implemented on the basis of a real-time algorithm. Results of experiments based on real FCD confirm the applicability, accuracy, and efficiency of the model. In addition, the results indicate that the model is practicable for traffic estimation on urban arterials and works well even when more than 70% of the probe data are missing.

  12. A Hidden Markov Model for Urban-Scale Traffic Estimation Using Floating Car Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Peng, Ling; Chi, Tianhe; Li, Mengzhu; Yao, Xiaojing; Shao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Urban-scale traffic monitoring plays a vital role in reducing traffic congestion. Owing to its low cost and wide coverage, floating car data (FCD) serves as a novel approach to collecting traffic data. However, sparse probe data represents the vast majority of the data available on arterial roads in most urban environments. In order to overcome the problem of data sparseness, this paper proposes a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based traffic estimation model, in which the traffic condition on a road segment is considered as a hidden state that can be estimated according to the conditions of road segments having similar traffic characteristics. An algorithm based on clustering and pattern mining rather than on adjacency relationships is proposed to find clusters with road segments having similar traffic characteristics. A multi-clustering strategy is adopted to achieve a trade-off between clustering accuracy and coverage. Finally, the proposed model is designed and implemented on the basis of a real-time algorithm. Results of experiments based on real FCD confirm the applicability, accuracy, and efficiency of the model. In addition, the results indicate that the model is practicable for traffic estimation on urban arterials and works well even when more than 70% of the probe data are missing. PMID:26710073

  13. A Hidden Markov Model for Urban-Scale Traffic Estimation Using Floating Car Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Peng, Ling; Chi, Tianhe; Li, Mengzhu; Yao, Xiaojing; Shao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Urban-scale traffic monitoring plays a vital role in reducing traffic congestion. Owing to its low cost and wide coverage, floating car data (FCD) serves as a novel approach to collecting traffic data. However, sparse probe data represents the vast majority of the data available on arterial roads in most urban environments. In order to overcome the problem of data sparseness, this paper proposes a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based traffic estimation model, in which the traffic condition on a road segment is considered as a hidden state that can be estimated according to the conditions of road segments having similar traffic characteristics. An algorithm based on clustering and pattern mining rather than on adjacency relationships is proposed to find clusters with road segments having similar traffic characteristics. A multi-clustering strategy is adopted to achieve a trade-off between clustering accuracy and coverage. Finally, the proposed model is designed and implemented on the basis of a real-time algorithm. Results of experiments based on real FCD confirm the applicability, accuracy, and efficiency of the model. In addition, the results indicate that the model is practicable for traffic estimation on urban arterials and works well even when more than 70% of the probe data are missing. PMID:26710073

  14. ESO's Hidden Treasures Brought to Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition attracted nearly 100 entries, and ESO is delighted to announce the winners. Hidden Treasures gave amateur astronomers the opportunity to search ESO's vast archives of astronomical data for a well-hidden cosmic gem. Astronomy enthusiast Igor Chekalin from Russia won the first prize in this difficult but rewarding challenge - the trip of a lifetime to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. The pictures of the Universe that can be seen in ESO's releases are impressive. However, many hours of skilful work are required to assemble the raw greyscale data captured by the telescopes into these colourful images, correcting them for distortions and unwanted signatures of the instrument, and enhancing them so as to bring out the details contained in the astronomical data. ESO has a team of professional image processors, but for the ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 competition, the experts decided to give astronomy and photography enthusiasts the opportunity to show the world what they could do with the mammoth amount of data contained in ESO's archives. The enthusiasts who responded to the call submitted nearly 100 entries in total - far exceeding initial expectations, given the difficult nature of the challenge. "We were completely taken aback both by the quantity and the quality of the images that were submitted. This was not a challenge for the faint-hearted, requiring both an advanced knowledge of data processing and an artistic eye. We are thrilled to have discovered so many talented people," said Lars Lindberg Christensen, Head of ESO's education and Public Outreach Department. Digging through many terabytes of professional astronomical data, the entrants had to identify a series of greyscale images of a celestial object that would reveal the hidden beauty of our Universe. The chance of a great reward for the lucky winner was enough to spur on the competitors; the first prize being a trip to ESO's Very Large

  15. Hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2014-01-01

    In the superconformal formulation of supergravity, the standard supergravity action appears as a result of spontaneous symmetry breaking when the conformal compensator scalar field, the conformon, acquires a nonzero value, giving rise to the Planck mass. After that, many symmetries of the original theory become well hidden, and therefore they are often ignored. However, recent developments demonstrated that superconformal invariance is more than just a tool: it plays an important role in generalizing previously existing formulations of supergravity and developing new classes of inflationary models. In this paper we describe hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution. In this formulation, inflation can be equivalently described as the conformon instability, and creation of the universe 'from nothing' can be interpreted as spontaneous symmetry breaking due to emergence of a classical conformon field. We develop a general formalism that allows to describe the cosmological evolution simultaneously with the evolution of the conformon. We find a set of gauge invariant physical observables, including the superconformally invariant generalizations of the square of the Weyl tensor, which are necessary for invariant description of the cosmological singularities.

  16. Monitoring volcano activity through Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, C.; Montalto, P.; Prestifilippo, M.; Aliotta, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

    2013-12-01

    During 2011-2013, Mt. Etna was mainly characterized by cyclic occurrences of lava fountains, totaling to 38 episodes. During this time interval Etna volcano's states (QUIET, PRE-FOUNTAIN, FOUNTAIN, POST-FOUNTAIN), whose automatic recognition is very useful for monitoring purposes, turned out to be strongly related to the trend of RMS (Root Mean Square) of the seismic signal recorded by stations close to the summit area. Since RMS time series behavior is considered to be stochastic, we can try to model the system generating its values, assuming to be a Markov process, by using Hidden Markov models (HMMs). HMMs are a powerful tool in modeling any time-varying series. HMMs analysis seeks to recover the sequence of hidden states from the observed emissions. In our framework, observed emissions are characters generated by the SAX (Symbolic Aggregate approXimation) technique, which maps RMS time series values with discrete literal emissions. The experiments show how it is possible to guess volcano states by means of HMMs and SAX.

  17. Three Dimensional Sector Design with Optimal Number of Sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min

    2010-01-01

    In the national airspace system, sectors get overloaded due to high traffic demand and inefficient airspace designs. Overloads can be eliminated in some cases by redesigning sector boundaries. This paper extends the Voronoi-based sector design method by automatically selecting the number of sectors, allowing three-dimensional partitions, and enforcing traffic pattern conformance. The method was used to design sectors at Fort-Worth and Indianapolis centers for current traffic scenarios. Results show that new designs can eliminate overloaded sectors, although not in all cases, reduce the number of necessary sectors, and conform to major traffic patterns. Overall, the new methodology produces enhanced and efficient sector designs.

  18. Secret Codes: The Hidden Curriculum of Semantic Web Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Carmichael, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    There is a long tradition in education of examination of the hidden curriculum, those elements which are implicit or tacit to the formal goals of education. This article draws upon that tradition to open up for investigation the hidden curriculum and assumptions about students and knowledge that are embedded in the coding undertaken to facilitate…

  19. The Hidden Curriculum of Youth Policy: A Dutch Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopman, Marit; de Winter, Micha; Koops, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Youth policy is more than a mere response to the actual behavior of children, but it is equally influenced by values and beliefs of policy makers. These values are however rarely made explicit and, therefore, the authors refer to them as "the hidden curriculum" of youth policy. The study investigation explicates this hidden curriculum by…

  20. Hidden attractor in the Rabinovich system, Chua circuits and PLL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. V.; Leonov, G. A.; Mokaev, T. N.; Seledzhi, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this report the existence of hidden attractors in Rabinovich system, phase-locked loop and coupled Chua circuits is considered. It is shown that the existence of hidden attractors may complicate the analysis of the systems and significantly affect the synchronization.

  1. Seuss's Butter Battle Book: Is There Hidden Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Cleaf, David W.; Martin, Rita J.

    1986-01-01

    Examines whether elementary school children relate to the "harmful hidden message" about nuclear war in Dr. Seuss's THE BUTTER BATTLE BOOK. After ascertaining the children's cognitive level, they participated in activities to find hidden meanings in stories, including Seuss's book. Students failed to identify the nuclear war message in Seuss's…

  2. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  3. Buildings Sector Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

    2005-08-01

    A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

  4. Identifying hidden sexual bridging communities in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yoosik; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Williams, Chyvette T; Ouellet, Lawrence J

    2009-07-01

    Bridge populations can play a central role in the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by providing transmission links between higher and lower prevalence populations. While social network methods are well suited to the study of bridge populations, analyses tend to focus on dyads (i.e., risk between drug and/or sex partners) and ignore bridges between distinct subpopulations. This study takes initial steps toward moving the analysis of sexual network linkages beyond individual and risk group levels to a community level in which Chicago's 77 community areas are examined as subpopulations for the purpose of identifying potential bridging communities. Of particular interest are "hidden" bridging communities; that is, areas with above-average levels of sexual ties with other areas but whose below-average AIDS prevalence may hide their potential importance for HIV prevention. Data for this analysis came from the first wave of recruiting at the Chicago Sexual Acquisition and Transmission of HIV Cooperative Agreement Program site. Between August 2005 through October 2006, respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit users of heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine, men who have sex with men regardless of drug use, the sex partners of these two groups, and sex partners of the sex partners. In this cross-sectional study of the sexual transmission of HIV, participants completed a network-focused computer-assisted self-administered interview, which included questions about the geographic locations of sexual contacts with up to six recent partners. Bridging scores for each area were determined using a matrix representing Chicago's 77 community areas and were assessed using two measures: non-redundant ties and flow betweenness. Bridging measures and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) case prevalence rates were plotted for each community area on charts representing four conditions: below-average bridging and AIDS prevalence, below-average bridging and above

  5. Defect Detection Using Hidden Markov Random Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dogandzic, Aleksandar; Eua-anant, Nawanat; Zhang Benhong

    2005-04-09

    We derive an approximate maximum a posteriori (MAP) method for detecting NDE defect signals using hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs). In the proposed HMRF framework, a set of spatially distributed NDE measurements is assumed to form a noisy realization of an underlying random field that has a simple structure with Markovian dependence. Here, the random field describes the defect signals to be estimated or detected. The HMRF models incorporate measurement locations into the statistical analysis, which is important in scenarios where the same defect affects measurements at multiple locations. We also discuss initialization of the proposed HMRF detector and apply to simulated eddy-current data and experimental ultrasonic C-scan data from an inspection of a cylindrical Ti 6-4 billet.

  6. Magneto-Radar Hidden Metal Detector

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    2005-07-05

    A varying magnetic field excites slight vibrations in an object and a radar sensor detects the vibrations at a harmonic of the excitation frequency. The synergy of the magnetic excitation and radar detection provides increased detection range compared to conventional magnetic metal detectors. The radar rejects background clutter by responding only to reflecting objects that are vibrating at a harmonic excitation field, thereby significantly improving detection reliability. As an exemplary arrangement, an ultra-wideband micropower impulse radar (MIR) is capable of being employed to provide superior materials penetration while providing range information. The magneto-radar may be applied to pre-screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients, landmine detection and finding hidden treasures.

  7. Hidden baryons: The physics of Compton composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Frederick J.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of the mass-energy of the Universe appears to be composed of Compton composites. How is it then that these composites are not frequently observed in experiments? This paper addresses this question, and others, by reviewing recent publications that: 1) introduced Compton composites, 2) showed how and where they are formed and 3) explained how they interact with other systems. Though ubiquitous in many physical situations, Compton composites are almost completely hidden in experiments due to their unique interaction characteristics. Still, their presence has been indirectly observed, though not interpreted as such until recently. Looking to the future, direct-detection experiments are proposed that could verify the composites' components. It is with deep sadness that I dedicate this paper to my mentor, collaborator, and friend, Dr. John R. Reitz, who passed away within days of the publication of our paper “Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe”.

  8. The hidden biology of sponges and ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Casey W; Leys, Sally P; Haddock, Steven H D

    2015-05-01

    Animal evolution is often presented as a march toward complexity, with different living animal groups each representing grades of organization that arose through the progressive acquisition of complex traits. There are now many reasons to reject this classical hypothesis. Not only is it incompatible with recent phylogenetic analyses, but it is also an artifact of 'hidden biology', that is, blind spots to complex traits in non-model species. A new hypothesis of animal evolution, where many complex traits have been repeatedly gained and lost, is emerging. As we discuss here, key details of this new model hinge on a better understanding of the Porifera and Ctenophora, which have each been hypothesized to be sister to all other animals, but are poorly studied and often misrepresented. PMID:25840473

  9. Identifying Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-09-25

    The LHCb Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN discovered two pentaquark states P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450). These two hidden-charm states are interpreted as the loosely bound Σ_{c}(2455)D^{*} and Σ_{c}^{*}(2520)D^{*} molecular states in the boson exchange interaction model, which provides an explanation for why the experimental width of P_{c}(4450) is much narrower than that of P_{c}(4380). The discovery of the new resonances P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450), indeed, opens a new page for hadron physics. The partners of P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450) should be pursued in future experiments. PMID:26451546

  10. Identifying Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiang; Li, Xue-Qian; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-09-25

    The LHCb Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN discovered two pentaquark states P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450). These two hidden-charm states are interpreted as the loosely bound Σ_{c}(2455)D^{*} and Σ_{c}^{*}(2520)D^{*} molecular states in the boson exchange interaction model, which provides an explanation for why the experimental width of P_{c}(4450) is much narrower than that of P_{c}(4380). The discovery of the new resonances P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450), indeed, opens a new page for hadron physics. The partners of P_{c}(4380) and P_{c}(4450) should be pursued in future experiments.

  11. Mixture Hidden Markov Models in Finance Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, José G.; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Ramos, Sofia

    Finite mixture models have proven to be a powerful framework whenever unobserved heterogeneity cannot be ignored. We introduce in finance research the Mixture Hidden Markov Model (MHMM) that takes into account time and space heterogeneity simultaneously. This approach is flexible in the sense that it can deal with the specific features of financial time series data, such as asymmetry, kurtosis, and unobserved heterogeneity. This methodology is applied to model simultaneously 12 time series of Asian stock markets indexes. Because we selected a heterogeneous sample of countries including both developed and emerging countries, we expect that heterogeneity in market returns due to country idiosyncrasies will show up in the results. The best fitting model was the one with two clusters at country level with different dynamics between the two regimes.

  12. Plume mapping via hidden Markov methods.

    PubMed

    Farrell, J A; Pang, Shuo; Li, Wei

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping likely locations of a chemical source using an autonomous vehicle operating in a fluid flow. The paper reviews biological plume-tracing concepts, reviews previous strategies for vehicle-based plume tracing, and presents a new plume mapping approach based on hidden Markov methods (HMM). HMM provide efficient algorithms for predicting the likelihood of odor detection versus position, the likelihood of source location versus position, the most likely path taken by the odor to a given location, and the path between two points most likely to result in odor detection. All four are useful for solving the odor source localization problem using an autonomous vehicle. The vehicle is assumed to be capable of detecting above threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. The fluid flow is assumed to vary with space and time, and to have a high Reynolds number (Re>10). PMID:18238238

  13. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27271936

  14. The hidden biology of sponges and ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Casey W; Leys, Sally P; Haddock, Steven H D

    2015-05-01

    Animal evolution is often presented as a march toward complexity, with different living animal groups each representing grades of organization that arose through the progressive acquisition of complex traits. There are now many reasons to reject this classical hypothesis. Not only is it incompatible with recent phylogenetic analyses, but it is also an artifact of 'hidden biology', that is, blind spots to complex traits in non-model species. A new hypothesis of animal evolution, where many complex traits have been repeatedly gained and lost, is emerging. As we discuss here, key details of this new model hinge on a better understanding of the Porifera and Ctenophora, which have each been hypothesized to be sister to all other animals, but are poorly studied and often misrepresented.

  15. Natural inflation with hidden scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Neil D.; Kobakhidze, Archil; Liang, Shelley

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new class of natural inflation models based on a hidden scale invariance. In a very generic Wilsonian effective field theory with an arbitrary number of scalar fields, which exhibits scale invariance via the dilaton, the potential necessarily contains a flat direction in the classical limit. This flat direction is lifted by small quantum corrections and inflation is realised without need for an unnatural fine-tuning. In the conformal limit, the effective potential becomes linear in the inflaton field, yielding to specific predictions for the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, being respectively: ns - 1 ≈ - 0.025 (N⋆/60)-1 and r ≈ 0.0667 (N⋆/60)-1, where N⋆ ≈ 30- 65 is a number of efolds during observable inflation. This predictions are in reasonable agreement with cosmological measurements. Further improvement of the accuracy of these measurements may turn out to be critical in falsifying our scenario.

  16. Facies Reconstruction by hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, M.; Della Rossa, E.; Dovera, L.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-04-01

    The inherent heterogeneity of natural aquifer complex systems can be properly described by a doubly stochastic composite medium approach, where distributions of geomaterials (facies) and attributes, e.g., hydraulic conductivity and porosity, can be uncertain. We focus on the reconstruction of the spatial distribution of facies within a porous medium. The key contribution of our work is to provide a methodology for evaluating the unknown facies distribution while maintaining the spatial correlation between the geological bodies. The latter is considered to be known a priori. The geostatistical model for the spatial distribution of facies is defined in the framework of multiple-point geostatistics, relying on transition probabilities (Stien and Kolbjornsen, 2011). Specifically, we model the facies distribution over the domain by employing the notion of Hidden Markov Model. The hidden states of the system are provided by the value of the indicator function at each cell of the grid, while the the petrophysical properties of the soil (e.g., the permeability) are considered as known. In this context, the key issue is the assessment of the spatial architecture of the geological bodies within the domain of interest upon maximizing the probability associated with a given permeability distribution. This objective is achieved through the Viterbi algorithm. This algorithm was initially introduced for signal denoising problems (e.g., Rabiner, 1989) and has been extended here to a two-dimensional system, following the approach proposed by Li et al. (2000) according to the following steps: (1) the parameters of the transitional probabilities of the facies distribution are estimated from a given training image; (2) the facies distribution maximizing the probability of occurrence considering the probability of (i) facies distribution, (ii) conductivity distribution and (iii) their joint conditional probability is then reconstructed. We demonstrate the reliability and advantage of

  17. How hidden are hidden processes? A primer on crypticity and entropy convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John R.; Ellison, Christopher J.; James, Ryan G.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate a stationary process's crypticity—a measure of the difference between its hidden state information and its observed information—using the causal states of computational mechanics. Here, we motivate crypticity and cryptic order as physically meaningful quantities that monitor how hidden a hidden process is. This is done by recasting previous results on the convergence of block entropy and block-state entropy in a geometric setting, one that is more intuitive and that leads to a number of new results. For example, we connect crypticity to how an observer synchronizes to a process. We show that the block-causal-state entropy is a convex function of block length. We give a complete analysis of spin chains. We present a classification scheme that surveys stationary processes in terms of their possible cryptic and Markov orders. We illustrate related entropy convergence behaviors using a new form of foliated information diagram. Finally, along the way, we provide a variety of interpretations of crypticity and cryptic order to establish their naturalness and pervasiveness. This is also a first step in developing applications in spatially extended and network dynamical systems.

  18. How hidden are hidden processes? A primer on crypticity and entropy convergence.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John R; Ellison, Christopher J; James, Ryan G; Crutchfield, James P

    2011-09-01

    We investigate a stationary process's crypticity--a measure of the difference between its hidden state information and its observed information--using the causal states of computational mechanics. Here, we motivate crypticity and cryptic order as physically meaningful quantities that monitor how hidden a hidden process is. This is done by recasting previous results on the convergence of block entropy and block-state entropy in a geometric setting, one that is more intuitive and that leads to a number of new results. For example, we connect crypticity to how an observer synchronizes to a process. We show that the block-causal-state entropy is a convex function of block length. We give a complete analysis of spin chains. We present a classification scheme that surveys stationary processes in terms of their possible cryptic and Markov orders. We illustrate related entropy convergence behaviors using a new form of foliated information diagram. Finally, along the way, we provide a variety of interpretations of crypticity and cryptic order to establish their naturalness and pervasiveness. This is also a first step in developing applications in spatially extended and network dynamical systems. PMID:21974675

  19. Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2007-01-01

    A radial probe transition between a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) and a waveguide has been designed for operation at frequency of 340 GHz and to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that includes the MMIC. Integrated radial probe transitions like this one are expected to be essential components of future MMIC amplifiers operating at frequencies above 200 GHz. While MMIC amplifiers for this frequency range have not yet been widely used because they have only recently been developed, there are numerous potential applications for them-- especially in scientific instruments, test equipment, radar, and millimeter-wave imaging systems for detecting hidden weapons.

  20. Carelessness: A Hidden Doxa of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the implications of new public sector "reforms" for the culture of higher education. It argues that a culture of carelessness, grounded in Cartesian rationalism, has been exacerbated by new managerialism. The article challenges a prevailing sociological assumption that the character of higher education culture is primarily…

  1. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-08

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled “hidden electric field,” oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Our “straw man” setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1/ν. However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. As a result, we find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.

  2. Hidden anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, F; Ziff, M

    1982-01-01

    When MRL/l mouse spleen cell culture supernatants were incubated with normal mouse spleen cells, a two-50-fold increase in anti-dsDNA activity was noted. A smaller increase in anti-ssDNA and no change in anti-TNP antibody activity were observed. This 'hidden' antibody in the MRL/l supernatants could not be revealed by DNAse digestion and could not be absorbed by a DNA cellulose column. Hidden antibody was removed from supernatants by sepharose-anti Ig. After DNAase digestion of the MRL/l supernatants, hidden anti-dsDNA could not be revealed by incubation with spleen cells. All the hidden activity was excluded by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300 (mol. wt greater than 300,000) but was banded in the low density protein area of caesium chloride equilibrium density gradients. It was also noted that MRL/l mouse sera had hidden anti-dsDNA antibodies. Hidden antibodies were present in both the IgG and IgM classes. The revealed antibodies demonstrated impaired ability to bind Fc specific anti-Ig reagents suggesting that they were partially degraded during the incubation with mouse spleen cells. The hidden anti-dsDNA thus appears to represent a DNA-anti-dsDNA complex, perhaps of very high affinity. It may explain why anti-dsDNA but not anti-ssDNA antibodies are of pathological importance in SLE. PMID:6756722

  3. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-01

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled "hidden electric field," oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Our "straw man" setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1 /ν . However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. We find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.

  4. Radio for hidden-photon dark matter detection

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Graham, Peter W.; Irwin, Kent; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2015-10-08

    We propose a resonant electromagnetic detector to search for hidden-photon dark matter over an extensive range of masses. Hidden-photon dark matter can be described as a weakly coupled “hidden electric field,” oscillating at a frequency fixed by the mass, and able to penetrate any shielding. At low frequencies (compared to the inverse size of the shielding), we find that the observable effect of the hidden photon inside any shielding is a real, oscillating magnetic field. We outline experimental setups designed to search for hidden-photon dark matter, using a tunable, resonant LC circuit designed to couple to this magnetic field. Ourmore » “straw man” setups take into consideration resonator design, readout architecture and noise estimates. At high frequencies, there is an upper limit to the useful size of a single resonator set by 1/ν. However, many resonators may be multiplexed within a hidden-photon coherence length to increase the sensitivity in this regime. Hidden-photon dark matter has an enormous range of possible frequencies, but current experiments search only over a few narrow pieces of that range. As a result, we find the potential sensitivity of our proposal is many orders of magnitude beyond current limits over an extensive range of frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 700 GHz and potentially higher.« less

  5. Hidden order to antiferromagnetic transition in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jesse; Movassagh, Mahsa Rahimi; Wilson, Murray; Luke, Graeme; Kanchanavatee, Noravee; Huang, Kevin; Janoschek, Marc; Maple, M. Brian; Timusk, Tom

    The second-order phase transition in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 continues to confound efforts to reveal its true nature, and bears the moniker ''hidden order'' with good reason. While the order parameter remains mysterious, antiferromagnetism is easily induced with modest chemical substitution. The proximity of these two phases offers tantalizing clues about the nature of the hidden order phase. We present data on the antiferromagnetic phase, revealing the similarities and the differences between the two phases, including evidence for effects above the transition temperature. The implications of these findings for the hidden order parameter will be discussed. Alternate affiliation: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  6. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles.

  7. Hidden Fermionic Excitation Boosting High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shiro; Civelli, Marcello; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of a microscopic cuprate model, namely, the two-dimensional Hubbard model, is studied with a cluster extension of the dynamical mean-field theory. We find a nontrivial structure of the frequency-dependent self-energies, which describes an unprecedented interplay between the pseudogap and superconductivity. We show that these properties are well described by quasiparticles hybridizing with (hidden) fermionic excitations, emergent from the strong electronic correlations. The hidden fermion enhances superconductivity via a mechanism distinct from a conventional boson-mediated pairing, and originates the normal-state pseudogap. Though the hidden fermion is elusive in experiments, it can solve many experimental puzzles. PMID:26894730

  8. Sector-scanning echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Griffith, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical sector scanner is described in detail, and its clinical application is discussed. Cross sectional images of the heart are obtained in real time using this system. The sector scanner has three major components: (a) hand held scanner, (b) video display, and (c) video recorder. The system provides diagnostic information in a wide spectrum of cardiac diseases, and it quantitates the severity of mitral stenosis by measurement of the mitral valve orifice area in diagnosing infants, children and adults with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  9. Public Sector Impasse Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadakin, James C.

    The subject of collective bargaining negotiation impasse procedures in the public sector, which includes public school systems, is a broad one. In this speech, the author introduces the various procedures, explains how they are used, and lists their advantages and disadvantages. Procedures discussed are mediation, fact-finding, arbitration,…

  10. Shadow Higgs boson from a scale-invariant hidden U(1){sub s} model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2007-06-01

    We study a scale-invariant SU(2)xU(1){sub Y}xU(1){sub s} model which has only dimensionless couplings. The shadow U(1){sub s} is hidden, and it interacts with the standard model (SM) solely through mixing in the scalar sector and kinetic mixing of the U(1) gauge bosons. The gauge symmetries are broken radiatively by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Lifting of the flat direction in the scalar potential gives rise to a light scalar, the scalon, or the shadow Higgs, and a heavier scalar which we identify as the SM Higgs boson. The phenomenology of this model is discussed. In particular, the constraints on the shadow Higgs in different mass ranges, and the possibility of discovering a shadow Higgs with a mass a few tens of GeV in precision t-quark studies at the LHC, are investigated.

  11. Hidden sources of mercury in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Chavez, C R; Federico-Perez, R A; Gomez-Alvarez, A; Velazquez-Contreras, L E; Perez-Rios, R

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare sector is an important contributor to mercury (Hg) pollution because of the potential presence of mercury in thermometers, blood pressure cuffs, amalgams, etc. There are also other potential sources of mercury in this sector which are used frequently and in high volumes where the presence of the metal is not obvious and which might be collectively contributing to pollution. For instance, some chemicals used for the clinical diagnosis of illness may contain mercury. The goal of this study was to investigate potential sources of mercury pollution, which originate from clinical laboratory discharges, using an exploratory approach. The focus was on the residue generated during automatic analysis of patients' bodily fluids at a medical center in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. This study shows an overview of what might be happening in the region or the country related to non-obvious sources of mercury in the healthcare sector. The results showed measurable levels of mercury in the residues coming from urine sediment analysis. These amounts do not exceed the maximum allowed by Mexican environmental regulations; nevertheless, the frequency and cumulative volume of residues generated, combined with the potential for persistence and the bioaccumulation of mercury in the environment, warrant attention. The work carried out in this study is being taken as a model for future studies for pollution prevention in the healthcare sector with the goal of measuring mercury emissions to the environment from clinical laboratory wastewater, including identifying sources which--while not obvious--could be important given the frequency and volume of their use in the clinical diagnosis.

  12. Feedback stabilization using two-hidden-layer nets.

    PubMed

    Sontag, E D

    1992-01-01

    The representational capabilities of one-hidden-layer and two-hidden-layer nets consisting of feedforward interconnections of linear threshold units are compared. It is remarked that for certain problems two hidden layers are required, contrary to what might be in principle expected from the known approximation theorems. The differences are not based on numerical accuracy or number of units needed, nor on capabilities for feature extraction, but rather on a much more basic classification into direct and inverse problems. The former correspond to the approximation of continuous functions, while the latter are concerned with approximating one-sided inverses of continuous functions, and are often encountered in the context of inverse kinematics determination or in control questions. A general result is given showing that nonlinear control systems can be stabilized using two hidden layers, but not, in general, using just one.

  13. Hidden pion varieties in composite models for diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-10-01

    The diphoton excesses at 750 GeV seen in the LHC data may be the first hint of new physics at the TeV scale. We discuss variations of the model considered earlier, in which one or more diphoton excesses arise from composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (hidden pions) associated with new strong dynamics at the TeV scale. We study the case in which the 750 GeV excess arises from a unique hidden pion leading to a diphoton final state as well as the case in which it arises from one of the hidden pions decaying into diphotons. We consider S U (N ), S O (N ), and S p (N ) gauge groups for the strong dynamics and find that S O (N ) and S p (N ) models give extra hidden pions beyond those in the S U (N ) models, which can be used to discriminate among models.

  14. Hidden gauge structure of supersymmetric free differential algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianopoli, Laura; D'Auria, Riccardo; Ravera, Lucrezia

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the role of the nilpotent fermionic generator Q ' introduced in [6] and appearing in the hidden supergroup underlying the free differential algebra (FDA) of D=11 supergravity.

  15. Diagnostic Sampling to Reveal Hidden Lead and Copper Health Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead, copper and other metallic contamination sources in premise drinking water plumbing systems, are unevenly distributed and are usually hidden from thought, view, or both. Many sampling protocols exist, each with some set of implicit assumptions governing its applicability to...

  16. SECTION L FROM FLAGPOLE TOWARD SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT (HIDDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION L FROM FLAGPOLE TOWARD SOLDIERS AND SAILORS MONUMENT (HIDDEN BY TREES). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bath National Cemetery, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Juan Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  17. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  18. West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, and the deep shadow of the 1962 annex. View to northeast. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Even 'Good' Insurance Comes with Hidden Hospital Bills

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159575.html Even 'Good' Insurance Comes With Hidden Hospital Bills Average out-of- ... June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quality private health insurance is no protection against large out-of-pocket ...

  20. Phase transitions in Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Lathouwers, Emma

    In Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), a Markov process is not directly accessible. In the simplest case, a two-state Markov model ``emits'' one of two ``symbols'' at each time step. We can think of these symbols as noisy measurements of the underlying state. With some probability, the symbol implies that the system is in one state when it is actually in the other. The ability to judge which state the system is in sets the efficiency of a Maxwell demon that observes state fluctuations in order to extract heat from a coupled reservoir. The state-inference problem is to infer the underlying state from such noisy measurements at each time step. We show that there can be a phase transition in such measurements: for measurement error rates below a certain threshold, the inferred state always matches the observation. For higher error rates, there can be continuous or discontinuous transitions to situations where keeping a memory of past observations improves the state estimate. We can partly understand this behavior by mapping the HMM onto a 1d random-field Ising model at zero temperature. We also present more recent work that explores a larger parameter space and more states. Research funded by NSERC, Canada.

  1. The infinite hidden Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Sotirios P; Tsechpenakis, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    Hidden Markov random field (HMRF) models are widely used for image segmentation, as they appear naturally in problems where a spatially constrained clustering scheme is asked for. A major limitation of HMRF models concerns the automatic selection of the proper number of their states, i.e., the number of region clusters derived by the image segmentation procedure. Existing methods, including likelihood- or entropy-based criteria, and reversible Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, usually tend to yield noisy model size estimates while imposing heavy computational requirements. Recently, Dirichlet process (DP, infinite) mixture models have emerged in the cornerstone of nonparametric Bayesian statistics as promising candidates for clustering applications where the number of clusters is unknown a priori; infinite mixture models based on the original DP or spatially constrained variants of it have been applied in unsupervised image segmentation applications showing promising results. Under this motivation, to resolve the aforementioned issues of HMRF models, in this paper, we introduce a nonparametric Bayesian formulation for the HMRF model, the infinite HMRF model, formulated on the basis of a joint Dirichlet process mixture (DPM) and Markov random field (MRF) construction. We derive an efficient variational Bayesian inference algorithm for the proposed model, and we experimentally demonstrate its advantages over competing methodologies.

  2. Hidden Markov models in automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzoskowicz, Adam

    1993-11-01

    This article describes a method for constructing an automatic speech recognition system based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The author discusses the basic concepts of HMM theory and the application of these models to the analysis and recognition of speech signals. The author provides algorithms which make it possible to train the ASR system and recognize signals on the basis of distinct stochastic models of selected speech sound classes. The author describes the specific components of the system and the procedures used to model and recognize speech. The author discusses problems associated with the choice of optimal signal detection and parameterization characteristics and their effect on the performance of the system. The author presents different options for the choice of speech signal segments and their consequences for the ASR process. The author gives special attention to the use of lexical, syntactic, and semantic information for the purpose of improving the quality and efficiency of the system. The author also describes an ASR system developed by the Speech Acoustics Laboratory of the IBPT PAS. The author discusses the results of experiments on the effect of noise on the performance of the ASR system and describes methods of constructing HMM's designed to operate in a noisy environment. The author also describes a language for human-robot communications which was defined as a complex multilevel network from an HMM model of speech sounds geared towards Polish inflections. The author also added mandatory lexical and syntactic rules to the system for its communications vocabulary.

  3. Systolic Architectures For Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. N.; Vlontzos, J. A.; Kung, S. Y.

    1988-10-01

    This paper proposes an unidirectional ring systolic architecture for implementing the hidden Markov models (HMMs). This array architecture maximizes the strength of VLSI in terms of intensive and pipelined computing and yet circumvents the limitation on communication. Both the scoring and learning phases of an HMM are formulated as a consecutive matrix-vector multiplication problem, which can be executed in a fully pipelined fashion (100% utilization effi-ciency) by using an unidirectional ring systolic architecture. By appropriately scheduling the algorithm, which combines both the operations of the backward evaluation procedure and reestimation algorithm at the same time, we can use this systolic HMM in a most efficient manner. The systolic HMM can also be easily adapted to the left-to-right HMM by using bidirectional semi-global links with significant time saving. This architecture can also incorporate the scaling scheme with little extra effort in the computations of forward and backward evaluation variables to prevent the frequently encountered mathematical undertow problems. We also discuss a possible implementation of this proposed architecture using Inmos transputer (T-800) as the building block.

  4. Spatiotemporal pattern recognition using hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Kenneth H.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Welsh, Byron M.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1993-10-01

    A spatio-temporal method for identifying objects contained in an image sequence is presented. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM) technique is used as the classification algorithm, making classification decisions based on a spatio-temporal sequence of observed object features. A five class problem is considered. Classification accuracies of 100% and 99.7% are obtained for sequences of images generated over two separate regions of viewing positions. HMMs trained on image sequences of the objects moving in opposite directions showed a 98.1% successful classification rate by class and direction of movement. The HMM technique proved robust to image corruption with additive correlated noise and had a higher accuracy than a single look nearest neighbor method. A real image sequence of one of the objects used was successfully recognized with the HMMs trained on synthetic data. This study shows the temporal changes that observed feature vectors undergo due to object motion hold information that can yield superior classification accuracy when compared to single frame techniques.

  5. A Hidden Portrait by Edgar Degas.

    PubMed

    Thurrowgood, David; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D; Kirkham, Robin; Thurrowgood, Saul; Howard, Daryl L

    2016-01-01

    The preservation and understanding of cultural heritage depends increasingly on in-depth chemical studies. Rapid technological advances are forging connections between scientists and arts communities, enabling revolutionary new techniques for non-invasive technical study of culturally significant, highly prized artworks. We have applied a non-invasive, rapid, high definition X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental mapping technique to a French Impressionist painting using a synchrotron radiation source, and show how this technology can advance scholarly art interpretation and preservation. We have obtained detailed technical understanding of a painting which could not be resolved by conventional techniques. Here we show 31.6 megapixel scanning XRF derived elemental maps and report a novel image processing methodology utilising these maps to produce a false colour representation of a "hidden" portrait by Edgar Degas. This work provides a cohesive methodology for both imaging and understanding the chemical composition of artworks, and enables scholarly understandings of cultural heritage, many of which have eluded conventional technologies. We anticipate that the outcome from this work will encourage the reassessment of some of the world's great art treasures. PMID:27490856

  6. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  7. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  8. Academic mobbing: hidden health hazard at workplace.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Sb

    2010-01-01

    Academic mobbing is a non-violent, sophisticated, 'ganging up' behaviour adopted by academicians to "wear and tear" a colleague down emotionally through unjustified accusation, humiliation, general harassment and emotional abuse. These are directed at the target under a veil of lies and justifications so that they are "hidden" to others and difficult to prove. Bullies use mobbing activities to hide their own weaknesses and incompetence. Targets selected are often intelligent, innovative high achievers, with good integrity and principles. Mobbing activities appear trivial and innocuous on its own but the frequency and pattern of their occurrence over long period of time indicates an aggressive manipulation to "eliminate" the target. Mobbing activities typically progress through five stereotypical phases that begins with an unsolved minor conflict between two workers and ultimately escalates into a senseless mobbing whereby the target is stigmatized and victimized to justify the behaviours of the bullies. The result is always physical, mental, social distress or illness and, most often, expulsion of target from the workplace. Organizations are subjected to great financial loss, loss of key workers and a tarnished public image and reputation. Public awareness, education, effective counselling, establishment of anti-bullying policies and legislations at all levels are necessary to curb academic mobbing. General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in supporting patients subjected to mental and physical health injury caused by workplace bullying and mobbing.

  9. Dietary phytate, zinc and hidden zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological data suggest at least one in five humans are at risk of zinc deficiency. This is in large part because the phytate in cereals and legumes has not been removed during food preparation. Phytate, a potent indigestible ligand for zinc prevents it's absorption. Without knowledge of the frequency of consumption of foods rich in phytate, and foods rich in bioavailable zinc, the recognition of zinc deficiency early in the illness may be difficult. Plasma zinc is insensitive to early zinc deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration≤20μg/L is a potential indirect biomarker. Early effects of zinc deficiency are chemical, functional and may be "hidden". The clinical problem is illustrated by 2 studies that involved US Mexican-American children, and US premenopausal women. The children were consuming home diets that included traditional foods high in phytate. The premenopausal women were not eating red meat on a regular basis, and their consumption of phytate was mainly from bran breakfast cereals. In both studies the presence of zinc deficiency was proven by functional responses to controlled zinc treatment. In the children lean-mass, reasoning, and immunity were significantly affected. In the women memory, reasoning, and eye-hand coordination were significantly affected. A screening self-administered food frequency questionnaire for office might help caregiver's identify patients at risk of zinc deficiency.

  10. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in nf to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer nf limit to a Z2 valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N =1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like S U (N ) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles.

  11. Hidden Staphylococcus aureus Carriage: Overrated or Underappreciated?

    PubMed

    van Belkum, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent companion bacterial species in one-third of humankind. Reservoirs include the nasal and nasopharyngeal cavities, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Despite earlier claims that colonization of individuals is caused by clonal organisms, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revealed that resident type heterogeneity is not exceptional. Carriage, whether overt or hidden, is correlated with a risk of autoinfection. In a recent article in mBio, it was shown that, based on staphylococcal genome sequencing, low-level GI persistence may cause long-term nosocomial outbreaks [L. Senn et al., 7(1):e02039-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02039-15]. Institutional endemicity with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) sequence type 228 (ST228) is shown to originate not from high-level nasal carriage or poor compliance with infection control practice but from low-grade asymptomatic GI colonization. This shows the power of NGS in elucidating staphylococcal epidemiology and, even more important, demonstrates that (drug-resistant) microorganisms may possess stealthy means of persistence. Identifying these persistence mechanisms is key to successful infection control. PMID:26884429

  12. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  13. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs). PMID:26270958

  14. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs). PMID:26270958

  15. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-08-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs).

  16. Local suppression of the hidden-order phase by impurities in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzoli, Maria E.; Graf, Matthias J.; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-06-01

    We consider the effects of impurities on the enigmatic hidden order (HO) state of the heavy-fermion material URu2Si2. In particular, we focus on local effects of Rh impurities as a tool to probe the suppression of the HO state. To study local properties, we introduce a lattice free energy, where the time invariant HO order parameter Ψ and local antiferromagnetic (AFM) order parameter M are competing orders. Near each Rh atom, the HO order parameter is suppressed, creating a hole in which local AFM order emerges as a result of competition. These local holes are created in the fabric of the HO state like in a Swiss cheese and “filled” with droplets of AFM order. We compare our analysis with recent NMR results on U(RhxRu1-x)2Si2 and find good agreement with the data.

  17. Guided ultrasonic wave testing of an immersed plate with hidden defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Abdollah; Rizzo, Piervincenzo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study in which guided ultrasonic waves are used for the contactless nondestructive testing of a plate immersed in water. In the experiment, narrowband leaky Lamb waves are generated using a focused transducer and are detected with an array of five immersion sensors arranged in a semicircle. The ultrasonic signals are processed to extract a few damage-sensitive features from the time and frequency domains. These features are then fed to an artificial neural network to identify the presence of hidden defects, i.e., defects devised on the surface of the plate not facing the probing system. We find that the noncontact inspection system and the signal processing technique enable the classification of the plate health with a success rate >75%.

  18. Informatic analysis for hidden pulse attack exploiting spectral characteristics of optics in plug-and-play quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Heasin; Lim, Kyongchun; Oh, Junsang; Rhee, June-Koo Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Quantum channel loopholes due to imperfect implementations of practical devices expose quantum key distribution (QKD) systems to potential eavesdropping attacks. Even though QKD systems are implemented with optical devices that are highly selective on spectral characteristics, information theory-based analysis about a pertinent attack strategy built with a reasonable framework exploiting it has never been clarified. This paper proposes a new type of trojan horse attack called hidden pulse attack that can be applied in a plug-and-play QKD system, using general and optimal attack strategies that can extract quantum information from phase-disturbed quantum states of eavesdropper's hidden pulses. It exploits spectral characteristics of a photodiode used in a plug-and-play QKD system in order to probe modulation states of photon qubits. We analyze the security performance of the decoy-state BB84 QKD system under the optimal hidden pulse attack model that shows enormous performance degradation in terms of both secret key rate and transmission distance.

  19. Informatic analysis for hidden pulse attack exploiting spectral characteristics of optics in plug-and-play quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Heasin; Lim, Kyongchun; Oh, Junsang; Rhee, June-Koo Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Quantum channel loopholes due to imperfect implementations of practical devices expose quantum key distribution (QKD) systems to potential eavesdropping attacks. Even though QKD systems are implemented with optical devices that are highly selective on spectral characteristics, information theory-based analysis about a pertinent attack strategy built with a reasonable framework exploiting it has never been clarified. This paper proposes a new type of trojan horse attack called hidden pulse attack that can be applied in a plug-and-play QKD system, using general and optimal attack strategies that can extract quantum information from phase-disturbed quantum states of eavesdropper's hidden pulses. It exploits spectral characteristics of a photodiode used in a plug-and-play QKD system in order to probe modulation states of photon qubits. We analyze the security performance of the decoy-state BB84 QKD system under the optimal hidden pulse attack model that shows enormous performance degradation in terms of both secret key rate and transmission distance.

  20. Measuring the Hidden Aspects of Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2008 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of astrophysical magnetic fields, when George Ellery Hale recorded the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in sunspots. With the introduction of Babcock's photoelectric magnetograph, it soon became clear that the Sun's magnetic field outside sunspots is extremely structured. The field strengths that were measured were found to get larger when the spatial resolutionwas improved. It was therefore necessary to come up with methods to go beyond the spatial resolution limit and diagnose the intrinsic magnetic-field properties without dependence on the quality of the telescope used. The line-ratio technique that was developed in the early 1970s revealed a picture where most flux that we see in magnetograms originates in highly bundled, kG fields with a tiny volume filling factor. This led to interpretations in terms of discrete, strong-field magnetic flux tubes embedded in a rather field-free medium, and a whole industry of flux tube models at increasing levels of sophistication. This magnetic-field paradigm has now been shattered with the advent of high-precision imaging polarimeters that allow us to apply the so-called "Second Solar Spectrum" to diagnose aspects of solar magnetism that have been hidden to Zeeman diagnostics. It is found that the bulk of the photospheric volume is seething with intermediately strong, tangled fields. In the new paradigm, the field behaves like a fractal with a high degree of self-similarity, spanning about 8 orders of magnitude in scale size, down to scales of order 10m.

  1. Foundational Forces & Hidden Variables in Technology Commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    The science of physics seems vastly different from the process of technology commercialization. Physics strives to understand our world through the experimental deduction of immutable laws and dependent variables and the resulting macro-scale phenomenon. In comparison, the~goal of business is to make a profit by addressing the needs, preferences, and whims of individuals in a market. It may seem that this environment is too dynamic to identify all the hidden variables and deduct the foundational forces that impact a business's ability to commercialize innovative technologies. One example of a business ``force'' is found in the semiconductor industry. In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months. Known as Moore's Law, this prediction has become the guiding principle for the semiconductor industry for the last 40 years. Of course, Moore's Law is not really a law of nature; rather it is the result of efforts by Intel and the entire semiconductor industry. A closer examination suggests that there are foundational principles of business that underlie the macro-scale phenomenon of Moore's Law. Principles of profitability, incentive, and strategic alignment have resulted in a coordinated influx of resources that has driven technologies to market, increasing the profitability of the semiconductor industry and optimizing the fitness of its participants. New innovations in technology are subject to these same principles. So, in addition to traditional market forces, these often unrecognized forces and variables create challenges for new technology commercialization. In this talk, I will draw from ethnographic research, complex adaptive theory, and industry data to suggest a framework with which to think about new technology commercialization. Intel's bio-silicon initiative provides a case study.

  2. Identifying hidden voice and video streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jieyan; Wu, Dapeng; Nucci, Antonio; Keralapura, Ram; Gao, Lixin

    2009-04-01

    Given the rising popularity of voice and video services over the Internet, accurately identifying voice and video traffic that traverse their networks has become a critical task for Internet service providers (ISPs). As the number of proprietary applications that deliver voice and video services to end users increases over time, the search for the one methodology that can accurately detect such services while being application independent still remains open. This problem becomes even more complicated when voice and video service providers like Skype, Microsoft, and Google bundle their voice and video services with other services like file transfer and chat. For example, a bundled Skype session can contain both voice stream and file transfer stream in the same layer-3/layer-4 flow. In this context, traditional techniques to identify voice and video streams do not work. In this paper, we propose a novel self-learning classifier, called VVS-I , that detects the presence of voice and video streams in flows with minimum manual intervention. Our classifier works in two phases: training phase and detection phase. In the training phase, VVS-I first extracts the relevant features, and subsequently constructs a fingerprint of a flow using the power spectral density (PSD) analysis. In the detection phase, it compares the fingerprint of a flow to the existing fingerprints learned during the training phase, and subsequently classifies the flow. Our classifier is not only capable of detecting voice and video streams that are hidden in different flows, but is also capable of detecting different applications (like Skype, MSN, etc.) that generate these voice/video streams. We show that our classifier can achieve close to 100% detection rate while keeping the false positive rate to less that 1%.

  3. VISTA Captures Celestial Cat's Hidden Secrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    The Cat's Paw Nebula, NGC 6334, is a huge stellar nursery, the birthplace of hundreds of massive stars. In a magnificent new ESO image taken with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, the glowing gas and dust clouds obscuring the view are penetrated by infrared light and some of the Cat's hidden young stars are revealed. Towards the heart of the Milky Way, 5500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Scorpius (the Scorpion), the Cat's Paw Nebula stretches across 50 light-years. In visible light, gas and dust are illuminated by hot young stars, creating strange reddish shapes that give the object its nickname. A recent image by ESO's Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the La Silla Observatory (eso1003) captured this visible light view in great detail. NGC 6334 is one of the most active nurseries of massive stars in our galaxy. VISTA, the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert, is the world's largest survey telescope (eso0949). It works at infrared wavelengths, seeing right through much of the dust that is such a beautiful but distracting aspect of the nebula, and revealing objects hidden from the sight of visible light telescopes. Visible light tends to be scattered and absorbed by interstellar dust, but the dust is nearly transparent to infrared light. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 metres across and it is equipped with the largest infrared camera on any telescope. It shares the spectacular viewing conditions with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), which is located on the nearby summit. With this powerful instrument at their command, astronomers were keen to see the birth pains of the big young stars in the Cat's Paw Nebula, some nearly ten times the mass of the Sun. The view in the infrared is strikingly different from that in visible light. With the dust obscuring the view far less, they can learn much more about how these stars form and develop in their first

  4. VISTA Captures Celestial Cat's Hidden Secrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-04-01

    The Cat's Paw Nebula, NGC 6334, is a huge stellar nursery, the birthplace of hundreds of massive stars. In a magnificent new ESO image taken with the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, the glowing gas and dust clouds obscuring the view are penetrated by infrared light and some of the Cat's hidden young stars are revealed. Towards the heart of the Milky Way, 5500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Scorpius (the Scorpion), the Cat's Paw Nebula stretches across 50 light-years. In visible light, gas and dust are illuminated by hot young stars, creating strange reddish shapes that give the object its nickname. A recent image by ESO's Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the La Silla Observatory (eso1003) captured this visible light view in great detail. NGC 6334 is one of the most active nurseries of massive stars in our galaxy. VISTA, the latest addition to ESO's Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert, is the world's largest survey telescope (eso0949). It works at infrared wavelengths, seeing right through much of the dust that is such a beautiful but distracting aspect of the nebula, and revealing objects hidden from the sight of visible light telescopes. Visible light tends to be scattered and absorbed by interstellar dust, but the dust is nearly transparent to infrared light. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 metres across and it is equipped with the largest infrared camera on any telescope. It shares the spectacular viewing conditions with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), which is located on the nearby summit. With this powerful instrument at their command, astronomers were keen to see the birth pains of the big young stars in the Cat's Paw Nebula, some nearly ten times the mass of the Sun. The view in the infrared is strikingly different from that in visible light. With the dust obscuring the view far less, they can learn much more about how these stars form and develop in their first

  5. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  6. Employment in the Public Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report synthesizes the findings from several areas of work undertaken to assess what impact public sector employment has had on both the level and structure of employment. It also examines the impact of the public sector as employer on the labor market from two viewpoints: the level and share of public sector employment and the structure of…

  7. Future Trends in Children's Web Pages: Probing Hidden Biases for Information Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    As global digital communication continues to flourish, Children's Web pages become more critical for children to realize not only the surface but also breadth and deeper meanings in presenting these milieus. These pages not only are very diverse and complex but also enable intense communication across social, cultural and political restrictions…

  8. Future Trends in Chlldren's Web Pages: Probing Hidden Biases for Information Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    As global digital communication continues to flourish, Children's Web pages become more critical for children to realize not only the surface but also breadth and deeper meanings in presenting these milieus. These pages not only are very diverse and complex but also enable intense communication across social, cultural and political restrictions…

  9. Infinite hidden conditional random fields for human behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Bousmalis, Konstantinos; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Hidden conditional random fields (HCRFs) are discriminative latent variable models that have been shown to successfully learn the hidden structure of a given classification problem (provided an appropriate validation of the number of hidden states). In this brief, we present the infinite HCRF (iHCRF), which is a nonparametric model based on hierarchical Dirichlet processes and is capable of automatically learning the optimal number of hidden states for a classification task. We show how we learn the model hyperparameters with an effective Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampling technique, and we explain the process that underlines our iHCRF model with the Restaurant Franchise Rating Agencies analogy. We show that the iHCRF is able to converge to a correct number of represented hidden states, and outperforms the best finite HCRFs--chosen via cross-validation--for the difficult tasks of recognizing instances of agreement, disagreement, and pain. Moreover, the iHCRF manages to achieve this performance in significantly less total training, validation, and testing time. PMID:24808217

  10. Reputation and Competition in a Hidden Action Model

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The economics models of reputation and quality in markets can be classified in three categories. (i) Pure hidden action, where only one type of seller is present who can provide goods of different quality. (ii) Pure hidden information, where sellers of different types have no control over product quality. (iii) Mixed frameworks, which include both hidden action and hidden information. In this paper we develop a pure hidden action model of reputation and Bertrand competition, where consumers and firms interact repeatedly in a market with free entry. The price of the good produced by the firms is contractible, whilst the quality is noncontractible, hence it is promised by the firms when a contract is signed. Consumers infer future quality from all available information, i.e., both from what they know about past quality and from current prices. According to early contributions, competition should make reputation unable to induce the production of high-quality goods. We provide a simple solution to this problem by showing that high quality levels are sustained as an outcome of a stationary symmetric equilibrium. PMID:25329387

  11. The Hale solar sector boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A Hale solar sector boundary is defined as the half (Northern Hemisphere or Southern Hemisphere) of a sector boundary in which the change of sector magnetic field polarity is the same as the change of polarity from a preceding spot to a following spot. Above a Hale sector boundary the green corona has maximum brightness, while above a non-Hale boundary the green corona has a minimum brightness. The Hale portion of a photospheric sector boundary tends to have maximum magnetic field strength, while the non-Hale portion has minimum field strength.

  12. A hidden efficacy of seemingly unproductive production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Manu

    Contrary to the fairly established notion in the learning sciences that un-scaffolded, ill-structured problem-solving processes rarely lead to meaningful learning, this study reports a hidden efficacy of such processes in a synchronous, computer-supported, collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. A contrasting-case, double-transfer design investigated the effect of problem type (well- vs. ill-structured problems in Newtonian Kinematics) on collaborative processes and outcomes as well as the transfer of problem-solving skills to the individual. N = 104 triads of 11th-grade science students were randomly assigned to solve either well- or ill-structured problems. Thereafter, all participants individually solved well-structured problems followed by ill-structured problems. Findings suggested that compared to well-structured problem-solving groups, ill-structured problem-solving groups struggled with defining the problem and spent much of their sustained interactional effort around problem critiquing and solution evaluation within a discussion that was highly complex, chaotic, and divergent. As such, they found it difficult to converge on the causes of the problem, set appropriate criteria for a solution, and develop a solution, which, in turn, decreased their group performance. Thus, on many counts, production in ill-structured problem-solving groups seemed unproductive when compared to production in well-structured problem-solving groups. Notwithstanding, the contrasting-case, double-transfer design of this study provided participants in the ill-structured condition with an opportunity to spontaneously contrast the ill-structured problems that they had solved in groups with the well-structured problems they solved on an individual basis afterwards. This contrast helped them separate the relevant from the irrelevant components of ill-structured problems, thereby facilitating a spontaneous transfer of problem-solving skills, which, in the absence of the contrast

  13. Hidden Statistics Approach to Quantum Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information theory have inspired an explosion of interest in new quantum algorithms for solving hard computational (quantum and non-quantum) problems. The basic principle of quantum computation is that the quantum properties can be used to represent structure data, and that quantum mechanisms can be devised and built to perform operations with this data. Three basic non-classical properties of quantum mechanics superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability were main reasons for optimism about capabilities of quantum computers that promised simultaneous processing of large massifs of highly correlated data. Unfortunately, these advantages of quantum mechanics came with a high price. One major problem is keeping the components of the computer in a coherent state, as the slightest interaction with the external world would cause the system to decohere. That is why the hardware implementation of a quantum computer is still unsolved. The basic idea of this work is to create a new kind of dynamical system that would preserve the main three properties of quantum physics superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. In other words, such a system would reinforce the advantages and minimize limitations of both quantum and classical aspects. Based upon a concept of hidden statistics, a new kind of dynamical system for simulation of Schroedinger equation is proposed. The system represents a modified Madelung version of Schroedinger equation. It preserves superposition, entanglement, and direct-product decomposability while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such an optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for simulating quantum systems. The model includes a transitional component of quantum potential (that has been overlooked in previous treatment of the Madelung equation). The role of the

  14. [Materials for construction sector].

    PubMed

    Macchia, C

    2012-01-01

    The construction sector is characterized by high complexity due to several factors. There are a lot of processes within the building sites and they need the use of different materials with the help of appropriate technologies. Traditional materials have evolved and diversified, meanwhile new products and materials appeared and still appear, offering services which meet user needs, but that often involve risks to the health of workers. Research in the field of materials, promoted and carried out at various levels, has led to interesting results, encoded in the form of rules and laws.

  15. Translational science and the hidden research system in universities and academic hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lander, Bryn; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Innovation systems (IS) and science policy scholarship predominantly focus on linkages between universities and industry, and the commercial translation of academic discoveries. Overlooked in such analyses are important connections between universities and academic hospitals, and the non-commercial aspects of translational science. The two types of institutions tend to be collapsed into a single entity-'the university'-and relational flows are lost. Yet the distinctions and flows between the two are crucial elements of translational science and the biomedical innovation system. This paper explores what has been called the 'hidden research system' that connects hospitals, universities, and their resources, with the clinical and scientific actors who make the linkages possible. Then, using a novel conceptual model of translational science, we examine the individual interactions and dynamics involved in a particular example of the biomedical innovation system at work: the diagnosis of IRAK-4 deficiency, a rare immunological disorder, and the translational flows that result. Contra to conventional IS analyses, we are able to point to the strong role of public-sector institutions, and the weak role of the private-sector, in the translational processes described here. Our research was conducted within a Canadian network of scientists and clinician-scientists studying the pathogenomics of immunological disorders and innate immunity.

  16. Midnight Sector Observations of Auroral Omega Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, J. A.; Woodfield, E. E.; Donovan, E. F.; Fear, R. C.; Grocott, A.; Lester, M.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Lucek, E. A.; Kadokura, A.; Hosokawa, K.; Carlson, C. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Björnsson, G.

    2010-12-01

    We present observations of auroral omega bands on 28 September 2009. Although generally associated with the substorm recovery phase and typically observed in the morning sector, the omega bands presented here occurred just after expansion phase onset and were observed in the midnight sector, immediately dawnward of the onset region. The Tjörnes “Rainbow” all-sky imager, located in north-eastern Iceland, revealed that the omega bands were ˜200 km in scale and propagated eastward from the onset region at ˜0.4 km/s while a co-located ground magnetometer recorded the simultaneous passage of Ps 6 pulsations. Although somewhat smaller and slower-moving than the majority of previously reported omega bands, the observed structures were clear examples of this phenomenon, albeit in an atypical location and much earlier in the substorm cycle than is usual. During the study interval the THEMIS A and C probes provided detailed measurements of the upstream interplanetary environment while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the tail plasma sheet conjugate to the ground-based all-sky imager. Cluster observed pulsed fluxes of electrons moving parallel to the magnetic field towards the northern hemisphere auroral ionosphere. Despite mapping uncertainties, there is some suggestion that keV electron fluxes in the tail were related to the auroral emissions in the omega bands. We suggest that omega band formation may be linked to expansion phase onset in the midnight sector and that the finite propagation speed through post-midnight and early morning local times may account for the interpretation of omega bands as a morning sector recovery phase phenomenon.

  17. Fast scanning probe for ophthalmic echography using an ultrasound motor.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Riccardo; Caliano, Giosuè; Caronti, Alessandro; Savoia, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Massimo

    2005-11-01

    High-frequency transducers, up to 35-50 MHz, are widely used in ophthalmic echography to image fine eye structures. Phased-array techniques are not practically applicable at such a high frequency, due to the too small size required for the single transducer element, and mechanical scanning is the only practical alternative. At present, all ophthalmic ultrasound systems use focused single-element, mechanically scanned probes. A good probe positioning and image evaluation feedback requires an image refresh-rate of about 15-30 frames per second, which is achieved in commercial mechanical scanning probes by using electromagnetic motors. In this work, we report the design, construction, and experimental characterization of the first mechanical scanning probe for ophthalmic echography based on a small piezoelectric ultrasound motor. The prototype probe reaches a scanning rate of 15 sectors per second, with very silent operation and little weight. The first high-frequency echographic images obtained with the prototype probe are presented.

  18. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  19. Multivariate longitudinal data analysis with mixed effects hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Jesse D; Dubin, Joel A

    2015-09-01

    Multiple longitudinal responses are often collected as a means to capture relevant features of the true outcome of interest, which is often hidden and not directly measurable. We outline an approach which models these multivariate longitudinal responses as generated from a hidden disease process. We propose a class of models which uses a hidden Markov model with separate but correlated random effects between multiple longitudinal responses. This approach was motivated by a smoking cessation clinical trial, where a bivariate longitudinal response involving both a continuous and a binomial response was collected for each participant to monitor smoking behavior. A Bayesian method using Markov chain Monte Carlo is used. Comparison of separate univariate response models to the bivariate response models was undertaken. Our methods are demonstrated on the smoking cessation clinical trial dataset, and properties of our approach are examined through extensive simulation studies. PMID:25761965

  20. Towards Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks in QCD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Steele, T G; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-23

    Inspired by P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) recently observed by LHCb, a QCD sum rule investigation is performed, by which they can be identified as exotic hidden-charm pentaquarks composed of an anticharmed meson and a charmed baryon. Our results suggest that P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) have quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and 5/2(+), respectively. Furthermore, two extra hidden-charm pentaqurks with configurations D̅Σ(c)(*) and D̅(*)Σ(c)(*) are predicted, which have spin-parity quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and J(P)=5/2(+), respectively. As an important extension, the mass predictions of hidden-bottom pentaquarks are also given. Searches for these partners of P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) are especially accessible at future experiments like LHCb and BelleII. PMID:26551105

  1. Detection and tracking of moving objects hidden from view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Tonolini, Francesco; Henderson, Robert; Leach, Jonathan; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect motion and track a moving object hidden around a corner or behind a wall provides a crucial advantage when physically going around the obstacle is impossible or dangerous. Previous methods have demonstrated that it is possible to reconstruct the shape of an object hidden from view. However, these methods do not enable the tracking of movement in real time. We demonstrate a compact non-line-of-sight laser ranging technology that relies on the ability to send light around an obstacle using a scattering floor and then detect the return signal from a hidden object within only a few seconds of acquisition time. By detecting this signal with a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) camera, we follow the movement of an object located a metre away from the camera with centimetre precision. We discuss the possibility of applying this technology to a variety of real-life situations in the near future.

  2. The hidden-charm pentaquark and tetraquark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade many charmonium-like states were observed experimentally. Especially those charged charmonium-like Zc states and bottomonium-like Zb states cannot be accommodated within the naive quark model. These charged Zc states are good candidates of either the hidden-charm tetraquark states or molecules composed of a pair of charmed mesons. Recently, the LHCb Collaboration discovered two hidden-charm pentaquark states, which are also beyond the quark model. In this work, we review the current experimental progress and investigate various theoretical interpretations of these candidates of the multiquark states. We list the puzzles and theoretical challenges of these models when confronted with the experimental data. We also discuss possible future measurements which may distinguish the theoretical schemes on the underlying structures of the hidden-charm multiquark states.

  3. Analysing the hidden curriculum: use of a cultural web

    PubMed Central

    Mossop, Liz; Dennick, Reg; Hammond, Richard; Robbé, Iain

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Major influences on learning about medical professionalism come from the hidden curriculum. These influences can contribute positively or negatively towards the professional enculturation of clinical students. The fact that there is no validated method for identifying the components of the hidden curriculum poses problems for educators considering professionalism. The aim of this study was to analyse whether a cultural web, adapted from a business context, might assist in the identification of elements of the hidden curriculum at a UK veterinary school. METHODS A qualitative approach was used. Seven focus groups consisting of three staff groups and four student groups were organised. Questioning was framed using the cultural web, which is a model used by business owners to assess their environment and consider how it affects their employees and customers. The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically using a combination of a priori and emergent themes. RESULTS The cultural web identified elements of the hidden curriculum for both students and staff. These included: core assumptions; routines; rituals; control systems; organisational factors; power structures, and symbols. Discussions occurred about how and where these issues may affect students’ professional identity development. CONCLUSIONS The cultural web framework functioned well to help participants identify elements of the hidden curriculum. These aspects aligned broadly with previously described factors such as role models and institutional slang. The influence of these issues on a student’s development of a professional identity requires discussion amongst faculty staff, and could be used to develop learning opportunities for students. The framework is promising for the analysis of the hidden curriculum and could be developed as an instrument for implementation in other clinical teaching environments. PMID:23323652

  4. The hidden opportunity cost of time effect on intertemporal choice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cui-Xia; Jiang, Cheng-Ming; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shu; Rao, Li-Lin; Zheng, Rui

    2015-01-01

    An interesting phenomenon called “hidden opportunity cost of time effect” was detected in intertemporal choices. The majority of our participants preferred the smaller but sooner (SS) option to the larger but later (LL) option if opportunity cost was explicit. However, a higher proportion of participants preferred the LL to SS option if opportunity cost was hidden. This shift violates the invariance principle and opens a new way to encourage future-oriented behavior. By simply mentioning the “obvious” opportunity cost of alternatives, decision makers can be more informed in prioritizing their long-term goals rather than short-term goals. PMID:25870570

  5. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  6. Exploring Oman's Energy Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saqlawi, Juman; Madani, Kaveh; Mac Dowell, Niall

    2016-04-01

    Located in a region where over 40% of the world's oil and gas reserves lie and in a trend similar to that of its neighbors, Oman's economy has been reliant on crude oil export since the 1970's. Being aware of the dangers of this reliance along with the discovery of Natural Gas since the 1980s, the Omani government's policy of diversifying its economy has shifted its reliance on Oil to another fossil fuel, namely Natural Gas. Given that energy is the lifeline of Oman's economy, effective and efficient forward planning and policy development is essential for the country's current and future economic development. This presentation explores the current status of the energy sector in Oman from home production and import to eventual final uses. The presentation highlights the major issues with Oman's current energy policies and suggests various strategies that could be adopted by Oman for a more efficient and sustainable future.

  7. 78 FR 17744 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Maya: Hidden Worlds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed,'' imported...

  8. Higgs sector radiative corrections and s-channel production.

    PubMed

    Berger, M S

    2001-09-24

    Higgs boson mass sum rules of supersymmetric models offer attractive targets for precision tests at future muon colliders. These sum rules involve the gauge boson masses as well as the masses of the Higgs boson states which can be precisely measured in the s-channel production process at a muon collider. These measurements can sensitively probe radiative corrections to the Higgs boson masses as well as test for CP violation and nonminimality of the Higgs sector.

  9. The sun's magnetic sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Howard, R.

    1975-01-01

    The synoptic appearance of solar magnetic sectors is studied using 454 sector boundaries observed at earth from 1959 to 1973. The sectors are clearly visible in the photospheric magnetic field. Sector boundaries can be clearly identified as north-south demarcation lines between regions of persistent magnetic-polarity imbalances. These regions extend up to about 35 deg in latitude on both sides of the equator. They generally do not extend into the polar caps. The polar-cap boundary can be identified as an east-west demarcation line marking the poleward limit of the sectors. The typical flux imbalance for a magnetic sector is about 4 by 10 to the 21st power Mx.

  10. The sun's magnetic sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.; Howard, R.

    1975-01-01

    The synoptic appearance of solar magnetic sectors is studied using 454 sector boundaries observed at earth during 1959-1973. The sectors are clearly visible in the photospheric magnetic field. Sector boundaries can be clearly identified as north-south running demarcation lines between regions of persistent magnetic polarity imbalances. These regions extend up to about 35 deg of latitude on both sides of the equator. They generally do not extend into the polar caps. The polar cap boundary can be identified as an east-west demarcation line marking the poleward limit of the sectors. The typical flux imbalance for a magnetic sector is about 4 x 10 to the 21st power Maxwells.

  11. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  12. Decoupled sectors and Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Willy; Jimmy; Lorshbough, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been proposed that gamma-ray burst (GRB) events may be modified by the presence of a dark matter sector subcomponent that is charged under an unbroken U(1). This proposal depends upon there being a nontrivial density of charged dark matter in star forming regions of galaxies which host GRBs. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of dark matter gas and visible matter gas in the star forming regions. We show that the ratio of dark jet power to visible jet power depends only on the ratio of particle mass and charge when the densities are equal, allowing for these input parameters to be probed directly by future observations of GRBs.

  13. Hidden, Unacknowledged, Acquaintance, and Date Rape: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Mary P.

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, the author reflects on two articles that have been among the most highly cited publications in "Psychology of Women Quarterly" ("PWQ") over its first 35 years, "The Hidden Rape Victim: Personality, Attitudinal, and Situational Characteristics" (Koss, 1985) and "Stranger and Acquaintance Rape: Are There Differences in the…

  14. Is There a Hidden Agenda? The English Language Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Herman H.

    A discussion of the movement to make English the official language of the United States, by constitutional amendment, looks for a hidden agenda among its advocates. The history of and debate over the amendment in Congress and around the country are reviewed, drawing from legislative texts, speeches, essays, media commentary, and related research.…

  15. Resources of learning through hidden curriculum: Iranian nursing students’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Zohreh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Abedi, Heidarali; Zarea, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students tend to internalize and perpetuate the patterns of behavior and the values surrounding them. Review of literature showed that there are several student learning sources through the hidden curriculum, but they have not been identified in nursing yet. Hence, the purpose of this study is explanation of learning resources in the hidden curriculum in the view of baccalaureate nursing students. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was carried out in 2012 with the participation of 32 baccalaureate nursing students in Nursing and Midwifery College of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran by purposeful sampling strategies. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews and continued to the level of data saturation and themes’ emergence. Data analysis was performed through inductive content analysis method. Result: “Instructor as the unique learning element,” “various learning resources in the clinical setting,” and “instructive nature of the education environment” were extracted as the main themes, each of which incorporated some categories. Conclusion: Baccalaureate undergraduate nursing students learnt the hidden curriculum by the resources such as instructors, resources existing in the clinical setting, and the university campus. Therefore, more research is recommended for the identification of other resources. In order to promote positive messages and reduce the negative messages of the hidden curricula running at academic and clinical settings, nursing educators and nurses need to learn more about this issue in the nursing profession. PMID:26430684

  16. Discovering the Hidden Treasures of Physical Best and Fitnessgram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patti

    2011-01-01

    Physical Best and Fitnessgram have a 25-year history, yet many physical educators have yet to be exposed to their full potential. Exploring the Physical Best Activity Guide worksheets and the "Reports" section of Fitnessgram is like finding buried treasure in one's own back yard. These hidden treasures can help physical educators incorporate the…

  17. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites. PMID:24223436

  18. Using hidden cameras to monitor suspected parental abuse.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, T

    2001-01-01

    In using hidden cameras to monitor suspected parental abuse a security requirement or an invasion of privacy? Covert surveillance of patients suspected of having Munchausen syndrome by proxy at an Atlanta children's hospital resulted in considerable media scrutiny when researchers published their findings. This article presents details of the research, the involvement of security officers, and the reactions of local authorities and health officials.

  19. Simple yet Hidden Counterexamples in Undergraduate Real Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.; Shipman, Patrick D.

    2013-01-01

    We study situations in introductory analysis in which students affirmed false statements as true, despite simple counterexamples that they easily recognized afterwards. The study draws attention to how simple counterexamples can become hidden in plain sight, even in an active learning atmosphere where students proposed simple (as well as more…

  20. Doing School Time: The Hidden Curriculum Goes to Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, José; De Lissovoy, Noah

    2013-01-01

    The hidden curriculum is generally understood as the process by which daily exposure to school expectations and routines transmits norms and values of the dominant society to students. In the present, through the regimentation of thought, control of bodies and movement, and proliferation of punishment, contemporary accountability and testing…

  1. Progressing to University: Hidden Messages at Two State Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers some of the ways that schools play a role in shaping higher education (HE) decision-making. Through their everyday practices and processes, schools can carry hidden messages about progression to HE, including choice of university. The sorts of routine aspects of school life dealt with here include events and activities,…

  2. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites.

  3. Hidden algebra method (quasi-exact-solvability in quantum mechanics)

    SciTech Connect

    Turbiner, Alexander

    1996-02-20

    A general introduction to quasi-exactly-solvable problems of quantum mechanics is presented. Main attention is given to multidimensional quasi-exactly-solvable and exactly-solvable Schroedinger operators. Exact-solvability of the Calogero and Sutherland N-body problems ass ociated with an existence of the hidden algebra slN is discussed extensively.

  4. Commitment-Based Learning of Hidden Linguistic Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akers, Crystal Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Learners must simultaneously learn a grammar and a lexicon from observed forms, yet some structures that the grammar and lexicon reference are unobservable in the acoustic signal. Moreover, these "hidden" structures interact: the grammar maps an underlying form to a particular interpretation. Learning one structure depends on learning…

  5. Was 49: Mirror for a hidden Seyfert 1 galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules; Moran, E.; Kay, L.; Antonucci, R.

    1993-01-01

    Was 49 is an interacting pair of Seyfert galaxies at z = 0.063, one of which contains a hidden Seyfert 1 nucleus as evidenced by the highly polarized broad wings on its Balmer lines. The disk of the main galaxy, Was 49a, appears to be globally photoionized by a powerful continuum source, undoubtedly the hidden Seyfert 1 companion, Was 49b. The intrinsic luminosity of Was 49b is at least 100 times larger than the observed (scattered) luminosity. A single SWP spectrum of the pair, which can be spatially resolved in the large aperture was obtained. A narrow Ly-alpha line was detected from Was 49b, the hidden Seyfert 1, at a flux level consistent with that of an unreddened Seyfert 2 galaxy. The lack of detection of a continuum is consistent with a power-law of v(sup -1) or steeper extrapolated from the optical, again consistent with the spectrum of other Seyfert 2 and hidden Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  6. Unpacking the Hidden Efficacies of Learning in Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David; Chen, Victor; Lim, Seo Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for learning where learners undergo experimentations with the phenomena at hand according to progressive and staged goals. Bowling is used as a case study in this paper. The premise for experimentations is that learners can experience hidden efficacies, including the formation of "bad habits." A distinction is made…

  7. Hidden Covariation Detection Produces Faster, Not Slower, Social Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Lynne A.; Andrade, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    In P. Lewicki's (1986b) demonstration of hidden covariation detection (HCD), responses of participants were slower to faces that corresponded with a covariation encountered previously than to faces with novel covariations. This slowing contrasts with the typical finding that priming leads to faster responding and suggests that HCD is a unique type…

  8. Generalized hidden Z{sub 2} symmetry of neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, Duane A.; Ge Shaofeng; Repko, Wayne W.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the consequences of the neutrino mass matrix having a hidden Z{sub 2} symmetry and one zero eigenvalue. When implemented, these two conditions give relations among the mixing angles. In addition, fitting these relations to the existing oscillation data allows limits to be placed on the parameter of the symmetry.

  9. Hidden Assumptions, Attitudes, and Procedures in Failing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzelmann, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    Many hidden assumptions, attitudes, and procedures are practiced routinely in schools without much thought or analysis. One possible explanation for their occurrence is that educators become comfortable with familiar routines and believe they must be doing OK because that's the way schools have always operated. Another likely possibility involves…

  10. Masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Paripovic, Dusan; Kostic, Mirjana; Spasojevic, Brankica; Kruscic, Divna; Peco-Antic, Amira

    2010-09-01

    Arterial hypertension is a risk factor affecting graft function in pediatric kidney transplants. Recent pediatric studies reported a high prevalence of hypertension, especially nocturnal hypertension in this population. Data regarding the prevalence of masked hypertension in pediatric patients with kidney transplants are still scarce. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension after renal transplantation. A total of 41 patients (25 males) with stable functioning renal graft were included in the study. Their median age was 14.5 years with the median interval since transplantation of 2.5 years (range 0.3 to 20.6). Spacelabs 90207 was used to measure ambulatory blood pressure (BP) during a 24-h period. Ambulatory hypertension was defined as mean systolic and/or diastolic BP index at day-time or nighttime >or=1. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP but daytime ambulatory hypertension in patients without antihypertensive medications. Hidden uncontrolled hypertension was defined as daytime ambulatory hypertension undetected by office BP measurements in treated patients. Antihypertensive medications were prescribed to 58%. Prevalence of nocturnal hypertension was 68%. On the basis of combination of office and ABPM masked hypertension and hidden uncontrolled hypertension was detected in 24% and 21% of the study population, respectively. Regular use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in transplanted patients enables detection of masked and hidden uncontrolled hypertension. PMID:20467790

  11. Is There Hidden Potential for Rural Population Growth in Sweden?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedomysl, Thomas; Amcoff, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Rural depopulation is a concern in many countries, and various policy initiatives have been taken to combat such trends. This article examines whether hidden potential for rural population growth can be found in Sweden. If such potential exists, it implies that the development prospects for many rural areas are not as unpromising as they may seem…

  12. Thermoelectric generator hidden in a shirt with a fabric radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Vladimir; Vullers, Ruud J. M.; Hoof, Chris Van

    2012-06-01

    Integration of thermopiles in garments has been performed in this work in different ways. It is shown that textile has a minor effect on power generation, which enables completely hidden and unobtrusive energy harvester. A one-milliwatt thermoelectric generator is then integrated between two layers of a shirt and its characteristics are reported.

  13. Hidden Milky Way star clusters hosting Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J.; Ivanov, V. D.; Georgiev, L.

    2009-05-01

    A noticeable fraction of the hidden young star clusters contain WR and O stars providing us with unique laboratories to study the evolution of these rare objects and their maternity places. We are reporting the reddening, the distance and age of two new members of the family of massive young Galactic clusters, hosting WR stars - Glimpse 23 and Glimpse 30.

  14. On local-hidden-variable no-go theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methot, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    The strongest attack against quantum mechanics came in 1935 in the form of a paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. It was argued that the theory of quantum mechanics could not be called a complete theory of Nature, for every element of reality is not represented in the formalism as such. The authors then put forth a proposition: we must search for a theory where, upon knowing everything about the system, including possible hidden variables, one could make precise predictions concerning elements of reality. This project was ultimately doomed in 1964 with the work of Bell, who showed that the most general local hidden variable theory could not reproduce correlations that arise in quantum mechanics. There exist mainly three forms of no-go theorems for local hidden variable theories. Although almost every physicist knows the consequences of these no-go theorems, not every physicist is aware of the distinctions between the three or even their exact definitions. Thus, we will discuss here the three principal forms of no-go theorems for local hidden variable theories of Nature. We will define Bell theorems, Bell theorems without inequalities, and pseudo-telepathy. A discussion of the similarities and differences will follow.

  15. 29. WORTHINGTON FIRE PUMP WITH TURBINE HIDDEN BEHIND. PUMP HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. WORTHINGTON FIRE PUMP WITH TURBINE HIDDEN BEHIND. PUMP HOUSE IS LOCATED AT HEAD OF OLD TRASH GATES. PUMP ENTERS WATER ON EXTERIOR OF WALL IN FAR SIDE OF PHOTO. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  16. The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisson, Christian

    Academic training programs in the field of outdoor education and recreation have increased considerably in the past few decades, but their true costs are often hidden. A survey of 15 outdoor college programs in the United States and Canada examined special fees associated with outdoor courses. The cost of necessary personal equipment and clothing…

  17. Cellular compartmentation in ischemic myocardium: indirect analysis by electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.G.; Tormey, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was carried out directly on myocardial cells and on the myofibrils and the mitochondria within them. A third subcellular compartment, which contains sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), was measured indirectly. The percent of the total cell calcium content that resides within this ''hidden'' compartment was calculated from cell data minus weighted myofibril and mitochondria data. This approach was applied to control, ischemic, and reperfused myocardium, and other elements were also quantified. We found that the calcium content of this third compartment is little changed during global ischemia but is markedly depleted after 5 min reperfusion. We conclude that these changes are ascribable to changes in SR function.

  18. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  19. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  20. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  1. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  2. Hidden Owners, Hidden Profits, and Poor Nursing Home Care: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene; Ross, Leslie; Kang, Taewoon

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the ownership transparency, financial accountability, and quality indicators of a regional for-profit nursing home chain in California, using a case study methodology to analyze data on the chain's ownership and management structure, financial data, staffing levels, deficiencies and complaints, and litigation. Secondary data were obtained from regulatory and cost reports and litigation cases. Qualitative descriptions of ownership and management were presented and quantitative analyses were conducted by comparing financial and quality indicators with other California for-profit chains, for-profit non-chains, and nonprofit nursing home groups in 2011. The chain's complex, interlocking individual and corporate owners and property companies obscured its ownership structure and financial arrangements. Nursing and support services expenditures were lower than nonprofits and administrative costs were higher than for-profit non-chains. The chain's nurse staffing was lower than expected staffing levels; its deficiencies and citations were higher than in nonprofits; and a number of lawsuits resulted in bankruptcy. Profits were hidden in the chain's management fees, lease agreements, interest payments to owners, and purchases from related-party companies. Greater ownership transparency and financial accountability requirements are needed to ensure regulatory oversight and quality of care. PMID:26159173

  3. [Harassment in the public sector].

    PubMed

    Puech, Paloma; Pitcho, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The French Labour Code, which provides full protection against moral and sexual harassment, is not applicable to public sector workers. The public hospital is however not exempt from such behaviour, which could go unpunished. Public sector workers are therefore protected by the French General Civil Service Regulations and the penal code.

  4. Partnership in Sector Wide Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Hilary

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of bilateral support to the education sector in Tonga and the Solomon Islands, this paper will explore how the discourse of "partnership" has been interpreted and activated within the Sector wide approach (SWAp). In concentrating particularly on the relationship between the respective Ministries of Education and New Zealand's…

  5. Stochastic Analysis of Exit-Fluid Temperature Time-Series Data from the TAG Hydrothermal Mound: Events, States, and Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reves-Sohn, R.; Humphris, S.; Canales, J.

    2005-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal mound is a dynamic structure that is continuously growing via mineral deposition, collapsing from gravitational instabilities and anhydrite dissolution, and shaking from frequent seismic activity on the adjacent normal faults. As a result, the sub-surface fluid circulation patterns beneath the mound are continually re-organizing in response to events that close and open flow paths. These characteristics are clearly evident in time series exit-fluid temperature data acquired from June 2003 through July 2004 as part of the Seismicity and Fluid Flow of TAG (STAG) experiment. Twenty one temperature probes were deployed in actively venting cracks across the TAG mound, and temperature measurements were acquired at each site every ~10 minutes. A key insight for understanding the exit-fluid temperature data is that the measurements can be modeled as Markov chains, where each measurement is a random variable drawn from a finite set of probability distributions associated with the hidden states of the system (i.e., Hidden Markov Models). The Markov chain changes states in response to events that can affect multiple probes, but not necessarily in the same way. For example, an event may cause temperatures at one probe to rapidly increase while temperatures at another probe rapidly decrease. The data from many probes can be explained with a two-state Markov chain, with one state corresponding to "crack open" and the second state corresponding to "crack closed", but still other probes require three or more states, possibly in a nested structure. These stochastic models are deepening our understanding of shallow circulation patterns beneath the TAG mound, and we hope to use them to condition subsurface flow models incorporating the relevant physics of permeable flow in fractures and heat flow.

  6. Neuro fuzzy force control for soft dry contact Hertzian ultrasonic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, E.; Baltazar, A.; Treesatayapun, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the use of a cartesian robotic manipulator as scanner for the automated identification of hidden defects in an aluminum test plate is proposed. The robotic manipulator includes a custom made soft deformable ultrasonic probe and a force sensor for the recollection of the ultrasonic signals and force feedback. The contact between the soft probe and the test plate is regulated using a Neuro Fuzzy controller in order to avoid the complex mathematical model produced by the interaction. Finally the use of the correlation coefficient is proposed for the post processing of the obtained ultrasonic signals and identification of hidden defects inside the test plate. Experimental studies demonstrated the efficiency of the method.

  7. Light chiral dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U (1 ) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, S U (N ) , and a U (1 ) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and the stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimental and cosmological constraints. In a corner of the parameter space, the discrepancy of the muon g -2 between experiments and the standard model prediction can also be ameliorated due to a loop contribution of the dark photon. Smoking-gun signatures of the model include a monophoton signal from the e+e- collision into a photon and a "dark rho meson." Observation of two processes in e+e- collision—the mode into the dark photon and that into the dark rho meson—would provide strong evidence for the model.

  8. An impossibility theorem for parameter independent hidden variable theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leegwater, Gijs

    2016-05-01

    Recently, Roger Colbeck and Renato Renner (C&R) have claimed that '[n]o extension of quantum theory can have improved predictive power' (Colbeck & Renner, 2011, 2012b). If correct, this is a spectacular impossibility theorem for hidden variable theories, which is more general than the theorems of Bell (1964) and Leggett (2003). Also, C&R have used their claim in attempt to prove that a system's quantum-mechanical wave function is in a one-to-one correspondence with its 'ontic' state (Colbeck & Renner, 2012a). C&R's claim essentially means that in any hidden variable theory that is compatible with quantum-mechanical predictions, probabilities of measurement outcomes are independent of these hidden variables. This makes such variables otiose. On closer inspection, however, the generality and validity of the claim can be contested. First, it is based on an assumption called 'Freedom of Choice'. As the name suggests, this assumption involves the independence of an experimenter's choice of measurement settings. But in the way C&R define this assumption, a no-signalling condition is surreptitiously presupposed, making the assumption less innocent than it sounds. When using this definition, any hidden variable theory violating parameter independence, such as Bohmian Mechanics, is immediately shown to be incompatible with quantum-mechanical predictions. Also, the argument of C&R is hard to follow and their mathematical derivation contains several gaps, some of which cannot be closed in the way they suggest. We shall show that these gaps can be filled. The issue with the 'Freedom of Choice' assumption can be circumvented by explicitly assuming parameter independence. This makes the result less general, but better founded. We then obtain an impossibility theorem for hidden variable theories satisfying parameter independence only. As stated above, such hidden variable theories are impossible in the sense that any supplemental variables have no bearing on outcome probabilities

  9. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  10. A quirky probe of neutral naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of neutral naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which top partners carry electroweak charges, such as folded supersymmetry or the quirky little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are pair produced as quirky bound states, since they are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The quirks promptly de-excite and annihilate into glueballs, which decay back to Standard Model fermions via Higgs mixing. This can give rise to spectacular signatures at the LHC, such displaced decays, or high-multiplicity prompt production of many hard b ¯b or τ+τ- pairs. We show that signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space, and might provide the only experimental probe of scenarios with sub-cm glueball decay lengths. The measurement of top partner masses and couplings, which could be used to test the neutral naturalness mechanism directly, is also a tantalizing possibility.

  11. Three Dimensional Sector Design with Optimal Number of Sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dynamic sector design suggests a strategic approach to ease air traffic congestion, which is predicted to become a serious problem in the national airspace system by 2025. Considerable research has been conducted to address the sectorization problem. In previous work, an approach that combines the Voronoi diagrams, Genetic Algorithms (GA), and the iterative deepening algorithm was proposed. However, as originally formulated, the number of sectors used was predefined and only two-dimensional partitions were allowed, which constrained the method's ability to achieve good designs. The current work extends the earlier Voronoi-based method by treating the number of sectors as an additional decision variable, allowing 3D partitions, and developing more comprehensive costs.

  12. An ultrafast reciprocating probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenbin; Tan, Yi; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    For tokamak plasma diagnostics, an ultrafast reciprocating probe system driven by magnetic field coils, achieving a maximum velocity of 21 m/s, is introduced. The probes are attached with a driving hoop made of carbon steel and accelerated by three acceleration coils in series, then decelerated by two deceleration coils and buffer springs and return slowly. The coils with a current of about 1 kA generate a magnetic field of about 1 T. This probe system has been tested on the SUNIST (Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak) spherical tokamak. Radial profiles of the floating potential and other plasma parameters measured by this probe system are given.

  13. Atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Forbes, R.G.

    2009-06-15

    This introductory tutorial describes the technique of atom probe tomography for materials characterization at the atomic level. The evolution of the technique from the initial atom probe field ion microscope to today's state-of-the-art three dimensional atom probe is outlined. An introduction is presented on the basic physics behind the technique, the operation of the instrument, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional data. The common methods for analyzing the three-dimensional atom probe data, including atom maps, isoconcentration surfaces, proximity histograms, maximum separation methods, and concentration frequency distributions, are described.

  14. Active Inference for Binary Symmetric Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-10-01

    We consider active maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference problem for hidden Markov models (HMM), where, given an initial MAP estimate of the hidden sequence, we select to label certain states in the sequence to improve the estimation accuracy of the remaining states. We focus on the binary symmetric HMM, and employ its known mapping to 1d Ising model in random fields. From the statistical physics viewpoint, the active MAP inference problem reduces to analyzing the ground state of the 1d Ising model under modified external fields. We develop an analytical approach and obtain a closed form solution that relates the expected error reduction to model parameters under the specified active inference scheme. We then use this solution to determine most optimal active inference scheme in terms of error reduction, and examine the relation of those schemes to heuristic principles of uncertainty reduction and solution unicity.

  15. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

  16. Time series segmentation with shifting means hidden markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, Ath.; Fortin, V.

    2006-08-01

    We present a new family of hidden Markov models and apply these to the segmentation of hydrological and environmental time series. The proposed hidden Markov models have a discrete state space and their structure is inspired from the shifting means models introduced by Chernoff and Zacks and by Salas and Boes. An estimation method inspired from the EM algorithm is proposed, and we show that it can accurately identify multiple change-points in a time series. We also show that the solution obtained using this algorithm can serve as a starting point for a Monte-Carlo Markov chain Bayesian estimation method, thus reducing the computing time needed for the Markov chain to converge to a stationary distribution.

  17. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:26012881

  18. MODELING PAVEMENT DETERIORATION PROCESSES BY POISSON HIDDEN MARKOV MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Le Thanh; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Okizuka, Ryosuke

    In pavement management, it is important to estimate lifecycle cost, which is composed of the expenses for repairing local damages, including potholes, and repairing and rehabilitating the surface and base layers of pavements, including overlays. In this study, a model is produced under the assumption that the deterioration process of pavement is a complex one that includes local damages, which occur frequently, and the deterioration of the surface and base layers of pavement, which progresses slowly. The variation in pavement soundness is expressed by the Markov deterioration model and the Poisson hidden Markov deterioration model, in which the frequency of local damage depends on the distribution of pavement soundness, is formulated. In addition, the authors suggest a model estimation method using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, and attempt to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed Poisson hidden Markov deterioration model by studying concrete application cases.

  19. Attribute-Based Encryption with Partially Hidden Ciphertext Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Takashi; Yoneyama, Kazuki; Ohta, Kazuo

    We propose attribute-based encryption schemes where encryptor-specified policies (called ciphertext policies) are hidden. By using our schemes, an encryptor can encrypt data with a hidden access control policy. A decryptor obtains her secret key associated with her attributes from a trusted authority in advance and if the attributes associated with the decryptor's secret key do not satisfy the access control policy associated with the encrypted data, the decryptor cannot decrypt the data or guess even what access control policy was specified by the encryptor. We prove security of our construction based on the Decisional Bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption and the Decision Linear assumption. In our security notion, even the legitimate decryptor cannot obtain the information about the access control policy associated with the encrypted data more than the fact that she can decrypt the data.

  20. Penta-Quark States with Strangeness, Hidden Charm and Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Zou, Bing-Song

    The classical quenched quark models with three constituent quarks provide a good description for the baryon spatial ground states, but fail to reproduce the spectrum of baryon excited states. More and more evidences suggest that unquenched effects with multi-quark dynamics are necessary ingredients to solve the problem. Several new hyperon resonances reported recently could fit in the picture of penta-quark states. Based on this picture, some new hyperon excited states were predicted to exist; meanwhile with extension from strangeness to charm and beauty, super-heavy narrow N* and Λ* resonances with hidden charm or beauty were predicted to be around 4.3 and 11 GeV, respectively. Recently, two of such N* with hidden charm might have been observed by the LHCb experiment. More of those states are expected to be observed in near future. This opens a new window in order to study hadronic dynamics for the multi-quark states.

  1. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  2. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  3. A Hidden Markov Approach to Modeling Interevent Earthquake Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, D.; Ebel, J. E.; Kafka, A. L.; Baglivo, J.

    2003-12-01

    A hidden Markov process, in which the interevent time distribution is a mixture of exponential distributions with different rates, is explored as a model for seismicity that does not follow a Poisson process. In a general hidden Markov model, one assumes that a system can be in any of a finite number k of states and there is a random variable of interest whose distribution depends on the state in which the system resides. The system moves probabilistically among the states according to a Markov chain; that is, given the history of visited states up to the present, the conditional probability that the next state is a specified one depends only on the present state. Thus the transition probabilities are specified by a k by k stochastic matrix. Furthermore, it is assumed that the actual states are unobserved (hidden) and that only the values of the random variable are seen. From these values, one wishes to estimate the sequence of states, the transition probability matrix, and any parameters used in the state-specific distributions. The hidden Markov process was applied to a data set of 110 interevent times for earthquakes in New England from 1975 to 2000. Using the Baum-Welch method (Baum et al., Ann. Math. Statist. 41, 164-171), we estimate the transition probabilities, find the most likely sequence of states, and estimate the k means of the exponential distributions. Using k=2 states, we found the data were fit well by a mixture of two exponential distributions, with means of approximately 5 days and 95 days. The steady state model indicates that after approximately one fourth of the earthquakes, the waiting time until the next event had the first exponential distribution and three fourths of the time it had the second. Three and four state models were also fit to the data; the data were inconsistent with a three state model but were well fit by a four state model.

  4. Perpetual points and hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Prasad, Awadhesh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the use of perpetual points for tracing the hidden and the rare attractors of dynamical systems. The analysis of perpetual points and their co-existence due to the parameters values is presented and the impact of these points on the behavior of the systems is shown. The results are obtained for single as well as coupled externally excited van der Pol-Duffing oscillators. The presented results can be generalized to other systems having different dynamics.

  5. Hidden algebra method (quasi-exact-solvability in quantum mechanics)

    SciTech Connect

    Turbiner, A. |

    1996-02-01

    A general introduction to quasi-exactly-solvable problems of quantum mechanics is presented. Main attention is given to multidimensional quasi-exactly-solvable and exactly-solvable Schroedinger operators. Exact-solvability of the Calogero and Sutherland {ital N}-body problems ass ociated with an existence of the hidden algebra {ital sl}{sub {ital N}} is discussed extensively. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Abdominal candidiasis is a hidden reservoir of echinocandin resistance.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2014-12-01

    FKS mutant Candida isolates were recovered from 24% (6/25) of abdominal candidiasis patients exposed to echinocandin. Candida glabrata (29%) and Candida albicans (14%) mutants were identified. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were recovered from 83% of FKS mutant infections. Mutations were associated with prolonged echinocandin exposure (P = 0.01), breakthrough infections (P = 0.03), and therapeutic failures despite source control interventions (100%). Abdominal candidiasis is a hidden reservoir for the emergence of echinocandin-resistant Candida.

  7. Hidden Markov Models: The Best Models for Forager Movements?

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Rocio; Bertrand, Sophie; Tam, Jorge; Fablet, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    One major challenge in the emerging field of movement ecology is the inference of behavioural modes from movement patterns. This has been mainly addressed through Hidden Markov models (HMMs). We propose here to evaluate two sets of alternative and state-of-the-art modelling approaches. First, we consider hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs). They may better represent the behavioural dynamics of foragers since they explicitly model the duration of the behavioural modes. Second, we consider discriminative models which state the inference of behavioural modes as a classification issue, and may take better advantage of multivariate and non linear combinations of movement pattern descriptors. For this work, we use a dataset of >200 trips from human foragers, Peruvian fishermen targeting anchovy. Their movements were recorded through a Vessel Monitoring System (∼1 record per hour), while their behavioural modes (fishing, searching and cruising) were reported by on-board observers. We compare the efficiency of hidden Markov, hidden semi-Markov, and three discriminative models (random forests, artificial neural networks and support vector machines) for inferring the fishermen behavioural modes, using a cross-validation procedure. HSMMs show the highest accuracy (80%), significantly outperforming HMMs and discriminative models. Simulations show that data with higher temporal resolution, HSMMs reach nearly 100% of accuracy. Our results demonstrate to what extent the sequential nature of movement is critical for accurately inferring behavioural modes from a trajectory and we strongly recommend the use of HSMMs for such purpose. In addition, this work opens perspectives on the use of hybrid HSMM-discriminative models, where a discriminative setting for the observation process of HSMMs could greatly improve inference performance. PMID:24058400

  8. Local hidden-variable models for entangled quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusiak, R.; Demianowicz, M.; Acín, A.

    2014-10-01

    While entanglement and violation of Bell inequalities were initially thought to be equivalent quantum phenomena, we now have different examples of entangled states whose correlations can be described by local hidden-variable models and, therefore, do not violate any of the Bell inequalities. We provide an up-to-date overview of the existing literature regarding local hidden-variable models for entangled quantum states, in both the bipartite and multipartite cases, and discuss some of the most relevant open questions in this context. Our review covers twenty five years of this line of research, beginning with the seminal work by Werner (1989 Phys. Rev. A 40 8), which provided the first example of an entangled state with a local model. Werner's work, in turn, appeared twenty five years after the seminal work by Bell (1964 Physics 1 195), about the impossibility of recovering the predictions of quantum mechanics using a local hidden-variable theory. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

  9. Security in Quantum Cryptography vs. Nonlocal Hidden Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek; Pawłowski, Marcin

    2007-02-01

    In order to prove equivalence of quantum mechanics with nonlocal hidden-variable theories of a Bohm type one assumes that all the possible measurements belong to a restricted class: (a) we measure only positions of particles and (b) have no access to exact values of initial conditions for Bohm's trajectories. However, in any computer simulation based on Bohm's equations one relaxes the assumption (b) and yet obtains agreement with quantum predictions concerning the results of positional measurements. Therefore a theory where (b) is relaxed, although in principle allowing for measurements of a more general type, cannot be experimentally falsified within the current experimental paradigm. Such generalized measurements have not been invented, or have been invented but the information is qualified, but we cannot exclude their possibility on the basis of known experimental data. Since the measurements would simultaneously allow for eavesdropping in standard quantum cryptosystems, the arguments for security of quantum cryptography become logically circular: Bohm-type theories do not allow for eavesdropping because they are fully equivalent to quantum mechanics, but the equivalence follows from the assumption that we cannot measure hidden variables, which would be equivalent to the possibility of eavesdropping… Here we break the vicious circle by a simple modification of entangled-state protocols that makes them secure even if our enemies have more imagination and know how to measure hidden-variable initial conditions with arbitrary precision.

  10. Generalized single-hidden layer feedforward networks for regression problems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Er, Meng Joo; Han, Min

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, traditional single-hidden layer feedforward network (SLFN) is extended to novel generalized SLFN (GSLFN) by employing polynomial functions of inputs as output weights connecting randomly generated hidden units with corresponding output nodes. The significant contributions of this paper are as follows: 1) a primal GSLFN (P-GSLFN) is implemented using randomly generated hidden nodes and polynomial output weights whereby the regression matrix is augmented by full or partial input variables and only polynomial coefficients are to be estimated; 2) a simplified GSLFN (S-GSLFN) is realized by decomposing the polynomial output weights of the P-GSLFN into randomly generated polynomial nodes and tunable output weights; 3) both P- and S-GSLFN are able to achieve universal approximation if the output weights are tuned by ridge regression estimators; and 4) by virtue of the developed batch and online sequential ridge ELM (BR-ELM and OSR-ELM) learning algorithms, high performance of the proposed GSLFNs in terms of generalization and learning speed is guaranteed. Comprehensive simulation studies and comparisons with standard SLFNs are carried out on real-world regression benchmark data sets. Simulation results demonstrate that the innovative GSLFNs using BR-ELM and OSR-ELM are superior to standard SLFNs in terms of accuracy, training speed, and structure compactness.

  11. Multiple Changes to Reusable Solid Rocket Motors, Identifying Hidden Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCann, Bradley Q.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) baseline is subject to various changes. Changes are necessary due to safety and quality improvements, environmental considerations, vendor changes, obsolescence issues, etc. The RSRM program has a goal to test changes on full-scale static test motors prior to flight due to the unique RSRM operating environment. Each static test motor incorporates several significant changes and numerous minor changes. Flight motors often implement multiple changes simultaneously. While each change is individually verified and assessed, the potential for changes to interact constitutes additional hidden risk. Mitigating this risk depends upon identification of potential interactions. Therefore, the ATK Thiokol Propulsion System Safety organization initiated the use of a risk interaction matrix to identify potential interactions that compound risk. Identifying risk interactions supports flight and test motor decisions. Uncovering hidden risks of a full-scale static test motor gives a broader perspective of the changes being tested. This broader perspective compels the program to focus on solutions for implementing RSRM changes with minimal/mitigated risk. This paper discusses use of a change risk interaction matrix to identify test challenges and uncover hidden risks to the RSRM program.

  12. Infinite Factorial Unbounded-State Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Valera, Isabel; Ruiz, Francisco J R; Perez-Cruz, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    There are many scenarios in artificial intelligence, signal processing or medicine, in which a temporal sequence consists of several unknown overlapping independent causes, and we are interested in accurately recovering those canonical causes. Factorial hidden Markov models (FHMMs) present the versatility to provide a good fit to these scenarios. However, in some scenarios, the number of causes or the number of states of the FHMM cannot be known or limited a priori. In this paper, we propose an infinite factorial unbounded-state hidden Markov model (IFUHMM), in which the number of parallel hidden Markovmodels (HMMs) and states in each HMM are potentially unbounded. We rely on a Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) prior over integer-valued matrices, in which the columns represent the Markov chains, the rows the time indexes, and the integers the state for each chain and time instant. First, we extend the existent infinite factorial binary-state HMM to allow for any number of states. Then, we modify this model to allow for an unbounded number of states and derive an MCMC-based inference algorithm that properly deals with the trade-off between the unbounded number of states and chains. We illustrate the performance of our proposed models in the power disaggregation problem. PMID:26571511

  13. Estimating demographic parameters using hidden process dynamic models.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Olivier; Lebreton, Jean-Dominique; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Choquet, Rémi; Pradel, Roger

    2012-12-01

    Structured population models are widely used in plant and animal demographic studies to assess population dynamics. In matrix population models, populations are described with discrete classes of individuals (age, life history stage or size). To calibrate these models, longitudinal data are collected at the individual level to estimate demographic parameters. However, several sources of uncertainty can complicate parameter estimation, such as imperfect detection of individuals inherent to monitoring in the wild and uncertainty in assigning a state to an individual. Here, we show how recent statistical models can help overcome these issues. We focus on hidden process models that run two time series in parallel, one capturing the dynamics of the true states and the other consisting of observations arising from these underlying possibly unknown states. In a first case study, we illustrate hidden Markov models with an example of how to accommodate state uncertainty using Frequentist theory and maximum likelihood estimation. In a second case study, we illustrate state-space models with an example of how to estimate lifetime reproductive success despite imperfect detection, using a Bayesian framework and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. Hidden process models are a promising tool as they allow population biologists to cope with process variation while simultaneously accounting for observation error. PMID:22373775

  14. Unsupervised Segmentation of Hidden Semi-Markov Non Stationary Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuyade-Lahorgue, Jérôme; Pieczynski, Wojciech

    2006-11-01

    In the classical hidden Markov chain (HMC) model we have a hidden chain X, which is a Markov one and an observed chain Y. HMC are widely used; however, in some situations they have to be replaced by the more general "hidden semi-Markov chains" (HSMC) which are particular "triplet Markov chains" (TMC) T = (X, U, Y), where the auxiliary chain U models the semi-Markovianity of X. Otherwise, non stationary classical HMC can also be modeled by a triplet Markov stationary chain with, as a consequence, the possibility of parameters' estimation. The aim of this paper is to use simultaneously both properties. We consider a non stationary HSMC and model it as a TMC T = (X, U1, U2, Y), where U1 models the semi-Markovianity and U2 models the non stationarity. The TMC T being itself stationary, all parameters can be estimated by the general "Iterative Conditional Estimation" (ICE) method, which leads to unsupervised segmentation. We present some experiments showing the interest of the new model and related processing in image segmentation area.

  15. ENSO informed Drought Forecasting Using Nonhomogeneous Hidden Markov Chain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Yoo, J.; Kim, T.

    2013-12-01

    The study aims at developing a new scheme to investigate the potential use of ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation) for drought forecasting. In this regard, objective of this study is to extend a previously developed nonhomogeneous hidden Markov chain model (NHMM) to identify climate states associated with drought that can be potentially used to forecast drought conditions using climate information. As a target variable for forecasting, SPI(standardized precipitation index) is mainly utilized. This study collected monthly precipitation data over 56 stations that cover more than 30 years and K-means cluster analysis using drought properties was applied to partition regions into mutually exclusive clusters. In this study, six main clusters were distinguished through the regionalization procedure. For each cluster, the NHMM was applied to estimate the transition probability of hidden states as well as drought conditions informed by large scale climate indices (e.g. SOI, Nino1.2, Nino3, Nino3.4, MJO and PDO). The NHMM coupled with large scale climate information shows promise as a technique for forecasting drought scenarios. A more detailed explanation of large scale climate patterns associated with the identified hidden states will be provided with anomaly composites of SSTs and SLPs. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant(11CTIPC02) from Construction Technology Innovation Program (CTIP) funded by Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs of Korean government.

  16. Efficient Parallel Learning of Hidden Markov Chain Models on SMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Fu, Bin; Faloutsos, Christos

    Quad-core cpus have been a common desktop configuration for today's office. The increasing number of processors on a single chip opens new opportunity for parallel computing. Our goal is to make use of the multi-core as well as multi-processor architectures to speed up large-scale data mining algorithms. In this paper, we present a general parallel learning framework, Cut-And-Stitch, for training hidden Markov chain models. Particularly, we propose two model-specific variants, CAS-LDS for learning linear dynamical systems (LDS) and CAS-HMM for learning hidden Markov models (HMM). Our main contribution is a novel method to handle the data dependencies due to the chain structure of hidden variables, so as to parallelize the EM-based parameter learning algorithm. We implement CAS-LDS and CAS-HMM using OpenMP on two supercomputers and a quad-core commercial desktop. The experimental results show that parallel algorithms using Cut-And-Stitch achieve comparable accuracy and almost linear speedups over the traditional serial version.

  17. Decoding coalescent hidden Markov models in linear time

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelley; Sheehan, Sara; Kamm, John A.; Song, Yun S.

    2014-01-01

    In many areas of computational biology, hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been used to model local genomic features. In particular, coalescent HMMs have been used to infer ancient population sizes, migration rates, divergence times, and other parameters such as mutation and recombination rates. As more loci, sequences, and hidden states are added to the model, however, the runtime of coalescent HMMs can quickly become prohibitive. Here we present a new algorithm for reducing the runtime of coalescent HMMs from quadratic in the number of hidden time states to linear, without making any additional approximations. Our algorithm can be incorporated into various coalescent HMMs, including the popular method PSMC for inferring variable effective population sizes. Here we implement this algorithm to speed up our demographic inference method diCal, which is equivalent to PSMC when applied to a sample of two haplotypes. We demonstrate that the linear-time method can reconstruct a population size change history more accurately than the quadratic-time method, given similar computation resources. We also apply the method to data from the 1000 Genomes project, inferring a high-resolution history of size changes in the European population. PMID:25340178

  18. Seeing hidden colors with acoustically modulated laser speckle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Terence S.; Jiang, Shihong

    2013-03-01

    A technique based on acoustically modulated laser speckle has been demonstrated which can quantify and classify 25 colored papers, even when they are hidden 5 mm behind an opaque slab barrier with a thickness of 5 mm and a reduced scattering coefficient of 1.8 mm-1. A small vibration at 200 Hz was induced on the colored paper by attaching it to the central diaphragm of a loudspeaker. Two He-Ne lasers (green at 543 nm and red at 633 nm) illuminated the slab surface sequentially. Although the slab blocked most of the incoming light, a small proportion of light penetrated through, interacted with the vibrating colored paper and backscattered, causing a time-varying speckle pattern on the slab surface. A consumer grade digital camera was used to capture the speckle pattern from which the speckle contrast difference was calculated and shown to be indicative of the color of the hidden object. Using the speckle contrast difference measured at 543 nm and 633 nm, the nearest neighbor classification algorithm was employed to classify the 25 hidden colors (formed by different percentages of base colors magenta and cyan), achieving an accuracy of 72%. This work has demonstrated that the acoustically modulated laser speckle technique can increase the sensitivity of spectroscopic measurements in a deeper region, which has the potential to be translated into clinical applications such as cerebral oxygenation measurement in which a superficial layer (skull) is present.

  19. [Hidden allergens in processed food. The consumer perspective].

    PubMed

    Schnadt, S

    2012-03-01

    Despite improved allergen-labeling and careful avoidance strategies, hidden allergens in food are a substantial risk for unintended reactions in food allergy sufferers. Unpublished data from a survey of the German Allergy and Asthma Association (Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) show that 85% of 738 questioned food allergic patients have experienced at least one allergic reaction from each prepacked products as well as food sold loose. Almost half of the participants said to have not received information of a food allergen as an ingredient or possible trace on the label. Different possibilities are discussed under which food allergens can be hidden in processed products, like incomprehensible labeling, labeling gaps, unexpected occurrence of allergens as well as cross contaminations or allergens in loose products. To each of the seven highlighted sources of hidden allergens in food, practical examples are given as well as proposals for the improvement of the situation from consumer view. The aim is to indicate possibilities and measures for politics and industry by which allergic consumers and their social circle are able to make an informed choice concerning the safe consumption of a certain product and to protect themselves from unintentional reactions.

  20. Exploring inequality violations by classical hidden variables numerically

    SciTech Connect

    Vongehr, Sascha

    2013-12-15

    There are increasingly suggestions for computer simulations of quantum statistics which try to violate Bell type inequalities via classical, common cause correlations. The Clauser–Horne–Shimony–Holt (CHSH) inequality is very robust. However, we argue that with the Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen setup, the CHSH is inferior to the Bell inequality, although and because the latter must assume anti-correlation of entangled photon singlet states. We simulate how often quantum behavior violates both inequalities, depending on the number of photons. Violating Bell 99% of the time is argued to be an ideal benchmark. We present hidden variables that violate the Bell and CHSH inequalities with 50% probability, and ones which violate Bell 85% of the time when missing 13% anti-correlation. We discuss how to present the quantum correlations to a wide audience and conclude that, when defending against claims of hidden classicality, one should demand numerical simulations and insist on anti-correlation and the full amount of Bell violation. -- Highlights: •The widely assumed superiority of the CHSH fails in the EPR problem. •We simulate Bell type inequalities behavior depending on the number of photons. •The core of Bell’s theorem in the EPR setup is introduced in a simple way understandable to a wide audience. •We present hidden variables that violate both inequalities with 50% probability. •Algorithms have been supplied in form of Mathematica programs.

  1. Trends in Public Sector Arbitration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Harry; Wallace, Virginia

    1982-01-01

    Presents developments in grievance arbitration in government employment by examining all public sector arbitration cases from 1971 through 1979. Predicts that issues of employee discipline and discharge will comprise the largest number of cases proceeding to arbitration. (Author/MLF)

  2. Temperature compensation for miniaturized magnetic sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Temperature compensation for a magnetic sector used in mass spectrometry. A high temperature dependant magnetic sector is used. This magnetic sector is compensated by a magnetic shunt that has opposite temperature characteristics to those of the magnet.

  3. Baryon states with open beauty in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. H.; Xiao, C. W.; Oset, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we examine the interaction of B stretchy="false">¯N, B stretchy="false">¯Δ, B stretchy="false">¯*N, and B stretchy="false">¯*Δ states, together with their coupled channels, by using a mapping from the light meson sector. The assumption that the heavy quarks act as spectators at the quark level automatically leads us to the results of the heavy quark spin symmetry for pion exchange and reproduces the results of the Weinberg Tomozawa term, coming from light vector exchanges in the extended local hidden gauge approach. With this dynamics we look for states dynamically generated from the interaction and find two states with nearly zero width, which we associate to the Λb(5912) and Λb(5920) states. The states couple mostly to B stretchy="false">¯*N, which are degenerate with the Weinberg Tomozawa interaction. The difference of masses between these two states, with J =1/2 and 3/2, respectively, is due to pion exchange connecting these states to intermediate B stretchy="false">¯N states. In addition to these two Λb states, we find three more states with I =0, one of them nearly degenerate in two states of J =1/2, 3/2. Furthermore, we also find eight more states in I =1, two of them degenerate in J =1/2, 3/2, and another two degenerate in J =1/2, 3/2, 5/2.

  4. Twisted sectors from plane partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shouvik; Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Li, Wei; Peng, Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Twisted sectors arise naturally in the bosonic higher spin CFTs at their free points, as well as in the associated symmetric orbifolds. We identify the coset representations of the twisted sector states using the description of W_{∞} representations in terms of plane partitions. We confirm these proposals by a microscopic null-vector analysis, and by matching the excitation spectrum of these representations with the orbifold prediction.

  5. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  6. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  7. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  8. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-14

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin. PMID:24320261

  9. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin.

  10. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments.

  11. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments. PMID:26943524

  12. Hidden vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Linghua; Xiong Hongwei; Wu Biao

    2010-11-15

    We study vortex formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating double-well potential. In addition to the ordinary quantized vortices and elusive ghost vortices, 'hidden' vortices are found distributed along the central barrier. These hidden vortices are invisible like ghost vortices but carry angular momentum. Moreover, their core size is not given by the healing length, but is strongly influenced by the external potential. We find that the Feynman rule can be well satisfied only after including the hidden vortices. There is no critical rotation frequency for the formation of hidden vortices while there is one for the formation of ordinary visible vortices. Hidden vortices can be revealed in the free expansion of Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition, the hidden vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate can appear in other external potentials, such as a rotating anisotropic toroidal trap.

  13. Short Summary European Reports on Retail Sector, Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector, Food and Beverages Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    This document is composed of European synthesis reports on retail trade, the agro-food sector, and the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. They are based on the most important findings of the European report and the 12 national reports for each sector. Section 1, "Retail Sector," deals in part 1 with the structure of retailing in the different…

  14. PeV-scale dark matter as a thermal relic of a decoupled sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan; Krnjaic, Gordan

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we consider a class of scenarios in which the dark matter is part of a heavy hidden sector that is thermally decoupled from the Standard Model in the early universe. The dark matter freezes-out by annihilating to a lighter, metastable state, whose subsequent abundance can naturally come to dominate the energy density of the universe. When this state decays, it reheats the visible sector and dilutes all relic abundances, thereby allowing the dark matter to be orders of magnitude heavier than the weak scale. For concreteness, we consider a simple realization with a Dirac fermion dark matter candidate coupled to a massive gauge boson that decays to the Standard Model through its kinetic mixing with hypercharge. We identify viable parameter space in which the dark matter can be as heavy as ∼1-100 PeV without being overproduced in the early universe.

  15. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  16. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  17. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  18. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  19. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  20. Transient enthalpy probe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Brian K.

    A reliable diagnostic probe has been developed to measure the local enthalpy in high-pressure, arc heated test streams that simulate atmospheric reentry conditions. The probe employs the double sonic-throat technique and is designed for the sweep (transient) mode to survive the severe heating environment. Tests in the high-pressure arc heater facilities show that, under certain conditions, the enthalpy probe measurements are in good agreement with enthalpy profiles inferred from heat flux measurements using the theory of Fay and Riddell (1958).

  1. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  2. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  3. Incremental discovery of hidden structure: Applications in theory of elementary particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zytkow, J.M. |; Fischer, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Discovering hidden structure is a challenging, universal research task in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and other disciplines. Not only must the elements of hidden structure be postulated by the discoverer, but they can only be verified by indirect evidence, at the level of observable objects. In this paper we describe a framework for hidden structure discovery, built on a constructive definition of hidden structure. This definition leads to operators that build models of hidden structure step by step, postulating hidden objects, their combinations and properties, reactions described in terms of hidden objects, and mapping between the hidden and the observed structure. We introduce the operator dependency diagram, which shows the order of operator application and model evaluation. Different observational knowledge supports different evaluation criteria, which lead to different search systems with verifiable sequences of operator applications. Isomorph-free structure generation is another issue critical for efficiency of search. We apply our framework in the system GELL-MANN, that hypothesizes hidden structure for elementary particles and we present the results of a large scale search for quark models.

  4. Acausality from a dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, Christopher D.

    2014-03-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem that require partners for each standard model particle often require that these states live at or above the electroweak scale, to satisfy phenomenological bounds. Partners to possible dark sector particles may be significantly lighter, due to the assumed weakness of the couplings between the dark and visible sectors. Here we consider the possibility that a dark sector might include light Lee-Wick particles. We present the formulation of a theory in which a dark photon and its Lee-Wick partner have kinetic mixing with hypercharge. We point out that the Lee-Wick partner of the dark photon will lead to an apparent violation of causality at small distance scales that might be discerned in low-energy experiments.

  5. Network topology of economic sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djauhari, Maman A.; Gan, Siew Lee

    2016-09-01

    A lot of studies dealing with stock network analysis, where each individual stock is represented by a univariate time series of its closing price, have been published. In these studies, the similarity of two different stocks is quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient on the logarithmic price returns. In this paper, we generalize the notion of similarity between univariate time series into multivariate time series which might be of different dimensions. This allows us to deal with economic sector network analysis, where the similarity between economic sectors is defined using Escoufier’s vector correlation RV. To the best of our knowledge, there is no study dealing with this notion of economic sector similarity. Two examples of data from the New York stock exchange will be presented and discussed, and some important results will be highlighted.

  6. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  7. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  8. Geophysical Investigations at Hidden Dam, Raymond, California Flow Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, Burke J.; Ikard, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Numerical flow modeling and analysis of observation-well data at Hidden Dam are carried out to supplement recent geophysical field investigations at the site (Minsley and others, 2010). This work also is complementary to earlier seepage-related studies at Hidden Dam documented by Cedergren (1980a, b). Known seepage areas on the northwest right abutment area of the downstream side of the dam was documented by Cedergren (1980a, b). Subsequent to the 1980 seepage study, a drainage blanket with a sub-drain system was installed to mitigate downstream seepage. Flow net analysis provided by Cedergren (1980a, b) suggests that the primary seepage mechanism involves flow through the dam foundation due to normal reservoir pool elevations, which results in upflow that intersects the ground surface in several areas on the downstream side of the dam. In addition to the reservoir pool elevations and downstream surface topography, flow is also controlled by the existing foundation geology as well as the presence or absence of a horizontal drain in the downstream portion of the dam. The current modeling study is aimed at quantifying how variability in dam and foundation hydrologic properties influences seepage as a function of reservoir stage. Flow modeling is implemented using the COMSOL Multiphysics software package, which solves the partially saturated flow equations in a two-dimensional (2D) cross-section of Hidden Dam that also incorporates true downstream topography. Use of the COMSOL software package provides a more quantitative approach than the flow net analysis by Cedergren (1980a, b), and allows for rapid evaluation of the influence of various parameters such as reservoir level, dam structure and geometry, and hydrogeologic properties of the dam and foundation materials. Historical observation-well data are used to help validate the flow simulations by comparing observed and predicted water levels for a range of reservoir elevations. The flow models are guided by, and

  9. Economic Indicators of the Farm Sector. Farm Sector Review, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This report contains 44 tables and 23 figures, along with narrative summaries, that provide an overall view of the farm sector in the United States in 1986. Some of the findings highlighted in the report are the following: (1) farmers spent less to produce their crops and livestock in 1986; (2) government payments to farmers increased, but prices…

  10. Backpropagation neural nets with one and two hidden layers.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, J; Barnard, E

    1993-01-01

    The differences in classification and training performance of three- and four-layer (one- and two-hidden-layer) fully interconnected feedforward neural nets are investigated. To obtain results which do not merely reflect performance on a particular data set, the networks are trained on various distributions, which are themselves drawn from a distribution of distributions. Experimental results indicate that four-layered networks are more prone to fall into bad local minima, but that three- and four-layered networks perform similarly in all other respects.

  11. "Hidden treasures": librarian office hours for three health sciences schools.

    PubMed

    Handler, Lara; Lackey, Mellanye; Vaughan, K T L

    2009-10-01

    The changing needs of students and faculty have prompted UNC Chapel Hill's Health Sciences Library to reconsider the delivery of library services. Several years of outreach and office hours have yielded an array of "hidden treasures," or secondary outcomes, of both online and in-person office hours. The online office hours are tailored for the Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, and Public Health. This article examines the benefits that go beyond simple consultation statistics and encompass more qualitative aspects of success resulting from increased outreach, goodwill, and stronger library-departmental partnerships.

  12. AIRWAY LABELING USING A HIDDEN MARKOV TREE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James C.; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Okajima, Yuka; Wassermann, Demian; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; San José Estépar, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel airway labeling algorithm based on a Hidden Markov Tree Model (HMTM). We obtain a collection of discrete points along the segmented airway tree using particles sampling [1] and establish topology using Kruskal’s minimum spanning tree algorithm. Following this, our HMTM algorithm probabilistically assigns labels to each point. While alternative methods label airway branches out to the segmental level, we describe a general method and demonstrate its performance out to the subsubsegmental level (two generations further than previously published approaches). We present results on a collection of 25 computed tomography (CT) datasets taken from a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) study. PMID:25436039

  13. Incompatible quantum measurements admitting a local-hidden-variable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino, Marco Túlio; Bowles, Joseph; Hirsch, Flavien; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The observation of quantum nonlocality, i.e., quantum correlations violating a Bell inequality, implies the use of incompatible local quantum measurements. Here we consider the converse question. That is, can any set of incompatible measurements be used in order to demonstrate Bell inequality violation? Our main result is to construct a local hidden variable model for an incompatible set of qubit measurements. Specifically, we show that if Alice uses this set of measurements, then for any possible shared entangled state and any possible dichotomic measurements performed by Bob, the resulting statistics are local. This represents significant progress towards proving that measurement incompatibility does not imply Bell nonlocality in general.

  14. Hidden Markov Modeling for Weigh-In-Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Ferragut, Erik M; Boone, Shane

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a hidden Markov model to assist in the weight measurement error that arises from complex vehicle oscillations of a system of discrete masses. Present reduction of oscillations is by a smooth, flat, level approach and constant, slow speed in a straight line. The model uses this inherent variability to assist in determining the true total weight and individual axle weights of a vehicle. The weight distribution dynamics of a generic moving vehicle were simulated. The model estimation converged to within 1% of the true mass for simulated data. The computational demands of this method, while much greater than simple averages, took only seconds to run on a desktop computer.

  15. "Hidden" bone metastasis from thyroid carcinoma: a clinical note.

    PubMed

    Sioka, C; Skarulis, M C; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Heiss, J D; Reynolds, J C

    2014-01-01

    The (131)I-iodide ((131)I) whole-body scan, for thyroid carcinoma is at times difficult to interpret. In a diagnostic whole body (131)I scan of a patient with follicular carcinoma, a posterior skull lesion was partially hidden by overlapping facial structures. On lateral head view, the abnormality was clearly evident. SPECT/CT and MRI showed the lesion originated in the occipital bone and had enlarged into the posterior fossa. The mass was surgically removed and the patient received (131)I therapy for residual tissue. The study demonstrates a pitfall in the reading of two dimensional radioiodine images which can be overcome by SPECT or lateral imaging.

  16. Improved Hidden-Markov-Model Method Of Detecting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic J.

    1994-01-01

    Method of automated, continuous monitoring to detect faults in complicated dynamic system based on hidden-Markov-model (HMM) approach. Simpler than another, recently proposed HMM method, but retains advantages of that method, including low susceptibility to false alarms, no need for mathematical model of dynamics of system under normal or faulty conditions, and ability to detect subtle changes in characteristics of monitored signals. Examples of systems monitored by use of this method include motors, turbines, and pumps critical in their applications; chemical-processing plants; powerplants; and biomedical systems.

  17. Venus ionopause 'clouds' and IMF sector boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, Hanying; Ma, Yingjuan; Zhang, Tielong; McEnulty, T.

    Disconnected or partially connected structures observed by the PVO Langmuir Probe near the ionopause of Venus were called 'clouds' by Brace et al. (1980). These authors speculated that the loss of atmosphere represented by these features could be significant compared to other loss processes. Russell et al. (1982) subsequently showed that the clouds occurred together with sharp rotations in the magnetic field. They suggested that the extreme draping of the interplanetary field that occurs near the ionopause at the draping poles could exert JxB forces sufficient to pull the ionospheric plasma in the cloud tailward and out into the heliosphere. But in 1991, Ong et al. demonstrated via analysis of many clouds that they are not generally seen in the polar regions of the draped magnetosheath field. Instead they occur at times when the interplanetary magnetic field undergoes a sudden rotation, as in interplanetary field sector boundaries. We discuss the statistics of such rotations at the orbit of Venus and their frequency as a function of solar cycle. Whether they enable or enhance escape or not requires simulation studies, but this study calls attention to the potential importance of time dependent external conditions.

  18. Interplanetary sector boundaries, 1971 - 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen interplanetary sector boundary crossings observed at 1 AU by the magnetometer on the IMP-6 spacecraft are discussed. The events were examined on many different time scales ranging from days on either side of the boundary to high resolution measurements of 12.5 vectors per second. Two categories of boundaries were found, one group being relatively thin and the other being thick. In many cases the field vector rotated in a plane from one polarity to the other. Only two of the transitions were null sheets. Using the minimum variance analysis to determine the normals to the plane of rotation, and assuming that this is the same as the normal to the sector boundary surface, it was found that the normals were close to the ecliptic plane. An analysis of tangential discontinuities contained in 4-day periods about the events showed that their orientations were generally not related to the orientations of the sector boundary surface, but rather their characteristics were about the same as those for discontinuities outside the sector boundaries.

  19. Algorithmic information theory and the hidden variable question

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    The admissibility of certain nonlocal hidden-variable theories are explained via information theory. Consider a pair of Stern-Gerlach devices with fixed nonparallel orientations that periodically perform spin measurements on identically prepared pairs of electrons in the singlet spin state. Suppose the outcomes are recorded as binary strings l and r (with l sub n and r sub n denoting their n-length prefixes). The hidden-variable theories considered here require that there exists a recursive function which may be used to transform l sub n into r sub n for any n. This note demonstrates that such a theory cannot reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics. Specifically, consider an ensemble of outcome pairs (l,r). From the associated probability measure, the Shannon entropies H sub n and H bar sub n for strings l sub n and pairs (l sub n, r sub n) may be formed. It is shown that such a theory requires that the absolute value of H bar sub n - H sub n be bounded - contrasting the quantum mechanical prediction that it grow with n.

  20. Self-Organizing Hidden Markov Model Map (SOHMMM).

    PubMed

    Ferles, Christos; Stafylopatis, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    A hybrid approach combining the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) and the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is presented. The Self-Organizing Hidden Markov Model Map (SOHMMM) establishes a cross-section between the theoretic foundations and algorithmic realizations of its constituents. The respective architectures and learning methodologies are fused in an attempt to meet the increasing requirements imposed by the properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein chain molecules. The fusion and synergy of the SOM unsupervised training and the HMM dynamic programming algorithms bring forth a novel on-line gradient descent unsupervised learning algorithm, which is fully integrated into the SOHMMM. Since the SOHMMM carries out probabilistic sequence analysis with little or no prior knowledge, it can have a variety of applications in clustering, dimensionality reduction and visualization of large-scale sequence spaces, and also, in sequence discrimination, search and classification. Two series of experiments based on artificial sequence data and splice junction gene sequences demonstrate the SOHMMM's characteristics and capabilities. PMID:24001407

  1. In-vessel composting at the Hidden Valley Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C.

    1998-01-01

    Yard waste composting is a simple and natural process. But left alone, natural decomposition takes years. With commercial composting, on the other hand, the process must be accelerated by workers and equipment. Moreover, it has to be accomplished in a relatively small space, it has to be accessible to trucks and other vehicles, it is subject to quality control standards, and it has to be free or relatively free of objectionable odor. Most importantly, for economic feasibility, it must find an end market. One facility that apparently has met those criteria is Land Recovery, Inc.`s (LRI, Tacoma, Wash.) Hidden Valley Landfill site in Puyallup, Wash., south of Tacoma. LRI is a fully integrated solid waste management company that operates a landfill, intermodal transfer site, and a recycling center. The Purdy facility has surpassed its designed average capacity of 80 tpd and designed peak capacity of 120 tpd, with peaks running as high as 200 tpd. LRI needed to expand, but there was very little room to do so at the Purdy site. LRI`s solution was to start an in-vessel composting operation adjacent to the Hidden Valley Landfill, using 50-cu.yd. modified roll-off containers as the composting enclosure and 20-cu.yd. containers to filter the odorous exhaust from the decomposing materials. The compost facility is a temporary measure until a new, fully enclosed facility is built in about another year.

  2. Trajectory classification using switched dynamical hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Figueiredo, Mario; Marques, Jorge S

    2010-05-01

    This paper proposes an approach for recognizing human activities (more specifically, pedestrian trajectories) in video sequences, in a surveillance context. A system for automatic processing of video information for surveillance purposes should be capable of detecting, recognizing, and collecting statistics of human activity, reducing human intervention as much as possible. In the method described in this paper, human trajectories are modeled as a concatenation of segments produced by a set of low level dynamical models. These low level models are estimated in an unsupervised fashion, based on a finite mixture formulation, using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm; the number of models is automatically obtained using a minimum message length (MML) criterion. This leads to a parsimonious set of models tuned to the complexity of the scene. We describe the switching among the low-level dynamic models by a hidden Markov chain; thus, the complete model is termed a switched dynamical hidden Markov model (SD-HMM). The performance of the proposed method is illustrated with real data from two different scenarios: a shopping center and a university campus. A set of human activities in both scenarios is successfully recognized by the proposed system. These experiments show the ability of our approach to properly describe trajectories with sudden changes.

  3. Hiding scattering layers for noninvasive imaging of hidden objects

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Shi, Yile; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-01

    The ability to noninvasive image through turbid media has long been a major scientific and technological goal in many disciplines. A breakthrough has been made to observe objects that were completely hidden behind an opaque scattering layer. However, such approach needs not only to scan both illumination light and detector but further off-line procedures to numerically retrieve the image of the objects. Here, we report a distant invisibility-based noninvasive method that can hide scattering layers and allows to directly image objects behind. By recording holograms of the objects through a ground glass and then using the holograms produced time-reversal lights to re-illuminate the objects, we implemented to observe objects with feature size ranging from 39 μm to 80 μm that were hidden behind a 3 mm thick ground glass. Of importance, our approach opens a door towards real-time, high speed biomedical imaging and in-site inspection of integrated devices. PMID:25669436

  4. Toward a Diagnostic Test for Hidden Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Plack, Christopher J; Léger, Agnès; Prendergast, Garreth; Kluk, Karolina; Guest, Hannah; Munro, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy (or hidden hearing loss), due to noise exposure or aging, has been demonstrated in animal models using histological techniques. However, diagnosis of the condition in individual humans is problematic because of (a) test reliability and (b) lack of a gold standard validation measure. Wave I of the transient-evoked auditory brainstem response is a noninvasive electrophysiological measure of auditory nerve function and has been validated in the animal models. However, in humans, Wave I amplitude shows high variability both between and within individuals. The frequency-following response, a sustained evoked potential reflecting synchronous neural activity in the rostral brainstem, is potentially more robust than auditory brainstem response Wave I. However, the frequency-following response is a measure of central activity and may be dependent on individual differences in central processing. Psychophysical measures are also affected by intersubject variability in central processing. Differential measures may help to reduce intersubject variability due to unrelated factors. A measure can be compared, within an individual, between conditions that are affected differently by cochlear synaptopathy. Validation of the metrics is also an issue. Comparisons with animal models, computational modeling, auditory nerve imaging, and human temporal bone histology are all potential options for validation, but there are technical and practical hurdles and difficulties in interpretation. Despite the obstacles, a diagnostic test for hidden hearing loss is a worthwhile goal, with important implications for clinical practice and health surveillance. PMID:27604783

  5. Algorithmic information theory and the hidden variable question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Christopher

    1992-02-01

    The admissibility of certain nonlocal hidden-variable theories are explained via information theory. Consider a pair of Stern-Gerlach devices with fixed nonparallel orientations that periodically perform spin measurements on identically prepared pairs of electrons in the singlet spin state. Suppose the outcomes are recorded as binary strings l and r (with l sub n and r sub n denoting their n-length prefixes). The hidden-variable theories considered here require that there exists a recursive function which may be used to transform l sub n into r sub n for any n. This note demonstrates that such a theory cannot reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics. Specifically, consider an ensemble of outcome pairs (l,r). From the associated probability measure, the Shannon entropies H sub n and H bar sub n for strings l sub n and pairs (l sub n, r sub n) may be formed. It is shown that such a theory requires that the absolute value of H bar sub n - H sub n be bounded - contrasting the quantum mechanical prediction that it grow with n.

  6. Volatility: A hidden Markov process in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2007-11-01

    Volatility characterizes the amplitude of price return fluctuations. It is a central magnitude in finance closely related to the risk of holding a certain asset. Despite its popularity on trading floors, volatility is unobservable and only the price is known. Diffusion theory has many common points with the research on volatility, the key of the analogy being that volatility is a time-dependent diffusion coefficient of the random walk for the price return. We present a formal procedure to extract volatility from price data by assuming that it is described by a hidden Markov process which together with the price forms a two-dimensional diffusion process. We derive a maximum-likelihood estimate of the volatility path valid for a wide class of two-dimensional diffusion processes. The choice of the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (expOU) stochastic volatility model performs remarkably well in inferring the hidden state of volatility. The formalism is applied to the Dow Jones index. The main results are that (i) the distribution of estimated volatility is lognormal, which is consistent with the expOU model, (ii) the estimated volatility is related to trading volume by a power law of the form σ∝V0.55 , and (iii) future returns are proportional to the current volatility, which suggests some degree of predictability for the size of future returns.

  7. Radio quiet quasar main sequence - a hidden parameter behind it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerny, B.; Du, P.; Wang, J.-M.; Wildy, C.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the hidden parameter behind the properties of the radio-quiet type 1 AGN is known since the work by Boroson & Green. The concept gains importance with an increase in the number of sources in catalogs. It has been recently argued that a single observational parameter R_Fe actually catches the most important AGN properties. However, it still leaves an open issue what this parameter is in the context of basic theoretical parameters of AGN: black hole mass, Eddington ratio, spin and the inclination. We propose that the hidden parameter is the position of the maximum of the AGN broad band band spectrum. This, in the case of the simplest Shakura-Sunyaev disk is equivalent to the maximum temperature of the accretion disk, and is fully determined by the ratio of the Eddington ratio to the mass. This qualitatively explains a decrease of R_Fe with mass and an increase with L/L_Edd. Using the recent values of the black hole masses from Lijiang monitoring of high L/L_Edd objects and the quasars from SDSS catalog we try to produce a conversion between R_Fe and the basic accretion disk parameters.

  8. Invisible waves and hidden realms: augmented reality and experimental art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, Silvia

    2012-03-01

    Augmented reality is way of both altering the visible and revealing the invisible. It offers new opportunities for artistic exploration through virtual interventions in real space. In this paper, the author describes the implementation of two art installations using different AR technologies, one using optical marker tracking on mobile devices and one integrating stereoscopic projections into the physical environment. The first artwork, De Ondas y Abejas (The Waves and the Bees), is based on the widely publicized (but unproven) hypothesis of a link between cellphone radiation and the phenomenon of bee colony collapse disorder. Using an Android tablet, viewers search out small fiducial markers in the shape of electromagnetic waves hidden throughout the gallery, which reveal swarms of bees scattered on the floor. The piece also creates a generative soundscape based on electromagnetic fields. The second artwork, Urban Fauna, is a series of animations in which features of the urban landscape become plants and animals. Surveillance cameras become flocks of birds while miniature cellphone towers, lampposts, and telephone poles grow like small seedlings in time-lapse animation. The animations are presented as small stereoscopic projections, integrated into the physical space of the gallery. These two pieces explore the relationship between nature and technology through the visualization of invisible forces and hidden alternate realities.

  9. The hidden X-ray breaks in afterglow light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Starling, R. L. C.

    2008-05-22

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared to the BeppoSAX, or pre-Swift era. Specifically, relatively few breaks, consistent with jet breaks, are observed in the X-ray light curves of these bursts. If these breaks are truly missing, it has serious consequences for the interpretation of GRB jet collimation and energy requirements, and the use of GRBs as standard candles.Here we address the issue of X-ray breaks which are possibly 'hidden' and hence the light curves are misinterpreted as being single power-laws. We show how a number of precedents, including GRB 990510 and GRB 060206, exist for such hidden breaks and how, even with the well sampled light curves of the Swift era, these breaks may be left misidentified. We do so by synthesising X-ray light curves and finding general trends via Monte Carlo analysis. Furthermore, in light of these simulations, we discuss how to best identify achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves via multi-wavelength analysis.

  10. Trajectory classification using switched dynamical hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Figueiredo, Mario; Marques, Jorge S

    2010-05-01

    This paper proposes an approach for recognizing human activities (more specifically, pedestrian trajectories) in video sequences, in a surveillance context. A system for automatic processing of video information for surveillance purposes should be capable of detecting, recognizing, and collecting statistics of human activity, reducing human intervention as much as possible. In the method described in this paper, human trajectories are modeled as a concatenation of segments produced by a set of low level dynamical models. These low level models are estimated in an unsupervised fashion, based on a finite mixture formulation, using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm; the number of models is automatically obtained using a minimum message length (MML) criterion. This leads to a parsimonious set of models tuned to the complexity of the scene. We describe the switching among the low-level dynamic models by a hidden Markov chain; thus, the complete model is termed a switched dynamical hidden Markov model (SD-HMM). The performance of the proposed method is illustrated with real data from two different scenarios: a shopping center and a university campus. A set of human activities in both scenarios is successfully recognized by the proposed system. These experiments show the ability of our approach to properly describe trajectories with sudden changes. PMID:20051342

  11. Toward a Diagnostic Test for Hidden Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Agnès; Prendergast, Garreth; Kluk, Karolina; Guest, Hannah; Munro, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy (or hidden hearing loss), due to noise exposure or aging, has been demonstrated in animal models using histological techniques. However, diagnosis of the condition in individual humans is problematic because of (a) test reliability and (b) lack of a gold standard validation measure. Wave I of the transient-evoked auditory brainstem response is a noninvasive electrophysiological measure of auditory nerve function and has been validated in the animal models. However, in humans, Wave I amplitude shows high variability both between and within individuals. The frequency-following response, a sustained evoked potential reflecting synchronous neural activity in the rostral brainstem, is potentially more robust than auditory brainstem response Wave I. However, the frequency-following response is a measure of central activity and may be dependent on individual differences in central processing. Psychophysical measures are also affected by intersubject variability in central processing. Differential measures may help to reduce intersubject variability due to unrelated factors. A measure can be compared, within an individual, between conditions that are affected differently by cochlear synaptopathy. Validation of the metrics is also an issue. Comparisons with animal models, computational modeling, auditory nerve imaging, and human temporal bone histology are all potential options for validation, but there are technical and practical hurdles and difficulties in interpretation. Despite the obstacles, a diagnostic test for hidden hearing loss is a worthwhile goal, with important implications for clinical practice and health surveillance. PMID:27604783

  12. Policing of reproduction by hidden threats in a cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Cant, Michael A; Nichols, Hazel J; Johnstone, Rufus A; Hodge, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cooperation in animal and human societies is associated with mechanisms to suppress individual selfishness. In insect societies, queens and workers enforce cooperation by "policing" selfish reproduction by workers. Insect policing typically takes the form of damage limitation after individuals have carried out selfish acts (such as laying eggs). In contrast, human policing is based on the use of threats that deter individuals from acting selfishly in the first place, minimizing the need for damage limitation. Policing by threat could in principle be used to enforce reproductive suppression in animal societies, but testing this idea requires an experimental approach to simulate reproductive transgression and provoke out-of-equilibrium behavior. We carried out an experiment of this kind on a wild population of cooperatively breeding banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Uganda. In this species, each group contains multiple female breeders that give birth to a communal litter, usually on the same day. In a 7-y experiment we used contraceptive injections to manipulate the distribution of maternity within groups, triggering hidden threats of infanticide. Our data suggest that older, socially dominant females use the threat of infanticide to deter selfish reproduction by younger females, but that females can escape the threat of infanticide by synchronizing birth to the same day as older females. Our study shows that reproduction in animal societies can be profoundly influenced by threats that remain hidden until they are triggered experimentally. Coercion may thus extend well beyond the systems in which acts of infanticide are common. PMID:24367092

  13. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  14. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  15. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  16. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  17. Nurture Hidden Talents: Transform School Culture into One That Values Teacher Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Diane P.

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the school culture where teacher expertise is often hidden and underused. While the media-rich culture places a high value on talent, the irony is that talent is underrated in most schools, and educators often remain silent about their hidden talents. Many school cultures are not conducive to dialogue that supports displays…

  18. Manifestations of Hidden Curriculum in a Community College Online Opticianry Program: An Ecological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the influential factors at work within an online learning environment is a growing area of interest. Hidden or implicit expectations, skill sets, knowledge, and social process can help or hinder student achievement, belief systems, and persistence. This qualitative study investigated how hidden curricular issues transpired in an…

  19. Raising awareness of the hidden curriculum in veterinary medical education: a review and call for research.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L

    2014-01-01

    The hidden curriculum is characterized by information that is tacitly conveyed to and among students about the cultural and moral environment in which they find themselves. Although the hidden curriculum is often defined as a distinct entity, tacit information is conveyed to students throughout all aspects of formal and informal curricula. This unconsciously communicated knowledge has been identified across a wide spectrum of educational environments and is known to have lasting and powerful impacts, both positive and negative. Recently, medical education research on the hidden curriculum of becoming a doctor has come to the forefront as institutions struggle with inconsistencies between formal and hidden curricula that hinder the practice of patient-centered medicine. Similarly, the complex ethical questions that arise during the practice and teaching of veterinary medicine have the potential to cause disagreement between what the institution sets out to teach and what is actually learned. However, the hidden curriculum remains largely unexplored for this field. Because the hidden curriculum is retained effectively by students, elucidating its underlying messages can be a key component of program refinement. A review of recent literature about the hidden curriculum in a variety of fields, including medical education, will be used to explore potential hidden curricula in veterinary medicine and draw attention to the need for further investigation. PMID:25335646

  20. Visible sector inflation and the right thermal history in light of Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingfei; Pukartas, Ernestas; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2013-07-01

    Inflation creates perturbations for the large scale structures in the universe, but it also dilutes everything. Therefore it is pertinent that the end of inflation must explain how to excite the Standard Model dof along with the dark matter. In this paper we will briefly discuss the role of visible sector inflaton candidates which are embedded within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and discuss their merit on how well they match the current data from the Planck. Since the inflaton carries the Standard Model charges their decay naturally produces all the relevant dof with no dark/hidden sector radiation and no isocurvature fluctuations. We will first discuss a single supersymmetric flat direction model of inflation and demonstrate what parameter space is allowed by the Planck and the LHC. We will also consider where the perturbations are created by another light field which decays after inflation, known as a curvaton. The late decay of the curvaton can create observable non-Gaussianity. In the end we will discuss the role of a spectator field whose origin may not lie within the visible sector physics, but its sheer presence during inflation can still create all the perturbations responsible for the large scale structures including possible non-Gaussianity, while the inflaton is embedded within the visible sector which creates all the relevant matter including dark matter, but no dark radiation.

  1. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  2. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  3. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  4. A curved vitrectomy probe.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Shah, Vinay A; Tripathi, Ramesh C

    2004-01-01

    A curved vitrectomy probe for better accessibility of the peripheral retina in phakic eyes is described. The specially designed curved vitrectomy probe has a 20-gauge pneumatic cutter. The radius of curvature at the shaft is 19.4 mm and it is 25 mm long. The ora serrata is accessed through a 3.0- or 4.0-mm sclerotomy in phakic eyes without touching the crystalline lens. Use of this instrument avoids inadvertent trauma to the clear lens in phakic eyes requiring vitreous base excision. This curved vitrectomy instrument complements wide-angle viewing systems and endoscopes for safe surgical treatment of peripheral retinal pathology in phakic eyes. PMID:15185799

  5. Haiti's progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured.

    PubMed

    Koski-Karell, Victoria; Farmer, Paul E; Isaac, Benito; Campa, Elizabeth M; Viaud, Loune; Namphy, Paul C; Ternier, Ralph; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge), policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation's 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government's capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of the three government-sponsored water treatment stations in the research area is still functional and utilized by those who can afford it. Latrines are scarce and often shared by up to 30 people; open defecation remains common. Structural vulnerabilities cut across all sectors - not just water, sanitation, health care, and education, but agriculture, environment, (global and local) commerce, transportation, and governance as well. These are among the hidden sicknesses that impede Haiti and its partners' capacity to eliminate cholera. PMID:27307774

  6. Haiti's progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured.

    PubMed

    Koski-Karell, Victoria; Farmer, Paul E; Isaac, Benito; Campa, Elizabeth M; Viaud, Loune; Namphy, Paul C; Ternier, Ralph; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge), policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation's 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government's capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of the three government-sponsored water treatment stations in the research area is still functional and utilized by those who can afford it. Latrines are scarce and often shared by up to 30 people; open defecation remains common. Structural vulnerabilities cut across all sectors - not just water, sanitation, health care, and education, but agriculture, environment, (global and local) commerce, transportation, and governance as well. These are among the hidden sicknesses that impede Haiti and its partners' capacity to eliminate cholera.

  7. On the trail of 'hidden streamflow' in Luxembourgish catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael; Pfister, Laurent; Morgenstern, Uwe; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    Tritium measurements are being carried out in well-studied catchments in the Attert sub-basin of the Alzette River in Luxembourg to investigate transit times of baseflow from the various lithologies in the area. Rock-types vary from sandstone with high permeability to marl and schist with low permeabilities. In contrast to other methods, tritium reveals the full spectrum of ages present in streams including 'hidden streamflow' (i.e. water older than that measurable by stable isotope or conservative tracer methods) Stewart et al. (2012). In principle, it can also provide ages for individual samples and therefore reveal variations in age with flow if measurements are accurate enough. However, difficulties arise in determining the tritium input function and from ambiguous age solutions due to the past input of thermonuclear tritium. Previous and concurrent geochemical and stable isotope studies are providing complementary information about the systems (e.g. geological controls on catchment storage, mixing potential, isotopic signatures in streamflow) Pfister et al. (2014). Results to date are showing that old water with mean transit times of about 18 years flow from catchments dominated by sandstone at medium to low flows. These streams also have very homogeneous δD values at such flows showing large storages and mixing potentials. On the other hand, catchments dominated by marl and schist show varying mean transit times ranging from 2 to 20 years depending on flows, although data is limited. The δD values of these streams are scattered and have a decreasing trend with streamflow showing event and seasonal rainfall influence, and thus small storage capacities and mixing potentials. It appears that 'hidden streamflow' is alive and well, and living in Luxembourg! Pfister L. et al. 2014: Catchment storage, baseflow isotope signatures and basin geology: Is there a connection? In preparation. Stewart, M.K., Morgenstern, U., McDonnell, J.J., Pfister, L. 2012: The 'hidden

  8. Printed sectoral horn power combiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccia, Luigi; Emanuele, Antonio; Shamsafar, Alireza; Arnieri, Emilio; Amendola, Giandomenico

    2015-02-01

    In this work, it is presented a new configuration of planar power combiner/divider based on an H-plane sectoral horn antenna. This component is proposed to realise the basic building blocks of printed power-combining amplifiers. It will be shown how the sectoral horn elements can be implemented on substrate integrated waveguide and multilayer printed circuit board technologies, thus obtaining a high integration level. In the following, the design procedure will be described reporting an example of an 11-stage power divider/combiner in C-band. A prototype has been fabricated, and the measured results compared with the numerical model. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations showing a single-stage efficiency of about 90% and a bandwidth of 40%.

  9. Sectoral shifts and aggregate unemployment

    SciTech Connect

    Loungani, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent research has taken the view that sectoral or industry-specific shocks significantly affect aggregate unemployment by increasing the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required. The empirical evidence for this view rests on the finding that during the 1950s - and again during the 1970s - there was a positive correlation between aggregate unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth rates. This thesis demonstrates that this correlation arises largely because oil price shocks affect both unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth. Once the dispersion due to oil shocks is accounted for, the residual dispersion in employment has very low explanatory power for unemployment. Since the dispersion index does not measure pure sectoral shifts, an alternate measure of dispersion is developed that serves as a better proxy for the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required each period. Estimates using this measure suggest that, during the 1950s, temporary increases in the relative price of oil were responsible for generating the observed correlation. On the other hand, sectoral shifts were important during the 1970s; in particular, the 1973 oil price increase has had significant reallocative effects on the economy. This contention is subjected to further tests by looking at the time-series behavior of employment in durable-goods industries and also by following the inter-industry movements of workers over time through the use of panel data.

  10. Probing ion channel conformational dynamics using simultaneous single-molecule ultrafast spectroscopy and patch-clamp electric recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Greg; Orr, Galya; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-03-01

    An approach to probing single-molecule ion channel kinetics and conformational dynamics, patch-clamp confocal fluorescence microscopy (PCCFM), uses simultaneous ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy and single-channel electric current recording. PCCFM is applied to determine single-channel conformational dynamics by probing single-pair fluorescence resonant energy transfer, fluorescence self-quenching, and anisotropy of the dye-labeled gramicidin ion channel incorporated in an artificial lipid bilayer. Hidden conformational changes were observed, which strongly suggests that multiple intermediate conformation states are involved in gramicidin ion channel dynamics.

  11. Hidden Markov models for fault detection in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a system failure monitoring method and apparatus which learns the symptom-fault mapping directly from training data. The invention first estimates the state of the system at discrete intervals in time. A feature vector x of dimension k is estimated from sets of successive windows of sensor data. A pattern recognition component then models the instantaneous estimate of the posterior class probability given the features, p(w(sub i) (vertical bar)/x), 1 less than or equal to i isless than or equal to m. Finally, a hidden Markov model is used to take advantage of temporal context and estimate class probabilities conditioned on recent past history. In this hierarchical pattern of information flow, the time series data is transformed and mapped into a categorical representation (the fault classes) and integrated over time to enable robust decision-making.

  12. Combining Wavelet Transform and Hidden Markov Models for ECG Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreão, Rodrigo Varejão; Boudy, Jérôme

    2006-12-01

    This work aims at providing new insights on the electrocardiogram (ECG) segmentation problem using wavelets. The wavelet transform has been originally combined with a hidden Markov models (HMMs) framework in order to carry out beat segmentation and classification. A group of five continuous wavelet functions commonly used in ECG analysis has been implemented and compared using the same framework. All experiments were realized on the QT database, which is composed of a representative number of ambulatory recordings of several individuals and is supplied with manual labels made by a physician. Our main contribution relies on the consistent set of experiments performed. Moreover, the results obtained in terms of beat segmentation and premature ventricular beat (PVC) detection are comparable to others works reported in the literature, independently of the type of the wavelet. Finally, through an original concept of combining two wavelet functions in the segmentation stage, we achieve our best performances.

  13. Hidden Stages of Cognition Revealed in Patterns of Brain Activation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Pyke, Aryn A; Fincham, Jon M

    2016-09-01

    To advance cognitive theory, researchers must be able to parse the performance of a task into its significant mental stages. In this article, we describe a new method that uses functional MRI brain activation to identify when participants are engaged in different cognitive stages on individual trials. The method combines multivoxel pattern analysis to identify cognitive stages and hidden semi-Markov models to identify their durations. This method, applied to a problem-solving task, identified four distinct stages: encoding, planning, solving, and responding. We examined whether these stages corresponded to their ascribed functions by testing whether they are affected by appropriate factors. Planning-stage duration increased as the method for solving the problem became less obvious, whereas solving-stage duration increased as the number of calculations to produce the answer increased. Responding-stage duration increased with the difficulty of the motor actions required to produce the answer. PMID:27440808

  14. Rational first integrals of geodesic equations and generalised hidden symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Arata; Houri, Tsuyoshi; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    We discuss novel generalisations of Killing tensors, which are introduced by considering rational first integrals of geodesic equations. We introduce the notion of inconstructible generalised Killing tensors, which cannot be constructed from ordinary Killing tensors. Moreover, we introduce inconstructible rational first integrals, which are constructed from inconstructible generalised Killing tensors, and provide a method for checking the inconstructibility of a rational first integral. Using the method, we show that the rational first integral of the Collinson-O’Donnell solution is not inconstructible. We also provide several examples of metrics admitting an inconstructible rational first integral in two and four-dimensions, by using the Maciejewski-Przybylska system. Furthermore, we attempt to generalise other hidden symmetries such as Killing-Yano tensors.

  15. Vision-based road detection by hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Deyun; Tao, Liyuan; Shi, Chaoxia

    2009-07-01

    A novel vision-based road detection method was proposed in this paper to realize visual guiding navigation for ground mobile vehicles (GMV). The original image captured by single camera was first segmented into the road region and nonroad region by using an adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm named OTSU. Subsequently, the Canny edges extracted in grey images would be filtered in the road region so that the road boundary could be recognized accurately among those disturbances caused by other edges existed in the image. In order to improve the performance of road detection, the dynamics of GMV and the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) was taken into account to associate the possible road boundary at different time step. The method proposed in this paper was robust against strong shadows, surface dilapidation and illumination variations. It has been tested on real GMV and performed well in real road environments.

  16. Hidden Markov model using Dirichlet process for de-identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Cullen, Richard M; Godwin, Marshall

    2015-12-01

    For the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth de-identification challenge, we introduced a new non-parametric Bayesian hidden Markov model using a Dirichlet process (HMM-DP). The model intends to reduce task-specific feature engineering and to generalize well to new data. In the challenge we developed a variational method to learn the model and an efficient approximation algorithm for prediction. To accommodate out-of-vocabulary words, we designed a number of feature functions to model such words. The results show the model is capable of understanding local context cues to make correct predictions without manual feature engineering and performs as accurately as state-of-the-art conditional random field models in a number of categories. To incorporate long-range and cross-document context cues, we developed a skip-chain conditional random field model to align the results produced by HMM-DP, which further improved the performance. PMID:26407642

  17. Understanding eye movements in face recognition using hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Tim; Chan, Antoni B; Hsiao, Janet H

    2014-09-16

    We use a hidden Markov model (HMM) based approach to analyze eye movement data in face recognition. HMMs are statistical models that are specialized in handling time-series data. We conducted a face recognition task with Asian participants, and model each participant's eye movement pattern with an HMM, which summarized the participant's scan paths in face recognition with both regions of interest and the transition probabilities among them. By clustering these HMMs, we showed that participants' eye movements could be categorized into holistic or analytic patterns, demonstrating significant individual differences even within the same culture. Participants with the analytic pattern had longer response times, but did not differ significantly in recognition accuracy from those with the holistic pattern. We also found that correct and wrong recognitions were associated with distinctive eye movement patterns; the difference between the two patterns lies in the transitions rather than locations of the fixations alone.

  18. Search for passing-through-walls neutrons constrains hidden braneworlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, Michaël; Pignol, Guillaume; Lamblin, Jacob; Pinon, Jonhathan; Méplan, Olivier; Terwagne, Guy; Debarsy, Paul-Louis; Petit, Fabrice; Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.

    2016-07-01

    In many theoretical frameworks our visible world is a 3-brane, embedded in a multidimensional bulk, possibly coexisting with hidden braneworlds. Some works have also shown that matter swapping between braneworlds can occur. Here we report the results of an experiment - at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) - designed to detect thermal neutron swapping to and from another braneworld, thus constraining the probability p2 of such an event. The limit, p < 4.6 ×10-10 at 95% C.L., is 4 orders of magnitude better than the previous bound based on the disappearance of stored ultracold neutrons. In the simplest braneworld scenario, for two parallel Planck-scale branes separated by a distance d, we conclude that d > 87 in Planck length units.

  19. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  20. Hidden costs of food production: the veterinarian's role.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Caroline J

    2006-01-01

    Veterinarians who work in food-animal production and food safety help to deliver food policy by enabling farmers to supply safe, affordable food. However, existing food policy reflects a production bias and is increasingly being criticized for its hidden costs. These costs include reduced animal welfare, the inflated risk of anti-microbial resistance, and the current pandemic of human obesity and overweight. Veterinarians do not generally recognize that this is the context within which they do their work. In this article, I review this context and argue that veterinary students should be taught about it. I also argue that the profession should join with food-policy analysts, ethicists, and others who are already calling for a rethinking of food policy, so that new policy might meet the full wealth of problems and not just some.

  1. Quantum cosmology: From hidden symmetries towards a new (supersymmetric) perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalzadeh, S.; Rostami, T.; Moniz, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    We review pedagogically some of the basic essentials regarding recent results intertwining boundary conditions, the algebra of constraints and hidden symmetries in quantum cosmology. They were extensively published in Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014), S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439 and T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212], where complete discussions and full details can be found. More concretely, in Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014) and S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439] it has been shown that specific boundary conditions can be related to the algebra of Dirac observables. Moreover, a process afterwards associated to the algebra of existent hidden symmetries, from which the boundary conditions can be selected, was introduced. On the other hand, in Ref. [T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212] it was subsequently argued that some factor ordering choices can be extracted from the hidden symmetries structure of the minisuperspace model. In Refs. [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 89 (2014), S. Jalalzadeh, T. Rostami and P. V. Moniz, Eur. Phys. J. C 75 (2015) 38, arXiv:gr-qc/1412.6439 and T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 92 (2015) 023526, arXiv:gr-qc/1507.04212], we proceeded gradually towards less simple models, ranging from a FLRW model with a perfect fluid [S. Jalalzadeh, S. M. M. Rasouli and P. V. Moniz, Phys. Rev. D 90 (2014) 023541] up to a conformal scalar field content [T. Rostami, S. Jalalzadeh and

  2. The Hidden Complexity of Mendelian Traits across Natural Yeast Populations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Sigwalt, Anastasie; Fournier, Téo; Pflieger, David; Peter, Jackson; de Montigny, Jacky; Dunham, Maitreya J; Schacherer, Joseph

    2016-07-26

    Mendelian traits are considered to be at the lower end of the complexity spectrum of heritable phenotypes. However, more than a century after the rediscovery of Mendel's law, the global landscape of monogenic variants, as well as their effects and inheritance patterns within natural populations, is still not well understood. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a species-wide survey of Mendelian traits across a large population of isolates. We generated offspring from 41 unique parental pairs and analyzed 1,105 cross/trait combinations. We found that 8.9% of the cases were Mendelian. Further tracing of causal variants revealed background-specific expressivity and modified inheritances, gradually transitioning from Mendelian to complex traits in 30% of the cases. In fact, when taking into account the natural population diversity, the hidden complexity of traits could be substantial, confounding phenotypic predictability even for simple Mendelian traits. PMID:27396326

  3. The triangle compare method of hidden-line elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    An original algorithm which solves the classical computer graphics problem of eliminating those lines that should not be visible in a wire-frame model representation of a solid figure is presented. The basis of this Triangle Compare algorithm is that any polygon, regardless of its complexity, can be constructed from a set of triangles. In the Triangle Compare algorithm, once the triangles defining the figure are defined, they are ordered based on the nearness of each triangle to the viewer and stored in a linked list. The nearest triangle are compared to all succeeding triangles. The remaining parts of triangles are synthesized into other triangles and are added in order to the linked list. Subsequent reference triangles are provided by a traversal of the linked list. After the entire list is traversed and each triangle used as a reference, the resulting list is used for a final rendering with hidden lines removed via calligraphic MOVE and DRAW commands.

  4. Directed Hidden-Code Extractor for Environment-Sensitive Malwares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chunfu; Wang, Zhi; Lu, Kai; Liu, Xinhai; Liu, Xin

    Malware writers often use packing technique to hide malicious payload. A number of dynamic unpacking tools are.designed in order to identify and extract the hidden code in the packed malware. However, such unpacking methods.are all based on a highly controlled environment that is vulnerable to various anti-unpacking techniques. If execution.environment is suspicious, malwares may stay inactive for a long time or stop execution immediately to evade.detection. In this paper, we proposed a novel approach that automatically reasons about the environment requirements.imposed by malware, then directs a unpacking tool to change the controlled environment to extract the hide code at.the new environment. The experimental results show that our approach significantly increases the resilience of the.traditional unpacking tools to environment-sensitive malware.

  5. Hidden Markov models for fault detection in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a system failure monitoring method and apparatus which learns the symptom-fault mapping directly from training data. The invention first estimates the state of the system at discrete intervals in time. A feature vector x of dimension k is estimated from sets of successive windows of sensor data. A pattern recognition component then models the instantaneous estimate of the posterior class probability given the features, p(w(sub i) perpendicular to x), 1 less than or equal to i is less than or equal to m. Finally, a hidden Markov model is used to take advantage of temporal context and estimate class probabilities conditioned on recent past history. In this hierarchical pattern of information flow, the time series data is transformed and mapped into a categorical representation (the fault classes) and integrated over time to enable robust decision-making.

  6. A 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with hidden attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Pham, V.-T.; Volos, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with three positive Lyapunov exponents which is derived by adding two state feedback controls to the famous 3-D Rikitake two-disk dynamo system. It is noted that the proposed hyperchaotic system has no equilibrium points and hence it exhibits hidden attractors. In addition, the qualitative properties, as well as the adaptive synchronization of the hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with unknown system parameters, are discussed in details. The main results are proved using Lyapunov stability theory and numerical simulations are shown using MATLAB. Moreover, an electronic circuit realization in SPICE has been detailed to confirm the feasibility of the theoretical 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo model.

  7. Statistical patterns of visual search for hidden objects

    PubMed Central

    Credidio, Heitor F.; Teixeira, Elisângela N.; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Moreira, André A.; Andrade Jr, José S.

    2012-01-01

    The movement of the eyes has been the subject of intensive research as a way to elucidate inner mechanisms of cognitive processes. A cognitive task that is rather frequent in our daily life is the visual search for hidden objects. Here we investigate through eye-tracking experiments the statistical properties associated with the search of target images embedded in a landscape of distractors. Specifically, our results show that the twofold process of eye movement, composed of sequences of fixations (small steps) intercalated by saccades (longer jumps), displays characteristic statistical signatures. While the saccadic jumps follow a log-normal distribution of distances, which is typical of multiplicative processes, the lengths of the smaller steps in the fixation trajectories are consistent with a power-law distribution. Moreover, the present analysis reveals a clear transition between a directional serial search to an isotropic random movement as the difficulty level of the searching task is increased. PMID:23226829

  8. Nano-gold as artificial enzymes: hidden talents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-07-01

    Creating artificial enzymes that mimic the complexity and function of natural systems has been a great challenge for the past two decades. In this Progress Report, the focus is on recently discovered "hidden talents" of gold nanomaterials in artificial enzymes, including mimicking of nuclease, esterase, silicatein, glucose oxidase, peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. These unexpected enzyme-like activities can be ascribed to nano-gold itself or the functional groups present on surrounding monolayer. Along with introducing the mechanisms of the various enzyme-like activities, the design and development of gold-based biomimetic catalysts, the search for efficient modulators, and their potential applications in bionics, biosensing, and biomedical sciences are highlighted. Eventually, it is expected that the rapidly growing interest in gold-based nanozymes will certainly fuel the excitement and stimulate research in this highly active field.

  9. IC5063: A merger with a hidden luminous active nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, L.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    IC5063 is a nearby galaxy classified as an SO and containing a system of dust lanes parallel to its major optical axis (Danziger, Goss and Wellington, 1981; Bergeron, Durret and Boksenberg, 1983). Extended emission line regions with high excitation properties have been detected over distances of up to 19 kpc from the nucleus. This galaxy has been classified as Seyfert 2 on the basis of its emission line spectrum. These characteristics make IC5063 one of the best candidates for a merger remnant and an excellent candidate for a hidden luminous active nucleus. Based on new broad and narrow band images and long-slit spectroscopy obtained at the ESO 3.6 m telescope, the authors present some preliminary results supporting this hypothesis.

  10. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  11. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robichaud; A. Crawley; and L. Poole: NREL

    2005-09-09

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  12. Neurochemistry and electroanalytical probes.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Kevin P; Heien, Michael L A V; Venton, B Jill; Wightman, R Mark

    2002-10-01

    Electroanalytical techniques have been applied to monitoring chemical events including neurotransmitter release during rodent behaviour and the release of zeptomoles of molecules from single cells. Transgenic mice models have been developed and studied to identify specific cell types in vitro. Characterization and surface modification of electroanalytical probes has enhanced the selectivity and sensitivity of measurements.

  13. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  14. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  15. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  16. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  17. Experimenting with Temperature Probes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presented are four activities which are designed to familiarize children with the multiple uses of computers and help them learn about heat and temperature using temperature probes. Included are the tempering effect of water, heat capacity, caloric content of foods, and weather. Hardware and software are discussed. (CW)

  18. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  19. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  20. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Laura J; Poore, Joshua C; Krum, David M; Schwartz, Jana L; Coskren, William D; Jones, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit.

  1. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Laura J.; Poore, Joshua C.; Krum, David M.; Schwartz, Jana L.; Coskren, William D.; Jones, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit. PMID

  2. Energy Sector Impacts and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R. L.; Macknick, J.; Martinez, A.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-12-01

    The power sector is the largest user of freshwater in the U.S. The dominant use of water in power plants is for steam cycle cooling. The current portfolio of electricity generating technologies in the U.S. has highly regionalized and technology-specific requirements for water. Certain areas employ once-through cooling technologies with high withdrawals and low consumptive uses, whereas other areas employ recirculating cooling technologies with relatively low withdrawals but high consumptive uses. As water availability differs widely throughout the nation, assessments of water withdrawal and consumption impacts from the power sector must have a high geographic resolution and consider regional differences. The U.S. electricity portfolio is likely to evolve in coming years, shaped by various energy policies and economic drivers on both the national and regional level, which will impact power sector water demands. It is likely that the U.S. will continue to decarbonize its electricity industry, leading to more low-carbon technologies. However, many low-carbon technologies, such as coal with carbon capture and storage, nuclear, and concentrated solar power, can use more water than the current electricity portfolio average. National- and state-level water policies have been proposed (and enacted) that affect cooling system choices for power plants, with resulting implications for water use as well as power plant installed and operating costs and reliability. Energy policy analyses that do not consider power plant cooling system impacts may miss an important component power plant siting decisions. Similarly, water policies that do not take into consideration potential impacts on power plant operations or comprehensive regional water budget impacts may have deleterious effects on the energy industry. Analysis of future energy scenarios that incorporate technology options and constraints as well as different policies can provide useful insights about likely changes to both

  3. Force law in material media, hidden momentum and quantum phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Yarman, T.

    2016-06-01

    We address to the force law in classical electrodynamics of material media, paying attention on the force term due to time variation of hidden momentum of magnetic dipoles. We highlight that the emergence of this force component is required by the general theorem, deriving zero total momentum for any static configuration of charges/currents. At the same time, we disclose the impossibility to add this force term covariantly to the Lorentz force law in material media. We further show that the adoption of the Einstein-Laub force law does not resolve the issue, because for a small electric/magnetic dipole, the density of Einstein-Laub force integrates exactly to the same equation, like the Lorentz force with the inclusion of hidden momentum contribution. Thus, none of the available expressions for the force on a moving dipole is compatible with the relativistic transformation of force, and we support this statement with a number of particular examples. In this respect, we suggest applying the Lagrangian approach to the derivation of the force law in a magnetized/polarized medium. In the framework of this approach we obtain the novel expression for the force on a small electric/magnetic dipole, with the novel expression for its generalized momentum. The latter expression implies two novel quantum effects with non-topological phases, when an electric dipole is moving in an electric field, and when a magnetic dipole is moving in a magnetic field. These phases, in general, are not related to dynamical effects, because they are not equal to zero, when the classical force on a dipole is vanishing. The implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  4. Learning where to look for a hidden target.

    PubMed

    Chukoskie, Leanne; Snider, Joseph; Mozer, Michael C; Krauzlis, Richard J; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2013-06-18

    Survival depends on successfully foraging for food, for which evolution has selected diverse behaviors in different species. Humans forage not only for food, but also for information. We decide where to look over 170,000 times per day, approximately three times per wakeful second. The frequency of these saccadic eye movements belies the complexity underlying each individual choice. Experience factors into the choice of where to look and can be invoked to rapidly redirect gaze in a context and task-appropriate manner. However, remarkably little is known about how individuals learn to direct their gaze given the current context and task. We designed a task in which participants search a novel scene for a target whose location was drawn stochastically on each trial from a fixed prior distribution. The target was invisible on a blank screen, and the participants were rewarded when they fixated the hidden target location. In just a few trials, participants rapidly found the hidden targets by looking near previously rewarded locations and avoiding previously unrewarded locations. Learning trajectories were well characterized by a simple reinforcement-learning (RL) model that maintained and continually updated a reward map of locations. The RL model made further predictions concerning sensitivity to recent experience that were confirmed by the data. The asymptotic performance of both the participants and the RL model approached optimal performance characterized by an ideal-observer theory. These two complementary levels of explanation show how experience in a novel environment drives visual search in humans and may extend to other forms of search such as animal foraging.

  5. Prevalence of Hidden Gastroparesis in the Community: The Gastroparesis "Iceberg"

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Enrique; Choung, Rok Seon; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Talley, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The prevalence of diagnosed gastroparesis is 24.2/100,000 inhabitants, but a large group of people with gastroparesis-like symptoms have never had a gastric emptying (GE) test. Some of them may have undiagnosed gastroparesis. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of hidden gastroparesis in the community. Methods The study was conducted in 2 parts: (1) Patients referred for a scintigraphic GE test completed a validated questionnaire (Bowel Disease Questionnaire). Multiple linear regression models to predict 2 hours and 4 hours GE rates were developed. (2) A revised Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 4,194 Olmsted County residents. GE rates were estimated with the models for each subject and delayed GE was considered when they were lower than normal values. Hidden gastroparesis was defined in community subjects with predicted delayed GE that had not been diagnosed with gastroparesis prior to the survey. Results The regression models for GE rates were constructed using data from 450 patients. In addition to age and gender, the symptoms found significant were nausea/vomiting, early satiety, upper abdominal pain, bloating, loss of appetite and weight loss more than 7 pounds. 2,298 (55%) community subjects returned a questionnaire. Five subjects were excluded due to a prior diagnosis of gastroparesis. When models were applied to the community survey data, 42 (1.8%) subjects were estimated to have delayed GE. Conclusions Delayed GE was estimated to occur in 1.8% of community subjects. Since the prevalence of diagnosed gastroparesis is low (0.02%), many subjects with gastroparesis may remain undiagnosed. PMID:22323986

  6. 50 CFR 648.87 - Sector allocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... permit sanctions pursuant to 15 CFR part 904. If an ACE allocated to a sector is not exceeded in a given... CFR part 904, each sector, permit/vessel owner, and vessel operator participating in the sector may be..., the stock-level ACL plus the carryover amount, does not exceed the stock overfishing limit. Any...

  7. Business and AIDS: sectoral challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Weston, Mark D; Churchyard, Gavin J; Mametja, David; McIntyre, James A; Randera, Fazel

    2007-07-01

    The Business and AIDS think tank held in Durban, South Africa, in June 2006, included a discussion of the policies with which different types of employer could address HIV/AIDS in southern Africa. Breakout groups discussed the role of large and small private sector firms, the public sector, and parastatal organizations. They made recommendations for policies, programmes and future research for each sector.

  8. Hidden Farmworker Labor Camps in North Carolina: An Indicator of Structural Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Phillip; Quandt, Sara A.; Talton, Jennifer W.; Galván, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We used geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate whether farmworker labor camps were hidden and to determine whether hidden camps differed from visible camps in terms of physical and resident characteristics. Methods. We collected data using observation, interview, and public domain GIS data for 180 farmworker labor camps in east central North Carolina. A hidden camp was defined as one that was at least 0.15 miles from an all-weather road or located behind natural or manufactured objects. Hidden camps were compared with visible camps in terms of physical and resident characteristics. Results. More than one third (37.8%) of the farmworker labor camps were hidden. Hidden camps were significantly larger (42.7% vs 17.0% with 21 or more residents; P ≤ .001; and 29.4% vs 13.5% with 3 or more dwellings; P = .002) and were more likely to include barracks (50% vs 19.6%; P ≤ .001) than were visible camps. Conclusions. Poor housing conditions in farmworker labor camps often go unnoticed because they are hidden in the rural landscape, increasing farmworker vulnerability. Policies that promote greater community engagement with farmworker labor camp residents to reduce structural vulnerability should be considered. PMID:26469658

  9. Universal approximation of extreme learning machine with adaptive growth of hidden nodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Lan, Yuan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Xu, Zong-Ben

    2012-02-01

    Extreme learning machines (ELMs) have been proposed for generalized single-hidden-layer feedforward networks which need not be neuron-like and perform well in both regression and classification applications. In this brief, we propose an ELM with adaptive growth of hidden nodes (AG-ELM), which provides a new approach for the automated design of networks. Different from other incremental ELMs (I-ELMs) whose existing hidden nodes are frozen when the new hidden nodes are added one by one, in AG-ELM the number of hidden nodes is determined in an adaptive way in the sense that the existing networks may be replaced by newly generated networks which have fewer hidden nodes and better generalization performance. We then prove that such an AG-ELM using Lebesgue p-integrable hidden activation functions can approximate any Lebesgue p-integrable function on a compact input set. Simulation results demonstrate and verify that this new approach can achieve a more compact network architecture than the I-ELM.

  10. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  11. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  12. Nonparametric model validations for hidden Markov models with applications in financial econometrics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhibiao

    2011-01-01

    We address the nonparametric model validation problem for hidden Markov models with partially observable variables and hidden states. We achieve this goal by constructing a nonparametric simultaneous confidence envelope for transition density function of the observable variables and checking whether the parametric density estimate is contained within such an envelope. Our specification test procedure is motivated by a functional connection between the transition density of the observable variables and the Markov transition kernel of the hidden states. Our approach is applicable for continuous time diffusion models, stochastic volatility models, nonlinear time series models, and models with market microstructure noise. PMID:21750601

  13. Extracting hidden-photon dark matter from an LC-circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Arza, Ariel; Döbrich, Babette; Gamboa, Jorge; Méndez, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    We point out that a cold dark matter condensate made of gauge bosons from an extra hidden U(1) sector—dubbed hidden photons—can create a small, oscillating electric density current. Thus, they could also be searched for in the recently proposed LC-circuit setup conceived for axion cold dark matter search by Sikivie, Sullivan and Tanner. We estimate the sensitivity of this setup for hidden-photon cold dark matter and we find it could cover a sizable, so far unexplored parameter space.

  14. Hidden-symmetry-protected topological phases on a one-dimensional lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhu; Chen, Shu

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a topologically nontrivial phase in a one-dimensional fermionic lattice system subjected to synthetic gauge fields, which is beyond the standard Altland-Zirnbauer classification of topological insulators. The topological phase can be characterized by the presence of degenerate zero-mode edge states or a quantized Berry phase of the occupied Bloch band. By analyzing symmetries of the system, we identify that the topological phase and zero-mode edge states are protected by two hidden symmetries. An extended model with hidden symmetry breaking is also studied in order to reveal the effect of hidden symmetries on the symmetry-protected topological phase.

  15. Hidden symmetry and protection of Dirac points on the honeycomb lattice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice possesses a novel energy band structure, which is characterized by two distinct Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, dominating most of the physical properties of the honeycomb structure materials. However, up till now, the origin of the Dirac points is unclear yet. Here, we discover a hidden symmetry on the honeycomb lattice and prove that the existence of Dirac points is exactly protected by such hidden symmetry. Furthermore, the moving and merging of the Dirac points and a quantum phase transition, which have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed on the honeycomb lattice, can also be perfectly explained by the parameter dependent evolution of the hidden symmetry. PMID:26639178

  16. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R.; Duerksen, K. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer (LNMS) uses a single focusing magnetic sector field mass analyzer with mass range of 1-208 amu, resolution sufficient to separate the mercury isotopes, and sensitivity sufficient to detect minor constituents in the 1 ppm range relative to the CO2 in the Venus atmosphere. A combination of ion and chemical pumping is used to maintain a vacuum in the mass analyzer and to remove the atmosphere gases which enter the ion source chamber through a special leak. A microprocessor controls the operation of the instrument through a highly efficient peak stepping and data compression program, permitting acquisition of a complete mass spectrum roughly once each minute.

  17. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  18. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  19. Dynamically Evolving Sectors for Convective Weather Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    A new strategy for altering existing sector boundaries in response to blocking convective weather is presented. This method seeks to improve the reduced capacity of sectors directly affected by weather by moving boundaries in a direction that offers the greatest capacity improvement. The boundary deformations are shared by neighboring sectors within the region in a manner that preserves their shapes and sizes as much as possible. This reduces the controller workload involved with learning new sector designs. The algorithm that produces the altered sectors is based on a force-deflection mesh model that needs only nominal traffic patterns and the shape of the blocking weather for input. It does not require weather-affected traffic patterns that would have to be predicted by simulation. When compared to an existing optimal sector design method, the sectors produced by the new algorithm are more similar to the original sector shapes, resulting in sectors that may be more suitable for operational use because the change is not as drastic. Also, preliminary results show that this method produces sectors that can equitably distribute the workload of rerouted weather-affected traffic throughout the region where inclement weather is present. This is demonstrated by sector aircraft count distributions of simulated traffic in weather-affected regions.

  20. Sectoral approaches to improve regional carbon budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Pete; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Marland, Gregg

    2008-06-01

    Humans utilise about 40% of the earth s net primary production (NPP) but the products of this NPP are often managed by different sectors, with timber and forest products managed by the forestry sector and food and fibre products from croplands and grasslands managed by the agricultural sector. Other significant anthropogenic impacts on the global carbon cycle include human utilization of fossil fuels and impacts on less intensively managed systems such as peatlands, wetlands and permafrost. A great deal of knowledge, expertise and data is available within each sector. We describe the contribution of sectoral carbon budgets to our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Whilst many sectors exhibit similarities for carbon budgeting, some key differences arise due to differences in goods and services provided, ecology, management practices used, landmanagement personnel responsible, policies affecting land management, data types and availability, and the drivers of change. We review the methods and data sources available for assessing sectoral carbon budgets, and describe some of key data limitations and uncertainties for each sector in different regions of the world. We identify the main gaps in our knowledge/data, show that coverage is better for the developed world for most sectors, and suggest how sectoral carbon budgets could be improved in the future. Research priorities include the development of shared protocols through site networks, a move to full carbon accounting within sectors, and the assessment of full greenhouse gas budgets.

  1. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  2. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  3. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  4. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  5. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  6. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  7. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  8. A hidden-charm \\varvec{S=-1} pentaquark from the decay of \\varvec{Λ_b} into \\varvec{J/ψ η Λ} states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijoo, A.; Magas, V. K.; Ramos, A.; Oset, E.

    2016-08-01

    The hidden-charm pentaquark P_c(4450) observed recently by the LHCb collaboration may be of molecular nature, as advocated by some unitary approaches that also predict pentaquark partners in the strangeness S=-1 sector. In this work we argue that a hidden-charm strange pentaquark could be seen from the decay of the Λ_b, just as in the case of the non-strange P_c(4450), but looking into the J/ψ η Λ decay mode and forming the invariant mass spectrum of J/ψ Λ pairs. In the model presented here, which assumes a standard weak decay topology and incorporates the hadronization process and final-state interaction effects, we find the J/ψ η Λ final states to be populated with similar strength as the J/ψ K^- p states employed for the observation of the non-strange pentaquark. This makes the Λ_ b → J/ψ η Λ decay to be an interesting process to observe a possible strange partner of the P_c(4450). We study the dependence of the J/ψ Λ mass spectra on various model ingredients and on the unknown properties of the strange pentaquark.

  9. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe

    PubMed Central

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Materials and Methods: Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Results: Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Conclusion: Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe. PMID:27563204

  10. Hidden Markov Models for Detecting Aseismic Events in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, R.

    2004-12-01

    We employ a hidden Markov model (HMM) to segment surface displacement time series collection by the Southern California Integrated Geodetic Network (SCIGN). These segmented time series are then used to detect regional events by observing the number of simultaneous mode changes across the network; if a large number of stations change at the same time, that indicates an event. The hidden Markov model (HMM) approach assumes that the observed data has been generated by an unobservable dynamical statistical process. The process is of a particular form such that each observation is coincident with the system being in a particular discrete state, which is interpreted as a behavioral mode. The dynamics are the model are constructed so that the next state is directly dependent only on the current state -- it is a first order Markov process. The model is completely described by a set of parameters: the initial state probabilities, the first order Markov chain state-to-state transition probabilities, and the probability distribution of observable outputs associated with each state. The result of this approach is that our segmentation decisions are based entirely on statistical changes in the behavior of the observed daily displacements. In general, finding the optimal model parameters to fit the data is a difficult problem. We present an innovative model fitting method that is unsupervised (i.e., it requires no labeled training data) and uses a regularized version of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to ensure that model solutions are both robust with respect to initial conditions and of high quality. We demonstrate the reliability of the method as compared to standard model fitting methods and show that it results in lower noise in the mode change correlation signal used to detect regional events. We compare candidate events detected by this method to the seismic record and observe that most are not correlated with a significant seismic event. Our analysis

  11. Classification of Arnold-Beltrami flows and their hidden symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, P.; Sorin, A. S.

    2015-07-01

    In the context of mathematical hydrodynamics, we consider the group theory structure which underlies the so named ABC flows introduced by Beltrami, Arnold and Childress. Main reference points are Arnold's theorem stating that, for flows taking place on compact three manifolds ℳ3, the only velocity fields able to produce chaotic streamlines are those satisfying Beltrami equation and the modern topological conception of contact structures, each of which admits a representative contact one-form also satisfying Beltrami equation. We advocate that Beltrami equation is nothing else but the eigenstate equation for the first order Laplace-Beltrami operator ★ g d, which can be solved by using time-honored harmonic analysis. Taking for ℳ3, a torus T 3 constructed as ℝ3/Λ, where Λ is a crystallographic lattice, we present a general algorithm to construct solutions of the Beltrami equation which utilizes as main ingredient the orbits under the action of the point group B A of three-vectors in the momentum lattice *Λ. Inspired by the crystallographic construction of space groups, we introduce the new notion of a Universal Classifying Group which contains all space groups as proper subgroups. We show that the ★ g d eigenfunctions are naturally arranged into irreducible representations of and by means of a systematic use of the branching rules with respect to various possible subgroups we search and find Beltrami fields with non trivial hidden symmetries. In the case of the cubic lattice the point group is the proper octahedral group O24 and the Universal Classifying Group is a finite group G1536 of order |G1536| = 1536 which we study in full detail deriving all of its 37 irreducible representations and the associated character table. We show that the O24 orbits in the cubic lattice are arranged into 48 equivalence classes, the parameters of the corresponding Beltrami vector fields filling all the 37 irreducible representations of G1536. In this way we obtain an

  12. Anomalous ω-Z-γ vertex from hidden local symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    We formulate the general form of the ω-Z-γ vertex in the framework based on the hidden local symmetry, which arises from the gauge-invariant terms for intrinsic parity-odd part of the effective action. Those terms are given as the homogeneous part of the general solution (having free parameters) to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation and hence are not determined by the anomaly, in sharp contrast to the Harvey-Hill-Hill (HHH) action where the relevant vertex is claimed to be uniquely determined by the anomaly. We show that, even in the framework that HHH was based on, the ω-Z-γ vertex is actually not determined by the anomaly but by the homogeneous (anomaly-free) part of the general solution to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation having free parameters in the same way as in the hidden local symmetry formulation: The HHH action is just a particular choice of the free parameters in the general solution. We further show that the ω-Z-γ vertex related to the neutrino (ν)-nucleon (N) scattering cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is determined not by the anomaly but by the anomaly-free part of the general solution having free parameters. Nevertheless, we find that the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is related through the Ward-Takahashi identity to Γ(ω→π0γ) which has the same parameter dependence as that of σ(νN→νN(N')γ) and hence the ratio σ(νN→νN(N')γ)/Γ(ω→π0γ) is fixed independently of these free parameters. Other set of the free parameters of the general solution can be fixed to make the best fit of the ω→π0l+l- process, which substantially differs from the HHH action. This gives a prediction of the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ*(l+l-)) to be tested at ν-N collision experiments in the future.

  13. Reading Hidden Messages Through Deciphered Manual Alphabets on Classic Artwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castronovo, Joseph Anthony, Jr.

    1998-10-01

    Decipherment is the tool used to uncover several types of hand signs that played vital roles in the creation of hidden messages in classic artwork. A 3,100 B.C. bas-relief of The 'Kaph' Telescope, formerly named The Narmer Palette, and Michaelangelo Buonarrotte's Battle of Cascina of 1506 were two key works of art that show certain similarities even though separated by 4,500 years. It is evident that Renaissance humanists provided artists with certain knowledge of the ancients. Results of incorporating a number of minor works of art showed that the competence of ancient Egyptians, Cretans and Australian Aboriginals, to name a few, as astronomers, was underestimated. Some deciphered Indus seals attested to a global understanding of the universe, with Gemini and the star of Thuban at the center of their attention. Certain forms of secrecy had to be undertaken for various reasons throughout the millennia. Three examples are: (1) In Italy, to keep controversial and truthful teachings discreet and hidden, artists embedded them in artwork long before the plight of Galileo Galilei and his discoveries. (2) Among Jewish Kabbalists, a well-known design was obscured in The Arnolfini Wedding painting for fear it would be lost due to persecution. (3) Michaelangelo Buonarrotte indicated several meanings through the hands of The Statue of Moses. They were overlooked by several societies, including the gesticulating culture of Italy, because they oppressed the value of signed languages. Spatial decipherment may testify to a need for the restoration of a spatial writing system for expanded linguistic accessibility. A 21st century model community for sign language residents and employees will benefit visual learners, particularly visual artists and non-phonetic decipherers, to better uncover, understand and perhaps use ancient hand forms to restore ancient knowledge. Moreover, the National Association of Teaching English (NATE) has recently endorsed the addition of two skills

  14. An overview of waste crime, its characteristics, and the vulnerability of the EU waste sector.

    PubMed

    Baird, J; Curry, R; Cruz, P

    2014-02-01

    While waste is increasingly viewed as a resource to be globally traded, increased regulatory control on waste across Europe has created the conditions where waste crime now operates alongside a legitimate waste sector. Waste crime,is an environmental crime and a form of white-collar crime, which exploits the physical characteristics of waste, the complexity of the collection and downstream infrastructure, and the market opportunities for profit. This paper highlights some of the factors which make the waste sector vulnerable to waste crime. These factors include new legislation and its weak regulatory enforcement, the economics of waste treatment, where legal and safe treatment of waste can be more expensive than illegal operations, the complexity of the waste sector and the different actors who can have some involvement, directly or indirectly, in the movement of illegal wastes, and finally that waste can be hidden or disguised and creates an opportunity for illegal businesses to operate alongside legitimate waste operators. The study also considers waste crime from the perspective of particular waste streams that are often associated with illegal shipment or through illegal treatment and disposal. For each, the nature of the crime which occurs is shown to differ, but for each, vulnerabilities to waste crime are evident. The paper also describes some approaches which can be adopted by regulators and those involved in developing new legislation for identifying where opportunities for waste crime occurs and how to prevent it.

  15. Shimony-Wolf states and hidden coherences in classical light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    The classical theory of polarisation coherence is briefly summarised and then extended. The extension is motivated by the recognition that the traditional theory of two-point coherence provides only what we identify as 'diagonal' correlation functions and their associated two-point coherence matrices. It is pointed out that a wider focus is possible when taking account of the three-sector vector space underlying all two-point coherences in classical optics. This reveals the possibility of observing a new type of 'off-diagonal' correlations that arise when the correlation functions under investigation are associated with points in two distinct vector spaces, pairs of points that are not analogous to the pairs of space points or time points that underlie traditional measures of spatial and temporal coherence. Quantum theory has experience with correlations engaging such 'cross-sector' coherences, for example in tests of Bell inequalities, and the quantum formulations are shown to be easily adopted by classical theory without incorporating quantum features in the optical signals. The familiar theory of classical coherence that is associated with the pioneering work of Emil Wolf is extended in conformance with three criteria advanced by Abner Shimony to obtain formulas for correlation functions and for the Bell measure ? of coherence. Values of ? greater than the standard upper limit ? are predicted for certain classical Shimony-Wolf fields, indicating strong cross-sector coherence, but only when standard measures of coherence such as degree of polarisation ? are minimised. Experimental results confirming the predictions for cross-sector coherence are exhibited.

  16. Hidden topological order and its correlation with glass-forming ability in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Li, M Z; Wang, W H; Liu, K X

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the well-defined long-range periodic order that characterizes crystals, so far the inherent atomic packing mode in glassy solids remains mysterious. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, here we find medium-range atomic packing orders in metallic glasses, which are hidden in the diffraction data in terms of structure factors or pair correlation functions. The analysis of the hidden orders in various metallic glasses indicates that the glassy and crystalline solids share a nontrivial structural homology in short-to-medium range, and the hidden orders are formulated by inheriting partial crystalline orders during glass formation. As the number of chemical components increases, more hidden orders are often developed in a metallic glass and entangled topologically. We use this phenomenon to explain the geometric frustration in glass formation and the glass-forming ability of metallic alloys.

  17. Bayesian inference of hidden corrosion in steel bridge connections: Non-contact and sparse contact approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earls, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes approaches for inferring the presence and nature of hidden corrosion occurring between connection plies in steel truss bridges. The proposed methods furnish, both non-contact and very sparse contact inspection modalities supporting this goal.

  18. Characteristics of Hidden Status Among Users of Crack, Powder Cocaine, and Heroin in Central Harlem

    PubMed Central

    Davis, W. Rees; Johnson, Bruce D.; Liberty, Hilary James; Randolph, Doris D.

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes hidden status among crack, powder cocaine, and heroin users and setters, in contrast to more accessible users/sellers. Several sampling strategies acquired 657 users (N=559) and sellers (N=98). Indicators of hidden status were those who (1) paid rent in full in the last 30 days, (2) used nonstreet drug procurement. (3) had legal jobs, and (4) earned $1,000 or more in legal income in the last 30 days. Nearly half had at least one indicator: approximately 16% of users/sellers had two to four indicators. In logistic regression analyses, those who had not panhandled in the last 30 days, those who had used powder cocaine in the last 30 days, and those never arrested were the most likely to have hidden status, whether the analysis predicted those having any indicators or those having two to four indicators. The four indicators begin to operationally define hidden status among users of cocaine and heroin. PMID:17710217

  19. High-order hidden Markov model for piecewise linear processes and applications to speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lee-Min; Jean, Fu-Rong

    2016-08-01

    The hidden Markov models have been widely applied to systems with sequential data. However, the conditional independence of the state outputs will limit the output of a hidden Markov model to be a piecewise constant random sequence, which is not a good approximation for many real processes. In this paper, a high-order hidden Markov model for piecewise linear processes is proposed to better approximate the behavior of a real process. A parameter estimation method based on the expectation-maximization algorithm was derived for the proposed model. Experiments on speech recognition of noisy Mandarin digits were conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method can reduce the recognition error rate compared to a baseline hidden Markov model. PMID:27586781

  20. Hypnosis and the dream hidden observer: primary process and demand characteristics.

    PubMed

    Maré, C; Lynn, S J; Kvaal, S; Segal, D; Sivec, H

    1994-05-01

    In Study 1, virtuoso (n = 13; passed more than 10 suggestions on the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A [HGSHS:A] and Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C), high hypnotizable (n = 14; passed more than 8 suggestions on the HGSHS:A), and medium hypnotizable (n = 17; passed 4-8 suggestions on the HGSHS:A) Ss were administered a hypnotic dream suggestion followed by a "dream hidden observer" suggestion (i.e., access hidden part; have new thoughts and images pertinent to dream). The majority of Ss reported dreams (81.8%) and hidden observers (80%), with hidden reports being characterized by more personal content, less primary processes, and poorer recall than dream reports. Study 2 replicated major findings. Although hypnotized (n = 18) and low hypnotizable simulating Ss (n = 17) responded comparably on most measures, hypnotizable Ss' dreams contained more primary process than did simulating Ss, providing support for M. R. Nash's (1991) psychoanalytic model. PMID:8040501

  1. A TWO-STATE MIXED HIDDEN MARKOV MODEL FOR RISKY TEENAGE DRIVING BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John C.; Albert, Paul S.; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a joint model for longitudinal binary and count outcomes. We apply the model to a unique longitudinal study of teen driving where risky driving behavior and the occurrence of crashes or near crashes are measured prospectively over the first 18 months of licensure. Of scientific interest is relating the two processes and predicting crash and near crash outcomes. We propose a two-state mixed hidden Markov model whereby the hidden state characterizes the mean for the joint longitudinal crash/near crash outcomes and elevated g-force events which are a proxy for risky driving. Heterogeneity is introduced in both the conditional model for the count outcomes and the hidden process using a shared random effect. An estimation procedure is presented using the forward–backward algorithm along with adaptive Gaussian quadrature to perform numerical integration. The estimation procedure readily yields hidden state probabilities as well as providing for a broad class of predictors.

  2. Hidden topological order and its correlation with glass-forming ability in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Li, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, K. X.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the well-defined long-range periodic order that characterizes crystals, so far the inherent atomic packing mode in glassy solids remains mysterious. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, here we find medium-range atomic packing orders in metallic glasses, which are hidden in the diffraction data in terms of structure factors or pair correlation functions. The analysis of the hidden orders in various metallic glasses indicates that the glassy and crystalline solids share a nontrivial structural homology in short-to-medium range, and the hidden orders are formulated by inheriting partial crystalline orders during glass formation. As the number of chemical components increases, more hidden orders are often developed in a metallic glass and entangled topologically. We use this phenomenon to explain the geometric frustration in glass formation and the glass-forming ability of metallic alloys.

  3. 77 FR 8253 - Notice of Proposed Settlement Agreement and Opportunity for Public Comment: Hidden Lane Landfill...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Proposed Settlement Agreement and Opportunity for Public Comment: Hidden Lane Landfill... Landfill Superfund Site, Sterling, Loudoun County, Virginia (``Site''). DATES: Written comments on...

  4. Hidden-variable problem for a continuous family of spin-1 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyński, Paweł; Soeda, Akihito; Bzdęga, Bartłomiej; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2013-02-01

    We study a continuous set of spin-1 measurements and show that for a special family of measurements parametrized by a single variable θ the possibility of hidden-variable description depends on the rationality of θ/π.

  5. Hidden in the background: a local approach to CMB anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno Sánchez, Juan C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a framework aiming to provide a common origin for the large-angle anomalies detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), which are hypothesized as the result of the statistical inhomogeneity developed by different isocurvature fields of mass m~ H present during inflation. The inhomogeneity arises as the combined effect of (i) the initial conditions for isocurvature fields (obtained after a fast-roll stage finishing many e-foldings before cosmological scales exit the horizon), (ii) their inflationary fluctuations and (iii) their coupling to other degrees of freedom. Our case of interest is when these fields (interpreted as the precursors of large-angle anomalies) leave an observable imprint only in isolated patches of the Universe. When the latter intersect the last scattering surface, such imprints arise in the CMB. Nevertheless, due to their statistically inhomogeneous nature, these imprints are difficult to detect, for they become hidden in the background similarly to the Cold Spot. We then compute the probability that a single isocurvature field becomes inhomogeneous at the end of inflation and find that, if the appropriate conditions are given (which depend exclusively on the preexisting fast-roll stage), this probability is at the percent level. Finally, we discuss several mechanisms (including the curvaton and the inhomogeneous reheating) to investigate whether an initial statistically inhomogeneous isocurvature field fluctuation might give rise to some of the observed anomalies. In particular, we focus on the Cold Spot, the power deficit at low multipoles and the breaking of statistical isotropy.

  6. Shallow velocity structure and hidden faults of Kunming city region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geng-Xin; Lou, Hai; Wang, Chun-Yong; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Qin, Jia-Zheng; Yang, Run-Hai; Li, Hai-Ou

    2008-09-01

    In order to image the 3-D velocity structure of its shallow crust in Kunming region, China, finite-difference seismic tomography is used to invert the seismic data selected carefully from six-shot data. The result lays a foundation for the discussion of the relationship between the obtained velocity structure and the hidden faults, and for the illumination of the depth extents of main active faults surrounding Kunming city. Puduhe-Xishan fault lies on the western margin of the Kunming basin and is just situated on the west edge of the low velocity anomaly zone found at all depth levels. This indicates that this fault is a borderline fault of the Kunming basin. It can be concluded that the fault dips eastwards with a steep angle and its depth extent is large. Puji-Hanjiacun fault and Heilongtan-Guandu fault play a role in controlling the low velocity anomaly zone in middle basin. The depth extents of the two faults are comparatively small, without traversing the interface of basin floor.

  7. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  8. Analyzing Hidden Semantics in Social Bookmarking of Open Educational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillón, Julià

    Web 2.0 services such as social bookmarking allow users to manage and share the links they find interesting, adding their own tags for describing them. This is especially interesting in the field of open educational resources, as delicious is a simple way to bridge the institutional point of view (i.e. learning object repositories) with the individual one (i.e. personal collections), thus promoting the discovering and sharing of such resources by other users. In this paper we propose a methodology for analyzing such tags in order to discover hidden semantics (i.e. taxonomies and vocabularies) that can be used to improve descriptions of learning objects and make learning object repositories more visible and discoverable. We propose the use of a simple statistical analysis tool such as principal component analysis to discover which tags create clusters that can be semantically interpreted. We will compare the obtained results with a collection of resources related to open educational resources, in order to better understand the real needs of people searching for open educational resources.

  9. A hidden Markov model for multimodal biometrics score fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2011-05-01

    There are strong evidences of that multimodal biometric score fusion can significantly improve human identification performance. Score level fusion usually involves score normalization, score fusion, and fusion decision. There are several types of score fusion methods, direct combination of fusion scores, classifier-based fusion, and density-based fusion. The real applications require achieving greater reliability in determining or verifying person's identity. The goal of this research is to improve the accuracy and robustness of human identification by using multimodal biometrics score fusion. The accuracy means high verification rate if tested on a closed dataset, or a high genuine accept rate under low false accept rate if tested on an open dataset. While the robustness means the fusion performance is stable with variant biometric scores. We propose a hidden Markov model (HMM) for multiple score fusion, where the biometric scores include multimodal scores and multi-matcher scores. The state probability density functions in a HHM model are estimated by Gaussian mixture model. The proposed HMM model for multiple score fusion is accurate for identification, flexible and reliable with biometrics. The proposed HMM method are tested on three NIST-BSSR1 multimodal databases and on three face-score databases. The results show the HMM method is an excellent and reliable score fusion method.

  10. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore » the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  11. Hidden Markov chain modeling for epileptic networks identification.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie; Maillard, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The partial epileptic seizures are often considered to be caused by a wrong balance between inhibitory and excitatory interneuron connections within a focal brain area. These abnormal balances are likely to result in loss of functional connectivities between remote brain structures, while functional connectivities within the incriminated zone are enhanced. The identification of the epileptic networks underlying these hypersynchronies are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the brain mechanisms responsible for the development of the seizures. In this objective, threshold strategies are commonly applied, based on synchrony measurements computed from recordings of the electrophysiologic brain activity. However, such methods are reported to be prone to errors and false alarms. In this paper, we propose a hidden Markov chain modeling of the synchrony states with the aim to develop a reliable machine learning methods for epileptic network inference. The method is applied on a real Stereo-EEG recording, demonstrating consistent results with the clinical evaluations and with the current knowledge on temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:24110697

  12. Identification and classification of conopeptides using profile Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Laht, Silja; Koua, Dominique; Kaplinski, Lauris; Lisacek, Frédérique; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-03-01

    Conopeptides are small toxins produced by predatory marine snails of the genus Conus. They are studied with increasing intensity due to their potential in neurosciences and pharmacology. The number of existing conopeptides is estimated to be 1 million, but only about 1000 have been described to date. Thanks to new high-throughput sequencing technologies the number of known conopeptides is likely to increase exponentially in the near future. There is therefore a need for a fast and accurate computational method for identification and classification of the novel conopeptides in large data sets. 62 profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) were built for prediction and classification of all described conopeptide superfamilies and families, based on the different parts of the corresponding protein sequences. These models showed very high specificity in detection of new peptides. 56 out of 62 models do not give a single false positive in a test with the entire UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot protein sequence database. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of mature peptide models for automatic classification with accuracy of 96% for the mature peptide models and 100% for the pro- and signal peptide models. Our conopeptide profile HMMs can be used for finding and annotation of new conopeptides from large datasets generated by transcriptome or genome sequencing. To our knowledge this is the first time this kind of computational method has been applied to predict all known conopeptide superfamilies and some conopeptide families. PMID:22244925

  13. Optical character recognition of handwritten Arabic using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Aulama, Mohannad M.; Natsheh, Asem M.; Abandah, Gheith A.; Olama, Mohammed M

    2011-01-01

    The problem of optical character recognition (OCR) of handwritten Arabic has not received a satisfactory solution yet. In this paper, an Arabic OCR algorithm is developed based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) combined with the Viterbi algorithm, which results in an improved and more robust recognition of characters at the sub-word level. Integrating the HMMs represents another step of the overall OCR trends being currently researched in the literature. The proposed approach exploits the structure of characters in the Arabic language in addition to their extracted features to achieve improved recognition rates. Useful statistical information of the Arabic language is initially extracted and then used to estimate the probabilistic parameters of the mathematical HMM. A new custom implementation of the HMM is developed in this study, where the transition matrix is built based on the collected large corpus, and the emission matrix is built based on the results obtained via the extracted character features. The recognition process is triggered using the Viterbi algorithm which employs the most probable sequence of sub-words. The model was implemented to recognize the sub-word unit of Arabic text raising the recognition rate from being linked to the worst recognition rate for any character to the overall structure of the Arabic language. Numerical results show that there is a potentially large recognition improvement by using the proposed algorithms.

  14. Cochlear Synaptopathy and Noise-Induced Hidden Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lijuan; Chang, Ying; Li, Xiaowei; Aiken, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on animal models have shown that noise exposure that does not lead to permanent threshold shift (PTS) can cause considerable damage around the synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and type-I afferent auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). Disruption of these synapses not only disables the innervated ANFs but also results in the slow degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons if the synapses are not reestablished. Such a loss of ANFs should result in signal coding deficits, which are exacerbated by the bias of the damage toward synapses connecting low-spontaneous-rate (SR) ANFs, which are known to be vital for signal coding in noisy background. As there is no PTS, these functional deficits cannot be detected using routine audiological evaluations and may be unknown to subjects who have them. Such functional deficits in hearing without changes in sensitivity are generally called “noise-induced hidden hearing loss (NIHHL).” Here, we provide a brief review to address several critical issues related to NIHHL: (1) the mechanism of noise induced synaptic damage, (2) reversibility of the synaptic damage, (3) the functional deficits as the nature of NIHHL in animal studies, (4) evidence of NIHHL in human subjects, and (5) peripheral and central contribution of NIHHL. PMID:27738526

  15. Hidden Attraction - The History and Mystery of Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1996-04-01

    Long one of nature's most fascinating phenomena, magnetism was once the subject of many superstitions. Magnets were thought useful to thieves, effective as a love potion, and as a cure for gout or spasms. They could remove sorcery from women and put demons to flight and even reconcile married couples. It was said that a lodestone pickled in the salt of sucking fish had the power to attract gold. Today, these beliefs have been put aside, but magnetism is no less remarkable for our modern understanding of it. In Hidden Attraction , Gerrit L. Verschuur, a noted astronomer and National Book Award nominee for The Invisible Universe , traces the history of our fascination with magnetism, from the mystery and superstition that propelled the first alchemical experiments with lodestone, through the more tangible works of Faraday, Maxwell, Hertz and other great pioneers of magnetism (scientists responsible for the extraordinary advances in modern science and technology, including radio, the telephone, and computers, that characterize the twentieth century), to state-of-the-art theories that see magnetism as a basic force in the universe. Boasting many informative illustrations, this is an adventure of the mind, using the specific phenomenon of magnetism to show how we have moved from an era of superstitions to one in which the Theory of Everything looms on the horizon.

  16. Hidden diversity in the freshwater planktonic diatom Asterionella formosa.

    PubMed

    Van den Wyngaert, S; Möst, M; Freimann, R; Ibelings, B W; Spaak, P

    2015-06-01

    Many freshwater and marine algal species are described as having cosmopolitan distributions. Whether these widely distributed morphologically similar algae also share a similar gene pool remains often unclear. In the context of island biogeography theory, stronger spatial isolation deemed typical of freshwater lakes should restrict gene flow and lead to higher genetic differentiation among lakes. Using nine microsatellite loci, we investigate the genetic diversity of a widely distributed freshwater planktonic diatom, Asterionella formosa, across different lakes in Switzerland and the Netherlands. We applied a hierarchical spatial sampling design to determine the geographical scale at which populations are structured. A subset of the isolates was additionally analysed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Our results revealed complex and unexpected population structure in A. formosa with evidence for both restricted and moderate to high gene flow at the same time. Different genetic markers (microsatellites and AFLPs) analysed with a variety of multivariate methods consistently revealed that genetic differentiation within lakes was much stronger than among lakes, indicating the presence of cryptic species within A. formosa. We conclude that the hidden diversity found in this study is expected to have implications for the further use of A. formosa in biogeographical, conservation and ecological studies. Further research using species-level phylogenetic markers is necessary to place the observed differentiation in an evolutionary context of speciation.

  17. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change.

    PubMed

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO2 emissions by 10,686 tonnes. PMID:25790439

  18. Enzyme kinetics: the whole picture reveals hidden meanings.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Maria F; Estevinho, Berta N; Crespo, Rosa; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2015-06-01

    The methodology adopted by Michaelis and Menten in 1913 is still routinely used to characterize the catalytic power and selectivity of enzymes. These kinetic measurements must be performed soon after the purified enzyme is mixed with a large excess of substrate. Other time scales and solution compositions are no less physiologically relevant, but fall outside the range of applicability of the classical formalism. Here we show that the complete picture of an enzyme's mode of function is critically obscured by the limited scope of conventional kinetic analysis, even in the simplest case of a single active site without inhibition. This picture is now unveiled in a mathematically closed form that remains valid over the reaction time for all combinations of enzyme/substrate concentrations and rate constants. Algebraic simplicity is maintained in the new formalism when stationary reaction phases are considered. By achieving this century-old objective, the otherwise hidden role of the reversible binding step is revealed and atypical kinetic profiles are explained. Most singular kinetic behaviors are identified in a critical region of conditions that coincide with typical cell conditions. Because it is not covered by the Michaelis-Menten model, the critical region has been missed until now by low- and high-throughput screenings of new drugs. New possibilities are therefore raised for novel and once-promising inhibitors to therapeutically target enzymes.

  19. A Network of SCOP Hidden Markov Models and Its Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database uses a large number of hidden Markov models (HMMs) to represent families and superfamilies composed of proteins that presumably share the same evolutionary origin. However, how the HMMs are related to one another has not been examined before. Results In this work, taking into account the processes used to build the HMMs, we propose a working hypothesis to examine the relationships between HMMs and the families and superfamilies that they represent. Specifically, we perform an all-against-all HMM comparison using the HHsearch program (similar to BLAST) and construct a network where the nodes are HMMs and the edges connect similar HMMs. We hypothesize that the HMMs in a connected component belong to the same family or superfamily more often than expected under a random network connection model. Results show a pattern consistent with this working hypothesis. Moreover, the HMM network possesses features distinctly different from the previously documented biological networks, exemplified by the exceptionally high clustering coefficient and the large number of connected components. Conclusions The current finding may provide guidance in devising computational methods to reduce the degree of overlaps between the HMMs representing the same superfamilies, which may in turn enable more efficient large-scale sequence searches against the database of HMMs. PMID:21635719

  20. Ladar System Identifies Obstacles Partly Hidden by Grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, Andres

    2003-01-01

    A ladar-based system now undergoing development is intended to enable an autonomous mobile robot in an outdoor environment to avoid moving toward trees, large rocks, and other obstacles that are partly hidden by tall grass. The design of the system incorporates the assumption that the robot is capable of moving through grass and provides for discrimination between grass and obstacles on the basis of geometric properties extracted from ladar readings as described below. The system (see figure) includes a ladar system that projects a range-measuring pulsed laser beam that has a small angular width of radians and is capable of measuring distances of reflective objects from a minimum of dmin to a maximum of dmax. The system is equipped with a rotating mirror that scans the beam through a relatively wide angular range of in a horizontal plane at a suitable small height above the ground. Successive scans are performed at time intervals of seconds. During each scan, the laser beam is fired at relatively small angular intervals of radians to make range measurements, so that the total number of range measurements acquired in a scan is Ne = / .