Science.gov

Sample records for probing zeolite internal

  1. Probing zeolite internal structures using very low temperature {sup 129}Xe NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Earl, W.L.; Pietrass, T.; Weber, W.A.; Panjabi, G.; Gates, B.C.

    1998-08-01

    In recent years, probing pore structure with {sup 129}Xe NMR has received a bad reputation. This is due to the fact that the method is more complex than was originally suggested so the data is somewhat difficult to interpret. The authors find that the use of a wide temperature range (40--350 K) allows them to interpret {sup 129}Xe chemical shifts in terms of van der Waals attraction between the xenon atom and oxygen in zeolite walls. Using rather simple models from the literature, they can extract useful pore size information as well as the van der Waals potential energy.

  2. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  3. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  4. Zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that have complex framework structures. However, there are several features of zeolite crystals that make unequivocal structure determinations difficult. The acquisition of reliable structural information on zeolites is greatly facilitated by the availability of high-quality specimens. For structure determinations by conventional diffraction techniques, large single-crystal specimens are essential. Alternatively, structural determinations by powder profile refinement methods relax the constraints on crystal size, but still require materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection. Studies conducted at CAMMP (Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing) have demonstrated that microgravity processing can produce larger crystal sizes and fewer structural defects relative to terrestrial crystal growth. Principal Investigator: Dr. Albert Sacco

  5. Temperature Dependence of Internal Deformation Field in Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Song, Sanghoon; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Pham, Tung; Harder, Ross; Xiong, Gang; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Robinson, Ian K.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2011-03-01

    We studied temperature dependent internal deformation field distributions in zeolite microcrystals using coherent x-ray diffraction. We measured the coherent x-ray diffraction patterns around (200) and (020) Bragg peaks of the crystals. The three-dimensional real space images were obtained by phasing and inverting the oversampled diffraction patterns using the phase retrieval algorithm combined with error reduction and hybrid input-output method. The internal deformation fields show unusual temperature dependent behaviors which might be originated from the synthesis and calcination process. This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (Nos. 2010-0000112 and R15-2008-006-01001-0), Seoul Research and Business Development Program (10816), and Sogang University Research Grant (2010).

  6. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statisticalmore » analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.« less

  7. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  8. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  9. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Perea, Daniel E; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W; Lercher, Johannes A; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al-Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  10. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Perea, Daniel E; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W; Lercher, Johannes A; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al-Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  11. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al-Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  12. 2nd International Planetary Probe Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Martinez, Ed; Arcadi, Marla

    2005-01-01

    Included are presentations from the 2nd International Planetary Probe Workshop. The purpose of the second workshop was to continue to unite the community of planetary scientists, spacecraft engineers and mission designers and planners; whose expertise, experience and interests are in the areas of entry probe trajectory and attitude determination, and the aerodynamics/aerothermodynamics of planetary entry vehicles. Mars lander missions and the first probe mission to Titan made 2004 an exciting year for planetary exploration. The Workshop addressed entry probe science, engineering challenges, mission design and instruments, along with the challenges of reconstruction of the entry, descent and landing or the aerocapture phases. Topics addressed included methods, technologies, and algorithms currently employed; techniques and results from the rich history of entry probe science such as PAET, Venera/Vega, Pioneer Venus, Viking, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder and Mars MER; upcoming missions such as the imminent entry of Huygens and future Mars entry probes; and new and novel instrumentation and methodologies.

  13. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: report of the subcommittee on zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission of New Minerals and Mineral Names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1998-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association Commission of New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for review, interrupted tetrahedral framework structures are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is allowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundance in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemical symbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely on Si:Al ratio except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration, and over-hydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of a zeolite. Newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr.-Ba: chabazite-Ca.-Na.-K; clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca: dachiardite-Ca, -Na; erionite-K, -Ca: faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Na: paulingite-K. -Ca; phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -Ka; stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data. IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry; unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral species, and three of doubtful status. Herschelite, leonhardite, svetlozarite, and wellsite are discredited as mineral species names. Obsolete and

  14. Development of a transient internal probe diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanjers, G. G.; Galambos, J. P.; Bohnet, M. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Christiansen, W. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Wright, B. L.; Smith, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    The transient internal probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas. In the TIP scheme, a probe is fired, using a two-stage light gas gun, through a hot plasma at velocities up to 5 km/s, and makes direct, local measurements of the internal magnetic field structure. The data are relayed to the laboratory optical detection system using an incident laser that is directed through a Faraday rotator payload acting as a magneto-optic sensor. Ablative effects are avoided by minimizing the probe size, limiting the time that the probe is in the hot plasma, and encasing the probe with a diamond cladding. The degree to which the diamond probe cladding is susceptible to ablative effects will determine the plasma density and temperature regime in which the TIP diagnostic can be used. If the TIP suffers significant ablation it is an indication that the diagnostic is not usable on this hot and dense of a plasma (or that greater velocity must be imparted to the probe to further minimize the time that it is in the plasma). A quantitative experimental study of the ablation rates of diamond is planned as part of the TIP development. The integrated TIP system will be functional in 1992 and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) [T. R. Jarboe, Fusion Tech. 15, 9 (1989)] at the University of Washington.

  15. Internal load management in eutrophic, anoxic environments. The role of natural zeolite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianni, Areti; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2015-04-01

    During the last decades, the increase of the nutrient and organic load inflows in the coastal zone increased the number of the anoxic environments. Inputs' control constitutes one of the basic practices for the eutrophic/anoxic aquatic ecosystems management. However, the induced changes at the ecosystem characteristics resulting from the trophic state alteration, and anoxic conditions prevalence, render the ecosystem's restoration difficult if not impossible. Bottom water anoxia accelerates PO43-, NH4+ and S2- recycling and accumulation from organic matter decomposition. This, toxic layer is a permanent menace for the balance of the entire ecosystem, as it can supply PO43-, NH4+ and S2- to the surface layers altering their qualitative character and threatening the welfare of fishes and other aquatic organisms. Having as objective the water basins' internal load control and based on practices are used in eutrophic environments' restoration, this study is referred to the role of the natural zeolite in eutrophic/anoxic ecosystems management. For the first time are presented, results from S2- removal experiments using the zeolitic mineral mordenite, [(Na2, Ca, K2)4 (H2O)28] [Al8Si40O96]. Four different sets of experiments were conducted, in order to examine zeolite's removal capacity of S2- in aquatic solutions, under a wide range of physicochemical parameters. More specific: a) the effect of initial pH on the removal process, b) the removal process kinetics, c) the removal process isotherms and d) the effect of salinity on the removal process were studied. Natural zeolite has the ability to neutralize the pH of aqueous solutions, thus all the experiments were practically performed at pH 7. Initially sulfides concentration range from 1 to 10mg/l. Zeolite's removal capability appeared to be directly depended on the S2- initial concentration. For initial concentration of 1mg/l, the removal rate reached up to 90% after 24h. The maximum zeolite removal capacity was

  16. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc).

  17. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc). PMID:20454729

  18. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  19. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  20. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. PMID:27485276

  1. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: report of the subcommittee on zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on new Minerals and Mineral names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for this review, structures containing an interrupted framework of tetrahedra are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is allowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundant in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemicalsymbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix, except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely on the ratio Si:Al except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration, and overhydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of a zeolite. newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr, -Ba, chabazite-Ca, -Na, -K, clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca, dachiardite-Ca, -Na, erionite-Na, erionite-Na, -K, -Ca, faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Mg, ferrierite-Mg, -K, -Na, gmelinite-Na, -Ca, -K, heulandite-Ca, -Na, -K, -Sr, levyne-Ca, -Na, paulingite-K, -Ca, phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -K, and stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data, IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry, unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral species

  2. Recommended nomenclature for zeolite minerals: Report of the Subcommittee on Zeolites of the International Mineralogical Association, Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, D.S.; Alberti, A.; Armbruster, T.; Artioli, G.; Colella, C.; Galli, E.; Grice, Joel D.; Liebau, F.; Mandarino, J.A.; Minato, H.; Nickel, E.H.; Passaglia, E.; Peacor, D.R.; Quartieri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, R.A.; Tillmanns, E.; Vezzalini, G.

    1998-01-01

    This report embodies recommendations on zeolite nomenclature approved by the International Mineralogical Association Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names. In a working definition of a zeolite mineral used for this review, structures containing an interrupted containing an interrupted framework of tetrahedra are accepted where other zeolitic properties prevail, and complete substitution by elements other than Si and Al is alloowed. Separate species are recognized in topologically distinctive compositional series in which different extra-framework cations are the most abundant in atomic proportions. To name these, the appropriate chemical symbol is attached by a hyphen to the series name as a suffix, except for the names harmotome, pollucite and wairakite in the phillipsite and analcime series. Differences in space-group symmetry and in order-disorder relationships in zeolites having the same topologically distinctive framework do not in general provide adequate grounds for recognition of separate species. Zeolite species are not to be distinguished solely in Si:Al ratio except for heulandite (Si:Al < 4.0) and clinoptilolite (Si:Al ??? 4.0). Dehydration, partial hydration and over-hydration are not sufficient grounds for the recognition of separate species of zeolites. Use of the term 'ideal formula' should be avoided in referring to a simplified or averaged formula of zeolite. Newly recognized species in compositional series are as follows: brewsterite-Sr, -Ba; chabazite-Ca, -Na, -K; clinoptilolite-K, -Na, -Ca; dechiardite-Ca, -Na; erionite-Na, -K, -Ca,; faujasite-Na, -Ca, -Mg; ferrierite-Mg, -K, -Na; gmelinite-Na, -Ca, -K; heulandite-Ca, -Na, -K, -Sr; levyne-Ca, -Na; paulingite-K, -Ca; phillipsite-Na, -Ca, -K stilbite-Ca, -Na. Key references, type locality, origin of name, chemical data, IZA structure-type symbols, space-group symmetry, unit-cell dimensions, and comments on structure are listed for 13 compositional series, 82 accepted zeolite mineral

  3. Monte Carlo Simulations Probing the Adsorptive Separation of Hydrogen Sulfide/Methane Mixtures Using All-Silica Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi S; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-11-10

    Selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour natural gas mixtures is one of the key challenges facing the natural gas industry. Adsorption and pervaporation processes utilizing nanoporous materials, such as zeolites, can be alternatives to highly energy-intensive amine-based absorption processes. In this work, the adsorption behavior of binary mixtures containing H2S and methane (CH4) in seven different all-silica zeolite frameworks (CHA, DDR, FER, IFR, MFI, MOR, and MWW) is investigated using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations at two temperatures (298 and 343 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 50 bar. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities that, with the exception of MOR, increase with increasing H2S concentration due to favorable sorbate-sorbate interactions. The simulations indicate significant inaccuracies of predictions using unary adsorption data and ideal adsorbed solution theory. In addition, the adsorption of binary H2S/H2O mixtures in MFI is considered to probe whether the presence of H2S induces coadsorption and reduces the hydrophobic character of all-silica zeolites. The simulations show preferential adsorption of H2S from moist gases with a selectivity of about 18 over H2O.

  4. Aluminum-phosphate binder formation in zeolites as probed with X-ray absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Cicmil, Dimitrije; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; de Groot, Frank M F; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-12-24

    In this work, three industrially relevant zeolites with framework topologies of MOR, FAU and FER have been explored on their ability to form an AlPO4 phase by reaction of a phosphate precursor with expelled framework aluminum. A detailed study was performed on zeolite H-mordenite, using in situ STXM and soft X-ray absorption tomography, complemented with (27)Al and (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy, XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption. Extraframework aluminum was extracted from steam-dealuminated H-mordenite and shown to dominantly consist of amorphous AlO(OH). It was found that phosphoric acid readily reacts with the AlO(OH) phase in dealuminated H-mordenite and forms an extraframework amorphous AlPO4 phase. It was found that while AlPO4 crystallizes outside of the zeolitic channel system forming AlPO4 islands, AlPO4 that remains inside tends to stay more amorphous. In the case of ultrastable zeolite Y the FAU framework collapsed during phosphatation, due to extraction of framework aluminum from the lattice. However, using milder phosphatation conditions an extraframework AlPO4 α-cristobalite/tridymite phase could also be produced within the FAU framework. Finally, in steamed zeolite ferrierite with FER topology the extraframework aluminum species were trapped and therefore not accessible for phosphoric acid; hence, no AlPO4 phase could be formed within the structure. Therefore, the parameters to be taken into account in AlPO4 synthesis are the framework Si/Al ratio, stability of framework aluminum, pore dimensionality and accessibility of extraframework aluminum species.

  5. Aluminum-phosphate binder formation in zeolites as probed with X-ray absorption microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Cicmil, Dimitrije; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; de Groot, Frank M F; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-12-24

    In this work, three industrially relevant zeolites with framework topologies of MOR, FAU and FER have been explored on their ability to form an AlPO4 phase by reaction of a phosphate precursor with expelled framework aluminum. A detailed study was performed on zeolite H-mordenite, using in situ STXM and soft X-ray absorption tomography, complemented with (27)Al and (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy, XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption. Extraframework aluminum was extracted from steam-dealuminated H-mordenite and shown to dominantly consist of amorphous AlO(OH). It was found that phosphoric acid readily reacts with the AlO(OH) phase in dealuminated H-mordenite and forms an extraframework amorphous AlPO4 phase. It was found that while AlPO4 crystallizes outside of the zeolitic channel system forming AlPO4 islands, AlPO4 that remains inside tends to stay more amorphous. In the case of ultrastable zeolite Y the FAU framework collapsed during phosphatation, due to extraction of framework aluminum from the lattice. However, using milder phosphatation conditions an extraframework AlPO4 α-cristobalite/tridymite phase could also be produced within the FAU framework. Finally, in steamed zeolite ferrierite with FER topology the extraframework aluminum species were trapped and therefore not accessible for phosphoric acid; hence, no AlPO4 phase could be formed within the structure. Therefore, the parameters to be taken into account in AlPO4 synthesis are the framework Si/Al ratio, stability of framework aluminum, pore dimensionality and accessibility of extraframework aluminum species. PMID:25415849

  6. Physical characterization of the state of motion of the phenalenyl spin probe in cation-exchanged faujasite zeolite supercages with pulsed EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetschman, D. C.; Dwyer, D. W.; Fox, J. D.; Frederick, C. K.; Scull, S.; Thomas, G. D.; Utterback, S. G.; Wei, J.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular motion of the phenalenyl (PNL) spin probe in the supercages of cation-exchanged X and Y zeolites (faujasites) has been physically characterized by pulsed and continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both X and Y zeolites, whose cation sites were exchanged with the alkali metal ions, Li +, Na +, K +, Rb + and Cs + were examined. There is a good correspondence between the temperature dependences of the PNL electron spin phase memory time and the CW EPR spectra. Both display evidence of a thermal activation from a stationary, non-rotating molecular state to a low-temperature state of in-plane rotation (Das et al., Chem Phys. 143 (1990) 253). The rate of in-plane rotation is an activated process, with E* | / R=1289 |+- 35 K and 1462 ± 47 K in NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The rotation appears to be about an axis along which the half-filled, non-bonding π orbital interacts with the exchanged cation in the supercage. Both CW and pulsed EPR also show a higher temperature activation from the in-plane rotating state to an effectively isoptropic state of rotation of PNL in which the PNL-cation bond is thought to be broken, with E* ⊥ / R=2050 ± 110 K, 1956 ± 46K, 1335 ± 97 K in LiX, NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The strength of the PNL-cation bonding decreases with increasing cation atomic number as indicated by E* ⊥ and the peripheral repulsion (crowding) of PNL increases with cation size as indicated E* |. There are qualitative indications that the binding of PNL to the cations in the Y zeolite is stronger than in the X zeolite.

  7. European Microgravity Facilities for ZEOLITE Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Minster, O.; Kremer, S.; Kirschhock, C.; Martens, J.; Jacobs, P.

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic zeolites are complex porous silicates. Zeolites are applied as catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. Whereas the traditional applications are situated in the petrochemical area, zeolite catalysis and related zeolite-based technologies have a growing impact on the economics and sustainability of products and processes in a growing number of industrial sectors, including environmental protection and nanotechnology. A Sounding Rocket microgravity experiment led to significant insight in the physical aggregation patterns of zeolitic nanoscopic particles and the occurrence of self-organisation phenomena when undisturbed by convection. The opportunity of performing longer microgravity duration experiments on zeolite structures was recently offered in the frame of a Taxi-Flight to the ISS in November 2002 organized by Belgium and ESA. Two facilities are currently under development for this flight. One of them will use the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the US Lab. Destiny to achieve thermal induced self-organization of different types of Zeosil nanoslabs by heating and cooling. The other facility will be flown on the ISS Russian segment and will allow to form Zeogrids at ambient temperature. On the other hand, the European Space Agency (ESA) is studying the possibility of developing a dedicated insert for zeolite experiments to be used with the optical and diagnostic platform of the Protein Crystallisation Diagnostic Facility (PCDF), that will fly integrated in the European Drawer Rack on the Columbus Laboratory starting in 2004. This paper will present the approach followed by ESA to prepare and support zeolite investigations in microgravity and will present the design concept of these three facilities.

  8. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  9. Characterization of internal interfaces by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.

    1992-12-31

    The near atomic spatial resolution of the atom probe field ion microscope permits the elemental characterization of internal interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces to be performed in a wide variety of materials. Information such as the orientation relationship between grains, topology of the interface, and the coherency of small precipitates with the surrounding matrix may be obtained from field ion microscopy. Details of the solute segregation may be obtained at the plane of the interface and as a function of distance from the interface for all elements simultaneously from atom probe compositional analysis. Capabilities and limitations of the atom probe technique in characterization of internal interfaces is illustrated with examples of grain boundaries and interphase interfaces in a wide range of materials including intermetallics, model alloys, and commercial steels.

  10. Characterization of internal interfaces by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    The near atomic spatial resolution of the atom probe field ion microscope permits the elemental characterization of internal interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces to be performed in a wide variety of materials. Information such as the orientation relationship between grains, topology of the interface, and the coherency of small precipitates with the surrounding matrix may be obtained from field ion microscopy. Details of the solute segregation may be obtained at the plane of the interface and as a function of distance from the interface for all elements simultaneously from atom probe compositional analysis. Capabilities and limitations of the atom probe technique in characterization of internal interfaces is illustrated with examples of grain boundaries and interphase interfaces in a wide range of materials including intermetallics, model alloys, and commercial steels.

  11. Probe into the Internal Mechanism of Interlanguage Fossilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Qian

    2009-01-01

    Interlanguage fossilization is normal for second language acquisition. It is also a hotspot for studies on theory of foreign language acquisition. Many reasons cause the interlanguage fossilization. This paper probes into the internal mechanism of interlanguage fossilization from five aspects, namely the physiological aspect, the psychological…

  12. Internal magnetic probe for use in high temperature FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Slough, John; Miller, Ken

    1998-11-01

    In the TCS and STX experiments a Rotating Magnetic Field is used to drive the FRC current. An internal magnetic probe has been built to measure both Bθ and Bz along the plasma radius. The probe has 24 multi-turn coils which are made of 0.0015" dia copper wire. The coils are enclosed in a 0.08 cm ID, 0.20 cm OD, 24 cm long berillum oxide (BeO) tube chosen for its high thermal conductivity, high melting point and low contamination potential. Measurements made on high temperature FRCs will be presented. (www.aa.washington.edu/AERP/RPPL) Supported by USDOE.

  13. Diagram of Zeolite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP) in Cambridge, MA, a NASA-sponsored Commercial Space Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Depicted here is one of the many here complex geometric shapes which make them highly absorbent. Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station

  14. Biochemical evolution. I. Polymerization on internal, organophilic silica surfaces of dealuminated zeolites and feldspars

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Catalysis at mineral surfaces might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and photochemical gas reactions. Many ideas are implausible in detail because the proposed mineral surfaces strongly prefer water and other ionic species to organic ones. The molecular sieve silicalite (Union Carbide; = Al-free Mobil ZSM-5 zeolite) has a three-dimensional, 10-ring channel system whose electrically neutral Si-O surface strongly adsorbs organic species over water. Three -O-Si tetrahedral bonds lie in the surface, and the fourth Si-O points inwards. In contrast, the outward Si-OH of simple quartz and feldspar crystals generates their ionic organophobicity. The ZSM-5-type zeolite mutinaite occurs in Antarctica with boggsite and tschernichite (Al-analog of Mobil Beta). Archean mutinaite might have become de-aluminated toward silicalite during hot/cold/wet/dry cycles. Catalytic activity of silicalite increases linearly with Al-OH substitution for Si, and Al atoms tend to avoid each other. Adjacent organophilic and catalytic Al-OH regions in nanometer channels might have scavenged organic species for catalytic assembly into specific polymers protected from prompt photochemical destruction. Polymer migration along weathered silicic surfaces of micrometer-wide channels of feldspars might have led to assembly of replicating catalytic biomolecules and perhaps primitive cellular organisms. Silica-rich volcanic glasses should have been abundant on the early Earth, ready for crystallization into zeolites and feldspars, as in present continental basins. Abundant chert from weakly metamorphosed Archaean rocks might retain microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbent/catalysts. Other framework silicas are possible, including ones with laevo/dextro one-dimensional channels. Organic molecules, transition-metal ions, and P occur inside modern feldspars. PMID:9520372

  15. Zealous zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hairston, D.W.

    1996-07-01

    Zeolites have made significant inroads in fluid cracking catalysts for gasoline and have pushed phosphates out of laundry detergents. But these crystalline aluminosilicate structures are just beginning to make their mark in chemical processes and environmental applications. Ideally suited for work as molecular sieves and catalysts, zeolites sport uniform surface pores and channels that are receptive only to molecules of a specific size and shape. This high selectivity makes zeolites a good alterative to some of the conventional products used for chemical reaction and filtration. One of the most potentially lucrative markets for zeolites is chemical catalyst replacements for liquid acids, such as hydrofluoric acid and sulfuric acid, and aluminum chloride in a number of alkylation and acrylation reactions. Zeolites are also being considered for oligomerization,isomerization, amination and condensation processes for the manufacture of chemical intermediates. The paper discusses the market and manufacturers of zeolites, justifying the cost of converting to zeolite catalysts, and natural zeolites.

  16. Effect of internal noise on the oscillation of N{sub 2}O decomposition over Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites using a stochastic description

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fuliang; Li, Yaping Sun, Xiaoming

    2014-01-28

    When considering stochastic oscillations of heterogeneous catalyst systems, most researches have focused on the surface of a metal or its oxide catalysts, but there have been few studies on porous catalysts. In this work, the effects of internal noise on oscillations of N{sub 2}O decomposition over Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites are investigated, using the chemical Langevin equation and a mesoscopic stochastic model. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 particles are finely divided particles, the number of Cu ions (N{sub s}) is proportional to the particle size at a certain Cu/Al, and the internal noise is inversely proportional to N{sub s}. Stochastic oscillations can be observed outside the deterministic oscillatory region. Furthermore, the performance of the oscillation characterized by the signal-to-noise ratio has a maximum within the optimal size range of 4–8 nm. This suggests that a nanometer-sized zeolite may be best for oscillations.

  17. Characterization of Fe²⁺ ions in Fe,H/SSZ-13 zeolites: FTIR spectroscopy of CO and NO probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Szanyi, János; Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Kollár, Márton; Wang, Yilin; Peden, Charles H F

    2016-04-21

    The IR spectra of adsorbed CO and NO probe molecules were used to characterize the coordination chemistry of Fe(2+) ions in solution ion exchanged Fe,H/SSZ-13 zeolites. The effects of Fe ion exchange levels, as well as the sample pre-treatment conditions, on the adsorption of these probe molecules were investigated. The ion exchange levels (in the range of the study) did not affect significantly the IR spectra of either probe molecule, and the IR features and their intensity ratios were very similar. Experiments with both probe molecules substantiated the presence of two distinct types of Fe(2+) ions in cationic positions. We assign these two Fe(2+) ions to two distinct cationic positions: Fe(2+) in 6R and 8R positions. NO initially adsorbs preferentially onto Fe(2+) sites in the 6R position, and then populates sites in the 8R. Fe(2+) ions in the 8R positions require the interaction of more than one NO molecule to move them out from their adsorbate-free cationic positions. As soon as they move from their stable positions, they are able to bind to multiple NO molecules, and form mostly tri-nitrosyls. These tri-nitrosyls, however, are only stable in the presence of gas phase NO; under dynamic vacuum they lose one of the NO molecules from their coordination sphere and form stable di-nitrosyls. The adsorption of CO is much weaker on Fe(2+) sites than that of NO, and requires cryogenic sample temperatures to initiate CO adsorption. Under the conditions applied in this study, only mono-carbonyl formation was observed. Reduction in H2 at 773 K increased the number of Fe(2+) adsorption sites, primarily in the 8R locations. Oxidation by N2O, on the other hand, selectively reduced the adsorption of both CO and NO on the Fe(2+) sites in 8R positions. Adsorbed oxygen left behind from the decomposition of N2O at 573 K readily reacted with CO to produce CO2 even at 150 K. PMID:27030020

  18. Probing Internal Dynamics of two SMGs with OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Blain, A. W.; Chapman, S. C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Alexander, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    We used the OH-Suppresing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II with laser AO to investigate the internal dynamics of two of the most luminous submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at redshifts z 2-3: SMM J030227.73+000653.5 at z=1.408 and SMM J221804.42+002154.4 at z=2.517 (Chapman et al. 2005). Recent ultradeep Chandra X-ray results indicate that the majority of SMGs contain an actively fueled AGN (Alexander et al. 2005), as their hard X-ray emission is too powerful to be explained by the high-mass X-ray binaries associated with pure star formation. This AGN contributes a minor fraction to the total luminosity, but the potential modifies the observed spectra, complicating their interpretation in terms of excitation and metallicity. We expect the restframe optical light from this nuclear emission to be centrally concentrated, surrounded by a more extended emission from star-forming regions. With AO we attempt to resolve the separation between the nuclear and extended emission, to probe the AGN and the velocity field of the wider starburst. We aimed to map the two-dimensional spatial distribution of H-alpha line emission, using the appropriate narrow band filters Hn2 and Kn5 matched to our known redshifts using the coarsest OSIRIS plate scale (0.1-arcsec) to have the largest field of view and optimize the coverage of the luminous region of the galaxies. By measuring accurately both the velocity dispersion point-by-point and the physical extent of these high redshift galaxies, we can estimate their dynamical masses. This enables us to better understand their internal astrophysics, their fate in terms of the galaxies we observe today, and the links between properties of dark matter halos and the stellar systems that form within. We thank NASA, NSF and Sloan Foundation.

  19. Floating Potential Probe Deployed on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2001-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 2000, at the request of the International Space Station (ISS) Program Office, a Plasma Contactor Unit Tiger Team was set up to investigate the threat of the ISS arcing in the event of a plasma contactor outage. Modeling and ground tests done under that effort showed that it is possible for the external structure of the ISS to become electrically charged to as much as -160 V under some conditions. Much of this work was done in anticipation of the deployment of the first large ISS solar array in November 2000. It was recognized that, with this deployment, the power system would be energized to its full voltage and that the predicted charging would pose an immediate threat to crewmembers involved in extravehicular activities (EVA's), as well as long-term damage to the station structure, were the ISS plasma contactors to be turned off or stop functioning. The Floating Potential Probe was conceived, designed, built, and deployed in record time by a crack team of scientists and engineers led by the NASA Glenn Research Center in response to ISS concerns about crew safety.

  20. Early Results from the Floating Potential Probe on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The FPP measures the body voltage (electric potential) of the, and the measurements are then transmitted to Earth.

  1. Probing the interior of synaptic vesicles with internalized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadd, Jennifer C.; Budzinski, Kristi L.; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Ye, Fangmao; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2012-03-01

    Synaptic vesicles are subcellular organelles that are found in the synaptic bouton and are responsible for the propagation of signals between neurons. Synaptic vesicles undergo endo- and exocytosis with the neuronal membrane to load and release neurotransmitters. Here we discuss how we utilize this property to load nanoparticles as a means of probing the interior of synaptic vesicles. To probe the intravesicular region of synaptic vesicles, we have developed a highly sensitive pH-sensing polymer dot. We feel the robust nature of the pH-sensing polymer dot will provide insight into the dynamics of proton loading into synaptic vesicles.

  2. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  3. An ion thruster internal discharge chamber electrostatic probe diagnostic technique using a high-speed probe positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2008-01-15

    Extensive resources have been allocated to diagnose and minimize lifetime-limiting factors in gridded ion thrusters. While most of this effort has focused on grid erosion, results from wear tests indicate that discharge cathode erosion may also play an important role in limiting the lifetime of ring-cusp ion thrusters proposed for future large flagship missions. The detailed characterization of the near-cathode discharge plasma is essential for mitigating discharge cathode erosion. However, severe difficulty is encountered when attempting to measure internal discharge plasma parameters during thruster operation with conventional probing techniques. These difficulties stem from the high-voltage, high-density discharge cathode plume, which is a hostile environment for probes. A method for interrogating the discharge chamber plasma of a working ion thruster over a two-dimensional grid is demonstrated. The high-speed axial reciprocating probe positioning system is used to minimize thruster perturbation during probe insertion and to reduce heating of the probe. Electrostatic probe measurements from a symmetric double Langmuir probe are presented over a two-dimensional spatial array in the near-discharge cathode assembly region of a 30-cm-diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Electron temperatures, 2-5 eV, and number density contours, with a maximum of 8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} on centerline, are measured. These data provide detailed electron temperature and number density contours which, when combined with plasma potential measurements, may shed light on discharge cathode erosion processes and the effect of thruster operating conditions on erosion rates.

  4. Nanocrystalline Zeolites: Synthesis, Mechanism, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severance, Michael Andrew

    zeolite host-guest chemistry is explored. A nanozeolite-silver nanoparticle host-guest system is synthesized and a mechanism describing its evolution is developed. Also, the photochemistry of a colloidal nanozeolite-organic dye host-guest system is explored with ultrafast transient UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. This allows some of the fastest chemical events to be probed within the host-guest system.

  5. A probe into reasons for international migration in Fujian Province.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses the extent of international migration from China's Fujian Province and considers the reasons behind the migration. The most recent estimates place China's overseas population at 22.1 million, 19 million (88%) of which are concentrated in Southeast Asia. According to the author's calculations, at least 7 million of the Chinese overseas population are of Fujian descent. Indonesia alone holds some 3.3 million Fujianese. Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines account for most of the remaining Fujianese overseas population. Having established the extent of international migration from the Fujian Province, the author attempts to establish the reasons behind it. The author first considers the historical origins of Fujianese international migration, from its early states (end century B.C.-17th century) to modern times *18-early 20th century) to the current period (1949-present). The author then examines the reasons behind the migration, primarily the social environment and individual behavior. Finally, the author provides categories of international migration, stressing that these categories often overlap or coincide. Most of the early migration was "spontaneous" -- essentially, an unplanned occurrence. During the modern period, most migration was "forced" by the contract labor system instituted by colonialists. Political and social upheaval also prompted "provoked" international migration. And following the Chinese Revolution, "free" migration allowed many to return home or to join relative abroad.

  6. A probe into reasons for international migration in Fujian Province.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses the extent of international migration from China's Fujian Province and considers the reasons behind the migration. The most recent estimates place China's overseas population at 22.1 million, 19 million (88%) of which are concentrated in Southeast Asia. According to the author's calculations, at least 7 million of the Chinese overseas population are of Fujian descent. Indonesia alone holds some 3.3 million Fujianese. Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines account for most of the remaining Fujianese overseas population. Having established the extent of international migration from the Fujian Province, the author attempts to establish the reasons behind it. The author first considers the historical origins of Fujianese international migration, from its early states (end century B.C.-17th century) to modern times *18-early 20th century) to the current period (1949-present). The author then examines the reasons behind the migration, primarily the social environment and individual behavior. Finally, the author provides categories of international migration, stressing that these categories often overlap or coincide. Most of the early migration was "spontaneous" -- essentially, an unplanned occurrence. During the modern period, most migration was "forced" by the contract labor system instituted by colonialists. Political and social upheaval also prompted "provoked" international migration. And following the Chinese Revolution, "free" migration allowed many to return home or to join relative abroad. PMID:12284987

  7. Etchable plasmonic nanoparticle probes to image and quantify cellular internalization

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gary B.; Friman, Tomas; Pang, Hong-Bo; Pallaoro, Alessia; de Mendoza, Tatiana Hurtado; Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mann, Aman P.; She, Zhi-Gang; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Reich, Norbert O.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using nanoparticles as labels or to deliver drugs and other bioactive compounds to cells in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent imaging, commonly used to study internalization and subcellular localization of nanoparticles, does not allow unequivocal distinction between cell surface-bound and internalized particles, since there is no methodology to turn particles ‘off.’ We have developed a simple technique to rapidly remove silver nanoparticles outside living cells leaving only the internalized pool for imaging or quantification. The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) etching is based on the sensitivity of Ag to a hexacyanoferrate/thiosulfate redox-based destain solution. In demonstration of the technique we present a new class of multicolored plasmonic nanoprobes comprising dye-labeled AgNPs that are exceptionally bright and photostable, carry peptides as model targeting ligands, can be etched rapidly and with minimal toxicity in mice and that show tumour uptake in vivo. PMID:24907927

  8. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  9. Achievement of Broad Acceleration Profile for Launching Active Transient Internal Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyundae; Jarboe, Thomas; Mattick, Arthur; Smith, Roger

    2003-10-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is a diagnostic for the direct measurement of internal local magnetic or electric fields with high spatial and temporal resolution (1 cm, 1 MHz). A two-stage light-gas gun launches an optic probe at high velocity (1.5 km/s ˜ 1.8 km/s) so that the probe can transit the plasma before severe ablation occurs. The polarization change of a light, retroreflected after double-pass through the probe, provides one component of the field measurements along a chord of a plasma. A Faraday rotator glass or a Pockels cell has been used for the present passive optic probes. Active probes, currently in development, utilizing on-board sensor and electronics will allow measurements of multi-parameters including 3-D magnetic- and electric fields, plasma temperature, and density. The frequency-modulated sensor information will be transmitted to the remote detector using a LED or a laser diode. At issue is whether the on-board microelectronic components will survive the high acceleration during launch. A recent study emonstrated the survivability of a standard size electronic circuitry on ˜ 25 mm diameter circuit board, launched in a rail-gun at ˜ 1 × 10^6 m/s^2 (0.1 Mg¡¯s). [1] Considering the size of the TIP probes, ( ˜ 5 mm in diameter) it is believed the TIP active probes with surface-mount electronic components will survive much higher accelerations, up to 2 × 10^6 m/s^2 or more. Experimental and numerical studies of the TIP light gas gun have been performed to achieve a launch condition that lowers the peak acceleration and broadens the acceleration profile of the probe. [1] K. A. Schroder et al, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 35(1), Jan. 1999

  10. Temperature-dependent internal photoemission probe for band parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yan-Feng; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2012-11-01

    The temperature-dependent characteristic of band offsets at the heterojunction interface was studied by an internal photoemission (IPE) method. In contrast to the traditional Fowler method independent of the temperature (T), this method takes into account carrier thermalization and carrier/dopant-induced band-renormalization and band-tailing effects, and thus measures the band-offset parameter at different temperatures. Despite intensive studies in the past few decades, the T dependence of this key band parameter is still not well understood. Re-examining a p-type doped GaAs emitter/undoped AlxGa1-xAs barrier heterojunction system disclosed its previously ignored T dependency in the valence-band offset, with a variation up to ˜-10-4 eV/K in order to accommodate the difference in the T-dependent band gaps between GaAs and AlGaAs. Through determining the Fermi energy level (Ef), IPE is able to distinguish the impurity (IB) and valence bands (VB) of extrinsic semiconductors. One important example is to determine Ef of dilute magnetic semiconductors such as GaMnAs, and to understand whether it is in the IB or VB.

  11. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torusa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y. S.

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  12. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y S

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  13. Synthesis of NaY zeolite on preformed kaolinite spheres. Evolution of zeolite content and textural properties with the reaction time

    SciTech Connect

    Basaldella, E.I.; Bonetto, R.; Tara, J.C. )

    1993-04-01

    The synthesis of NaY zeolite was carried out on fired kaolinite microspheres. Changes in porosity, chemical composition, and crystallinity of the solid show zeolite growth on both internal and external microsphere surfaces. It was also observed that, as a consequence of the alkaline treatment, the SiO[sub 2]/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] ratio in the solid diminishes prior to the appearance of the zeolite, but increases when the zeolite begins to crystallize.

  14. ZEOLITES: EFFECTIVE WATER PURIFIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are known for their adsorption, ion exchange and catalytic properties. Various natural zeolites are used as odor and moisture adsorbents and water softeners. Due to their acidic nature, synthetic zeolites are commonly employed as solid acid catalysts in petrochemical ind...

  15. Spectroscopic evidence of 3-hydroxyflavone sorption within MFI type zeolites: ESIPT and metal complexation.

    PubMed

    Moissette, A; Hureau, M; Kokaislova, A; Le Person, A; Cornard, J P; De Waele, I; Batonneau-Gener, I

    2015-10-21

    Due to its chemical and photochemical properties and potential applications in numerous domains as a molecular probe, 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) is a molecule of high interest. In particular, the processes of intramolecular proton transfer in the excited state and metallic complexation are known to be dependent on the chemical environment. In this context, the particular properties of zeolites make these microporous materials an environment adapted to study the reactivity of isolated molecules adsorbed in their porous void space. Thus, this report investigates the incorporation without any solvent of 3HF into the internal volume of various channel-type MFI zeolites. Using complementary techniques (diffuse reflectance UV-vis absorption, Raman scattering, FTIR, fluorescence emission and molecular modelling), very different spectral behaviours are observed in totally dealuminated silicalite-1 and in Al rich MZSM-5 (M = H(+), Na(+), Zn(2+)). In silicalite-1, the non-polar and non-protic internal micro-environment does not induce any valuable interaction between 3HF and the channel walls. Therefore, the molecule shows easy tautomer formation upon excitation. Within HZSM-5, 3HF is adsorbed in close proximity of the acid proton of the zeolite which inhibits the intramolecular proton transfer and then, only the normal form is observed at the excited state. For NaZSM-5, the spectral data show an intermediary behaviour due to the aprotic but polar environment, in agreement with 3HF sorption in close proximity of the Na(+) extra framework cation. After mixing 3HF and ZnZSM-5, the spectral features clearly indicate metallic complexation of the guest molecule. The zeolite dependent reactivity reported here demonstrates the adsorption of the guest within the internal volume because the charge balancing cations which clearly control the reaction are principally located in the zeolite channels. The 3HF incorporation into the internal volume is proved by the decrease of the microporous

  16. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  17. Zeolite Crystal Growth in Microgravity and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP), a NASA-sponsored Research Partnership Center, is working to improve zeolite materials for storing hydrogen fuel. CAMMP is also applying zeolites to detergents, optical cables, gas and vapor detection for environmental monitoring and control, and chemical production techniques that significantly reduce by-products that are hazardous to the environment. Shown here are zeolite crystals (top) grown in a ground control experiment and grown in microgravity on the USML-2 mission (bottom). Zeolite experiments have also been conducted aboard the International Space Station.

  18. Proton-loaded zeolites. 1. HX (X = Cl, Br, I) in sodium zeolite Y archetype: Packaged acids on the rod to intrazeolite semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ozin, G.A.; Oezkar, S. ); Stucky, G.D. )

    1990-09-20

    This series of three papers is concerned with an in-depth investigation of proton-loaded zeolites (packaged acids), a novel class of controlled microporosity, solid-state Broensted acids. Proton-loaded zeolites are formed from the reaction between anhydrous Broensted acids and dehydrated zeolites. Initial experiments focus attention on the chemistry, spectroscopy, diffraction, and dynamics of the sorption and desorption of anhydrous hydrogen halides (HX) in zeolite Y with some important control experiments in all-silica zeolite Y (SiO{sub 2}-Y) and ALPO-5. Zeolite cation, HX anion, H/D isotope, and probe-base effects are explored to elucidate details of location, population, distribution (homogeneity), thermal/kinetic stability, acidity, and reactivity of protonation, anionation, and solvation sites in the zeolite Y lattice.

  19. Zeolite membranes from kaolin

    SciTech Connect

    Karle, B.G.; Brinker, C.J. |; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1996-07-01

    Zeolite films are sought as components of molecular sieve membranes. Different routes used to prepare zeolite composite membranes include growing zeolite layers from gels on porous supports, depositing oriented zeolites on supports, and dispersing zeolites in polymeric membranes. In most cases, it is very difficult to control and avoid the formation of cracks and/or pinholes. The approach to membrane synthesis is based on hydrothermally converting films of layered aluminosilicates into zeolite films. The authors have demonstrated this concept by preparing zeolite A membranes on alumina supports from kaolin films. The authors have optimized the process parameters not only for desired bulk properties, but also for preparing thin (ca. 5 {micro}m), continuous zeolite A films. Scanning electron microscopy shows highly intergrown zeolite A crystals over most of the surface area of the membrane, but gas permeation experiments indicate existence of mesoporous defects and/or intercrystalline gaps. It has been demonstrated that the thickness of the final zeolite A membrane can be controlled by limiting the amount of precursor kaolin present in the membrane.

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure study of copper sites hosted at the internal surface of ZSM-5 zeolite: A comparison with quantitative and energetic data on the CO and NH3 adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, V.; Maggiorini, S.; Meda, L.; D'Acapito, F.; Palomino, G. Turnes; Bordiga, S.; Lamberti, C.

    2000-11-01

    The oxidation state of Cu species dispersed in a Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite obtained by a nonconventional gas-phase CuCl exchange, and nominally containing only Cu(I) species, was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. The oxidation of Cu(I) species to Cu(II) by simple exposure to the atmosphere and subsequent reduction by thermal activation in vacuo was monitored. The quantitative and energetic aspects of the formation of carbonyl-like and amino-complexes at the metallic sites was studied by means of adsorption microcalorimetry. CO and NH3 were used as probe molecules in order to assess the coordinative unsaturation of the Cu(I) cations. Adsorption heats comprised in the 130-40 kJ mol-1 interval were obtained for the formation of both type of complexes. The perturbation induced on the Cu centers and/or on the zeolite matrix by the adsorption of the probe molecules was monitored by parallel experiments of XPS, IR, and XANES. A significant fraction of CO and NH3 molecules are irreversibly held on Cu(I) sites even after outgassing at room temperature (RT) at a final dynamic vacuum of 10-5 Torr. On the contrary, no evidence of Cu(I)/CO or of Cu(I)/NH3 complexes was observed by XPS, indicating that such adducts are totally destroyed upon outgassing at 10-9 Torr. This fact implies a reconsideration of what was previously considered as a "stable adduct." XPS allowed to reveal the existence of ammonia adsorbed on defective Al(III) species, and to explain the chemical nature of species formed at the earliest stages of NH3 dosage and characterized by a heat of adsorption as high as 180 kJ mol-1. By comparing the quantitative XPS and volumetric-calorimetric data it was inferred that a significant gradient of defects amount is present in the system. Finally, from the whole set of XPS measurements here reported and from parallel blank experiments on the ZSM-5 zeolite before Cu-exchange, a calibration scale for the N(1

  1. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  2. A new biplane ultrasound probe for real-time visualization and cannulation of the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, Jeremy; Bigeleisen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance is recommended for cannulation of the internal jugular vein. Use of ultrasound allows you to identify relevant anatomy and possible anatomical anomalies. The most common approach is performed while visualizing the vein transversely and inserting the needle out of plane to the probe. With this approach needle tip visualization may be difficult. We report the use of a new biplane ultrasound probe which allows the user to simultaneously view the internal jugular vein in transverse and longitudinal views in real time. Use of this probe enhances needle visualization during venous cannulation.

  3. Nitration of internal tyrosine of cytochrome c probed by resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, L; Smith, W E

    1999-01-01

    Tyrosines can be selectively nitrated in a protein and the resultant chromophore can be used as an in situ probe of the tyrosine environment. Resonance Raman scattering could have specific advantages as a detection method because of the inherent selectivity of the technique and because shifts in the intensity and frequency of the nitro stretch can be detected and related to the form and environment of the nitrotyrosine. To evaluate this possibility the internal residue Tyr67 of cytochrome c was nitrated and resonance Raman scattering was recorded. With 413.1-nm excitation the resonance scattering from the heme protein dominates, but with 457.9-nm excitation intense bands due to nitrostretching vibrations are readily observed. The frequency of the internal Tyr67 indicates an aqueous environment that suggests that on nitration this residue becomes exposed on the protein surface or that water enters the active pocket. pH dependent measurements can be used to follow the protonation of the residue. A pK(a) of approximately 7 also indicates an aqueous environment. This initial study indicates that resonance Raman scattering does have unique advantages as an in situ probe of the local structure of nitrated tyrosine residues.

  4. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  5. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct

  6. Study of Molecular-Shape Selectivity of Zeolites by Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Yao-Yuan; Ho, Grace Hsiuying; Chuang, Shiow-Huey; Tsai, Tseng-Chang; Lee, Chi-Young; Tsai, Shang-Tien; Huang, Jun-Fu

    2008-01-01

    A sorption experiment using a gas chromatograph is described that can help students understand the "molecular-shape selectivity" behavior of zeolites in the subnano regime. Hexane isomers are used as probe molecules to demonstrate the sorption phenomena. In the experiment, a zeolite adsorbs certain hexane isomers with molecular sizes smaller than…

  7. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  8. Composite zeolite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

  9. Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Ultrasonic probes and stereo-correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dossmann, Yvan; Paci, Alexandre; Auclair, Francis; Lepilliez, Mathieu; Cid, Emmanuel

    2014-05-15

    Internal solitary waves (ISWs) are large amplitude stable waves propagating in regions of high density gradients such as the ocean pycnocline. Their dynamics has often been investigated in two-dimensional approaches, however, their three-dimensional evolution is still poorly known. Experiments have been conducted in the large stratified water tank of CNRM-GAME to study the generation of ISWs in two academic configurations inspired by oceanic regimes. First, ultrasonic probes are used to measure the interfacial displacement in the two configurations. In the primary generation case for which the two layers are of constant density, the generation of ISWs is investigated in two series of experiments with varying amplitude and forcing frequency. In the secondary generation case for which the lower layer is stratified, the generation of ISWs from the impact of an internal wave beam on the pycnocline and their subsequent dynamics is studied. The dynamics of ISWs in these two regimes accords well with analytical approaches and numerical simulations performed in analogous configurations. Then, recent developments of a stereo correlation technique are used to describe the three-dimensional structure of propagating ISWs. In the primary generation configuration, small transverse effects are observed in the course of the ISW propagation. In the secondary generation configuration, larger transverse structures are observed in the interfacial waves dynamics. The interaction between interfacial troughs and internal waves propagating in the lower stratified layer are a possible cause for the generation of these structures. The magnitude of these transverse structures is quantified with a nondimensional parameter in the two configurations. They are twice as large in the secondary generation case as in the primary generation case.

  10. Fabrication and operation of GRIN probes for in vivo fluorescence cellular imaging of internal organs in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ki; Lee, Woei Ming; Kim, Pilhan; Choi, Myunghwan; Jung, Keehoon; Kim, Seonghoon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in vivo. However, the size of the objective lenses has limited physical accessibility to various tissue sites in the internal organs of small animals. The use of small-diameter probes using graded-index (GRIN) lenses expands the capabilities of conventional intravital microscopes into minimally invasive internal organs imaging. In this protocol, we describe the detailed steps for the fabrication of front- and side-view GRIN probes and the integration and operation of the probes in a confocal microscope for visualizing fluorescent cells and microvasculature in various murine organs. We further present longitudinal imaging of immune cells in renal allografts and the tumor development in the colon. The fabrication and integration can be completed in 5–7 hours, and a typical in vivo imaging session takes 1–2 hours. PMID:22767088

  11. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  12. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little attention has thus far been paid to probes containing these dyes internally attached, a fact which is mainly due to the quite challenging synthesis of such oligonucleotide probes. Herein, by using 2'-O-propargyl uridine phosphoramidite and a series of xanthenes and cyanine azide derivatives, we have for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation of novel oligonucleotide probes containing internally positioned xanthene and cyanine dye pairs and thus represents a significant step forward for the preparation of advanced fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the novel xanthene and cyanine labeled probes display unusual and very promising photophysical properties resulting from energy-transfer interactions between the fluorophores controlled by nucleic acid assembly. Potential benefits of using these novel fluorescent probes within, for example, molecular diagnostics and fluorescence microscopy include: Considerable Stokes shifts (40-110 nm), quenched fluorescence of single-stranded probes accompanied by up to 7.7-fold light-up effect of emission upon target DNA/RNA binding, remarkable sensitivity to single-nucleotide mismatches, generally high fluorescence brightness values (FB up to 26), and hence low limit of target detection values (LOD down to <5 nM).

  13. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  14. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  15. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  16. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  17. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  18. Coordination of Cd 2+ ions in the internal pore system of zeolite-X: A combined EXAFS and isotopic exchange study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I. A. M.; Young, S. D.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Crout, N. M. J.; Bailey, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of prolonged contact time (up to 130 days) on the immobilization of Cd by sorption to calcium exchanged zeolite-X (CaX), under environmentally relevant conditions, was studied using both isotopic exchange and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Sorption and isotopic exchange measurements revealed time-dependent Cd sorption and indicated the movement of Cd 2+ ions into less accessible sites due to ageing. EXAFS suggested progressive fixation of Cd in the double six-ring ( D6R) unit of the CaX structure. Proportional allocation of the apparent Cd-Si bond distance to two 'end-members', across all contact times, indicated that the bond distance for labile Cd was 3.41 Å and for non-labile (or fixed) Cd was 3.47 Å.

  19. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  20. Zeolite crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert W.; Dixon, Anthony G.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of large, uniform zeolite crystals in high yield in space can have a major impact on the chemical process industry. Large zeolite crystals will be used to improve basic understanding of adsorption and catalytic mechanisms, and to make zeolite membranes. To grow large zeolites in microgravity, it is necessary to control the nucleation event and fluid motion, and to enhance nutrient transfer. Data is presented that suggests nucleation can be controlled using chemical compounds (e.g., Triethanolamine, for zeolite A), while not adversely effecting growth rate. A three-zone furnace has been designed to perform multiple syntheses concurrently. The operating range of the furnace is 295 K to 473 K. Teflon-lined autoclaves (10 ml liquid volume) have been designed to minimize contamination, reduce wall nucleation, and control mixing of pre-gel solutions on orbit. Zeolite synthesis experiments will be performed on USML-1 in 1992.

  1. Zeolite exposure and associated pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K.R.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Rom, W.N.; Moatamed, F.

    1985-06-01

    Naturally occurring zeolite minerals are aluminum silicates widespread in the earth's crust. Several of these minerals have fibrous forms and have been implicated as a possible cause of benign and malignant diseases of the lung and pleura in Turkey. This report describes a patient, living in an area of Nevada rich in zeolites, who presented with idiopathic pleural thickening and pulmonary fibrosis associated with extensive pulmonary deposition of zeolites.

  2. Effect of hydrophilic defects on water transport in MFI zeolites.

    PubMed

    Humplik, Thomas; Raj, Rishi; Maroo, Shalabh C; Laoui, Tahar; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-06-10

    The subnanometer pore structure of zeolites and other microporous materials has been proposed to act as a molecular sieve for various water separation technologies. However, due to the increased interaction between the solid and water in these nanoconfined spaces, it is unclear which type of interface, be it hydrophilic or hydrophobic, offers an advantageous medium for enhancing transport properties. In this work, we probe the role of hydrophilic defects on the transport of water inside the microporous hydrophobic MFI zeolite pore structure via combined sorption and high-pressure infiltration experiments. While the inclusion of defects was observed to increase the amount of water within the zeolite pore network by up to 7 times at the saturation pressure, the diffusivity of this infiltrated water was lowered by up to 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to that of water within the nearly defect-free hydrophobic MFI zeolite. Subsequently, the permeability of water within the more defective MFI zeolite was an order of magnitude lower than that of the nearly defect-free zeolite. The results from these experiments suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic pore structure of MFI zeolites can facilitate faster water transport due to the decreased attraction between the water and the defect-free surface. While the strong attraction of water to the defects allows for water to infiltrate the porous network at lower pressures, the results suggest that this strong attraction decreases the mobility of the infiltrated water. The insights gained from this study can be utilized to improve the design of future membranes for water desalination and other separation techniques.

  3. Cellular internalization of a membrane binding two-photon probe by a complex of anionic diblock copolymer and cationic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil Kumar; Woo, Han Young; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    We report a two-photon (TP) absorbing molecular probe 1,4-bis(4'-(N,N-bis(6''-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl)amino)-styryl)benzene tetrabromide (C1) and its interaction with cells upon encapsulation with polymeric vesicles. Two-photon microscopy (TPM) revealed that the free C1 specifically could bind to the plasma membrane and shows bright TP emission. However, C1 encapsulated with polymeric vesicles internalized into the cytosol. In addition, fluorescence quantum efficiency and TP cross section of encapsulated C1 enhanced by 2-fold. These results not only show useful guidelines for the development of efficient TP probes, but also underscore the possibility of using this type of nanostructure for intracellular delivery of the bioactive therapeutics.

  4. New diagnostic method for monitoring plasma reactor walls: Multiple total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared surface probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Anna R.; Ullal, Saurabh J.; Braly, Linda B.; Edelberg, Erik A.; Vahedi, Vahid; Aydil, Eray S.

    2001-08-01

    Films and adsorbates that deposit on reactor walls during plasma etching and deposition affect the discharge properties such as the charged particle and reactive radical concentrations. A systematic study of this plasma-wall interaction is made difficult by a lack of diagnostic methods that enable one to monitor the chemical nature of the reactor wall surface. A new diagnostic technique based on multiple total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared (MTIR-FTIR) spectroscopy was developed to monitor films and adsorbates on plasma etching and deposition reactor walls with monolayer sensitivity. Applications of this MTIR-FTIR probe are demonstrated. Specifically, we use this probe to (i) detect etch products and films that deposit on the reactor walls during Cl2 plasma etching of Si, (ii) determine the efficacy of a SF6 plasma to clean films deposited on reactor walls during Cl2/O2 etching of Si, and (iii) monitor wafer-to-wafer etching reproducibility.

  5. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  6. Microcalorimetric characterization of the basicity in alkali-exchanged x zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Kaliaguine, S.; Muscas, M.

    1995-11-01

    In this work the chemisorbed pyrrole on alkali-exchanged X zeolites was characterized using differential calorimetry. In fact, heat flow microcalorimetry is one of the best methods known for measuring accurately the differential heats of adsorption and so yielding a thermodynamic scale for the energy distribution of surface sites. A series of alkali-exchanged X zeolites and also a Cs exchanged Y sample were then examined by microcalorimetry using pyrrole as a probe. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Role of endocytosis in the internalization of spermidine-C(2)-BODIPY, a highly fluorescent probe of polyamine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Soulet, Denis; Covassin, Laurence; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Charest-Gaudreault, René; Audette, Marie; Poulin, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of transmembrane polyamine internalization in mammalian cells remains unknown. A novel fluorescent spermidine conjugate [Spd-C(2)-BODIPY; N-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-propionyl)-N'-(S -[spermidine-(N(4)-ethyl)]thioacetyl)ethylenediamine] was synthesized from N(4)-(mercaptoethyl)spermidine by a simple, one-step coupling procedure. In Chinese-hamster ovary (CHO) cells, Spd-C(2)-BODIPY accumulation was inhibited by exogenous putrescine, spermidine and spermine, was subject to feedback transport inhibition and was up-regulated by prior polyamine depletion achieved with a biosynthetic inhibitor. Probe internalization was decreased by about 85% in a polyamine-transport-deficient CHO mutant cell line. Using confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy, internalized Spd-C(2)-BODIPY was concentrated in vesicle-like structures similar to the recycling endosomes observed with fluorescent transferrin, which partly co-localized with the polyamine probe. In yeast, Spd-C(2)-BODIPY uptake was stringently dependent on receptor-mediated endocytosis, as determined with a mutant defective in early- endosome formation. On the other hand, Spd-C(2)-BODIPY did not mimic the substrate behaviour of natural polyamines in yeast, as shown by the lack of correlation of its uptake characteristics with the phenotypes of mutants defective in either polyamine transport or biosynthesis. These data suggest that endocytosis might be an integral part of the mechanism of polyamine transport in mammalian cells, and that the mammalian and yeast transport systems use qualitatively different transport mechanisms. However, the current data do not rule out the possibility that sequestration of the probe into vesicular structures might be secondary to its prior uptake via a "classical" plasma membrane carrier. Spd-C(2)-BODIPY, a highly sensitive probe of polyamine transport with biochemical parameters qualitatively similar to those of natural polyamines in

  8. Electric Field Penetration in Au/Nb:SrTiO3 Schottky Junctions Probed by Bias-Dependent Internal Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hikita, Y.

    2011-08-15

    Electric field penetration into the metallic side of a Schottky junction is in principle a universal phenomenon, the magnitude of which increases with the semiconductor permittivity. Here, we quantitatively probe this effect using bias-dependent internal photoemission spectroscopy at the Schottky junction between a large dielectric permittivity semiconductor SrTiO{sub 3} and gold. A clear linear reduction of the barrier height with increasing interface electric field was observed, highlighting the importance of field penetration into the gold. The interfacial permittivity of SrTiO{sub 3} at the interface is reduced from the bulk value, reflecting intrinsic suppression at the interface.

  9. Blue Straggler Stars in Globular Clusters: A Powerful Tool to Probe the Internal Dynamical Evolution of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Mucciarelli, Alessio; Lovisi, Loredana

    This chapter presents an overview of the main observational results obtained to date about Blue Straggler Stars (BSSs) in Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs). The BSS specific frequency, radial distribution, chemical composition and rotational properties are presented and discussed in the framework of using this stellar population as probe of GC internal dynamics. In particular, the shape of the BSS radial distribution has been found to be a powerful tracer of the dynamical age of stellar systems, thus allowing the definition of the first empirical "dynamical clock".

  10. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios for natural samples of the zeolites analcime, chabazite, clinoptilolite, laumontite, mordenite, and natrolite have been obtained. The zeolite samples were classified into sedimentary, hydrothermal, and igneous groups. The ratios for each species of zeolite are reported. The results are used to discuss the origin of channel water, the role of zeolites in water-rock interaction, and the possibility that a calibrated zeolite could be used as a low-temperature geothermometer.

  11. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  12. Synthetic Zeolites and Other Microporous Oxide Molecular Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, John D.

    1999-03-01

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol.

  13. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J D

    1999-03-30

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol.

  14. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields.

  15. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields. PMID:26882441

  16. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  17. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  18. UV-vis spectroscopy of iodine adsorbed on alkali-metal-modified zeolite catalysts for addition of carbon dioxide to ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Doskocil, E.J.; Bordawekar, S.V.; Kaye, B.G.; Davis, R.J.

    1999-07-29

    The basicity of alkali-metal-exchange (Na, K, Cs) zeolites X and Y was probed by UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of adsorbed iodine. The observed blue shift in the visible absorption spectrum of adsorbed iodine, compared to gaseous iodine, correlated well with the negative charge on the framework oxygen atoms calculated from the Sanderson electronegativity equalization principle. The blue shifts associated with iodine adsorbed on classical catalytic supports like silica, alumina, and magnesia suggest that the iodine adsorption technique for probing basicity is applicable to a wide variety of solids. Iodine was also adsorbed on X and Y zeolites containing occluded cesium oxide formed by decomposition of impregnated cesium acetate. However, the iodine appeared to irreversibly react on these strongly basic samples, possibly forming an adsorbed triiodide ions. As a complement to the adsorption studies, the activity of alkali-metal-containing zeolites for the base-catalyzed formation of ethylene carbonate from ethylene oxide and carbon dioxide was investigated. Among the ion-exchanged zeolites, the cesium form of zeolite X exhibited the highest activity for ethylene carbonate formation. The catalytic activity of a zeolite containing occluded cesium was even higher than that of a cesium-exchanged zeolite. The presence of water adsorbed in zeolite pores promoted the rate of ethylene carbonate formation for both cesium-exchanged and cesium-impregnated zeolite X.

  19. Overview of Solar Seismology: Oscillations as Probes of Internal Structure and Dynamics in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.

    1984-01-01

    The physical nature of solar oscillations is reviewed. The nomenclature of the subject and the techniques used to interpret the oscillations are discussed. Many of the acoustic and gravity waves that can be observed in the atmosphere of the Sun are actually resonant or standing modes of the interior; precise measurements of the frequencies of such modes allow deductions of the internal structure and dynamics of this star. The scientific objectives of such studies of solar seismic disturbances, or of solar seismology, are outlined. The reasons why it would be very beneficial to carry out further observations of solar oscillations both from ground based networks and from space will be discussed.

  20. Global analysis of fluorescence decays to probe the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Jean

    2014-03-11

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader first to the mathematical complexity associated with the analysis of fluorescence decays acquired with solutions of macromolecules labeled with a fluorophore and its quencher that are capable of interacting with each other via photophysical processes within the macromolecular volume, second to the experimental and mathematical approaches that have been proposed over the years to handle this mathematical complexity, and third to the information that one can expect to retrieve with respect to the internal dynamics of such fluorescently labeled macromolecules. In my view, the ideal fluorophore-quencher pair to use in studying the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules would involve a long-lived fluorophore, a fluorophore and a quencher that do not undergo energy migration, and a photophysical process that results in a change in fluorophore emission upon contact between the excited fluorophore and quencher. Pyrene, with its ability to form an excimer on contact between excited-state and ground-state species, happens to possess all of these properties. Although the concepts described in this review apply to any fluorophore and quencher pair sharing pyrene's exceptional photophysical properties, this review focuses on the study of pyrene-labeled macromolecules that have been characterized in great detail over the past 40 years and presents the main models that are being used today to analyze the fluorescence decays of pyrene-labeled macromolecules reliably. These models are based on Birks' scheme, the DMD model, the fluorescence blob model, and the model free analysis. The review also provides a step-by-step protocol that should enable the noneducated user to achieve a successful decay analysis exempt of artifacts. Finally, some examples of studies of pyrene-labeled macromolecules are also presented to illustrate the different types of information that can be retrieved from these fluorescence decay

  1. Probing insulin bioactivity in oral nanoparticles produced by ultrasonication-assisted emulsification/internal gelation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene A; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Oliveira, Claudia; Fonte, Pedro; Souza, Alessandra M T; Lira, Tammy; Sequeira, Joana A D; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Cabral, Lúcio M; Sarmento, Bruno; Seiça, Raquel; Veiga, Francisco; Ribeiro, António J

    2015-01-01

    Alginate-dextran sulfate-based particles obtained by emulsification/internal gelation technology can be considered suitable carriers for oral insulin delivery. A rational study focused on the emulsification and particle recovery steps was developed in order to reduce particles to the nanosize range while keeping insulin bioactivity. There was a decrease in size when ultrasonication was used during emulsification, which was more pronounced when a cosurfactant was added. Ultrasonication add-on after particle recovery decreased aggregation and led to a narrower nanoscale particle-size distribution. Insulin encapsulation efficiency was 99.3%±0.5%, attributed to the strong pH-stabilizing electrostatic effect between insulin and nanoparticle matrix polymers. Interactions between these polymers and insulin were predicted using molecular modeling studies through quantum mechanics calculations that allowed for prediction of the interaction model. In vitro release studies indicated well-preserved integrity of nanoparticles in simulated gastric fluid. Circular dichroism spectroscopy proved conformational stability of insulin and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique showed rearrangements of insulin structure during processing. Moreover, in vivo biological activity in diabetic rats revealed no statistical difference when compared to nonencapsulated insulin, demonstrating retention of insulin activity. Our results demonstrate that alginate-dextran sulfate-based nanoparticles efficiently stabilize the loaded protein structure, presenting good physical properties for oral delivery of insulin. PMID:26425087

  2. Probing insulin bioactivity in oral nanoparticles produced by ultrasonication-assisted emulsification/internal gelation

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marlene A; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Oliveira, Claudia; Fonte, Pedro; Souza, Alessandra M T; Lira, Tammy; Sequeira, Joana A D; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Cabral, Lúcio M; Sarmento, Bruno; Seiça, Raquel; Veiga, Francisco; Ribeiro, António J

    2015-01-01

    Alginate–dextran sulfate-based particles obtained by emulsification/internal gelation technology can be considered suitable carriers for oral insulin delivery. A rational study focused on the emulsification and particle recovery steps was developed in order to reduce particles to the nanosize range while keeping insulin bioactivity. There was a decrease in size when ultrasonication was used during emulsification, which was more pronounced when a cosurfactant was added. Ultrasonication add-on after particle recovery decreased aggregation and led to a narrower nanoscale particle-size distribution. Insulin encapsulation efficiency was 99.3%±0.5%, attributed to the strong pH-stabilizing electrostatic effect between insulin and nanoparticle matrix polymers. Interactions between these polymers and insulin were predicted using molecular modeling studies through quantum mechanics calculations that allowed for prediction of the interaction model. In vitro release studies indicated well-preserved integrity of nanoparticles in simulated gastric fluid. Circular dichroism spectroscopy proved conformational stability of insulin and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique showed rearrangements of insulin structure during processing. Moreover, in vivo biological activity in diabetic rats revealed no statistical difference when compared to nonencapsulated insulin, demonstrating retention of insulin activity. Our results demonstrate that alginate–dextran sulfate-based nanoparticles efficiently stabilize the loaded protein structure, presenting good physical properties for oral delivery of insulin. PMID:26425087

  3. Allosteric regulation of tryptophan synthase channeling: the internal aldimine probed by trans-3-indole-3'-acrylate binding.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Niks, Dimitri; Ngo, Huu; Pan, Peng; Brzovic, Peter; Blumenstein, Lars; Barends, Thomas Reinier; Schlichting, Ilme; Dunn, Michael F

    2007-07-01

    Substrate channeling in the tryptophan synthase bienzyme complex from Salmonella typhimurium is regulated by allosteric interactions triggered by binding of ligand to the alpha-site and covalent reaction at the beta-site. These interactions switch the enzyme between low-activity forms with open conformations and high-activity forms with closed conformations. Previously, allosteric interactions have been demonstrated between the alpha-site and the external aldimine, alpha-aminoacrylate, and quinonoid forms of the beta-site. Here we employ the chromophoric l-Trp analogue, trans-3-indole-3'-acrylate (IA), and noncleavable alpha-site ligands (ASLs) to probe the allosteric properties of the internal aldimine, E(Ain). The ASLs studied are alpha-d,l-glycerol phosphate (GP) and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P), and examples of two new classes of high-affinity alpha-site ligands, N-(4'-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F6) and N-(4'-trifluoromethoxybenzenesulfonyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F9), that were previously shown to bind to the alpha-site by optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structures [Ngo, H., Harris, R., Kimmich, N., Casino, P., Niks, D., Blumenstein, L., Barends, T. R., Kulik, V., Weyand, M., Schlichting, I., and Dunn, M. F. (2007) Synthesis and characterization of allosteric probes of substrate channeling in the tryptophan synthase bienzyme complex, Biochemistry 46, 7713-7727]. The binding of IA to the beta-site is stimulated by the binding of GP, G3P, F6, or F9 to the alpha-site. The binding of ASLs was found to increase the affinity of the beta-site of E(Ain) for IA by 4-5-fold, demonstrating for the first time that the beta-subunit of the E(Ain) species undergoes a switching between low- and high-affinity states in response to the binding of ASLs.

  4. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  5. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na{sub 2}O added as NAOH instead of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to avoid severe foaming due to CO{sub 2} evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  6. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na[sub 2]O added as NAOH instead of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] to avoid severe foaming due to CO[sub 2] evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  7. Effect of ultrasound energy on the zeolitization of chemical extracts from fused coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Salman; Rohani, Sohrab; Kazemian, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of ultrasound (UTS) energy at different temperatures on the zeolitization of aluminosilicate constituents of coal fly ash. UTS energy irradiated directly into the reaction mixture utilizing a probe immersed into the reaction mixture, unlike previously reported works that have used UTS baths. Controlled synthesis was also conducted at constant stirring and at the same temperatures using conventional heating. The precursor reaction solution was obtained by first fusing the coal fly ash with sodium hydroxide at 550°C followed by dissolution in water and filtration. The synthesized samples were characterized by XRF, XRD, SEM and TGA. The crystallinity of crystals produced with UTS assisted conversion compared to conventional conversion at 85°C was twice as high. UTS energy also reduced the induction time from 60 min to 40 min and from 80 min to 60 min for reaction temperatures of 95°C and 85°C, respectively. Prolonging the UTS irradiation at 95°C resulted in the conversion of zeolite-A crystals to hydroxysodalite, which is a more stable zeolitic phase. It was found that at 85°C coupled with ultrasound energy produced the best crystalline structure with a pure single phase of zeolite-A. It has been shown that crystallization using UTS energy can produce zeolitic crystals at lower temperatures and within 1h, dramatically cutting the synthesis time of zeolite. PMID:26384882

  8. Single Molecule Nanospectroscopy Visualizes Proton-Transfer Processes within a Zeolite Crystal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing proton-transfer processes at the nanoscale is essential for understanding the reactivity of zeolite-based catalyst materials. In this work, the Brønsted-acid-catalyzed oligomerization of styrene derivatives was used for the first time as a single molecule probe reaction to study the reactivity of individual zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in different zeolite framework, reactant and solvent environments. This was accomplished via the formation of distinct dimeric and trimeric fluorescent carbocations, characterized by their different photostability, as detected by single molecule fluorescence microscopy. The oligomerization kinetics turned out to be very sensitive to the reaction conditions and the presence of the local structural defects in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals. The remarkably photostable trimeric carbocations were found to be formed predominantly near defect-rich crystalline regions. This spectroscopic marker offers clear prospects for nanoscale quality control of zeolite-based materials. Interestingly, replacing n-heptane with 1-butanol as a solvent led to a reactivity decrease of several orders and shorter survival times of fluorescent products due to the strong chemisorption of 1-butanol onto the Brønsted acid sites. A similar effect was achieved by changing the electrophilic character of the para-substituent of the styrene moiety. Based on the measured turnover rates we have established a quantitative, single turnover approach to evaluate substituent and solvent effects on the reactivity of individual zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals. PMID:27709925

  9. Effect of ultrasound energy on the zeolitization of chemical extracts from fused coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Salman; Rohani, Sohrab; Kazemian, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of ultrasound (UTS) energy at different temperatures on the zeolitization of aluminosilicate constituents of coal fly ash. UTS energy irradiated directly into the reaction mixture utilizing a probe immersed into the reaction mixture, unlike previously reported works that have used UTS baths. Controlled synthesis was also conducted at constant stirring and at the same temperatures using conventional heating. The precursor reaction solution was obtained by first fusing the coal fly ash with sodium hydroxide at 550°C followed by dissolution in water and filtration. The synthesized samples were characterized by XRF, XRD, SEM and TGA. The crystallinity of crystals produced with UTS assisted conversion compared to conventional conversion at 85°C was twice as high. UTS energy also reduced the induction time from 60 min to 40 min and from 80 min to 60 min for reaction temperatures of 95°C and 85°C, respectively. Prolonging the UTS irradiation at 95°C resulted in the conversion of zeolite-A crystals to hydroxysodalite, which is a more stable zeolitic phase. It was found that at 85°C coupled with ultrasound energy produced the best crystalline structure with a pure single phase of zeolite-A. It has been shown that crystallization using UTS energy can produce zeolitic crystals at lower temperatures and within 1h, dramatically cutting the synthesis time of zeolite.

  10. Monitoring penetratin interactions with lipid membranes and cell internalization using a new hydration-sensitive fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Shvadchak, Volodymyr V; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2014-09-28

    A new fluorescent label N-[4′-(dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone-7-yl]-N-methyl-β-alanine (7AF) was synthesized. Due to two electron donor groups at the opposite ends of the chromophore, an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) resulting in a dual emission was observed even in highly polar media and its fluorescence quantum yield was found to be remarkably high in a broad range of solvents including water. As a consequence, this label exhibits a remarkable sensitivity to the hydration of its environment, which is observed as a color switch between the emission of the ESIPT product (T* form) and that of the normal N* form. The 7AF label was coupled to the N-terminus of penetratin, a cell penetrating peptide, in order to study its interactions with lipid membranes and internalization inside the cells. As expected, the binding of penetratin to lipid membranes resulted in a dramatic switch in the relative intensity of its two emission bands as compared to its emission in buffer. Our studies with different lipid compositions confirmed the preference of penetratin to lipid membranes of the liquid disordered phase. After incubation of low concentrations of labeled penetratin with living cells, ratiometric imaging revealed, in addition to membrane-bound species, a significant fraction of free peptide in cytosol showing the characteristic emission from aqueous medium. At higher concentrations of penetratin, mainly peptides bound to cell membrane structures were observed. These observations confirmed the ability of penetratin to enter the cytosol by direct translocation through the cell plasma membrane, in addition to the classical entry by endocytosis. The present probe constitutes thus a powerful tool to study the interaction of peptides with living cells and their internalization mechanisms. PMID:25072870

  11. Zeolite synthesis: an energetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Zwijnenburg, Martijn A; Bromley, Stefan T

    2010-11-21

    Taking |D(H(2)O)(x)|[AlSiO(4)] based materials (where D is Li, Na, K, Rb or Cs) as an archetypal aluminosilicate system, we use accurate density functional theory calculations to demonstrate how the substitution of silicon cations in silica, with pairs of aluminium and (alkali metal) cations, changes the energetic ordering of different competing structure-types. For large alkali metal cations we further show that the formation of porous aluminosilicate structures, the so-called zeolites, is energetically favored. These findings unequivocally demonstrate that zeolites can be energetic preferred reaction products, rather than being kinetically determined, and that the size of the (hydrated) cations in the pore, be it inorganic or organic, is critical for directing zeolite synthesis.

  12. Zeolite synthesis: an energetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Zwijnenburg, Martijn A; Bromley, Stefan T

    2010-11-21

    Taking |D(H(2)O)(x)|[AlSiO(4)] based materials (where D is Li, Na, K, Rb or Cs) as an archetypal aluminosilicate system, we use accurate density functional theory calculations to demonstrate how the substitution of silicon cations in silica, with pairs of aluminium and (alkali metal) cations, changes the energetic ordering of different competing structure-types. For large alkali metal cations we further show that the formation of porous aluminosilicate structures, the so-called zeolites, is energetically favored. These findings unequivocally demonstrate that zeolites can be energetic preferred reaction products, rather than being kinetically determined, and that the size of the (hydrated) cations in the pore, be it inorganic or organic, is critical for directing zeolite synthesis. PMID:20938518

  13. Internalization of RGD peptide conjugates of near-infrared fluorescent probes in different cell lines occurs via different integrin receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, S.; Xu, B.; Ye, Y.; Liang, K.; Achilefu, S.

    2006-02-01

    Expression of integrin α vβ 3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Previous studies demonstrated that near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes designed to target α vβ 3 accumulated both in vitro and in vivo in α vβ 3-positive tumor cells. To evaluate the selectivity of some NIR-labeled RGD peptides for α vβ 3, the molecular probes were incubated in different cells, including the α vβ 3-positive U87 and A549 cells, and α vβ 3-negative HT29 cells. Whereas the RGD compounds tested internalized in the A549 cells, their uptake by the HT29 cell line, which is positive for α vβ 5 and α vβ 6, was low. The uptake of these probes in U87 depended on the structural features of the compounds. Further studies with functional blocking antibodies showed that the internalization in the α vβ 3-positive cells may be mediated by different integrin receptor subtypes. The preliminary results suggest that the internalization of linear RGD peptides is mediated by the α vβ 3 heterodimer but rearrangement of the peptide sequence could alter the selectivity of the molecular probes for different integrin subunits in the dimeric α and β proteins. Thus, a careful choice of RGD peptides can be used to monitor the functional status of different integrins in cells and tissues.

  14. Metallo-hydrazone complexes immobilized in zeolite Y: Synthesis, identification and acid violet-1 degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayman H.; Thabet, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Copper(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of hydrazone ligand (SAPH) derived from salicylaldehyde and phenylhydrazine have been encapsulated in zeolite-Y super cages via ship-in-a-bottle synthesis. Detailed characterization of the intrazeolitic complexes were performed by elemental analysis, spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis.) studies, magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction. Furthers, surface texture and thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA) have provided further evidence for successful immobilization of the metal complexes inside zeolite Y. Investigation of the stereochemistry of these incorporated chelates pointed out that, SAPH ligand is capable to coordinate with the central metal through the (C dbnd N), phenolic (OH) and (NH) groups forming polynuclear structures. The involvement of zeolite oxygen in coordination was postulated in the hybrid materials. The intrazeolitic copper, cobalt and nickel-SAPH complexes have distorted tetrahedral, octahedral and square-pyramidal configurations, respectively. The zeolite encapsulated complexes are thermally stable up to 800 °C except Cu(II) sample which is thermally stable up to midpoint 428 °C. The assessment of the catalytic activity was performed by the use of the photo-degradation of acid violet-1 dye as a probe reaction in presence of H 2O 2 as an oxidant. Decolorization of acid violet-1 dye was examined under the same conditions whereas the unpromoted zeolite and Cu II, Co II, Ni II-hydrazone complexes supported on zeolite showed 13% and 76%, 53%, 43% color removal, respectively. The results revealed that, the zeolite encapsulated Cu(II) complex generally exhibited better catalytic efficiency (76%) compared with other investigated zeolite encapsulated metal-hydrazone samples.

  15. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications. PMID:24789252

  16. Zeolites to peptides: Statistical mechanics methods for structure solution and property evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pophale, Ramdas S.

    Methods in statistical mechanics are used to study structure and properties of zeolites and peptides. A Monte Carlo method is applied to solve structure of a newly synthesized zeolite. Understanding the structure of a zeolite could lead to optimization of chemical processes it is involved in. Dielectric constant and elastic modulus are calculated using a molecular dynamics method for a pure silica zeolite with and without the structure directing agent used in its synthesis. These properties are of interest due to the potential use of this zeolite as low dielectric constant material in manufacturing integrated circuits. Results of four methods probing energy landscapes in peptides are compared for four cyclic peptides. Their ability to equilibrate structural properties and their relative speeds are important in their ability to simulate complex structures. A docking study is carried out to probe interactions between two proteins, Cripto and Snail, and E-cadherin promoter. The study supports experimental evidence that Cripto is involved in expression of E-cadherin through a promoter priming mechanism. Finally, the use of computational models in the design of better vaccines is illustrated through an example of Influenza.

  17. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  18. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences weremore » effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.« less

  19. Continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” on 5A zeolite for distinguishing small organic molecules by size

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-11

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. Lastly, this novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  20. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation. PMID:26358480

  1. Enhanced selectivity of zeolites by controlled carbon deposition

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Kartin, Mutlu

    2006-05-09

    A method for carbonizing a zeolite comprises depositing a carbon coating on the zeolite pores by flowing an inert carrier gas stream containing isoprene through a regenerated zeolite at elevated temperature. The carbonized zeolite is useful for the separation of light hydrocarbon mixtures due to size exclusion and the differential adsorption properties of the carbonized zeolite.

  2. Synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Davood

    This work focuses on the synthesis and testing of nanosized zeolite Y. The synthesis formulations of faujasite-type structure of zeolite Y prepared in nanosized form are described. The synthetic zeolite Y is the most widely employed for the preparation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts. The synthesis of zeolite Y is very complicated process. The mean particle size of zeolite Y is 1800 nm. The major challenge of this work involved reducing this average particle size to less than 500 nm. The preliminary experiments were conducted to obtain the pure zeolite Y using the soluble silicates as a silica source. This was achieved by applying the experimental design approach to study the effects of many parameters. The ageing time turned out to be the most significant variable affecting product purity. Based on the preliminary results, a detailed investigation was carried out to determine the effects of silica-alumina precursor preparations on zeolite Y synthesis. Aluminosilicate precursors were prepared by gelling and precipitation of soluble silicate. The as-prepared precursors were used for the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolite Y. The procedure of the precipitation of soluble silicate yielded pure zeolite Y at the conventional synthesis conditions. The extent of purity of zeolite Y depends on the surface areas of aluminosilicate precursors. A novel approach to zeolite Y synthesis was employed for the preparation of the pure nanosized zeolite Y. This was achieved by applying the method of impregnation of precipitated silica. This novel method of impregnation for zeolite Y preparation allows eliminating the vigorous agitation step required for the preparation of a homogeneous silica solution, thereby simplifying the synthesis of zeolite Y in one single vessel. In case of the synthesis of nanosized zeolite Y, the effect of varying the organic templates on the formation of nanosized particles of zeolite Y was investigated, while all other reaction parameters were

  3. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  4. Single- and dual-fiber fluorescence probes: application to oil-film measurements in an internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Ghandhi, J B

    2000-10-20

    Single- and dual-fiber fluorescence probes have been utilized to study oil-film behavior in a firing Diesel engine. A detailed analysis of the response characteristics of these probes was performed, and universal response curves have been generated through identification of the appropriate nondimensional parameters. For single-fiber probes a single curve was obtained, and for dual-fiber probes families of curves were identified based on three geometric dimensionless parameters. The complementary response characteristics of the single- and dual-fiber probes allows determination of the oil distribution within the piston-liner gap. The dual-fiber probe is not sensitive at small distances. Thus its signal originates solely from the piston surface, whereas the single-fiber probe is most sensitive at small distances and hence to the wall oil film. The engine data from the dual-fiber probe confirmed the presence of an oil film on the piston and provided a means of quantifying the transport of this oil within the engine. PMID:18354541

  5. Single- and dual-fiber fluorescence probes: application to oil-film measurements in an internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Ghandhi, J B

    2000-10-20

    Single- and dual-fiber fluorescence probes have been utilized to study oil-film behavior in a firing Diesel engine. A detailed analysis of the response characteristics of these probes was performed, and universal response curves have been generated through identification of the appropriate nondimensional parameters. For single-fiber probes a single curve was obtained, and for dual-fiber probes families of curves were identified based on three geometric dimensionless parameters. The complementary response characteristics of the single- and dual-fiber probes allows determination of the oil distribution within the piston-liner gap. The dual-fiber probe is not sensitive at small distances. Thus its signal originates solely from the piston surface, whereas the single-fiber probe is most sensitive at small distances and hence to the wall oil film. The engine data from the dual-fiber probe confirmed the presence of an oil film on the piston and provided a means of quantifying the transport of this oil within the engine.

  6. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Elyassi, Bahman; Lima, Fernando; Iyer, Aparna; Agrawal, Kumar; Sabnis, Sanket

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  7. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN HAZARDOUS METAL REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature by using synthetic zeolites. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants including arseni...

  8. Tailored zeolites for the removal of metal oxyanions: overcoming intrinsic limitations of zeolites.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Hugo; Quintelas, Cristina

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to present a global view of the efforts conducted to convert zeolites into efficient supports for the removal of heavy metal oxyanions. Despite lacking affinity for these species, due to inherent charge repulsion between zeolite framework and anionic species, zeolites have still received considerable attention from the scientific community, since their versatility allowed tailoring them to answer specific requirements. Different processes for the removal and recovery of toxic metals based on zeolites have been presented. These processes resort to modification of the zeolite surface to allow direct adsorption of oxyanions, or by combination with reducing agents for oxyanions that allow ion-exchange with the converted species by the zeolite itself. In order to testify zeolite versatility, as well as covering the wide array of physicochemical constraints that oxyanions offer, chromium and arsenic oxyanions were selected as model compounds for a review of treatment/remediation strategies, based on zeolite modification.

  9. Mesoporous MFI zeolites by microwave induced assembly between sulfonic acid functionalized MFI zeolite nanoparticles and alkyltrimethylammonium cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hailian; Ansari, Mohd Bismillah; Park, Sang-Eon

    2011-07-14

    Mesoporous MFI zeolites (ZSM-5, TS-1, S-1) having intracrystalline mesoporosity within zeolite crystals were synthesized by microwave induced assembly through the ionic interaction between the sulfonic acid functionalized MFI zeolite nanoparticles and alkyltrimethylammonium cationic surfactants.

  10. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-31

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. New results indicated that good quality highly ordered nanoporous silica host can be synthesized in the presence of zeolite Y seed precursor depending on the amount of precursor added. Preliminary research on the catalytic performance of the materials is underway. Probe acid catalyzed reactions, such as the cracking of cumene is currently being conducted. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of ZeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite catalysts of improved structural and

  11. [What a physician should know about zeolites].

    PubMed

    Boranić, M

    2000-01-01

    Zeolites are natural and synthetic hydrated crystalline aluminosilicates endowed with absorptive and ion exchange properties. They have found numerous and multifarous applications--in industry as catalysts and absorbents, in water sanitation for the removal of ammonia and heavy metals, in agriculture as fertilizers, and in animal husbandry as the absorbents of excreted material and as food additives. Medical applications have included the use in filtration systems for anesthesia or dialysis and as the contrast materials in NMR imaging. Recently, zeolite powders for external use have found application as deodorants, antimycotic agents and wound dressings. Peroral use of encapsulated zeolite powders enriched with vitamins, oligoelements or other ingredients has been claimed to exert beneficial medical effects. Ingestion of zeolites may be considered analogous to the clay eating (geophagia), considered in traditional medicine as a remedy for various illnesses. Being amphoteric, zeolites are partly soluble in acid or alkaline media, but within the physiological pH range the solubility is generally low. Minimal amounts of free aluminium or silicium from the ingested zeolites are resorbed from the gut. The bulk of ingested zeolite probably remains undissolved in the gut. In view of the ion exchange properties, zeolites may be expected to change the ionic content, pH and buffering capacity of the gastrointestinal secretions and to affect the transport through the intestinal epithelium. In addition, zeolites could affect the bacterial flora and the resorption of bacterial products, vitamins and oligoelements. The contact of zeolite particles with gastrointestinal mucosa may elicit the secretion of cytokines with local and systemic actions. Reactive silicium ions might react with biomolecules of the intestinal epithelium, and if resorbed, do so in other cells. Mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of zeolite particles have been described, resembling such effects of asbestos

  12. Low perturbation interrogation of the internal and near-field plasma structure of a Hall thruster using a high-speed probe positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, James Matthew

    This thesis presents research aimed at characterizing the internal and near field plasma structure of a Hall thruster. This information is vital to extending our understanding of the physical processes in the Hall thruster. In turn, this aids in the design of next generation Hall thrusters with improved performance both directly and through the validation of thruster models. Internal plasma parameter measurements were accomplished using a unique High-speed Axial Reciprocating Probe (HARP) system. The HARP system enabled, for the first time, the insertion and removal of probes from the Hall thruster discharge channel while minimizing perturbation to thruster operation. The system was used with an emissive probe to map plasma potential and with a double Langmuir probe to map electron temperature and ion number density. Thruster perturbation, determined by monitoring discharge current, was less than 10% for the majority of measurements. Using the data obtained with the HARP, a number of thruster parameters were investigated on a PEPL designed and built Hall thruster, the P5. The magnitude and spatial structure of the Hall current is presented and its contribution to propellant ionization and self magnetic fields discussed. The classical Hall parameter is compared to that inferred from the generalized Ohm's law. Thrust and beam current are computed and compared to direct measurements from a thrust stand and Faraday probe, respectively. Ion number density profiles are compared with results from a two dimensional numerical model, which predicted similar qualitative profiles. Combining data from the P5, SPT-140 and the model, it was surmised that a radially symmetric magnetic field would provide increased performance by generating a more collimated ion beam.

  13. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-21

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of polymer-SBA15 nanocomposites will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

  14. Synthesis of ‘unfeasible’ zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Michal; Wheatley, Paul S.; Navarro, Marta; Roth, Wieslaw J.; Položij, Miroslav; Mayoral, Alvaro; Eliášová, Pavla; Nachtigall, Petr; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are porous aluminosilicate materials that have found applications in many different technologies. However, although simulations suggest that there are millions of possible zeolite topologies, only a little over 200 zeolite frameworks of all compositions are currently known, of which about 50 are pure silica materials. This is known as the zeolite conundrum—why have so few of all the possible structures been made? Several criteria have been formulated to explain why most zeolites are unfeasible synthesis targets. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of two such ‘unfeasible’ zeolites, IPC-9 and IPC-10, through the assembly-disassembly-organization-reassembly mechanism. These new high-silica zeolites have rare characteristics, such as windows that comprise odd-membered rings. Their synthesis opens up the possibility of preparing other zeolites that have not been accessible by traditional solvothermal synthetic methods. We envisage that these findings may lead to a step change in the number and types of zeolites available for future applications.

  15. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  16. Paramagnetic complexes of 9,10-anthraquinone on zeolite surfaces and their thermal transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fionov, A. V.; Nekhaev, A. I.; Shchapin, I. Yu.; Maksimov, A. L.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    The concentration of one-electron transfer sites on the surface of H-ZSM-5, H-Y, H-mordenite, and H-β zeolites was measured by EPR using 9,10-antrhraquinone as a probe. It has been found that the hyperfine structure from four protons typical for one-centered complexes of anthraquinone with one acidic site was observed in the EPR spectra after anthraquinone interaction with a zeolite surface in the temperature range of 373 to 423 K. It has been established that an elevated temperature of 473 K promoted the decomposition of the adsorbed anthraquinone and the disappearance of the hyperfine structure. It has been shown that the thermal instability of anthraquinone adsorbed on zeolites changed in the series H-β > H-Y > H-ZSM-5 ˜ H-mordenite; the coke-forming ability of zeolites with regard to n-decane at 443 K changed in a similar manner. It has been established that the presence of air promoted coke-forming processes upon interaction between n-decane and zeolites.

  17. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  18. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  19. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, John D.

    1999-01-01

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow “tailoring” of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol. PMID:10097059

  20. Core-shell strain structure of zeolite microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Song, Sanghoon; Park, Hyun-jun; Thanh Pham, Tung Cao; Harder, Ross; Lim, Bobae; Xiong, Gang; Ahn, Docheon; McNulty, Ian; Kim, Jungho; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Robinson, Ian K; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-08-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicate minerals featuring a network of 0.3-1.5-nm-wide pores, used in industry as catalysts for hydrocarbon interconversion, ion exchangers, molecular sieves and adsorbents. For improved applications, it is highly useful to study the distribution of internal local strains because they sensitively affect the rates of adsorption and diffusion of guest molecules within zeolites. Here, we report the observation of an unusual triangular deformation field distribution in ZSM-5 zeolites by coherent X-ray diffraction imaging, showing the presence of a strain within the crystal arising from the heterogeneous core-shell structure, which is supported by finite element model calculation and confirmed by fluorescence measurement. The shell is composed of H-ZSM-5 with intrinsic negative thermal expansion whereas the core exhibits a different thermal expansion behaviour due to the presence of organic template residues, which usually remain when the starting materials are insufficiently calcined. Engineering such strain effects could have a major impact on the design of future catalysts. PMID:23832126

  1. Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J D

    1999-03-30

    Use of synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxides since 1950 has improved insulated windows, automobile air-conditioning, refrigerators, air brakes on trucks, laundry detergents, etc. Their large internal pore volumes, molecular-size pores, regularity of crystal structures, and the diverse framework chemical compositions allow "tailoring" of structure and properties. Thus, highly active and selective catalysts as well as adsorbents and ion exchangers with high capacities and selectivities were developed. In the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries, zeolites have made possible cheaper and lead-free gasoline, higher performance and lower-cost synthetic fibers and plastics, and many improvements in process efficiency and quality and in performance. Zeolites also help protect the environment by improving energy efficiency, reducing automobile exhaust and other emissions, cleaning up hazardous wastes (including the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and other radioactive wastes), and, as specially tailored desiccants, facilitating the substitution of new refrigerants for the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons banned by the Montreal Protocol. PMID:10097059

  2. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. So far the cation exchanger properties of zeolites have been extensively studied and utilized. The anion exchanger properties of zeolites are less studied. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove arseni...

  3. Novel Approach for Clustering Zeolite Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Lach-Hab, M; Yang, S; Vaisman, I I; Blaisten-Barojas, E

    2010-04-12

    Informatics approaches play an increasingly important role in the design of new materials. In this work we apply unsupervised statistical learning for identifying four framework-type attractors of zeolite crystals in which several of the zeolite framework types are grouped together. Zeolites belonging to these super-classes manifest important topological, chemical and physical similarities. The zeolites form clusters located around four core framework types: LTA, FAU, MFI and the combination of EDI, HEU, LTL and LAU. Clustering is performed in a 9-dimensional space of attributes that reflect topological, chemical and physical properties for each individual zeolite crystalline structure. The implemented machine learning approach relies on hierarchical top-down clustering approach and the expectation maximization method. The model is trained and tested on ten partially independent data sets from the FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database.

  4. High-Throughput Screening for Internalizing Antibodies by Homogeneous Fluorescence Imaging of a pH-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Thilo; van Boxtel, Egon; Bosch, Martijn; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Gerritsen, Arnout F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a rapidly growing class of biotherapeutics that deliver drugs specifically to target cells by binding of the antibody component to surface receptors. The majority of ADCs require receptor internalization depending on intrinsic features of the specific ADC-antigen interaction. The development of potent ADCs would greatly benefit from the identification of efficiently internalizing antibodies at early stages of discovery. We developed a highly sensitive and rapid antibody internalization assay using an indirect Cypher5E label. The pH-activated CypHer5E label becomes fluorescent upon internalization into the acidic environment of endocytic organelles, whereas background fluorescence of noninternalized CypHer5E is minimal. The pH-dependency of the CypHer5E signal enables robust discrimination of antibody internalization from surface binding. The favorable signal-over-background ratio allows a homogeneous assay design with high-throughput fluorescence imaging in 384- and 1536-well formats. The biophysical readout of the primary internalization event substantially shortens incubation times compared to killing assays using toxin internalization. The assay was validated with tumor-relevant targets, including receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR and HER2) and a class II cytokine receptor (TF) expressed by A431, AU565, and SKOV-3 cells and transient expression systems (CHO-S). Our method enables functional screening of large antibody libraries to identify therapeutic antibody candidates with internalization characteristics favorable for the development of ADCs. PMID:26518032

  5. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  6. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov`s results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov`s result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  7. Zeolites on Mars: Prospects for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Singer, R. B.; Kunkle, T. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian surface composition measured by Viking can be represented by several combinations of minerals incorporating major fractions of zeolites known to occur in altered mafic rocks and polar soils on Earth. The abundant occurrence of zeolites on Mars is consistent with what is known about both the physical and chemical environment of that planet. The laboratory reflectance spectra (0.65 to 2.55 microns) of a number of relatively pure zeolite minerals and some naturally occurring zeolite-clay soils were measured. All of the spectra measured are dominated by strong absorption near 1.4 and 1.9 microns and a steep reflectance drop longward of about 2.2 microns, all of which are due to abundant H2O. Weaker water overtone bands are also apparent, and in most cases there is spectral evidence for minor Fe(3+). In these features the zeolite spectra are similar to spectra of smectite clays which have abundant interlayer water. The most diagnostic difference between clay and zeolite spectra is the total absence in the zeolites of the weak structural OH absorption.

  8. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Gonghu Li; Conrad A. Jones; Vicki H. Grassian; Sarah C. Larsen

    2005-09-10

    In this study, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub 2} with urea in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was investigated with in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At T=473 K, the reaction rate for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} in nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was significantly greater than that in commercial NaY zeolite with a larger crystal size. In addition, a dramatic decrease in the concentration of undesirable surface species, including biuret and cyanuric acid, was observed in nanocrystalline NaY compared with commercial NaY after urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} at T=473 K. The increased reactivity for urea-SCR of NO{sub 2} was attributed to silanol groups and extra-framework aluminum species located on the external surface of nanocrystalline NaY. Specifically, NOx storage as nitrate and nitrite on the internal zeolite surface was coupled to reactive deNOx sites on the external surface. Isotopic labeling combined with IR analysis suggest that NN bond formation involved both an N-atom originating from NO{sub 2} and an N-atom originating from urea. This is the first clear example demonstrating that the increased external surface area (up to 40% of total surface area) of nanocrystalline zeolites can be used as a reactive surface with unique active sites for catalysis.

  9. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and energetics of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pingping

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicates, and Al or Si can be substituted by other elements, such as Ge, Ga, or P. Zeolites have been studied for more than two hundred years, because of their wide application and importance in mineralogy and technology. With high acidity and special pore system, zeolite beta (IZA code BEA) receives much attention. In the dissertation, the formation and dehydration enthalpy of cation exchanged zeolite beta, Li/Na/K/Rb/Cs/Mg/Ca/Sr/Ba -BEA 14 (14 is the Si/Al ratio), Mg/Ca - BEA 4 (4 is the Si/Al ratio), were studied by high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. From an energetic point of view, zeolites beta are less stable than other zeolites of similar Si/Al ratio and cation content. Their enthalpies of formation and dehydration become more endothermic with increasing average ionic potential of the cations in the channels. The unfavorable enthalpy of low silica Mg-BEA 4 and Ca-BEA 4 suggests a possible energy barrier in their direct synthesis. The formation and partial molar dehydration enthalpy of Li-BEA 3 and Na-BEA 3.67 are also investigated by high temperature calorimetry. The partial molar dehydration enthalpies are a linear function of water content. Molecular mechanics simulations explore the cation and water molecule positions in the framework at several water contents. Ga substitution is of great interest due to the special catalytic character of Ga zeolites and the directing agent effect of Ga atoms. The energetics of gallosilicate zeolites Ga-NaSOD, Ga-NaFAU, Ga-NaNAT, Ga-KNAT, Ga-KLTL and Ga-KTUN-1 were studied. The lattice parameters and adsorbed water content increase after Ga substitution of Al. Compared to analogous aluminosilicate zeolites, the gallosilicate zeolites have a similar dehydration enthalpy per mole of tetrahedra, but a less endothermic dehydration enthalpy per mole of water. The gallosilicate zeolites also have less exothermic formation enthalpies from oxide components. The energetics of Ga

  11. Copper-Exchanged Zeolite L Traps Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Seshan, Panchalam K.

    1991-01-01

    Brief series of simple chemical treatments found to enhance ability of zeolite to remove oxygen from mixture of gases. Thermally stable up to 700 degrees C and has high specific surface area which provides high capacity for adsorption of gases. To increase ability to adsorb oxygen selectively, copper added by ion exchange, and copper-exchanged zeolite reduced with hydrogen. As result, copper dispersed atomically on inner surfaces of zeolite, making it highly reactive to oxygen, even at room temperature. Reactivity to oxygen even greater at higher temperatures.

  12. Photochemical charge separation in zeolites: Electron transfer dynamics, nanocrystals and zeolitic membranes. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    2001-09-30

    Aluminosilicate zeolites provide an excellent host for photochemical charge separation. Because of the constraints provided by the zeolite, the back electron transfer from the reduced acceptor to the oxidized sensitizer is slowed down. This provides the opportunity to separate the charge and use it in a subsequent reaction for water oxidation and reduction. Zeolite-based ruthenium oxide catalysts have been found to be efficient for the water splitting process. This project has demonstrated the usefulness of zeolite hosts for photolytic splitting of water.

  13. Tetraethylenepentamine embedded zeolite A for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Mo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Jun; You, Hyo-Sang; Yi, Chang-Keun; Park, Young Cheol; Park, Sang-Eon

    2013-04-01

    Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) embedded zeolite A crystals were synthesized by using TEPA and the preformed zeolite A precursor under the microwave irradiation. The presence of TEPA in zeolite A crystal was confirmed by TG analysis and FTIR, Raman spectra. The CO2 adsorptive behavior of TEPA embedded zeolite A samples was investigated by CO2 isotherms measured at 25 degrees C comparing with zeolite A. The optimum CO2 sorption capacity was found in the case of 7.5% TEPA embedded zeolite A, which showed 3.75 mmol g(-1) where as the zeolite A showed less CO2 adsorption capacity of 2.88 mmol g(-1). The adsorption capacity of TEPA embedded Zeolite A was sustained up to 90% during 4 cycles of temperature swing adsorption (TSA) from 40 degrees C to 140 degrees C, indicating that the TEPA embedded Zeolite A was found to be useful as one of the application to solid amine adsorbent for CO2.

  14. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  15. Three Mile Island zeolite vitirification demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Knowlton, D.E.; Shupe, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The cleanup of the high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island (TMI) provides an opportunity to further develop waste management technology. Approximately 790,000 gallons of high-activity-level water at TMI's Unit-2 Nuclear Power Station will be decontaminated at the site using the submerged demineralizer system (SDS). In the SDS process, the cesium and strontium in the water are sorbed onto zeolite that is contained within metal liners. The Department of Energy has asked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to take a portion of the zeolite from the SDS process and demonstrate, on a production scale, that this zeolite can be vitrified using the in-can melting process. This paper is a brief overview of the TMI zeolite vitrification program. The first section discusses the formulation of a glass suitable for immobilizing SDS zeolite. The following section describes a feed system that was developed to feed zeolite to the in-can melter. It also describes the in-can melting process and the government owned facilities in which the demonstrations will take place. Finally, the schedule for completing the program activities is outlined.

  16. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  17. Salt-occluded zeolite waste forms: Crystal structures and transformability

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Neutron diffraction studies of salt-occluded zeolite and zeolite/glass composite samples, simulating nuclear waste forms loaded with fission products, have revealed complex structures, with cations assuming the dual roles of charge compensation and occlusion (cluster formation). These clusters roughly fill the 6--8 {angstrom} diameter pores of the zeolites. Samples are prepared by equilibrating zeolite-A with complex molten Li, K, Cs, Sr, Ba, Y chloride salts, with compositions representative of anticipated waste systems. Samples prepared using zeolite 4A (which contains exclusively sodium cations) as starting material are observed to transform to sodalite, a denser aluminosilicate framework structure, while those prepared using zeolite 5A (sodium and calcium ions) more readily retain the zeolite-A structure. Because the sodalite framework pores are much smaller than those of zeolite-A, clusters are smaller and more rigorously confined, with a correspondingly lower capacity for waste containment. Details of the sodalite structures resulting from transformation of zeolite-A depend upon the precise composition of the original mixture. The enhanced resistance of salt-occluded zeolites prepared from zeolite 5A to sodalite transformation is thought to be related to differences in the complex chloride clusters present in these zeolite mixtures. Data relating processing conditions to resulting zeolite composition and structure can be used in the selection of processing parameters which lead to optimal waste forms.

  18. ZnO modified ZSM-5 and Y zeolites fabricated by atomic layer deposition for propane conversion.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Qin, Lijun; Lu, Jian; Feng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ZnO modified ZSM-5 and Y zeolites are synthesized by performing atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO to HZSM-5 and HY using diethyl zinc and water as the precursors. The surface area and pore volume of ZSM-5 and Y zeolites are progressively reduced with the increasing number of ZnO ALD cycles. XRD and SEM characterization methods show that highly dispersed ZnO species are deposited on the internal and external surfaces of both zeolites. The ZnO species deposited on ZSM-5 are in an amorphous form while nano-crystallites of ZnO are present on Y zeolites after performing ≥2 cycles of ZnO ALD. XPS and TPR characterization methods reveal that isolated Zn(OH)(+) species are predominantly formed on both zeolites after the first cycle of ZnO ALD and the ZnO clusters gradually grow larger with the increasing number of ALD cycles. The type and strength of acid sites on the parent and the ALD ZnO modified zeolites are studied by FTIR spectra of adsorbed pyridine. Incorporation of ZnO into Y zeolite by ALD completely eliminates the Brønsted acid sites and increases the number of strong Lewis acid sites. Similar effects are obtained on ALD ZnO modified ZSM-5 except that the Brønsted acid sites are only partially removed. Catalytic properties of the ALD ZnO modified zeolites are evaluated in propane conversion. Introduction of ZnO species significantly improves the activities of both zeolites. Propylene is the major reaction product on ALD ZnO modified Y zeolite while high selectivities to aromatics are achieved on ALD ZnO modified ZSM-5. These results suggest that ZnO species merely promote the dehydrogenation reaction while the subsequent oligomerization and cyclization reactions require Brønsted acid sites. For both zeolites the catalyst fabricated by only 1 or 2 cycles of ZnO ALD performs better than those fabricated by multiple cycles of ALD, indicating that isolated Zn(OH)(+) species are more effective for the conversion of propane to propylene and aromatics. PMID

  19. ZnO modified ZSM-5 and Y zeolites fabricated by atomic layer deposition for propane conversion.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Qin, Lijun; Lu, Jian; Feng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    ZnO modified ZSM-5 and Y zeolites are synthesized by performing atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO to HZSM-5 and HY using diethyl zinc and water as the precursors. The surface area and pore volume of ZSM-5 and Y zeolites are progressively reduced with the increasing number of ZnO ALD cycles. XRD and SEM characterization methods show that highly dispersed ZnO species are deposited on the internal and external surfaces of both zeolites. The ZnO species deposited on ZSM-5 are in an amorphous form while nano-crystallites of ZnO are present on Y zeolites after performing ≥2 cycles of ZnO ALD. XPS and TPR characterization methods reveal that isolated Zn(OH)(+) species are predominantly formed on both zeolites after the first cycle of ZnO ALD and the ZnO clusters gradually grow larger with the increasing number of ALD cycles. The type and strength of acid sites on the parent and the ALD ZnO modified zeolites are studied by FTIR spectra of adsorbed pyridine. Incorporation of ZnO into Y zeolite by ALD completely eliminates the Brønsted acid sites and increases the number of strong Lewis acid sites. Similar effects are obtained on ALD ZnO modified ZSM-5 except that the Brønsted acid sites are only partially removed. Catalytic properties of the ALD ZnO modified zeolites are evaluated in propane conversion. Introduction of ZnO species significantly improves the activities of both zeolites. Propylene is the major reaction product on ALD ZnO modified Y zeolite while high selectivities to aromatics are achieved on ALD ZnO modified ZSM-5. These results suggest that ZnO species merely promote the dehydrogenation reaction while the subsequent oligomerization and cyclization reactions require Brønsted acid sites. For both zeolites the catalyst fabricated by only 1 or 2 cycles of ZnO ALD performs better than those fabricated by multiple cycles of ALD, indicating that isolated Zn(OH)(+) species are more effective for the conversion of propane to propylene and aromatics.

  20. Probing the flexibility of internal rotation in silylated phenols with the NMR scalar spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Benda, Ladislav; Prokop, Alexandr; Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan; Spirko, Vladimír

    2008-06-12

    The rotation of a trimethylsiloxy (TMSO) group in three silylated phenols (with three different ortho substituents -H, -CH3, and -C(CH3)3) was studied with the NMR (n)J(Si,C), n = 2, 3, 4, 5, scalar spin-spin coupling between the (29)Si nucleus of the TMSO group and the (13)C nuclei of the phenyl ring. The internal rotation potential calculated with the B3LYP and MP2 calculation methods including the effect of a solvent environment (gas phase, chloroform, and water) was used for the calculation of the dynamical averages of the scalar coupling constants in the framework of the rigid-bender formalism. Solvent effects, the quality of the rotational potential, and the applicability of the classical molecular dynamic to the problem is discussed. Quantum effects have a sizable impact on scalar couplings, particularly for the internal rotational states well localized within the wells of the potential surfaces for the TMSO group. The overall difference between the experimental and theoretical scalar couplings calculated for the global energy-minima structures (static model) decreases substantially for both model potentials (B3LYP, MP2) when the molecular motion of the TMSO group is taken into account. The calculated data indicate that the inclusion of molecular motion is necessary for the accurate calculation of the scalar coupling constants and their reliable structural interpretation for any system which possesses a large-amplitude motion. PMID:18491850

  1. Evaluation of internal potential distribution and carrier extraction properties of organic solar cells through Kelvin probe and time-of-flight measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yuya; Oda, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yasuo; Noguchi, Yutaka Ishii, Hisao; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Tokairin, Hiroshi

    2014-09-21

    The carrier extraction property of a prototypical small molecule organic solar cell (OSC) composed of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), C⁶⁰, and bathocuproine (BCP) was studied on the basis of the internal potential distribution and carrier dynamics in the device. The internal potential distribution in the OSC structure at the interfaces and in the bulk region was determined by the Kelvin probe method. Significant potential gradients were found in the CuPc film on indium tin oxide and in the C⁶⁰ film on CuPc, consistent with charge transfer through the contacts. Moreover, surface potential of the BCP layer grew linearly with increasing film thickness with a slope of ca. 35 mV/nm (giant surface potential: GSP), which indicated spontaneous orientation polarization in the film. The potential gradient and GSP significantly changed the built-in potential of the device. Current–voltage and modified time-of-flight measurements revealed that the BCP layer worked as an electron injection and extraction layer despite the wide energy gap. These results were discussed based on the contributions of GSP and the gap states in the BCP layer.

  2. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short. PMID:27020096

  3. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short.

  4. Synthesis of novel perfluoroalkylglucosides on zeolite and non-zeolite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Janusz; Mokrzycki, Łukasz; Sulikowski, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylglucosides comprise a very important class of fluorine-containing surfactants. These compounds can be synthesized by using the Fisher reaction, starting directly from glucose and the required perfluoroalcohols. We wish to report on the use of zeolite catalysts of different structure and composition for the synthesis of perfluoroalkylglucosides when using glucose and 1-octafluoropentanol as substrates. Zeolites of different pore architecture have been chosen (ZSM-5, ZSM-12, MCM-22 and Beta). Zeolites were characterized by XRD, nitrogen sorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and solid-state 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. The activity of the zeolite catalysts in the glycosidation reaction was studied in a batch reactor at 100 °C below atmospheric pressure. The performance of zeolites was compared to other catalysts, an ion-exchange resin (Purolite) and a montmorillonite-type layered aluminosilicate. The catalytic performance of zeolite Beta was the highest among the zeolites studied and the results were comparable to those obtained over Purolite and montmorillonite type catalysts.

  5. Experimental probe of adsorbate binding energies at internal crystalline/amorphous interfaces in Gd-doped Si(3)N(4)

    SciTech Connect

    van Benthem, Klaus; Painter, Gayle S; Averill, F.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Becher, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Through novel use of beam irradiation during scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) observations, the relative binding energies for rare earth atoms (Gd) at different adsorption sites on the prismatic grain surfaces in Si3N4 ceramics have been successfully measured. Site-specific binding strengths of interfacial adsorbates in bulk ceramics containing amorphous intergranular films and amorphous pockets at multigrain junctions have, until now eluded researchers. With the approach described here, theoretically predicted differences in the adsorption energies of rare earths at internal interfaces can be directly assessed. This technique has also identified the decrease in stability of successive planes of ordered rare earth atoms paralleling the grain surfaces as a function of position out into the amorphous pockets. The findings bring forward a critical test of the theoretical concepts that now provide the understanding of segregation and adsorption behavior in a complex, multi-component ceramic. Such wetting behavior (by rare earth additions) dictates phase transformation and, therefore, microstructural evolution processes. The observations made in this study provide confirmation of calculated relative strengths of bonding at different interfacial sites and can therefore be used for both tailoring new functional ceramic microstructures, with atomic level descriptions of their macroscopic mechanical properties

  6. Structural and catalytic properties of zeolite EMT containing NiMo sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Becue, T.; Manoli, J.M.; Potvin, C.; Leglise, J.; Cornet, D.

    1998-10-01

    This work examines bifunctional catalysts made of an acidic EMT zeolite into which Ni and Mo ions were introduced, and then sulfided. Their structure and catalytic properties were compared to those of analogous NiMo/HY. Ni and Mo were loaded onto the HEMT by wet treatment, and the solids were characterized in the calcined and sulfided state by means of XRD, porosimetry, and TEM coupled with EDX analysis. When the oxidic NiMo/EMT was sulfided, the zeolite crystals fractured in a few planar directions, and the fissures appeared to be filled with MoS{sub 2} particles promoted with Ni. This is very different to the HY zeolite in which the sulfide slabs were scattered into the mesopores. With both supports, however, about half of the NiMo is present outside the zeolite as incompletely sulfided particles. The catalytic properties of the sulfided NiMo/EMT were examined by measuring the conversion of an n-heptane and benzene mixture in a flow reactor under 8 MPa hydrogen pressure. With the EMT as well as with the HY support, the rate of benzene hydrogenation varied in accordance with the amount of internal Mo. The intrinsic activity of the internal Mo matched that of a commercial NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The NiMo/zeolites exhibited high activity for the conversion of heptane, but the cracked products exceeded by far the heptane isomers. Differences in selectivity between EMT and HY catalysts are interpreted on the basis of the balance between acidic and hydrogenation functions.

  7. Vibrational and thermodynamic properties of Ar, N2, O2, H2 and CO adsorbed and condensed into (H,Na)-Y zeolite cages as studied by variable temperature IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gribov, Evgueni N; Cocina, Donato; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bordiga, Silvia; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Zecchina, Adriano

    2006-03-14

    The adsorption of Ar, H2, O2, N2 and CO on (H,Na)-Y zeolite (Si/Al = 2.9, H+/Na+ approximately 5) has been studied at variable-temperature (90-20 K) and sub-atmospheric pressure (0-40 mbar) by FTIR spectroscopy. Unprecedented filling conditions of the zeolite cavities were attained, which allowed the investigation of very weakly adsorbed species and of condensed, liquid-like or solid-like, phases. Two pressure regimes were singled out, characterized by: (i) specific interaction at low pressure of the probe molecules (P) with the internal Brønsted and Lewis sites, and (ii) multilayer adsorption at higher pressure. In the case of CO the perturbation of the protonic sites located inside the sodalite cages was also observed. As the molecule is too large to penetrate the sodalite cage, the perturbation is thought to involve a proton jump tunneling mechanism. The adsorption energy for the (HF)OH...P (P = Ar, H2, O2, N2 and CO) specific interaction involving the high frequency Brønsted acid sites exposed in the supercages was derived following the VTIR (variable temperature infrared spectroscopy) method described by E. Garrone and C. Otero Areán (Chem. Soc. Rev., 2005, 34, 846).

  8. A sensitive one-step real-time PCR for detection of avian influenza viruses using a MGB probe and an internal positive control

    PubMed Central

    Di Trani, Livia; Bedini, Barbara; Donatelli, Isabella; Campitelli, Laura; Chiappini, Barbara; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Delogu, Mauro; Buonavoglia, Canio; Vaccari, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Background Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are endemic in wild birds and their introduction and conversion to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in domestic poultry is a cause of serious economic losses as well as a risk for potential transmission to humans. The ability to rapidly recognise AIVs in biological specimens is critical for limiting further spread of the disease in poultry. The advent of molecular methods such as real time polymerase chain reaction has allowed improvement of detection methods currently used in laboratories, although not all of these methods include an Internal Positive Control (IPC) to monitor for false negative results. Therefore we developed a one-step reverse transcription real time PCR (RRT-PCR) with a Minor Groove Binder (MGB) probe for the detection of different subtypes of AIVs. This technique also includes an IPC. Methods RRT-PCR was developed using an improved TaqMan technology with a MGB probe to detect AI from reference viruses. Primers and probe were designed based on the matrix gene sequences from most animal and human A influenza virus subtypes. The specificity of RRT-PCR was assessed by detecting influenza A virus isolates belonging to subtypes from H1–H13 isolated in avian, human, swine and equine hosts. The analytical sensitivity of the RRT-PCR assay was determined using serial dilutions of in vitro transcribed matrix gene RNA. The use of a rodent RNA as an IPC in order not to reduce the efficiency of the assay was adopted. Results The RRT-PCR assay is capable to detect all tested influenza A viruses. The detection limit of the assay was shown to be between 5 and 50 RNA copies per reaction and the standard curve demonstrated a linear range from 5 to 5 × 108 copies as well as excellent reproducibility. The analytical sensitivity of the assay is 10–100 times higher than conventional RT-PCR. Conclusion The high sensitivity, rapidity, reproducibility and specificity of the AIV RRT-PCR with the use of IPC to monitor

  9. Towards a sustainable manufacture of hierarchical zeolites.

    PubMed

    Verboekend, Danny; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-03-01

    Hierarchical zeolites have been established as a superior type of aluminosilicate catalysts compared to their conventional (purely microporous) counterparts. An impressive array of bottom-up and top-down approaches has been developed during the last decade to design and subsequently exploit these exciting materials catalytically. However, the sustainability of the developed synthetic methods has rarely been addressed. This paper highlights important criteria to ensure the ecological and economic viability of the manufacture of hierarchical zeolites. Moreover, by using base leaching as a promising case study, we verify a variety of approaches to increase reactor productivity, recycle waste streams, prevent the combustion of organic compounds, and minimize separation efforts. By reducing their synthetic footprint, hierarchical zeolites are positioned as an integral part of sustainable chemistry.

  10. Hydrogen Purification Using Natural Zeolite Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelValle, William

    2003-01-01

    The School of Science at Universidad del Turabo (UT) have a long-lasting investigation plan to study the hydrogen cleaning and purification technologies. We proposed a research project for the synthesis, phase analysis and porosity characterization of zeolite based ceramic perm-selective membranes for hydrogen cleaning to support NASA's commitment to achieving a broad-based research capability focusing on aerospace-related issues. The present study will focus on technology transfer by utilizing inorganic membranes for production of ultra-clean hydrogen for application in combustion. We tested three different natural zeolite membranes (different particle size at different temperatures and time of exposure). Our results show that the membranes exposured at 900 C for 1Hr has the most higher permeation capacity, indicated that our zeolite membranes has the capacity to permeate hydrogen.

  11. Growth of zeolite crystals in the microgravity environment of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Sand, L. B.; Collette, D.; Dieselman, K.; Crowley, J.; Feitelberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    Zeolites are hydrated, crystalline aluminosilicates with alkali and alkaling earth metals substituted into cation vacancies. Typically zeolite crystals are 3 to 8 microns. Larger cyrstals are desirable. Large zeolite crystals were produced (100 to 200 microns); however, they have taken restrictively long times to grow. It was proposed if the rate of nucleation or in some other way the number of nuclei can be lowered, fewer, larger crystals will be formed. The microgravity environment of space may provide an ideal condition to achieve rapid growth of large zeolite crystals. The objective of the project is to establish if large zeolite crystals can be formed rapidly in space.

  12. Coke induced stabilization of catalytic activity of silylated ZSM-5 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Y.S.; Das, J.; Halgeri, A.B.

    1995-08-01

    One of the ways to synthesize dialkylbenzenes is to alkylate monoalkylbenzene with an alkylating agent such as alcohol or olefin over a Friedel-Crafts or zeolite catalyst. The latter is gaining importance as it is an environmentally friendly system. Dialkylbenzenes like paraxylene, para-ethyltoluene, and para-diethylbenzene are sources for various monomers. Several techniques have been reported in the literature to modify the zeolite characteristics in such a way that the dialkylbenzenes formed during monoalkylbenzene alkylation contain more para isomer. Among these techniques, the chemical vapor deposition of silica (CVD) is drawing the attention of researchers. The silylation results in fine control of pore opening size with the silica deposited on the external surface. The internal structure remains unaffected; only the pore entrance is narrowed. It was observed that the silylated zeolite used for synthesizing para-dialkylbenzene by monoalkylbenzene alkylation deactivates with increased time on stream. This paper deals with the coke-induced stabilization of catalytic activity of ZSM-5 zeolite during alkylation of ethylbenzene with ethanol.

  13. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method.

  14. Natural zeolite reactivity towards ozone: the role of compensating cations.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Héctor; Alejandro, Serguei; Zaror, Claudio A

    2012-08-15

    Among indoor pollutants, ozone is recognised to pose a threat to human health. Recently, low cost natural zeolites have been applied as alternative materials for ozone abatement. In this work, the effect of compensating cation content of natural zeolite on ozone removal is studied. A Chilean natural zeolite is used here as starting material. The amount of compensating cations in the zeolite framework was modified by ion exchange using an ammonium sulphate solution (0.1 mol L(-1)). Characterisation of natural and modified zeolites were performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS), and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH(3)-TPD). Ozone adsorption and/or decomposition on natural and modified zeolites were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Results show that the zeolite compensating cation content affects ozone interaction with zeolite active sites. Ammonium ion-exchange treatments followed by thermal out-gassing at 823 K, reduces ozone diffusion resistance inside the zeolite framework, increasing ozone abatement on zeolite surface active sites. Weak and strong Lewis acid sites of zeolite surface are identified here as the main active sites responsible of ozone removal.

  15. Synthesis of zeolite as ordered multicrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Seok; Lee, Yun-Jo; Tae, Eunju Lee; Park, Yong Soo; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2003-08-01

    Zeolites are crystalline nanoporous aluminosilicates widely used in industry. In order for zeolites to find applications as innovative materials, they need to be organized into large two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) arrays. We report that uniformly aligned polyurethane films can serve as templates for the synthesis of uniformly aligned 2D and possibly 3D arrays of silicalite-1 crystals, in which the orientations of the crystals are controlled by the nature of the polymers. We propose that the supramolecularly organized organic-inorganic composites that consist of the hydrolyzed organic products and the seed crystals are responsible for this phenomenon.

  16. Audit and improve! Evaluation of a real-time probe-based PCR assay with internal control for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Tang, W Y; Wee, S Y; Barkham, T

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively audited the performance of the commercial kit in use in our laboratory for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and found the sensitivity to be unacceptably low at 69% (52/75). We developed an in-house end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detecting IS6110, an IS-like element of MTBC, and achieved a sensitivity of 90% (66/73) with the same DNA samples, re-emphasising the poor performance of the commercial kit. In order to avoid specificity issues surrounding gel-based PCR, we developed a probe-based real-time PCR assay with an internal control and achieved a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 97% and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 207. The evaluation was performed on clinically requested samples, so we expect the performance of the assay in real life to match the data from this evaluation. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommending nucleic acid tests for the investigation of possible cases of tuberculosis are expected to promote the use of molecular assays. It is important that clinical laboratories do not assume that assays, in-house or commercial, will perform well or that they will continue to perform well. Audit at regular intervals is necessary to maintain confidence and to demonstrate that the assay works to specification in the real test population.

  17. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose Using Nano Zeolite and Zeolite/Matrix Catalysts in a GC/Micro-Pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose, as a model compound of biomass, was catalyzed over zeolite (HY,.HZSM-5) and zeolite/matrix (HY/Clay, HM/Clay) in a GC/micro-pyrolyzer at 500 degrees C, to produce the valuable products. The catalysts used were pure zeolite and zeolite/matrix including 20 wt% matrix content, which were prepared into different particle sizes (average size; 0.1 mm, 1.6 mm) to study the effect of the particle size of the catalyst for the distribution of product yields. Catalytic pyrolysis had much more volatile products as light components and less content of sugars than pyrolysis only. This phenomenon was strongly influenced by the particle size of the catalyst in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Also, in zeolite and zeolite/matrix catalysts the zeolite type gave the dominant impact on the distribution of product yields. PMID:27483802

  18. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose Using Nano Zeolite and Zeolite/Matrix Catalysts in a GC/Micro-Pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose, as a model compound of biomass, was catalyzed over zeolite (HY,.HZSM-5) and zeolite/matrix (HY/Clay, HM/Clay) in a GC/micro-pyrolyzer at 500 degrees C, to produce the valuable products. The catalysts used were pure zeolite and zeolite/matrix including 20 wt% matrix content, which were prepared into different particle sizes (average size; 0.1 mm, 1.6 mm) to study the effect of the particle size of the catalyst for the distribution of product yields. Catalytic pyrolysis had much more volatile products as light components and less content of sugars than pyrolysis only. This phenomenon was strongly influenced by the particle size of the catalyst in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Also, in zeolite and zeolite/matrix catalysts the zeolite type gave the dominant impact on the distribution of product yields.

  19. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  20. MERCURY SEPARATION FROM POLLUTANT WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water has been examined at room temperature. Experiments have...

  1. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  2. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  3. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  4. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    Mechanistic explanations have been found for the migration of atoms and ions through the zeolite channels leading to specific distribution of ions and the metal clusters. In this report, we summarize the state of understanding attained on a number of topics in the area of mono- and multimetal/zeolite systems, to which our recent research has made significant contributions. The following topics are discussed: (1) Formation of isolated metal atoms in sodalite cages; (2) differences of metal/zeolite systems prepared by ion reduction in channels or via isolated atoms; (3) rejuvenation of Pd/NaY and Pd/HY catalysts by oxidative redispersion of the metal; (4) formation of mono- or bimetal particles in zeolites by programmed reductive decomposition of volatile metal complexes; (5) cation-cation interaction as a cause of enhanced reducibility; (6) formation of palladium carbonyl clusters in supercages; (7) enhanced catalytic activity of metal particle-proton complexes for hydrocarbon conversion reactions; (8) stereoselectivity of catalytic reactions due to geometric constraints of particles in cages.

  5. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-22

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  6. Energetics of sodium-calcium exchanged zeolite A.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Wu, D; Guo, X; Shen, B; Navrotsky, A

    2015-05-01

    A series of calcium-exchanged zeolite A samples with different degrees of exchange were prepared. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry measured the formation enthalpies of hydrated zeolites CaNa-A from constituent oxides. The water content is a linear function of the degree of exchange, ranging from 20.54% for Na-A to 23.77% for 97.9% CaNa-A. The enthalpies of formation (from oxides) at 25 °C are -74.50 ± 1.21 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite Na-A and -30.79 ± 1.64 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Dehydration enthalpies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are 32.0 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite Na-A and 20.5 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Enthalpies of formation of Ca-exchanged zeolites A are less exothermic than for zeolite Na-A. A linear relationship between the formation enthalpy and the extent of calcium substitution was observed. The energetic effect of Ca-exchange on zeolite A is discussed with an emphasis on the complex interactions between the zeolite framework, cations, and water.

  7. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8–12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  8. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, M; Ng, E-P; Bakhtiari, K; Vinciguerra, M; Ali Ahmad, H; Awala, H; Mintova, S; Daghighi, M; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F; de Vries, M; Motazacker, M M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Mahmoudi, M; Rezaee, F

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy. PMID:26616161

  9. Zeolite Nanoparticles for Selective Sorption of Plasma Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Ng, E.-P.; Bakhtiari, K.; Vinciguerra, M.; Ahmad, H. Ali; Awala, H.; Mintova, S.; Daghighi, M.; Bakhshandeh Rostami, F.; de Vries, M.; Motazacker, M. M.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-11-01

    The affinity of zeolite nanoparticles (diameter of 8-12 nm) possessing high surface area and high pore volume towards human plasma proteins has been investigated. The protein composition (corona) of zeolite nanoparticles has been shown to be more dependent on the plasma protein concentrations and the type of zeolites than zeolite nanoparticles concentration. The number of proteins present in the corona of zeolite nanoparticles at 100% plasma (in vivo state) is less than with 10% plasma exposure. This could be due to a competition between the proteins to occupy the corona of the zeolite nanoparticles. Moreover, a high selective adsorption for apolipoprotein C-III (APOC-III) and fibrinogen on the zeolite nanoparticles at high plasma concentration (100%) was observed. While the zeolite nanoparticles exposed to low plasma concentration (10%) exhibited a high selective adsorption for immunoglobulin gamma (i.e. IGHG1, IGHG2 and IGHG4) proteins. The zeolite nanoparticles can potentially be used for selectively capture of APOC-III in order to reduce the activation of lipoprotein lipase inhibition during hypertriglyceridemia treatment. The zeolite nanoparticles can be adapted to hemophilic patients (hemophilia A (F-VIII deficient) and hemophilia B (F-IX deficient)) with a risk of bleeding, and thus might be potentially used in combination with the existing therapy.

  10. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants...

  11. Differences in the location of guest molecules within zeolite pores as revealed by multilaser excitation confocal fluorescence microscopy: which molecule is where?

    PubMed

    Sprung, Christoph; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-11

    A detailed and systematic polarized confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation is presented on three batches of large coffin-shaped ZSM-5 crystals (i.e., parent, steamed at 500 °C, and steamed at 700 °C). In total, six laser lines of different wavelength in the visible region are employed on two crystal positions and three orientations with respect to the polarization plane of the excitation laser light. A fluorescent probe molecule is generated inside the zeolite pores, originating from the acid-catalyzed oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene. A thorough analysis of the polarization plane of emitting fluorescent light reveals insight into the orientation of the fluorescent probe molecule restricted by the highly ordered zeolite channel framework, thereby visualizing pore accessibility and clearly distinguishing the occupation of straight and sinusoidal channels by the probe molecule. Spectral features are, furthermore, observed to tell apart molecules situated in one or the other pore. Special focus was given on the rim and tip regions of the zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. On the basis of the confocal approach of the investigation, the aforementioned features are evaluated in three dimensions, while the degradation of the zeolite framework upon postsynthesis steam treatment could be visualized by occupation of the sinusoidal pores.

  12. Differences in the Location of Guest Molecules within Zeolite Pores As Revealed by Multilaser Excitation Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy: Which Molecule Is Where?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A detailed and systematic polarized confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation is presented on three batches of large coffin-shaped ZSM-5 crystals (i.e., parent, steamed at 500 °C, and steamed at 700 °C). In total, six laser lines of different wavelength in the visible region are employed on two crystal positions and three orientations with respect to the polarization plane of the excitation laser light. A fluorescent probe molecule is generated inside the zeolite pores, originating from the acid-catalyzed oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene. A thorough analysis of the polarization plane of emitting fluorescent light reveals insight into the orientation of the fluorescent probe molecule restricted by the highly ordered zeolite channel framework, thereby visualizing pore accessibility and clearly distinguishing the occupation of straight and sinusoidal channels by the probe molecule. Spectral features are, furthermore, observed to tell apart molecules situated in one or the other pore. Special focus was given on the rim and tip regions of the zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. On the basis of the confocal approach of the investigation, the aforementioned features are evaluated in three dimensions, while the degradation of the zeolite framework upon postsynthesis steam treatment could be visualized by occupation of the sinusoidal pores. PMID:25590519

  13. CO2 SEPARATIONS USING ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2001-06-30

    Zeolite and other inorganic molecular sieve membranes have shown potential for separations based on molecular size and shape because of their small pore sized, typically less than 1 nm, and their narrow pore size distribution. The high thermal and chemical stability of these inorganic crystals make them ideal materials for use in high temperature applications such as catalytic membrane reactors. Most of the progress with zeolite membranes has been with MFI zeolites prepared on porous disks and tubes. The MFI zeolite is a medium pore size structure having nearly circular pores with diameters between .53 and .56 nm. Separation experiments through MFI membranes indicate that competitive adsorption separates light gas mixtures. Light gas selectivities are typically small, however, owing to small differences in adsorption strengths and their small sizes relative to the MFI pore opening. Furthermore, competitive adsorption does not work well at high temperature where zeolite membranes are stable and have potential application. Separation by differences in size has a greater potential to work at high temperature than competitive adsorption, but pores smaller than those in MFI zeolites are required. Therefore, some studies focused on the synthesis of a small, 8-membered-pore structures such as zeolite A (0.41-nm pore diameter) and SAPO-34, a chabazite (about .4-nm pore diameter with about 1.4 nm cages) analog. The small pore size of the zeolite A and SAPO-34 structures made the separation of smaller molecules by differences in size possible. Zeolite MFI and SAPO-34 membranes were prepared on the inside surface of porous alumina tubes by hydrothermal synthesis, and single gas and binary mixture permeances were measured to characterize the membrane's performance. A mathematical diffusion model was developed to determine the relative quantities of zeolite and non-zeolite pores in different membranes by modeling the permeation date of CO{sub 2}. This model expresses the total

  14. Single-Cell Metabolite Profiling of Stalk and Glandular Cells of Intact Trichomes with Internal Electrode Capillary Pressure Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Taiken; Wada, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    In this report, we developed the pressure probe electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with internal electrode capillary (IEC-PPESI-MS) which enables high spatial-resolution cell sampling, precise postsampling manipulation, and high detection sensitivity. Using this technique, a comparative in situ single-cell metabolite profiling of stalk and glandular cells, the two adjacent cell types comprising a trichome unit in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.), were performed to clarify the extent of metabolic differentiation between two cell types as well as among different types of trichomes. Owing to high sensitivity of the system, less than a picoliter cell sap from a single stalk cell sufficiently yielded a number of peaks of amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and flavonoids. The minimal cell sap removal from a stalk cell without severe disturbance of trichome structure enabled sequential analysis of adjacent glandular cell on the same trichome, which showed the presence of striking differences in metabolite compositions between two adjacent cell types. Comparison among different types of trichome also revealed significant variations in metabolite profiles, particularly in flavonoids and acyl sugars compositions. Some metabolites were found only in specific cell types or particular trichome types. Although extensive metabolomics analysis of glandular cells of tomato trichomes has been previously documented, this is the first report describing cell-to-cell variations in metabolite compositions of stalk and glandular cells as well as in different trichome types. Further application of this technique may provide new insights into distinct metabolism in plant cells displaying variations in shape, size, function and physicochemical properties. PMID:26845634

  15. Atom probe tomography study of internal interfaces in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin-films

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, T. Cojocaru-Mirédin, O.; Choi, P. Raabe, D.; Mousel, M.; Redinger, A.; Siebentritt, S.

    2015-09-07

    We report on atom probe tomography studies of the composition at internal interfaces in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin-films. For Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} precursors, which are deposited at 320 °C under Zn-rich conditions, grain boundaries are found to be enriched with Cu irrespective of whether Cu-poor or Cu-rich growth conditions are chosen. Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} grains are found to be Cu-poor and excess Cu atoms are found to be accumulated at grain boundaries. In addition, nanometer-sized ZnSe grains are detected at or near grain boundaries. The compositions at grain boundaries show different trends after annealing at 500 °C. Grain boundaries in the annealed absorber films, which are free of impurities, are Cu-, Sn-, and Se-depleted and Zn-enriched. This is attributed to dissolution of ZnSe at the Cu-enriched grain boundaries during annealing. Furthermore, some of the grain boundaries of the absorbers are enriched with Na and K atoms, stemming from the soda-lime glass substrate. Such grain boundaries show no or only small changes in composition of the matrix elements. Na and K impurities are also partly segregated at some of the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4}/ZnSe interfaces in the absorber, whereas for the precursors, only Na was detected at such phase boundaries possibly due to a higher diffusivity of Na compared to K. Possible effects of the detected compositional fluctuations on cell performance are discussed.

  16. Single-Cell Metabolite Profiling of Stalk and Glandular Cells of Intact Trichomes with Internal Electrode Capillary Pressure Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Taiken; Wada, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    In this report, we developed the pressure probe electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with internal electrode capillary (IEC-PPESI-MS) which enables high spatial-resolution cell sampling, precise postsampling manipulation, and high detection sensitivity. Using this technique, a comparative in situ single-cell metabolite profiling of stalk and glandular cells, the two adjacent cell types comprising a trichome unit in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.), were performed to clarify the extent of metabolic differentiation between two cell types as well as among different types of trichomes. Owing to high sensitivity of the system, less than a picoliter cell sap from a single stalk cell sufficiently yielded a number of peaks of amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and flavonoids. The minimal cell sap removal from a stalk cell without severe disturbance of trichome structure enabled sequential analysis of adjacent glandular cell on the same trichome, which showed the presence of striking differences in metabolite compositions between two adjacent cell types. Comparison among different types of trichome also revealed significant variations in metabolite profiles, particularly in flavonoids and acyl sugars compositions. Some metabolites were found only in specific cell types or particular trichome types. Although extensive metabolomics analysis of glandular cells of tomato trichomes has been previously documented, this is the first report describing cell-to-cell variations in metabolite compositions of stalk and glandular cells as well as in different trichome types. Further application of this technique may provide new insights into distinct metabolism in plant cells displaying variations in shape, size, function and physicochemical properties.

  17. Preparation of Robust, Thin Zeolite Membrane Sheet for Molecular Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jian; Canfield, Nathan L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2011-10-19

    This paper reports a feasibility study on the preparation of zeolite membrane films on a thin, porous metal support sheet (50-{micro}m thick). Zeolite sodium A (NaA) and silicalite zeolite frameworks are chosen to represent synthesis of respective hydrophilic-type and hydrophobic-type zeolite membranes on this new support. It is found that a dense, continuous inter-grown zeolite crystal layer at a thickness less than 2 {micro}m can be directly deposited on such a support by using direct and secondary growth techniques. The resulting membrane shows excellent adhesion on the metal sheet. Molecular-sieving functions of the prepared membranes are characterized with ethanol/water separation, CO2 separation, and air dehumidification. The results show great potential to make flexible metal-foil-like zeolite membranes for a range of energy conversion and environmental applications.

  18. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-01-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as (137)Cs(+) from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs(+) ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs(+) ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations.

  19. Atomic sites and stability of Cs+ captured within zeolitic nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kaname; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Kurata, Hiroki; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Sasaki, Yukichi

    2013-08-01

    Zeolites have potential application as ion-exchangers, catalysts and molecular sieves. Zeolites are once again drawing attention in Japan as stable adsorbents and solidification materials of fission products, such as 137Cs+ from damaged nuclear-power plants. Although there is a long history of scientific studies on the crystal structures and ion-exchange properties of zeolites for practical application, there are still open questions, at the atomic-level, on the physical and chemical origins of selective ion-exchange abilities of different cations and detailed atomic structures of exchanged cations inside the nanoscale cavities of zeolites. Here, the precise locations of Cs+ ions captured within A-type zeolite were analyzed using high-resolution electron microscopy. Together with theoretical calculations, the stable positions of absorbed Cs+ ions in the nanocavities are identified, and the bonding environment within the zeolitic framework is revealed to be a key factor that influences the locations of absorbed cations.

  20. Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1994-02-01

    The authors have studied the kinetics of oxylose/xylulose isomerization in significant detail over a variety of zeolites and obtained the pseudo-first order reaction rate constants. The authors have found that HY zeolite is still the best material and zeolites are more selective than homogeneous acid catalysts where decomposition of the sugar compounds is much faster. They have completed, as described in the Year 2 Work Plan, the study of cellobiose hydrolysis with an ion exchange resin. The kinetics of the solid-catalyzed reaction is qualitatively similar to that for catalysis by homogeneous acids. The planned program of NMR studies has revealed the dynamics of sugar molecules within the zeolite cavities. Two chemisorbed and a physisorbed state have been identified in HY zeolite. A new state, accounting for as much as a half of the sugar, has been found in ZSM-5 zeolite.

  1. Prediction of Zeolite Framework Types by a Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujiang; Lach-Hab, Mohammed; Vaisman, Iosif; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2009-03-01

    Zeolites are microporous crystalline materials with highly regular framework structures consisting of molecular-sized pores and channels. Characteristic framework types of zeolites are traditionally determined by the combined information of coordination sequences and vertex symbols. Here we present a machine learning model for classifying zeolite crystals according to their framework types. An eighteen-dimensional feature vector is defined including topological descriptors and physical/chemical properties of zeolite crystals [Microporous and Mesoporous Materials 117, 339 (2009)]. Trained with crystallographic data of known zeolites, the new model can predict the framework types of unknown zeolite crystals with up to 98 % accuracy. Compared with conventional methods, the machine learning model is more robust handling crystal disorder and/or crystal defects in a more effective manner. This model can be adapted for classifying and clustering other crystalline species.

  2. Zeolite and swine inoculum effect on poultry manure biomethanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougias, P. G.; Fotidis, I. A.; Zaganas, I. D.; Kotsopoulos, T. A.; Martzopoulos, G. G.

    2013-03-01

    Poultry manure is an ammonia-rich substrate that inhibits methanogenesis, causing severe problems to the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, the effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of poultry waste inoculated with well-digested swine manure was investigated. A significant increase in methane production was observed in treatments where zeolite was added, compared to the treatment without zeolite.Methane production in the treatment with 10 g dm-3 of natural zeolite was found to be 109.75% higher compared to the treatment without zeolite addition. The results appear to be influenced by the addition of zeolite, which reduces ammonia toxicity in anaerobic digestion and by the ammonia-tolerant swine inoculum.

  3. Inclusion of polyaniline filaments in zeolite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Enzel, P.; Bein, T. )

    1989-08-24

    Polyaniline has been synthesized in the channels of mordenite (one-dimensional) and zeolite Y (three-dimensional). Aniline was diffused from hexane solution into dehydrated zeolite pores containing different concentrations of framework hydroxyl groups. Addition of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} to an aqueous suspension of the loaded zeolites afforded intrazeolite polyaniline chains, as demonstrated by FTIR, electronic absorption data, and recovery of the included polymer. Stoichiometric, kinetic, XPS, and microscopic data and the absence of bulk conductivity of the polymer/zeolite powders lead to the conclusion that the polymer is formed inside the host channel system. While the polyaniline chains in mordenite channels appear to be more highly oxidized than in Y zeolite, both systems show spectroscopic features typical of emeraldine base and emeraldine salt polymers. The polyaniline/zeolite hybrids represent a new class of materials containing synthetic conductors encapsulated in crystalline inorganic hosts with channel systems of molecular dimensions.

  4. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  5. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  6. Asymmetric printing of molecules and zeolites on self assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Nermin Seda; Schäfer, Andreas; Ravoo, Bart Jan; De Cola, Luisa

    2010-04-01

    Microcontact printing (mCP) is used to immobilize dyes and peptides asymmetrically, by a "peptide coupling" reaction, on monolayers of zeolite L crystals in the contact area between the stamp and the surface of the monolayer. Chemically patterned surfaces of monolayers of zeolite L crystals are obtained by using patterned stamps with different ink solutions. Additional printing of functionalized nano-objects on SAMs of zeolite L crystals is demonstrated.

  7. Large zeolites - Why and how to grow in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of zeolite crystals which are considered to be the most valuable catalytic and adsorbent materials of the chemical processing industry are discussed. It is proposed to use triethanolamine as a nucleation control agent to control the time release of Al in a zeolite A solution and to increase the average and maximum crystal size by 25-50 times. Large zeolites could be utilized to make membranes for reactors/separators which will substantially increase their efficiency.

  8. Fluoride-assisted synthesis of bimodal microporous SSZ-13 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Kosinov, Nikolay; Hofmann, Jan P; Mezari, Brahim; Qian, Qingyun; Rohling, Roderigh; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-02-21

    The presence of small amount of fluoride in alkaline hydrothermal synthesis of SSZ-13 zeolite yields bimodal microporous particles with substantially improved performance in the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction. Hydrocarbon uptake measurements and fluorescence microspectroscopy of spent catalysts demonstrate enhanced diffusion through micropores at the grain boundaries of nanocrystals running through the zeolite particles. Fluoride-assisted SSZ-13 synthesis is a cheap and scalable approach to optimize the performance of MTO zeolite catalysts. PMID:26810114

  9. Molecular motion of ferrocene in a faujasite-type zeolite: A quasielastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, E.; Schepper, I.M. de; Schmets, A.J.M.; Grimm, H.; Overweg, A.R.; Santen, R.A. van

    2000-02-24

    The authors study the molecular motion of ferrocene Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2} locked up in the supercages of KY zeolite at temperatures 22 K {le} T {le} 238 K by means of quasielastic neutron scattering. The geometry of the motion is determined to be a 5-fold internal jump reorientation of the cyclopentadienyl C{sub 5}H{sub 5} rings around the symmetry axis of the ferrocene molecule. The mean residence time was obtained for these jumps as well as the activation energy for the process. A comparison was made of NMR results on ferrocene in faujasite-type zeolites and quasielastic neutron scattering results on pure ferrocene.

  10. Peculiarities of the dielectric response of natural zeolite composites prepared by using zeolite and silicon powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk Koc, S.; Orbukh, V. I.; Eyvazova, G. M.; Lebedeva, N. N.; Salamov, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the real and imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of natural zeolite composites prepared by using zeolite and silicon powders. The dielectric response (DR) dependences on the frequency (3-300 GHz) of electric field and different Si concentrations (5-33%) are non-monotonic and a maximum peak is observed. This peak position is practically independent on the frequency and its maximum is observed in zeolite composites which included 9% of the Si-powder. Also the maximum peak is decreased by about an order of magnitude when frequency increases from 500 Hz to 5 kHz. Addition of the conductive Si-particles to zeolite-powder leads to two opposite effects. Firstly, the movement of electrons in the Si-particles provides increase of DR. Secondly, cations which leaving from zeolite pores can be neutralized by the particles of Si in the intercrystalline-space. Such a peculiar mechanism for recombination of Si electrons and cations from pores leads to a reduction of DR for large silicon concentrations. Due to the fact that the contribution of free carriers in the decreasing of the DR as the frequency increases, it is consistent with the suggestion that the maximum peak decreases with increasing frequency.

  11. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  12. Large zeolites: why and how to grow in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1991-12-01

    Zeolite crystals are one of the Chemical Process Industry's most valuable catalytic and adsorbent materials. Large, essentially defect-free zeolite crystals could be used to better understand zeolite catalysis mechanisms, and could help in designing better zeolite adsorption systems. In addition, if zeolites could be made large enough, they could be used to make zeolite membranes; these could be used as reactors/separators, resulting in highly improved efficiency. Space provides a unique environment to grow large zeolites by allowing them to continue to grow suspended in their nutrient field. In order to better utilize this microgravity environment, it is necessary to control the nucleation event. Triethanolamine (TEA) can be used to control the time release of aluminum in a zeolite A solution. In a 1 g environment, the use of TEA resulted in a 25 - 50X increase in average and maximum crystal size. It is proposed that if fluid motion can be controlled and the rate of nutrient transport increased, substantially larger zeolite crystals can be formed in microgravity, using such nucleation control agents.

  13. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, George A.

    1986-01-01

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  14. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, G.A.

    1985-03-05

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  15. Dry method for recycling iodine-loaded silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Thomas R.; Staples, Bruce A.; Murphy, Llewellyn P.

    1978-05-09

    Fission product iodine is removed from a waste gas stream and stored by passing the gas stream through a bed of silver-exchanged zeolite until the zeolite is loaded with iodine, passing dry hydrogen gas through the bed to remove the iodine and regenerate the bed, and passing the hydrogen stream containing the hydrogen iodide thus formed through a lead-exchanged zeolite which adsorbs the radioactive iodine from the gas stream and permanently storing the lead-exchanged zeolite loaded with radioactive iodine.

  16. Ion exchange properties of Japanese natural zeolites in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Ion exchange properties of five different Japanese natural zeolites in seawater were examined. Sodium ions could be reduced by all zeolites, although anions, Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-), in seawater showed barely changes. Natural zeolite desalination treatment mainly depends on the ion exchange between Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+) in seawater and Ca(2+) in natural zeolite. This study found that mordenite is superior to clinoptilolite for use in Na(+) reduction. Mordenite with high cation exchange capacity containing Ca(2+) resulted in the highest Na(+) reduction from seawater.

  17. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  18. Delaminated zeolites: Combining the benefits of zeolites and mesoporous materials for catalytic uses

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A.; Fornes, V.; Martinez-Triguero, J.; Pergher, S.B.

    1999-08-15

    The delamination of the layered precursor of the MCM-22 zeolite (MWW structure) affords monolayers of a crystalline aluminosilicate with more than 700 m{sup 2}/g of a well defined external surface formed by cups of 0.7 x 0.7 nm. In this layered structure the circular 10-member-ring microporous system is preserved. The resultant material presents the strong acidity and stability characteristic of the zeolites but, at the same time, offers the high accessibility to large molecules characteristic of the amorphous aluminosilicates. The cracking behavior during the process of small and large molecules has been compared with that of the zeolite MCM-22 and pillared laminar precursor MCM-36.

  19. Surface modified natural zeolite as a carrier for sustained diclofenac release: A preliminary feasibility study.

    PubMed

    de Gennaro, Bruno; Catalanotti, Lilia; Cappelletti, Piergiulio; Langella, Alessio; Mercurio, Mariano; Serri, Carla; Biondi, Marco; Mayol, Laura

    2015-06-01

    In view of zeolite potentiality as a carrier for sustained drug release, a clinoptilolite-rich rock from California (CLI_CA) was superficially modified with cetylpyridinium chloride and loaded with diclofenac sodium (DS). The obtained surface modified natural zeolites (SMNZ) were characterized by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and laser light scattering (LS). Their flowability properties, drug adsorption and in vitro release kinetics in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) were also investigated. CLI_CA is a Na- and K-rich clinoptilolite with a cationic exchange ability that fits well with its zeolite content (clinoptilolite=80 wt%); the external cationic exchange capacity is independent of the cationic surfactant used. LS and CLSM analyses have shown a wide distribution of volume diameters of SMNZ particles that, along with their irregular shape, make them cohesive with scarce flow properties. CLSM observation has revealed the localization of different molecules in/on SMNZ by virtue of their chemical nature. In particular, cationic and polar probes prevalently localize in SMNZ bulk, whereas anionic probes preferentially arrange themselves on SMNZ surface and the loading of a nonpolar molecule in/on SMNZ is discouraged. The adsorption rate of DS onto SMNZ was shown by different kinetic models highlighting the fact that DS adsorption is a pseudo-second order reaction and that the diffusion through the boundary layer is the rate-controlling step of the process. DS release in an ionic medium, such as SIF, can be sustained for about 5h through a mechanism prevalently governed by anionic exchange with a rapid final phase.

  20. Zeolite thin films: from computer chips to space stations.

    PubMed

    Lew, Christopher M; Cai, Rui; Yan, Yushan

    2010-02-16

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline oxides that have uniform and molecular-sized pores (3-12 A in diameter). Although natural zeolites were first discovered in 1756, significant commercial development did not begin until the 1950s when synthetic zeolites with high purity and controlled chemical composition became available. Since then, major commercial applications of zeolites have been limited to catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange, all using zeolites in powder form. Although researchers have widely investigated zeolite thin films within the last 15 years, most of these studies were motivated by the potential application of these materials as separation membranes and membrane reactors. In the last decade, we have recognized and demonstrated that zeolite thin films can have new, diverse, and economically significant applications that others had not previously considered. In this Account, we highlight our work on the development of zeolite thin films as low-dielectric constant (low-k) insulators for future generation computer chips, environmentally benign corrosion-resistant coatings for aerospace alloys, and hydrophilic and microbiocidal coatings for gravity-independent water separation in space stations. Although these three applications might not seem directly related, they all rely on the ability to fine-tune important macroscopic properties of zeolites by changing their ratio of silicon to aluminum. For example, pure-silica zeolites (PSZs, Si/Al = infinity) are hydrophobic, acid stable, and have no ion exchange capacity, while low-silica zeolites (LSZs, Si/Al < 2) are hydrophilic, acid soluble, and have a high ion exchange capacity. These new thin films also take advantage of some unique properties of zeolites that have not been exploited before, such as a higher elastic modulus, hardness, and heat conductivity than those of amorphous porous silicas, and microbiocidal capabilities derived from their ion exchange capacities. Finally, we briefly discuss our

  1. Zeolite thin films: from computer chips to space stations.

    PubMed

    Lew, Christopher M; Cai, Rui; Yan, Yushan

    2010-02-16

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline oxides that have uniform and molecular-sized pores (3-12 A in diameter). Although natural zeolites were first discovered in 1756, significant commercial development did not begin until the 1950s when synthetic zeolites with high purity and controlled chemical composition became available. Since then, major commercial applications of zeolites have been limited to catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange, all using zeolites in powder form. Although researchers have widely investigated zeolite thin films within the last 15 years, most of these studies were motivated by the potential application of these materials as separation membranes and membrane reactors. In the last decade, we have recognized and demonstrated that zeolite thin films can have new, diverse, and economically significant applications that others had not previously considered. In this Account, we highlight our work on the development of zeolite thin films as low-dielectric constant (low-k) insulators for future generation computer chips, environmentally benign corrosion-resistant coatings for aerospace alloys, and hydrophilic and microbiocidal coatings for gravity-independent water separation in space stations. Although these three applications might not seem directly related, they all rely on the ability to fine-tune important macroscopic properties of zeolites by changing their ratio of silicon to aluminum. For example, pure-silica zeolites (PSZs, Si/Al = infinity) are hydrophobic, acid stable, and have no ion exchange capacity, while low-silica zeolites (LSZs, Si/Al < 2) are hydrophilic, acid soluble, and have a high ion exchange capacity. These new thin films also take advantage of some unique properties of zeolites that have not been exploited before, such as a higher elastic modulus, hardness, and heat conductivity than those of amorphous porous silicas, and microbiocidal capabilities derived from their ion exchange capacities. Finally, we briefly discuss our

  2. Superconducting characteristics of 4-Å carbon nanotube–zeolite composite

    PubMed Central

    Lortz, Rolf; Zhang, Qiucen; Shi, Wu; Ye, Jian Ting; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Zhe; He, Hongtao; Sheng, Ping; Qian, Tiezheng; Tang, Zikang; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xixiang; Wang, Jiannong; Chan, Che Ting

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated nanocomposites consisting of 4-Å carbon nanotubes embedded in the 0.7-nm pores of aluminophosphate-five (AFI) zeolite that display a superconducting specific heat transition at 15 K. MicroRaman spectra of the samples show strong and spatially uniform radial breathing mode (RBM) signals at 510 cm−1 and 550 cm−1, characteristic of the (4, 2) and (5, 0) nanotubes, respectively. The specific heat transition is suppressed at >2 T, with a temperature dependence characteristic of finite-size effects. Comparison with theory shows the behavior to be consistent with that of a type II BCS superconductor, characterized by a coherence length of 14 ± 2 nm and a magnetic penetration length of 1.5 ± 0.7 μm. Four probe and differential resistance measurements have also indicated a superconducting transition initiating at 15 K, but the magnetoresistance data indicate the superconducting network to be inhomogeneous, with a component being susceptible to magnetic fields below 3 T and other parts capable of withstanding a magnetic field of 5 T or beyond. PMID:19369206

  3. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  4. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  5. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading. PMID:26652350

  6. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading.

  7. Zeolite-type metal organic frameworks immobilized Eu³⁺ for cation sensing in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Yan, Bing

    2015-12-01

    A novel luminescent lanthanide metal organic framework (Ln-MOF) is synthesized by in situ encapsulating Eu(3+) ions to partial replace the transition-metal clusters in the channels of CPM-17-Zn nanocrystals. The Eu(3+) functionalized zeolite-type MOF hybrid system shows excellent luminescence property and photo-stability in aqueous environment for the sensitization and protection from the host framework. Subsequently, as a highly selective and sensitive sensor, its nanocrystals can be used to detect Cd(2+) in aqueous solution. In addition, the possible sensing mechanism based on ion exchange is discussed in detail. This work is one of the few cases for detecting Cd(2+) in aqueous solution based on a zeolite-type MOF. The good fluorescence stability, low detection limit and broad linear range in aqueous environment make this probe to be expected to have potential application in intracellular sensing and imaging of Cd(2+) potentially.

  8. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

    1999-06-22

    A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

  9. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2001-01-01

    A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  10. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1999-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  12. FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS OF PERVAPORATION THROUGH ZEOLITE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolite membranes are well suited for separating liquid-phase mixtures by pervaporation because of their molecular-sized pores and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature, and the first commercial application of zeolite membranes has been for dehydrating organics [1]. Because of ...

  13. Crewmember working on the mid deck Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View showing Payload Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, in the mid deck, conducting the Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Experiment in the mid deck stowage locker work area. View shows assembly of zeolite sample in the metal autoclave cylinders prior to insertion into the furnace.

  14. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J.

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  15. Factors that Determine Zeolite Stability in Hot Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Kuizhi; Chen, Banghao; White, Jeffery L; Resasco, Daniel E

    2015-09-16

    The susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water may hamper their full utilization in aqueous phase processes, such as those involved in biomass conversion and upgrading reactions. Interactions of zeolites with water strongly depend on the presence of hydrophilic moieties including Brønsted acid sites (BAS), extraframework cations, and silanol defects, which facilitate wetting of the surface. However, it is not clear which of these moieties are responsible for the susceptibility of zeolites to liquid water. Previous studies have offered contradictory explanations because the role of each of these characteristics has not been investigated independently. In this work, a systematic comparison has been attempted by relating crystallinity losses to the variation of each of the five zeolite characteristics that may influence their stability in liquid water, including number of BAS, Si-O-Si bonds, framework type, silanol defects, and extraframework Al. In this study, we have systematically monitored the crystallinity changes of a series of HY, H-ZSM-5, and H-β zeolite samples with varying Si/Al ratio, density of BAS, zeolite structure, and density of silanol defects upon exposure to liquid water at 200 °C. The results of this comparison unambiguously indicate that the density of silanol defects plays the most crucial role in determining susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water. By functionalizing the silanol defects with organosilanes, the hydrophobicity of defective zeolite is increased and the tolerance to hot liquid water is significantly enhanced. PMID:26301890

  16. Transition Metal Ions in Zeolites: Coordination and activation of O2

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Pieter J.; Woertink, Julia S.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.; Schoonheydt, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites containing transition metal ions (TMI) often show promising activity as heterogeneous catalysts in pollution abatement and selective oxidation reactions. In this paper, two aspects of research on the TMI Cu, Co and Fe in zeolites are discussed: (i) coordination to the lattice and (ii) activated oxygen species. At low loading, TMI preferably occupy exchange sites in six-membered oxygen rings (6MR) where the TMI preferentially coordinate with the oxygen atoms of Al tetrahedra. High TMI loadings result in a variety of TMI species formed at the zeolite surface. Removal of the extra-lattice oxygens during high temperature pretreatments can result in auto-reduction. Oxidation of reduced TMI sites often results in the formation of highly reactive oxygen species. In Cu-ZSM-5, calcination with O2 results in the formation of a species, which was found to be a crucial intermediate in both the direct decomposition of NO and N2O and the selective oxidation of methane into methanol. An activated oxygen species, called α-oxygen, is formed in Fe-ZSM5 and reported to be the active site in the partial oxidation of methane and benzene into methanol and phenol, respectively. However, this reactive α-oxygen can only be formed with N2O, not with O2. O2 activated Co intermediates in Faujasite (FAU) zeolites can selectively oxidize α-pinene and epoxidize styrene. In Co-FAU, CoIII superoxo and peroxo complexes are suggested to be the active cores, whereas in Cu and Fe-ZSM-5 various monomeric and dimeric sites have been proposed, but no consensus has been obtained. Very recently, the active site in Cu-ZSM-5 was identified as a bent [Cu-O-Cu]2+ core (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009, 106, 18908-18913). Overall, O2 activation depends on the interplay of structural factors such as type of zeolite, size of the channels and cages and chemical factors such as Si/Al ratio and the nature, charge and distribution of the charge balancing cations. The presence of several different TMI sites

  17. Selective Transformation of Various Nitrogen-Containing Exhaust Gases toward N2 over Zeolite Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning; Lei, Zhigang; Chen, Biaohua

    2016-03-23

    In this review we focus on the catalytic removal of a series of N-containing exhaust gases with various valences, including nitriles (HCN, CH3CN, and C2H3CN), ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxides (NO(x)), which can cause some serious environmental problems, such as acid rain, haze weather, global warming, and even death. The zeolite catalysts with high internal surface areas, uniform pore systems, considerable ion-exchange capabilities, and satisfactory thermal stabilities are herein addressed for the corresponding depollution processes. The sources and toxicities of these pollutants are introduced. The important physicochemical properties of zeolite catalysts, including shape selectivity, surface area, acidity, and redox ability, are described in detail. The catalytic combustion of nitriles and ammonia, the direct catalytic decomposition of N2O, and the selective catalytic reduction and direct catalytic decomposition of NO are systematically discussed, involving the catalytic behaviors as well as mechanism studies based on spectroscopic and kinetic approaches and molecular simulations. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are given. In the present work, emphasis is placed on the structure-performance relationship with an aim to design an ideal zeolite-based catalyst for the effective elimination of harmful N-containing compounds. PMID:26889565

  18. Mechanisms of CPB Modified Zeolite on Mercury Adsorption in Simulated Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Huang, Hui; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hao, Shuoshuo; Shen, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study was carried out to analyze the effects of mercury(II) adsorption by surface modified zeolite (SMZ) and adsorption mechanism. Cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was used to prepare SMZ. The characterization methods by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that both the surface and internal zeolite were covered with CPB molecules, but the main binding sites were surface. Results showed that the organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the SMZ were 7.76 times and 4.22 times higher than those of natural zeolite (NZ), respectively. Zeta potentials before and after modification were measured at -7.80 mV and -30.27 mV, respectively. Moreover, the saturation adsorptive capacity of SMZ was 16.35 times higher than NZ in mercury-containing wastewater. The possible mechanisms of mercury elimination were surface adsorption, hydrophobic interaction, ion exchange, electricity neutralization. The adsorption process was affected little by competitive ions.

  19. Selective Transformation of Various Nitrogen-Containing Exhaust Gases toward N2 over Zeolite Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning; Lei, Zhigang; Chen, Biaohua

    2016-03-23

    In this review we focus on the catalytic removal of a series of N-containing exhaust gases with various valences, including nitriles (HCN, CH3CN, and C2H3CN), ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxides (NO(x)), which can cause some serious environmental problems, such as acid rain, haze weather, global warming, and even death. The zeolite catalysts with high internal surface areas, uniform pore systems, considerable ion-exchange capabilities, and satisfactory thermal stabilities are herein addressed for the corresponding depollution processes. The sources and toxicities of these pollutants are introduced. The important physicochemical properties of zeolite catalysts, including shape selectivity, surface area, acidity, and redox ability, are described in detail. The catalytic combustion of nitriles and ammonia, the direct catalytic decomposition of N2O, and the selective catalytic reduction and direct catalytic decomposition of NO are systematically discussed, involving the catalytic behaviors as well as mechanism studies based on spectroscopic and kinetic approaches and molecular simulations. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are given. In the present work, emphasis is placed on the structure-performance relationship with an aim to design an ideal zeolite-based catalyst for the effective elimination of harmful N-containing compounds.

  20. Zeolites in Eocene basaltic pillow lavas of the Siletz River Volcanics, Central Coast Range, Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, T.E.C.; Staples, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Zeolites and associated minerals occur in a tholeiitic basaltic pillow lava sequence. Although the zeolite assemblages are similar to those found in other major zeolite occurrences in basaltic pillow lavas, regional zoning of the zeolite assemblages is not apparent. The formation of the different assemblages is discussed.-D.F.B.

  1. Synthesis and catalytic applications of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials

    PubMed Central

    Vernimmen, Jarian; Cool, Pegie

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the last decade, research concerning nanoporous siliceous materials has been focused on mesoporous materials with intrinsic zeolitic features. These materials are thought to be superior, because they are able to combine (i) the enhanced diffusion and accessibility for larger molecules and viscous fluids typical of mesoporous materials with (ii) the remarkable stability, catalytic activity and selectivity of zeolites. This review gives an overview of the state of the art concerning combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. Focus is put on the synthesis and the applications of the combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. The different synthesis approaches and formation mechanisms leading to these materials are comprehensively discussed and compared. Moreover, Ti-containing nanoporous materials as redox catalysts are discussed to illustrate a potential implementation of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. PMID:22259762

  2. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na+ with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  3. Potential and actual uses of zeolites in crop protection.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Caroline; Someus, Edward; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2015-10-01

    In this review, it is demonstrated that zeolites have a potential to be used as crop protection agents. Similarly to kaolin, zeolites can be applied as particle films against pests and diseases. Their honeycomb framework, together with their carbon dioxide sorption capacity and their heat stress reduction capacity, makes them suitable as a leaf coating product. Furthermore, their water sorption capacity and their smaller particle sizes make them effective against fungal diseases and insect pests. Finally, these properties also ensure that zeolites can act as carriers of different active substances, which makes it possible to use zeolites for slow-release applications. Based on the literature, a general overview is provided of the different basic properties of zeolites as promising products in crop protection.

  4. A pair distribution function analysis of zeolite beta

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Inesta, M.M.; Peral, I.; Proffen, T.; Lobo, R.F.

    2010-07-20

    We describe the structural refinement of zeolite beta using the local structure obtained with the pair distribution function (PDF) method. A high quality synchrotron and two neutron scattering datasets were obtained on two samples of siliceous zeolite beta. The two polytypes that make up zeolite beta have the same local structure; therefore refinement of the two structures was possible using the same experimental PDF. Optimized structures of polytypes A and B were used to refine the structures using the program PDFfit. Refinements using only the synchrotron or the neutron datasets gave results inconsistent with each other but a cyclic refinement with the two datasets gave a good fit to both PDFs. The results show that the PDF method is a viable technique to analyze the local structure of disordered zeolites. However, given the complexity of most zeolite frameworks, the use of both X-ray and neutron radiation and high-resolution patterns is essential to obtain reliable refinements.

  5. Preparation of a Versatile Bifunctional Zeolite for Targeted Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Raidoo, Renugan; Schultz, Michael K.; Larsen, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional zeolite Y was prepared for use in targeted in vivo molecular imaging applications. The strategy involved functionalization of the external surface of zeolite Y with chloropropyltriethoxysilane followed by reaction with sodium azide to form azide-functionalized NaY, which is amenable to copper(1) catalyzed click chemistry. In this study, a model alkyne (4-pentyn-1-ol) was attached to the azide-terminated surface via click chemistry to demonstrate feasibility for attachment of molecular targeting vectors (e.g., peptides, aptamers) to the zeolite surface. The modified particle efficiently incorporates the imaging radioisotope gallium-68 (68Ga) into the pores of the azide-functionalized NaY zeolite to form a stable bifunctional molecular targeting vector. The result is a versatile “clickable” zeolite platform that can be tailored for future in vivo molecular targeting and imaging modalities. PMID:21306141

  6. Mineral resource of the month: natural and synthetic zeolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.

    2008-01-01

    Robert Virta, mineral commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, prepared the following information about the zeolite industry. Volcanic rocks containing natural zeolites — hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that contain alkaline and alkaline-earth metals — have been mined worldwide for more than 1,000 years for use as cements and building stone. For centuries, people thought natural zeolites occurred only in small amounts inside cavities of volcanic rock. But in the 1950s and early 1960s, large zeolite deposits were discovered in volcanic tuffs in the western United States and in marine tuffs in Italy and Japan. And since then, similar deposits have been found around the world, from Hungary to Cuba to New Zealand. The discovery of these larger deposits made commercial mining of natural zeolite possible.

  7. Influence of NaA Zeolite Crystal Expansion/Contraction on Zeolite Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Stephanie G; Payzant, E Andrew; Gibbons, Will T; Soydas, Belma; Kita, Hidetoshi; Noble, Richard D; Falconer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ powder XRD measurements showed that the NaA zeolite unit cell contracts and expands upon adsorption, and these changes in zeolite crystal size correlate with permeation changes through NaA zeolite membranes. These membranes had high pervaporation selectivities, even though gas permeation was mainly through defects, as indicated by Knudsen selectivities for gases. At 300 K and a thermodynamic activity of 0.03, water contracted the NaA crystals by 0.22 vol%, and this contraction increased the helium flux through two NaA membranes by approximately 80%. Crystal contraction also increased the fluxes of i-butane during vapor permeation and i-propanol (IPA) during pervaporation (~ 0.03 wt% water). At activities above 0.07, water expanded NaA crystals and correspondingly decreased the membrane fluxes of helium, i-butane, and IPA. Similarly, methanol contracted NaA crystals by 0.05 vol% at an activity of 0.02, and this contraction slightly increased the helium and i-butane fluxes through a NaA membrane. Above an activity of 0.06, methanol expanded the crystals, and the fluxes of helium and i-butane through a NaA membrane decreased. The adsorbate-induced changes explain some pervaporation behavior reported by others, and they indicate that crystal expansion and contraction may increase or decrease zeolite NaA membrane selectivity by changing the defect sizes.

  8. Radiation-induced silver agglomeration in molecular sieves: A comparison between A and X zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadło, Jarosław; Waşowicz, Tomasz; Michalik, Jacek

    1995-06-01

    The stabilization conditions of silver atoms and clusters in hydrated and dehydrated AgNa-A and AgNa-X zeolites γ-irradiated at 77 K have been studied by ESR. It was found that silver agglomeration mechanisms in hydrated A and X zeolites are very similar and are controlled by the migration of silver atoms into the α-cages. In dehydrated zeolites agglomeration leads to completely different silver clusters in A and X zeolites. Small cationic clusters are stabilized in A zeolites and metallic clusters in X zeolites. Various factors affecting the agglomeration process in A and X zeolites are discussed.

  9. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: the influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, Serguei; Valdés, Héctor; Manéro, Marie-Hélène; Zaror, Claudio A

    2014-06-15

    In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity.

  10. Possible Responsibility of Silicone Materials for Degradation of the CO2 Removal System in the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, Mario; Sharma, Hemant; Borrok, David; Ren, Mingua; Pannell, Keith

    2011-01-01

    From data concerning the degradation of the CO2 removal system in the International Space Station (ISS) two important features were apparent: (1) The atmosphere within the International Space Station (ISS) contained many organic compounds including alcohols, halocarbons, aldehydes, esters, and ketones, inter alia. Various cyclosiloxanes Dn, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3) and its higher homologs (D4) and (D5) are also present presumably due to offgassing. (2) Screens within the zeolite-containing canisters, used for the removal of CO2, exhibited partial clogging due to zeolitic fragments (dust) along with "sticky" residues, that in toto significantly reduced the efficiency of the CO2 removal process. Samples of the ISS fresh zeolite, used zeolite, filter clogging zeolite particles and residual polymeric materials were examined using, inter alia, NMR, EM and HRSEM. These data were compared to equivalent samples obtained prior and subsequent to Dn polymerization experiments performed in our laboratories using the clean ISS zeolite samples as catalyst. Polysiloxane materials produced were essentially equivalent in the two cases and the EM images demonstrate a remarkable similarity between the ISS filter zeolite samples and the post-polymerization zeolite material from our experiments. In this regard even the changes in the Al/Si ratio from the virgin zeolite material to the filter samples and the post-polymerization laboratory samples samples is noteworthy. This research was supported by a contract from the Boeing Company

  11. Investigation on the effect of zeolite precursor on the formation process of MCM-41 containing zeolite Y building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Xiong, Guang; Liu, Liping; Wang, Longlong

    2013-04-01

    The formation process of MCM-41 containing zeolite Y building units has been investigated by UV Raman spectroscopy, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption and electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). It is found that the precursor containing zeolite Y secondary building units promotes the formation of a metastable mesopore structure just after mixing the zeolite precursors with CTAB. In contrast, the low-polymerized aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolite crystals cannot be assembled with CTAB at this stage. The result supports that the zeolite secondary building units should promote to the formation of the mesopore wall. This has been ascribed to its high anionic charge density as well as the appropriate multidentate coordination. Lowering down the pH value to 9.3 facilitates the further polymerization of the aluminosilicate species to build up a stable mesoporous phase.

  12. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  13. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-12-31

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  14. Characteristics of Lead Sorption by Zeolite Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sewailem, M. S.

    Lead adsorption behavior was investigated using four Zeolite minerals (clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite). The used Pb2+ concentrations were 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 5 µmol mL-1. Results indicated that Pb2+ sorption followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, but over limited concentration ranges for clinoptilolite and analcime. The bindg energy (Kd) reached, 2.400 and 0.875 g L-1 for phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity for such minerals reached 208.33 and 204.08 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) reached, 0.997 and 0.995, respectively. Meanwhile, two stages for Pb2+adsorption were observed with clinoptilolite and analcime in the low and high concentrations of the applied Pb2+. Data also was applicable to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm over the used entire Pb2+ concentration ranges. The binding energy (n) reached, 1.014, 1.005, 1.001 and 1.001 g L-1 for clinoptilolite, analcime, phillipsite and chabazite, respectively. However, the b values (maximum adsorption capacity) reached 202.582, 201.651, 207.062 and 206.871 mg g-1 with correlation coefficient (R2) nearly one for all studying minerals, respectively. Desorption data indicated that most of the sorbed Pb2+ was extractedin the 1st extraction following the adsorption experiment. The ability of the used zeolite minerals to retain Pb2+ was high and there were differences between the studied minerals in sorption of Pb2+. In conclusion, data eliminated that, zeolite minerals especially, philipsite and chabazite, could be successfully used as packing material in subsurface reactive barriers intercepting ground water plumes and for fixed bed reactors designed to remove Pb2+ from industrial wastewater.

  15. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact.

  16. Growth of large zeolite crystals in space

    SciTech Connect

    Sacco, A. Jr.; Dixon, A.; Thompson, R.; Scott, G.; Ditr, J.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis studies performed using close analogs of triethanolamine (TEA) have shown that all three hydroxyl groups and the amine group in this molecule are necessary to provide nucleation suppression. Studies using C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the hydroxyl ions and the amine group are involved in the formation of an aluminum complex. It was also shown that silicate species do not interact this way with TEA in an alkaline solution. These results suggest that successful aluminum complexation leads to nucleation in zeolite-A crystallization.

  17. Hydrogen storage in Chabazite zeolite frameworks.

    PubMed

    Regli, Laura; Zecchina, Adriano; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Spoto, Giuseppe; Lamberti, Carlo; Lillerud, Karl P; Olsbye, Unni; Bordiga, Silvia

    2005-09-01

    We have recently highlighted that H-SSZ-13, a highly siliceous zeolite (Si/Al = 11.6) with a chabazitic framework, is the most efficient zeolitic material for hydrogen storage [A. Zecchina, S. Bordiga, J. G. Vitillo, G. Ricchiardi, C. Lamberti, G. Spoto, M. Bjørgen and K. P. Lillerud, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 6361]. The aim of this new study is thus to clarify both the role played by the acidic strength and by the density of the polarizing centers hosted in the same framework topology in the increase of the adsorptive capabilities of the chabazitic materials towards H2. To achieve this goal, the volumetric experiments of H2 uptake (performed at 77 K) and the transmission IR experiment of H2 adsorption at 15 K have been performed on H-SSZ-13, H-SAPO-34 (the isostructural silico-aluminophosphate material with the same Brønsted site density) and H-CHA (the standard chabazite zeolite: Si/Al = 2.1) materials. We have found that a H2 uptake improvement has been obtained by increasing the acidic strength of the Brønsted sites (moving from H-SAPO-34 to H-SSZ-13). Conversely, the important increase of the Brønsted sites density (moving from H-SSZ-13 to H-CHA) has played a negative role. This unexpected behavior has been explained as follows. The additional Brønsted sites are in mutual interaction via H-bonds inside the small cages of the chabazitic framework and for most of them the energetic cost needed to displace the adjacent OH ligand is higher than the adsorption enthalpy of the OH...H2 adduct. From our work it can be concluded that proton exchanged chabazitic frameworks represent, among zeolites, the most efficient materials for hydrogen storage. We have shown that a proper balance between available space (volume accessible to hydrogen), high contact surface, and specific interaction with strong and isolated polarizing centers are the necessary characteristics requested to design better materials for molecular H2 storage.

  18. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  19. Imperfect wetting of hydrogen in zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.S.; Rall, M.

    1995-11-01

    We have considered the theoretical dependencies of the amount of supercooling of liquid hydrogen as a function of pore size for constrained geometries in order to compare the different mechanisms for supercooling that can be observed: notably the inhibition of nucleation in small geometries and the use of surfaces for which there is imperfect wetting. Analysis of the dependence of the observed supercooling reported elsewhere for molecular hydrogen and hydrogen deuteride on the pore size in zeolites supports the view that imperfect wetting occurs for small pores that have rough surfaces and dimension less than approximately 10{angstrom}.

  20. Hydrogen storage in Chabazite zeolite frameworks.

    PubMed

    Regli, Laura; Zecchina, Adriano; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Spoto, Giuseppe; Lamberti, Carlo; Lillerud, Karl P; Olsbye, Unni; Bordiga, Silvia

    2005-09-01

    We have recently highlighted that H-SSZ-13, a highly siliceous zeolite (Si/Al = 11.6) with a chabazitic framework, is the most efficient zeolitic material for hydrogen storage [A. Zecchina, S. Bordiga, J. G. Vitillo, G. Ricchiardi, C. Lamberti, G. Spoto, M. Bjørgen and K. P. Lillerud, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 6361]. The aim of this new study is thus to clarify both the role played by the acidic strength and by the density of the polarizing centers hosted in the same framework topology in the increase of the adsorptive capabilities of the chabazitic materials towards H2. To achieve this goal, the volumetric experiments of H2 uptake (performed at 77 K) and the transmission IR experiment of H2 adsorption at 15 K have been performed on H-SSZ-13, H-SAPO-34 (the isostructural silico-aluminophosphate material with the same Brønsted site density) and H-CHA (the standard chabazite zeolite: Si/Al = 2.1) materials. We have found that a H2 uptake improvement has been obtained by increasing the acidic strength of the Brønsted sites (moving from H-SAPO-34 to H-SSZ-13). Conversely, the important increase of the Brønsted sites density (moving from H-SSZ-13 to H-CHA) has played a negative role. This unexpected behavior has been explained as follows. The additional Brønsted sites are in mutual interaction via H-bonds inside the small cages of the chabazitic framework and for most of them the energetic cost needed to displace the adjacent OH ligand is higher than the adsorption enthalpy of the OH...H2 adduct. From our work it can be concluded that proton exchanged chabazitic frameworks represent, among zeolites, the most efficient materials for hydrogen storage. We have shown that a proper balance between available space (volume accessible to hydrogen), high contact surface, and specific interaction with strong and isolated polarizing centers are the necessary characteristics requested to design better materials for molecular H2 storage. PMID:16240032

  1. Growth of large zeolite crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Dixon, A.; Thompson, R.; Scott, G.; Ditr, J.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis studies performed using close analogs of triethanolamine (TEA) have shown that all three hydroxyl groups and the amine group in this molecule are necessary to provide nucleation suppression. Studies using C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the hydroxyl ions and the amine group are involved in the formation of an aluminum complex. It was also shown that silicate species fo not interact this way with TEA in an alkaline solution. These results suggest that successful aluminum complexation leads to nucleation in zeolite-A crystallization.

  2. Design and characterization of chitosan/zeolite composite films--Effect of zeolite type and zeolite dose on the film properties.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Gustavo P; Debone, Henrique S; Severino, Patrícia; Souto, Eliana B; da Silva, Classius F

    2016-03-01

    Chitosan films can be used as wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds and severe burns. The antimicrobial properties of these films may be enhanced by the addition of silver. Despite the antimicrobial activity of silver, several studies have reported the cytotoxicity as a factor limiting its biomedical applications. This problem may, however, be circumvented by the provision of sustained release of silver. Silver zeolites can be used as drug delivery platforms to extend the release of silver. The objective of this study was to evaluate the addition of clinoptilolite and A-type zeolites in chitosan films. Sodium zeolites were initially subjected to ion-exchange in a batch reactor. Films were prepared by casting technique using a 2% w/w chitosan solution and two zeolite doses (0.1 or 0.2% w/w). Films were characterized by thermal analysis, color analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and water vapor permeation. The results showed that films present potential for application as dressing. The water vapor permeability is one of the main properties in wound dressings, the best results were obtained for A-type zeolite/chitosan films, which presented a brief reduction of this property in relation to zeolite-free chitosan film. On the other hand, the films containing clinoptilolite showed lower water vapor permeation, which may be also explained by the best distribution of the particles into the polymer which also promoted greater thermal resistance.

  3. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  4. Microcalorimetric study of silica- and zeolite-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.B.; Dumesic, J.A. ); Miller, J.T. )

    1994-07-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heats of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption versus adsorbate coverate were made at 403 K for platinum supported on silica, magnesia/alumina, L-zeolite, Y-zeolite, and ZSM-5. The differential heats at zero coverage for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption were 90 and 140 kJ/mol, respectively, for platinum supported on silica and nonacidic zeolites. The differential heats were large by approximately 20 kJ/mol for hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on platinum particles supported on basis supports such as potassium/silica, magnesia/alumina, and zeolites containing basic cations (K[sup +], Ba[sup 2+]) exchanged in excess of the zeolite framework aluminum content. The microcalorimetric results suggest that the high paraffin aromatization activity and selectivity observed for L-zeolite-supported platinum catalysts do not appear to be caused solely by changes in the adsorptive properties of the cluster-size platinum particles located within the zeolite. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) Flight on USML-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, Nurcan; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Guray, Ipek; Marceau, Michelle; Sacco, Teran L.; Whalen, Leah M.

    1997-01-01

    The extensive use of zeolites and their impact on the world's economy has resulted in many efforts to characterize their structure, and improve the knowledge base for nucleation and growth of these crystals. The zeolite crystal growth (ZCG) experiment on USML-2 aimed to enhance the understanding of nucleation and growth of zeolite crystals, while attempting to provide a means of controlling the defect concentration in microgravity. Zeolites A, X, Beta, and Silicalite were grown during the 16 day - USML-2 mission. The solutions where the nucleation event was controlled yielded larger and more uniform crystals of better morphology and purity than their terrestrial/control counterparts. The external surfaces of zeolite A, X, and Silicalite crystals grown in microgravity were smoother (lower surface roughness) than their terrestrial controls. Catalytic studies with zeolite Beta indicate that crystals grown in space exhibit a lower number of Lewis acid sites located in micropores. This suggests fewer structural defects for crystals grown in microgravity. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) of zeolite Beta crystals also show that crystals grown in microgravity were free of line defects while terrestrial/controls had substantial defects.

  6. Copper cation removal in an electrokinetic cell containing zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elsayed-Ali, Omar H; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E

    2011-01-30

    Zeolites are used in environmental remediation of soil or water to immobilize or remove toxic materials by cation exchange. An experiment was conducted to test the use a low electric field to direct the toxic cations towards the zeolite. An electrokinetic cell was constructed using carbon electrodes. Synthetic Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite was placed in the cell. Copper(II) chloride dissolved in water was used as a contaminant. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured for ten hours with and without an applied electric field. The removal of the Cu(2+) ions was accelerated by the applied field in the first two hours. For longer time, the electric field did not improve the removal rate of the Cu(2+) ions. The presence of zeolite and applied electric field complicates the chemistry near the cathode and causes precipitation of Cu(2+) ions as copper oxide on the surface of the zeolite. With increased electric field the zeolite farther away from the cathode had little cation exchange due to the higher drift velocity of the Cu(2+) ions. The results also show that, in the LTA Zeolite A pellets, the cation exchange of Cu is limited to a shell of several tens of micrometers. PMID:21109348

  7. Carbon Dioxide Adsorption on a 5A Zeolite Designed for CO2 Removal in Spacecraft Cabins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Finn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide adsorption data were obtained for a 5A zeolite manufactured by AlliedSignal Inc. (Des Plaines, Illinois). The material is planned for use in the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) for U.S. elements of the International Space Station. The family of adsorption isotherms covers a temperature range of O to 250 C, and a pressure range of 0.001 to 800 torr. Coefficients of the Toth equation are fit to the data. Isosteric heats of adsorption are derived from the equilibrium loading data.

  8. Zeolitic BIF Crystal Directly Producing Noble-Metal Nanoparticles in Its Pores for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Xia; Liu, Meng; Bu, Xianhui; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As an integral part of a porous framework and uniformly distributed throughout the internal pore space, the high density of the exposed B–H bond in zeolite-like porous BIF-20 (BIF = Boron Imidazolate Framework) is shown here to effectively produce nanoparticles within its confined pore space. Small noble-metal nanoparticles (Ag or Au) are directly synthesized into its pores without the need for any external reducing agent or photochemical reactions, and the resulting Ag@BIF-20 (or Au@BIF-20) samples show high catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24473155

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-04-29

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  11. Gallium Zeolites for Light Paraffin Aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.L.; Dooley, K.M.

    1999-02-10

    The primary original goal of this project was to investigate the active state of gallium-containing MFI catalysts for light paraffin aromatization, in particular the state of gallium in the active material. Our original hypothesis was that the most active and selective materials were those which contained gallium zeolitic cations, and that previously reported conditions for the activation of gallium-containing catalysts served to create these active centers. We believed that in high silica materials such as MFI, ion-exchange is most effectively accomplished with metals in their 1+ oxidation state, both because of the sparsity of the anionic ion-exchange sites associated with the zeolite, and because the large hydration shells associated with aqueous 3+ cations hinder transport. Metals such as Ga which commonly exist in higher oxidation states need to be reduced to promote ion-exchange and this is the reason that reduction of gallium-containing catalysts for light paraffin aromatization often yields a dramatic enhancement in catalytic activity. We have effectively combined reduction with ion-exchange and we term this combined process ''reductive solid-state ion-exchange''. Our hypothesis has largely been proven true, and a number of the papers we have published directly address this hypothesis.

  12. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  13. Multinuclear MAS NMR investigation of zeolites reacted with chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Kónya, Z.; Lentz, P.; Nagy, J. B.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    Multinuclear ( 23Na, 27Al, 29Si, 13C) MAS NMR techniques were used for investigation of surface reaction of Y-type zeolites with CFCs (CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2, CClF 3, CF 4) and HCFC (CHClF 2). The hydrogen containing derivative reacts slowly. Those possessing more than 2 F atoms can be regarded as stable unreactive materials. CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2 react strongly with the zeolites. The reaction of HCFC with zeolites has a different mechanism to the other CFCs tested. On the basis of multinuclear NMR results a mechanism is given for the decomposition of HCFC.

  14. Accelerated crystallization of zeolites via hydroxyl free radicals.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guodong; Cheng, Peng; Yan, Wenfu; Boronat, Mercedes; Li, Xu; Su, Ji-Hu; Wang, Jianyu; Li, Yi; Corma, Avelino; Xu, Ruren; Yu, Jihong

    2016-03-11

    In the hydrothermal crystallization of zeolites from basic media, hydroxide ions (OH(-)) catalyze the depolymerization of the aluminosilicate gel by breaking the Si,Al-O-Si,Al bonds and catalyze the polymerization of the aluminosilicate anions around the hydrated cation species by remaking the Si,Al-O-Si,Al bonds. We report that hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) are involved in the zeolite crystallization under hydrothermal conditions. The crystallization processes of zeolites-such as Na-A, Na-X, NaZ-21, and silicalite-1-can be accelerated with hydroxyl free radicals generated by ultraviolet irradiation or Fenton's reagent.

  15. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C.

    1997-03-18

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000 K to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  16. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Pereira, Candido

    1997-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000.degree. K. to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  17. Zeolite crystal growth in space - What has been learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Thompson, R. W.; Dixon, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    Three zeolite crystal growth experiments developed at WPI have been performed in space in last twelve months. One experiment, GAS-1, illustrated that to grow large, crystallographically uniform crystals in space, the precursor solutions should be mixed in microgravity. Another experiment evaluated the optimum mixing protocol for solutions that chemically interact ('gel') on contact. These results were utilized in setting the protocol for mixing nineteen zeolite solutions that were then processed and yielded zeolites A, X and mordenite. All solutions in which the nucleation event was influenced produced larger, more 'uniform' crystals than did identical solutions processed on earth.

  18. Hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Pallavi

    Fly ash, a coal combustion byproduct is classified as types class C and class F. Class C fly ash is traditionally recycled for concrete applications and Class F fly ash often disposed in landfills. Class F poses an environmental hazard due to disposal and leaching of heavy metals into ground water and is important to be recycled in order to mitigate the environmental challenges. A major recycling option is to reuse the fly ash as a low-cost raw material for the production of crystalline zeolites, which serve as catalysts, detergents and adsorbents in the chemical industry. Most of the prior literature of fly ash conversion to zeolites does not focus on creating high zeolite surface area zeolites specifically with hierarchical pore structure, which are very important properties in developing a heterogeneous catalyst for catalysis applications. This research work aids in the development of an economical process for the synthesis of high surface area hierarchical zeolites from class F coal fly ash. In this work, synthesis of zeolites from fly ash using classic hydrothermal treatment approach and fusion pretreatment approach were examined. The fusion pretreatment method led to higher extent of dissolution of silica from quartz and mullite phases, which in turn led to higher surface area and pore size of the zeolite. A qualitative kinetic model developed here attributes the difference in silica content to Si/Al ratio of the beginning fraction of fly ash. At near ambient crystallization temperatures and longer crystallization times, the zeolite formed is a hierarchical faujasite with high surface area of at least 360 m2/g. This work enables the large scale recycling of class F coal fly ash to produce zeolites and mitigate environmental concerns. Design of experiments was used to predict surface area and pore sizes of zeolites - thus obviating the need for intense experimentation. The hierarchical zeolite catalyst supports tested for CO2 conversion, yielded hydrocarbons

  19. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  20. Sustainable production of acrylic acid: alkali-ion exchanged beta zeolite for gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Tao, Li-Zhi; Liang, Yu; Xu, Bo-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid (LA) to acrylic acid (AA) was investigated over alkali-exchanged β zeolite (M(x)Na(1-x)β, M=Li(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)) of different exchange degrees (x). The reaction was conducted under varying conditions to understand the catalyst selectivity for AA production and trends of byproduct formation. The nature and exchange degree of M(+) were found to be critical for the acid-base properties and catalytic performance of the exchanged zeolite. K(x)Na(1-x)β of x=0.94 appeared to be the best performing catalyst whereas Li(x)Na(1-x)β and Naβ were the poorest in terms of AA selectivity and yield. The AA yield as high as 61 mol % (selectivity: 64 mol %) could be obtained under optimized reaction conditions for up to 8 h over the best performing K0.94Na0.06β. The acid and base properties of the catalysts were probed, respectively by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of adsorbed NH3 and CO2, and were related to the electrostatic potentials of the alkali ions in the zeolite, which provided a basis for the discussion of the acid-base catalysis for sustainable AA formation from LA.

  1. Synthesis of a ferrolite: A zeolitic all-iron framework

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Chance, W. Michael; Morrison, Gregory; zur Loye, Karl D.; Wilkins, Branford O.; Smith, Mark D.; Whitfield, Pamela S.; Kirkham, Melanie J.; Stoian, Sebastian A.; zur Loye, Hans -Conrad

    2016-09-21

    Here, crystals of the first sodalite-type zeolite containing an all-iron framework, a ferrolite, Ba8(Fe12O24)Nay(OH)6 • xH2O, were synthesized using the hydroflux method in nearly quantitative yield. Ba8(Fe12O24)Nay(OH)6 • xH2O crystallizes in the cubic space group Pm3¯m with α = 10.0476(1) Å. Slightly distorted FeO4 tetrahedra are linked to form Fe4O4 and Fe6O6 rings, which in turn yield channels and internal cavities that are characteristic of the sodalite structure. Barium, sodium, and hydroxide ions and water molecules are found in the channels and provide charge balance. Magnetic measurements indicate that the ferrolite exhibits magnetic order up to at least 700 K,more » with the field-cooled and zero-field-cooled curves diverging. Analysis of the 57Fe Mossbauer spectra revealed two spectral components that have equal spectral areas, indicating the presence of two subsets of iron centers in the structure. Dehydrated versions of the ferrolite were also prepared by heating the sample.« less

  2. Mimicking high-silica zeolites: highly stable germanium- and tin-rich zeolite-type chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qipu; Bu, Xianhui; Mao, Chengyu; Zhao, Xiang; Sasan, Koroush; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-05-20

    High-silica zeolites, as exemplified by ZSM-5, with excellent chemical and thermal stability, have generated a revolution in industrial catalysis. In contrast, prior to this work, high-silica-zeolite-like chalcogenides based on germanium/tin remained unknown, even after decades of research. Here six crystalline high-germanium or high-tin zeolite-type sulfides and selenides with four different topologies are reported. Their unprecedented framework compositions give these materials much improved thermal and chemical stability with high surface area (Langmuir surface area of 782 m(2)/g(-1)) comparable to or better than zeolites. Among them, highly stable CPM-120-ZnGeS allows for ion exchange with diverse metal or complex cations, resulting in fine-tuning in porosity, fast ion conductivity, and photoelectric response. Being among the most porous crystalline chalcogenides, CPM-120-ZnGeS (exchanged with Cs(+) ions) also shows reversible adsorption with high capacity and affinity for CO2 (98 and 73 cm(3) g(-1) at 273 and 298 K, respectively, isosteric heat of adsorption = 40.05 kJ mol(-1)). Moreover, CPM-120-ZnGeS could also function as a robust photocatalyst for water reduction to generate H2. The overall activity of H2 production from water, in the presence of Na2S-Na2SO3 as a hole scavenger, was 200 μmol h(-1)/(0.10 g). Such catalytic activity remained undiminished under illumination by UV light for as long as measured (200 h), demonstrating excellent resistance to photocorrosion even under intense UV radiation.

  3. Effects of Hydrothermal Aging on NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Szanyi, Janos; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-02-06

    The effects of hydrothermal treatment on model Cu/zeolite catalysts were investigated to better understand the nature of Cu species for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 800 C for 16 h, the NO{sub x} reduction performance of Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta were significantly reduced at low temperatures, while that of Cu-SSZ-13 was not affected. When the zeolite framework aluminum species were probed using solid state {sup 27}Al-NMR, significant reduction in the intensities of the tetrahedral aluminum peak was observed for Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, although no increase in the intensities of the octahedral aluminum peak was observed. When the redox behavior of Cu species was examined using H{sub 2}-TPR, it was found that Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} and to Cu{sup 0} fir Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta catalysts, while Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} only for Cu-SSZ-13. After hydrothermal aging, CuO and Cu-aluminate species were found to form in Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, while little changes were observed for Cu-SSZ-13.

  4. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  5. Magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate-zeolite catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, E.H.; Stanulonis, J.J.; Swift, H.E.

    1980-09-16

    A catalyst for cracking gasoline feedstock with superior selectivity to gasoline production and greater metals tolerance comprises a magnesia-alumina-aluminum phosphate matrix composited with a zeolite having cracking activity.

  6. [Zeolite-containing tripoli powder in experimental hepatology].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, M L; Ivanov, L N

    2005-01-01

    Biological activity of zeolite-containing tripoli powder was studied in rats. Biochemical, enzymatic and lipid peroxidation indices were assessed. The results of the study confirm enterosorption and detoxication activity of the powder.

  7. Characterization of a zeolite membrane for catalytic membrane reactor application

    SciTech Connect

    Giroir-Fendler, A.; Peureux, J.; Mozzanega, H.; Dalmon, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the morphological and transport properties of a composite zeolite (silicalite) - alumina membrane. Some advantages obtained in combining the membrane with a conventional fixed-bed catalyst are also reported.

  8. 12. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 2, ORIGINAL ZEOLITE PLANT, AT WEYMOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 2, ORIGINAL ZEOLITE PLANT, AT WEYMOUTH LOOKING WEST TO FOUNTAIN. STAIRWAY RUNS DOWN TO FILTRATION BAYS. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. The stability of copper oxo species in zeolite frameworks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vilella, Laia; Studt, Felix

    2016-03-07

    Cu-exchanged zeolites are promising heterogeneous catalysts, as they provide a confined environment to carry out highly selective reactions. Furthermore, the knowledge of how the zeolite framework and the location of Al atoms therein affect the adsorption of copper species is still not well understood. In this work, DFT was used to investigate the adsorption of potential Cu oxo active species suggested in the literature [Cu(η2-O2), Cu(µ-O)Cu, and Cu2O2] into zeolites with different pore sizes and shapes (AFI, CHA, TON, MOR, and MFI). The calculations revealed that both monomeric and dimeric Cu oxo species bind strongly to the O atoms ofmore » the lattice. For the monometallic species similar adsorption energies are obtained with the different zeolite frameworks, whereas an optimum Al–Al distance is required for the dimeric species.« less

  10. Zeolite - A Natural Filter Material for Lead Polluted Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neamţu, Corina Ioana; Pică, Elena Maria; Rusu, Tiberiu

    2014-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of lead ions in a wastewater using zeolite has proven to be a successful water treatement method, all over the world. Putting the two media (solid and liquid) in contact in static conditions had good results regarding the concentration of the filtered solution, the pH and the electric conductivity, depending on the values of certain parameters such as the amount of the zeolite, volume of the solution or interaction time. The present study highlights the zeolite ability to retain the lead ions from a solution, in dynamic interaction conditions between the two environments, in a short interaction time. The results confirmed the effectiveness of ion exchange water treatment method in the conditions set, emphasizing once again the properties of the filter material - the zeolite

  11. CO2 capture using zeolite 13X prepared from bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Park, Dong-Wha; Ahn, Wha-Seung

    2014-02-01

    Zeolite 13X was prepared using bentonite as the raw material by alkaline fusion followed by a hydrothermal treatment without adding any extra silica or alumina sources. The prepared zeolite 13X was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N2-adsorption-desorption measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The CO2 capture performance of the prepared zeolite 13X was examined under both static and flow conditions. The prepared zeolite 13X showed a high BET surface area of 688 m2/g with a high micropore volume (0.30 cm3/g), and exhibited high CO2 capture capacity (211 mg/g) and selectivity to N2 (CO2/N2 = 37) at 25 °C and 1 bar. In addition, the material showed fast adsorption kinetics, and stable CO2 adsorption-desorption recycling performance at both 25 and 200 °C.

  12. Hierarchical zeolites overcome all obstacles: next stop industrial implementation.

    PubMed

    Verboekend, Danny; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This review emphasizes key recent accomplishments towards the industrial exploitation of hierarchically structured zeolites in catalytic processes. A major milestone comprises the demonstration that affordable post-synthetic modifications enable the transformation of any conventional zeolite into hierarchical analogues with tunable porosity and functionality. Through specific examples, belonging to the transformation of fossil fuel and renewable feedstocks, we quantitatively illustrate the spectacular benefits attained upon application of hierarchical zeolite catalysts due to improved accessibility or modification of the type and distribution of active sites. A crucial step for these exciting lab-designed materials to be implemented in industrial processes is to shape them into technical forms. Accordingly, we studied the synthesis, characterization, and catalytic evaluation of millimeter-sized hierarchical zeolite bodies, enriching the fundamental understanding on scale-up and representing an additional solid step towards the commercial application of these materials.

  13. Experimental probe of adsorbate binding energies at internal crystalline/amorphous interfaces in Gd-doped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Benthem, Klaus van; Painter, Gayle S.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Becher, Paul F.; Averill, Frank W.

    2008-04-21

    Electron beam irradiation during scanning transmission electron microscopy has been used to probe the relative abundance and stabilities of gadolinium adsorption sites in polycrystalline silicon nitride ceramics. Site-specific binding strengths in the interface plane between {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and the adjacent amorphous triple pockets were found to be consistent with theoretical predictions. Decreasing stability was found for Gd within partially ordered planes further from the interface. Atomic level characterization such as that reported here provides detailed insights that will allow one to tailor new functional ceramic microstructures with improved macroscopic mechanical properties.

  14. Metal Oxide/Zeolite Combination Absorbs H2S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed copper and molybdenum oxides supported in pores of zeolite found to remove H2S from mixture of gases rich in hydrogen and steam, at temperatures from 256 to 538 degree C. Absorber of H2S needed to clean up gas streams from fuel processors that incorporate high-temperature steam reformers or hydrodesulfurizing units. Zeolites chosen as supporting materials because of their high porosity, rigidity, alumina content, and variety of both composition and form.

  15. Nanocellulose-Zeolite Composite Films for Odor Elimination.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Neda; Mashayekhy Rad, Farshid; Mace, Amber; Ansari, Farhan; Akhtar, Farid; Nilsson, Ulrika; Berglund, Lars; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-07-01

    Free standing and strong odor-removing composite films of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a high content of nanoporous zeolite adsorbents have been colloidally processed. Thermogravimetric desorption analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy combined with computational simulations showed that commercially available silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 have a high affinity and uptake of volatile odors like ethanethiol and propanethiol, also in the presence of water. The simulations showed that propanethiol has a higher affinity, up to 16%, to the two zeolites compared with ethanethiol. Highly flexible and strong free-standing zeolite-CNF films with an adsorbent loading of 89 w/w% have been produced by Ca-induced gelation and vacuum filtration. The CNF-network controls the strength of the composite films and 100 μm thick zeolite-CNF films with a CNF content of less than 10 vol % displayed a tensile strength approaching 10 MPa. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis showed that the CNF-zeolite films can eliminate the volatile thiol-based odors to concentrations below the detection ability of the human olfactory system. Odor removing zeolite-cellulose nanofibril films could enable improved transport and storage of fruits and vegetables rich in odors, for example, onion and the tasty but foul-smelling South-East Asian Durian fruit. PMID:26061093

  16. Role of ammonium fluoride in crystallization process of beta zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jon, Hery; Oumi, Yasunori; Itabashi, Keiji; Sano, Tsuneji

    2007-09-01

    The addition of Na + cations to the starting gel prepared using NH 4F significantly prolonged the crystallization time of beta zeolite. However, in the case of pure silica beta zeolite an addition of more NH 4F reduced the crystallization time by one-half. From 29Si MAS NMR measurements, the signal attributed to pentacoordinated silicon was found to be more pronounced for pure silica beta zeolite in the presence of Na + cations even in the solid phase with low crystallinity, as compared to that in the absence of Na + cations. Considering the results of theoretical calculation, because of more energetically stable state of Na +[SiO 4/2F] - species, it could be presumed that Na +[SiO 4/2F] - species might exist in pure silica beta zeolite. Furthermore, as confirmed by 19F MAS NMR measurements tetraethylammonium fluoride (TEAF) species were enclathrated intact in solid phase during the initial crystallization stage. This suggests that TEAF species are required for the formation of beta zeolite framework, in other words, as "SDA" which conditions the formation of kinetically favored phase, i.e., beta zeolite. Moreover, since part of TEA + cations is replaced by sodium cations, forming Na +[SiO 4/2F] - species, the amount of TEA +[SiO 4/2F] - species involved in either nucleation or crystal growth decreases and thus the crystallization time becomes longer.

  17. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene.

  18. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene. PMID:27486717

  19. Solvent Evaporation Assisted Preparation of Oriented Nanocrystalline Mesoporous MFI Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Kake; Sun, Junming; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Wan, Haiying; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF; Nie, Zimin

    2011-07-01

    A solvent evaporation route to produce hierarchically porous zeolites with an oriented MFI nanocrystalline structure has been developed, and the method is scalable and productive. In this method, hexadecyltrimethoxysilane is added to an ethanol solution containing zeolitic precursors. A hard gel is formed during the evaporation process. Subsequent hydrothermal treatments produce the hierarchically porous zeolite. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies suggest that misoriented zeolite nuclei are produced in the very early stages of the hydrothermal treatment, but further reactions lead to single crystal-like aggregates composed of intergrowth nanocrystals with a mean interparticle pore diameter of 12 nm. All Al atoms exist in tetrahedral sites, as confirmed by 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). Variable temperature hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR spectroscopy suggest a fast molecular diffusion process from the interconnection between micro- and mesopores. Catalytic conversion of acetone to the isobutene reactions show comparable (with respect to conventional zeolites) selectivity to isobutene. However, hierarchically porous zeolites display enhanced activity and durability because of the more accessible acidic sites in the hierarchically porous structures.

  20. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 °C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species.

  1. Nanocellulose-Zeolite Composite Films for Odor Elimination.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Neda; Mashayekhy Rad, Farshid; Mace, Amber; Ansari, Farhan; Akhtar, Farid; Nilsson, Ulrika; Berglund, Lars; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-07-01

    Free standing and strong odor-removing composite films of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a high content of nanoporous zeolite adsorbents have been colloidally processed. Thermogravimetric desorption analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy combined with computational simulations showed that commercially available silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 have a high affinity and uptake of volatile odors like ethanethiol and propanethiol, also in the presence of water. The simulations showed that propanethiol has a higher affinity, up to 16%, to the two zeolites compared with ethanethiol. Highly flexible and strong free-standing zeolite-CNF films with an adsorbent loading of 89 w/w% have been produced by Ca-induced gelation and vacuum filtration. The CNF-network controls the strength of the composite films and 100 μm thick zeolite-CNF films with a CNF content of less than 10 vol % displayed a tensile strength approaching 10 MPa. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis showed that the CNF-zeolite films can eliminate the volatile thiol-based odors to concentrations below the detection ability of the human olfactory system. Odor removing zeolite-cellulose nanofibril films could enable improved transport and storage of fruits and vegetables rich in odors, for example, onion and the tasty but foul-smelling South-East Asian Durian fruit.

  2. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline and mesoporous zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petushkov, Anton

    2011-12-01

    Mesoporous aggregates of nanocrystalline zeolites with MFI and BEA frameworks have been synthesized using a one-pot and single structure directing agent. The effect of different reaction conditions, such as temperature, time, pH and water content, on the particle size, surface area and mesopore volume has been studied. Nanocrystalline and mesoporous ZSM-5, beta and Y zeolites were modified with different transition metals and the resulting single- and double metal containing catalyst materials were characterized. Nanocrystalline Silicalite-1 zeolite samples with varying particle size were functionalized with different organosilane groups and the cytotoxic activity of the zeolite nanocrystals was studied as a function of particle size, concentration, organic functional group type, as well as the type of cell line. Framework stability of nanocrystalline NaY zeolite was tested under different pH conditions. The synthesized zeolites used in this work were characterized using a variety of physico-chemical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, Solid State NMR, nitrogen sorption, electron microscopy, Inductively Coupled Plasma -- Optical Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  4. Nanosized zeolites as a perspective material for conductometric biosensors creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, Ivan; Soldatkin, Oleksandr; Kasap, Berna Ozansoy; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Kurc, Burcu Akata; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Soldatkin, Alexei; Lagarde, Florence; Dzyadevych, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the method of enzyme adsorption on different zeolites and mesoporous silica spheres (MSS) was investigated for the creation of conductometric biosensors. The conductometric transducers consisted of gold interdigitated electrodes were placed on the ceramic support. The transducers were modified with zeolites and MSS, and then the enzymes were adsorbed on the transducer surface. Different methods of zeolite attachment to the transducer surface were used; drop coating with heating to 200°C turned out to be the best one. Nanozeolites beta and L, zeolite L, MSS, and silicalite-1 (80 to 450 nm) were tested as the adsorbents for enzyme urease. The biosensors with all tested particles except zeolite L had good analytical characteristics. Silicalite-1 (450 nm) was also used for adsorption of glucose oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase. The glucose and acetylcholine biosensors were successfully created, whereas butyrylcholinesterase was not adsorbed on silicalite-1. The enzyme adsorption on zeolites and MSS is simple, quick, well reproducible, does not require use of toxic compounds, and therefore can be recommended for the development of biosensors when these advantages are especially important.

  5. Characterization of Chemical Properties, Unit Cell Parameters and Particle Size Distribution of Three Zeolite Reference Materials: RM 8850 - Zeolite Y, RM 8851 - Zeolite A and RM 8852 - Ammonium ZSM-5 Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Turner,S.; Sieber, J.; Vetter, T.; Zeisler, R.; Marlow, A.; Moreno-Ramirez, M.; Davis, M.; Kennedy, G.; Borghard, W.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites have important industrial applications including use as catalysts, molecular sieves and ion exchange materials. In this study, three zeolite materials have been characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as reference materials (RMs): zeolite Y (RM 8850), zeolite A (RM 8851) and ZSM-5 zeolite (RM 8852). They have been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical measurement methods: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gravimetry, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), calorimetry, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, laser light extinction, laser light scattering, electric sensing zone, X-ray sedimentation, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The chemical homogeneity of the materials has been characterized. Reference values are given for the major components (major elements, loss on ignition [LOI] and loss on fusion [LOF]), trace elements and Si/Al and Na/Al ratios. Information values are given for enthalpies of formation, unit cell parameters, particle size distributions, refractive indices and variation of mass with variation in relative humidity (RH). Comparisons are made to literature unit cell parameters. The RMs are expected to provide a basis for intercomparison studies of these zeolite materials.

  6. Moderate-temperature zeolitic alteration in a cooling pyroclastic deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, S.S.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The locally zeolitized Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (13 Myr.), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A., is part of a thick sequence of zeolitized pyroclastic units. Most of the zeolitized units are nonwelded tuffs that were altered during low-temperature diagenesis, but the distribution and textural setting of zeolite (heulandite-clinoptilolite) and smectite in the densely welded Topopah Spring tuff suggest that these hydrous minerals formed while the tuff was still cooling after pyroclastic emplacement and welding. The hydrous minerals are concentrated within a transition zone between devitrified tuff in the central part of the unit and underlying vitrophyre. Movement of liquid and convected heat along fractures from the devitrified tuff to the ritrophyre caused local devitrification and hydrous mineral crystallization. Oxygen isotope geothermometry of cogenetic quartz confirms the nondiagenetic moderate temperature origin of the hydrous minerals at temperatures of ??? 40-100??C, assuming a meteoric water source. The Topopah Spring tuff is under consideration for emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The natural rock alteration of the cooling pyroclastic deposit may be a good natural analog for repository-induced hydrothermal alteration. As a result of repository thermal loading, temperatures in the Topopah Spring vitrophyre may rise sufficiently to duplicate the inferred temperatures of natural zeolitic alteration. Heated water moving downward from the repository into the vitrophyre may contribute to new zeolitic alteration. ?? 1989.

  7. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles. PMID:26510611

  8. Enthalpy of formation for natural paulingite zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodova, L. P.; Mel'Chakova, L. V.; Kiseleva, I. A.

    2008-01-01

    Natural paulingite zeolite of the composition (K4.48Na0.56Ca2.95Ba0.87Mg0.06)[Al11.04Fe{0.04/3+}Si30.49O84] · 35.25H2O (Vinariská Hora, Czechia) was studied calorimetrically on a high-temperature Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter. Enthalpies of formation from oxides (-1969 ± 128 kJ/mol) and elements (-52393 ± 132 kJ/mol) were determined for this mineral by melt dissolution calorimetry. The obtained experimental results and the literature data were used to calculate the Gibbs free energy of formation from elements.

  9. Photocatalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolite cages

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

    1996-06-01

    Oxidation of hydrocarbons by molecular oxygen is a key process in chemical industry. But reactions that use O{sub 2} as the primary oxidant often produce large amounts of unwanted byproducts. One major reason that selectivities are low is that the desired products (such as alcohols or carbonyls) are more easily oxidized by O{sub 2} than the parent hydrocarbon. The authors recently discovered a simple method that gives partial oxidation of small alkenes, alkanes, and alkyl-substituted benzenes by O{sub 2} at unprecedented selectivity, even at high conversion of the hydrocarbon. The approach is based on visible light-induced chemistry of hydrocarbon-O{sub 2} collisional pairs in the cages of large-pore zeolites. Reactions are conducted at ambient temperature in the absence of solvent or photosensitizer. Here the authors describe the most interesting reactions established thus far and define issues that pertain to scale-up of the method.

  10. Preparation and gas permeabilities of zeolite membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jinqu Wang; Yongfeng Wang; Shuanshi Fan

    1994-12-31

    Zeolites with less than 10 {angstrom} pore are desirable membrane materials, due to their crystallinity, resistance to high temperature, and chemical inertness. A variety of new membranous materials were synthesized composed of a continuous intergrowth of 5-50 micrometer type A, X, Y, or ZSM-5 crystals. The membranes were crystallized under hydrothermal conditions at 90 to 220{degrees}C on the external surface of a porous ceramics. The reagents used were aluminum sulphate, water glass (20.1 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 6.09 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 73.8 wt% water), sodium hydroxide, sulphuric acid, deionized water and templating agents. The molar composition was: 0.1-0.5 Na{sub 2}O:1 SiO{sub 2}:0.04-0.05 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:20-60H{sub 2}O.

  11. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Pyrolysis of scrap tyres with zeolite USY.

    PubMed

    Shen, Boxiong; Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Rui; Guo, Binbin; Liang, Cai

    2006-09-21

    A zeolite catalyst of ultrastable Y-type (USY) was investigated in the research of two staged pyrolysis-catalysis of scrap tyres. Scrap tyres were pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor and the evolved pyrolysis gases were passed through a secondary catalytic reactor. The main objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of zeolite USY on the yield of products and the composition of derived oil. The influences of several parameters such as pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature, catalyst/tyre ratio, heating rate, etc. on the yield of the derived oil, char and gas were investigated. It showed that the increase of catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio resulted in high yield of gas at the expense of the oil yield. For example, when the catalyst/tyre ratio increased from 0.25 to 1.0, the yield of gas increased from 30.5 to 49.9 wt.%, and the oil yield decreased nearly two-fold from 31.6 to 12.7 wt.%. The concentration of light naphtha (boiling point < 160 degrees C) was also investigated in this study. And the high catalyst/tyre ratio favored to increase the concentration of light naphtha (< 160 degrees C) in oil. In order to study the composition of derived oil, a distilled fraction (< 280 degrees C), which was 92.5 wt.% of the oil obtained from catalytic pyrolysis of scrap tyre at a pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio of 500, 400 degrees C and 0.5, respectively, was analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The distillate was found to contain 1.23 wt.% benzene, 9.35 wt.% toluene, 3.68 wt.% ethylbenzene, 12.64 wt.% xylenes, 1.81 wt.% limonene and 13.89 wt.% PAHs, etc., where the single ring aromatics represented a significant potential use as chemicals.

  13. NMR Studies of Molecular Hydrogen Confined to the Pores of Zeolite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rall, Markus

    Molecular hydrogen is interesting to investigate in a porous material. It is strongly quantum-mechanical with respect to its translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as its ortho-para conversion. Zeolite (13X) was selected as porous material for its almost monodisperse pore diameter of 13 A. The studies mainly focussed on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data. The hydrogen-zeolite system was probed in coherent pulse and continuous wave (cw) mode at 268 MHz. The pulse data revealed a strong peak in the transverse relaxation time T_2 at about 10 K. A similar peaking was observed for the nuclear spin echoes. This behavior was interpreted in terms of supercooling and implies that hydrogen in zeolite solidifies about 5 degrees below its bulk melting point. Two features are especially remarkable. Firstly, the T_2 was found to be nonhysteretic and emphasizes a purely energetically driven process. Secondly, the supercooling transition temperatures exhibit a linear parahydrogen concentration dependence of -0.10 +/- 0.01 K/%. This implies that parahydrogen can be supercooled more easily than orthohydrogen. The continuous wave data show a glass-type lineshape of 130 kHz width at 4.2 K with sigma=0.45 +/-0.3. It is a combination of broad wings with a narrow component in the center. This behavior is displayed upon warming from 4.2 K when the narrow line disappears and the broad contribution remains. No sharp transition at 10 K is observed. The line broadens by a factor of 1.5 due to orientational ordering when the sample is cooled to 0.8 K. This latter observation indicates that the pulse data peaks at 10 K do not originate from orientational ordering. The ortho-para conversion was extracted from the time dependence of the lineshape. The orthohydrogen contents was followed over 1600 hours which yielded two different conversion constants. For the first 500 hours the conversion is characterized by k_1=0.425+/-0.006 %/h which is only a fourth of the bulk value and is

  14. Unusual coordination state of cobalt ions in zeolites modified by aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Shilina, M I; Vasilevskii, G Yu; Rostovshchikova, T N; Murzin, V Yu

    2015-08-01

    Co- and Al-modified zeolites (Al-Co-ZSM-5) were prepared by solid-state ion exchange with cobalt acetate or chloride, followed by AlCl3 immobilization from anhydrous toluene solution. Based on data from XRD, X-ray absorption (XANES/EXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DRIFT spectral studies of adsorbed probe molecules (carbon monoxide, ethane), a new cobalt electronic state, bonded with surface aluminum atoms through oxygen and chlorine atoms, arises on the surface of Al-Co-ZSM-5. A new band at 2192 cm(-1) appears in the DRIFT spectrum, shifted to lower frequencies compared to CO complexes with isolated Co(2+) cations (2205 cm(-1)). Spectral data of the ethane adsorption (new strong bands in the range of 2740-2770 cm(-1)) prove the existence of specific centers of alkane activation on coordinately unsaturated cobalt cations, resulting in the interaction with aluminum chloride.

  15. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  16. Preparation of zeolite NaA for CO2 capture from nickel laterite residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Liu, Li-ying; Xiao, Penny; Che, Shuai; Wang, He-ming

    2014-08-01

    Zeolite NaA was successfully prepared from nickel laterite residue for the first time via a fusion-hydrothermal procedure. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized zeolite NaA were characterized with a range of experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the structures of the produced zeolites were dependent on the molar ratios of the reactants and hydrothermal reaction conditions, so the synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain pure zeolite NaA. Adsorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the prepared zeolite NaA was also measured and analyzed. The results showed that zeolite NaA could be prepared with reasonable purity, it had physicochemical properties comparable with zeolite NaA made from other methods, and it had excellent gas adsorption properties, thus demonstrating that zeolite NaA could be prepared from nickel laterite residue.

  17. Removal of heavy metals from mine waters by natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla Wingenfelder; Carsten Hansen; Gerhard Furrer; Rainer Schulin

    2005-06-15

    The study investigated the removal of Fe, Pb, Cd, and Zn from synthetic mine waters by a natural zeolite. The emphasis was given to the zeolite's behavior toward a few cations in competition with each other. Pb was removed efficiently from neutral as well as from acidic solutions, whereas the uptake of Zn and Cd decreased with low pH and high iron concentrations. With increasing Ca concentrations in solution, elimination of Zn and Cd became poorer while removal of Pb remained virtually unchanged. The zeolite was stable in acidic solutions. Disintegration was only observed below pH 2.0. Forward- and back-titration of synthetic acidic mine water were carried out in the presence and absence of zeolite to simulate the effects of a pH increase by addition of neutralizing agents and a re-acidification which can be caused by subsequent mixing with acidic water. The pH increase during neutralization causes precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides and decreased dissolved metal concentrations. Zeolite addition further diminished Pb concentrations but did not have an effect on Zn and Cd concentrations in solution. During re-acidification of the solution, remobilization of Pb was weaker in the presence than in the absence of zeolite. No substantial differences were observed for Fe, Cd, and Zn immobilization. The immobilization of the metals during pH increase and the subsequent remobilization caused by re-acidification can be well described by a geochemical equilibrium speciation model that accounts for metal complexation at hydrous ferric oxides, for ion exchange on the zeolite surfaces, as well as for dissolution and precipitation processes. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite single crystals with cheap porogens

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Haixiang; Li Changlin; Ren Jiawen; Wang Yanqin; Lu Guanzhong

    2011-07-15

    Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals have been successfully synthesized by adding soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to a conventional zeolite synthesis system. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen sorption analysis, {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR), temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The SEM images clearly show that all zeolite crystals possess the similar morphology with particle size of about 300 nm, the TEM images reveal that irregular intracrystal pores are randomly distributed in the whole crystal. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra indicate that nearly all of the Al atoms are in tetrahedral co-ordination in ZSM-5, UV-vis spectra confirm that nearly all of titanium atoms are incorporated into the framework of TS-1. The catalytic activity of meso-ZSM-5 in acetalization of cyclohexanone and meso-TS-1 in hydroxylation of phenol was also studied. The synthesis method reported in this paper is cost-effective and environmental friendly, can be easily expended to prepare other hierarchical structured zeolites. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous zeolite single crystals were synthesized by using cheap porogens as template. Highlights: > Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals were synthesized. > Soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as porogens. > The mesoporous zeolites had connected mesopores although closed pores existed. > Higher catalytic activities were obtained.

  19. Bayberry-like ZnO/MFI zeolite as high performance methanol-to-aromatics catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Qian, Weizhong; Shen, Kui; Su, Chang; Wei, Fei

    2016-02-01

    Unique bayberry-like MFI zeolites are synthesized through a quasi-solid-state crystallization approach. This hierarchical zeolite structure has a relatively thick shell, densely grown nanocrystals with an ordered packed channel, high mechanical stability, high surface area and a low Si/Al ratio. Its catalytic efficiency for methanol-to-aromatics is significantly higher than that of conventional MFI zeolites.

  20. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoot, Alison L.; Lindquist, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce students to the myriad properties of zeolites using the sodium form of zeolite A (Na-A) from laundry detergent. Experiments include extracting Na-A from detergent, water softening properties, desiccant properties, ion-exchange properties, and Zeolite HA as a dehydration catalyst. (JRH)

  1. Dynamic and reversible organization of zeolite L crystals induced by holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Woerdemann, Mike; Gläsener, Stefan; Hörner, Florian; Devaux, André; De Cola, Luisa; Denz, Cornelia

    2010-10-01

    Organization and patterning of zeolite L crystals with their unique properties such as their one-dimensional nano channel system is of highest topical interest with various applications in many areas of science. We demonstrate full three-dimensional optical control of single zeolite L crystals and for the first time fully reversible, dynamic organization of a multitude of individually controlled zeolite L crystals.

  2. Framework Stabilization of Si-Rich LTA Zeolite Prepared in Organic-Free Media

    SciTech Connect

    Conato, Marlon T.; Oleksiak, Matthew D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Motkuri, Radha K.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2014-10-16

    Zeolite HOU-2 (LTA type) is prepared with the highest silica content (Si/Al = 2.1) reported for Na-LTA zeolites without the use of an organic structure-directing agent. The rational design of Si-rich zeolites has the potential to improve their thermal stability for applications in catalysis, gas storage, and selective separations.

  3. Micro/macroporous system: MFI-type zeolite crystals with embedded macropores.

    PubMed

    Machoke, Albert G; Beltrán, Ana M; Inayat, Alexandra; Winter, Benjamin; Weissenberger, Tobias; Kruse, Nadine; Güttel, Robert; Spiecker, Erdmann; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2015-02-01

    Zeolite crystals with an embedded and interconnected macropore system are prepared by using mesoporous silica particles as a silica source and as a sacrificial macroporogen. These novel hierarchical zeolite crystals are expected to reduce diffusion limitations in all zeolite-catalyzed reactions, especially in the transformation of larger molecules like in the catalytic cracking of polymers and the conversion of biomass. PMID:25535114

  4. Properties of Zeolite A Obtained from Powdered Laundry Detergent: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, David A.; Smoot, Alison L.

    1997-05-01

    Zeolites, crystalline porous aluminosilicates, are valued for their ability to absorb ions and molecules as well as function as catalysts. A number of laboratory experiments using zeolites filtered from a suspension of powdered laundry detergent are described. The various experiments illustrate the myriad uses of zeolites as desiccants, ion exchange materials, and catalysts.

  5. ZEOLITE PERFORMANCE AS AN ANION EXCHANGER FOR ARSENIC SEQUESTRATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their use in ion exchange and acid catalysis reactions. The use of zeolites in anion or ligand exchange reactions is less studied. The NH4+ form of zeolite Y (NY6, Faujasite) has been tested in this work to evaluate its performance for arsenic removal...

  6. UTILITY OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES IN REMOVAL OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange and adsorption properties. Different inorganic and organic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature using various zeolites. Synthetic zeolites like ZSM-5, Ferrierite, Beta and Faujasite Y have been used to remove i...

  7. The influence of framework-gallium in zeolites: Electronegativity and infrared spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dompas, D.H.; Mortier, W.J. ); Kenter, O.C.H. ); Janssen, M.J.G.; Verduijn, J.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Based on the influence of the composition (Si/Al and Si/Ga ratio) on the framework vibrations of zeolites with different structure types (FAU, LTL, BETA, MOR, MEL, MFI, TON, and MTW), an electronegativity value for gallium substituted into zeolite frameworks is proposed (Sanderson electronegativity scale). The present electronegativity value agrees with the known physicochemical properties of gallium substituted zeolites.

  8. Fabrication of zeolite/polymer multilayer composite membranes for carbon dioxide capture: Deposition of zeolite particles on polymer supports.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Kartik; Severance, Michael A; Dutta, Prabir K; Ho, W S Winston

    2015-08-15

    Membranes, due to their smaller footprint and potentially lower energy consumption than the amine process, offer a promising route for post-combustion CO2 capture. Zeolite Y based inorganic selective layers offer a favorable combination of CO2 permeance and CO2/N2 selectivity, membrane properties crucial to the economics. For economic viability on large scale, we propose to use flexible and scalable polymer supports for inorganic selective layers. The work described in this paper developed a detailed protocol for depositing thin zeolite Y seed layers on polymer supports, the first step in the synthesis of a polycrystalline zeolite Y membrane. We also studied the effects of support surface morphology (pore size and surface porosity) on the quality of deposition and identified favorable supports for the deposition. Two different zeolite Y particles with nominal sizes of 200 nm and 40 nm were investigated. To obtain a complete coverage of zeolite particles on the support surface with minimum defects and in a reproducible manner, a vacuum-assisted dip-coating technique was developed. Images obtained using both digital camera and optical microscope showed the presence of color patterns on the deposited surface which suggested that the coverage was complete. Electron microscopy revealed that the particle packing was dense with some drying cracks. Layer thickness with the larger zeolite Y particles was close to 1 μm while that with the smaller particles was reduced to less than 0.5 μm. In order to reduce drying cracks for layers with smaller zeolite Y particles, thickness was reduced by lowering the dispersion concentration. Transport measurement was used as an additional technique to characterize these layers.

  9. Rationalizing inter- and intracrystal heterogeneities in dealuminated acid mordenite zeolites by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy correlated with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Lin; Kubarev, Alexey V; Van Loon, Jordi; Uji-i, Hiroshi; De Vos, Dirk E; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J

    2014-12-23

    Dealuminated zeolites are widely used acid catalysts in research and the chemical industry. Bulk-level studies have revealed that the improved catalytic performance results from an enhanced molecular transport as well as from changes in the active sites. However, fully exploiting this information in rational catalyst design still requires insight in the intricate interplay between both. Here we introduce fluorescence and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy to quantify subcrystal reactivity as well as acid site distribution and to probe site accessibility in the set of individual mordenite zeolites. Dealumination effectively introduces significant heterogeneities between different particles and even within individual crystals. Besides enabling direct rationalization of the nanoscale catalytic performance, these observations reveal valuable information on the industrial dealumination process itself.

  10. Rationalizing Inter- and Intracrystal Heterogeneities in Dealuminated Acid Mordenite Zeolites by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy Correlated with Super-resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dealuminated zeolites are widely used acid catalysts in research and the chemical industry. Bulk-level studies have revealed that the improved catalytic performance results from an enhanced molecular transport as well as from changes in the active sites. However, fully exploiting this information in rational catalyst design still requires insight in the intricate interplay between both. Here we introduce fluorescence and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy to quantify subcrystal reactivity as well as acid site distribution and to probe site accessibility in the set of individual mordenite zeolites. Dealumination effectively introduces significant heterogeneities between different particles and even within individual crystals. Besides enabling direct rationalization of the nanoscale catalytic performance, these observations reveal valuable information on the industrial dealumination process itself. PMID:25402756

  11. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  12. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. PMID:25078817

  13. [Adsorption of phenol chemicals by surfactant-modified zeolites].

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Zhe; Wu, De-Yi; Li, Chun-Jie

    2012-12-01

    Two kinds of zeolites were prepared from fly ash and modified by surfactant subsequently. Surfactant-modified zeolites were studied for adsorption of phenol chemicals (phenol, p-chlorphenol, bisphenol A). It showed that the adsorption affinity of zeolite to phenol chemicals was significantly improved after surfactant modification. The adsorption isotherms of phenol chemicals were well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm. For the two surfactant-surfactant modified zeolites, the maximum adsorption amounts of phenol, p-chlorphenol, and bisphenol A calculated from the Langmuir equation were 37.7, 52.36, 90.9 mg x g(-1) and 10.7, 22.83, 56.8 mg x g(-1), respectively. When pH values of solutions were higher than the pK(a) values of phenol chemicals, the removal efficiencies were getting higher with the increase of pH values. The octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)) was also found to be an important factor affecting adsorption of phenol chemicals by the modified zeolites. Higher K(ow) value, which means the greater hydrophobicity of the chemicals, resulted in a higher removal.

  14. Impact protection behavior of a mordenite zeolite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Hu, R.; Chen, X.; Hu, D.

    2016-05-01

    By combining zeolite with water, a novel nanocomposite may exhibit extraordinary capability of energy absorption and impact mitigation. The multiple size of zeolite may lead to simultaneous yet different infiltration behaviors of water molecules, and thus multi-staged energy mitigation characteristics (which may benefit the scope of application). In this study, we investigate the dynamic infiltration behavior of water into mordenite zeolite (MOR) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thanks to its hydrophobicity and multi pore-sized structure, the MOR system has a decent energy mitigation performance upon high impact speed. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of various parameters, including the impact speed, mass, and water/zeolite ratio, on energy mitigating characteristics. The MOR/water mixture may perform better at a higher impact energy with higher MOR zeolite-water ratio. Upon unloading, the defiltration of water molecules is faster and more complete at higher impact speed. Results may guide the design and application of the energy mitigation nanosystem.

  15. Risk assessment for the transportation of radioactive zeolite liners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The risk is estimated for the shipment of radioactive zeolite liners in support of the Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program currently underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. This program will establish the feasibility of zeolite vitrification as an effective means of immobilizing high-specific-activity wastes. In this risk assessment, it is assumed that two zeolite liners, each loaded around July 1, 1981 to 60,000 Ci, will be shipped by truck around January 1, 1982. However, to provide a measure of conservatism, each liner is assumed to initially hole 70,000 Ci, with the major radioisotopes as follow: /sup 90/Sr = 3000 Ci, /sup 134/Cs = 7000 Ci, /sup 137/Cs = 60,000 Ci. Should shipment take place with essentially no delay after initial loading (regardless of loading date), the shipment loading would be only 2.7% higher than that for the assumed six-month delay. This would negligibly affect the overall risk. As a result of this risk assessment, it is concluded that the transport of the radioactive zeolite liners from TMI to PNL by truck can be conducted at an insignificant level of risk to the public.

  16. Producing a synthetic zeolite from secondary coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunyu; Yan, Chunjie; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Hongquan; Luo, Wenjun

    2016-11-01

    Secondary coal fly ash is known as a by-product produced by the extracting alumina industry from high-alumina fly ash, which is always considered to be solid waste. Zeolitization of secondary coal fly ash offers an opportunity to create value-added products from this industrial solid waste. The influence of synthesis parameters on zeolite NaA such as alkalinity, the molar ratio of SiO2/Al2O3, crystallization time and temperature was investigated in this paper. It was found that the types of synthetic zeolites produced were to be highly dependent on the conditions of the crystallization process. Calcium ion exchange capacity and whiteness measurements revealed that the synthesized product meets the standard for being used as detergent, indicating a promising use as a builder in detergent, ion-exchangers or selective adsorbents. Yield of up to a maximum of 1.54 g/g of ash was produced for zeolite NaA from the secondary coal fly ash residue. This result presents a potential use of the secondary coal fly ash to obtain a high value-added product by a cheap and alternative zeolitization procedure. PMID:27080358

  17. Cadmium adsorption on vermiculite, zeolite and pumice: batch experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Panuccio, Maria Rosaria; Sorgonà, Agostino; Rizzo, Marcella; Cacco, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the combined effects of ionic activity, pH, and contact time on the cadmium sorption in three different minerals, vermiculite, zeolite, and pumice, commonly employed as substrata in nurseries and recently considered for their potential use in remediation methods. The extent of cadmium sorption was vermiculite>zeolite>pumice, as shown by the Langmuir and Freundlich parameters, and it was highly dependent on mineral characteristics. The percentage of cadmium sorption in zeolite and vermiculite did not depend on cadmium concentration, while in pumice this percentage was positively correlated to the initial cadmium concentration. At low cadmium concentrations (30-120 microM), the metal sorbed on zeolite was mainly present in the nonexchangeable form (70%) at levels much higher than those found for vermiculite and pumice. The primary variable responsible for determination of cadmium mobility in these minerals was confirmed to be pH. The ionic concentrations of Hoagland nutrient solution were significantly modified by both pH and mineral composition, while the presence of cadmium caused no changes. With vermiculite and zeolite, the time-course of cadmium sorption was related to mineral composition to a greater extent than to cadmium concentration. While with pumice, the percentage of cadmium sorbed after 6 weeks was lower than with the other two minerals, and it was inversely correlated to the initial cadmium concentration.

  18. Zeolite A effect on calcium homeostasis in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, D; Wilkens, M R; Liesegang, A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of 2 different concentrations of zeolite A on calcium homeostasis. Seventeen growing goats were divided into 3 groups. Whereas the control group (5 animals) received no supplementation, 2 treatment groups were supplemented with zeolite A at either 1.2 (6 animals) or 1.6 g/kg BW (6 animals), respectively. Blood and urine samples were continually drawn and bone mineral density was measured weekly by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. After 3 wks, the animals were slaughtered and samples were taken from the rumen, duodenum, and kidneys. Plasma concentrations of phosphate ( < 0.001), magnesium ( < 0.001), and 1.25-dihydroxycholecalciferol ( < 0.01) as well as renal excretion of phosphate ( < 0.05) were significantly lower in the treatment groups compared with the control group. Although bone resorption was increased in both treatment groups ( < 0.05), no alterations in bone structure were detected. Determination of gastrointestinal absorption of calcium by Ussing chamber technique and quantification of RNA and protein expression of genes known to be involved in active calcium absorption did not reveal any stimulating effect of zeolite. Plasma calcium concentrations were not altered, probably because of the sufficient dietary calcium supply. However due to the effects of zeolite on 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol, bone metabolism and serum concentrations of phosphate and magenesium shown in the present study, potential negative long-termin effects on the animals should be considered whenever rations with zeolite are designed. PMID:27136016

  19. Copper removal using bio-inspired polydopamine coated natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Shapter, Joseph G; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel; Bennett, John W; Ellis, Amanda V

    2014-05-30

    Herein, for the first time, natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite powders modified with a bio-inspired adhesive, polydopamine (PDA), have been systematically studied as an adsorbent for copper cations (Cu(II)) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed successful grafting of PDA onto the zeolite surface. The effects of pH (2-5.5), PDA treatment time (3-24h), contact time (0 to 24h) and initial Cu(II) ion concentrations (1 to 500mgdm(-3)) on the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The adsorption behavior was fitted to a Langmuir isotherm and shown to follow a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) were shown to be 14.93mgg(-1) for pristine natural zeolite and 28.58mgg(-1) for PDA treated zeolite powders. This impressive 91.4% increase in Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity is attributed to the chelating ability of the PDA on the zeolite surface. Furthermore studies of recyclability using NAA showed that over 50% of the adsorbed copper could be removed in mild concentrations (0.01M or 0.1M) of either acid or base. PMID:24731937

  20. Bendable Zeolite Membranes: Synthesis and Improved Gas Separation Performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Ho, W S Winston; Figueroa, Jose D; Dutta, Prabir K

    2015-06-23

    Separation and sequestration of CO2 emitted from fossil energy fueled electric generating units and industrial facilities will help in reducing anthropogenic CO2, thereby mitigating its adverse climate change effects. Membrane-based gas separation has the potential to meet the technical challenges of CO2 separation if high selectivity and permeance with low costs for large-scale manufacture are realized. Inorganic zeolite membranes in principle can have selectivity and permeance considerably higher than polymers. This paper presents a strategy for zeolite growth within the pores of a polymer support, with crystallization time of an hour. With a thin coating of 200-300 nm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the zeolite-polymer composite, transport data for CO2/N2 separation indicate separation factors of 35-45, with CO2 permeance between 1600 and 2200 GPU (1 GPU = 3.35 × 10(-10) mol/(m(2) s Pa)) using dry synthetic mixtures of CO2 and N2 at 25 °C. The synthesis process results in membranes that are highly reproducible toward transport measurements and exhibit long-term stability (3 days). Most importantly, these membranes because of the zeolite growth within the polymer support, as contrasted to conventional zeolite growth on top of a support, are mechanically flexible.

  1. Determination of trace elements in zeolites by laser ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, C; Brenner, I B; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-QMS) was applied for the analysis of powdered zeolites (microporous aluminosilicates) used for clean-up procedures. For the quantitative determination of trace element concentrations three geological reference materials, granite NIM-G, lujavrite NIM-L and syenite NIM-S, from the National Institute for Metallurgy (South Africa) with a matrix composition corresponding to the zeolites were employed. Both the zeolites and reference materials were fused with a lithium borate mixture to increase the homogeneity and to eliminate mineralogical effects. In order to compare two different approaches for the quantification of analytical results in LA-ICP-MS relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of chemical elements and calibration curves were measured using the geostandards. The experimentally obtained RSCs are in the range of 0.2-6 for all elements of interest. Calibration curves for trace elements were measured without and with Li or Ti as internal standard element. With a few exceptions the regression coefficients of the calibration curves are better than 0.993 with internal standardization. NIM-G granite reference material was employed to evaluate the accuracy of the technique. Therefore, the measured concentrations were corrected with RSCs which were determined using lujavrite reference material NIM-L. This quantification method provided analytical results with deviations of 1-11% from the recommended and proposed values in granite reference material NIM-G, except for Co, Cs, La and Tb. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the determination of the trace element concentration (n = 5) is about 1% to 6% using Ti as internal standard element. Detection limits of LA-ICP-QMS in the lower microg/g range (from 0.03 microg/g for Lu, Ta and Th to 7.3 microg/g for Cu, with the exception of La) have been achieved for all elements of interest. Under the laser ablation

  2. Determination of trace elements in zeolites by laser ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, C; Brenner, I B; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-QMS) was applied for the analysis of powdered zeolites (microporous aluminosilicates) used for clean-up procedures. For the quantitative determination of trace element concentrations three geological reference materials, granite NIM-G, lujavrite NIM-L and syenite NIM-S, from the National Institute for Metallurgy (South Africa) with a matrix composition corresponding to the zeolites were employed. Both the zeolites and reference materials were fused with a lithium borate mixture to increase the homogeneity and to eliminate mineralogical effects. In order to compare two different approaches for the quantification of analytical results in LA-ICP-MS relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of chemical elements and calibration curves were measured using the geostandards. The experimentally obtained RSCs are in the range of 0.2-6 for all elements of interest. Calibration curves for trace elements were measured without and with Li or Ti as internal standard element. With a few exceptions the regression coefficients of the calibration curves are better than 0.993 with internal standardization. NIM-G granite reference material was employed to evaluate the accuracy of the technique. Therefore, the measured concentrations were corrected with RSCs which were determined using lujavrite reference material NIM-L. This quantification method provided analytical results with deviations of 1-11% from the recommended and proposed values in granite reference material NIM-G, except for Co, Cs, La and Tb. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the determination of the trace element concentration (n = 5) is about 1% to 6% using Ti as internal standard element. Detection limits of LA-ICP-QMS in the lower microg/g range (from 0.03 microg/g for Lu, Ta and Th to 7.3 microg/g for Cu, with the exception of La) have been achieved for all elements of interest. Under the laser ablation

  3. Chiral modification of copper exchanged zeolite-Y with cinchonidine and its application in the asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Deka, Jogesh; Satyanarayana, L; Karunakar, G V; Bhattacharyya, Pradip Kr; Bania, Kusum K

    2015-12-28

    Chirally modified Cu(2+) exchanged zeolite-Y was synthesized by direct adsorption of cinchonidine under ambient conditions. The chirally modified materials were characterized using various spectrochemical and physicochemical techniques viz. BET, FTIR, MAS ((1)H and (13)C NMR), XPS, SEM, cyclic voltammetry and PXRD. Characteristic peaks of cinchonidine observed in the supported materials confirmed the adsorption of cinchonidine and its coordination with the Cu(2+) active site on copper exchanged zeolite-Y. (13)C SSNMR and XPS analysis however confirmed for the half encapsulation process, only the quinoline ring of cinchonidine gets coordinated to the internal metal sites via the N atom while the quinuclidine moiety extends out of the host surface. Cinchonidine supported Cu(2+)-Y zeolites were found to exhibit good catalytic performance in the asymmetric Henry reaction. (1)H SSNMR studies also confirmed the protonation of the N atom of the quinuclidine ring during the course of the Henry reaction. Heterogeneous chiral catalysts were effective for up to two consecutive cycles. Leaching of cinchonidine after the second cycle was found to have a negative result in the catalytic performance.

  4. Silver nitrate in silver zeolite A: three-dimensional incommensurate guest ordering in a zeolite framework.

    PubMed

    Viertelhaus, M; Taylor, A E; Kloo, L; Gameson, I; Anderson, P A

    2006-05-21

    We report the results of a detailed examination of the occlusion of silver nitrate in silver zeolite A (AgA). The superlattice reported to occur in (AgNO3)9-AgA was found to melt at between 80 and 100 degrees C on heating and reappear when the sample was cooled down to 80 degrees C. Annealing in this temperature range and rigorous exclusion of water produced an enhancement of the superlattice peaks, which results from ordering of the contents of the zeolite cages. Peaks assigned to the superlattice were indexed with the tetragonal lattice parameters a = 17.440(5) and c = 12.398(4) A and proposed space group P4/nmm. The sharp peaks representing the lattice of the framework (a = 12.3711(5) A, Pm3m) remained largely unaffected by the guest in this compound, which was found to exhibit strong negative thermal expansion. The host and guest lattices are incommensurate with the tetragonal guest lattice being slightly larger than the cubic host in the c-direction and slightly smaller in the a- and b-directions. PMID:16688325

  5. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  7. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  8. The removal of bacteria by modified natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; de Las Pozas, C; Cruz, M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Ilangovan, K; Espinosa, Y; Luna, B

    2001-01-01

    The removal effect of natural and modified zeolites containing different heavy metals (Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+) on pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a solid medium was evaluated in this work. These experiments were carried out in a continuous mode treating municipal wastewater. Faecal coliform species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The rate constants of heavy metal lixiviation were determined using a first order kinetic model. The removal effect of modified natural zeolites in both a solid medium and in continuous mode showed an increased elimination of the bacterial population. The results established a decreasing order of the removal effect as follows: Cu2+ > Fe3+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+. The best performance of columns was obtained for inlet bacterial concentrations below 10(6) cells/100 ml. Most of the identified bacterial species were affected by copper modified zeolites, although Serratia marcescens presented the highest sensitivity and Klebsiella pneumoniae the greatest resistance. PMID:11501306

  9. Hot isostatic pressing of glass-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, M.C.; Pereira, C.; Lewis, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Glass-zeolite waste forms are being developed for immobilizing the chloride waste salt generated from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent fuel. Glass-zeolite composites with high densities were made using hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Processing parameters were investigated to yield desirable structural ceramic properties such as mechanical, chemical, and thermal stability. Limits for these parameters were determined by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. The resulting ceramic properties such as bulk density, open or apparent porosity, and leach resistance were determined. In addition, phase equilibria and particle-size distribution were observed by optical light and electron microscopy. Pre-HIP processing techniques were also studied to ensure intimate mixing of the glass and zeolite powders. Particle size distributions resulting from dry blending procedure are appropriate for needed flow and packing characteristics.

  10. The removal of bacteria by modified natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; de Las Pozas, C; Cruz, M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Ilangovan, K; Espinosa, Y; Luna, B

    2001-01-01

    The removal effect of natural and modified zeolites containing different heavy metals (Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+) on pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a solid medium was evaluated in this work. These experiments were carried out in a continuous mode treating municipal wastewater. Faecal coliform species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The rate constants of heavy metal lixiviation were determined using a first order kinetic model. The removal effect of modified natural zeolites in both a solid medium and in continuous mode showed an increased elimination of the bacterial population. The results established a decreasing order of the removal effect as follows: Cu2+ > Fe3+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+. The best performance of columns was obtained for inlet bacterial concentrations below 10(6) cells/100 ml. Most of the identified bacterial species were affected by copper modified zeolites, although Serratia marcescens presented the highest sensitivity and Klebsiella pneumoniae the greatest resistance.

  11. Wet gringing of zeolite in stirred media mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucsi, G.; Bohács, K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study the results of systematic experimental series are presented with the specific goal of optimizing the zeolite nanoparticles' production using a wet stirred media mill. The diameter of the grinding media as well as the rotor velocity were varied in the experiments. Particle size distribution and "outer" specific surface area of the ground samples were measured by a laser particle size analyser. Additionally, BET, XRD and FT-IR analyses were performed for the characterization of the "total" specific surface area as well as the crystalline and material structure, respectively. Based on the results of the laboratory experiments it was found that wet stirred media milling provided significant reductions in the particle size of zeolite. Furthermore, the crystallinity of the samples also decreased, so not only the physical but the mineralogical characteristics of zeolite can be controlled by stirred media milling.

  12. Formulation of cracking catalyst based on zeolite and natural clays

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, R.R.; Lupina, M.I.

    1995-11-01

    Domestically manufactured cracking catalysts are based on a synthetic amorphous aluminosilicate matrix and Y zeolite. A multistage {open_quotes}gel{close_quotes} technology is used in manufacturing the catalysts. The process includes mixing solutions of sodium silicate and acidic aluminum sulfate, forming, syneresis, and activation of the beaded gel. In the manufacture of bead catalysts, the next steps in the process are washing, drying, and calcining; in the manufacture of microbead catalysts, the next steps are dispersion and formation of a hydrogel slurry, spray-drying, and calcining. The Y zeolite is either introduced into the alumina-silica sol in the stage of forming the beads, or introduced in the dispersion stage. With the aim of developing an active and selective cracking catalyst based on Y zeolite and natural clays, with improved physicomechanical properties, the authors carried out a series of studies, obtaining results that are set forth in the present article.

  13. Ring opening of methylcyclohexane over platinum-loaded zeolites.

    PubMed

    Calemma, Vincenzo; Carati, Angela; Flego, Cristina; Giardino, Roberto; Gagliardi, Federica; Millini, Roberto; Bellussi, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    The activity of different platinum-loaded zeolites (Mordenite, ZSM-12, ZSM-5, ZSM-23) was investigated in the hydroconversion of methylcyclohexane (MCH), in the context of upgrading highly aromatic distillates for fuel blending. In all cases, conversion of MCH proceeds according to a pathway where the primary products are a mixture of dimethylcyclopentanes and ethylcyclopentane formed by isomerization and ring contraction of MCH. The primary products undergo consecutive ring-opening reactions with formation of n- and isoheptanes. The latter further react to form lower-molecular-weight n- and isoalkanes. The selectivity and distribution of products deriving from ring-contraction and ring-opening reactions are strongly affected by the pore size and topology of the zeolites. ZSM-5 exhibits a strong reactant shape-selectivity effect on ring-opening products. The evaluated zeolites show the following order of activity in the conversion of methylcyclohexane: Mordenite>ZSM-12>ZSM-5>ZSM-23. PMID:18702154

  14. Mechanistic proposal for the zeolite catalyzed methylation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Svelle, Stian; Bjørgen, Morten

    2010-12-01

    Alkylation and methylation reactions are important reactions in petrochemical production and form part of the reaction mechanism of many hydrocarbon transformation processes. Here, a new reaction mechanism is explored for the zeolite catalyzed methylation of arenes using quantum chemical calculations. It is proposed that the most substituted methylbenzenes, which will reside predominantly on the protonated form when adsorbed in a zeolite, can react directly with a neutral methanol molecule in the vicinity, thereby initiating the methylation reaction without having to return a proton to the zeolite surface. The calculated barriers are quite low, indicating that the suggested mechanism is plausible. This route might explain how the most substituted methylbenzenes can function as efficient reaction intermediates in the methanol to hydrocarbons reaction without themselves acting as catalyst poisons as a consequence of their high proton affinities. PMID:21049891

  15. Mechanochemical approach for selective deactivation of external surface acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Satoshi; Sato, Koki; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Tatami, Junichi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Wakihara, Toru

    2015-03-01

    The acid sites associated with the external surface of zeolite particles are responsible for undesirable consecutive reactions, such as isomerization, alkylation, and oligomerization, resulting in a lower selectivity to a target product; therefore, the selective modification (deactivation) of the external surface of zeolite particles has been an important issue in zeolite science. Here, a new method for surface deactivation of zeolite catalyst was tested via a mechanochemical approach using powder composer. Postsynthetic mechanochemical treatment of ZSM-5 zeolite causes a selective deactivation of catalytically active sites existing only on the external surface, as a potentially useful catalyst for highly selective production of p-xylene.

  16. Squaraines inside Zeolites: Preparation, Stability, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Cano, María Luz; Cozens, Frances L.; Esteves, María A.; Márquez, Francisco; García, Hermenegildo

    1997-10-17

    A series of four symmetrical squaraines (ditoylyl, di-m-xylyl, dianisyl, and diresorcinyl) incorporated inside zeolites Y, mordenite, and ZSM-5 have been obtained by treating squaric acid and the corresponding arene in the presence of acid zeolites. Acid sites and high reaction temperatures (150 degrees C) were found to be crucial for the success of the preparation procedure. Surprisingly, this method failed for the preparation of the squaraine derived from N,N-dimethylaniline, which is known to be readily formed from squaric acid in homogeneous phase without a catalyst. The solid samples containing squaraines were characterized by diffuse reflectance and Raman spectroscopies and by thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry. Among the hosts, mordenite was found to be the most general and convenient zeolite for the preparation of the squaraines, while in the other solids either the organic content adsorbed was comparatively smaller (ZSM-5) or some squaraines were not very stable (Y zeolite for ditolyl and dixylyl squaraines). The absorption spectra of the samples correspond to the J-aggregation state of the squaraines, except for some ZSM-5 samples, where simultaneous observation of the bands due to both monomers and aggregates occurs. Aggregation also changes with the water content of the samples. Treatment of the zeolite-bound diresorcinyl squaraine with basic aqueous solutions leads to remarkable variations in the diffuse reflectance and Raman spectra. These changes in the Raman spectrum of the diresorcinyl squaraine were found to be reversible by basic or acid washings. Laser flash photolysis using the 355- or 532-nm output of a Nd-YAG laser (<10 ns pulses; zeolite host. On the basis of the similarity of the UV-vis absorption spectra obtained in solution, these transients have been identified as the radical cation (HY) and the triplet excited

  17. Bicontinuous zeolite polymer composite membranes prepared via float casting.

    PubMed

    Kiesow, Ina; Marczewski, Dawid; Reinhardt, Lutz; Mühlmann, Marcel; Possiwan, Mario; Goedel, Werner A

    2013-03-20

    We prepared bicontinuous composite membranes comprising zeolite A particles. The particles form a monolayer which is embedded in a polymer sheet in such a way that each particle penetrates both surfaces of the polymer sheet. Preparation was done via "float casting"; a mixture of hydrophobized zeolite particles and an appropriate volume of a nonvolatile polymerizable organic liquid monomer was applied onto a water surface. The monomer was solidified via photopolymerization to form the above-mentioned membrane. In as-prepared state (without extensive drying), this membrane is permeable for water vapor (in case of zeolite 4A permeance = 8 × 10(-9) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability = 1.65 × 10(-14) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 49 barrer) but impermeable for nitrogen (permeance below detection limit of 5 × 10(-12) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability below detection limit of 1 × 10(-17) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 0.03 barrer). The permeance for water vapor increases with increasing pore size of the zeolite (in case of zeolite 5A, all other parameters being unchanged, permeance = 12 × 10(-9) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1), permeability = 2.4 × 10(-14) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1) = 72 barrer). These observations indicate that the water molecules are predominantly transported through the zeolite channels and at the same time block the passage of other molecules. The impermeability for nitrogen in as-prepared state indicates a low amount of defects that are not blocked by water. Furthermore, the composite nature of the membrane gives rise to a reduced brittleness; membranes can be handled manually without support structure and thus might be promising candidates for separation technology. PMID:23398555

  18. Novel modified zeolites for energy-efficient hydrocarbon separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Arruebo, Manuel; Dong, Junhang; Anderson, Thomas (Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, MO); Gu, Xuehong; Gray, Gary (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Bennett, Ron (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Nenoff, Tina Maria; Kartin, Mutlu; Johnson, Kaylynn (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Falconer, John; Noble, Richard

    2006-11-01

    We present synthesis, characterization and testing results of our applied research project, which focuses on the effects of surface and skeletal modification of zeolites for significant enhancements in current hydrocarbon (HC) separations. Zeolites are commonly used by the chemical and petroleum industries as catalysts and ion-exchangers. They have high potential for separations owing to their unique pore structures and adsorption properties and their thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. Because of zeolites separation properties, low cost, and robustness in industrial process, they are natural choice for use as industrial adsorbents. This is a multidisciplinary effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials for the separation of branched vs. linear organic molecules found in commercially important HC streams via adsorption based separations. The focus of this project was the surface and framework modification of the commercially available zeolites, while tuning the adsorption properties and the selectivities of the bulk and membrane separations. In particular, we are interested with our partners at Goodyear Chemical, on how to apply the modified zeolites to feedstock isoprene purification. For the characterization and the property measurements of the new and improved materials powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Residual Gas Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (RGA-MS), Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDAX), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area techniques were utilized. In-situ carbonization of MFI zeolite membranes allowed for the maximum separation of isoprene from n-pentane, with a 4.1% enrichment of the binary stream with n-pentane. In four component streams, a modified MFI membrane had high selectivities for n-pentane and 1-3-pentadiene over isoprene but virtually no separation for the 2-methyl-2-butene/isoprene pair.

  19. Role of Delamination in Zeolite-Catalyzed Aromatic Alkylation: UCB‑3 versus 3‑D Al-SSZ-70

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, Ron C.; Ouyang, Xiaoying; Edsinga, Jeffrey A.; Rea, Thomas; Arslan, Ilke; Hwang, Son-Jong; Zones, Stacey I.; Katz, Alexander

    2014-07-03

    Delaminated zeolite UCB-3 exhibits 2.4-fold greater catalytic activity relative to its three-dimensional (3D) zeolite counterpart, Al-SSZ-70, and 2.0-fold greater activity (per catalyst mass) when compared with industrial catalyst MCM-22, for the alkylation of toluene with propylene at 523 K. The former increase is nearly equal to the observed relative increase in external surface area and acid sites upon delamination. However, at 423 K for the same reaction, UCB-3 exhibits a 3.5-fold greater catalytic activity relative to 3D Al-SSZ-70. The higher relative rate enhancement for the delaminated material at lower temperature can be elucidated on the basis of increased contributions from internal acid sites. Evidence of possible contributions from such acid sites is obtained by performing catalysis after silanation treatment, which demonstrates that although virtually all catalysis in MCM-22 occurs on the external surface, catalysis also occurs on internal sites for 3D Al-SSZ-70. The additional observed enhancement at low temperatures can therefore be rationalized by greater access to internal active sites as a result of sheet breakage during delamination. Such breakage leads to shorter characteristic internal diffusion paths and was visualized using TEM comparisons of UCB-3 and 3D Al-SSZ-70.

  20. Regenerative Cu/La zeolite supported desulfurizing sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor); Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Efficient, regenerable sorbents for removal of H2S from fluid hydrocarbons such as diesel fuel at moderate condition comprise a porous, high surface area aluminosilicate support, suitably a synthetic zeolite, and most preferably a zeolite having a free lattice opening of at least 6 Angstroms containing from 0.1 to 0.5 moles of copper ions, lanthanum ions or their mixtures. The sorbent removes sulfur from the hydrocarbon fuel in high efficiency and can be repetitively regenerated without loss of activity.

  1. Zeolites replacing plant fossils in the Denver formation, Lakewood, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Well-developed crystals of heulandite and stilbite, within fossil wood, occur in sedimentary rocks in Lakewood, Jefferson County. The rocks belong to the Denver formation, a locally fossiliferous deposit of fluvial claystone, siltstone, sandstone and conglomerate, containing some volcanic mudflows (andesitic) of late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age. Altered volcanic glass released Na and Ca into the ground-water and subsequently zeolites were crystallized in the open spaces between grains and within fossil plant structures. Minor pyrite, quartz (jasper), calcite and apatite also occur as replacements of fossil wood. Similar zeolite occurrences in other areas are reviewed.-R.S.M.

  2. Synthesis process of zeolite P using a poorly crystallized kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Oueslati, W.; Ben Haj Amara, A.

    2009-11-01

    Poorly crystallized kaolinite KGa2 and metakaolinites derived from them were studied under hydrothermal conditions in an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. Reaction was obtained in a specific reactor allowing a continuous agitation and pH and temperature controls. Metakaolinte were derived from heated kaolinite at 500∘ C and 900∘ C. Using kaolinite and metakaolinite obtained after heating at 500∘ C the main formed products w metakaolinte obtained at 900∘ C reacted with NaOH solution zeolite A (LTA) is the first synthesized product and a prolonged treatment (72 hours) leads to synthesize zeolite P. Intermediate and homogeneous phases were characterized by XRD analysis and MAS NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Method for encapsulating nanoparticles in a zeolite matrix

    DOEpatents

    Coker, Eric N.

    2007-12-11

    A method for preparing a metal nanocluster composite material. A porous zeolitic material is treated with an aqueous metal compound solution to form a metal ion-exchanged zeolitic material, heated at a temperature ramp rate of less than 2.degree. C./min to an elevated temperature, cooled, contacted with an organic monomer and heating to induce polymerization, and heating the composite material to greater than 350.degree. C. under non-oxidizing conditions to form a metal nanocluster-carbon composite material with nanocluster sizes between approximately 0.6 nm and 10 nm.

  4. Zeolite catalysis in the synthesis of isobutylene from hydrous ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Cory Bernard

    1999-11-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of isobutylene from a hydrous ethanol feedstock over zeolites. The synthesis is accomplished in three steps: (1) low-temperature direct ethanol conversion to ethylene on H-ZSM-5 zeolite, (2) ethylene conversion to butene products over metal-exchanged zeolites, and (3) butene skeletal rearrangement to isobutylene over FER zeolites. The key to understanding and optimizing each synthesis step lies in the ability to control and regulate the zeolite acidity (Bronsted and Lewis)---both strength and number. Therefore, the continuous temperature programmed amine desorption (CTPAD) technique was further developed to simultaneously count the Bronsted acid sites and quantitatively characterize their strength. The adsorption of ethanol, reaction products, amines, coke and ethanol-derived residue (EDR) were monitored gravimetrically using the highly sensitive, novel Tapered Element Oscillating Microreactor (TEOM) apparatus. The TEOM was also used also in conjunction with CTPAD to characterize Bronsted acidity which is a new application for the instrument. For the first synthesis step, a parallel reaction exists which simultaneously produces diethyl ether and ethylene directly over H-ZSM-5. The reaction rates for each pathway were measured directly using a differential reactor operating at low temperatures (<473 K). Water in the ethanol feed enhances the rate of ethylene formation. A mechanism and kinetic expression are proposed for this reaction over H-ZSM-5, with diethyl-ether desorption and ethylene formation as the rate limiting steps. Heat of adsorption values measured from the independent microcalorimetry work reported in the literature are incorporated into the kinetic analysis which reduces the number of regressed parameters. For the remaining synthesis steps, several zeolite structures (ZSM-5, Y, FER) partially exchanged with Pd, Ti, Ni and Au were prepared and tested. It was determined from this screening study that the zeolites

  5. Nano- and microsized zeolites as a perspective material for potentiometric biosensors creation.

    PubMed

    Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Shelyakina, Margaryta K; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; Soy, Esin; Kirdeciler, Salih Kaan; Ozansoy Kasap, Berna; Lagarde, Florence; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Akata Kurç, Burcu; Soldatkin, Alexei P; Dzyadevych, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    A number of potentiometric biosensors based on coimmobilization of enzymes with different types of zeolite on pH-ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) have been developed. Their working characteristics have been determined and compared. It was shown that clinoptilolite and zeolite Beta polymorph A (BEA) are more promising for creating biosensors than zeolite A. Changing the concentration of zeolite BEA in membranes, it is possible to extend the biosensor linear measurement range. The two-layer method of deposition of the enzyme with clinoptilolite was found to provide a significant increase in the biosensor sensitivity to substrates, whereas thermal modification of the zeolite BEA crystals can improve analytical characteristics of potentiometric biosensors for detection of toxic substances. These results show that it is possible to regulate the ISFET characteristics for different enzyme-based biosensors by tailoring the electrode surfaces via different zeolites. This makes zeolites strong candidates for integration into biosensors as ISFET modifiers.

  6. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  7. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rolllins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  8. Experiments with Zeolites at the Secondary School Level: Experience from The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Eric N.; Davis, Pamela J.; Kerkstra, Aonne; van Bekkum, Herman

    1999-10-01

    This article describes a number of experiments that involve zeolites and are suitable for secondary-school chemistry laboratories. The experiments have been introduced successfully into secondary schools in The Netherlands. Zeolites are used in enormous quantities as builders (water softeners) in laundry detergents; they account for 15-30 wt % of most laundry detergents currently on the European market. In a series of experiments, students test the hardness of tap water before and after treatment with some zeolite and perform tests with a range of commercial laundry detergents containing zeolites. Zeolites are also used as catalysts in numerous industrial processes; another experiment described here highlights the use of zeolites as recyclable catalysts in an esterification reaction. A duplicate reaction is carried out in parallel, but using the conventional sulfuric acid catalyst instead of the zeolite. This experiment provides a good example of the benefit of a recyclable, heterogeneous catalyst over the conventional homogeneous one that is discarded as waste material.

  9. Rapid detection of Cronobacter sakazakii by real-time PCR based on the cgcA gene and TaqMan probe with internal amplification control.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuangfang; Yu, Yigang; Li, Rong; Wu, Xinwei; Xiao, Xinglong; Wu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a severe virulent strain that is frequently detected in powdered infant formula (PIF). Therefore, it is necessary to develop a fast and specific detection method. The specificity of our newly developed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was validated with DNA from 46 strains. Among them, 12 C. sakazakii strains were correctly amplified, whereas no positive florescent signal was observed from 34 nontarget controls. The detection limit of C. sakazakii was about 110 CFU/mL in broth and 1100 CFU/g in PIF. After enrichment in buffered peptone water for 6 h, our developed qRT-PCR assay could reliably detect C. sakazakii when the inoculation level was as low as 2 CFU/25 g (0.08 CFU/g) in PIF. The growth of C. sakazakii could be inhibited by the presence of Lactobacillus pentosus and Bacillus cereus, which used a longer enrichment period before the isolation was accomplished. However, at 5 and 50 CFU/25 g inoculation levels of C. sakazakii in the presence of 4 × 10(6) CFU L. pentosus/25 g or of 2 × 10(4) CFU B. cereus/25 g, the qRT-PCR assay could detect the presence of Cronobacter even though these artificially spiked samples were negative in culture. Therefore, our results indicated that the qRT-PCR assay could detect samples containing inhibitors and could avoid false negatives by using an internal amplification control.

  10. CAN WE PROBE THE LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM GeV-TeV SPECTRA INTEGRATED OVER INTERNAL SHOCKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Aoi, Junichi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Murase, Kohta; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ioka, Kunihito

    2010-10-10

    We revisit the high-energy spectral cutoff originating from the electron-positron pair creation in the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with numerical and analytical calculations. We show that the conventional exponential and/or broken power-law cutoff should be drastically modified to a shallower broken power law in practical observations that integrate emissions from different internal shocks. Since the steepening is tiny for observations, this 'smearing' effect can generally reduce the previous estimates of the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflows. We apply our formulation to GRB 080916C, recently detected by the Large Area Telescope detector on the Fermi satellite, and find that the minimum Lorentz factor can be {approx}600 (or even smaller values), which is below but consistent with the previous result of {approx}900. Observing the steepening energy (the so-called 'pair-break energy') is crucial to diagnosing the Lorentz factor and/or the emission site in future observations, especially current and future Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC, VERITAS, and CTA.

  11. The growth of zeolites A, X and mordenite in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Bac, N.; Coker, E. N.; Dixon, A. G.; Warzywoda, J.; Thompson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials that form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide. They are used primarily as adsorbents and catalysts and support to a significant extent the positive balance of trade realized by the chemical industry in the United States (around $19 billion in 1991). The magnitude of their efforts can be appreciated when one realizes that since their introduction as 'cracking catalysts' in the early 1960's, they have saved the equivalent of 60 percent of the total oil production from Alaska's North Slope. Thus the performance of zeolite catalysts can have a profound effect on the U.S. economy. It is estimated that a 1 percent increase in yield of the gasoline fraction per barrel of oil would represent a savings of 22 million barrels of crude oil per year, representing a reduction of $400 million in the United States' balance of payments. Thus any activity that results in improvement in zeolite catalyst performance is of significant scientific and industrial interest. In addition, due to their 'stability,' uniformity, and, within limits, their 'engineerable' structures, zeolites are being tested as potential adsorbents to purify gases and liquids at the parts-per-billion levels needed in today's electronic, biomedical, and biotechnology industries and for the environment. Other exotic applications, such as host materials for quantum-confined semiconductor atomic arrays, are also being investigated. Because of the importance of this class of material, extensive efforts have been made to characterize their structures and to understand their nucleation and growth mechanisms, so as to be able to custom-make zeolites for a desired application. To date, both the nucleation mechanics and chemistry (such as what are the 'key' nutrients) are, as yet, still unknown for many, if not all, systems. The problem is compounded because there is usually a 'gel' phase present that is assumed to control the degree of

  12. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L; Hallaert, Simon D; Böttger, Lars H; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-08-18

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(ii), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species-α-Fe(ii) and α-O-are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive 'spectator' iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(ii) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(ii) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(iv)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function-producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an 'entatic' state-might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27535535

  13. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  14. Martian zeolites as a source of atmospheric methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, Olivier; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Frédéric; Bouley, Sylvain; Chassefière, Eric; Sautter, Violaine; Quesnel, Yoann; Picaud, Sylvain; Lectez, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    The origin of the martian methane is still poorly understood. A plausible explanation is that methane could have been produced either by hydrothermal alteration of basaltic crust or by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks producing hydrogen and reducing crustal carbon into methane. Once formed, methane storage on Mars is commonly associated with the presence of hidden clathrate reservoirs. Here, we alternatively suggest that chabazite and clinoptilolite, which belong to the family of zeolites, may form a plausible storage reservoir of methane in the martian subsurface. Because of the existence of many volcanic terrains, zeolites are expected to be widespread on Mars and their Global Equivalent Layer may range up to more than ∼1 km, according to the most optimistic estimates. If the martian methane present in chabazite and clinoptilolite is directly sourced from an abiotic source in the subsurface, the destabilization of a localized layer of a few millimeters per year may be sufficient to explain the current observations. The sporadic release of methane from these zeolites requires that they also remained isolated from the atmosphere during its evolution. The methane release over the ages could be due to several mechanisms such as impacts, seismic activity or erosion. If the methane outgassing from excavated chabazite and/or clinoptilolite prevails on Mars, then the presence of these zeolites around Gale Crater could explain the variation of methane level observed by Mars Science Laboratory.

  15. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite single crystals with cheap porogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Haixiang; Li, Changlin; Ren, Jiawen; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2011-07-01

    Mesoporous zeolite (silicalite-1, ZSM-5, TS-1) single crystals have been successfully synthesized by adding soluble starch or sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to a conventional zeolite synthesis system. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen sorption analysis, 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ( 27Al MAS NMR), temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3-TPD) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The SEM images clearly show that all zeolite crystals possess the similar morphology with particle size of about 300 nm, the TEM images reveal that irregular intracrystal pores are randomly distributed in the whole crystal. 27Al MAS NMR spectra indicate that nearly all of the Al atoms are in tetrahedral co-ordination in ZSM-5, UV-vis spectra confirm that nearly all of titanium atoms are incorporated into the framework of TS-1. The catalytic activity of meso-ZSM-5 in acetalization of cyclohexanone and meso-TS-1 in hydroxylation of phenol was also studied. The synthesis method reported in this paper is cost-effective and environmental friendly, can be easily expended to prepare other hierarchical structured zeolites.

  16. Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential

    SciTech Connect

    Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant

    2009-10-15

    The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  17. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks for kinetic separation of propane and propene

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jing; Li, Kunhao; Olson, David H.

    2014-08-05

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) characterized by organic ligands consisting of imidazole ligands that are either essentially all 2-chloroimidazole ligands or essentially all 2-bromoimidazole ligands are disclosed. Methods for separating propane and propene with the ZIFs of the present invention, as well as other ZIFs, are also disclosed.

  18. Oxidation of bioethanol using zeolite-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielby, Jerrik; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng; Kasama, Takeshi; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Kegnaes, Søren

    2014-11-10

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98 % selectivity toward acetaldehyde at 200 °C, which (under the given reaction conditions) corresponds to 606 mol acetaldehyde/mol Au hour(-1) . PMID:25196739

  19. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1993-02-24

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  20. USE OF SYNTHETIC ZEOLITES FOR ARSENATE REMOVAL FROM POLLUTANT WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water that causes arsenical dermatitis and skin cancer. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of synthetic zeolites for removal of arsenic from water below the current and proposed EPA MCL has been examined...

  1. Oxidation of bioethanol using zeolite-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielby, Jerrik; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng; Kasama, Takeshi; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Kegnaes, Søren

    2014-11-10

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98 % selectivity toward acetaldehyde at 200 °C, which (under the given reaction conditions) corresponds to 606 mol acetaldehyde/mol Au hour(-1) .

  2. Direct Observation of Luminescent Silver Clusters Confined in Faujasite Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Altantzis, Thomas; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Martinez, Gerardo T; Abakumov, Artem M; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Bals, Sara; Hofkens, Johan

    2016-08-23

    One of the ultimate goals in the study of metal clusters is the correlation between the atomic-scale organization and their physicochemical properties. However, direct observation of the atomic organization of such minuscule metal clusters is heavily hindered by radiation damage imposed by the different characterization techniques. We present direct evidence of the structural arrangement, at an atomic level, of luminescent silver species stabilized in faujasite (FAU) zeolites using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Two different silver clusters were identified in Ag-FAU zeolites, a trinuclear silver species associated with green emission and a tetranuclear silver species related to yellow emission. By combining direct imaging with complementary information obtained from X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis, we were able to elucidate the main differences at an atomic scale between luminescent (heat-treated) and nonluminescent (cation-exchanged) Ag-FAU zeolites. It is expected that such insights will trigger the directed synthesis of functional metal nanocluster-zeolite composites with tailored luminescent properties. PMID:27391548

  3. DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS DURING PERVAPORATION THROUGH A ZEOLITE MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory


    An isotopic-transient technique was used to directly measure diffusion times of H2O, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetone in pure and binary mixture feeds transporting through a zeolite membrane under steady-state pervaporation conditions. Diffusivities can be determ...

  4. Synthesis and Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2010-07-21

    Nano sized zeolitic imidazolate frameworks [nZIF-8] with excellent chemical and thermal stability has been synthesized at room temperature by simple mixing of 2-methylimidazole and zinc nitrate hexahydrate in methanol/ 1% high molecular weight poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) solution for 24 hrs

  5. Ionization and protonation of aromatic diamines by sorption in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, S.; Moissette, A.; Brémard, C.; Vezin, H.

    2003-06-01

    In situ diffuse reflectance UV visible, Raman scattering and EPR spectroscopies were used to monitor spontaneous ionization of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) by direct exposure to dehydrated M nZSM-5 zeolite (M=Na +, H +; n=0,3,6). The TMPD •+ radical cation is found to be generated in low yield in purely siliceous silicalite-1 whereas TMPD •+ is generated in high yield in aluminated Na nZSM-5 and H nZSM-5. The ejected electron is also characterized though electronic absorption spectra. The charge separation was found to be persistent over several months. The tight fit between the shape of TMPD and the pore size of straight channels of zeolites is considered to be the main factor responsible for the stabilization of the TMPD radical ion by preventing rapid electron back transfer. Within Na nZSM-5, the amounts of TMPD •+ and trapped electron were found to decrease over long time and to recombine to molecular TMPD. In contrast, in acidic H nZSM-5 zeolite the charge recombination generates diprotonated TMPDH 22+ occluded species. Furthermore, within H nZSM-5, protonation appears competitive to the ionization efficiency of zeolite.

  6. Preparation of zeolites for TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) using microtomy

    SciTech Connect

    Csencsits, R.; Gronsky, R.

    1987-12-01

    The application of microtomy to Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) specimen preparation of zeolite catalysts is explained. Using a new acrylic resin (LR White) thin sections (less than or equal to60 nm) may be cut with relative ease. Although the details described are specific to catalysts, microtomy and the use of the acrylic resin are applicable to any hard ceramic powder sample. 3 figs.

  7. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  8. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  9. Biogas cleaning and upgrading with natural zeolites from tuffs.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Valerio; Petracchini, Francesco; Guerriero, Ettore; Bencini, Alessandro; Drigo, Serena

    2016-01-01

    CO2 adsorption on synthetic zeolites has become a consolidated approach for biogas upgrading to biomethane. As an alternative to synthetic zeolites, tuff waste from building industry was investigated in this study: indeed, this material is available at a low price and contains a high fraction of natural zeolites. A selective adsorption of CO2 and H2S towards CH4 was confirmed, allowing to obtain a high-purity biomethane (CO2 <2 g m(-3), i.e. 0.1%; H2S <1.5 mg m(-3)), suitable for injection in national grids or as vehicle fuel. The loading capacity was found to be 45 g kg(-1) and 40 mg kg(-1), for CO2 and H2S, respectively. Synthetic gas mixtures and real biogas samples were used, and no significant effects due to biogas impurities (e.g. humidity, dust, moisture, etc.) were observed. Thermal and vacuum regenerations were also optimized and confirmed to be possible, without significant variations in efficiency. Hence, natural zeolites from tuffs may successfully be used in a pressure/vacuum swing adsorption process.

  10. Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 °C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite

  11. Facile synthesis of hollow zeolite microspheres through dissolution–recrystallization procedure in the presence of organosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Haixiang; Ren, Jiawen; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2013-04-15

    Hollow zeolite microspheres have been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of organosilanes via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure. In the presence of organosilanes, zeolite particles with a core/shell structure formed at the first stage of hydrothermal treatment, then the core was consumed and recrystallized into zeolite framework to form the hollow structure during the second hydrothermal process. The influence of organosilanes was discussed, and a related dissolution–recrystallization mechanism was proposed. In addition, the hollow zeolite microspheres exhibited an obvious advantage in catalytic reactions compared to conventional ZSM-5 catalysts, such as in the alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride. - Graphical abstract: Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure in the presence of organosiline. Highlights: ► Hollow zeolite spheres with aggregated zeolite nanocrystals were synthesized via a dissolution–recrystallization procedure. ► Organosilane influences both the morphology and hollow structure of zeolite spheres. ► Hollow zeolite spheres showed an excellent catalytic performance in alkylation of toluene with benzyl chloride.

  12. Exploitation of unique properties of zeolites in the development of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors.

  13. Exploitation of Unique Properties of Zeolites in the Development of Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yangong; Li, Xiaogan; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of microporous zeolites, including ion-exchange properties, adsorption, molecular sieving, catalysis, conductivity have been exploited in improving the performance of gas sensors. Zeolites have been employed as physical and chemical filters to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors. In addition, direct interaction of gas molecules with the extraframework cations in the nanoconfined space of zeolites has been explored as a basis for developing new impedance-type gas/vapor sensors. In this review, we summarize how these properties of zeolites have been used to develop new sensing paradigms. There is a considerable breadth of transduction processes that have been used for zeolite incorporated sensors, including frequency measurements, optical and the entire gamut of electrochemical measurements. It is clear from the published literature that zeolites provide a route to enhance sensor performance, and it is expected that commercial manifestation of some of the approaches discussed here will take place. The future of zeolite-based sensors will continue to exploit its unique properties and use of other microporous frameworks, including metal organic frameworks. Zeolite composites with electronic materials, including metals will lead to new paradigms in sensing. Use of nano-sized zeolite crystals and zeolite membranes will enhance sensor properties and make possible new routes of miniaturized sensors. PMID:22666081

  14. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  15. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  16. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  17. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  18. Development of a quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Piasentin Alessio, Elsa; Astegiano, Sara; Gasparini, Giorgio; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-03-01

    Evidence demonstrating that human rhinovirus (HRV) disease is not exclusively limited to the upper airways and may cause lower respiratory complications, together with the frequency of HRV infections and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients underline the need for rapid and accurate diagnosis of HRV infections. In this study, we developed the first quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes. We described a simple method to accurately quantify RNA target by computing the time to positivity (TTP) values for HRV RNA. Quantification capacity was assessed by plotting these TTP values against the starting number of target molecules. By using this simple method, we have significantly increased the diagnostic accuracy, precision, and trueness of real-time NASBA assay. Specificity of the method was verified in both in silico and experimental studies. Moreover, for assessment of clinical reactivity of the assay, NASBA has been validated on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Our quantitative NASBA assay was found to be very specific, accurate, and precise with high repeatability and reproducibility.

  19. The influence of chemisorbed molecules on mass transfer in H-ZSM-5-type zeolites and the location of Broensted acid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, J.; Buelow, M. ); Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1988-11-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is one of the most important applications of zeolites. Therefore, various methods have been developed to determine the strength and concentration of Bronsted acid sites in zeolites. Among them, in the last few years, {sup 1}H MAS NMR has become a powerful tool. In addition to the accessibility of the acid sites probed by chemisorption of N-bases, the steric environment of these catalytically active sites is of importance since it imposes constraints on the geometry of the transition state. However, only a few studies have been reported on this topic. Information was obtained from quantum chemical calculations, catalytic experiments, I.R. spectroscopy, and the arrangement of guest molecules. From these investigations it has been concluded that in H-ZSM-5 the channel intersections should be preferential location centers for the Bronsted acid sites. In adsorption technology, in the use of zeolites as shape-selective adsorbents, modification of the molecular sieve properties by chemisorption of nitrogen-containing bases (N-compounds) has become a common technique. The authors have applied the NMR pulsed field gradient technique to study the influence of chemisorbed N-compounds on transport properties of molecular sieves, considering the chemisorbed compounds as transport obstacles.

  20. X‐ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal: Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    PubMed Central

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P.; Richard, Marie‐Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A.; Schülli, Tobias U.; Meirer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Structure–activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single‐particle level. For the first time, one X‐ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm‐resolved X‐ray diffraction (μ‐XRD) and X‐ray excited optical fluorescence (μ‐XEOF) maps of the crystallinity and Brønsted reactivity of a zeolite crystal previously reacted with a styrene probe molecule. The local gradients in chemical reactivity (derived from μ‐XEOF) were correlated with local crystallinity and framework Al content, determined by μ‐XRD. Two distinctly different types of fluorescent species formed selectively, depending on the local zeolite crystallinity. The results illustrate the potential of this approach to resolve the crystallographic structure of a porous material and its reactivity in one experiment via X‐ray induced fluorescence of organic molecules formed at the reactive centers. PMID:27478278

  1. X‐ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal: Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    PubMed Central

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P.; Richard, Marie‐Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A.; Schülli, Tobias U.; Meirer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Structure–activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single‐particle level. For the first time, one X‐ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm‐resolved X‐ray diffraction (μ‐XRD) and X‐ray excited optical fluorescence (μ‐XEOF) maps of the crystallinity and Brønsted reactivity of a zeolite crystal previously reacted with a styrene probe molecule. The local gradients in chemical reactivity (derived from μ‐XEOF) were correlated with local crystallinity and framework Al content, determined by μ‐XRD. Two distinctly different types of fluorescent species formed selectively, depending on the local zeolite crystallinity. The results illustrate the potential of this approach to resolve the crystallographic structure of a porous material and its reactivity in one experiment via X‐ray induced fluorescence of organic molecules formed at the reactive centers. PMID:27145171

  2. Multi-component lanthanide hybrids based on zeolite A/L and zeolite A/L-polymers for tunable luminescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yan, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Some multi-component hybrids based on zeolite L/A are prepared. Firstly, zeolite A/L is loaded with lanthanide complexes (Eu-DBM or Tb-AA (acetylacetone = AA, dibenzoylmethane = DBM)) into its channels. Secondly, 3-methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) is used to covalently graft onto the surface of functionalized zeolite A/L (Si-[ZA/L⊃Eu-DBM(Tb-AA)]). Thirdly, lanthanide ions (Eu(3+)/Tb(3+)) are coordinated to the functionalized zeolite A/L and ligands (phen(1,10-phenanthroline) or bipy (2,2'-bipyridyl)) are introduced by a ship-in-bottle method. The inside-outside double modifications of ZA/L with lanthanide complexes afford the final hybrids and these are characterized by means of XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS, SEM and luminescence spectroscopy, some of which display white or near-white light emission. Furthermore, selected above-mentioned hybrids are incorporated into PEMA/PMMA (poly ethyl methylacryate/poly methyl methacrylate) hosts to prepare luminescent polymer films. These results provide abundant data that these hybrid materials can be expected to have potential application in various practical fields.

  3. Antimicrobial properties of zeolite-X and zeolite-A ion-exchanged with silver, copper, and zinc against a broad range of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Selami; Ustaoğlu, Zeynep; Yılmazer, Gonca Altın; Sahin, Fikrettin; Baç, Nurcan

    2014-02-01

    Zeolites are nanoporous alumina silicates composed of silicon, aluminum, and oxygen in a framework with cations, water within pores. Their cation contents can be exchanged with monovalent or divalent ions. In the present study, the antimicrobial (antibacterial, anticandidal, and antifungal) properties of zeolite type X and A, with different Al/Si ratio, ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions were investigated individually. The study presents the synthesis and manufacture of four different zeolite types characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The ion loading capacity of the zeolites was examined and compared with the antimicrobial characteristics against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and mold. It was observed that Ag(+) ion-loaded zeolites exhibited more antibacterial activity with respect to other metal ion-embedded zeolite samples. The results clearly support that various synthetic zeolites can be ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions to acquire antimicrobial properties or ion-releasing characteristics to provide prolonged or stronger activity. The current study suggested that zeolite formulations could be combined with various materials used in manufacturing medical devices, surfaces, textiles, or household items where antimicrobial properties are required.

  4. Epitaxial Growth of ZSM-5@Silicalite-1: A Core-Shell Zeolite Designed with Passivated Surface Acidity.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanpour, Arian; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Grabow, Lars C; Crossley, Steven P; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-04-28

    The design of materials with spatially controlled chemical composition has potential advantages for wide-reaching applications that span energy to medicine. Here, we present a method for preparing a core-shell aluminosilicate zeolite with continuous translational symmetry of nanopores and an epitaxial shell of tunable thickness that passivates Brønsted acid sites associated with framework Al on exterior surfaces. For this study, we selected the commercially relevant MFI framework type and prepared core-shell particles consisting of an aluminosilicate core (ZSM-5) and a siliceous shell (silicalite-1). Transmission electron microscopy and gas adsorption studies confirmed that silicalite-1 forms an epitaxial layer on ZSM-5 crystals without blocking pore openings. Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used in combination to confirm that the shell thickness can be tailored with nanometer resolution (e.g., 5-20 nm). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption measurements revealed the presence of a siliceous shell, while probe reactions using molecules that were either too large or adequately sized to access MFI pores confirmed the uniform shell coverage. The synthesis of ZSM-5@silicalite-1 offers a pathway for tailoring the physicochemical properties of MFI-type materials, notably in the area of catalysis, where surface passivation can enhance product selectivity without sacrificing catalyst activity. The method described herein may prove to be a general platform for zeolite core-shell design with potentially broader applicability to other porous materials.

  5. Adsorptive Separation of 1-Butanol from Aqueous Solutions Using MFI- and FER-Type Zeolite Frameworks: A Monte Carlo Study.

    PubMed

    DeJaco, Robert F; Bai, Peng; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic fermentation can transform carbohydrates to yield a multicomponent mixture comprising mainly of acetone, 1-butanol, and ethanol (ABE) in a typical weight ratio of 3:6:1. Compared to ethanol, 1-butanol, the main product of ABE fermentation, offers significant advantages as a biofuel or a fuel additive. However, the toxicity of 1-butanol for cell cultures requires broth concentrations to be low in 1-butanol (≈1-2 wt %). An energy-efficient recovery method that performs well even at low 1-butanol concentrations is therefore necessary to ensure economic feasibility of the ABE fermentation process. In this work, configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble are performed to probe the adsorption of 1-butanol/water solutions onto all-siliceous zeolites with the framework types MFI and FER. At low solution concentration, the selectivity and capacity for 1-butanol in MFI are larger than those in FER, while the opposite is true for concentrations at or above those of ABE broths. Structural analysis at various loadings sheds light on the different sorbate-sorbate and sorbate-sorbent interactions that govern trends in adsorption in each zeolite.

  6. Studies of zeolite-based artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoyu

    Two ruthenium polypyridyl compounds of structural formula [(bpy) 2RuL]2+ (RuL) and [(bpy)2RuLDQ]4+ (RuLDQ) (where bpy = bipyridine, L = trans-1,2-bis-4-(4'-methyl)-2,2'-bipyridyl) ethane, LDQ = 1-[4-(4'-methyl)-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-2-[4-(4'-N,N'-tetramethylene-2,2'-bipyridinium)] ethene) were synthesized and purified. From pH titrations, it was found that the Ru complex was a stronger base (pKa* = 6) in the excited state than in the ground state (pKa = 4). Photolysis of the RuL complex in solutions at pH 7 and 12 led to formation of species with increased emission quantum yields, ˜55 nm blue-shift of the emission maximum to 625 nm and disappearance of the absorption band at 330 nm, the latter arising from the olefinic bond of the L ligand. Photoproducts formed at neutral pH have been analyzed. It was found that the major product was a dimer of RuL, dimerizing around the double bond. Photoreactions did not occur in the dark or in the aprotic solvent acetonitrile. We proposed that a Ru(III) radical intermediate was formed by photoinduced excited-state electron and proton transfer, which initiated the dimerization. The radical intermediate also underwent photochemical degradative reductions. Below pH 4, the emission quenching was proposed to arise via protonation of the monoprotonated RuLH + followed by electron transfer to the viologen-type moiety created by protonation. The products of photodegradation at pH > 12 were different from those of pH 7, but the mechanism of the degradation at pH > 12 was not elucidated. RuLDQ was stable under visible irradiation. We examined nanocrystalline zeolite as a host for light absorbing sensitizers (electron donors) and electron acceptors. Nanocrystalline zeolite Y (NanoY) with uniform particle size, pure phase was prepared. NanoY was obtained by periodically removing nanocrystals from the mother liquor and recycling the unused reagents. The nanoparicles were characterized by XRD and TEM. Optically clear colloidal solutions of Nano

  7. Understanding Mechanism and Designing Strategies for Sustainable Synthesis of Zeolites: A Personal Story.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeqing; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2016-06-01

    Zeolites with intricate micropores have been widely studied for a long time as an important class of porous materials in different areas of industrial processes such as gas adsorption and separation, ion exchange, and shape-selective catalysis. However, their industrial syntheses are not sustainable, and normally require the presence of expensive organic templates and a large amount of solvents such as water. The presence of organic templates not only increases zeolite cost but also produces harmful gases during the removal of these templates by calcination, while the use of solvents significantly increases the amount of polluted water. This Personal Account briefly summarizes recent sustainable routes for the synthesis of zeolites in our group according to our understanding of the synthetic mechanism, and mainly focuses on the organotemplate-free synthesis of zeolites in the presence of zeolite seeds, the design of environmentally friendly templates, and solvent-free synthesis of zeolites. PMID:27009872

  8. Heterogeneities of the nanostructure of platinum/zeolite y catalysts revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Zečević, Jovana; van der Eerden, Ad M J; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jongh, Petra E; de Jong, Krijn P

    2013-04-23

    To develop structure-performance relationships for important catalysts, a detailed characterization of their morphology is essential. Using electron tomography, we determined in three dimensions the structure of Pt/zeolite Y bifunctional catalysts. Optimum experimental conditions enabled for the first time high-resolution 3D imaging of Pt particles as small as 1 nm located inside zeolite micropores. Semiautomated image analysis of 3D reconstructions provided an efficient study of numbers, size distributions, and interparticle distances of thousands of Pt particles within individual zeolite crystals. Upon extending this approach to a number of zeolite crystals of one batch of Pt/zeolite Y catalyst, heterogeneities were revealed. The Pt loading, an important parameter for catalyst performance, varied between zeolite crystals up to a factor of 35. This discovery calls for re-evaluation of catalyst preparation methods and suggests potential for lowering the nominal loading with noble metals.

  9. Understanding Mechanism and Designing Strategies for Sustainable Synthesis of Zeolites: A Personal Story.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeqing; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2016-06-01

    Zeolites with intricate micropores have been widely studied for a long time as an important class of porous materials in different areas of industrial processes such as gas adsorption and separation, ion exchange, and shape-selective catalysis. However, their industrial syntheses are not sustainable, and normally require the presence of expensive organic templates and a large amount of solvents such as water. The presence of organic templates not only increases zeolite cost but also produces harmful gases during the removal of these templates by calcination, while the use of solvents significantly increases the amount of polluted water. This Personal Account briefly summarizes recent sustainable routes for the synthesis of zeolites in our group according to our understanding of the synthetic mechanism, and mainly focuses on the organotemplate-free synthesis of zeolites in the presence of zeolite seeds, the design of environmentally friendly templates, and solvent-free synthesis of zeolites.

  10. XAFS Study on TiO2 Photocatalyst Loaded on Zeolite Synthesized from Steel Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Ohmichi, Tetsutaro; Mori, Kosuke; Katayama, Iwao; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2007-02-02

    The convenient route for the synthesis of Y-zeolites by utilizing steel slag as a material source was developed. Through hydrothermal treatment, well-crystallized Y-zeolite was obtained. We also synthesized TiO2-loaded Y-zeolites by an impregnation method. The structure of titanium oxide species highly dispersed on the zeolite, which couldn't be detected by XRD patterns, was investigated by XAFS analysis. Photocatalytic activity for decomposition of 2-propanol in liquid phase was found to be enhanced by the hydrophobic surface property of zeolite. It has been demonstrated that the zeolite synthesized from steel slag would be applicable as a promising support of TiO2 photocatalyst.

  11. Dispersible Exfoliated Zeolite Nanosheets and Their Application as a Selective Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Varoon, Kumar; Zhang, Xueyi; Elyassi, Bahman; Brewer, Damien D.; Gettel, Melissa; Kumar, Sandeep; Lee, J. Alex; Maheshwari, Sundeep; Mittal, Anudha; Sung, Chun-Yi; Cococcioni, Matteo; Francis, Lorraine F.; McCormick, Alon V.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2011-10-06

    Thin zeolite films are attractive for a wide range of applications, including molecular sieve membranes, catalytic membrane reactors, permeation barriers, and low-dielectric-constant materials. Synthesis of thin zeolite films using high-aspect-ratio zeolite nanosheets is desirable because of the packing and processing advantages of the nanosheets over isotropic zeolite nanoparticles. Attempts to obtain a dispersed suspension of zeolite nanosheets via exfoliation of their lamellar precursors have been hampered because of their structure deterioration and morphological damage (fragmentation, curling, and aggregation). We demonstrated the synthesis and structure determination of highly crystalline nanosheets of zeolite frameworks MWW and MFI. The purity and morphological integrity of these nanosheets allow them to pack well on porous supports, facilitating the fabrication of molecular sieve membranes.

  12. Potential and challenges of zeolite chemistry in the catalytic conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Ennaert, Thijs; Van Aelst, Joost; Dijkmans, Jan; De Clercq, Rik; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Verboekend, Danny; Sels, Bert F

    2016-02-01

    Increasing demand for sustainable chemicals and fuels has pushed academia and industry to search for alternative feedstocks replacing crude oil in traditional refineries. As a result, an immense academic attention has focused on the valorisation of biomass (components) and derived intermediates to generate valuable platform chemicals and fuels. Zeolite catalysis plays a distinct role in many of these biomass conversion routes. This contribution emphasizes the progress and potential in zeolite catalysed biomass conversions and relates these to concepts established in existing petrochemical processes. The application of zeolites, equipped with a variety of active sites, in Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, or multifunctional catalysed reactions is discussed and generalised to provide a comprehensive overview. In addition, the feedstock shift from crude oil to biomass involves new challenges in developing fields, like mesoporosity and pore interconnectivity of zeolites and stability of zeolites in liquid phase. Finally, the future challenges and perspectives of zeolites in the processing of biomass conversion are discussed.

  13. Potential and challenges of zeolite chemistry in the catalytic conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Ennaert, Thijs; Van Aelst, Joost; Dijkmans, Jan; De Clercq, Rik; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Verboekend, Danny; Sels, Bert F

    2016-02-01

    Increasing demand for sustainable chemicals and fuels has pushed academia and industry to search for alternative feedstocks replacing crude oil in traditional refineries. As a result, an immense academic attention has focused on the valorisation of biomass (components) and derived intermediates to generate valuable platform chemicals and fuels. Zeolite catalysis plays a distinct role in many of these biomass conversion routes. This contribution emphasizes the progress and potential in zeolite catalysed biomass conversions and relates these to concepts established in existing petrochemical processes. The application of zeolites, equipped with a variety of active sites, in Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, or multifunctional catalysed reactions is discussed and generalised to provide a comprehensive overview. In addition, the feedstock shift from crude oil to biomass involves new challenges in developing fields, like mesoporosity and pore interconnectivity of zeolites and stability of zeolites in liquid phase. Finally, the future challenges and perspectives of zeolites in the processing of biomass conversion are discussed. PMID:26691750

  14. Composting domestic sewage sludge with natural zeolites in a rotary drum reactor.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, J; Rodríguez, L; Fernández, F J

    2011-01-01

    This work aimed the influence of zeolites addition on a sludge-straw composting process using a pilot-scale rotary drum reactor. The type and concentration of three commercial natural zeolites were considered: a mordenite and two clinoptilolites (Klinolith and Zeocat). Mordenite caused the greatest carbon removal (58%), while the clinoptilolites halved losses of ammonium. All zeolites removed 100% of Ni, Cr, Pb, and significant amounts (more than 60%) of Cu, Zn and Hg. Zeocat displayed the greatest retention of ammonium and metals, and retention efficiencies increased as Zeocat concentration increased. The addition of 10% Zeocat produced compost compliant with Spanish regulations. Zeolites were separated from the final compost, and leaching studies suggested that zeolites leachates contained very low metals concentrations (<1 mg/kg). Thus, the final compost could be applied directly to soil, or metal-polluted zeolites could be separated from the compost prior to application. The different options have been discussed. PMID:20951578

  15. Effects of Surface and Morphological Properties of Zeolite on Impedance Spectroscopy-Based Sensing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Li, Xiaogan; White, Jeremy; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement by impedance spectroscopy of the changes in intrazeolitic cation motion of pressed pellets of zeolite particles upon adsorption of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) provides a strategy for sensing DMMP, a commonly used simulant for highly toxic organophosphate nerve agents. In this work, two strategies for improving the impedance spectroscopy based sensing of DMMP on zeolites were investigated. The first one is the use of cerium oxide (CeO2) coated on the zeolite surface to neutralize acidic groups that may cause the decomposition of DMMP, and results in better sensor recovery. The second strategy was to explore the use of zeolite Y membrane. Compared to pressed pellets, the membranes have connected supercages of much longer length scales. The zeolite membranes resulted in higher sensitivity to DMMP, but recovery of the device was significantly slower as compared to pressed zeolite pellets. PMID:23201996

  16. The Ameliorative Effect of Artificial Zeolite on Barley under Saline Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Busaidi, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Irshad, M.

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the effects of zeolite in conjunction with seawater irrigation on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth and salt composition of soil. A sand dune soil was amended with Ca-type zeolite at the rate of 1 and 5% and the seawater was diluted up to the electrical conductivity of 3 and 16 dS mG1. Present results showed that zeolite application significantly increased water holding capacity of the soil and accumulated more salts. The zeolite mixed soils improved plant growth compared to the un-amended control. Higher saline water significantly suppressed the growth of barley than the water with low salinity. The restricted plant growth due to the effects of specific ion or Na+/Ca2+ imbalance may be ameliorated using Ca-type zeolite. We may conclude that soil amendment with zeolite could alleviate the adverse effects of salts on plants following irrigation with higher saline water.

  17. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content.

  18. Ammonium removal from high-strength aqueous solutions by Australian zeolite.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, D Thushari N; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B; Sommer, Sven G; Jayasinghe, Guttila Y; J Scales, Peter; Chen, Deli

    2016-07-01

    Removal of ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) particularly from sources which are highly rich in nitrogen is important for addressing environmental pollution. Zeolites, aluminosilicate minerals, are commonly used as commercial adsorbents and ion-exchange medium in number of commercial applications due to its high adsorption capacity of ammonium (NH4(+)). However, detailed investigations on NH4(+) adsorption and ion exchange capacities of Australian natural zeolites are rare, particularly under higher NH4(+) concentrations in the medium. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine NH4(+) adsorption characteristics of Australian natural zeolites at high NH4(+) concentrations with and without other chemical compounds in an aqueous solution. Results showed that initial NH4(+) concentration, temperature, reaction time, and pH of the solution had significant effects on NH4(+) adsorption capacity of zeolite. Increased retention time and temperature generally had a positive impact on adsorption. Freundlich model fitted well with adsorption process of Australian natural zeolites; however, Langmuir model had best fitted for the adsorption process of sodium (Na(+)) treated zeolites. NaCl treatment increased the NH4(+) adsorption capacity of Australian zeolites by 25% at 1000 mg-N, NH4(+) solution. The maximum adsorption capacity of both natural Australian zeolites and Na(+) treated zeolites were estimated as 9.48 and 11.83 mg-N/g, respectively, which is lower than many zeolites from other sources. Compared to the NH4(+) only medium, presence of other competitive ions and acetic acid in the medium (resembling composition in digested swine manure slurries) reduced NH4(+) removal of natural and Na(+) treated zeolites by 44% and 57%, respectively. This suggests detailed investigations are required to determine practically achievable NH4(+) -N removal potential of zeolites for applications in complex mediums such as animal manure slurries.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of zeolites prepared from industrial fly ash.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wdowin, Magdalena; Franus, Małgorzata

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of using fly ash to produce synthetic zeolites. The synthesis class F fly ash from the Stalowa Wola SA heat and power plant was subjected to 24 h hydrothermal reaction with sodium hydroxide. Depending on the reaction conditions, three types of synthetic zeolites were formed: Na-X (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 75 °C), Na-P1 (20 g fly ash, 0.5 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaOH, 95 °C), and sodalite (20 g fly ash, 0.8 dm(3) of 5 mol · dm(-3) NaOH + 0.4 dm(3) of 3 mol · dm(-3) NaCl, 95 °C). As synthesized materials were characterized to obtain mineral composition (X-ray diffractometry, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry), adsorption properties (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption), and ion exchange capacity. The most effective reaction for zeolite preparation was when sodalite was formed and the quantitative content of zeolite from X-ray diffractometry was 90 wt%, compared with 70 wt% for the Na-X and 75 wt% for the Na-P1. Residues from each synthesis reaction were the following: mullite, quartz, and the remains of amorphous aluminosilicate glass. The best zeolitic material as characterized by highest specific surface area was Na-X at almost 166 m(2) · g(-1), while for the Na-P1 and sodalite it was 71 and 33 m(2) · g(-1), respectively. The ion exchange capacity decreased in the following order: Na-X at 1.8 meq · g(-1), Na-P1 at 0.72 meq · g(-1), and sodalite at 0.56 meq · g(-1). The resulting zeolites are competitive for commercially available materials and are used as ion exchangers in industrial wastewater and soil decontamination. PMID:24838802

  20. Removal of Ca2+ and Zn2+ from aqueous solutions by zeolites NaP and KP.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Alias Mohd; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik; Kamaruzaman, Nurul Asyikin; Adil, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites P in sodium (NaP) and potassium (KP) forms were used as adsorbents for the removal of calcium (Ca2+) and zinc (Zn2+) cations from aqueous solutions. Zeolite KP was prepared by ion exchange of K+ with Na+ which neutralizes the negative charge of the zeolite P framework structure. The ion exchange capacity of K+ on zeolite NaP was determined through the Freundlich isotherm equilibrium study. Characterization of zeolite KP was determined using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. From the characterization, the structure of zeolite KP was found to remain stable after the ion exchange process. Zeolites KP and NaP were used for the removal of Ca and Zn from solution. The amount of Ca2+ and Zn2+ in aqueous solution before and after the adsorption by zeolites was analysed using the flame atomic absorption spectroscopy method. The removal of Ca2+ and Zn2+ followed the Freundlich isotherm rather than the Langmuir isotherm model. This result also revealed that zeolite KP adsorbs Ca2+ and Zn2+ more than zeolite NaP and proved that modification of zeolite NaP with potassium leads to an increase in the adsorption efficiency of the zeolite. Therefore, the zeolites NaP and KP can be used for water softening (Ca removal) and reducing water pollution/toxicity (Zn removal). PMID:20232677

  1. Synthesis and characterization of various zeolites and study of dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate over them

    SciTech Connect

    Khanday, Waheed Ahmad; Majid, Sheikh Abdul; Chandra Shekar, S.; Tomar, Radha

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Thermal desorption pattern of DMMP over various zeolites (a) 1st desorption and (b) 2nd desorption. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite by hydrothermal method. • Zeolites were characterized by using XRD, FTIR, BET, NH{sub 3}-TPD, SEM and EDS techniques. • Dynamic adsorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried out using TPD plus chemisorption system. • Thermal desorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried using the same system. - Abstract: Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite were synthesized successfully under hydrothermal conditions and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis and thermal programmed desorption (TPD). Dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate (DMMP) was carried out on these zeolites. Zeolite-X having high surface area among all four zeolites shows highest adsorption capacity followed by Erionite and MCM-22 where as Zeolite-A shows the least. For all zeolites adsorption was found to be high initially and it then decreases with increase in injected volume. Then desorption pattern was analyzed which shows two types of peaks, sharp peak representing desorption of physisorbed DMMP and a broad peak representing desorption of strongly chemisorbed DMMP.

  2. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of the Aluminosilicate LZ-135, a Zeolite Related to ZSM-10

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, Lynne B.; Baerlocher, Christian; Wilson, Stephen T.; Broach, Robert W.

    2009-09-02

    The aluminosilicate LZ-135 was one of the first zeolites to be prepared in the presence of two or more organic structure-directing agents (in this case, Me{sub 4}N{sup +} (TMA) and Et{sub 4}N{sup +} (TEA)) and was patented 20 years ago. However, the material was polycrystalline, and at the time, its aluminosilicate framework structure could not be determined. In view of the fact that methods of structure determination from powder diffraction data have developed considerably in the meantime, a fresh analysis of the problem was undertaken. High-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction data were collected on a calcined sample of LZ-135 (as synthesized composition ca. |Na{sub 26}TMA{sub 6}|[Si{sub 76}Al{sub 32}O{sub 216}]), and the new powder charge-flipping structure-solution algorithm was applied. The framework structure (P6{sub 3}/mmc; a = 31.3830(2) {angstrom}, c = 7.6513(1) {angstrom}) was revealed immediately, and then the positions of the Na{sup +} ions and a few water molecules were located in a series of difference electron density maps. The [001] projection of the framework structure is identical to that of ZSM-10 (P6{sub 3}/mmm), but the (up-down) orientations of the (Si,Al) tetrahedra, and therefore their connectivities, are different, and this leads to a distinctly different topology with two 1-dimensional, 12-ring channel systems with effective pore widths of 7.2 and 6.5 {angstrom}. The new framework has been assigned the framework type code LTF by the International Zeolite Association. The framework structures of LZ-135 and ZSM-10 are related to one another in the same way as are those of mazzite and zeolite L. Approximately 27.5 Na{sup +} ions were located in six different sites, and all are coordinated to oxygen atoms of the framework. Twelve H{sub 2}O molecules per unit cell are associated with one of the Na{sup +} ion positions, where they serve to complete an octahedral coordination geometry around the ion, and 5.2 are located in the larger of the

  3. The leading role of association in framework modification of highly siliceous zeolites with adsorbed methylamine.

    PubMed

    Han, Ai-Jie; Guo, Juan; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Yu; Huang, Yue-Fang; He, He-Yong; Long, Ying-Cai

    2006-03-13

    Affinity index (AT value), adsorption heat, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 13C and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopies were used to study the interaction of highly siliceous MFI-, FAU-, and FER-type zeolites with adsorbed methylamine (MA). Compared with the data for methanol, the much higher AT values and adsorption heats, and significant changes in XRD patterns, 29Si MAS NMR spectra, and FTIR spectra for the zeolites after adsorption of MA, revealed a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the perfect framework of the zeolites and the adsorbed MAs. This interaction results from the fact that the H atom of the amine group attacks the [Si-O] framework to form a Si-OHN bond, which leads to the appearance of Si-N bonds in the zeolites at 323 K. Therefore, the zeolite framework can be modified with MA under mild conditions. The highly siliceous MFI zeolite and the H-ZSM-5 zeolite with SiO2/Al2O3=31:1 were modified with MA and investigated by temperature-programmed desorption of CO2. The modified zeolites exhibited greatly enhanced basic properties in comparison with those of the raw materials. The influence of defects in the zeolite on the adsorption and the interaction with MA is discussed.

  4. Lithium modified zeolite synthesis for conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, Muhammad; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Inayat, Abrar

    2014-10-24

    Basic zeolite has received significant attention in the catalysis community. These zeolites modified with alkaline are the potential replacement for existing zeolite catalysts due to its unique features with added advantages. The present paper covers the preparation of lithium modified zeolite Y (Li-ZeY) and its activity for solvent free conversion of biodiesel-derived glycerol to polyglycerol via etherification process. The modified zeolite was well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen Adsorption. The SEM images showed that there was no change in morphology of modified zeolite structure after lithium modification. XRD patterns showed that the structure of zeolite was sustained after lithium modification. The surface properties of parent and modified zeolite was also observed N{sub 2} adsortion-desorption technique and found some changes in surface area and pore size. In addition, the basic strength of prepared materials was measured by Hammet indicators and found that basic strength of Li-ZeY was highly improved. This modified zeolite was found highly thermal stable and active heterogamous basic catalyst for conversion of solvent free glycerol to polyglycerol. This reaction was conducted at different temperatures and 260 °C was found most active temperature for this process for reaction time from 6 to 12 h over this basic catalyst in the absence of solvent.

  5. Assessing different zeolitic adsorbents for their potential use in Kr and Xe separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagappan, Breetha

    Separation of Kr from Xe is an important problem in spent nuclear fuel fission gas management. The energy intensive and expensive cryogenic distillation method is currently used to separate these gases. In this thesis, we have carried out the research into appropriate sorbents for the separation of Kr and Xe using pressure swing adsorption. We have examined zeolites using gas adsorption studies as they have the potential to be more cost effective than other sorbents. Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicates and have ordered pore structures. The pores in zeolites have extra-framework cations are substantially free to move. The mobility of cations and the uniformity in pore size permits the separation and removal of gases in zeolites. In our experiment, first, we have measured adsorption isotherms with same zeolitic framework but with different cations. Second, we have measured the adsorption isotherm with different zeolitic frameworks but with same cation. Using these adsorption isotherms, we have calculated the initial heats of adsorption to find out the strength of interaction between the zeolitic framework and the gases. Finally, we have compared the difference in the initial heats of adsorption to find the suitable zeolite that has the highest selectivity of Xe over Kr. In conclusion, we have found out that K LSX seems to have higher potential among the zeolites that we have compared for the separation of Kr from Xe with the differential heats of adsorption for Xe vs Kr as ˜7.4 kJ/mol.

  6. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles doped in the zeolite framework and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Using the chemical reduction method, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were effectively synthesized into the zeolite framework in the absence of any heat treatment. Zeolite, silver nitrate, and sodium borohydride were used as an inorganic solid support, a silver precursor, and a chemical reduction agent, respectively. Silver ions were introduced into the porous zeolite lattice by an ion-exchange path. After the reduction process, Ag NPs formed in the zeolite framework, with a mean diameter of about 2.12–3.11 nm. The most favorable experimental condition for the synthesis of Ag/zeolite nanocomposites (NCs) is described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO3. The Ag/zeolite NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared. The results show that Ag NPs form a spherical shape with uniform homogeneity in the particle size. The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs in zeolites was investigated against Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysentriae) and Gram-positive bacteria (ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) by disk diffusion method using Mueller–Hinton agar at different sizes of Ag NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/zeolite NCs were found to have antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag NPs in the zeolite framework can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications. PMID:21383858

  7. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  8. Ammonium removal from groundwater using a zeolite permeable reactive barrier: a pilot-scale demonstration.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengpin; Huang, Guoxin; Kong, Xiangke; Yang, Yingzhao; Liu, Fei; Hou, Guohua; Chen, Honghan

    2014-01-01

    In situ remediation of ammonium-contaminated groundwater is possible through a zeolite permeable reactive barrier (PRB); however, zeolite's finite sorption capacity limits the long-term field application of PRBs. In this paper, a pilot-scale PRB was designed to achieve sustainable use of zeolite in removing ammonium (NH(4)(+)-N) through sequential nitrification, adsorption, and denitrification. An oxygen-releasing compound was added to ensure aerobic conditions in the upper layers of the PRB where NH(4)(+)-N was microbially oxidized to nitrate. Any remaining NH(4)(+)-N was removed abiotically in the zeolite layer. Under lower redox conditions, nitrate formed during nitrification was removed by denitrifying bacteria colonizing the zeolite. During the long-term operation (328 days), more than 90% of NH(4)(+)-N was consistently removed, and approximately 40% of the influent NH(4)(+)-N was oxidized to nitrate. As much as 60% of the nitrate formed in the PRB was reduced in the zeolite layer after 300 days of operation. Removal of NH(4)(+)-N from groundwater using a zeolite PRB through bacterial nitrification and abiotic adsorption is a promising approach. The zeolite PRB has the advantage of achieving sustainable use of zeolite and immediate NH(4)(+)-N removal.

  9. Molecular recognition on acoustic wave devices: Sorption in chemically anchored zeolite monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yongan; Bein, T.

    1992-11-12

    Zeolite crystals were attached to the gold electrodes of quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Monolayers of thiol-alkoxysilanes on the gold surface served as interfacial layers for the subsequent adhesion of the zeolite crystals to the QCM. The process of anchoring the zeolite crystals via the thiol-silane monolayers was studied by reflection adsorption infrared (IR) spectroscopy, contact angle, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The siloxane linkages between the microporous zeolite crystals and the terminal cross-linked polysiloxane groups of the interfacial monolayer play an important role in enhancing the packing density of microporous crystals and the thermal stability (up to at least 350 {degrees}C) of the film on the gold surface. Dynamic sorption isotherms of organic vapors and nitrogen as well as the transient sorption behavior of organic vapor pulses were studied to characterize the zeolite-coated QCMs. The resonance frequency response of zeolite-coated QCMs to vapor pulses could be increased up to 500-fold compared to the bare sensor. The regular micropores (0.3-0.75 nm) of the QCM-attached zeolite crystals were found to efficiently control molecular access into the coating. Selectivity of the frequency response in excess of 100:1 toward molecules of different size and/or shape could be demonstrated. The kinetics of vapor desorption from the zeolite layers are strongly dependent on the adsorbate/zeolite combination, thus providing an additional capability for molecular recognition. 33 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. GREEN CHEMISTRY. Shape-selective zeolite catalysis for bioplastics production.

    PubMed

    Dusselier, Michiel; Van Wouwe, Pieter; Dewaele, Annelies; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2015-07-01

    Biodegradable and renewable polymers, such as polylactic acid, are benign alternatives for petrochemical-based plastics. Current production of polylactic acid via its key building block lactide, the cyclic dimer of lactic acid, is inefficient in terms of energy, time, and feedstock use. We present a direct zeolite-based catalytic process, which converts lactic acid into lactide. The shape-selective properties of zeolites are essential to attain record lactide yields, outperforming those of the current multistep process by avoiding both racemization and side-product formation. The highly productive process is strengthened by facile recovery and practical reactivation of the catalyst, which remains structurally fit during at least six consecutive reactions, and by the ease of solvent and side-product recycling. PMID:26138977

  11. Application of zeolites for radium removal from mine water.

    PubMed

    Chałupnik, Stanisław; Franus, Wojciech; Wysocka, Małgorzata; Gzyl, Grzegorz

    2013-11-01

    For removal of radium from saline waters in Upper Silesian mines, several methods of purification have been developed. The most efficient one is based on application of barium chloride, which was implemented in full technical scale in two Polish coal mines several years ago. Very good results of purification have been achieved-the removal efficiency exceeding 95% of the initial activity. Another possibility for the removal of different ions from salty waters and brines is the application of zeolites. We found that technique as a very promising method for removal of not only radium isotopes from mine waters but also other ions (barium, iron, manganese). Treatment of several various water samples has been done to assess the removal efficiency for natural radionuclides. Preliminary results show very good effects for radium isotopes as well as for barium ions. In the paper, a short description of laboratory results of the purification of mine waters with application of synthetic zeolites is presented.

  12. Shape-selective zeolite catalysis for bioplastics production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusselier, Michiel; Van Wouwe, Pieter; Dewaele, Annelies; Jacobs, Pierre A.; Sels, Bert F.

    2015-07-01

    Biodegradable and renewable polymers, such as polylactic acid, are benign alternatives for petrochemical-based plastics. Current production of polylactic acid via its key building block lactide, the cyclic dimer of lactic acid, is inefficient in terms of energy, time, and feedstock use. We present a direct zeolite-based catalytic process, which converts lactic acid into lactide. The shape-selective properties of zeolites are essential to attain record lactide yields, outperforming those of the current multistep process by avoiding both racemization and side-product formation. The highly productive process is strengthened by facile recovery and practical reactivation of the catalyst, which remains structurally fit during at least six consecutive reactions, and by the ease of solvent and side-product recycling.

  13. Modified Asphalt Binder with Natural Zeolite for Warm Mix Asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubravský, Marián; Mandula, Ján

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, warm mix asphalt (WMA) is becoming more and more used in the asphalt industry. WMA provide a whole range of benefits, whether economic, environmental and ecological. Lower energy consumption and less pollution is the most advantages of this asphalt mixture. The paper deals with the addition of natural zeolite into the sub base asphalt layers, which is the essential constituent in the construction of the road. Measurement is focused on basic physic - mechanical properties declared according to the catalog data sheets. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ability of addition the natural zeolite into the all asphalt layers of asphalt pavement. All asphalt mixtures were compared with reference asphalt mixture, which was prepared in reference temperature.

  14. GREEN CHEMISTRY. Shape-selective zeolite catalysis for bioplastics production.

    PubMed

    Dusselier, Michiel; Van Wouwe, Pieter; Dewaele, Annelies; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2015-07-01

    Biodegradable and renewable polymers, such as polylactic acid, are benign alternatives for petrochemical-based plastics. Current production of polylactic acid via its key building block lactide, the cyclic dimer of lactic acid, is inefficient in terms of energy, time, and feedstock use. We present a direct zeolite-based catalytic process, which converts lactic acid into lactide. The shape-selective properties of zeolites are essential to attain record lactide yields, outperforming those of the current multistep process by avoiding both racemization and side-product formation. The highly productive process is strengthened by facile recovery and practical reactivation of the catalyst, which remains structurally fit during at least six consecutive reactions, and by the ease of solvent and side-product recycling.

  15. Wastewater treatment in production of MgA zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Barsukov, V.V.; Akopyants, T.V.; Rudova, S.A.; Shumovskii, A.V.

    1986-09-01

    This paper reports the development of zero-waste technology for treatment of chloride waste formed in the manufacture of MgA microbead zeolite, based on the method and flow plan used in treating similar wastes formed in the manufacture of bead zeolite. The first crystals of sodium chloride appeared at a magnesium chloride concentration of 8-9% by weight. With a magnesium chloride concentration of 35% by weight, at 50 C, the sodium chloride was almost completely precipitated. Under these conditions, the magnesium chloride did not precipitate. Sodium chloride crystals were washed with water in order to obtain a commercial product meeting the requirements of the specification Tu 6-12-33-78. This product is recommended for use in regenerating cation exchange filters in thermal power plants.

  16. Computational studies of Bronsted acid sites in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, L.A.; Iton, L.E.; Zygmunt, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have performed high-level ab initio calculations using both Hartree-Fock (HF) and Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) to study the geometry and energetics of the adsorption complex involving H{sub 2}O and the Bronsted acid site in the zeolite H-ZSM-5. In these calculations, which use aluminosilicate cluster models for the zeolite framework with as many a 28 T atoms (T = Si, Al), we included geometry optimization in the local vicinity of the acid site at the HF/6-31G(d) level of theory, and have calculated corrections for zero-point energies, extensions for zero-point energies, extensions to higher basis sets, and the influence of electron correlation. Results for the adsorption energy and geometry of this complex are reported and compared with previous theoretical and experimental values.

  17. Hierarchical zeolites and their catalytic performance in selective oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Manuel; Grau-Atienza, Aida; Campos, Rafael; Romero, Antonio A; Serrano, Elena; Maria Marinas, Jose; García Martínez, Javier; Luque, Rafael

    2015-04-24

    Hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites prepared using a simple alkali treatment and subsequent HCl washing are found to exhibit unprecedented catalytic activities in selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation. The metal-free zeolites promote the microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol with hydrogen peroxide in yields ranging from 45-35 % after 5 min of reaction under mild reaction conditions as well as the epoxidation of cyclohexene to valuable products (40-60 % conversion). The hierarchically porous systems also exhibited an interesting catalytic activity in the dehydration of N,N-dimethylformamide (25-30 % conversion), representing the first example of transition-metal free catalysts in this reaction.

  18. Ammonia synthesis catalyzed by ruthenium supported on basic zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fishel, C.T.; Davis, R.J.; Garces, J.M.

    1996-09-15

    Ammonia synthesis was catalyzed by ruthenium metal clusters, promoted by alkali and alkaline earth elements, supported on zeolite X, magnesia, and pure silica MCM-41. At atmospheric total pressure and temperatures ranging from 623 to 723 K, the turnover frequencies of ammonia synthesis on Ru/KX varied significantly with Fu cluster size, demonstrating the known structure sensitivity of the reaction. Therefore, zeolite and magnesia catalysts were prepared with similar Ru cluster sizes, about 1 nm in diameter, in order to properly evaluate the effect of promoters. The same high degree of metal dispersion could not be obtained with Ru/MCM-41 catalysts. The turnover frequency for ammonia synthesis over Ru/CsX exceeded that over Ru/KX, consistent with the rank of promoter basicity. However, alkaline earth metals were more effective promoters than alkali metals for Ru supported on both zeolite X and MCM-41. Since alkaline earth metals are less basic; this promotional effect was unexpected. In addition, the turnover frequency for ammonia synthesis on Ru/BaX exceeded that of Ru/MgO, a nonzeolitic material. Pore volumes for Ru/BaX and Ru/KX measured by N{sub 2} adsorption were essentially identical, suggesting that pore blockage by ions within the zeolites does not account for the differences in reaction rates. The kinetics of ammonia synthesis over ruthenium differed considerably from what has been reported for industrial iron catalysts. Most significantly, the order of reaction in H{sub 2} was negative over Ru but is positive over Fe. A likely cause of this change in reaction order is that dissociated hydrogen atoms cover a greater fraction of the Ru clusters compared to Fe under reaction conditions. 49 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Epitaxially grown layered MFI-bulk MFI hybrid zeolitic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-gwi; Zhang, Xueyi; Lee, Jong Suk; Tsapatsis, Michael; Nair, Sankar

    2012-11-27

    The synthesis of hybrid zeolitic materials with complex micropore-mesopore structures and morphologies is an expanding area of recent interest for a number of applications. Here we report a new type of hybrid zeolite material, composed of a layered zeolite material grown epitaxially on the surface of a bulk zeolite material. Specifically, layered (2-D) MFI sheets were grown on the surface of bulk MFI crystals of different sizes (300 nm and 10 μm), thereby resulting in a hybrid material containing a unique morphology of interconnected micropores (∼0.55 nm) and mesopores (∼3 nm). The structure and morphology of this material, referred to as a "bulk MFI-layered MFI" (BMLM) material, was elucidated by a combination of XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM, TGA, and N(2) physisorption techniques. It is conclusively shown that epitaxial growth of the 2-D layered MFI sheets occurs in at least two principal crystallographic directions of the bulk MFI crystal and possibly in the third direction as well. The BMLM material combines the properties of bulk MFI (micropore network and mechanical support) and 2-D layered MFI (large surface roughness, external surface area, and mesoporosity). As an example of the uses of the BMLM material, it was incorporated into a polyimide and fabricated into a composite membrane with enhanced permeability for CO(2) and good CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity for gas separations. SEM-EDX imaging and composition analysis showed that the polyimide and the BMLM interpenetrate into each other, thereby forming a well-adhered polymer/particle microstructure, in contrast with the defective interfacial microstructure obtained using bare MFI particles. Analysis of the gas permeation data with the modified Maxwell model also allows the estimation of the effective volume of the BMLM particles, as well as the CO(2) and CH(4) gas permeabilities of the interpenetrated layer at the BMLM/polyimide interface.

  20. Generalized statistical model for multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rota, R.; Gamba, G.; Paludetto, R.; Carra, S.; Morbidelli, M. )

    1988-05-01

    The statistical thermodynamic approach to multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites has been extended to nonideal systems, through the correction of cross coefficients characterizing the interaction between unlike molecules. Estimation of the model parameters requires experimental binary equilibrium data. Comparisons with the classical model based on adsorbed solution theory are reported for three nonideal ternary systems. The two approaches provide comparable results in the simulation of binary and ternary adsorption equilibrium data at constant temperature and pressure.

  1. Lanthanum-NaY zeolite ion exchange. 2; Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.Y.; Lu, T.S.; Chen, S.H.; Chao, K.J. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on La-NaY ion exchange breakthrough curves which were obtained experimentally at 27 and 60{degrees}C. A mathematical model of an ion exchanger was formulated and employed to calculate the ion exchanger coefficients. An ionic diffusion coefficient of the order of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s was obtained. The effects of zeolite particle size, temperature, and column packing conditions on the kinetics of the exchange were investigated also.

  2. Hydrogenation properties of ruthenium sulfide clusters in acidic zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Breysse, M.; Cattenot, M.; Kougionas, V.

    1997-06-01

    Catalysts of ruthenium sulfide, dispersed in a series of Y zeolites with various acidic properties, were prepared by ion exchange and subsequent sulfidation. The activities for the reactions of hydrogenation of tetralin and toluene, carried out in the presence of H{sub 2}S (1.9%), vary widely according to the nature of the zeolites. Ruthenium sulfide catalysts are much more active when using acidic zeolite, HY and HYd (dealuminated), and a partially potassium-exchanged KHYd sample, than when using the KY support. The acidic properties of the sulfided RuY catalysts were determined in situ using infrared spectroscopy and the conversion of isooctane. Both methods gave similar rankings of catalyst acidity. The electronic properties of the ruthenium sulfide phase were examined by means of the infrared study of the adsorption of CO. A low-frequency shift of 15 cm{sup -1} was observed for CO adsorbed on RuKY by reference to CO adsorbed on all other samples. The increase in activity for the hydrogenation of aromatics is related to the electron- deficient character of the sulfide particles in the acidic zeolites; as has been proposed, in the literature, for metal catalysts. A superimposed influence of the acidic sites on the adsorption of the aromatic molecule may also occur which could explain the amplitude of the effect (difference of activity between the most and less active catalysts {approximately}200 times) and the variations of activity observed within the series of the acidic catalysts. 33 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  4. Smart epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites for corrosion protection of Mg-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Yanhao; Li, Chao; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Xinran; Yan, Yongde; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Jun; Shchukin, Dmitry G.

    2016-04-01

    The epoxy coatings containing MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites were prepared by coating method on the Mg-Li alloy surface. The influence of MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on corrosion protection of the epoxy coating was studied. The epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites showed high corrosion resistance. Artificial defects in the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on the Mg-Li surface were produced by the needle punching. The results show that the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites exhibits self-healing corrosion inhibition capabilities. It is ascribed to the fact that the Ce3+ ions are released from MCM-22 zeolites based on ion exchange of zeolite in the corrosion process of the Mg-Li alloy substrate. MCM-22 zeolites as reservoirs provided a prolonged release of cerium ions.

  5. Catalytic reactions of cyclooctane and ethylcyclohexane on HY zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Abbot, J.; Wojciechowski, B.W.

    1987-10-01

    Few systematic studies of the reactions of cycloparaffins on zeolites have been reported, considering their importance as a component of commercial crude feedstocks. Studies of small ring (C/sub 3/, C/sub 4/) cycloparaffins have shown that the primary reaction product is the corresponding olefin. It has not been established, however, that the corresponding olefin is produced as an initial product of the cracking of medium-sized (C/sub 5/, C/sub 6/) rings. Studies of cycloparaffin cracking on silica-alumina catalysts report that the degree of saturation of low-molecular-weight products is much greater than that observed in comparable n-paraffin cracking. Reactions of methylcyclohexane on HY zeolite at 450/sup 0/C have shown that dehydrogenation, isomerization, and cracking are all primary processes. Here the authors report product distributions in the cracking of ethylcyclohexane and cyclooctane on HY zeolite at 400/sup 0/C and compare product distributions for these cycloparaffins. 19 references.

  6. The safety of synthetic zeolites used in detergents.

    PubMed

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic zeolites are replacing phosphates as builders in laundry detergents; workers and consumers may, therefore, increasingly be exposed to these materials and it is important to assess their safety. This article puts mechanistic, toxicological and exposure data into context for a safety assessment. Zeolites are hygroscopic compounds with ion-exchanging properties. They may partially decompose under acidic conditions such as in the stomach releasing sodium ions, silicic acid and aluminum salts. The intact molecule is not bioavailable after oral intake or exposure through the dermal and inhalational routes. Under current conditions of manufacture and use, no systemic toxicity is to be expected from neither the intact molecule nor the degradation products; a significant effect on the bioavailability of other compounds is not likely. Zeolites may cause local irritation. It is, therefore, important to minimise occupational exposure. The co-operation of detergent manufacturers with the manufacturers of washing machines is necessary to find the right balance between environmental aspects such as energy and water savings and the occurrence of detergent residues on textiles due to insufficient rinsing.

  7. Zeolites on Mars: Possible environmental indicators in soils and sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Gooding, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Weathering products should serve as indicators of weathering environments and may provide the best evidence of the nature of climate change on Mars. No direct mineralogical measurements of Martian regolith were performed by the Viking missions, but the biology and X-ray fluorescence experiments provided some information on the physiochemical properties of Martian regolith. Most post-Viking studies of candidate weathering products have emphasized phyllosilicates and Fe-oxides; zeolites are potentially important, but overlooked, candidate Martian minerals. Zeolites would be important on Mars for three different reasons. First, they are major sinks of atmospheric gases and, per unit mass, are stronger and more efficient sorbents than are phyllosilicates. Secondly, they can be virtually unique sorbents and shelters for organic compounds and possible catalysts for organic-based reactions. Finally, their exchangeable ions are good indicators of the chemical properties of solutions with which they have communicated. Accordingly, the search for information on past compositions of the Martian atmosphere and hydrosphere should find zeolites to be rich repositories.

  8. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridium hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.

  9. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridiummore » hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.« less

  10. Unconventional, highly selective CO2 adsorption in zeolite SSZ-13.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Matthew R; Queen, Wendy L; Mason, Jarad A; Fickel, Dustin W; Lobo, Raul F; Brown, Craig M

    2012-02-01

    Low-pressure adsorption of carbon dioxide and nitrogen was studied in both acidic and copper-exchanged forms of SSZ-13, a zeolite containing an 8-ring window. Under ideal conditions for industrial separations of CO(2) from N(2), the ideal adsorbed solution theory selectivity is >70 in each compound. For low gas coverage, the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO(2) was found to be 33.1 and 34.0 kJ/mol for Cu- and H-SSZ-13, respectively. From in situ neutron powder diffraction measurements, we ascribe the CO(2) over N(2) selectivity to differences in binding sites for the two gases, where the primary CO(2) binding site is located in the center of the 8-membered-ring pore window. This CO(2) binding mode, which has important implications for use of zeolites in separations, has not been observed before and is rationalized and discussed relative to the high selectivity for CO(2) over N(2) in SSZ-13 and other zeolites containing 8-ring windows. PMID:22235866

  11. Theoretical maximal storage of hydrogen in zeolitic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Spoto, Giuseppe; Zecchina, Adriano

    2005-12-01

    Physisorption and encapsulation of molecular hydrogen in tailored microporous materials are two of the options for hydrogen storage. Among these materials, zeolites have been widely investigated. In these materials, the attained storage capacities vary widely with structure and composition, leading to the expectation that materials with improved binding sites, together with lighter frameworks, may represent efficient storage materials. In this work, we address the problem of the determination of the maximum amount of molecular hydrogen which could, in principle, be stored in a given zeolitic framework, as limited by the size, structure and flexibility of its pore system. To this end, the progressive filling with H2 of 12 purely siliceous models of common zeolite frameworks has been simulated by means of classical molecular mechanics. By monitoring the variation of cell parameters upon progressive filling of the pores, conclusions are drawn regarding the maximum storage capacity of each framework and, more generally, on framework flexibility. The flexible non-pentasils RHO, FAU, KFI, LTA and CHA display the highest maximal capacities, ranging between 2.86-2.65 mass%, well below the targets set for automotive applications but still in an interesting range. The predicted maximal storage capacities correlate well with experimental results obtained at low temperature. The technique is easily extendable to any other microporous structure, and it can provide a method for the screening of hypothetical new materials for hydrogen storage applications.

  12. Hierarchical Porous Zeolite Structures for Pressure Swing Adsorption Applications.

    PubMed

    Besser, Benjamin; Tajiri, Henrique Akira; Mikolajczyk, Gerd; Möllmer, Jens; Schumacher, Thomas C; Odenbach, Stefan; Gläser, Roger; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-02-10

    Porous adsorbents with hierarchical structured macropores ranging from 1 to 100 μm are prepared using a combination of freeze casting and additional sacrificial templating of polyurethane foams, with a zeolite 13X powder serving as adsorbent. The pore system of the prepared monoliths features micropores assigned to the zeolite 13X particle framework, interparticular pores of ∼1-2 μm, lamellar pores derived from freeze casting of ∼10 μm, and an interconnected pore network obtained from the sacrificial templates ranging from around 100 to 200 μm with a total porosity of 71%. Gas permeation measurements show an increase in intrinsic permeability by a factor of 14 for monoliths prepared with an additional sacrificial templated foam compared to monoliths solely providing freeze casting pores. Cyclic CO2 adsorption and desorption tests where pressure swings between 8 and 140 kPa reveal constant working capacities over multiple cycles. Furthermore, the monoliths feature a high volumetric working capacity of ∼1.34 mmol/cm(3) which is competitive to packed beds made of commercially available zeolite 13X beads (∼1.28 mmol/cm(3)). Combined with the faster CO2 uptake showing an adsorption of 50% within 5-8 s (beads ∼10 s), the monoliths show great potential for pressure swing adsorption applications, where high volumetric working capacities, fast uptakes, and low pressure drops are needed for a high system performance. PMID:26760054

  13. Development of Zeolite Nonwoven for the Adsorption of Radioactive Cesium - 13288

    SciTech Connect

    Murao, Ayako; Nakai, Tomonori; Mimura, Hitoshi; Miura, Teruo; Aoyama, Yoshihito

    2013-07-01

    The zeolite nonwoven fabric produced by TDS (Totally Dry System) process has some advantages such as the control of zeolite content, flexibility, strength and water-resistant property depending on the purpose. Hence the zeolite nonwoven fabric is expected for the application in various fields of the decontamination of Cs-contaminated water. In this study, Cs adsorption properties of zeolite nonwoven fabrics were examined by batch experiments, and the radiation stability, thermal stability and chemical durability were evaluated. As for batch adsorption properties, relatively large uptake rate of Cs{sup +} was obtained; the uptake equilibrium attained within 20 min and the uptake (%) was above 95%. The differences in zeolite content had no effects on the Cs{sup +} uptake (%). The uptake (%) of Cs{sup +} in seawater was slightly lowered compared to that in the presence of HNO{sub 3}. The uptake (%) of Cs{sup +} in seawater was estimated to be above 90% after 2 h-shaking, indicating the considerable enhancement of uptake rate compared to the conventional granular zeolites. The uptake (%) of Cs{sup +} for the zeolite high content type was estimated to be above 99% by using {sup 137}Cs tracer. As for the comparison of sealing treatment, the uptake (%) for the zeolite sheet treated with edge sealing was larger than that with rapping treatment. The uptake (%) for the zeolite sheet (zeolite high content type) was estimated to be about 95%, which is independent of sealing treatment and NaOH concentration. As for the stability, the surface morphology and the structure of zeolite sheet were not altered by the treatment with acid and alkaline solutions under the experimental conditions. The zeolite sheets were also stable after {sup 60}Co-γ ray irradiation up to 7.01x10{sup 6} R. On the other hand, color change for both fiber and zeolite and the shrinkage of the fiber were observed after heat treatment at 150 deg. C for 2 h. Thus the considerable enhancement of adsorption

  14. Zeolite inorganic scaffolds for novel biomedical application: Effect of physicochemical characteristic of zeolite membranes on cell adhesion and viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavolaro, Palmira; Catalano, Silvia; Martino, Guglielmo; Tavolaro, Adalgisa

    2016-09-01

    The design, preparation and selection of inorganic materials useful as functional scaffolds for cell adhesion is a complex question based both on the understanding of the chemical behavior of the materials and individual cells, and on their interactions. Pure zeolite membranes formed from synthetic crystals offer chemically-capable being modulated silanolic surfaces that are amenable to adhesion and growth of fibroblasts. We report the facile preparation of reusable, very longlasting, biocompatible, easily sterilized synthetic scaffolds in a zeolite membrane configuration, which are very stable in aqueous media (apart from ionic strength and pH values), able to adsorb pollutant species and to confine undesired toxic ions (present in culture media). This may ultimately lead to the development of cell supports for economic antibiotic-free culture media.

  15. Nanozeolite-LTL with Gd(III) deposited in the large and Eu(III) in the small cavities as a magnetic resonance optical imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Florian; Zhang, Wuyuan; Brichart, Thomas; Tillement, Olivier; Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva; Peters, Joop A; Djanashvili, Kristina

    2014-03-17

    The immense structural diversity of more than 200 known zeolites is the basis for the wide variety of applications of these fascinating materials ranging from catalysis and molecular filtration to agricultural uses. Despite this versatility, the potential of zeolites in medical imaging has not yet been much exploited. In this work a novel strategy is presented to selectively deposit different ions into distinct framework locations of zeolite-LTL (Linde type L) and it is demonstrated that the carefully ion-exchanged Gd/Eu-containing nanocrystals acquire exceptional magnetic properties in combination with enhanced luminescence. This smart exploitation of the framework structure yields the highest relaxivity density (13.7 s(-1)  L g(-1) at 60 MHz and 25 °C) reported so far for alumosilicates, rendering these materials promising candidates for the design of dual magnetic resonance/optical imaging probes, as demonstrated in preliminary phantom studies.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of Eu-Y and coexchanged EuFe-Y zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla, M.A.; Millman, W.S. ); Aparicio, L.A.; Balse, V.R.; Dumesic, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to probe the oxidation state of europium and the location of divalent europium cations in Eu-Y and EuFe-Y zeolite samples. Europium was present as trivalent cations following treatment in O{sub 2} at 770 K. Treatments in H{sub 2} or CO at 770 K led to formation of divalent cations, and perhaps also caused some reduction to lower oxidation states. Three EPR signals were observed for Eu{sup 2+}, giving rise to effective g values of 3, 4.9, and 6. The first and last signals are interpreted as being due to Eu{sup 2+} cations at sites I and II, respectively, while the latter signal is due to Eu{sup 2+} cations at sites I{prime} and II{prime}. The majority of the Eu{sup 2+} cations are at site I, and the amount of Eu at this site can be increased by reducing the sample in H{sub 2}, compared with reduction in CO. The presence of europium in site I forces the Fe{sup 2+} cations to occupy sites of lower coordination in the sodalite unit (sites I{prime} and II{prime}) and in the supercages (sites II and III{prime}).

  17. Low-temperature alkane C-H bond activation by zeolites: an in situ solid-state NMR H/D exchange study for a carbenium concerto.

    PubMed

    Haouas, Mohamed; Fink, Gerhard; Taulelle, Francis; Sommer, Jean

    2010-08-01

    Isotopic H/D exchange has been monitored by in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy of 2-[D(14)]methylpentane with H-USY to probe the controversy over the alkane conversion mechanism. The probe molecule has distinct exchangeable sites with different accessibility to the zeolite surface. In the early stages of the process, the regioselectivity of exchange demonstrates that the slow step of the mechanism is controlled by a carbenium ion intermediate. At a later stage of exchange, intramolecular hydride migrations, typical of carbenium chemistry, replace D by H also on other carbon atoms, resulting in a loss of regioselectivity. Therefore, the first and the subsequent steps of the H/D exchange proceed at this temperature through a carbenium intermediate species.

  18. Protective shield for an instrument probe

    DOEpatents

    Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

    2004-10-26

    A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

  19. Synthesis, deposition and characterization of magnesium hydroxide nanostructures on zeolite 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Pei-Yoong; Yan, Jing; Ward, Jason; Koros, William J.; Teja, Amyn S.; Xu, Bo

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Reports a simple precipitation-growth method to produce nanostructures of Mg(OH){sub 2} on the surface of zeolite 4A. {yields} Able to control the growth of the nanostructures by manipulating the experimental procedure. {yields} Able to deposit Mg(OH){sub 2} onto specific sites namely bridging hydroxyl protons (SiOHAl) on the surface of zeolite 4A. -- Abstract: The precipitation and self-assembly of magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH){sub 2} nanopetals on dispersed zeolite 4A particles was investigated. Mg(OH){sub 2}/zeolite nanocomposites were produced from magnesium chloride solutions and characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR), and solid state NMR. It was determined that Mg(OH){sub 2} interacted with bridging hydroxyl protons (SiOHAl) on the zeolite surface, but not with silanol or aluminol groups. NMR analysis showed that 13% of the tetrahedral Al sites on the zeolite were converted to octahedral Al. The zeolite structure and crystallinity remained intact after treatment, and no dealumination reactions were detected. This suggests that the deposition-precipitation process at ambient conditions is a facile method for controlling Mg(OH){sub 2} nanostructures on zeolites.

  20. Facile synthesis of nano-sized hollow single crystal zeolites under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Daniel; Pacosová, Lucie; Krumeich, Frank; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2014-01-01

    We report a method to synthesize hollow ZSM-5 single crystals of a size below 100 nm that could function as nanoreactors with access through the zeolite micropores only. In the first step, ZSM-5 is synthesized with the respective crystal size. In the second, the zeolite is base leached and acid washed under mild conditions.

  1. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  2. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Han, Changseok; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O functionalization of zeolite 4A. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The synthesized materials were characterized by porosimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction analysis, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21±1°C was about 60mgCg(-1). The results showed that the positive charge density of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents was proportional to the amount of ZnO coated on zeolite and thus, ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents exhibited a greater affinity for negatively charged ions. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents increased markedly after acid modification. Adsorption experiments demonstrated ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents possessed high adsorption capacity to remove HA from aqueous solutions mainly due to strong electrostatic interactions between negative functional groups of HA and the positive charges of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents.

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of supported TiO2 by selective surface modification of zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesh, Kiros; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Chebude, Yonas; Díaz, Isabel

    2016-08-01

    Zeolite Y was treated using ammonium acetate and ammonium fluoride sequentially. As a consequence the aluminum from the surface was selectively removed. Then, loading with TiO2 (20 wt%) led to a final photocatalyst. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis (ICP-OES), N2 adsorption, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that 50% of the Al atoms were removed from the surface of the zeolite without affecting the framework structure. The TiO2/treated zeolite sample yielded 92% photocatalytic degradation of 10 ppm methyl orange (MO), a model pollutant, while the TiO2/parent zeolite converted only 7.6%. The mass normalized turnover rate (TORm) of the treated zeolite loaded with TiO2 was about 12 times higher than that of the parent zeolite loaded with the same amount of TiO2 precursor. This higher photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 supported on treated zeolite can be attributed to a more efficient interaction of the TiO2 with the zeolite leading to higher adsorption capacity. Reusability of the photocatalysts was assessed by performing three consecutive reaction cycles that showed no significant loss of photocatalytic activity.

  4. One-pot synthesized hierarchical zeolite supported metal nanoparticles for highly efficient biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Darui; Ma, Bing; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Chen; Wu, Peng

    2015-10-21

    Hierarchically porous zeolite supported metal nanoparticles are successfully prepared through a base-assisted chemoselective interaction between the silicon species on the zeolite crystal surface and metal salts, in which in situ construction of mesopores and high dispersion of metal species are realized simultaneously. PMID:26361087

  5. Removal of ammonium from swine wastewater by zeolite combined with chlorination for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Yang, Liping; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated a process using ammonium ion (NH4(+)) exchange on zeolite in combination with chlorination regeneration for the safe treatment of simulated swine wastewater. Two stages i) 120-min zeolite ion-exchange and ii) 10-min exchanged zeolite regeneration facilitated NH4(+) ion removal from wastewater. Solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and competitive cations were the significant factors influencing the entire process. The effect of competitive cations on NH4(+) removal effectively followed the order of preference as Na(+)>K(+)>Ca(2+)>Mg(2+) at equivalent concentrations. The chlorination method experimentally removed approximately 99% of the NH4(+) exchanged on the zeolite, without remaining NH4(+) in the regeneration solution. Our analysis revealed that, in this process, the NH4(+) exchanged on the zeolite was first replaced by Na(+) and then oxidized to nitrogen gas. Reuse of the regenerated zeolite (GZ) indicated that the removal efficiency of NH4(+) ions was equal to that of the fresh zeolite modified with NaCl. Results of kinetic analysis revealed that the NH4(+) exchange on the GZ followed the pseudo-second-order model and the intraparticle diffusion model only for the first 60 min. The ion-exchange isotherm results demonstrated that the Langmuir model provided a slightly more consistent fit to the equilibrium data as compared with the Freundlich model. Repetitive experimental results confirmed that the proposed zeolite recycling process was stable and usable in simulated swine wastewater treatment.

  6. One-step synthesis of mesoporous pentasil zeolite with single-unit-cell lamellar structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapstsis, Michael; Zhang, Xueyi

    2015-11-17

    A method for making a pentasil zeolite material includes forming an aqueous solution that includes a structure directing agent and a silica precursor; and heating the solution at a sufficient temperature and for sufficient time to form a pentasil zeolite material from the silica precursor, wherein the structure directing agent includes a quaternary phosphonium ion.

  7. Photoinduced electron transfers in zeolites: impact of the aluminum content on the activation energies.

    PubMed

    Hureau, Matthieu; Moissette, Alain; Gaillard, Jeremy; Brémard, Claude

    2012-10-01

    We report the activation energy determination corresponding to the recombination of the radical cation electron moiety created through photoionization of the 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene molecule incorporated in ZSM-5 zeolite channels. We demonstrate that the charge separated state stabilization in zeolite does not depend only on the Al content but also on the Al repartition.

  8. Experiments for the Undergraduate Laboratory that Illustrate the Size-Exclusion Properties of Zeolite Molecular Sieves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are presented that demonstrate the size-exclusion properties of zeolites and reveal the reason for naming zeolites "molecular sieves". If an IR spectrometer is available, the adsorption or exclusion of alcohols of varying sizes from dichloromethane or chloroform solutions can be readily demonstrated by monitoring changes in the…

  9. Recrystallization of white slime (raw material for obtained Na-A zeolite)

    SciTech Connect

    Ganbarov, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors show the possibility of using white slime (hydroxide cancrinite) as the starting material for obtaining Na-A zeolite. The effect of temperature, aging process, and structure of the starting material on the kinetics of Na-A zeolite crystallization is studied.

  10. Nanocrystalline SSZ-39 zeolite as an efficient catalyst for the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process.

    PubMed

    Martín, Nuria; Li, Zhibin; Martínez-Triguero, Joaquín; Yu, Jihong; Moliner, Manuel; Corma, Avelino

    2016-04-26

    The synthesis of nanosized SSZ-39 zeolite has been achieved using a high silica FAU zeolite as the Si and Al source and tetraethylphosphonium (TEP) cations as OSDAs. The obtained SSZ-39 material shows a remarkably high catalyst lifetime compared to conventional SSZ-13 and SSZ-39 materials. PMID:26947336

  11. Synthesis of Zeolites Using the ADOR (Assembly-Disassembly-Organization-Reassembly) Route

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Paul S.; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are an important class of materials that have wide ranging applications such as heterogeneous catalysts and adsorbents which are dependent on their framework topology. For new applications or improvements to existing ones, new zeolites with novel pore systems are desirable. We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of novel zeolites using the ADOR route. ADOR is an acronym for Assembly, Disassembly, Organization and Reassembly. This synthetic route takes advantage of the assembly of a relatively poorly stable that which can be selectively disassembled into a layered material. The resulting layered intermediate can then be organized in different manners by careful chemical manipulation and then reassembled into zeolites with new topologies. By carefully controlling the organization step of the synthetic pathway, new zeolites with never before seen topologies are capable of being synthesized. The structures of these new zeolites are confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction and further characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. This new synthetic pathway for zeolites demonstrates its capability to produce novel frameworks that have never been prepared by traditional zeolite synthesis techniques. PMID:27078165

  12. Carbon dioxide capture utilizing zeolites synthesized with paper sludge and scrap-glass.

    PubMed

    Espejel-Ayala, F; Corella, R Chora; Pérez, A Morales; Pérez-Hernández, R; Ramírez-Zamora, R M

    2014-12-01

    The present work introduces the study of the CO2 capture process by zeolites synthesized from paper sludge and scrap glass. Zeolites ZSM-5, analcime and wairakite were produced by means of two types of Structure Directing Agents (SDA): tetrapropilamonium (TPA) and ethanol. On the one hand, zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized using TPA; on the other hand, analcime and wairakite were produced with ethanol. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique was performed for determining the CO2 sorption capacity of these zeolites at two sorption temperatures: 50 and 100 °C. CO2 sorption capacity of zeolite ZSM-5 synthesized at 50 °C was 0.683 mmol/g representing 38.2% of the value measured for a zeolite ZSM-5 commercial. Zeolite analcime showed a higher CO2 sorption capacity (1.698 mmol/g) at 50 °C and its regeneration temperature was relatively low. Zeolites synthesized in this study can be used in the purification of biogas and this will produce energy without increasing the atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  13. Magnetic interactions in cubic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle bound to zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, L. Herojit; Pati, Sudhanshu S.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Matilla, John; Guimarães, Edi M.; Oliveira, A. C.; Kuzmann, E.; Garg, Vijayendra K.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic interaction of the magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles grown on zeolite has been studied. XRD patterns show that in the presence of 25-75 mg of zeolite the average particle size of Fe3O4 decreases to ≈6 nm, but with the increase of zeolite content (75 mgzeolite 13x from 0 to 100 mg, the saturation magnetization decreases from 63 to 53 emu/g. Mössbauer studies show the presence of different Fe3O4 microenvironments, possibly in pores and on the surface of zeolite. Transformation of the superparamagnetic doublet to sextet at 80 K can indicate a variation in the magnetic interaction. At low temperature the interaction between Fe3O4 at the pore and at the surface enhances the magnetic ordering. The nanoparticles in the pores of zeolite are connected with the surface particles in low zeolite content and get isolated as the amount of zeolite increases.

  14. Remarkable effect of the preparation technique on the state of cobalt ions in BEA zeolites evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and NO, TPR and XRD.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Angelina; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin; Dzwigaj, Stanislaw; Che, Michel

    2006-10-01

    The state of cobalt in two BEA zeolites was studied by XRD, TPR, and FTIR spectroscopy using CO and NO as probe molecules. One of the samples, CoAlBEA (0.4 wt % of Co), was prepared by conventional ion exchange and the other, CoSiBEA (0.7 wt % Co), by a two-step postsynthesis method involving dealuminated SiBEA zeolite. The introduction of Co into SiBEA leads to an increase of unit cell parameters of the BEA structure and to the consumption of silanol groups in vacant T-sites of the dealuminated zeolite. In contrast, no structural changes are observed after incorporation of cobalt into AlBEA by ion-exchange. The reduction temperature of cobalt in CoSiBEA zeolite (1130 K), is much higher than for CoAlBEA and indicates a strong interaction of cobalt ions with SiBEA. Low-temperature CO adsorption on CoAlBEA results in (i) H-bonded CO, (ii) Co(3+)-CO adducts (2,208 cm(-1)) and (iii) a small amount of Co(2+)-CO complexes (2,188 cm(-1)). In agreement with these results, NO adsorption leads to the appearance of (i) NO(+) (2,133 cm(-1), formed with the participation of the zeolite acidic hydroxyls), (ii) Co(3+)-NO (1932 cm(-1)), and (iii) a small amount of Co(2+)(NO)(2) dinitrosyls (nu(s) = 1,898 and nu(as) = 1,814 cm(-1)). Low-temperature CO adsorption on CoSiBEA leads to formation of two kinds of Co(2+)-CO adducts (2,185 and 2,178 cm(-1)). No Co(3+) cations are detected. In line with these results, adsorption of NO reveals the existence of two kinds of Co(2+)(NO)(2) dinitrosyls (nu(s) = 1,888 and nu(as) = 1,808 cm(-1) and nu(s) = 1,878 and nu(as) = 1,799 cm(-1), respectively).

  15. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  16. [Effect of Nano Zeolite on Chemical Fractions of Cd in Soil and Its Uptake by Cabbage].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shi-juan; Xu, Wei-hong; Xie, Wen-wen; Chen, Rong; Chen, Yong-qin; Chi, Sun-lin; Chen, Xu- gen; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Xiong, Zhi-ting; Wang, Zheng-yin; Xie, De-ti

    2015-12-01

    Incubation experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different nano zeolite (NZ) and ordinary zeolite (OZ) levels(0, 5, 10 and 20 g · kg⁻¹) on the change trends in fraction distribution coefficient (FDC) of Cd when exposed to different Cadmium (Cd) levels (1, 5, 10 and 15 mg · kg⁻¹), and pot experiments were carried out to investigate their influence on soil Cd fraction and Cd uptake by cabbage. The results in incubation experiments showed that the application of nano zeolite as well as ordinary zeolite effectively decreased the FDC of exchangeable Cd and increased the FDC of Fe-Mn oxide fraction. The FDC of soil Cd from 0 d to 28 d was deceased at first, then increased and tended to be stable, and finally increased. At the end of incubation, the FDC of soil exchangeable Cd decreased from 72.0%-88.0% to 30.0%-66.4%. Exchangeable fraction Cd was the most dominant Cd fraction in soil during the whole incubation. The results in pot experiment indicated that the application of nano zeolite and ordinary zeolite decreased the concentration and FDC of soil exchangeable Cd, and concurrently the concentration and FDC of Cd in carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide, organic matter and residual fraction were increased. The lowest EX-Cd was observed in the treatment with high dose of nano zeolite (20 g · kg⁻¹). The FDC of exchangeable Cd showed significant negative relationship with the soil pH (P < 0.05), and was concurrently extremely positively correlated with Cd concentration in shoot and root of cabbage (P < 0.01). Soil pH increased by 1.8%-45.5% and 6.1%-54.3% in the presence of zeolite when exposed to 5 mg · kg⁻¹ 1 and Cd, respectively; FDC of exchangeable Cd decreased by 16.3%-47.7% and 16.2%-46.7%; Cd concentration in each tissues of cabbage decreased by 1.0%-75.0% and 3.8%-53.2%, respectively. Moreover, the reduction effect of nano zeolite on soil and plant Cd was better than that of ordinary zeolite. The growth of cabbage was stimulated by low and

  17. [Effect of Nano Zeolite on Chemical Fractions of Cd in Soil and Its Uptake by Cabbage].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shi-juan; Xu, Wei-hong; Xie, Wen-wen; Chen, Rong; Chen, Yong-qin; Chi, Sun-lin; Chen, Xu- gen; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Xiong, Zhi-ting; Wang, Zheng-yin; Xie, De-ti

    2015-12-01

    Incubation experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different nano zeolite (NZ) and ordinary zeolite (OZ) levels(0, 5, 10 and 20 g · kg⁻¹) on the change trends in fraction distribution coefficient (FDC) of Cd when exposed to different Cadmium (Cd) levels (1, 5, 10 and 15 mg · kg⁻¹), and pot experiments were carried out to investigate their influence on soil Cd fraction and Cd uptake by cabbage. The results in incubation experiments showed that the application of nano zeolite as well as ordinary zeolite effectively decreased the FDC of exchangeable Cd and increased the FDC of Fe-Mn oxide fraction. The FDC of soil Cd from 0 d to 28 d was deceased at first, then increased and tended to be stable, and finally increased. At the end of incubation, the FDC of soil exchangeable Cd decreased from 72.0%-88.0% to 30.0%-66.4%. Exchangeable fraction Cd was the most dominant Cd fraction in soil during the whole incubation. The results in pot experiment indicated that the application of nano zeolite and ordinary zeolite decreased the concentration and FDC of soil exchangeable Cd, and concurrently the concentration and FDC of Cd in carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide, organic matter and residual fraction were increased. The lowest EX-Cd was observed in the treatment with high dose of nano zeolite (20 g · kg⁻¹). The FDC of exchangeable Cd showed significant negative relationship with the soil pH (P < 0.05), and was concurrently extremely positively correlated with Cd concentration in shoot and root of cabbage (P < 0.01). Soil pH increased by 1.8%-45.5% and 6.1%-54.3% in the presence of zeolite when exposed to 5 mg · kg⁻¹ 1 and Cd, respectively; FDC of exchangeable Cd decreased by 16.3%-47.7% and 16.2%-46.7%; Cd concentration in each tissues of cabbage decreased by 1.0%-75.0% and 3.8%-53.2%, respectively. Moreover, the reduction effect of nano zeolite on soil and plant Cd was better than that of ordinary zeolite. The growth of cabbage was stimulated by low and

  18. Bionanocomposites of regenerated cellulose/zeolite prepared using environmentally benign ionic liquid solvent.

    PubMed

    Soheilmoghaddam, Mohammad; Wahit, Mat Uzir; Tuck Whye, Wong; Ibrahim Akos, Noel; Heidar Pour, Raheleh; Ali Yussuf, Abdirahman

    2014-06-15

    Bionanocomposite films based on regenerated cellulose (RC) and incorporated with zeolite at different concentrations were fabricated by dissolving cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIMCl) ionic liquid using a simple green method. The interactions between the zeolite and the cellulose matrix were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films significantly improved as compared with the pure regenerated cellulose film, without the loss of extensibility. Zeolite incorporation enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that zeolite was uniformly dispersed in the regenerated cellulose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both RC and RC/zeolite nanocomposite films are cytocompatible. These results indicate that the prepared nanocomposites have potential applications in biodegradable packaging, membranes and biomedical areas. PMID:24721086

  19. Discovery of optimal zeolites for challenging separations and chemical transformations using predictive materials modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Peng; Jeon, Mi Young; Ren, Limin; Knight, Chris; Deem, Michael W.; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites play numerous important roles in modern petroleum refineries and have the potential to advance the production of fuels and chemical feedstocks from renewable resources. The performance of a zeolite as separation medium and catalyst depends on its framework structure. To date, 213 framework types have been synthesized and >330,000 thermodynamically accessible zeolite structures have been predicted. Hence, identification of optimal zeolites for a given application from the large pool of candidate structures is attractive for accelerating the pace of materials discovery. Here we identify, through a large-scale, multi-step computational screening process, promising zeolite structures for two energy-related applications: the purification of ethanol from fermentation broths and the hydroisomerization of alkanes with 18-30 carbon atoms encountered in petroleum refining. These results demonstrate that predictive modelling and data-driven science can now be applied to solve some of the most challenging separation problems involving highly non-ideal mixtures and highly articulated compounds.

  20. Synthesis of polymorph A-enriched beta zeolites in a HF-concentrated system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanqun; Wang, Bingchun; Zhang, Weiping; Li, Mingrun; Tian, Zhijian

    2016-04-21

    Polymorph A-enriched beta zeolites were synthesized by employing high HF concentrations in the synthesis medium. The polymorphic compositions of the synthesized beta zeolites were determined by the complementary characterization methods (19)F NMR analysis and PXRD simulation. With a variety of SDAs, a high HF concentration (HF/SDA > 1.0) in the synthesis medium results in the A-rich feature (55-65% A) of beta zeolites, while a moderate HF concentration only results in typical beta zeolites. A systematic study on the synthesis conditions reveals the existence of a buffered system of H(+) and F(-) formed in the highly HF-concentrated medium. This buffer results in a small but continuous supply of F(-) during zeolite crystallization, in contrast to the conventional fluoride route where all F(-) are discharged all-at-once at the initial stage. PMID:26974286

  1. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite for Acylation of Veratrole with Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Aisha Mahmood Abdulkareem, Al-Turkustani; Selvin, Rosilda

    2016-04-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation of veratrole using homogeneous acid catalysts such as AlCl3, FeCl3, ZnCl2, and HF etc. produces acetoveratrone, (3',4'-dimethoxyacetophenone), which is the intermediate for synthesis of papavarine alkaloids. The problems associated with these homogeneous catalysts can be overcome by using heterogeneous solid catalysts. Since acetoveratrone is a larger molecule, large pore Beta zeolites with smaller particle sizes are beneficial for the liquid-phase acylation of veratrole, for easy diffusion of reactants and products. The present study aims in the acylation of veratrole with acetic anhydride using nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite catalyst. A systematic investigation of the effects of various reaction parameters was done. The catalysts were characterized for their structural features by using XRD, TEM and DLS analyses. The catalytic activity of nanocrystalline Beta zeolite was compared with commercial Beta zeolite for the acylation and was found that nanocrystalline Beta zeolite possessed superior activity.

  2. Enhanced butanol production by immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 using zeolite 13X as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Vichuviwat, Rapeephat; Boonsombuti, Akarin; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Wongkasemjit, Sujitra

    2014-11-01

    Butanol production by cell immobilization onto porous materials-brick and zeolite 13X-was investigated using Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461. Characterization results of two materials were completed to evaluate their potential as an immobilization carrier. Although zeolite has greater porosity than brick, it cannot be used for cell aggregation without treating with chemical. After immobilization, both materials can enhance butanol titers from 5.29 to 5.80g/L and 8.58g/L using brick and zeolite, respectively. Butanol to glucose yield also improved from 0.14 to 0.16g/g after immobilization. It was found that butanol production significantly increased due to an increase in buffering capacity, strong bonding between the zeolite surface and cell, and butanol tolerance. In addition, repeated batch fermentation was performed, demonstrating that cells immobilized onto zeolite 13X have high stability and potential for long-term use in continuous fermentation.

  3. Nanocrystals of zeolite act as enhanced sensing interface for biosensing of leviteracetum.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Malhotra, Nitesh; Pundir, C S

    2015-03-01

    In present work, nanocrystals of zeolites were employed as sensing interface for augmented electrochemical sensing of antiepileptic drug, that is, leviteracetum (LEV). Electrochemical sensing method was developed by depositing nanocrystals of zeolites and horseradish peroxidase (nanocrys zeolites-HRP) onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass surface for LEV detection. Various stages of biosensor fabrication were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The fabricated nanocrys zeolites-HRP-modified sensor exhibited wide linear range (10-500 μM) and a low detection limit of 0.01 μM. The biosensor also showed a short response time (within 2 s). In addition, the biosensor exhibited high reproducibility, good storage stability, and anti-interference ability. The applicability of the nanocrys zeolites-HRP-modified sensor is to determine LEV level in spiked serum samples.

  4. Effect of hierarchical porosity and phosphorus modification on the catalytic properties of zeolite Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Zheng, Jinyu; Luo, Yibin; Da, Zhijian

    2016-09-01

    The zeolite Y is considered as a leading catalyst for FCC industry. The acidity and porosity modification play important roles in determining the final catalytic properties of zeolite Y. The alkaline treatment of zeolite Y by dealumination and alkaline treatment with NaOH and NaOH&TBPH was investigated. The zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, transmission electron microscope, NMR, NH3-TPD and IR study of acidity. Accordingly, the hierarchical porosity and acidity property were discussed systematically. Finally, the catalytic performance of the zeolites Y was evaluated in the cracking of 1,3,5-TIPB. It was found that desilication with NaOH&TBPH ensured the more uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity with higher microporosity, while preserving higher B/L ratio and moderate Brønsted acidities resulting in catalysts with the most appropriated acidity and then with better catalytic performance.

  5. Surfactant-modified zeolites as permeable barriers to organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.S.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1995-10-01

    We have shown in laboratory experiments that natural zeolites treated with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) are effective sorbents for nonpolar organics, inorganic cations, and inorganic anions. Due to their low cost ({approximately}$0.75/kg) and granular nature, HDTMA-zeolites appear ideal candidates for reactive, permeable subsurface barriers. The HDTMA-zeolites are stable over a wide range of pH (3-13), ionic strength (1 M Cs{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}), and in organic solvents. Surfactant-modified zeolites sorb nonpolar organics (benzene, toluene, xylene, chlorinated aliphatics) via a partitioning mechanism, inorganic cations (Pb{sup 2+}) via ion exchange and surface complexation, and inorganic anions (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) via surface precipitation.The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of surfactant-modified zeolite as a permeable barrier to ground water contaminants.

  6. Electrical double-layer effects on the deposition of zeolite A on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Oonkhanond, Bovornlak; Mullins, Michael E

    2005-04-01

    Zeolite particles formed from an aluminosilicate solution possess a negative surface charge due to the substitution of aluminum atoms into a SiO4 tetrahedral structure making it difficult to form a continuous layer in solution. The particle interactions with surfaces and each other can be studied using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy between zeolite-zeolite and zeolite-substrate on various materials can be estimated in this fashion. The zeolite LTA particles show a stronger repulsion interaction on all substrates and on the each other as compared to the ZSM-5 particles. This repulsive energy also increases as the particles size increases. This results in the formation of conglomerate in the solution rather than forming an adhered layer on the substrate.

  7. Microwave-assisted regeneration of synthetic zeolite used in tritium removal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Takayama, S.; Sano, S.

    2015-03-15

    The regeneration process using synthetic honeycomb type 5A zeolite under microwave irradiation was experimentally investigated using a single-mode cavity at 2.46 GHz. In order to investigate the effect of electromagnetic fields, inductive heating by a magnetic field was applied to synthetic zeolite containing water. Because the microwave energy absorbed in the sample was less than 15 W, the zeolite sample was only heated to a temperature of 71 C. degrees. Water desorption was observed based on the increased temperature of the zeolite sample and the thermogravimetric curve that indicated a single step phenomenon. As a result, the regeneration process of zeolite was not complete over a period of 6000 s. A comparison of dielectric heating by an electric field with inductive heating by a magnetic field showed that the regeneration process by microwave irradiation was particularly beneficial in dielectric heating. (authors)

  8. Synthesis and structure of zeolite ZSM-5: a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Puri, M.

    1987-07-30

    The Raman spectra of the solution and solid phases present during various stages of ZSM-5 synthesis were examined by monitoring the vibrations of the tetrapropylammonium ion. It was found that this cation is trapped into the amorphous solid phase at the earliest stages of the synthesis in the all-trans configuration. Upon crystallization of the zeolite, there is a forced change in the conformation of the trapped tetrapropylammonium cation, such that it can fit into the zig-zag zeolite channels. The Raman spectra of the aluminosilicate zeolite framework is also distinct from other zeolites, such as A, X, and Y, and exhibits a band at 385 cm/sup -1/ characteristic of the five-membered building units of this zeolite.

  9. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite for Acylation of Veratrole with Acetic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Aisha Mahmood Abdulkareem, Al-Turkustani; Selvin, Rosilda

    2016-04-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation of veratrole using homogeneous acid catalysts such as AlCl3, FeCl3, ZnCl2, and HF etc. produces acetoveratrone, (3',4'-dimethoxyacetophenone), which is the intermediate for synthesis of papavarine alkaloids. The problems associated with these homogeneous catalysts can be overcome by using heterogeneous solid catalysts. Since acetoveratrone is a larger molecule, large pore Beta zeolites with smaller particle sizes are beneficial for the liquid-phase acylation of veratrole, for easy diffusion of reactants and products. The present study aims in the acylation of veratrole with acetic anhydride using nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite catalyst. A systematic investigation of the effects of various reaction parameters was done. The catalysts were characterized for their structural features by using XRD, TEM and DLS analyses. The catalytic activity of nanocrystalline Beta zeolite was compared with commercial Beta zeolite for the acylation and was found that nanocrystalline Beta zeolite possessed superior activity. PMID:27451793

  10. Highly acidic mesostructured aluminosilicates assembled from surfactant-mediated zeolite hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2006-03-16

    The surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of ZSM-5 zeolite affords five-membered ring subunits that can be readily incorporated into the framework walls of a hexagonal mesostructured aluminosilicate, denoted MSU-Z. The five-membered ring subunits, which are identifiable by infrared spectroscopy, impart unprecedented acidity to the mesostructure, as judged by cumene cracking activity at 300 degrees C. Most notably, MSU-Z aluminosilicate made through the base hydrolysis of ZSM-5 in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium ions exhibits a cumene conversion of 73%, which is 6.7-fold higher than the conversion provided by a conventional MCM-41. This approach to stabilizing zeolitic subunits through surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of zeolites appears to be general. The hydrolysis of USY zeolite under analogous hydrolytic conditions also affords zeolitic fragments that boost the acidity of the mesostructure in comparison to equivalent compositions prepared from conventional aluminosilicate precursors.

  11. Discovery of optimal zeolites for challenging separations and chemical transformations using predictive materials modeling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Jeon, Mi Young; Ren, Limin; Knight, Chris; Deem, Michael W; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-01-21

    Zeolites play numerous important roles in modern petroleum refineries and have the potential to advance the production of fuels and chemical feedstocks from renewable resources. The performance of a zeolite as separation medium and catalyst depends on its framework structure. To date, 213 framework types have been synthesized and >330,000 thermodynamically accessible zeolite structures have been predicted. Hence, identification of optimal zeolites for a given application from the large pool of candidate structures is attractive for accelerating the pace of materials discovery. Here we identify, through a large-scale, multi-step computational screening process, promising zeolite structures for two energy-related applications: the purification of ethanol from fermentation broths and the hydroisomerization of alkanes with 18-30 carbon atoms encountered in petroleum refining. These results demonstrate that predictive modelling and data-driven science can now be applied to solve some of the most challenging separation problems involving highly non-ideal mixtures and highly articulated compounds.

  12. The development of a zeolite system for upgrade of the Process Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Kent, T.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Studies have been undertaken to design an efficient zeolite ion exchange system for use at the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant to remove cesium and strontium to meet discharge limits. This report focuses on two areas: (1) design of column hardware and pretreatment steps needed to eliminate column plugging and channeling and (2) development of equilibrium models for the wastewater system. Results indicate that zeolite columns do not plug as quickly when the wastewater equalization is performed in the new Bethel Valley Storage Tanks instead of the former equalization basin where suspended solids concentration is high. A down-flow column with spent zeolite was used successfully as a prefilter to prevent plugging of the zeolite columns being used to remove strontium and cesium. Equilibrium studies indicate that a Langmuir isotherm models binary zeolite equilibrium data while the modified Dubinin-Polyani model predicts multicomponent data.

  13. Preparation and characterization of Na-LTA zeolite from Tunisian sand and aluminum scrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tounsi, H.; Mseddi, S.; Djemel, S.

    2009-11-01

    Pure Na-A (LTA) zeolite has been prepared from aluminosilicate gel obtained by a mixture of metasilicate and aluminate solutions. Metasilicate sol; used as silica source; was prepared from an alkaline attack of Tunisian sand in an autoclave under agitation at 220 ∘C and pressure of 27 bar. The aluminate solution was obtained by dissolution of aluminium scraps in NaOH solution. The crystallization of Na-LTA zeolite is controlled by the alkalinity of the mixture and the reaction time. At 90 ∘C, well crystallized LTA have been obtained after 3h. The Zeolite LTA converts into the more stable HS after long reaction times according to Ostwald's law. The alkalinity of the reaction mixture changes the nature of the obtained zeolite. At lower NaOH concentration (0.1 M), Na-X zeolite was obtained; whereas the crystallization of LTA was promoted at higher NaOH concentration (3M).

  14. Palladium-Zeolite nanofiber as an effective recyclable catalyst membrane for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungsu; Chan, Sophia; Yip, Garriott; Joo, Hyunjong; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank K

    2016-09-15

    Zeolite is an exciting natural material due to its unique capability of ammonium nitrogen (NH3N) adsorption in water. In this study, multifunctional hybrid composites of zeolite/palladium (Ze/Pd) on polymer nanofiber membranes were fabricated and explored for sustainable contaminant removal. SEM and XRD demonstrated that zeolite and palladium nanoparticles were uniformly distributed and deposited on the nanofibers. NH3N recovery rate was increased from 23 to 92% when palladium coated zeolite was embedded on the nanofiber. Multifunctional nanofibers of Ze/Pd membranes were able to adsorb NH3N on the zeolites placed on the surface of fibers and palladium catalysts were capable of selective oxidation of NH3N to N2 gas. The cycling of NH3N adsorption-oxidation, high flux, hydrophilicity, and flexibility of the membrane makes it a strong candidate for water treatment. PMID:27253639

  15. Metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors utilizing a Cr-zeolite catalytic layer for improved selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, D. P.; Paraskeva, T.; Pratt, K. F. E.; Parkin, I. P.; Williams, D. E.

    2005-05-01

    A novel method of improving the selectivity of metal oxide sensors has been developed. The addition of zeolites, catalytically modified with chromium, results in controlled selectivity to alkanes based on shape and size effects. The cracking patterns of n-alkanes over Cr-zeolite Y and Cr-zeolite β between 200 °C and 400 °C have been ascertained using a novel system involving a heated zeolite bed, thermal desorber and GC/MS. The findings correlate with discrimination shown when the respective zeolites are incorporated as a catalytic layer on chromium titanium oxide (CTO) gas sensors used in a proprietary sensor array system to ascertain their suitability for inclusion into an electronic nose.

  16. In situ studies of zeolite syntheses using powder diffraction methods: Crystallization of ``instant zeolite A`` powder and CoAPO-5

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.; Christensen, A.N.; Hanson, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    A series of hydrothermal zeolite synthesis were performed on a powder diffractometer using synchrotron radiation and a position sensitive detector. Direct observation of the induction period (nucleation stage), crystallization and transformation of zeolite 4A (Na-LTA) was possible due to the intense X-ray beam which allows fast data collection. High pressure experiments were performed, allowing observation of hydrothermal synthesis of a cobalt substituted AlPO{sub 4}-zeolite, CoAPO-5, up to 165{degrees}C. The temperature dependence of crystallization rates of CoAPO-5 was studied. This is to our knowledge the first time resolved powder diffraction studies of zeolite syntheses using angle dispersive synchrotron powder diffraction.

  17. Adsorption and Diffusion of Fructose in Zeolite HZSM-5: Selection of Models and Methods for Computational Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Kerber, Torsten; Sauer, Joachim

    2011-11-10

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose inHZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of fructose in zeolite HZSM-5: selection of models and methods for computational studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Assary, R. S.; Greeley, J.; Kerber, T.; Sauer, J.

    2011-09-14

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose in HZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  19. Analysis of the biological and chemical reactivity of zeolite-based aluminosilicate fibers and particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fach, Estelle; Waldman, W James; Williams, Marshall; Long, John; Meister, Richard K; Dutta, Prabir K

    2002-01-01

    Environmental and/or occupational exposure to minerals, metals, and fibers can cause lung diseases that may develop years after exposure to the agents. The presence of toxic fibers such as asbestos in the environment plus the continuing development of new mineral or vitreous fibers requires a better understanding of the specific physical and chemical features of fibers/particles responsible for bioactivity. Toward that goal, we have tested aluminosilicate zeolites to establish biological and chemical structure-function correlations. Zeolites have known crystal structure, are subject to experimental manipulation, and can be synthesized and controlled to produce particles of selected size and shape. Naturally occurring zeolites include forms whose biological activity is reported to range from highly pathogenic (erionite) to essentially benign (mordenite). Thus, we used naturally occurring erionite and mordenite as well as an extensively studied synthetic zeolite based on faujasite (zeolite Y). Bioactivity was evaluated using lung macrophages of rat origin (cell line NR8383). Our objective was to quantitatively determine the biological response upon interaction of the test particulates/fibers with lung macrophages and to evaluate the efficacy of surface iron on the zeolites to promote the Fenton reaction. The biological assessment included measurement of the reactive oxygen species by flow cytometry and chemiluminescence techniques upon phagocytosis of the minerals. The chemical assessment included measuring the hydroxyl radicals generated from hydrogen peroxide by iron bound to the zeolite particles and fibers (Fenton reaction). Chromatography as well as absorption spectroscopy were used to quantitate the hydroxyl radicals. We found that upon exposure to the same mass of a specific type of particulate, the oxidative burst increased with decreasing particle size, but remained relatively independent of zeolite composition. On the other hand, the Fenton reaction

  20. Energy Analysis of Aluminosilicate Zeolites with Comprehensive Ranges of Framework Topologies, Chemical Compositions, and Aluminum Distributions.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koki; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2016-05-18

    The contents and locations of Al in the zeolite frameworks are one of the key factors determining the physicochemical properties of zeolites. Systematic evaluation of the characteristics of zeolites with a wide variety of framework topologies, a wide range of Si/Al ratios, and various locations of Al is of great significance, but very challenging due to the limitation of the realizable ranges of Al contents in zeolites as well as the limited information on the Al locations obtained from the current analytical techniques. Here, we report the systematic analysis of the energetics of aluminosilicate zeolites with 209 existing framework topologies at different Si/Al ratios using molecular mechanics. More than 43 000 initial structures were generated to give comprehensive views of the energetics of zeolites. The results coincide well with the structural knowledge obtained experimentally. It was revealed that the relation between the relative framework energies versus the Al contents varies in accordance with the topologies, suggesting that the relative stability of zeolites depends not only on the topologies, but also on the substituting contents of Al. For particular topologies with the same Al contents, in addition, comparisons between random and specific distributions of Al showed that zeolite with Al at a particular T site is energetically more stable than those with random distributions, suggesting the inherent influences of the Al locations. The contents and locations of Al in zeolites likely have a certain preference that may reflect the range of chemical compositions, the Al distributions, and consequently the physicochemical properties of realizable aluminosilicate zeolites. PMID:27097121