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Sample records for probiotics alters bacterial

  1. [Use of probiotics in bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Mur Pérez, A M; Mateo Segura, Z; Ramírez Domínguez, N; Vela Condón, P

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a change in the vaginal microbiota due to bacterial overgrowth of normal microorganisms, which produces symptoms of vaginal discomfort, increased malodorous vaginal discharge, etc. Although they been seen to improve recurrence rates in clinical practice, the role of probiotics is questioned in these situations. A literature review on BV is presented in order to evaluate the effectiveness of using probiotics as adjuvant therapy in BV. PubMed, Cochrane and SCOPUS review of the last 5 years publications using probiotics to treat women diagnosed with BV. An analysis was performed on the 10 items that refer to the use of probiotics in addition to antibiotic treatments. All items conclude that the use of probiotics is beneficial in cases of BV in addition to conventional treatments. However, the conclusions are not categorical due to there being a wide variety of studies and probiotics used. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Early administration of probiotics alters bacterial colonization and limits diet-induced gut dysfunction and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Richard H; Siggers, Jayda; Boye, Mette; Thymann, Thomas; Mølbak, Lars; Leser, Thomas; Jensen, Bent B; Sangild, Per T

    2008-08-01

    Following preterm birth, bacterial colonization and enteral formula feeding predispose neonates to gut dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would beneficially influence early bacterial colonization, thereby reducing the susceptibility to formula-induced gut atrophy, dysfunction, and NEC. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were provided total parenteral nutrition (1.5 d) followed by enteral feeding (2 d) with porcine colostrum (COLOS; n = 5), formula (FORM; n = 9), or formula with probiotics (FORM-P; Bifidobacterium animalis and Lactobacillus: L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. pentosus, L. plantarum; n = 13). Clinical NEC scores were reduced (P < 0.05) in FORM-P (2.0 +/- 0.2) and COLOS groups (1.7 +/- 0.5) compared with FORM pigs (3.4 +/- 0.6). Lower NEC scores were associated with elevated intestinal weight, mucosa proportion, villus height, RNA integrity, and brush border aminopeptidase A and N activities, and lower gastric organic acid concentration in the FORM-P and COLOS groups (P < 0.05). Diversity of the mucosa-associated bacteria in the distal small intestine was similar among formula-fed pigs, yet the abundance of specific bacterial groups differed between FORM-P and FORM pigs. FORM-P pigs had lower colonization density of a potential pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, and had commensal Lactobacillus bacteria more closely associated with enterocytes along the villus-crypt axis relative to FORM pigs. These results suggest that probiotic administration immediately after birth promotes the colonization of a beneficial commensal microbiota capable of limiting the formula-induced mucosal atrophy, dysfunction, and pathogen load in preterm neonates, thereby reducing the incidence and severity of NEC.

  3. Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Garg, R

    2009-01-01

    The term "probiotic" was first used in 1965, by Lilly and Stillwell, to describe substances secreted by one organism which stimulate the growth of another. The use of antibiotics, immunosuppressive therapy and irradiation, amongst other means of treatment, may cause alterations in the composition and have an effect on the GIT flora. Therefore, the introduction of beneficial bacterial species to GI tract may be a very attractive option to re-establish the microbial equilibrium and prevent disease. Prebiotic is a non-digestible food ingredient that confers benefits on the host by selectively stimulating one bacterium or a group of bacteria in the colon with probiotic properties. Both probiotics and prebiotics are together called as Synbiotics. Various bacterial genera most commonly used in probiotic preparations are Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Escherichia, Enterococcus, Bacillus and Streptococcus . Some fungal strains belonging to Saccharomyces have also been used. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical conditions- ranging from infantile diarrhoea, necrotizing enterocolitis, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, relapsing Clostridium difficle colitis, Helicobacter pylori infections, inflammatory bowel disease to cancer, female uro-genital infection and surgical infections. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG has proven beneficial affects on intestinal immunity. It increases the number of IgA and other immunoglobulins secreting cells in the intestinal mucosa. It also stimulates local release of interferons. It facilitates antigen transport to underlying lymphoid cells, which serves to increase antigen uptake in Peyer's patches. Probiotics are live microorganisms, so it is possible that they may result in infection in the host. The risk and morbidity of sepsis due to probiotic bacteria should be weighed against the potential for sepsis due to more pathological bacteria and the morbidity of diseases for which probiotic bacteria are being used as

  4. Effect of probiotics on enterocyte bacterial translocation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mattar, A F; Drongowski, R A; Coran, A G; Harmon, C M

    2001-05-01

    Enteral probiotics such as Lactobacillus casei GG (LGG) have been used in the treatment of a variety of intestinal disorders in infants and children, including diarrhea, malabsorption, and Clostridium difficile colitis. We have previously demonstrated that the probiotic bacterium LGG has an inhibitory effect on bacterial translocation (BT) in a neonatal rabbit model. However, this in-vivo model is limited for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for probiotic inhibition of BT. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of LGG in reducing the rate of Escherichia coli C25 (E. coli C25) translocation using an in-vitro enterocyte cell-culture model. Human colonic carcinoma (Caco-2) enterocytes were seeded in porous filters in the apical chamber of a two-chamber cell-culture system and grown for 14 days to confluence. The monolayers were incubated at 37 degrees C with LGG for 180 min. Non-adherent LGG was washed away prior to a 120-min incubation period with 10(5) CFU E. coli C25. E. coli that had translocated across the enterocyte monolayer were quantified by growing basal-chamber media samples on gram-negative bacteria-specific MacConkey's agar. In order to determine monolayer integrity, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured across Caco-2 cells treated with LGG and E. coli. Statistical analysis was by ANOVA with P < 0.05 considered significant. LGG inhibited E. coli translocation at all LGG concentrations tested. The TEER ratio was not significantly altered by addition of LGG or E. coli (0.9 +/- 0.03 vs 0.8 +/- 0.05). These results demonstrate that the probiotic bacterium LGG inhibits BT of E. coli C25 in a dose-dependent manner in an in-vitro cell-culture model. This model should be valuable in investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of pathological enteral bacteria by probiotic agents.

  5. The influence of the immunostimulation by bacterial cell components derived from altered large intestinal microbiota on probiotic anti-inflammatory benefits.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hara, Kurt; Benno, Yoshimi

    2007-04-01

    Using murine macrophage-like J774.1 cells and fecal precipitates prepared from the feces of elderly volunteers whose acute inflammation had been inhibited by LKM512 yogurt consumption, we investigated the likelihood that immunostimulation by altered intestinal bacterial cell components contribute to the anti-inflammatory benefits of this yogurt. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha production due to stimulation by fecal precipitates obtained during LKM512 yogurt consumption tended to be higher than due to stimulation by precipitates obtained from preconsumption (P=0.0827), although acute phase response was suppressed by LKM512 yogurt consumption. We suggest that the anti-inflammatory benefits of LKM512 yogurt on elderly volunteers are independent of direct immunostimulation by the bacterial cell components derived from altered intestinal microbiota.

  6. Probiotics - a helpful additional therapy for bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Bodean, O; Munteanu, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bacterial vaginosis is a condition of unknown etiology, associated with an imbalance of the normal vaginal microbiota, characterized by a high recurrence rate despite of classical therapy solutions. Probiotics are microorganisms, which taken in adequate amounts, are proven to bring health benefits in human and animal bodies, by re-establishing the normal flora at different levels. Objective: The present article studies the possibility of using probiotic treatment as an adjuvant therapy for nonspecific vaginosis and reducing its recurrence rate. Methods: We have evaluated the evolution of patients with bacterial vaginosis who received the classical antibiotic therapy and a probiotic product. The study group consisted of 173 non-pregnant, sexually active patients, 20-45 years old, with no additional health problems and no contraceptive undergoing treatment, which have been admitted to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Bucharest Emergency University Hospital between 1.01.2012-31.12.2012.The bacteriological evaluation was made on cervical and vaginal cultures. Results: From a total of 173 patients, those who used probiotics oral capsules while taking an antibiotic had lower recurrence rates. More than a half of women who did not use any probiotic product had 3 or more relapse episodes per year. Vaginal capsules with probiotics have also proven to be useful in lowering the recurrence rate, but research is still needed. Conclusion: Probiotic products are proven to be a helpful adjuvant therapy for bacterial vaginosis, with no adverse outcomes. PMID:24868256

  7. Probiotics--a helpful additional therapy for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Bodean, O; Munteanu, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a condition of unknown etiology, associated with an imbalance of the normal vaginal microbiota, characterized by a high recurrence rate despite of classical therapy solutions. Probiotics are microorganisms, which taken in adequate amounts, are proven to bring health benefits in human and animal bodies, by re-establishing the normal flora at different levels. The present article studies the possibility of using probiotic treatment as an adjuvant therapy for nonspecific vaginosis and reducing its recurrence rate. We have evaluated the evolution of patients with bacterial vaginosis who received the classical antibiotic therapy and a probiotic product. The study group consisted of 173 non-pregnant, sexually active patients, 20-45 years old, with no additional health problems and no contraceptive undergoing treatment, which have been admitted to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Bucharest Emergency University Hospital between 1.01.2012-31.12.2012.The bacteriological evaluation was made on cervical and vaginal cultures. From a total of 173 patients, those who used probiotics oral capsules while taking an antibiotic had lower recurrence rates. More than a half of women who did not use any probiotic product had 3 or more relapse episodes per year. Vaginal capsules with probiotics have also proven to be useful in lowering the recurrence rate, but research is still needed. Probiotic products are proven to be a helpful adjuvant therapy for bacterial vaginosis, with no adverse outcomes.

  8. Probiotic Bacterial and Fungal Strains: Claims with Evidence.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, Hania; Konarska, Zofia; Kołodziej, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit for the host. This review summarizes current (i.e. published in the last 5 years) key evidence on probiotic efficacy and its safety in adults and children. To identify relevant data, searches of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library databases were performed in August 2015 to locate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or their meta-analyses. The focus was on commonly used, well-specified, bacterial and yeast probiotics for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The MEDLINE database was also searched for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, developed by scientific societies in the same timeframe. Data on safety of probiotics were obtained from a document developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. A number of relevant RCTs and meta-analyses are available. Saccharomyces boulardii is the most studied yeast probiotic, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is the most studied bacterial probiotic. For both, the best documented fact is their efficacy for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis, especially in children, and for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, both in adults and children. There is some evidence to support the use of probiotics to prevent or treat other diseases, such as necrotizing enterocolitis, infantile colic, Helicobacter pylori infection, and irritable bowel syndrome, but further studies are needed to identify which strain(s) is/are the most effective. Data on safety, particularly long-term safety, are limited. The risk of side effects is greater in people who have severe underlying health conditions. The evidence on bacterial and yeast probiotics has considerably expanded during recent years. Accumulated data allow one to make informed decisions about the effectiveness of probiotics and about how to reduce the use of those without proven efficacy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Bacterial and fungal microbiota in relation to probiotic therapy (VSL#3) in pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, T; Ott, S J; Helwig, U; Mimura, T; Rizzello, F; Kleessen, B; Gionchetti, P; Blaut, M; Campieri, M; Fölsch, U R; Kamm, M A; Schreiber, S

    2006-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of pouchitis, a major complication after ileal pouch anal anastomosis in patients with ulcerative colitis. Recently, controlled trials have demonstrated that probiotics are effective in maintenance of remission in pouchitis patients. However, the mechanism by which therapy with probiotics works remains elusive. This study explores the role of the bacterial and fungal flora in a controlled trial for maintenance of remission in pouchitis patients with the probiotic VSL#3 compound. Methods The mucosa associated pouch microbiota was investigated before and after therapy with VSL#3 by analysis of endoscopic biopsies using ribosomal DNA/RNA based community fingerprint analysis, clone libraries, real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Patients were recruited from a placebo controlled remission maintenance trial with VSL#3. Results Patients who developed pouchitis while treated with placebo had low bacterial and high fungal diversity. Bacterial diversity was increased and fungal diversity was reduced in patients in remission maintained with VSL#3 (p = 0.001). Real time PCR experiments demonstrated that VSL#3 increased the total number of bacterial cells (p = 0.002) and modified the spectrum of bacteria towards anaerobic species. Taxa specific clone libraries for Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria showed that the richness and spectrum of these bacteria were altered under probiotic therapy. Conclusions Probiotic therapy with VSL#3 increases the total number of intestinal bacterial cells as well as the richness and diversity of the bacterial microbiota, especially the anaerobic flora. The diversity of the fungal flora is repressed. Restoration of the integrity of a “protective” intestinal mucosa related microbiota could therefore be a potential mechanism of probiotic bacteria in inflammatory barrier diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract

  10. [Probiotic monotherapy of bacterial vaginosis: a open, randomized trial].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S; Dobrevski-Vacheva, R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to establish the clinical and microbiological efficacy of the therapy with local probiotics in the treatment of anaerobic vaginal infections and the therapy's effect upon vaginal flora. 381 (100%) women with bacterial vaginitis are included in the research. They were randomized into three groups. In the first group 143 women who were treated with local (10 applications) probiotics vaginal medicine, containing live lactobacillus types Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus. In the second group 126 patients were treated with five days oral administration of Clindamycin (tabl.x 600 mg) BID and local therapy of two vaginal ovules containing each 1000 mg Metronidazole, which were administered intravaginal every other day. In the third group 112 women were treated with the same therapy as the second group and in addition started from the day 5 after it were administered locally probiotic medicine containing Lactobacillus acidophilus u Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The efficacy of the therapeutic scheme was evaluated via comparison of patients' clinical complains in the different groups, of data from clinical examinations (Amsel) and microbiological tests (Nugent) for each patient. Thirty five-forty days after the probiotic therapy, the clinical efficacy in this group (Amsel) is 42.7% and microbiological efficacy (Gram preparation - Nugent)--41.3%. They are lower than the results which we received in the groups where the combine nitroimidazole/incozamide treatment was performed with or without local probiotic. The second group: clinical efficacy--51.6%, microbiological (Nugent)--46.4%. The highest clinical--87.5% and microbiological--80.3% efficacy showed the combine nitroimidazole/lincozamide/probiotic treatment in the third group. Our results show that the local monotherapy with probiotics has fewer efficacies in comparison to the combine therapeutic schemes for treatment of vaginal disbacteriosis with dominant anaerobic species.

  11. Bacterial vaginosis: a review on clinical trials with probiotics.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, Paola; Vitali, Beatrice; Mosca, Luciana

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal syndrome afflicting fertile, premenopausal and pregnant women. BV is associated with important adverse health conditions and infectious complications. Therapy with oral or local recommended antibiotics is often associated with failure and high rates of recurrences. The dominance of lactobacilli in healthy vaginal microbiota and its depletion in BV has given rise to the concept of oral or vaginal use of probiotic Lactobacillus strains for treatment and prevention of BV. This review investigated the evidence for the use of a single strain or cocktail of probiotics, administered orally or intravaginally, either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics for the treatment of BV. Lactobacilli use in BV is supported by positive results obtained in some clinical trials. The majority of clinical trials yielding positive results have been performed using probiotic preparations containing high doses of lactobacilli suggesting that, beside strain characteristics, the amount of exogenously applied lactobacilli could have a role in the effectiveness of the product. However, substantial heterogeneity in products, trial methodologies and outcome measures do not provide sufficient evidence for or against recommending probiotics for the treatment of BV.

  12. Probiotics in the prevention of recurrences of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Parma, Marta; Stella Vanni, Valeria; Bertini, Marco; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in women during their fertile years. BV prevalence runs from 10%-50%, in part due to the high rate of recurrence after standard treatment. Women with BV may experience a decreased quality of life and are at risk of serious obstetric complications. Limited data are available regarding optimal management strategies for preventing recurrence of BV, emphasizing the importance of the availability of a comprehensive source of scientific information and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical relevance of the recurrence of BV and to collect and review data about prophylactic approaches based on probiotic supplementation with lactobacilli (LB). A review of the literature was performed, based on combinations of the following keywords: bacterial vaginosis, bacterial vaginosis recurrences, vaginal discharge, vaginal flora, LB, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and probiotic supplementation. The studies were evaluated in terms of the cure rates for BV, incidence of recurrence of BV, decrease in patients' discomfort, maintenance of a healthy vaginal recolonization, and occurrence of complications and side effects. Recurrence of BV after standard therapy is a relevant clinical problem, with an incidence of 30%-40% and a significant impact on women's quality of life and on their risk of infrequent but serious obstetric complications. Therefore, finding effective prophylactic therapies to avoid or decrease the recurrence of BV is important. Even when they are effective, typical antibacterial regimens for long-term maintenance are known to have side effects. Different schemes of treatment with exogenous LB have proven effective in preventing recurrence of BV, even in patients at high risk for relapse. Probiotic supplementation with vaginal LB proved to be crucial in hindering bacteria growth after antibiotic therapy; therefore this intervention may be considered a new

  13. Bacterial Population in Intestines of Litopenaeus vannamei Fed Different Probiotics or Probiotic Supernatant.

    PubMed

    Sha, Yujie; Liu, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Jiang, Keyong; Qi, Cancan; Wang, Lei

    2016-10-28

    The interactions of microbiota in the gut play an important role in promoting or maintaining the health of hosts. In this study, in order to investigate and compare the effects of dietary supplementation with Lactobacillus pentosus HC-2 (HC-2), Enterococcus faecium NRW-2, or the bacteria-free supernatant of a HC-2 culture on the bacterial composition of Litopenaeus vannamei, Illumina sequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used. The results showed that unique species exclusively existed in specific dietary groups, and the abundance of Actinobacteria was significantly increased in the intestinal bacterial community of shrimp fed with the bacteria-free supernatant of an HC-2 culture compared with the control. In addition, the histology of intestines of the shrimp from the four dietary groups was also described, but no obvious improvements in the intestinal histology were observed. The findings in this work will help to promote the understanding of the roles of intestinal bacteria in shrimps when fed with probiotics or probiotic supernatant.

  14. A new risk factor for neonatal vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonisation: bacterial probiotics.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, Sevilay; Gursoy, Tugba; Ovalı, Fahri; Serce, Ozge; Karatekin, Guner

    2015-08-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonisation can be controlled with strict adherence to infection control measures. We describe a VRE outbreak coincident with bacterial probiotic trial. Relationship between probiotic and VRE colonisation, and other possible risk factors were investigated. Two hundred and ten infants with gestational age less than 32 weeks had been randomised for a trial with probiotic preparation containing Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium lactis, fructooligosaccharide, galactooligosaccharide, colostrums and lactoferrin (NBL probiotic ATP®; Nobel, Istanbul, Turkey) between February 2012 and August 2013 when a VRE outbreak also took place. The existence of a relationship between this probiotic preparation and VRE colonisation was investigated. The begining and end of the outbreak were coincident with the beginning and end of the probiotic trial. Demographic and clinical features of neonates did not differ between VRE colonised (n = 94) and non-colonised infants (n = 116) except for vancomycin (p = 0.012) and probiotic (p < 0.001) use. Probiotic and vancomycin exposure were significant risk factors for VRE colonisation. The acquisition and transfer of resistance genes of bacteria may be mediated by probiotics. Therefore, the safety of probiotics is a concern and should be investigated further.

  15. Microencapsulation of Bacterial Cells by Emulsion Technique for Probiotic Application.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Surajit; Hati, Subrota

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are dietary concepts to improve the dynamics of intestinal microbial balance favorably. Careful screening of probiotic strains for their technological suitability can also allow selection of strains with the best manufacturing and food technology characteristics. However, even the most robust probiotic bacteria are currently in the range of food applications to which they can be applied. Additionally, bacteria with exceptional functional heath properties are ruled out due to technological limitations. New process and formulation technologies will enable both expansion of the range of products in to which probiotics can be applied and the use of efficacious stains that currently cannot be manufactured or stored with existing technologies. Viability of probiotics has been both a marketing and technological concern for many industrial produces. Probiotics are difficult to work with, the bacteria often die during processing, and shelf life is unpredictable. Probiotics are extremely susceptible environmental conditions such as oxygen, processing and preservation treatments, acidity, and salt concentration, which collectively affect the overall viability of probiotics. Manufacturers have long been fortifying products with probiotics; they have faced significant processing challenges regarding the stability and survivability of probiotics during processing and preservation treatments, storage as well during their passage through GIT. Application of microencapsulation significantly improves the stability of probiotics during food processing and gastrointestinal transit.

  16. Rapid and accurate bacterial identification in probiotics and yoghurts by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Million, Matthieu; Henry, Mireille; Raoult, Didier

    2011-10-01

    Probiotic food is manufactured by adding probiotic strains simultaneously with starter cultures in fermentation tanks. Here, we investigate the accuracy and feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Probiotic food and yoghurts were cultured in Columbia and Lactobacillus specific agar and tested by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection and quantification of Lactobacillus sp. Bacterial identification was performed by MALDI-TOF analysis and by amplification and sequencing of tuf and 16S rDNA genes. We tested 13 probiotic food and yoghurts and we identified by qPCR that they presented 10(6) to 10(7) copies of Lactobacillus spp. DNA/g. All products contained very large numbers of living bacteria varying from 10(6) to 10(9) colony forming units/g. These bacteria were identified as Lactobacillus casei, Lactococcus lactis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus. MALDI-TOF MS presented 92% specificity compared to the molecular assays. In one product we found L. lactis, instead of Bifidus spp. which was mentioned on the label and for another L. delbrueckii and S. thermophilus instead of Bifidus spp. MALDI-TOF MS allows a rapid and accurate bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified. Practical Application:  MALDI-TOF MS is rapid and specific for the identification of bacteria in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Potential Bacillus probiotics enhance bacterial numbers, water quality and growth during early development of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Nimrat, Subuntith; Suksawat, Sunisa; Boonthai, Traimat; Vuthiphandchai, Verapong

    2012-10-12

    Epidemics of epizootics and occurrence of multiresistant antibiotics of pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture have put forward a development of effective probiotics for the sustainable culture. This study examined the effectiveness of forms of mixed Bacillus probiotics (probiotic A and probiotic B) and mode of probiotic administration on growth, bacterial numbers and water quality during rearing of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in two separated experiments: (1) larval stages and (2) postlarval (PL) stages. Forms of Bacillus probiotics and modes of probiotic administration did not affect growth and survival of larval to PL shrimp. The compositions of Bacillus species in probiotic A and probiotic B did not affect growth and survival of larvae. However, postlarvae treated with probiotic B exhibited higher (P<0.05) growth than probiotic A and controls, indicating Bacillus probiotic composition affects the growth of PL shrimp. Total heterotrophic bacteria and Bacillus numbers in larval and PL shrimp or culture water of the treated groups were higher (P<0.05) than in controls. Levels of pH, ammonia and nitrite of the treated shrimp were significantly decreased, compared to the controls. Microencapsulated Bacillus probiotic was effective for rearing of PL L. vannamei. This investigation showed that administration of mixed Bacillus probiotics significantly improved growth and survival of PL shrimp, increased beneficial bacteria in shrimp and culture water and enhanced water quality for the levels of pH, ammonia and nitrite of culture water.

  18. Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Gregor; Hammond, Jo-Anne

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To define the term probiotics, to indicate how to identify products that have been proven beneficial, and to assess the quality of evidence regarding probiotics. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE A few level I studies support the effectiveness of specific probiotics for certain diagnoses. For most so-called probiotics, however, weak or no evidence supports their effectiveness. MAIN MESSAGE Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Level I evidence supports use of VSL#3 for maintaining remission of inflammatory colitis. Probiotics for treating vaginal infections, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14, have level I evidence of effectiveness, but are not available in Canada. Specific probiotics taken for certain indications improve health and have few side effects. CONCLUSION Limited but good evidence supports the role of certain probiotics in medical practice. Because consumer pressure will undoubtedly stimulate further interest in probiotics, family doctors need to be informed about them so they can advise their patients appropriately. PMID:16353831

  19. Correlation between protection against sepsis by probiotic therapy and stimulation of a novel bacterial phylotype.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Timmerman, Harro M; Fuentes, Susana; van Minnen, L Paul; Panneman, Henk; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Rombouts, Frans M; Gooszen, Hein G; Akkermans, Louis M A; Smidt, Hauke; Rijkers, Ger T

    2011-11-01

    Prophylactic probiotic therapy has shown beneficial effects in an experimental rat model for acute pancreatitis on the health status of the animals. Mechanisms by which probiotic therapy interferes with severity of acute pancreatitis and associated sepsis, however, are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to identify the probiotic-induced changes in the gut microbiota and to correlate these changes to disease outcome. Duodenum and ileum samples were obtained from healthy and diseased rats subjected to pancreatitis for 7 days and prophylactically treated with either a multispecies probiotic mixture or a placebo. Intestinal microbiota was characterized by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These analyses showed that during acute pancreatitis the host-specific ileal microbiota was replaced by an "acute pancreatitis-associated microbiota." This replacement was not reversed by administration of the probiotic mixture. An increase, however, was observed in the relative abundance of a novel bacterial phylotype most closely related to Clostridium lituseburense and referred to as commensal rat ileum bacterium (CRIB). Specific primers targeting the CRIB 16S rRNA gene sequence were developed to detect this phylotype by quantitative PCR. An ileal abundance of CRIB 16S rRNA genes of more than 7.5% of the total bacterial 16S rRNA gene pool was correlated with reduced duodenal bacterial overgrowth, reduced bacterial translocation to remote organs, improved pancreas pathology, and reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma. Our current findings and future studies involving this uncharacterized bacterial phylotype will contribute to unraveling one of the potential mechanisms of probiotic therapy.

  20. Probiotics: a new way to fight bacterial pulmonary infections?

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Y; Le Blay, G; Boisramé-Gastrin, S; Le Gall, F; Héry-Arnaud, G; Gouriou, S; Vallet, S; Le Berre, R

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics, of which Fleming has identified the first representative, penicillin, in 1928, allowed dramatical improvement of the treatment of patients presenting with infectious diseases. However, once an antibiotic is used, resistance may develop more or less rapidly in some bacteria. It is thus necessary to develop therapeutic alternatives, such as the use of probiotics, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "micro-organisms which, administered live and in adequate amounts, confer a benefit to the health of the host". The scope of these micro-organisms is broad, concerning many areas including that of infectious diseases, especially respiratory infections. We describe the rational use of probiotics in respiratory tract infections and detail the results of various clinical studies describing the use of probiotics in the management of respiratory infections such as nosocomial or community acquired pneumonia, or on specific grounds such as cystic fibrosis. The results are sometimes contradictory, but the therapeutic potential of probiotics seems promising. Implementing research to understand their mechanisms of action is critical to conduct therapeutic tests based on a specific rational for the strains to be used, the dose, as well as the chosen mode and rhythm of administration.

  1. Combining prebiotics with probiotic bacteria can enhance bacterial growth and secretion of bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Pranckutė, Raminta; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kuisienė, Nomeda; Čitavičius, Donaldas J

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing interest in supporting human health by using prebiotics, such as oligosaccharides, and beneficial bacteria, also called probiotics. Combining these two components we can develop synbiotics. In order to create successful combination of synbiotic it is very important to evaluate the influence of prebiotic oligosaccharides to probiotic bacteria and their behavior, such as growth and secretion of health related biomolecules, including bacteriocins. In this study seven type strains of probiotic bacteria (five Lactobacillus sp. and two Lactococcus sp.) and two Lactobacillus sp. strains, isolated from probiotic yoghurt, were cultivated with various commercially available and extracted oligosaccharides (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of these OS on type and isolated bacterial strains growth and antibacterial activity. Obtained results suggest that combination of certain OS with probiotic strains may considerably improve their growth and/or antibacterial activity. We also determined the antibacterial activity spectrum of investigated strains with combination of OS against common food borne pathogens. Results of this work show that prebiotic OS can be useful for modulating probiotic bacteria growth, antibacterial activity and even specificity of this activity.

  2. Probiotics and diseases of altered IgE regulation: A short review.

    PubMed

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Bluth, Martin H

    2016-01-01

    The use of probiotics has gained considerable popularity in the marketplace in the US and has been steadily increasing due to consumer interest in potential treatment of various diseases, which may be due to modulation of immune responses. The aim of this review is to present information from representative studies regarding some of the possible applications and clinical effects of probiotic use in diseases of altered immunoglobulin (IgE) regulation (allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, atopic dermatitis (AD) and food sensitization). Reports in humans are sparse or controversial; there is currently little reliable scientific data that supports the theory that there exists a cause-effect relationship between taking probiotics and alleviation of allergic disease. Unfortunately, these findings are too variable to allow substantial conclusions as to the efficacy and effectiveness of probiotic use in these disease states.

  3. Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model for assessing the protective activity of probiotics against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Nardis, Chiara; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    The antagonistic activity against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens is an important property of probiotic bacteria and a desirable feature for pre-selection of novel strains with probiotic potential. Pre-screening of candidate probiotics for antibacterial activity should be based on in vitro and in vivo tests. This study investigated whether the protective activity of probiotic bacteria against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens can be evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae as an in vivo model. Larvae were pre-inoculated with either of two widely used probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Clostridium butyricum Miyairi 588, and then challenged with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli or Listeria monocytogenes. Survival rates increased in the probiotic pretreated larvae compared with control larvae inoculated with pathogens only. The hemocyte density increased as well in the probiotic pretreated larvae, indicating that both probiotics induce an immune response in the larvae. The antibacterial activity of probiotics against the pathogens was also assayed by an in vitro agar spot test: results were partially consistent with those obtained by the G. mellonella protection assay. The results obtained, as a whole, suggest that G. mellonella larvae are a potentially useful in vivo model that can complement in vitro assays for pre-screening of candidate probiotics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Alterations in fecal microbiota composition by probiotic supplementation in healthy adults: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Nadja B; Bryrup, Thomas; Allin, Kristine H; Nielsen, Trine; Hansen, Tue H; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-05-10

    The effects of probiotic supplementation on fecal microbiota composition in healthy adults have not been well established. We aimed to provide a systematic review of the potential evidence for an effect of probiotic supplementation on the composition of human fecal microbiota as assessed by high-throughput molecular approaches in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of healthy adults. The survey of peer-reviewed papers was performed on 17 August 2015 by a literature search through PubMed, SCOPUS, and ISI Web of Science. Additional papers were identified by checking references of relevant papers. Search terms included healthy adult, probiotic, bifidobacterium, lactobacillus, gut microbiota, fecal microbiota, intestinal microbiota, intervention, and (clinical) trial. RCTs of solely probiotic supplementation and placebo in healthy adults that examined alteration in composition of overall fecal microbiota structure assessed by shotgun metagenomic sequencing, 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, or phylogenetic microarray methods were included. Independent collection and quality assessment of studies were performed by two authors using predefined criteria including methodological quality assessment of reports of the clinical trials based on revised tools from PRISMA/Cochrane and by the Jadad score. Seven RCTs investigating the effect of probiotic supplementation on fecal microbiota in healthy adults were identified and included in the present systematic review. The quality of the studies was assessed as medium to high. Still, no effects were observed on the fecal microbiota composition in terms of α-diversity, richness, or evenness in any of the included studies when compared to placebo. Only one study found that probiotic supplementation significantly modified the overall structure of the fecal bacterial community in terms of β-diversity when compared to placebo. This systematic review of the pertinent literature demonstrates a lack of evidence for an impact of probiotics on

  5. Probiotic Activity of a Bacterial Strain Isolated from Ancient Permafrost Against Salmonella Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fursova, O; Potapov, V; Brouchkov, A; Pogorelko, G; Griva, G; Fursova, N; Ignatov, S

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strain F, collected from relict permafrost located in Siberia, was analyzed for probiotic activity in the mouse Salmonella enterica model. Viable bacterial cells were found in frozen soils taken at Mammoth Mountain in Yakutia from a depth below the level of seasonal thawing. Geological data indicated the absence of a thawing within millions of years of deposited soils, which helped to ensure the ancient origin of our sample. According to DNA analysis, bacterial cells collected from the relict permafrost appeared to be B. cereus strain F. The morphology of these bacteria was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. B. cereus strain F was assessed as a nonpathogenic bacterium by evaluation of its pathogenicity. A S. enterica model is described in mice after per oral inoculation and serves as a model for the human carrier state. Using this model, probiotic activity by the bacterial strain isolated from the ancient permafrost has been shown against Salmonella infection in mice.

  6. Occurrence of selected bacterial groups in the faeces of piglets fed with Bacillus coagulans as probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adami, A; Cavazzoni, V

    1999-01-01

    A microbiological analysis of piglet faeces was performed on samples collected from animals fed a diet without any additive, animals fed a diet that contained Bacillus coagulans CNCMI-1061 as probiotic, and animals fed a diet that contained Zn-bacitracin. The analysis was carried out in concurrence with a zootechnical trial. Selected bacterial groups (lactic acid bacteria, lacotococci, enterococci, aerobic and anaerobic cocci, total and faecal coliforms, clostridia, bacteroides, bifidobacteria) were determined at day 1 and after 1, 4 and 10 weeks of life. Numbers of enterococci, coliforms (especially faecal coliforms) showed a decrease over time with probiotic, more evident than with the antibiotic. Daily administration of B. coagulans allowed this bacterium to become integrated into the enteric microflora where it is transient. These results seem to show a positive effect of B. coagulans addition on cocci and faecal coliforms. We suggest that this probiotic may represent an alternative to antibiotics.

  7. Bacterial composition of commercial probiotic products as evaluated by PCR-DGGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Sara; Marzotto, Marta; Rizzotti, Lucia; Rossi, Franca; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2003-01-26

    The use of Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique in identifying the microorganisms present in commercial probiotic yoghurts and lyophilised products was evaluated. Two reference ladders were assembled constituted by PCR-amplified V2-V3 regions of 16S rDNA from bacterial species generally used as probiotics. Identification was achieved comparing the PCR-DGGE patterns obtained from the analysed products with the ladder bands. Bands from members of the same species showed the same migration distance in denaturing gel, hence supporting the identificative value of the method. The validity of the technique was also proven confirming the PCR-DGGE identification results by sequence data analysis and by species-specific PCR. General congruence between microorganisms declared on the label and those revealed by PCR-DGGE was found for probiotic yoghurts. Conversely, some discrepancies were observed for probiotic lyophilised preparations, i.e. the incorrect identification of some Bifidobacterium and Bacillus species and the presence of not declared microorganisms. PCR-DGGE turned out to be an appropriate culture-independent approach for a rapid detection of the predominant species in mixed probiotic cultures.

  8. Improving survival of probiotic bacteria using bacterial poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A R; Irorere, V U; Bartlett, T; Hill, D; Kedia, G; Charalampopoulos, D; Nualkaekul, S; Radecka, I

    2015-03-02

    A major hurdle in producing a useful probiotic food product is bacterial survival during storage and ingestion. The aim of this study was to test the effect of γ-PGA immobilisation on the survival of probiotic bacteria when stored in acidic fruit juice. Fruit juices provide an alternative means of probiotic delivery, especially to lactose intolerant individuals. In addition, the survival of γ-PGA-immobilised cells in simulated gastric juice was also assessed. Bifidobacteria strains (Bifidobacteria longum, Bifidobacteria breve), immobilised on 2.5% γ-PGA, survived significantly better (P<0.05) in orange and pomegranate juice for 39 and 11 days respectively, compared to free cells. However, cells survived significantly better (P<0.05) when stored in orange juice compared to pomegranate juice. Moreover, both strains, when protected with 2.5% γ-PGA, survived in simulated gastric juice (pH2.0) with a marginal reduction (<0.47 log CFU/ml) or no significant reduction in viable cells after 4h, whereas free cells died within 2h. In conclusion, this research indicates that γ-PGA can be used to protect Bifidobacteria cells in fruit juice, and could also help improve the survival of cells as they pass through the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Following our previous report on the use of γ-PGA as a cryoprotectant for probiotic bacteria, this research further suggests that γ-PGA could be used to improve probiotic survival during the various stages of preparation, storage and ingestion of probiotic cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The restoration of the vaginal microbiota after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with metronidazole or probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Weiguang; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Xia, Yaxian; Nelson, Karen E; Huang, Shaolei; Zhang, Shaoen; Wang, Yuezhu; Yuan, Jieli; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    Whether or not treatment with antibiotics or probiotics for bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a change in the diversity of vaginal microbiota in women was investigated. One hundred fifteen women, consisting of 30 healthy subjects, 30 BV-positive control subjects, 30 subjects with BV treated with a 7-day metronidazole regimen, and 25 subjects with BV treated with a 10-day probiotics regimen, were analyzed to determine the efficacy and disparity of diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing. Follow-up visits at days 5 and 30 showed a greater BV cure rate in the probiotics-treated subjects (88.0 and 96 %, respectively) compared to the metronidazole-treated subjects (83.3 and 70 %, respectively [p = 0.625 at day 5 and p = 0.013 at day 30]). Treatment with metronidazole reduced the taxa diversity and eradicated most of the BV-associated phylotypes, while probiotics only suppressed the overgrowth and re-established vaginal homeostasis gradually and steadily. Despite significant interindividual variation, the microbiota of the actively treated groups or participants constituted a unique profile. Along with the decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Coriobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Mycoplasma, and Sneathia, a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota was recovered. Acting as vaginal sentinels and biomarkers, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria determined the consistency of the BV clinical and microbiologic cure rates, as well as recurrent BV. Both 7-day intravaginal metronidazole and 10-day intravaginal probiotics have good efficacy against BV, while probiotics maintained normal vaginal microbiota longer due to effective and steady vaginal microbiota restoration, which provide new insights into BV treatment.

  10. Probiotic yogurt in the elderly with intestinal bacterial overgrowth: endotoxaemia and innate immune functions.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Eduardo J; Parlesak, Alexandr; Bode, Christiane; Bode, J Christian; van't Hof, Martin A; Grathwohl, Dominik; Guigoz, Yves

    2009-04-01

    A study was conducted in healthy elderly living independently in senior housing to assess the impact of a probiotic yoghurt supplement on small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Twenty-three participants with positive and thirteen participants with negative hydrogen breath test were studied before and after a period of 4 weeks of probiotic yoghurt administration. Intestinal permeability, plasma endotoxin levels, phagocytic activity of leucocytes, cytokine production by monocytes and free radical response of neutrophils were determined. Intestinal permeability was similar for the two groups and was unaffected by probiotic treatment. Both plasma endotoxin levels and the basal phagocytic activity of leucocytes decreased after yoghurt intake in the two groups. Exposure of monocytes and neutrophils ex vivo led to an increased cytokine response and free radical response, respectively. The normalisation of the various cytokine responses was more apparent in the group with positive breath test. In addition, the plasma levels of lipoplysaccharide binding protein and soluble CD14, lipoplysaccharide pattern recognition receptors and surrogate markers of lipoplysaccharide permeability were diminished by the end of the study. In conclusion, probiotic administration in the elderly normalises the response to endotoxin, and modulates activation markers in blood phagocytes, and therefore may help reduce low-grade chronic inflammation.

  11. Proteomics as a Quality Control Tool of Pharmaceutical Probiotic Bacterial Lysate Products

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Günter; Schanstra, Joost P.; Hoffmann, Janosch; Mischak, Harald; Siwy, Justyna; Zimmermann, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have a wide range of applications in veterinary and human therapeutics. Inactivated probiotics are complex samples and quality control (QC) should measure as many molecular features as possible. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE/MS) has been used as a multidimensional and high throughput method for the identification and validation of biomarkers of disease in complex biological samples such as biofluids. In this study we evaluate the suitability of CE/MS to measure the consistency of different lots of the probiotic formulation Pro-Symbioflor which is a bacterial lysate of heat-inactivated Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Over 5000 peptides were detected by CE/MS in 5 different lots of the bacterial lysate and in a sample of culture medium. 71 to 75% of the total peptide content was identical in all lots. This percentage increased to 87–89% when allowing the absence of a peptide in one of the 5 samples. These results, based on over 2000 peptides, suggest high similarity of the 5 different lots. Sequence analysis identified peptides of both E. coli and E. faecalis and peptides originating from the culture medium, thus confirming the presence of the strains in the formulation. Ontology analysis suggested that the majority of the peptides identified for E. coli originated from the cell membrane or the fimbrium, while peptides identified for E. faecalis were enriched for peptides originating from the cytoplasm. The bacterial lysate peptides as a whole are recognised as highly conserved molecular patterns by the innate immune system as microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP). Sequence analysis also identified the presence of soybean, yeast and casein protein fragments that are part of the formulation of the culture medium. In conclusion CE/MS seems an appropriate QC tool to analyze complex biological products such as inactivated probiotic formulations and allows determining the similarity between lots. PMID

  12. Probiotics in allergy management.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoof, Jon A

    2008-11-01

    The gut contains a diverse bacterial flora that is acquired at birth and has a number of physiological functions. Administration of prebiotics or probiotics may favourably alter this gut microflora. Prebiotics are poorly digested oligosaccharides that promote the growth of desirable bacteria and may have other beneficial gastrointestinal and systemic effects. Probiotics are "helpful" human bacteria that provide a variety of health benefits when administered exogenously. Probiotics produce beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of traveller's diarrhoea, viral diarrhoea, and diarrhoea in day care centres. Moreover, probiotics have been shown to reduce relapses associated with Clostridium difficile, and Lactobacilli are effective in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Probiotics may also be efficacious in the treatment of gastroenteritis. Clinical studies of probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease have proved disappointing, but beneficial effects in adults with irritable bowel syndrome have been reported with Bifidobacterium infantis 35624. Lactobacilli GG reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms and gut permeability in patients with atopic dermatitis, and administration of probiotics reduces the frequency and severity of atopic eczema when administered to pregnant women and then to newborn infants. In conclusion, probiotics are effective in the treatment and/or prevention of a number of conditions, including diarrhoea, irritable bowel syndrome and atopic dermatitis, and the product used should be selected based on the particular indication.

  13. Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 biofilms on silicone substrates for bacterial interference against pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Zhu, Zhiling; Wang, Jun; Lopez, Analette I; Li, Siheng; Kumar, Amit; Yu, Fei; Chen, Haoqing; Cai, Chengzhi; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial interference is an alternative strategy to fight against device-associated bacterial infections. Pursuing this strategy, a non-pathogenic bacterial biofilm is used as a live, protective barrier to fence off pathogen colonization. In this work, biofilms formed by probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) are investigated for their potential for long-term bacterial interference against infections associated with silicone-based urinary catheters and indwelling catheters used in the digestive system, such as feeding tubes and voice prostheses. We have shown that EcN can form stable biofilms on silicone substrates, particularly those modified with a biphenyl mannoside derivative. These biofilms greatly reduced the colonization by pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis in Lysogeny broth (LB) for 11days.

  14. [Probiotics in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Soriano, Germán; Sánchez, Elisabet; Guarner, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in intestinal microbiota and inflammatory response play a key role in disease progression and development of complications in liver diseases, mainly in cirrhosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Probiotics can be useful to delay disease progression and to prevent development of complications due to their ability to modulate intestinal flora, intestinal permeability and inflammatory response. Several studies have shown the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy and the prevention of episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy. Probiotics have also been observed to prevent postoperative bacterial infections and to improve liver damage in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, more studies are needed in order to confirm the efficacy and safety of probiotics in patients with liver diseases, and to better understanding of the mechanisms implicated in their effects.

  15. [Efficacy of combined 5-nitroimidazole and probiotic therapy of bacterial vaginosis: randomized open trial].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S; Vatcheva-Dobrevski, R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to identify the clinical and microbiological effect of 5-nitroimidazol therapy for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and in combination with probiotics and the influence of such therapy upon vaginal flora. Women (n = 539) with bacterial vaginosis who meet the criteria were included in the study. They were randomized into two groups with the following therapeutic regimes: in the first group (n = 242 women) the treatment included applications of 2g BID tinidazole for two days and vaginal suppositories of 1000 mg metronidazol at day 1 and 3 (T+M). In the second group (n = 297) the women were cured with the same treatment as those in the first group. In addition to it from the fifth day of the treatment was added a topical administration of vaginal probiotic which contains species of alive lactobacilli: Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (T+M+P). The efficacy from the therapy was evaluated using the clinical compliances of the women, the data from the clinical examination and the microbiological tests results. The results showed expected increase of clinical therapy efficacy (Amsel - criteria) from 42.8% (T+M; n = 211/242) to 84.06% (T+M+P; n = 274/297) in groups and of microbiological efficacy (Nugent) from 44.7% (T+M; n = 211/242) to 83.3% (T+M+P; n = 274/297), in follow up 35-40 days from the beginning of treatment. The percentage of women with normal vaginal flora on 35-40 day after the therapy increase with 57% in the (T+M) first group while in the second group (T+M+P) with 94%. Combining the therapies of 5-nitroimidazoles and vaginal probiotic reduce bacterial vaginosis recurrence and restores permanently normal vaginal flora.

  16. Acute oral toxicity and bacterial translocation studies on potentially probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Shu, Q; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-01-01

    Three potentially probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20(TM)), Lb. acidophilus HN017 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10()), have recently been identified and characterized. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute oral toxicity of these strains to mice, and also to investigate bacterial translocation and gut mucosal pathology in BALB/c mice fed HN019, HN001 or HN017 for 8 consecutive days at a high dose of 10(11)cfu/mouse/day. Results showed that these probiotic strains had no adverse effect on general health status, feed intake, body weight gain and intestinal mucosal morphology (villus height, crypt depth, epithelial cell height and mucosal thickness). No viable bacteria were recovered from blood and tissue samples (mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and spleen) of mice, and no treatment-associated illness or death was observed. According to these results, the oral LD(50) of HN019, HN001 and HN017 is more than 50g/kg/day for mice, and their acceptable daily intake (ADI) value is 35g dry bacteria per day for a 70-kg person. This suggests that the probiotic strains HN019, HN001 and HN017 are non-pathogenic and likely to be safe for human consumption.

  17. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from probiotic products available in Italy.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Ilaria; Speciale, Annamaria; Musumeci, Rosario; Fazio, Davide; Blandino, Giovanna

    2006-10-01

    This study was carried out to assay the bacterial viability and the probable contamination of a range of probiotic products available in Italy and to test the susceptibility of the isolates. Eleven dried food supplements and five fermented functional foods were examined using different isolation media under standardized cultivation conditions. The identification was made by conventional phenotypic characteristics and biochemical tests. Among isolates from the probiotic products antibiotic susceptibility was detected using the E-test (ABBiodisk). Our results demonstrate that nine food supplements and two fermented foods claimed species which could not be isolated, whereas potential pathogens (i.e. Micromonas micros) were isolated. Lactobacilli displayed species-dependent antibiotic resistance. Atypical resistance occurred for penicillin in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus and for erythromycin in Lactobacillus lactis and Lactobacillus salivarius. A broad range of MICs was observed for cephalosporins and fluroquinolones. Aminoglycosides had poor activity against Lactobacillus isolates. Two of the four isolates of Bifidobacterium exhibited high resistance to trimethroprim/sulfametoxazole and to fluoroquinolones. Our results suggest that some probiotic products claim species that cannot always be isolated, and are sometimes contaminated by potential pathogens. Moreover, the probable transferable erythromycin or penicillin resistance among the lactobacilli isolated should be taken into account.

  18. The potential for probiotics to prevent bacterial vaginosis and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Reid, Gregor; Bocking, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Infections of the urogenital tract in women represent a major burden on the quality of life of women and on the health care system of Canada and other countries. Complications arising from bacterial vaginosis (BV) include increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases including human immunodeficiency virus and elevated risk of preterm birth (PTB). Pharmaceutical interventions, such as antibiotics, have been suboptimally effective and have failed to reduce the incidence of PTB. The absence of lactobacilli in the vagina, a specific feature of BV, raises the question as to whether restoration of lactobacilli, by probiotic therapy, can restore the normal flora and improve the chances of having a healthy term pregnancy. The rationale for probiotic use in pregnant women is quite strong. Certain lactobacilli strains can safely colonize the vagina after oral and vaginal administration, displace and kill pathogens including Gardnerella vaginalis and Escherichia coli, and modulate the immune response to interfere with the inflammatory cascade that leads to PTB. Additional attributes of probiotics include their potential to degrade lipids and enhance cytokine levels, which promote embryo development. In a society that focuses on disease rather than health and drug therapy rather than natural preventive measures, it will take some effort to get remedies such as probiotics into mainstream care. Perhaps the escalating health care budgets and emergence of "superbugs" will provide the incentives to put in place clinical trials designed to evaluate how best to use the commensal organisms that, after all, make up more of our body than human cells, and without which none of us would survive.

  19. VSL#3 probiotic treatment decreases bacterial translocation in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elisabet; Nieto, Juan C; Boullosa, Ana; Vidal, Silvia; Sancho, Francesc J; Rossi, Giacomo; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Oms, Rosa; Mirelis, Beatriz; Juárez, Cándido; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Probiotics can prevent pathological bacterial translocation in cirrhosis by modulating intestinal microbiota and improving gut barrier and immune disturbances. To evaluate the effect of probiotic VSL#3 on bacterial translocation, intestinal microbiota, gut barrier and inflammatory response in rats with experimental cirrhosis. Forty-six Sprague-Dawley rats with CCl4 -induced cirrhosis were randomized into two groups: VSL#3 group (n = 22) that received VSL#3 in drinking water, and water group (n = 24) that received water only. Treatment began at week 6 of cirrhosis induction and continued until laparotomy, performed 1 week after development of ascites or at week 20. A control group included 11 healthy rats. At this study end, we evaluated bacterial translocation, intestinal flora, intestinal barrier (ileal claudin-2 and 4, β-defensin-1, occludin and malondialdehyde as index of oxidative damage) and serum cytokines. Mortality during this study was similar in the VSL#3 group (10/22, 45%) and the water group (10/24, 42%) (P = 1). The incidence of bacterial translocation was 1/12 (8%) in the VSL#3 group, 7/14 (50%) in the water group (P = 0.03 vs. VSL#3 group) and 0/11 in the control group (P = 0.008 vs. water group). The concentration of ileal and caecal enterobacteria and enterococci was similar in the two groups of cirrhotic rats. The ileal occludin concentration was higher and ileal malondialdehyde and serum levels of TNF-α were lower in the VSL#3 group than in the water group (P < 0.05). VSL#3 decreases bacterial translocation, the pro-inflammatory state and ileal oxidative damage and increases ileal occludin expression in rats with experimental cirrhosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Investigation of the effects of probiotic bacteria on bacterial translocation that developed during diagnostic laparoscopy: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Sahin, Idris; Acar, Selda; Ozaydın, Ismet; Ozaydın, Ciğdem; Calışkan, Emel; Yavuz, Mehmet Tevfik; Iskender, Abdulkadir

    2012-10-01

    Probiotics which are non-pathogenic live microorganisms ingested along with food or as dietary supplements, are thought to be beneficial to the host by supporting the microbial balance in digestive system. Various studies suggest that the effects of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa and immunity are protective against bacterial translocation. We aimed to investigate bacterial translocation related to the amount of CO2 insufflation given during laparoscopy and the effect of probiotic bacteria in an experimental peritonitis model. In this study 60 Wistar rats were used in six groups consisting of 10 rats. Group 1, 3 and 5 consisted of the rats that were fed without probiotics, while the rats in Group 2, 4, and 6 were fed with water containing 5 x 108 cfu/ml probiotic bacteria complex (Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus) for 15 days. To generate experimental peritonitis, 2 x 107 cfu/ml Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was inoculated intraperitoneally to all of the rats. Thereafter, laparoscopy was applied in all groups. Application in Group 1 and Group 2 was without CO2; Group 3 and Group 4 with 14 mmHg CO2 insufflation, and Group 5 and Group 6 with 20 mmHg CO2 insufflation. Blood samples were taken in 2nd, 4th, and 6th hours. Mesenteric lymph node, liver and spleen samples were taken at 6th hour when the rats were sacrificed and then these were evaluated microbiologically with qualitative and quantitative methods. Bacterial translocation and bacteremia were found in the rats that were undergone experimental peritonitis during laparoscopy. All positive tissue and blood cultures yielded E.coli. The highest level of bacterial translocation was found to be in mesenteric lymph nodes (in 3/10, 6/10 and 10/10 in groups 1, 3 and 5 fed without probiotics, respectively; in 2/10, 3/10 and 4/10 in groups 2, 4 and 6 fed with probiotics, respectively). The bacterial translocation rates were found to be related to the increased CO2

  1. Formula fortified with live probiotic culture reduces pulmonary and gastrointestinal bacterial colonization and translocation in a newborn animal model.

    PubMed

    McVay, Marcene R; Boneti, Cristiano; Habib, Christine M; Keller, Jennifer E; Kokoska, Evan R; Jackson, Richard J; Smith, Samuel D

    2008-01-01

    Acidified diets are protective against intestinal bacterial colonization and translocation. Probiotic diets are designed to modulate the intestinal flora to enhance mucosal immunity. This study was designed to determine if formula acidified with live probiotic decreases bacterial gut colonization and translocation, and is equally tolerated as other acidified diets. One hundred twenty-eight rabbit pups delivered via cesarean section [cesarean delivery, cesarean birth, abdominal delivery] were randomly assigned to 4 feeding groups: NAN Nestle (control, pH 7.0), NAN acidified with citric acid (pH 4.55), biologically acidified Pelargon (pH 4.55), and NAN with live Lactococcus lactis culture (pH 4.2). Pups were gavage fed every 12 hours with Enterobacter cloacae challenges of 10 colony-forming units/mL per feed and killed on day of life 3. Lungs, liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), stomach, and cecum were cultured and quantitatively analyzed for target organism growth. Results were analyzed using chi(2) tests. NAN with live probiotic culture, when compared with Pelargon, acidified NAN, and NAN, significantly reduced the incidence of Enterobacter pulmonary colonization (P < .01), bacterial translocation (liver, P < .025; spleen and MLN, P < .05), and gastric and intestinal colonization (P < .001 for both). Probiotic-fortified formula provides superior protection against pulmonary and gastrointestinal bacterial colonization and translocation compared with neutral and acidified formulas, and is equally tolerated.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain BPL5 (CECT 8800), a Probiotic for Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Codoñer, Francisco M.; Martinez-Blanch, Juan F.; Ramón, Daniel; Menabrito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus BPL5 (CECT 8800), is a probiotic strain suitable for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Here, we report its complete genome sequence deciphered by PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. Analysis of the sequence may provide insight into its functional activity. PMID:27103719

  3. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by bacterial probiotic supplementation during induced lactic and subacute acidosis in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ruminal disbiosis induced by feeding is the cause of ruminal acidosis, a digestive disorder prevalent in high-producing ruminants. Because probiotic microorganisms can modulate the gastrointestinal microbiota, propionibacteria- and lactobacilli-based probiotics were tested for their effectiveness in preventing different forms of acidosis. Results Lactic acidosis, butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) were induced by feed chalenges in three groups of four wethers intraruminally dosed with wheat, corn or beet pulp. In each group, wethers were either not supplemented (C) or supplemented with Propionibacterium P63 alone (P) or combined with L. plantarum (Lp + P) or L. rhamnosus (Lr + P). Compared with C, all the probiotics stimulated lactobacilli proliferation, which reached up to 25% of total bacteria during wheat-induced lactic acidosis. This induced a large increase in lactate concentration, which decreased ruminal pH. During the corn-induced butyric SARA, Lp + P decreased Prevotella spp. proportion with a concomitant decrease in microbial amylase activity and total volatile fatty acids concentration, and an increase in xylanase activity and pH. Relative to the beet pulp-induced propionic SARA, P and Lr + P improved ruminal pH without affecting the microbial or fermentation characteristics. Regardless of acidosis type, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that probiotic supplementations modified the bacterial community structure. Conclusion This work showed that the effectiveness of the bacterial probiotics tested depended on the acidosis type. Although these probiotics were ineffective in lactic acidosis because of a deeply disturbed rumen microbiota, some of the probiotics tested may be useful to minimize the occurrence of butyric and propionic SARA in sheep. However, their modes of action need to be further investigated. PMID:22812531

  4. Screening of Lactobacillus strains of domestic goose origin against bacterial poultry pathogens for use as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of human and animal mucous membranes, including the avian gastrointestinal tract. Recently, increasing attention has been given to their probiotic, health-promoting capacities, among which their antagonistic potential against pathogens plays a key role. A study was conducted to evaluate probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from feces or cloacae of domestic geese. Among the 104 examined isolates, previously identified to the species level by whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and analysis of 16S-23S regions of rDNA, dominated Lactobacillus salivarius (35%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18%) and Lactobacillus ingluviei (11%). All lactobacilli were screened for antimicrobial activity toward Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, and Riemerella anatipestifer using the agar slab method and the well diffusion method. Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum exhibited particularly strong antagonism toward all of the indicator strains. In the agar slab method, the highest sensitivity to Lactobacillus was observed in R. anatipestifer and P. multocida, and the lowest in E. coli and S. aureus. The ability to produce H₂O₂was exhibited by 92% of isolates, but there was no correlation between the rate of production of this reactive oxygen species and the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus sp. All lactobacilli showed resistance to pH 3.0 and 3.5 and to 2% bile. The data demonstrate that Lactobacillus isolates from geese may have probiotic potential in reducing bacterial infections. The antibacterial activity of the selected lactobacilli is mainly due to lactic acid production by these bacteria. The selected Lactobacillus strains that strongly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria, and were also resistant to low pH and bile salts, can potentially restore the balance

  5. Bacterial counts from five over-the-counter probiotics: are you getting what you paid for?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Claros, Marina C; Tyrrell, Kerin L

    2014-02-01

    There is concern that the bacterial colony counts present at the time of manufacture and listed on the probiotic package may not be reflective of the numbers viable colonies at the time of purchase and patient consumption thereby diminishing efficacy. We performed a colony count study of three separate samples of five different probiotics purchased from three different stores: Bifidobacterium infantis (Align(®)); Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285(®) and Lactobacillus casei LBC80R(®) (Bio-K+(®)); Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (Culturelle(®)); Saccharomyces boulardii (Florastor(®)) and "L. acidophilus" and "Lactobacillus helveticus" (Lactinex(®)). Approximately 1 g of powder of each (Lactinex(®) tablets were crushed before testing) was reconstituted in sterile distilled water, serial 10-fold dilutions were prepared and plated in duplicate onto blood agar plates, with incubation for 48 h in an anaerobic chamber (except the Saccharomyces which was incubated aerobically) after which colony counts were performed. The Florastor(®) packaging did not state an expected concentration and was found to have 9.2 × 10(9)-1.3 × 10(10) CFU/g. Lactinex(®), Align(®), Bio-K+(®), and Culturelle(®) had viable colony counts that were similar to those stated on the package. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probiotics Improve Inflammation-Associated Sickness Behavior by Altering Communication between the Peripheral Immune System and the Brain.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Charlotte; Ronaghan, Natalie; Zaheer, Raza; Dicay, Michael; Le, Tai; MacNaughton, Wallace K; Surrette, Michael G; Swain, Mark G

    2015-07-29

    Patients with systemic inflammatory diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic liver disease) commonly develop debilitating symptoms (i.e., sickness behaviors) that arise from changes in brain function. The microbiota-gut-brain axis alters brain function and probiotic ingestion can influence behavior. However, how probiotics do this remains unclear. We have previously described a novel periphery-to-brain communication pathway in the setting of peripheral organ inflammation whereby monocytes are recruited to the brain in response to systemic TNF-α signaling, leading to microglial activation and subsequently driving sickness behavior development. Therefore, we investigated whether probiotic ingestion (i.e., probiotic mixture VSL#3) alters this periphery-to-brain communication pathway, thereby reducing subsequent sickness behavior development. Using a well characterized mouse model of liver inflammation, we now show that probiotic (VSL#3) treatment attenuates sickness behavior development in mice with liver inflammation without affecting disease severity, gut microbiota composition, or gut permeability. Attenuation of sickness behavior development was associated with reductions in microglial activation and cerebral monocyte infiltration. These events were paralleled by changes in markers of systemic immune activation, including decreased circulating TNF-α levels. Our observations highlight a novel pathway through which probiotics mediate cerebral changes and alter behavior. These findings allow for the potential development of novel therapeutic interventions targeted at the gut microbiome to treat inflammation-associated sickness behaviors in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases. This research shows that probiotics, when eaten, can improve the abnormal behaviors (including social withdrawal and immobility) that are commonly associated with inflammation. Probiotics are able to cause this effect within the body by changing how

  7. Probiotics for Preventing and Treating Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Changqing; Qu, Changmin; Wang, Baoyan; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun

    2017-04-01

    The present study conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review of current evidence to assess the efficacy of probiotics in preventing or treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Relevant studies from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, until May 2016, were assimilated. The prevention efficacy was assessed by the incidence of SIBO in the probiotic group, and the treatment efficacy by the SIBO decontamination rate, reduction in H2 concentration, and symptom improvement. The relative risk (RR) and weighted mean difference (WMD) were used as effect measures and the random-effects model used for meta-analysis. A total of 14 full-text articles and 8 abstracts were included for the systematic review, and 18 studies were eligible for data synthesis. Patients on probiotic usage showed an insignificant trend toward low SIBO incidence [RR=0.54; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.19-1.52; P=0.24]. The pooled SIBO decontamination rate was 62.8% (51.5% to 72.8%). The probiotics group showed a significantly higher SIBO decontamination rate than the nonprobiotic group (RR=1.61; 95% CI, 1.19-2.17; P<0.05). Also, the H2 concentration was significantly reduced among probiotic users (WMD=-36.35 ppm; 95% CI, -44.23 to -28.47 ppm; P<0.05). Although probiotics produced a marked decrease in the abdominal pain scores (WMD=-1.17; 95% CI, -2.30 to -0.04; P<0.05), it did not significantly reduce the daily stool frequency (WMD=-0.09; 95% CI, -0.47 to 0.29). Therefore, the present findings indicated that probiotics supplementation could effectively decontaminate SIBO, decrease H2 concentration, and relieve abdominal pain, but were ineffective in preventing SIBO.

  8. Effect of dietary probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations in broilers.

    PubMed

    Salehimanesh, A; Mohammadi, M; Roostaei-Ali Mehr, M

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of probiotic (Primalac), prebiotic (TechnoMos) and synbiotic (Primalac + TechnoMos) supplementation on performance, immune responses, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum in broilers. A total of 240 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into four treatment groups which included 60 birds. Control group did not receive any treatment. The chicks in the second, third and fourth groups were fed probiotic (0.9 g/kg), prebiotic (0.9 g/kg) and probiotic (0.9 g/kg) plus probiotic (0.9 g/kg; synbiotic), respectively, at entire period. Daily feed intake, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio were evaluated. The birds were immunized by sheep red blood cell (SRBC) on days 12 and 29 of age and serum antibody titres were measured on days 28, 35 and 42. Newcastle vaccines administered on days 9, 18 and 27 to chicks and blood samples were collected on day 42. Intestinal morphometric assessment and enumeration of intestinal bacterial populations were performed on day 42. The results indicated that consumption of probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic had no significant effect on daily feed intake, daily body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, carcass traits, intestinal morphology and bacterial populations of ileum (p > 0.05). Consumption of prebiotic increased total and IgM anti-SRBC titres on days 28 and 42 and antibody titre against Newcastle virus disease on day 42 (p < 0.05). Synbiotic increased only total anti-SRBC on day 28 (p < 0.05). It is concluded that consumption of prebiotic increased humoral immunity in broilers. Therefore, supplementation of diet with prebiotic for improvement of humoral immune responses is superior to synbiotic supplementation. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. [Role of probiotics in Obstetrics and Gynecology].

    PubMed

    Castro, A; González, M; Tarín, J J; Cano, A

    2015-02-07

    The human microbiota is estimated to be 2.5-3.0 kg. Bacterial colonization starts during delivery, due to fetal contact with vaginal and intestinal maternal microorganisms. The oligosaccharides in human breast milk stimulate the growth of bacteria, which provide the optimal environment for intestinal mucosal immunity development. Additionally, breast milk has its own microbiota and it is altered in mastitis. The vagina is another important microenvironment. Vaginal dysbiosis leads to bacterial vaginosis and vaginal candidiasis, both of them very frequent in reproductive life. The probiotics are a potential and encouraging treatment for all microbiota alterations. Nevertheless, additional studies are required to confirm the benefits of probiotics.

  10. Randomised clinical trial: the effects of a multispecies probiotic vs. placebo on innate immune function, bacterial translocation and gut permeability in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Horvath, A; Leber, B; Schmerboeck, B; Tawdrous, M; Zettel, G; Hartl, A; Madl, T; Stryeck, S; Fuchs, D; Lemesch, S; Douschan, P; Krones, E; Spindelboeck, W; Durchschein, F; Rainer, F; Zollner, G; Stauber, R E; Fickert, P; Stiegler, P; Stadlbauer, V

    2016-11-01

    Probiotics may correct intestinal dysbiosis and proinflammatory conditions in patients with liver cirrhosis. To test the effects of a multispecies probiotic on innate immune function, bacterial translocation and gut permeability. In a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study, stable cirrhotic out-patients either received a daily dose of a probiotic powder containing eight different bacterial strains (Ecologic Barrier, Winclove, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) (n = 44) or a placebo (n = 36) for 6 months and were followed up for another 6 months. We found a significant but subclinical increase in neutrophil resting burst (2.6-3.2%, P = 0.0134) and neopterin levels (7.7-8.4 nmol/L, P = 0.001) with probiotics but not with placebo. Probiotic supplementation did not have a significant influence on neutrophil phagocytosis, endotoxin load, gut permeability or inflammatory markers. Ten severe infections occurred in total; one during intervention in the placebo group, and five and four after the intervention has ended in the probiotic and placebo group, respectively. Liver function showed some improvement with probiotics but not with placebo. Probiotic supplementation significantly increased serum neopterin levels and the production of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils. These findings might explain the beneficial effects of probiotics on immune function. Furthermore, probiotic supplementation may be a well-tolerated method to maintain or even improve liver function in stable cirrhosis. However, its influence on gut barrier function and bacterial translocation in cirrhotic patients is minimal. © 2016 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  12. Fighting fire with fire: is it time to use probiotics to manage pathogenic bacterial diseases?

    PubMed

    Heineman, John; Bubenik, Sara; McClave, Stephen; Martindale, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Probiotics, when considered in clinical practice, have traditionally been used for prophylaxis; however, there is growing data suggesting treatment benefits in numerous disease states. In this review, we focus on probiotics as treatment for and prevention of several acute and chronic infectious processes including Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, necrotizing enterocolitis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. It is inaccurate to generalize findings observed in a single probiotic species to all probiotics. This reasoning is due to the variability of colonizing abilities of native intestinal floras, probiotic or otherwise, secondary to different combinations, doses, and duration of treatments. Given these limitations, multiple animal and human studies have shown anti-inflammatory and selective antimicrobial effects of specific probiotics. Some studies suggest a role for probiotics as supplemental treatment, in combination with antibiotics, for the aforementioned disease processes. It is apparent from this review that the efficacy of probiotics is widely variable and multifaceted. More focused clinical and basic science research is necessary to better understand the treatment potential of various probiotics.

  13. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Coretti, Lorena; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the principal bacterial products known to elicit inflammation. Cells of myeloid lineage such as monocytes and macrophages, but also epithelial cells give rise to an inflammatory response upon LPS stimulation. This phenomenon implies reprogramming of cell specific gene expression that can occur through different mechanisms including epigenetic modifications. Given their intrinsic nature, epigenetic modifications may be involved both in the acute response to LPS and in the establishment of a preconditioned genomic state (epigenomic memory) that may potentially influence the host response to further contacts with microorganisms. Information has accumulated during the last years aimed at elucidating the epigenetic mechanisms which underlie the cellular LPS response. These findings, summarized in this chapter, will hopefully be a good basis for a definition of the complete cascade of LPS-induced epigenetic events and their biological significance in different cell types.

  14. Influence of a combination of probiotics on bacterial infections in very low birthweight newborns.

    PubMed

    Kanic, Zlatka; Micetic Turk, Dusanka; Burja, Silva; Kanic, Vojko; Dinevski, Dejan

    2015-12-01

    Late-onset infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. The purpose of our prospective randomised study was to establish whether a combination of probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecium and Bifidobacterium infantum) affects the incidence of late-onset sepsis and other infections in very low birthweight infants (birthweight under 1500 g, gestational age under 33 weeks). From 80 included infants, one half received probiotics (L. acidophilus, E. faecium and B. infantum) in the ratio 1.5:1:1.5, at a dose of 0.6 × 107 colony-forming units twice daily, given with the first portions of milk until discharge, whereas the other half did not. In the group receiving probiotics, 16 children had late-onset sepsis compared with 29 in the group without probiotics; p = 0.006. The number of late-onset septic events was lower (30) in the group receiving probiotics than in the group that did not receive probiotics (69); p = 0.003. Furthermore, fewer children had at least one late-onset infection (20 infants in the group receiving probiotics compared with 32 in the group without them; p = 0.009). There were less episodes of late-onset infections in the group receiving probiotics (35) than in the group without probiotics (79); p = 0.002. A combination of probiotics at a low dose (1.2 × 107 colony-forming units) decreased the frequency of late-onset sepsis and other infections, as described in previous studies. In addition, children were discharged at a lower postmenstrual age. There were no side effects of probiotics reported.

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Two Probiotic Bacterial Strains on Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswaranjan; Guha, Dipanjan; Ray, Pratikshya; Das, Debashmita; Aich, Palok

    2016-06-01

    Probiotic and potential probiotic bacterial strains are routinely prescribed and used as supplementary therapy for a variety infectious diseases, including enteric disorders among a wide range of individuals. While there are an increasing number of studies defining the possible mechanisms of probiotic activity, a great deal remains unknown regarding the diverse modes of action attributed to these therapeutic agents. More precise information is required to support the appropriate application of probiotics. To address this objective, we selected two probiotics strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus MTCC-10307 (LA) and Bacillus clausii MTCC-8326 (BC) that are frequently prescribed for the treatment of intestinal disorders and investigated their effects on the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our results reveal that LA and BC are potent activators of both metabolic activity and innate immune responses in these cells. We also observed that LA and BC possessed similar activity in preventing infection simulated in vitro in murine macrophages by Salmonella typhimurium serovar enterica.

  16. Is There a Role for Probiotics in Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Robert S.; Austin, Andrew S.; Freeman, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in health and disease. Alteration in its healthy homeostasis may result in the development of numerous liver disorders including complications of liver cirrhosis. On the other hand, restoration and modulation of intestinal flora through the use of probiotics is potentially an emerging therapeutic strategy. There is mounting evidence that probiotics are effective in the treatment of covert and overt hepatic encephalopathy, as well as in the prevention of recurrence of encephalopathy. The beneficial effect of probiotics also extends to liver function in cirrhosis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease. On the other hand, data associating probiotics and portal hypertension is scanty and conflicting. Probiotic therapy has also not been shown to prevent primary or secondary spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Larger clinical studies are required before probiotics can be recommended as a treatment modality in liver diseases. PMID:25436233

  17. The coral probiotic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Leah; Koren, Omry; Loya, Yossi; Zilber-Rosenberg, Ilana; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    Emerging diseases have been responsible for the death of about 30% of corals worldwide during the last 30 years. Coral biologists have predicted that by 2050 most of the world's coral reefs will be destroyed. This prediction is based on the assumption that corals can not adapt rapidly enough to environmental stress-related conditions and emerging diseases. Our recent studies of the Vibrio shiloi/Oculina patagonica model system of the coral bleaching disease indicate that corals can indeed adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions by altering their population of symbiotic bacteria. These studies have led us to propose the Coral Probiotic Hypothesis. This hypothesis posits that a dynamic relationship exists between symbiotic microorganisms and environmental conditions which brings about the selection of the most advantageous coral holobiont. Changing their microbial partners would allow the corals to adapt to changing environmental conditions more rapidly (days to weeks) than via mutation and selection (many years). An important outcome of the Probiotic Hypothesis would be development of resistance of the coral holobiont to diseases. The following evidence supports this hypothesis: (i) Corals contain a large and diverse bacterial population associated with their mucus and tissues; (ii) the coral-associated bacterial population undergoes a rapid change when environmental conditions are altered; and (iii) although lacking an adaptive immune system (no antibodies), corals can develop resistance to pathogens. The Coral Probiotic Hypothesis may help explain the evolutionary success of corals and moderate the predictions of their demise.

  18. Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum alters gut luminal metabolism through modification of the gut microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Hirosuke; Odamaki, Toshitaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are well known as health-promoting agents that modulate intestinal microbiota. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Using gnotobiotic mice harboring 15 strains of predominant human gut-derived microbiota (HGM), we investigated the effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536-HGM) supplementation on the gut luminal metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics showed significantly increased fecal levels of pimelate, a precursor of biotin, and butyrate in the BB536-HGM group. In addition, the bioassay revealed significantly elevated fecal levels of biotin in the BB536-HGM group. Metatranscriptomic analysis of fecal microbiota followed by an in vitro bioassay indicated that the elevated biotin level was due to an alteration in metabolism related to biotin synthesis by Bacteroides caccae in this mouse model. Furthermore, the proportion of Eubacterium rectale, a butyrate producer, was significantly higher in the BB536-HGM group than in the group without B. longum BB536 supplementation. Our findings help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the effect of B. longum BB536 on the gut luminal metabolism through its interactions with the microbial community. PMID:26315217

  19. Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum alters gut luminal metabolism through modification of the gut microbial community.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Hirosuke; Odamaki, Toshitaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-08-28

    Probiotics are well known as health-promoting agents that modulate intestinal microbiota. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Using gnotobiotic mice harboring 15 strains of predominant human gut-derived microbiota (HGM), we investigated the effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536-HGM) supplementation on the gut luminal metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics showed significantly increased fecal levels of pimelate, a precursor of biotin, and butyrate in the BB536-HGM group. In addition, the bioassay revealed significantly elevated fecal levels of biotin in the BB536-HGM group. Metatranscriptomic analysis of fecal microbiota followed by an in vitro bioassay indicated that the elevated biotin level was due to an alteration in metabolism related to biotin synthesis by Bacteroides caccae in this mouse model. Furthermore, the proportion of Eubacterium rectale, a butyrate producer, was significantly higher in the BB536-HGM group than in the group without B. longum BB536 supplementation. Our findings help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the effect of B. longum BB536 on the gut luminal metabolism through its interactions with the microbial community.

  20. Effects of a bacteria-based probiotic on ruminal pH, volatile fatty acids and bacterial flora of Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Qadis, Abdul Qadir; Goya, Satoru; Ikuta, Kentaro; Yatsu, Minoru; Kimura, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Shusuke; Sato, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Twelve ruminally cannulated Holstein calves (age, 12 ± 3 weeks) were used to identify the effect of a probiotic comprised of Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium and Clostridium butyricum on ruminal components. The calves were adapted to a diet containing a 50% high-concentrate (standard diet) for 1 week, and then, the probiotic was given once daily for 5 days (day 1-5) at 1.5 or 3.0 g/100 kg body weight to groups of four calves each. Four additional calves fed the standard diet without probiotic served as the corresponding control. Ruminal pH was measured continuously throughout the 15-day experimental period. Ruminal fluid was collected via a fistula at a defined time predose and on days 7 and 14 to assess volatile fatty acid (VFA), lactic acid and ammonia-nitrogen concentrations, as well as the bacterial community. The probiotic at either dose improved the reduced 24-hr mean ruminal pH in calves. The circadian patterns of the 1 hr mean ruminal pH were identical between the probiotic doses. In both probiotic groups, ruminal lactic acid concentrations remained significantly lower than that of the control. Probiotic did not affect ruminal VFA concentrations. L. plantarum and C. butyricum were not detected in the rumen of calves given the high-dose probiotic, whereas Enterococcus spp. remained unchanged. These results suggest that calves given a probiotic had stable ruminal pH levels (6.6-6.8), presumably due to the effects of the probiotic on stabilizing rumen-predominant bacteria, which consume greater lactate in the rumen.

  1. Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases.

    PubMed

    Newaj-Fyzul, A; Austin, B

    2015-11-01

    There is a rapidly increasing literature pointing to the success of probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines in immunomodulation, namely stimulation of the innate, cellular and/or humoral immune response, and the control of bacterial fish diseases. Probiotics are regarded as live micro-organisms administered orally and leading to health benefits. However, in contrast with the use in terrestrial animals, a diverse range of micro-organisms have been evaluated in aquaculture with the mode of action often reflecting immunomodulation. Moreover, the need for living cells has been questioned. Also, key subcellular components, including lipopolysaccharides, have been attributed to the beneficial effect in fish. Here, there is a link with immunostimulants, which may also be administered orally. Furthermore, numerous plant products have been reported to have health benefits, namely protection against disease for which stimulation of some immune parameters has been reported. Oral vaccines confer protection against some diseases, although the mode of action is usually linked to humoral rather than the innate and cellular immune responses. This review explores the relationship between probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines.

  2. Effect of probiotics on bacterial population and health status of shrimp in culture pond ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Dalmin, G; Kathiresan, K; Purushothaman, A

    2001-09-01

    The artificially manufactured probiotics having beneficial bacteria, Bacillus spp. was applied regularly in a modified extensive shrimp (Penaeus monodon) culture pond, located on the bank of Vellar estuary, Parangipettai. The populations of total heterotrophic bacteria (THB), beneficial bacteria (Bacillus spp.) and pathogenic bacteria (vibrios) were monitored in water and sediment of the pond. The results were compared with a control pond, situated in the same location having same water spread area, stocking density, species managed with same technologies and optimum environmental parameters in which no probiotic was applied. The populations of THB and Bacillus spp. in the experimental pond increased and the vibrios decreased after each application of probiotics. But the result of the control pond showed an increasing trend of the populations of THB, Bacillus spp. and vibrios towards days of culture. The control pond had lower levels of THB and Bacillus spp. and higher levels of vibrios than the probiotic applied (experimental) pond. Also the probiotics maintained optimum transparency and low organic load in the experimental pond as compared to control. In general, water and sediment had almost equal number of Bacillus spp. and vibrios, but sediment had higher THB load than water. The applications of probiotics lesser pathogenic vibrios and enhance beneficial bacilli in the culture leading to improved water quality, promoted growth and survival rates and increased the health status of the shrimp without stress and disease outbreaks. Thus the application of probiotics could lead to disease-free and profitable shrimp culture operations which will be helpful for shrimp farmers as most of them are now-a-days severely affected by microbial diseases.

  3. Intracloacal inoculation, an effective screening method for determining the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates against Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Arsi, K; Donoghue, A M; Woo-Ming, A; Blore, P J; Donoghue, D J

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. It is common in poultry, and human infections are often associated with consumption of contaminated poultry products. One strategy to reduce Campylobacter colonization in poultry is the use of oral probiotics, but this produces variable results, possibly because the probiotics are destroyed in the stomach's acidic environment. Protection (e.g., encapsulation) of isolates may overcome this problem, but there is no assurance that these isolates will have efficacy in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, screening candidate isolates by directly placing them in the lower intestinal tract via cloacal inoculation may eliminate the time and expense of encapsulating ineffective isolates. Thus, the purpose of this study was to collect bacterial isolates with anti-Campylobacter activity in vitro and evaluate their efficacy in vivo upon either oral or intracloacal administration. Bacterial isolates were collected from healthy birds and were evaluated for efficacy against C. jejuni in vitro. Isolates having generally regarded as safe status and demonstrating in vitro anti-Campylobacter properties were evaluated after oral or intracloacal inoculation into chicks on day 1 (n = 10 birds per isolate per route of administration). On day 7, birds were dosed by oral gavage with a four-strain mixture of wild-type Campylobacter containing at least 1 × 10(7) CFU/ml organisms. On day 14, birds were euthanized and the ceca were collected aseptically for Campylobacter enumeration. When dosed orally, only one isolate had a 1-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts, whereas when administered intracloacally, six of these isolates produced a 1- to 3-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts in 14-day-old chickens. These results support the strategy of evaluating the efficacy of potential probiotic isolates via cloacal inoculation prior to undergoing the effort of encapsulating isolates for oral administration.

  4. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Jeremiah A.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Classen, Aimée T.

    2016-11-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. Here, we chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.

  5. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    PubMed Central

    Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Classen, Aimée T.

    2016-01-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. We chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host. PMID:27833797

  6. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, Aimee T.; Henning, Jeremiah; Jawdy, Sara; Pelletier, Dale A.; Weston, David; Timm, Collin M.

    2016-11-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. We chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.

  7. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Henning, Jeremiah A.; Weston, David J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; ...

    2016-11-01

    Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. Here, we chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, netmore » photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.« less

  8. Probiotics in periodontal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Bhattacharya, Hirak; Kandwal, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Macfarlane Burnett stated in 1962 that “By the late twentieth century, we can anticipate the virtual elimination of infectious diseases as a significant factor in social life”. Probiotics have become of interest to researchers in recent times. Time has come to shift the paradigm of treatment from specific bacteria elimination to altering bacterial ecology by probiotics. The development of resistance to a range of antibiotics by some important pathogens has raised the possibility of a return to the pre-antibiotic dark ages. Here, probiotics provide an effective alternative way, which is economical and natural to combat periodontal disease. Thus, a mere change in diet by including probiotic foods may halt, retard, or even significantly delay the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases, promoting a healthy lifestyle to fight periodontal infections. PMID:21772717

  9. Canopy soil bacterial communities altered by severing host tree limbs

    PubMed Central

    Dangerfield, Cody R.; Nadkarni, Nalini M.

    2017-01-01

    Trees of temperate rainforests host a large biomass of epiphytic plants, which are associated with soils formed in the forest canopy. Falling of epiphytic material results in the transfer of carbon and nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor. This study provides the first characterization of bacterial communities in canopy soils enabled by high-depth environmental sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Canopy soil included many of the same major taxonomic groups of Bacteria that are also found in ground soil, but canopy bacterial communities were lower in diversity and contained different operational taxonomic units. A field experiment was conducted with epiphytic material from six Acer macrophyllum trees in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA to document changes in the bacterial communities of soils associated with epiphytic material that falls to the forest floor. Bacterial diversity and composition of canopy soil was highly similar, but not identical, to adjacent ground soil two years after transfer to the forest floor, indicating that canopy bacteria are almost, but not completely, replaced by ground soil bacteria. Furthermore, soil associated with epiphytic material on branches that were severed from the host tree and suspended in the canopy contained altered bacterial communities that were distinct from those in canopy material moved to the forest floor. Therefore, the unique nature of canopy soil bacteria is determined in part by the host tree and not only by the physical environmental conditions associated with the canopy. Connection to the living tree appears to be a key feature of the canopy habitat. These results represent an initial survey of bacterial diversity of the canopy and provide a foundation upon which future studies can more fully investigate the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of these communities. PMID:28894646

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus jensenii Strain SNUV360, a Probiotic for Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis Isolated from the Vagina of a Healthy Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunghee; You, Hyun Ju; Kwon, Bomi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactobacillus jensenii SNUV360 is a potential probiotic strain that shows antimicrobial activity for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Here, we present the complete genomic sequence of L. jensenii SNUV360, isolated from a vaginal sample from a healthy Korean woman. Analysis of the sequence may provide insight into its functional activity. PMID:28280032

  11. Practical approaches to probiotics use.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Amel; Comelli, Elena M

    2014-08-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms exerting beneficial effects on the host. They can be ingested through foods or supplements and their inclusion in these products is regulated in Canada by the Health Canada Health Products and Food Branch. The aim of this article is to summarize current evidence from randomized controlled trials and guidelines from Health Canada, the World Health Organization, and internationally recognized expert committees in the hope that it will help practitioners and professionals recommending probiotics to healthy and diseased patients, with a focus on the Canadian setting. From a general perspective, probiotics can be recommended for prevention of diseases that are associated to altered intestinal ecology. Specifically, they can be recommended for prevention of upper respiratory tract infections and pouchitis, for prevention and management of necrotizing enterocolitis, bacterial vaginosis and antibiotic associated diarrhea, including Clostridium difficile infection, and for treatment of atopic eczema in cow's milk allergy and of infectious diarrhea. Additional substantiated probiotic benefits include prevention of hypercholesterolemia, management of constipation, reduction of recurrent urinary tract infections, improvement of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and reduction of antibiotics side effects in Helicobacter pylori eradication. Because probiotics are generally recognized as safe and can be removed with antimicrobial agents, their use should be considered in patients of all ages.

  12. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Enzo; Vignera, La Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 109 CFU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = “6Tx/6-”: treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = “12Tx”: 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = “6-/6Tx”: no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = “12-”: no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = “6Tx/6-” and B = “12Tx” had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group “12-”: patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups “6Tx/6-” (15.5%) and “6-/6Tx” (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group “12-” (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups “6Tx/6-” and “6-/6Tx” had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group “12-” patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS. PMID:24969056

  13. Longevity in mice is promoted by probiotic-induced suppression of colonic senescence dependent on upregulation of gut bacterial polyamine production.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kurihara, Shin; Kibe, Ryoko; Ashida, Hisashi; Benno, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is recognized as an important factor contributing to senescence and age-related diseases. In mammals, levels of polyamines (PAs) decrease during the ageing process; PAs are known to decrease systemic inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. Reductions in intestinal luminal PAs levels have been associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 is known to increase intestinal luminal PA concentrations. We supplemented the diet of 10-month-old Crj:CD-1 female mice with LKM512 for 11 months, while the controls received no supplementation. Survival rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. LKM512-treated mice survived significantly longer than controls (P<0.001); moreover, skin ulcers and tumors were more common in the control mice. We then analyzed inflammatory and intestinal conditions by measuring several markers using HPLC, ELISA, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, and histological slices. LKM512 mice showed altered 16S rRNA gene expression of several predominant intestinal bacterial groups. The fecal concentrations of PAs, but not of short-chain fatty acids, were significantly higher in LKM512-treated mice (P<0.05). Colonic mucosal function was also better in LKM512 mice, with increased mucus secretion and better maintenance of tight junctions. Changes in gene expression levels were evaluated using the NimbleGen mouse DNA microarray. LKM512 administration also downregulated the expression of ageing-associated and inflammation-associated genes and gene expression levels in 21-month-old LKM512-treated mice resembled those in 10-month-old untreated (younger) mice. Our study demonstrated increased longevity in mice following probiotic treatment with LKM512, possibly due to the suppression of chronic low-grade inflammation in the colon induced by higher PA levels. This indicates that ingestion of specific probiotics may be

  14. Longevity in Mice Is Promoted by Probiotic-Induced Suppression of Colonic Senescence Dependent on Upregulation of Gut Bacterial Polyamine Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kurihara, Shin; Kibe, Ryoko; Ashida, Hisashi; Benno, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic low-grade inflammation is recognized as an important factor contributing to senescence and age-related diseases. In mammals, levels of polyamines (PAs) decrease during the ageing process; PAs are known to decrease systemic inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. Reductions in intestinal luminal PAs levels have been associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction. The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 is known to increase intestinal luminal PA concentrations. Methodology/Principal Findings We supplemented the diet of 10-month-old Crj:CD-1 female mice with LKM512 for 11 months, while the controls received no supplementation. Survival rates were compared using Kaplan–Meier survival curves. LKM512-treated mice survived significantly longer than controls (P<0.001); moreover, skin ulcers and tumors were more common in the control mice. We then analyzed inflammatory and intestinal conditions by measuring several markers using HPLC, ELISA, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, and histological slices. LKM512 mice showed altered 16S rRNA gene expression of several predominant intestinal bacterial groups. The fecal concentrations of PAs, but not of short-chain fatty acids, were significantly higher in LKM512-treated mice (P<0.05). Colonic mucosal function was also better in LKM512 mice, with increased mucus secretion and better maintenance of tight junctions. Changes in gene expression levels were evaluated using the NimbleGen mouse DNA microarray. LKM512 administration also downregulated the expression of ageing-associated and inflammation-associated genes and gene expression levels in 21-month-old LKM512-treated mice resembled those in 10-month-old untreated (younger) mice. Conclusion/Significance Our study demonstrated increased longevity in mice following probiotic treatment with LKM512, possibly due to the suppression of chronic low-grade inflammation in the colon induced by higher PA

  15. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  16. Clinical study comparing probiotic Lactobacillus GR-1 and RC-14 with metronidazole vaginal gel to treat symptomatic bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Anukam, Kingsley C; Osazuwa, Emmanuel; Osemene, Gibson I; Ehigiagbe, Felix; Bruce, Andrew W; Reid, Gregor

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is particularly common in black women, and in Nigeria it is often caused by Mycoplasma, as well as Atopobium, Prevotella and Gardnerella sp. Antimicrobial metronidazole oral therapy is poorly effective in eradicating the condition and restoring the Lactobacillus microbiota in the vagina. In this study, 40 women diagnosed with BV by discharge, fishy odor, sialidase positive test and Nugent Gram stain scoring, were randomized to receive either two dried capsules containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 each night for 5 days, or 0.75% metronidazole gel, applied vaginally twice a day (in the morning and evening). Follow-up at day 6, 15 and 30 showed cure of BV in significantly more probiotic treated subjects (16, 17 and 18/20, respectively) compared to metronidazole treatment (9, 9 and 11/20: P=0.016 at day 6, P=0.002 at day 15 and P=0.056 at day 30). This is the first report of an effective (90%) cure of BV using probiotic lactobacilli. Given the correlation between BV and HIV, and the high risk of the latter in Nigeria, intravaginal use of lactobacilli could provide women with a self-use therapy, similar to over-the-counter anti-yeast medication, for treatment of urogenital infections.

  17. Supplementation of standard antibiotic therapy with oral probiotics for bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Heczko, Piotr B; Tomusiak, Anna; Adamski, Paweł; Jakimiuk, Artur J; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena; Strus, Magdalena

    2015-12-03

    This multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to determine whether the use of oral probiotic preparation (prOVag®) containing three Lactobacillus strains together with standard metronidazole treatment and also targeted antibiotic treatment (following the failure of metronidazole therapy) could reduce the recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and aerobic vaginitis (AV). Patients at private gynaecological clinics in Poland with histories of recurrent BV/AV and current symptoms were randomly allocated to receive metronidazole and probiotic or placebo, and assessed monthly on visits II and III-V. The total number of study visits was 5-6 (I, II, II bis - if applicable, III, IV, V). One probiotic or placebo capsule was administered with metronidazole/targeted antibiotic twice daily for 10 days; during follow up, patients took one capsule daily for 10 days perimenstrually. Clinical examination and vaginal swabbing were performed at each visit. Primary outcomes were clinical or microbiological BV/AV recurrence and probiotic safety. Secondary outcomes were vaginal pH, Nugent score, and Lactobacillus counts in the vaginal microbiota. Safety analysis was performed in 578 (probiotic, n = 285; placebo, n = 293) 18-50-year-old women who were randomised. BV/AV was confirmed microbiologically in 241 (probiotic, n = 118; placebo, n = 123) participants, who continued the trial. Data from 154 (probiotic, n = 73; placebo, n = 81) participants who completed the study were analysed to determine the efficacy of prOVag. Additional analyses included 37 (probiotic, n = 22; placebo, n = 15) participants who received targeted antibiotics and probiotics or placebo. prOVag lengthened the time to clinical relapse of BV/AV symptoms up to 51 % (p < 0.05) compared with placebo; AV relapse was delayed by up to 76 % (p < 0.05). Probiotic use also reduced and maintained low vaginal pH and Nugent score, and increased

  18. A single natural nucleotide mutation alters bacterial pathogen host tropism.

    PubMed

    Viana, David; Comos, María; McAdam, Paul R; Ward, Melissa J; Selva, Laura; Guinane, Caitriona M; González-Muñoz, Beatriz M; Tristan, Anne; Foster, Simon J; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Penadés, José R

    2015-04-01

    The capacity of microbial pathogens to alter their host tropism leading to epidemics in distinct host species populations is a global public and veterinary health concern. To investigate the molecular basis of a bacterial host-switching event in a tractable host species, we traced the evolutionary trajectory of the common rabbit clone of Staphylococcus aureus. We report that it evolved through a likely human-to-rabbit host jump over 40 years ago and that only a single naturally occurring nucleotide mutation was required and sufficient to convert a human-specific S. aureus strain into one that could infect rabbits. Related mutations were identified at the same locus in other rabbit strains of distinct clonal origin, consistent with convergent evolution. This first report of a single mutation that was sufficient to alter the host tropism of a microorganism during its evolution highlights the capacity of some pathogens to readily expand into new host species populations.

  19. Fermented milk supplemented with probiotics and prebiotics can effectively alter the intestinal microbiota and immunity of host animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Zhu, H; Lu, C; Kang, Z; Luo, Y; Feng, L; Lu, X

    2012-09-01

    Fermented milk supplemented with 2 probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and a prebiotic, isomaltooligosaccharide, was orally administered to 100 healthy adults at 480 g/d for 2 wk in a randomized controlled trial. The fecal bacterial compositions of these subjects were examined by culture before and after the intervention. The same fermented milk was also orally fed to BALB/c mice, and immune as well as fecal bacteria analyses were conducted using the same culturing methods. After the intervention, increases in fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were observed among the subjects compared with the subjects in the control group. In contrast, after the intervention, fecal enterobacilli were significantly decreased in the test group compared with the control group. The same effects on the composition of the intestinal microbiota were observed in mice. Furthermore, the tested mice were found to have significantly increased delayed-type hypersensitivity, plaque-forming cells, and half-hemolysis values after the intervention with the fermented milk. In summary, the synbiotic fermented milk containing probiotics and a prebiotic may contribute to improve intestinal health and may have a positive effect on the humoral and cell-mediated immunity of host animals. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Probiotic agents in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M

    2007-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and alterations in bowel habits. Several pathogenetic factors, such as altered intestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, serotonin system abnormalities and psychic disturbances have been identified. Recently, a pathogenetic role of intestinal microflora has been shown in IBS: viral or bacterial infection can trigger post-infectious IBS; some patients have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; the composition of patients' enteric flora is altered; and minimal inflammatory changes, consistent with the pro-inflammatory role of bacteria, have been demonstrated. Probiotics may, therefore, offer a rational therapeutic approach to IBS. The data available on the use of probiotics in IBS are still limited and results of controlled clinical trials are contradictory because they have been performed using different species, dosages, treatment durations and end-points for results evaluation. A critical evaluation of the therapeutic role of the various probiotics in IBS is presented in this article.

  1. Alteration of the intestinal microbiome: fecal microbiota transplant and probiotics for Clostridium difficile and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Broussard, Elizabeth K; Surawicz, Christina M

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasingly common with a high risk of recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. In cases of recurrent C. difficile infection, fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option promoting the restoration of normal gut microbiota. Furthermore, preliminary uncontrolled evidence demonstrates possible benefit of FMT in the management of some cases of inflammatory bowel disease and chronic constipation. In addition to presenting an overview of FMT, we discuss the role of probiotics, a more common approach to modifying the intestinal microbiome. Probiotics have been utilized broadly for many disease processes, including gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and allergic disease settings, although with limited and inconsistent results. Multiple potential areas for research are also identified.

  2. Produced water exposure alters bacterial response to biocides.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Lipus, Daniel; Bibby, Kyle

    2014-11-04

    Microbial activity during the holding and reuse of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations, termed produced water, may lead to issues with corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. Biocides are applied to control biological activity, often with limited efficacy, which is typically attributed to chemical interactions with the produced water. However, it is unknown whether there is a biologically driven mechanism to biocide tolerance in produced water. Here, we demonstrate that produced water exposure results in an enhanced tolerance against the typically used biocide glutaraldehyde and increased susceptibility to the oxidative biocide hypochlorite in a native and a model bacteria and that this altered resistance is due to the salinity of the produced water. In addition, we elucidate the genetic response of the model organism Pseudomonas fluorescens to produced water exposure to provide a mechanistic interpretation of the altered biocide resistance. The RNA-seq data demonstrated the induction of genes involved in osmotic stress, energy production and conversion, membrane integrity, and protein transport following produced water exposure, which facilitates bacterial survival and alters biocide tolerance. Efforts to fundamentally understand biocide resistance mechanisms, which enable the optimization of biocide application, hold significant implications for greening of the fracturing process through encouraging produced water recycling. Specifically, these results suggest the necessity of optimizing biocide application at the level of individual shale plays, rather than historical experience, based upon produced water characteristics and salinity.

  3. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Kimberly C; Zhang, Weiping; Langer, Samantha J; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Hu, Dehong; Lemke, Rachelle A; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Orr, Galya; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2017-05-23

    Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides By screening an R. sphaeroides Tn5 mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL) mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.IMPORTANCE This paper reports on experiments to understand how to increase microbial lipid production. Microbial lipids are often cited as one renewable replacement for petroleum-based fuels and chemicals, but strategies to increase the yield of these compounds are needed to achieve this goal. While lipid biosynthesis is often well understood, increasing yields of these compounds to industrially relevant levels is a challenge, especially since genetic, synthetic biology, or engineering approaches are not feasible in many microbes. We show that altering the bacterial cell envelope can be used to increase microbial lipid production. We also find that the utility of some of these alterations can be

  4. Oral probiotic bacterial administration suppressed allergic responses in an ovalbumin-induced allergy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Kwack, Kubum; Kim, Dae-Young; Ji, Geun Eog

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated whether orally administered probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus casei) and a gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli) function as allergic immune modulators to prevent food allergy, according to the hygiene hypothesis. C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and cholera toxin for 5 weeks. After sensitization, the OVA-induced mice that were not treated with bacteria had significantly increased levels of OVA-specific IgE, total IgE, and IgG1 in sera, as well as scab-covered tails. In comparison, groups treated with B. bifidum BGN4 (BGN4), L. casei 911 (L. casei), or Escherichia coli MC4100 (E. coli) had decreased levels of OVA-specific IgE, total IgE, and IgG1, and decreased levels of mast cell degranulation and tail scabs. OVA-specific IgA levels were decreased in BGN4- and L. casei-treated groups. In conclusion, administration of E. coli, BGN4, or L. casei decreased the OVA-induced allergy response. However, a normal increase in body weight was inhibited in the E. coli-treated mice and in the montreated mice groups during allergy sensitization. Thus, BGN4 and L. casei appear to be useful probiotic bacteria for the prevention of allergy.

  5. Feeding Probiotic Bacteria To Swine Enhances Immunity To Ascaris Suum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Probiotic bacterial species are included in the diet to promote health. Probiotics purportedly protect the intestine against pathogenic microorganisms and can reduce inflammation; however, quantitative measurement of probiotic growth and related effects on intestinal function are often lacking. Asca...

  6. Impact of probiotics on colonizing microbiota of the gut.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Although precise mechanisms responsible for all demonstrations of probiotic health benefits are not known, many lines of evidence suggest that probiotics function through direct or indirect impact on colonizing microbiota of the gut. Probiotics can directly influence colonizing microbes through multiple mechanisms, including the production of inhibitory compounds (bacteriocins, short chain fatty acids, and others), by producing substrates that might promote the growth of colonizing microbes (secreted exopolysaccharides, vitamins, fatty acids, sugars from undigested carbohydrates and others), and by promoting immune responses against specific microbes. Indirectly, probiotics can influence colonizing microbes by inhibiting attachment through stimulated mucin production, reinforcing gut barrier effects, and downregulation of gut inflammation, thereby promoting microbes that are associated with a healthier gut physiology. Although the value of targeted changes in populations of gut bacteria is a matter of debate, increased levels of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in the gut correlate with numerous health endpoints. Microbiota changes due to probiotic intake include increased numbers of related phylotypes, decreasing pathogens and their toxins, altering bacterial community structure to enhance evenness, stabilizing bacterial communities when perturbed (eg, with antibiotics), or promoting a more rapid recovery from a perturbation. Further research will provide insight into the degree of permanence of probiotic-induced changes, although research to date suggests that continued probiotic consumption is needed for sustained impact.

  7. Probiotic-induced changes in the intestinal epithelium: implications in gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, B S

    2009-01-01

    There is resurgent interest in the use of probiotics to maintain gastrointestinal and systemic health, driven by recent advances in knowledge of bacterial interactions with the epithelium and innate immune system of the intestine. The effects of probiotic bacteria on the intestinal epithelium and their downstream consequences are reviewed. Probiotics prevent pathogen adherence and invasion of the epithelium, partly by blocking adherence sites but also by upregulating gene expression of MUC2 and of antimicrobial peptides. Metabolic effects of probiotics on the intestinal epithelium include production of short chain fatty acids which influence epithelial cell metabolism, turnover and apoptosis. Bacterial metabolism of unabsorbed dietary constituents with production of free radicals and phenolic metabolites can lead to DNA damage and cancer; probiotics restore eubiosis and potentially prevent this. Probiotics alter expression and redistribution of tight junction proteins and reduce intestinal permeability limiting absorption of noxious molecules from the gut lumen. Most studied are the effects of probiotics on epithelial cells which are the first line of innate immune-capable cells that encounter luminal flora. Probiotics, through secreted molecules, influence the innate inflammatory response of epithelial cells to stimuli from the gut lumen, and reduce mucosal inflammation. Through effects on dendritic, and possibly epithelial, cells they influence naïve T cells in the lamina propria of the gut and thus influence adaptive immunity. These varied effects of probiotics have implications for the treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases including antibiotic-associated colitis, acute gastroenteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, and irritable bowel syndrome.

  8. Glutamine with probiotics attenuates intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress in a rat burn injury model through altered iNOS gene aberrant methylation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen-Yu; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Dong, Zhi-Wei; Peng, Yi-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Severe burns may lead to intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress resulting in intestinal barrier damage and gut dysfunction. In the management of severe burns, therapies are needed to attenuate whole-body inflammatory responses and control the burden of oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the effects of oral glutamine (Gln) with probiotics on burn-induced intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress using a Wistar rat burn injury model. We then explored potential molecular mechanisms for the effects of glutamine and probiotics on intestinal tissue inflammation and oxidative stress. We found that glutamine and probiotics together significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) content; reduced levels of the inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8; and altered expression of oxidative stress factors including reactive oxygen species and superoxide dismutase. We found that the apoptotic proportion of intestinal epithelial cells in severely burned subjects was notably decreased following treatment with glutamine plus probiotics. We also found that glutamine and probiotics given together markedly reduced NO content by down-regulating the expression of iNOS in blood and intestinal tissue. These findings indicate that regulation of the iNOS gene plays a pivotal role in inflammation and oxidative stress in the response to severe burns in the Wistar rat. We then further investigated the mechanism by which combined therapy with glutamine and probiotics might reduce expression of iNOS and found that this treatment resulted in increased methylation of the iNOS gene. The methylation level of the iNOS gene was found to be regulated via differential expression of DNMT1 and Tet1. Collectively, our results suggest that combined therapy with glutamine and probiotics can markedly reduce the synthesis of NO, suppressing intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress in the Wistar rat burn injury model. PMID:28560003

  9. Characterization of certain bacterial strains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo-Mera, A; Caro, I; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Rúa, J; Ferrero, M A; García-Armesto, M R

    2011-08-01

    The present work was aimed at characterizing 12 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to obtain improved potential starter or probiotic cultures that could be used for making dairy products from ewe's milk and cow's milk. Eight strains with antimicrobial properties, isolated from ewe's milk and from cheese made from ewe's and/or cow's milk, were studied. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (five strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (one strain of each species). Additionally, four strains were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection: Lactobacillus casei 393 (isolated from cheese), L. lactis subsp. lactis 11454 (origin nonspecified and a producer of nisin), and two strains isolated from human feces (L. paracasei subsp. paracasei 27092 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus 53103, antibacterial agent producer). All E. faecalis strains showed at least one virulence factor (either hemolysin or gelatinase), which emphasizes the importance of these studies in this species. Both L. lactis strains and most Lactobacillus spp. were good acidifiers in ewe's milk and cow's milk at 30°C. High β-galactosidase activity, as well as aminopeptidase activities that favor the development of desirable flavors in cheese, were detected in all Lactobacillus spp. strains. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 showed α-fucosidase activity (thought to help colonization of the intestine) and lack of α-glucosidase activity (a trait considered positive for diabetic and obese humans). This last enzymatic activity was also lacking in L. lactis ATCC 11454. L. mesenteroides was the only strain D(2)-lactic acid producer. The selection of any particular strain for probiotic or dairy cultures should be performed according to the technological and/or functional abilities needed.

  10. A randomised controlled trial of probiotics for the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery associated with bacterial vaginosis: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis increases the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery at less than 34 weeks of gestation. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the early administration of selected lactobacilli strains (probiotics) to pregnant women with asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis/intermediate-degree infections to prevent spontaneous premature delivery and associated neonatal morbidity. Methods/Design Asymptomatic pregnant women at less than 20 weeks of gestation, with no indication of elective preterm delivery, with a vaginal pH ≥ 4.5 and Nugent score > 3 were randomly assigned to the placebo or intervention group (oral administration of selected lactobacilli up to the 24th to 26th week of gestation). The randomisation was stratified for the history of premature delivery (HPD) and blocked. The allocation was concealed, and the participating health professionals and patients were blinded. The primary outcome was preterm delivery (<34 to <32 weeks), and the secondary outcomes were associated neonatal complications. Results In total, 4,204 pregnant women were screened; 320 and 324 individuals were respectively randomly assigned to the placebo and intervention groups, and 62% finished the trial. None of the randomised patients were lost to follow-up. For the non-HPD stratum, the intent-to-treat relative risks of spontaneous premature birth at < 34 and < 37 weeks' gestation were 0.33 (0.03, 3.16) and 0.49 (0.17, 1.44), respectively, and they were non-significant (ns) with p = 0.31 and 0.14. The corresponding actual treatment figures were zero and 0.32 (0.09, 1.19), which were ns with p = 0.12 and 0.06. The intent-to-treat relative risk of spontaneous premature birth at < 37 weeks of gestation for the trial as a whole, including HPD and non-HPD participants, was 0.69 (0.26, 1.78), p = 0.30 (ns). The neonatal complications under evaluation occurred in only one infant (< 34 weeks; placebo group) who presented with respiratory distress

  11. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial on probiotics in small bowel bacterial overgrowth in children treated with omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Hutapea, Esther I; Advani, Najid; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) in children treated with omeprazole, and to test whether probiotics influence the incidence. A double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was performed in 70 children treated orally during four weeks with 20mg omeprazole per day. Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 (1.9×10(9) cfu) and Lactobacillus acidophilus R0052 (0.1×10(9) cfu) were simultaneously given daily to 36 subjects (probiotic group), while 34 subjects received placebo (placebo group). The diagnosis of SBBO was based on the development of suggestive symptoms, in combination with a positive glucose breath test. After one month of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment, 30% (21/70) had a positive breath test suggesting SBBO; of these 62% were symptomatic. Five children developed SBBO-like symptoms, but had a negative breath test; and 44 (63%) were symptom free and had a negative breath test. There was no difference in the incidence of positive breath tests in the probiotic versus the placebo group (33% vs 26.5%; p=0.13). Since symptoms suggesting SBBO developed in 26% of PPI-treated children, and since the glucose breath test was abnormal in 72% of these, this side-effect should be more frequently considered. The probiotic tested did not decrease the risk to develop SBBO. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Rice Bran and Probiotics Alter the Porcine Large Intestine and Serum Metabolomes for Protection against Human Rotavirus Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, Nora Jean; Yuan, Lijuan; Yang, Xingdong; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (HRV) is a leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea, and there is limited vaccine efficacy in the developing world. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs consuming a prophylactic synbiotic combination of probiotics and rice bran (Pro+RB) did not exhibit HRV diarrhea after challenge. Multiple immune, gut barrier protective, and anti-diarrheal mechanisms contributed to the prophylactic efficacy of Pro+RB when compared to probiotics (Pro) alone. In order to understand the molecular signature associated with diarrheal protection by Pro+RB, a global non-targeted metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the large intestinal contents and serum of neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry platform revealed significantly different metabolites (293 in LIC and 84 in serum) in the pigs fed Pro+RB compared to Pro, and many of these metabolites were lipids and amino acid/peptides. Lipid metabolites included 2-oleoylglycerol (increased 293.40-fold in LIC of Pro+RB, p = 3.04E-10), which can modulate gastric emptying, andhyodeoxycholate (decreased 0.054-fold in the LIC of Pro+RB, p = 0.0040) that can increase colonic mucus production to improve intestinal barrier function. Amino acid metabolites included cysteine (decreased 0.40-fold in LIC, p = 0.033, and 0.62-fold in serum, p = 0.014 of Pro+RB), which has been found to reduce inflammation, lower oxidative stress and modulate mucosal immunity, and histamine (decreased 0.18-fold in LIC, p = 0.00030, of Pro+RB and 1.57-fold in serum, p = 0.043), which modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as influences the enteric nervous system. Alterations to entire LIC and serum metabolic pathways further contributed to the anti-diarrheal and anti-viral activities of Pro+RB such as sphingolipid, mono/diacylglycerol, fatty acid, secondary bile acid, and polyamine metabolism. Sphingolipid and long chain fatty acid profiles influenced the ability of HRV to

  13. Alteration of macrophage membrane lipids following processing of bacterial peptidoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Polanski, M.; Gray, G.R.

    1986-03-01

    As part of the continuing investigation into the role played by macrophages in antigen presentation and bacterial adjuvant activation, the authors have examined the metabolites produced by macrophages after encounter with peptidoglycan. Peptidoglycan was chosen because it contains N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide), a known adjuvant whose primary target cell is the macrophage. In previous work, the authors established that a series of muramyl dipeptide-like glycopeptides was released into the medium following phagocytosis of peptidoglycan by a macrophage cell line. Here the authors report on the finding that, additionally, a membrane lipid has been covalently altered by the addition of a peptidoglycan fragment. Bacillus subtilis cell walls which had been radiolabeled in their muramic acid, glucosamine and alanine residues, were incubated with the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. Using standard lipid extraction procedures, a lipid was isolated and found to contain equal molar ratios of alanine, glutamic acid and diaminopimelic acid. Since lipidated peptidoglycan peptides have been shown to be immunoactivators, the isolated lipid derivative may serve as a signal for interactions with other lymphocytes.

  14. Gut microbiota and probiotics in chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Claudia; Tiso, Angelo; Del Prete, Anna; Cariello, Rita; Tuccillo, Concetta; Cotticelli, Gaetano; Del Vecchio Blanco, Camillo; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut: the portal system receives blood from the gut, and intestinal blood content activates liver functions. The liver, in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion into the intestinal lumen. Alterations of intestinal microbiota seem to play an important role in induction and promotion of liver damage progression, in addition to direct injury resulting from different causal agents. Bacterial overgrowth, immune dysfunction, alteration of the luminal factors, and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis, such as infections, hepatic encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and renal failure. Probiotics have been suggested as a useful integrative treatment of different types of chronic liver damage, for their ability to augment intestinal barrier function and prevent bacterial translocation. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut microbiota and chronic liver disease, both in the pathogenesis and in the treatment by probiotics of the liver damage.

  15. Intracloacal inoculation, an effective screening method for determining the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates against Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. It is common in poultry, and human infections are often associated with consumption of contaminated poultry products. One strategy to reduce Campylobacter colonization in poultry is by using oral probiotics. Unfortunately, oral probiot...

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Putative Probiotic Bacterial Strain, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, from North East Himalayan Soil Based on In Vitro and In Vivo Functional Properties.

    PubMed

    Hairul Islam, V I; Prakash Babu, N; Pandikumar, P; Ignacimuthu, S

    2011-12-01

    This study is aimed to isolate some novel probiotics from the soils of North East Himalayas. Eleven Gram positive isolates were obtained in MRS with Oxgall media from soil samples. Four of the isolates withstood the in vitro gastric juice pH 3.0 and 0.45% bile salt tolerance screening. Among these, PBT 3 showed high cell surface hydrophobicity and adhered to the Caco-2 cells. 16s rDNA gene sequences of this probiotic strains were identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (accession no: JF836079). In in vivo bioefficacy evaluation by DSS-induced colitis animals, B. amyloliquefaciens significantly ameliorated the loss in body weight. Further, the treatment altered the levels of myeloperoxidase, lipoperoxides, and mucous content in the colon tissues compared with normal colon. It reduced the protein and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These biochemical findings were supported by histopathological evidences. Our study reports the use of B. amyloliquefaciens isolated from Himalayan soil as probiotic and its beneficial effect on IBD for the first time and suggests that this could be used as potential probiotics in functional foods or as a curative agent.

  17. Characterization and in-vivo evaluation of potential probiotics of the bacterial flora within the water column of a healthy shrimp larviculture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ming; Liang, Huafang; He, Yaoyao; Wen, Chongqing

    2016-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the normal bacterial flora associated with shrimp larviculture systems contributes to probiotic screening and disease control. The bacterial community of the water column over a commercial Litopenaeus vannamei larval rearing run was characterized with both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 27 phylotypes at the species level were isolated and identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the V3-V5 region of 16S rRNA genes showed a dynamic bacterial community with major changes occurred from stages zoea to mysis during the rearing run. The sequences retrieved were affiliated to four phyla, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, with the family Rhodobacteraceae being the most frequently recovered one. Subsequently, 13 representative strains conferred higher larval survival than the control when evaluated in the in-vivo experiments; in particular, three candidates, assigned to Phaeobacter sp., Arthrobacter sp., and Microbacterium sp., significantly improved larval survival ( P < 0.05). Therefore, the healthy shrimp larviculture system harbored a diverse and favorable bacterial flora, which contribute to larval development and are of great importance in exploiting novel probiotics.

  18. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn K; Gøbel, Rikke; Michaelsen, Kim F; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars H; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2011-03-01

    The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children randomized to intake of one of the probiotic strain or placebo. Microbial composition was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR and, in a subset of subjects, by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core population of the Lactobacillus group was identified as Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus oris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, while the bifidobacterial community included Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium catenulatum. The fecal numbers of L. acidophilus and B. lactis increased significantly after intervention, indicating survival of the ingested bacteria. The levels of Bifidobacterium correlated positively (P=0.03), while the levels of the Lactobacillus group negatively (P=0.01) with improvement of atopic eczema evaluated by the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis index. This correlation was observed across the whole study cohort and not attributed to the probiotic intake. The main conclusion of the study is that administration of L. acidophilus NCFM and B. lactis Bi-07 does not affect the composition and diversity of the main bacterial populations in feces. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and sexual intercourse on vaginal colonization with the probiotic Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, Benjamin M; Hemmerling, Anke; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kikuvi, Gideon; Gikunju, Joseph; Shiboski, Stephen; Fredricks, David N; Cohen, Craig R

    2011-11-01

    Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), but their role in lactobacilli recolonization failure is unknown. We studied the effect of 7 BV-associated bacterial species and 2 Lactobacillus species on vaginal colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V). Twenty-four women with BV were given a 5-day course of metronidazole vaginal gel and then randomized 3:1 to receive either LACTIN-V or placebo applied vaginally once daily for 5 initial consecutive days, followed by a weekly application over 2 weeks. Vaginal swabs for L. crispatus CTV-05 culture and 9 bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were analyzed on several study visits for the 18 women receiving LACTIN-V. Vaginal colonization with CTV-05 was achieved in 61% of the participants receiving LACTIN-V at either day 10 or day 28 visit and 44% at day 28. Participants not colonized with CTV-05 had generally higher median concentrations of BV-associated bacteria compared to those who colonized. Between enrollment and day 28, the median concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis minimally reduced from 10 to 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab in women who colonized with CTV-05 but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.19). Similarly, the median concentration of Atopobium spp. reduced from 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab to below limit of detection in women who colonized with CTV-05, but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.04). The presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment was found to be significantly associated with a reduced odds of colonization with CTV-05 on day 28 (P = 0.003), and vaginal intercourse during the study significantly impaired successful CTV-05 colonization (P = 0.018). Vaginal concentration of certain BV-associated bacteria, vaginal intercourse during treatment, and the presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment predict colonization with probiotic

  20. Recent Advances and Understanding of Using Probiotic-Based Interventions to Restore Homeostasis of the Microbiome for the Prevention/Therapy of Bacterial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Suchodolski, Jan S; Jergens, Albert E

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the microbiome in health and disease has galvanized interest in using manipulations of the gastrointestinal ecosystem to prevent and/or combat gut bacterial infections and to restore mucosal homeostasis in patients with generalized microbial imbalances (i.e., dysbiosis), including the human inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Probiotics, prebiotics, or their combination use (i.e., synbiotics) are one mechanism for modifying the microbiota and exerting direct and indirect effects on the host immune responses and metabolomics profiles. These beneficial effects are transferred through various pathways, including the production of antimicrobial peptides, promoting the growth of beneficial microbes and enhancing immunomodulatory functions via various metabolites. While probiotic therapy has been used empirically for decades with mixed success, the recent advances in molecular and mass spectrophotometric techniques for the characterization of the complexity and diversity of the intestinal microbiome has aided in better understanding of host-microbe interactions. It is important to better understand the functional properties of the microbiome, because it is now clear that the microbiota secretes many metabolites that have a direct impact on host immune responses. This information will improve selection of the most appropriate probiotic strains that selectively target intestinal disease processes.

  1. Functional properties of peanut fractions on the growth of probiotics and foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Bitsko, Elizabeth; Biswas, Debabrata

    2015-03-01

    Various compounds found in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) have been shown to provide multiple benefits to human health and may influence the growth of a broad range of gut bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effects of peanut white kernel and peanut skin on 3 strains of Lactobacillus and 3 major foodborne enteric bacterial pathogens. Significant (P < 0.05) growth stimulation of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was observed in the presence of 0.5% peanut flour (PF) made from peanut white kernel, whereas 0.5% peanut skin extract (PSE) exerted the inhibitory effect on the growth of these beneficial microbes. We also found that within 72 h, PF inhibited growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), while PSE significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited Listeria monocytogenes but promoted the growth of both EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium. The cell adhesion and invasion abilities of 3 pathogens to the host cells were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by 0.5% PF and 0.5% PSE. These results suggest that peanut white kernel might assist in improving human gut flora as well as reducing EHEC, whereas the beneficial effects of peanut skins require further research and investigation.

  2. Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation and both alter the gut microbiota of healthy, young men.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kathryn J; Rosikiewicz, Marta; Pimentel, Grégory; Bütikofer, Ueli; von Ah, Ueli; Voirol, Marie-Jeanne; Croxatto, Antony; Aeby, Sébastien; Drai, Jocelyne; McTernan, Philip G; Greub, Gilbert; Pralong, François P; Vergères, Guy; Vionnet, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Probiotic yogurt and milk supplemented with probiotics have been investigated for their role in 'low-grade' inflammation but evidence for their efficacy is inconclusive. This study explores the impact of probiotic yogurt on metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers, with a parallel study of gut microbiota dynamics. The randomised cross-over study was conducted in fourteen healthy, young men to test probiotic yogurt compared with milk acidified with 2 % d-(+)-glucono-δ-lactone during a 2-week intervention (400 g/d). Fasting assessments, a high-fat meal test (HFM) and microbiota analyses were used to assess the intervention effects. Baseline assessments for the HFM were carried out after a run-in during which normal milk was provided. No significant differences in the inflammatory response to the HFM were observed after probiotic yogurt compared with acidified milk intake; however, both products were associated with significant reductions in the inflammatory response to the HFM compared with the baseline tests (assessed by IL6, TNFα and chemokine ligand 5) (P<0·001). These observations were accompanied by significant changes in microbiota taxa, including decreased abundance of Bilophila wadsworthia after acidified milk (log 2-fold-change (FC)=-1·5, P adj=0·05) and probiotic yogurt intake (FC=-1·3, P adj=0·03), increased abundance of Bifidobacterium species after acidified milk intake (FC=1·4, P adj=0·04) and detection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii spp. bulgaricus (FC=7·0, P adj<0·01) and Streptococcus salivarius spp. thermophilus (FC=6·0, P adj<0·01) after probiotic yogurt intake. Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation that is associated with a HFM while inducing distinct changes in the gut microbiota of healthy men. These observations could be relevant for dietary treatments that target 'low-grade' inflammation.

  3. Probiotic as a Novel Treatment Strategy Against Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Khani, Soghra; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2013-01-01

    Context A symbiotic relationship between the liver and intestinal tract enables the healthy status of both organs. Microflora resident in intestinal lumen plays a significant role in hepatocytes function. Alterations to the type and amount of microorganisms that live in the intestinal tract can result in serious and harmful liver dysfunctions such as cirrhosis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, and hepatic encephalopathy. An increased number of pathogens, especially enterobacteriaceae, enterococci, and streptococci species causes the elevation of intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. The presence of high levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial substances in the blood result in a portal hypertension and ensuing hepatocytes damage. Several methods including the usage of antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics can be used to prevent the overgrowth of pathogens. Compared to prebiotic and antibiotic therapy, probiotics strains are a safer and less expensive therapy. Probiotics are "live microorganisms (according to the FAO/WHO) which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host”. Evidence Acquisitions Data from numerous preclinical and clinical trials allows for control of the flora bacteria quantity, decreases in compounds derived from bacteria, and lowers proinflammatory production such as TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ via down-regulation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κ B). Results On the other hand, probiotic can reduce the urease activity of bacterial microflora. Furthermore, probiotic decreases fecal pH value and reduces ammonia adsorption. In addition, the serum level of liver enzymes and other substances synthesized by the liver are modulated subsequent to probiotic consumption. Conclusions According to our knowledge, Probiotic therapy as a safe, inexpensive and a noninvasive strategy can reduce pathophysiological symptoms and improve different types of liver diseases without side

  4. Phylogenetic identification of bacterial MazF toxin protein motifs among probiotic strains and foodborne pathogens and potential implications of engineered probiotic intervention in food

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The most common mechanism involved in bacterial programmed cell death or apoptosis is through toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, which exist in many bacterial species. An experimental procedure or method that provides novel insights into the molecular basis for the development of engineered/synthetic pr...

  5. Experimental sulfate amendment alters peatland bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Strickman, R J S; Fulthorpe, R R; Coleman Wasik, J K; Engstrom, D R; Mitchell, C P J

    2016-10-01

    As part of a long-term, peatland-scale sulfate addition experiment, the impact of varying sulfate deposition on bacterial community responses was assessed using 16S tag encoded pyrosequencing. In three separate areas of the peatland, sulfate manipulations included an eight year quadrupling of atmospheric sulfate deposition (experimental), a 3-year recovery to background deposition following 5years of elevated deposition (recovery), and a control area. Peat concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg), a bioaccumulative neurotoxin, were measured, the production of which is attributable to a growing list of microorganisms, including many sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. The total bacterial and Deltaproteobacterial community structures in the experimental treatment differed significantly from those in the control and recovery treatments that were either indistinguishable or very similar to one another. Notably, the relatively rapid return (within three years) of bacterial community structure in the recovery treatment to a state similar to the control, demonstrates significant resilience of the peatland bacterial community to changes in atmospheric sulfate deposition. Changes in MeHg accumulation between sulfate treatments correlated with changes in the Deltaproteobacterial community, suggesting that sulfate may affect MeHg production through changes in the community structure of this group.

  6. Vaginal colonisation by probiotic lactobacilli and clinical outcome in women conventionally treated for bacterial vaginosis and yeast infection.

    PubMed

    Pendharkar, Sonal; Brandsborg, Erik; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-07-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the colonisation by lactobacilli and clinical outcome in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (R-VVC) receiving antibiotic or anti-fungal treatment in combination with the probiotic EcoVag® capsules. A total of 40 Scandinavian women diagnosed with BV or VVC on the basis of Amsel's criteria or clinical symptoms were consecutively recruited in two pilot open label clinical trials. In trial I, women with BV were treated with clindamycin and metronidazole followed by vaginal EcoVag® capsules, containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus DSM 14870 and Lactobacillus gasseri DSM 14869, for 5 consecutive days after each antibiotic treatment. In trial II, women were recruited in three groups as follows: women with BV receiving clindamycin and metronidazole treatment together with a prolonged administration of EcoVag® (10 consecutive days after each antibiotic treatment followed by weekly administration of capsules for next four months), women with R-VVC receiving extended fluconazole and EcoVag® treatment, and women receiving extended fluconazole treatments only. The difference in frequency of isolation of EcoVag® strains or other lactobacilli between groups was compared by Fisher's exact test. The 6-month cure rate for BV was 50 % in trial I while both the 6- and 12-month cure rates were 67 % in trial II. The 6- and 12-month cure rates for VVC were 100 % and 89 % in women receiving fluconazole and EcoVag®, and 100 % and 70 % in women receiving fluconazole only. The frequency of isolation of any Lactobacillus species during the course of the study was associated with cure of BV in trial I and II, whereas the frequency of isolation of EcoVag® strains was significantly associated with the cure of BV in trial II only. As previously observed, a change in sexual partner was associated with relapse of BV with an Odds ratio of 77 (95 % CI: 2.665 to 2225). The study suggests that the treatment with

  7. Probiotics as Complementary Treatment for Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Le Barz, Mélanie; Anhê, Fernando F.; Varin, Thibaut V.; Desjardins, Yves; Levy, Emile; Roy, Denis; Urdaci, Maria C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence has established the gut microbiota as one of the most important determinants of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Indeed, obesogenic diet can drastically alter bacterial populations (i.e., dysbiosis) leading to activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms and metabolic endotoxemia, therefore promoting insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disorders. To counteract these deleterious effects, probiotic strains have been developed with the aim of reshaping the microbiome to improve gut health. In this review, we focus on benefits of widely used probiotics describing their potential mechanisms of action, especially their ability to decrease metabolic endotoxemia by restoring the disrupted intestinal mucosal barrier. We also discuss the perspective of using new bacterial strains such as butyrate-producing bacteria and the mucolytic Akkermansia muciniphila, as well as the use of prebiotics to enhance the functionality of probiotics. Finally, this review introduces the notion of genetically engineered bacterial strains specifically developed to deliver anti-inflammatory molecules to the gut. PMID:26301190

  8. Probiotics as Complementary Treatment for Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Le Barz, Mélanie; Anhê, Fernando F; Varin, Thibaut V; Desjardins, Yves; Levy, Emile; Roy, Denis; Urdaci, Maria C; Marette, André

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence has established the gut microbiota as one of the most important determinants of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Indeed, obesogenic diet can drastically alter bacterial populations (i.e., dysbiosis) leading to activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms and metabolic endotoxemia, therefore promoting insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disorders. To counteract these deleterious effects, probiotic strains have been developed with the aim of reshaping the microbiome to improve gut health. In this review, we focus on benefits of widely used probiotics describing their potential mechanisms of action, especially their ability to decrease metabolic endotoxemia by restoring the disrupted intestinal mucosal barrier. We also discuss the perspective of using new bacterial strains such as butyrate-producing bacteria and the mucolytic Akkermansia muciniphila, as well as the use of prebiotics to enhance the functionality of probiotics. Finally, this review introduces the notion of genetically engineered bacterial strains specifically developed to deliver anti-inflammatory molecules to the gut.

  9. Distinctive anti-allergy properties of two probiotic bacterial strains in a mouse model of allergic poly-sensitization.

    PubMed

    Schabussova, Irma; Hufnagl, Karin; Wild, Carmen; Nutten, Sophie; Zuercher, Adrian W; Mercenier, Annick; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2011-02-24

    We compared the immunomodulatory properties of Bifidobacterium longum NCC 3001 and Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 in a mouse model of poly-sensitization to birch and grass pollen allergens. Mucosal application of both strains at the time of sensitization and challenge led to significant suppression of airway inflammation and down-regulated allergen-specific immune responses. In contrast, in the mice treated with probiotics prior to sensitization and challenge, only B. longum displayed protective effects. Our findings stress that the choice of probiotic strain and the timing of the application are crucial for tolerance induction. Furthermore, this is the first demonstration of anti-allergic effects of probiotic bacteria in poly-sensitized mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Yersinia pestis infection and laboratory conditions alter flea-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan T; Vetter, Sara M; Montenieiri, John; Holmes, Jennifer; Bernhardt, Scott A; Gage, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    We collected Oropsylla montana from rock squirrels, Spermophilus varigatus, and infected a subset of collected fleas with Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague. We used bar-tagged DNA pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities of wild, uninfected controls and infected fleas. Bacterial communities within Y. pestis-infected fleas were substantially more similar to one another than communities within wild or control fleas, suggesting that infection alters the bacterial community in a directed manner such that specific bacterial lineages are severely reduced in abundance or entirely eliminated from the community. Laboratory conditions also significantly altered flea-associated bacterial communities relative to wild communities, but much less so than Y. pestis infection. The abundance of Firmicutes decreased considerably in infected fleas, and Bacteroidetes were almost completely eliminated from both the control and infected fleas. Bartonella and Wolbachia were unaffected or responded positively to Y. pestis infection.

  11. Probiotics for preventive health.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Gut flora and probiotics have potential to affect health and disease far beyond the gut. There is increasing evidence that probiotics have beneficial effects in preventing a wide range of conditions and improving health. Randomized, double-blind studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of probiotics for preventing various diarrheal illnesses as well as allergic disorders. Evidence for their efficacy for use in the prevention and treatment of bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections is also mounting. In addition, probiotics may be useful for preventing respiratory infections, dental caries, necrotizing enterocolitis, and certain aspects of inflammatory bowel disease. Data also suggest that probiotics may promote good health in day care and work settings, and may enhance growth in healthy as well as ill and malnourished children. Results from meta-analyses and systematic reviews that combine results of studies from different types of probiotics to examine the effects in any disease state should be interpreted with caution. Specific strains are effective in specific disease states. No 2 probiotics are exactly alike; we should not expect reproducible results from studies that employ different species or strains, variable formulations, and diverse dosing schedules.

  12. Changes in the Functional Potential of the Gut Microbiome Following Probiotic Supplementation during Helicobacter Pylori Treatment.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bumjo; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Probiotic supplementation is utilized to alleviate the side effects associated with antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection. Several studies have described the effects of administration of probiotics on the gut microbiota during antibiotic therapy. However, most of these studies have focused on specific bacteria, thereby providing limited information on the functional roles of the altered microbiota. Therefore, we examined the impact of probiotic supplementation on the structure and functional dynamics of the gut microbiota during H. pylori eradication, using whole-metagenomic sequence analysis. Subjects were divided into two groups: the antibiotics group, which received only antibiotics, and the probiotics group, which received antibiotics with probiotic supplementation. The structural and functional profiles of gut microbiota was analyzed using metagenomic DNA extracted from the feces during treatment by Illumina MiSeq system. The overall alterations in microbiota, as revealed by whole metagenome sequencing, were similar with results from our previous 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. The proportional shift in functional gene families was greater in the antibiotics group than in the probiotics group. In particular, the proportion of genes related to selenocompound metabolism was reduced in the probiotics group, whereas genes associated with the metabolism of nucleotide sugars were increased. The functional alterations of gut microbiota may link to the reduction in intestinal irritation and maintenance of bacterial diversity observed following probiotic supplementation with antibiotic therapy. The potential beneficial roles of altered gut microbiota following probiotic supplementation are expected a reduction in side effects such as intestinal irritation and antibiotics resistance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Antibiotic-induced dysbiosis alters host-bacterial interactions and leads to colonic sensory and motor changes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, M; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Martínez, V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the commensal microbiota (dysbiosis) seem to be a pathogenic component of functional gastrointestinal disorders, mainly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and might participate in the secretomotor and sensory alterations observed in these patients.We determined if a state antibiotics-induced intestinal dysbiosis is able to modify colonic pain-related and motor responses and characterized the neuro-immune mechanisms implicated in mice. A 2-week antibiotics treatment induced a colonic dysbiosis (increments in Bacteroides spp, Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus spp and reduction in Bifidobacterium spp). Bacterial adherence was not affected. Dysbiosis was associated with increased levels of secretory-IgA, up-regulation of the antimicrobial lectin RegIIIγ, and toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 7 and down-regulation of the antimicrobial-peptide Resistin-Like Molecule-β and TLR5. Dysbiotic mice showed less goblet cells, without changes in the thickness of the mucus layer. Neither macroscopical nor microscopical signs of inflammation were observed. In dysbiotic mice, expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 was up-regulated, while the cannabinoid 1 and the mu-opioid receptors were down-regulated. In antibiotic-treated mice, visceral pain-related responses elicited by intraperitoneal acetic acid or intracolonic capsaicin were significantly attenuated. Colonic contractility was enhanced during dysbiosis. Intestinal dysbiosis induce changes in the innate intestinal immune system and modulate the expression of pain-related sensory systems, an effect associated with a reduction in visceral pain-related responses. Commensal microbiota modulates gut neuro-immune sensory systems, leading to functional changes, at least as it relates to viscerosensitivity. Similar mechanisms might explain the beneficial effects of antibiotics or certain probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25531553

  14. Antibiotic-induced dysbiosis alters host-bacterial interactions and leads to colonic sensory and motor changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, M; Cerdà-Cuéllar, M; Martínez, V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of the commensal microbiota (dysbiosis) seem to be a pathogenic component of functional gastrointestinal disorders, mainly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and might participate in the secretomotor and sensory alterations observed in these patients.We determined if a state antibiotics-induced intestinal dysbiosis is able to modify colonic pain-related and motor responses and characterized the neuro-immune mechanisms implicated in mice. A 2-week antibiotics treatment induced a colonic dysbiosis (increments in Bacteroides spp, Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus spp and reduction in Bifidobacterium spp). Bacterial adherence was not affected. Dysbiosis was associated with increased levels of secretory-IgA, up-regulation of the antimicrobial lectin RegIIIγ, and toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 7 and down-regulation of the antimicrobial-peptide Resistin-Like Molecule-β and TLR5. Dysbiotic mice showed less goblet cells, without changes in the thickness of the mucus layer. Neither macroscopical nor microscopical signs of inflammation were observed. In dysbiotic mice, expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 was up-regulated, while the cannabinoid 1 and the mu-opioid receptors were down-regulated. In antibiotic-treated mice, visceral pain-related responses elicited by intraperitoneal acetic acid or intracolonic capsaicin were significantly attenuated. Colonic contractility was enhanced during dysbiosis. Intestinal dysbiosis induce changes in the innate intestinal immune system and modulate the expression of pain-related sensory systems, an effect associated with a reduction in visceral pain-related responses. Commensal microbiota modulates gut neuro-immune sensory systems, leading to functional changes, at least as it relates to viscerosensitivity. Similar mechanisms might explain the beneficial effects of antibiotics or certain probiotics in the treatment of IBS.

  15. Addition of probiotics to norfloxacin does not improve efficacy in the prevention of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pande, Chandana; Kumar, Ashish; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) may occur despite antibiotic prophylaxis. We investigated whether the addition of probiotics to norfloxacin enhances its efficacy in the prevention of SBP. A double-blind, randomized-controlled trial was conducted among consecutive cirrhotic patients who had either recovered from SBP (secondary prophylaxis) or who were at a high risk for the development of SBP (low ascitic fluid protein or serum bilirubin ≥ 2.5 mg/dl; primary prophylaxis). Norfloxacin 400 mg/day with probiotics capsules (Enterococcus faecalis JPC 30 million, Clostridium butyricum 2 million, Bacillus mesentericus JPC 1 million, Bacillus coagulans 50 million spores) at a dose of two capsules three times daily (group 1) or norfloxacin with a placebo (group 2) was given and the occurrence of SBP within a period of 6 months (primary endpoint) or side-effects of therapy and mortality (secondary endpoints) were recorded. From April 2005 through August 2007, 110 patients were randomized to group 1 (n=55) or group 2 (n=55) and 45 (82%) and 43 (78%) of them completed the trial, respectively. The baseline characteristics were comparable. On intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative probability of treatment failures was similar in both the groups [19/55 (34%) in group 1 vs. 20/55 (36%) in group 2, P=0.840]. The cumulative probability of mortality was also similar [13/45 (29%) in group 1 vs. 14/43 (32%) in group 2, P=0.834]. The frequency of side-effects was also comparable. In subgroup analyses, the frequencies of SBP and deaths were similar in the two groups in the subgroups of primary and secondary prophylaxes. The presence of encephalopathy and serum bilirubin of greater than 3.65 mg/dl were found to predict mortality independently. The addition of probiotics to norfloxacin does not improve its efficacy in primary or secondary prophylaxis of SBP or in reducing the mortality in cirrhotic patients with ascites.

  16. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-09

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility of probiotic strains: Is it reasonable to combine probiotics with antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Neut, C; Mahieux, S; Dubreuil, L J

    2017-08-07

    The main goal of this study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility of strains collected from marketed probiotics to antibiotics used to treat community-acquired infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antibiotics were determined using a gradient strip (E test) or the agar dilution method for fidaxomicin. The probiotics demonstrated various antibiotic patterns. Bacterial probiotics are generally susceptible to most prescribed antibiotics orally administered, whereas yeast probiotics, such as Saccharomyces boulardii, are resistant. Special attention must be paid to co-prescriptions of antibiotics and probiotics to ensure that the probiotic strain is not susceptible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Eosinophils, probiotics, and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Helene F; Masterson, Joanne C; Furuta, Glenn T

    2016-11-01

    There is currently substantial interest in the therapeutic properties of probiotic microorganisms as recent research suggests that oral administration of specific bacterial strains may reduce inflammation and alter the nature of endogenous microflora in the gastrointestinal tract. Eosinophils are multifunctional tissue leukocytes, prominent among the resident cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa that promote local immunity. Recent studies with genetically altered mice indicate that eosinophils not only participate in maintaining gut homeostasis, but that the absence of eosinophils may have significant impact on the nature of the endogenous gut microflora and responses to gut pathogens, notably Clostridium difficile Furthermore, in human subjects, there is an intriguing relationship between eosinophils, allergic inflammation, and the nature of the lung microflora, notably a distinct association between eosinophil infiltration and detection of bacteria of the phylum Actinobacteria. Among topics for future research, it will be important to determine whether homeostatic mechanisms involve direct interactions between eosinophils and bacteria or whether they involve primarily eosinophil-mediated responses to cytokine signaling in the local microenvironment. Likewise, although is it clear that eosinophils can and do interact with bacteria in vivo, their ability to discern between pathogenic and probiotic species in various settings remains to be explored.

  19. Use of Probiotics as Prophylaxis for Postoperative Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative bacterial infections are common despite prophylactic administration of antibiotics. The wide-spread use of antibiotics in patients has contributed to the emergence of multiresistant bacteria. A restricted use of antibiotics must be followed in most clinical situations. In surgical patients there are several reasons for an altered microbial flora in the gut in combination with an altered barrier function leading to an enhanced inflammatory response to surgery. Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that probiotics (mainly lactobacilli) may reduce the number of potentially pathogenia bacteria (PPM) and restore a deranged barrier function. It is therefore of interest to test if these abilities of probiotics can be utilized in preoperative prophylaxis. These factors may be corrected by perioperative administration of probiotics in addition to antibiotics. Fourteen randomized clinical trials have been presented in which the effect of such regimens has been tested. It seems that in patients undergoing liver transplantation or elective surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract prophylactic administration of different probiotic strains in combination with different fibers results in a three-fold reduction in postoperative infections. In parallel there seems to be a reduction in postoperative inflammation, although that has not been studied in a systematic way. The use of similar concepts in colorectal surgery has not been successful in reducing postoperative infections. Reasons for this difference are not obvious. It may be that higher doses of probiotics with longer duration are needed to influence microbiota in the lower gastrointestinal tract or that immune function in colorectal patients may not be as important as in transplantation or surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The favorable results for the use of prophylactic probiotics in some settings warrant further controlled studies to elucidate potential mechanisms, impact on gut

  20. Probiotics in shrimp aquaculture: avenues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ninawe, A S; Selvin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative strategy to antibiotic use in aquatic disease management, probiotics have recently attracted extensive attention in aquaculture. However, the use of terrestrial bacterial species as probiotics for aquaculture has had limited success, as bacterial strain characteristics are dependent upon the environment in which they thrive. Therefore, isolating potential probiotic bacteria from the marine environment in which they grow optimally is a better approach. Bacteria that have been used successfully as probiotics belong to the genus Vibrio and Bacillus, and the species Thalassobacter utilis. Most researchers have isolated these probiotic strains from shrimp culture water, or from the intestine of different penaeid species. The use of probiotic bacteria, based on the principle of competitive exclusion, and the use of immunostimulants are two of the most promising preventive methods developed in the fight against diseases during the last few years. It also noticed that probiotic bacteria could produce some digestive enzymes, which might improve the digestion of shrimp, thus enhancing the ability of stress resistance and health of the shrimp. However, the probiotics in aquatic environment remain to be a controversial concept, as there was no authentic evidence / real environment demonstrations on the successful use of probiotics and their mechanisms of action in vivo. The present review highlights the potential sources of probiotics, mechanism of action, diversity of probiotic microbes and challenges of probiotic usage in shrimp aquaculture.

  1. An update on the use and investigation of probiotics in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Guarner, Francisco; Guerrant, Richard; Holt, Peter R; Quigley, Eamonn MM; Sartor, R Balfour; Sherman, Philip M; Mayer, Emeran A

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are derived from traditional fermented foods, from beneficial commensals or from the environment. They act through diverse mechanisms affecting the composition or function of the commensal microbiota and by altering host epithelial and immunological responses. Certain probiotic interventions have shown promise in selected clinical conditions where aberrant microbiota have been reported, such as atopic dermatitis, necrotising enterocolitis, pouchitis and possibly irritable bowel syndrome. However, no studies have been conducted that can causally link clinical improvements to probiotic-induced microbiota changes. Whether a disease-prone microbiota pattern can be remodelled to a more robust, resilient and disease-free state by probiotic administration remains a key unanswered question. Progress in this area will be facilitated by: optimising strain, dose and product formulations, including protective commensal species; matching these formulations with selectively responsive subpopulations; and identifying ways to manipulate diet to modify bacterial profiles and metabolism. PMID:23474420

  2. An update on the use and investigation of probiotics in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Guarner, Francisco; Guerrant, Richard; Holt, Peter R; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Sartor, R Balfour; Sherman, Philip M; Mayer, Emeran A

    2013-05-01

    Probiotics are derived from traditional fermented foods, from beneficial commensals or from the environment. They act through diverse mechanisms affecting the composition or function of the commensal microbiota and by altering host epithelial and immunological responses. Certain probiotic interventions have shown promise in selected clinical conditions where aberrant microbiota have been reported, such as atopic dermatitis, necrotising enterocolitis, pouchitis and possibly irritable bowel syndrome. However, no studies have been conducted that can causally link clinical improvements to probiotic-induced microbiota changes. Whether a disease-prone microbiota pattern can be remodelled to a more robust, resilient and disease-free state by probiotic administration remains a key unanswered question. Progress in this area will be facilitated by: optimising strain, dose and product formulations, including protective commensal species; matching these formulations with selectively responsive subpopulations; and identifying ways to manipulate diet to modify bacterial profiles and metabolism.

  3. Altered Cytokine Expression and Barrier Properties after In Vitro Infection of Porcine Epithelial Cells with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Probiotic Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee; Bondzio, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of the probiotic feed additive Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium) on porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) during an in vitro challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Cells were incubated with E. faecium, ETEC, or both, and the effects on barrier function and structure and intra- and intercellular signaling were determined. Coincubation with E. faecium abolished the ETEC-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rt) (p ≤ 0.05). No differences were seen in the expression levels of the intercellular connecting tight junction proteins examined. However, for the first time, a reorganization of the monolayer was observed in ETEC-infected cells but not in coincubated cells. ETEC induced an increase in cytotoxicity that was prevented by coincubation (p ≤ 0.05), whereas apoptosis rates were not affected by bacterial treatment. ETEC increased the mRNA expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6 which could be prevented by coincubation for TNF-α mRNA expression and IL-6 protein (p ≤ 0.05). Likewise, cAMP concentrations elevated by ETEC were reduced in coincubated cells (p ≤ 0.05). These findings indicate a protective effect of the probiotic E. faecium on inflammatory responses during infection with ETEC. PMID:28607532

  4. Probiotics, immunomodulation, and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harsharn; Prasad, Jaya

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amount, confer a health benefit on the host. Amongst the many benefits associated with the consumption of probiotics, modulation of the immune system has received the most attention. Several animal and human studies have provided unequivocal evidence that specific strains of probiotics are able to stimulate as well as regulate several aspects of natural and acquired immune responses. There is also evidence that intake of probiotics is effective in the prevention and/or management of acute gastroenteritis and rotavirus diarrhoea, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and intestinal inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease and pouchitis, and paediatric atopic disorders. The efficacy of probiotics against bacterial infections and immunological disorders such as adult asthma, cancers, diabetes, and arthritis in humans remains to be proven. Also, major gaps exist in our knowledge about the mechanisms by which probiotics modulate immune function. Optimum dose, frequency and duration of treatment required for different conditions in different population groups also remains to be determined. Different probiotic strains vary in their ability to modulate the immune system and therefore efficacy of each strain needs to be carefully demonstrated through rigorously designed (randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled) studies. This chapter provides an over view of the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics in health and disease, and discusses possible mechanisms through which probiotics mediate their disparate effects.

  5. Transcriptomic and cellular response to bacterial challenge (pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in farmed juvenile Haliotis rufescens fed with or without probiotic diet.

    PubMed

    Silva-Aciares, Fernando; Moraga, Dario; Auffret, Michel; Tanguy, Arnaud; Riquelme, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    The abalone production in Chile has increased considerably in recent years with no sign of tapering off. Open and semi-closed circuits in the marine water zones in the north and south of Chile are the preferred areas of culture. Coastal ecosystems are subjected to a wide variety of contaminants that generate stress that affects populations via their impacts to individuals at both physiological and genetic levels. This work investigated the genomic and cellular response of post-weaning juvenile Haliotis rufescens abalone under hatchery conditions, fed with probiotic diets, and subsequently challenged with Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The expression patterns of 16 selected genes associated with different metabolic pathways were analyzed using Real-Time PCR. Gene expression was then compared to immunological response parameters in the abalone and quantification of V. parahaemolyticus during the experimental period. Both transcriptomic and immunological analyses indicated significant alteration of physiological processes in H. rufescens correlated to exposure to the pathogenic bacteria, as well as to probiotic nutrition.

  6. Alteration of epithelial cell lysosomal integrity induced by bacterial cholesterol‐dependent cytolysins

    PubMed Central

    Malet, Julien Karim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial pathogens can interfere during infection with host cell organelles, such as mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum‐Golgi system or nuclei. As important cellular functions are often compartmentalized in these organelles, their targeting allows pathogens to manipulate key host functions during infection. Here, we identify lysosomes as a new class of organelles targeted by the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We demonstrate that extracellular Listeria, via secretion of the pore‐forming toxin listeriolysin O, alters lysosomal integrity in epithelial cells but not in macrophages. Listeriolysin O induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization and release of lysosomal content, such as cathepsins proteases, which remain transiently active in the host cytosol. We furthermore show that other bacterial pore‐forming toxins, such as perfringolysin O and pneumolysin, also induce lysosomes alteration. Together, our data unveil a novel activity of bacterial cholesterol‐dependent cytolysins. PMID:27739224

  7. Alterations of digestive enzyme activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish, Polyodon spathula, fed dietary probiotics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Ma, Mingyang; Ji, Hong; Ren, Tongjun; Mims, Steven D

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of probiotics on digestive enzymes activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) were studied. A total of 400 fish were reared in two cages and fed with a basal diet (control group, CG) or diet supplemented with commercial probiotics (treatment group, TG) for 80 days. Enzymes activities analysis indicated that protease and α-amylase activities increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in TG. Light microscopy observation demonstrated the decrease of wall thickness and muscularis thickness in foregut (P < 0.01), the increase of those in hindgut (P < 0.05), the increase of folds height in foregut (P < 0.01) and midgut in TG (P < 0.05). DGGE results of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA confirmed that the richness and diversity of intestinal microbial species increased in TG. The similarity between the commercial bacteria product and intestinal microbiota of TG were higher than the microbiota from CG. The quantities of bacterium, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, present an increasing trend from foregut to hindgut both in two groups. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study to reveal the effect of dietary probiotics on intestinal digestive enzymes activities, morphology and microbiota in paddlefish.

  8. Perinatal outcomes of prenatal probiotic and prebiotic administration: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    VandeVusse, Leona; Hanson, Lisa; Safdar, Nasia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this integrative review was to identify, critique, and synthesize the maternal and neonatal evidence on the prenatal use of probiotics and prebiotics to inform perinatal health professionals. A comprehensive literature search resulted in 37 studies of prenatal probiotics and 1 on antepartal prebiotics published from 1990 through 2011 that reported maternal, fetal, and/or neonatal outcomes. The methodologic quality of the studies reviewed was high, although investigators used different probiotic combinations and inconsistently reported perinatal clinical outcomes. The extraction of perinatal outcome variables resulted in identification of 9 maternal and 5 neonatal categories. Prenatal probiotics significantly reduced the incidence of bacterial vaginosis, increased colonization with vaginal Lactobacillus and intestinal Lactobacillus rhamnosus, altered immune markers in serum and breast milk, improved maternal glucose metabolism, and reduced the incidence of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Antepartally, probiotics were associated with significantly higher counts of Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus lactis (healthy intestinal flora) in neonatal stool. Prenatal prebiotics significantly increased maternal intestinal Bifidobacterium. No adverse events were reported and there was evidence of safety and tolerance of prenatal probiotics and prebiotics in the scientific investigations reviewed. It is recommended that in future investigations of prenatal probiotics researchers explicitly report maternal and neonatal outcomes.

  9. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:24106397

  10. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-09-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS.

  11. Probiotics Blunt the Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Blueberry Feeding in Hypertensive Rats without Altering Hippuric Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that feeding polyphenol-rich wild blueberries to hypertensive rats lowered systolic blood pressure. Since probiotic bacteria produce bioactive metabolites from berry polyphenols that enhance the health benefits of berry consumption, we hypothesized that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet would augment the anti-hypertensive effects of blueberry consumption. Groups (n = 8) of male spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed one of four AIN ‘93G-based diets for 8 weeks: Control (CON); 3% freeze-dried wild blueberry (BB); 1% probiotic bacteria (PRO); or 3% BB + 1% PRO (BB+PRO). Blood pressure was measured at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 by the tail-cuff method, and urine was collected at weeks 4 and 8 to determine markers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes), nitric oxide synthesis (nitrites), and polyphenol metabolism (hippuric acid). Data were analyzed using mixed models ANOVA with repeated measures. Diet had a significant main effect on diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.046), with significantly lower measurements in the BB- vs. CON-fed rats (p = 0.035). Systolic blood pressure showed a similar but less pronounced response to diet (p = 0.220), again with the largest difference between the BB and CON groups. Absolute increase in blood pressure between weeks 0 and 8 tended to be smaller in the BB and PRO vs. CON and BB+PRO groups (systolic increase, p = 0.074; diastolic increase, p = 0.185). Diet had a significant main effect on hippuric acid excretion (p<0.0001), with 2- and ~1.5-fold higher levels at weeks 4 and 8, respectively, in the BB and BB+PRO vs. PRO and CON groups. Diet did not have a significant main effect on F2-isoprostane (p = 0.159) or nitrite excretion (p = 0.670). Our findings show that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet does not enhance and actually may impair the anti-hypertensive effect of blueberry consumption. However, probiotic bacteria are not interfering with blueberry polyphenol metabolism into hippuric

  12. Probiotics Blunt the Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Blueberry Feeding in Hypertensive Rats without Altering Hippuric Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Cynthia; He, Zhengcheng; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine T; Sweeney, Marva I

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that feeding polyphenol-rich wild blueberries to hypertensive rats lowered systolic blood pressure. Since probiotic bacteria produce bioactive metabolites from berry polyphenols that enhance the health benefits of berry consumption, we hypothesized that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet would augment the anti-hypertensive effects of blueberry consumption. Groups (n = 8) of male spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed one of four AIN '93G-based diets for 8 weeks: Control (CON); 3% freeze-dried wild blueberry (BB); 1% probiotic bacteria (PRO); or 3% BB + 1% PRO (BB+PRO). Blood pressure was measured at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 by the tail-cuff method, and urine was collected at weeks 4 and 8 to determine markers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes), nitric oxide synthesis (nitrites), and polyphenol metabolism (hippuric acid). Data were analyzed using mixed models ANOVA with repeated measures. Diet had a significant main effect on diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.046), with significantly lower measurements in the BB- vs. CON-fed rats (p = 0.035). Systolic blood pressure showed a similar but less pronounced response to diet (p = 0.220), again with the largest difference between the BB and CON groups. Absolute increase in blood pressure between weeks 0 and 8 tended to be smaller in the BB and PRO vs. CON and BB+PRO groups (systolic increase, p = 0.074; diastolic increase, p = 0.185). Diet had a significant main effect on hippuric acid excretion (p<0.0001), with 2- and ~1.5-fold higher levels at weeks 4 and 8, respectively, in the BB and BB+PRO vs. PRO and CON groups. Diet did not have a significant main effect on F2-isoprostane (p = 0.159) or nitrite excretion (p = 0.670). Our findings show that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet does not enhance and actually may impair the anti-hypertensive effect of blueberry consumption. However, probiotic bacteria are not interfering with blueberry polyphenol metabolism into hippuric acid.

  13. Probiotics: Interaction with gut microbiome and antiobesity potential.

    PubMed

    Arora, Tulika; Singh, Satvinder; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder afflicting people globally. There has been a pivotal advancement in the understanding of the intestinal microbiota composition and its implication in extraintestinal (metabolic) diseases. Therefore, any agent modulating gut microbiota may produce an influential effect in preventing the pathogenesis of disease. Probiotics are live microbes that, when administered in adequate amounts, have been shown to confer health benefits to the host. Over the years, probiotics have been a part of the human diet in the form of different fermented foods consumed around the world. Their influence on different physiologic functions in the host is increasingly being documented. The antiobesity potential of probiotics is also gaining wide attention because of increasing evidence of the role of gut microbiota in energy homeostasis and fat accumulation. Probiotics have also been shown to interact with the resident bacterial members already present in the gut by altering their properties, which may also affect the metabolic pathways involved in the regulation of fat metabolism. The underlying pathways governing the antiobesity effects of probiotics remain unclear. However, it is hoped that the evidence presented and discussed in this review will encourage and thus drive more extensive research in this field.

  14. Vizantin inhibits bacterial adhesion without affecting bacterial growth and causes Streptococcus mutans biofilm to detach by altering its internal architecture.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shoji; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yuki; Ohshima, Hayato; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Terao, Yutaka; Noiri, Yuichiro

    2016-11-11

    An ideal antibiofilm strategy is to control both in the quality and quantity of biofilm while maintaining the benefits derived from resident microflora. Vizantin, a recently developed immunostimulating compound, has also been found to have antibiofilm property. This study evaluated the influence on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of sulfated vizantin and biofilm development following bacterial adhesion on a hydroxyapatite disc coated with sulfated vizantin. Supplementation with sulfated vizantin up to 50 μM did not affect either bacterial growth or biofilm formation, whereas 50 μM sulfated vizantin caused the biofilm to readily detach from the surface. Sulfated vizantin at the concentration of 50 μM upregulated the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes, but downregulated the expression of the gtfD gene, suggesting altered architecture in the biofilm. Biofilm development on the surface coated with sulfated vizantin was inhibited depending on the concentration, suggesting prevention from bacterial adhesion. Among eight genes related to bacterial adherence in S. mutans, expression of gtfB and gtfC was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of gtfD, GbpA and GbpC was downregulated according to the concentration of vizantin, especially with 50 μM vizantin by 0.8-, 0.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively. These findings suggest that sulfated vizantin may cause structural degradation as a result of changing gene regulation related to bacterial adhesion and glucan production of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Probiotics and allergy in children--an update review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shih-Jin; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Lam, Ka-Pan; Chu, Yu-Te; Wang, Wei-Li; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2010-06-01

    The hygiene hypothesis suggests that the increased prevalence of allergic diseases has resulted from a relative lack of microbial stimuli during infancy and early childhood. Children with atopic diseases have different commensal bacterial groups in the gut compared to non-atopic children, and differences are also found between countries with high and low incidence of atopic diseases. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that provide benefits to the health of a host by altering the host's microflora when they are administered in adequate amounts. They are being investigated for possible roles in managing allergic diseases. To date, the evidence that probiotics can be used to treat or prevent allergic diseases of children remains controversial. We reviewed recent randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials using probiotics for allergic diseases of children and evaluated their clinical efficacy, possible mechanisms, dosage, and safety for managing allergic diseases of children. The current data are insufficient to strongly recommend probiotics as a standard treatment or preventative measure for pediatric allergic disease. More studies are needed to standardize study designs, bacterial strains, dosages, and durations for different allergic diseases of children.

  16. Altered Transcription of Murine Genes Induced in the Small Bowel by Administration of Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Corinda; Lawley, Blair; Loach, Diane; Gould, Maree; Dunn, Amy C.; McLellan, Alexander D.; Black, Michael A.; McNoe, Les; Dekker, James; Gopal, Pramod; Collett, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is a probiotic strain reported to increase resistance to epithelium-adherent and -invasive intestinal pathogens in experimental animals. To increase understanding of the relationship between strain HN001 and the bowel, transcription of selected genes in the mucosa of the murine small bowel was measured. Mice previously naive to lactobacilli (Lactobacillus-free mice) were examined after daily exposure to HN001 in drinking water. Comparisons were made to results from matched Lactobacillus-free mice. Infant and adult mice were investigated to provide a temporal view of gene expression in response to exposure to HN001. Genes sgk1, angptl4, and hspa1b, associated with the apoptosis pathway, were selected for investigation by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR on the basis of a preliminary duodenal DNA microarray screen. Normalized to gapdh gene transcription, these three genes were upregulated after 6 to 10 days exposure of adult mice to HN001. Angptl4 was shown by immunofluorescence to be upregulated in duodenal epithelial cells of mucosal samples. Epithelial cell migration was faster in HN001-exposed mice than in the Lactobacillus-free controls. Transcriptional responses in infant mice differed according to bowel region and age. For example, sgk1 was upregulated in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa of mice less than 25 days old, whereas angptl4 and hspa1b were upregulated at 10 days in the duodenum but downregulated in the jejunal mucosa until mice were 25 days old. Overall, the results provide links between a probiotic strain, mucosal gene expression, and host phenotype, which may be useful in delineating mechanisms of probiotic action. PMID:24584241

  17. Altered transcription of murine genes induced in the small bowel by administration of probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Taylor, Corinda; Lawley, Blair; Loach, Diane; Gould, Maree; Dunn, Amy C; McLellan, Alexander D; Black, Michael A; McNoe, Les; Dekker, James; Gopal, Pramod; Collett, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is a probiotic strain reported to increase resistance to epithelium-adherent and -invasive intestinal pathogens in experimental animals. To increase understanding of the relationship between strain HN001 and the bowel, transcription of selected genes in the mucosa of the murine small bowel was measured. Mice previously naive to lactobacilli (Lactobacillus-free mice) were examined after daily exposure to HN001 in drinking water. Comparisons were made to results from matched Lactobacillus-free mice. Infant and adult mice were investigated to provide a temporal view of gene expression in response to exposure to HN001. Genes sgk1, angptl4, and hspa1b, associated with the apoptosis pathway, were selected for investigation by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR on the basis of a preliminary duodenal DNA microarray screen. Normalized to gapdh gene transcription, these three genes were upregulated after 6 to 10 days exposure of adult mice to HN001. Angptl4 was shown by immunofluorescence to be upregulated in duodenal epithelial cells of mucosal samples. Epithelial cell migration was faster in HN001-exposed mice than in the Lactobacillus-free controls. Transcriptional responses in infant mice differed according to bowel region and age. For example, sgk1 was upregulated in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa of mice less than 25 days old, whereas angptl4 and hspa1b were upregulated at 10 days in the duodenum but downregulated in the jejunal mucosa until mice were 25 days old. Overall, the results provide links between a probiotic strain, mucosal gene expression, and host phenotype, which may be useful in delineating mechanisms of probiotic action.

  18. Role of F1C fimbriae, flagella, and secreted bacterial components in the inhibitory effect of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on atypical enteropathogenic E. coli infection.

    PubMed

    Kleta, Sylvia; Nordhoff, Marcel; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Kolenda, Rafal; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Bleiss, Wilfried; Schierack, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is recognized as an important intestinal pathogen that frequently causes acute and persistent diarrhea in humans and animals. The use of probiotic bacteria to prevent diarrhea is gaining increasing interest. The probiotic E. coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is known to be effective in the treatment of several gastrointestinal disorders. While both in vitro and in vivo studies have described strong inhibitory effects of EcN on enteropathogenic bacteria, including pathogenic E. coli, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EcN on infections of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) with respect to single infection steps, including adhesion, microcolony formation, and the attaching and effacing phenotype. We show that EcN drastically reduced the infection efficiencies of aEPEC by inhibiting bacterial adhesion and growth of microcolonies, but not the attaching and effacing of adherent bacteria. The inhibitory effect correlated with EcN adhesion capacities and was predominantly mediated by F1C fimbriae, but also by H1 flagella, which served as bridges between EcN cells. Furthermore, EcN seemed to interfere with the initial adhesion of aEPEC to host cells by secretion of inhibitory components. These components do not appear to be specific to EcN, but we propose that the strong adhesion capacities enable EcN to secrete sufficient local concentrations of the inhibitory factors. The results of this study are consistent with a mode of action whereby EcN inhibits secretion of virulence-associated proteins of EPEC, but not their expression.

  19. Effect of intestinal microbiota alteration on hepatic damage in rats with acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yirui; Chen, Huazhong; Zhu, Biao; Qin, Nan; Chen, Yunbo; Li, Zhengfeng; Deng, Min; Jiang, Haiyin; Xu, Xiangfei; Yang, Jiezuan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-11-01

    The previous studies all focus on the effect of probiotics and antibiotics on infection after liver transplantation. Here, we focus on the effect of gut microbiota alteration caused by probiotics and antibiotics on hepatic damage after allograft liver transplantation. Brown-Norway rats received saline, probiotics, or antibiotics via daily gavage for 3 weeks. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was carried out after 1 week of gavage. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota, liver function and histopathology, serum and liver cytokines, and T cells in peripheral blood and Peyer's patch were evaluated. Distinct segregation of fecal bacterial diversity was observed in the probiotic group and antibiotic group when compared with the allograft group. As for diversity of intestinal mucosal microbiota and pathology of intestine at 2 weeks after OLT, antibiotics and probiotics had a significant effect on ileum and colon. The population of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the probiotic group was significantly greater than the antibiotic group and the allograft group. The liver injury was significantly reduced in the antibiotic group and the probiotic group compared with the allograft group. The CD4/CD8 and Treg cells in Peyer's patch were decreased in the antibiotic group. The intestinal Treg cell and serum and liver TGF-β were increased markedly while CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly decreased in the probiotic group. It suggested that probiotics mediate their beneficial effects through increase of Treg cells and TGF-β and deduction of CD4/CD8 in rats with acute rejection (AR) after OLT.

  20. Probiotics and immunity: a fish perspective.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S K

    2010-07-01

    Probiotics are usually live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefits on host. Nowadays, probiotics are also becoming an integral part of the aquaculture practices to obtain high production. The common probiotics that are used for aquaculture practices include Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Enterococcus, Carnobacterium, Shewanella, Bacillus, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Clostridium, and Saccharomyces species. The involvement of probiotics in nutrition, disease resistance and other beneficial activities in fish has proven beyond any doubt. Among the numerous health benefits attributed to probiotics, modulation of immune system is one of the most commonly purported benefits of the probiotics and their potency to stimulate the systemic and local immunity under in vitro and in vivo conditions is noteworthy. Different probiotics either monospecies or multispecies supplementation can eventually elevate phagocytic, lysozyme, complement, respiratory burst activity as well as expression of various cytokines in fish. Similarly, probiotics can stimulate the gut immune system of fish with marked increase in the number of Ig(+) cells and acidophilic granulocytes. Furthermore, mono-bacterial association studies (with non-probiotic bacterial strains) in gnotobiotic fish also indicate the up-regulation of various immune related genes. Though the exact mode of action of probiotics is yet to be established in any animal including fish, probiotics often exert host specific and strain specific differences in their activities. Various factors like source, type, dose and duration of supplementation of probiotics can significantly affect the immunomodulatory activity of probiotics. The review is therefore, aiming to highlight the immunomodulatory activity of probiotics and also to evaluate the factors that regulate for the optimum induction of immune responses in fish.

  1. Safety assessment of potential probiotic lactic acid bacterial strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Shu, Q; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Birtles, M J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-05-25

    The general safety of immune-enhancing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20), Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10) was investigated in a feeding trial. Groups of BALB/c mice were orally administered test LAB strains or the commercial reference strain Lb. acidophilus LA-1 at 2.5 x 10(9), 5 x 10(10) or 2.5 x 10(12) colony forming units (CFU)/kg body weight/day for 4 weeks. Throughout this time, their feed intake, water intake, and live body weight were monitored. At the end of the 4 week observation period, samples of blood, liver, spleen, kidney, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gut tissues (ileum, caecum, and colon) were collected to determine: haematological parameters (red blood cell and platelet counts, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration); differential leukocyte counts; blood biochemistry (plasma total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and glucose); mucosal histology (epithelial cell height, mucosal thickness, and villus height); and bacterial translocation to extra-gut tissues (blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymph nodes). DNA finger printing techniques were used to identify any viable bacterial strains recovered from these tissues. The results demonstrated that 4 weeks consumption of these LAB strains had no adverse effects on animals' general health status, haematology, blood biochemistry, gut mucosal histology parameters, or the incidence of bacterial translocation. A few viable LAB cells were recovered from the tissues of animals in both control and test groups, but DNA fingerprinting did not identify any of these as the inoculated strains. The results obtained in this study suggest that the potentially probiotic LAB strains HN001, HN017, and HN019 are non-toxic for mice and are therefore likely to be safe for human use.

  2. Effect of addition of a probiotic microorganism to broiler diets contaminated with deoxynivalenol on performance and histological alterations of intestinal villi of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, W A; Böhm, J; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Ghareeb, K; Zentek, J

    2006-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) on the performance of broilers, organ weights, and intestinal histology and to evaluate the efficacy of a probiotic feed additive (PB, Eubacterium sp.) with the ability to deepoxidize DON. Two hundred seventy-seven 1-d-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 dietary treatments for 6 wk. The dietary treatments were 1) control; 2) artificially contaminated diets with 10 mg of DON/kg of diet; 3) DON-contaminated diets plus probiotic feed additive (DON-PB). The BW and the efficiency of feed utilization were not adversely affected (P > 0.05) by the inclusion of DON in the diets. A slight improvement in feed intake and BW gain over the course of the experiment was observed in broilers fed DON-PB with no change in feed efficiency. The absolute or relative organ weights were not altered (P > 0.05) in broilers fed the diet containing DON compared with controls and the DON-PB group. The absolute liver weights were numerically increased (P < 0.1) for broilers receiving the diet containing DON-PB. There were no significant differences in the absolute and relative weights of the gizzard, duodenum, pancreas, heart, and spleen. However, the absolute and relative weights of the jejunum and cecum were increased for DON-PB-fed broilers compared with the controls and DON group. No pathological lesions were found in the gut of birds fed DON-contaminated diets during the feeding trial, but mild intestinal changes were observed. The DON altered small intestinal morphology, especially in the duodenum and jejunum, where villi were shorter and thinner (P < 0.05). The addition of the eubacteria to the DON-contaminated feed of the broilers effectively alleviated the histological alterations caused by DON and led to comparable villus length as in the control group. In conclusion, diets with DON contamination below levels that induce a negative impact on health and performance could affect small intestinal

  3. Probiotics: current trends in the treatment of diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Sujatha S; Jalgaonkar, Sharmila; Shahani, S; Kulkarni, Vijaya N

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, research into and public interest in probiotics and probiotic foods have risen. Lactobacilli and bifidobacterium are the most commonly used probiotics while yoghurt and kefir are popular foods containing probiotics. Probiotics have been used to manage diarrhoea. Many things cause diarrhoea, including bacterial, viral and protozoal infections, radiation and antibiotic therapy. Different studies have found that probiotics may also enhance the immune response, reduce serum cholesterol, prevent colonic cancer, prevent dental caries, prevent ulcers due to Helicobacter pylori, maintain urogenital health, and ameliorate hepatic encephalopathy. Further studies are required to establish their role in these conditions.

  4. Altered gastrointestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome and its modification by diet: probiotics, prebiotics and the low FODMAP diet.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Whelan, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterised by abdominal pain or discomfort with disordered defecation. This review describes the role of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS and how dietary strategies to manage symptoms impact on the microbial community. Evidence suggests a dysbiosis of the luminal and mucosal colonic microbiota in IBS, frequently characterised by a reduction in species of Bifidobacteria which has been associated with worse symptom profile. Probiotic supplementation trials suggest intentional modulation of the GI microbiota may be effective in treating IBS. A smaller number of prebiotic supplementation studies have also demonstrated effectiveness in IBS whilst increasing Bifidobacteria. In contrast, a novel method of managing IBS symptoms is the restriction of short-chain fermentable carbohydrates (low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet). Studies consistently demonstrate clinical effectiveness of the low FODMAP diet in patients with IBS. However, one unintentional consequence of this dietary intervention is its impact on the microbiota. This leads to an interesting paradox; namely, increasing luminal Bifidobacteria through probiotic supplementation is associated with a reduction in IBS symptoms while in direct conflict to this, the low FODMAP diet has clinical efficacy but markedly reduces luminal Bifidobacteria concentration. Given the multifactorial aetiology of IBS, the heterogeneity of symptoms and the complex and diverse nature of the microbiome, it is probable that both interventions are effective in patient subgroups. However combination treatment has never been explored and as such, presents an exciting opportunity for optimising clinical management, whilst preventing potentially deleterious effects on the GI microbiota.

  5. Helminth-induced alterations of the gut microbiota exacerbate bacterial colitis.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Su, L; Li, Y; Long, S R; Chang, J; Zhang, W; Walker, W A; Xavier, R J; Cherayil, B J; Shi, H N

    2017-03-29

    Infection with the intestinal helminth parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus exacerbates the colitis caused by the bacterial enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium. To clarify the underlying mechanism, we analyzed fecal microbiota composition of control and helminth-infected mice and evaluated the functional role of compositional differences by microbiota transplantation experiments. Our results showed that infection of Balb/c mice with H. polygyrus resulted in significant changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, characterized by a marked increase in the abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreases in Firmicutes and Lactobacillales. Recipients of the gut microbiota from helminth-infected wide-type, but not STAT6-deficient, Balb/c donors had increased fecal pathogen shedding and significant worsening of Citrobacter-induced colitis compared to recipients of microbiota from control donors. Recipients of helminth-altered microbiota also displayed increased regulatory T cells and IL-10 expression. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and neutralization of IL-10 in recipients of helminth-altered microbiota led to reduced stool C. rodentium numbers and attenuated colitis. These results indicate that alteration of the gut microbiota is a significant contributor to the H. polygyrus-induced exacerbation of C. rodentium colitis. The helminth-induced alteration of the microbiota is Th2-dependent and acts by promoting regulatory T cells that suppress protective responses to bacterial enteropathogens.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 29 March 2017 doi:10.1038/mi.2017.20.

  6. Towards effective and stable probiotics.

    PubMed

    Yarullina, D R; Damshkaln, L G; Bruslik, N L; Konovalova, O A; Ilinskaya, O N; Lozinsky, V I

    2015-01-01

    months at 4°C. The bacterial viability tests also demonstrated that after 6 h treatment with 2% bile or HCl (pH 2) L. plantarum 8PA3 exhibited increased sensitivity (viability 14% and 0.4%, respectively). However, in similar conditions no significant differences were noticed between bacterial viability obtained for formulated with starch and non-formulated bacteria. Furthermore, we showed that loading into SPS had no effect on bacterial production of nitric oxide (NO) - a pluripotent regulatory molecule in human organism. Overall, the results strongly support that formulation with polymeric matrices on the basis of SPS represent an appealing technology of probiotics production. It provides slow release of bacteria in target environment and does not alter their viability and NO biosynthesis. However, SPS excipient does not preserve the bacteria from harsh conditions of upper GIT. Therefore, we conclude that for oral administration the composition should be loaded in acid-resistant capsules.

  7. Altered Functionality of Anti-Bacterial Antibodies in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, Anne; Long, Ronald E.; Comunale, Mary Ann; Hafner, Julie; Rodemich-Betesh, Lucy; Wang, Mengjun; Marrero, Jorge; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Background Using comparative glycoproteomics, we have previously identified a glycoprotein that is altered in both amount and glycosylation as a function of liver cirrhosis. The altered glycoprotein is an agalactosylated (G0) immunoglobulin G molecule (IgG) that recognizes the heterophilic alpha-gal epitope. Since the alpha gal epitope is found on gut enterobacteria, it has been hypothesized that anti-gal antibodies are generated as a result of increased bacterial exposure in patients with liver disease. Methods The N-linked glycosylation of anti-gal IgG molecules from patients with fibrosis and cirrhosis was determined and the effector function of anti-bacterial antibodies from over 100 patients examined. In addition, markers of microbial exposure were determined. Results Surprisingly, the subset of agalactosylated anti-gal antibodies described here, was impaired in their ability to mediate complement mediated lysis and inhibited the complement-mediated destruction of common gut bacteria. In an analysis of serum from more than 100 patients with liver disease, we have shown that those with increased levels of this modified anti-gal antibody had increased levels of markers of bacterial exposure. Conclusions Anti-gal antibodies in patients with liver cirrhosis were reduced in their ability to mediate complement mediated lysis of target cells. As bacterial infection is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial products such as LPS are thought to play a major role in the development and progression of liver fibrosis, this finding has many clinical implications in the etiology, prognosis and treatment of liver disease. PMID:23750224

  8. PCR-DGGE analysis of the bacterial composition of a kaolin slurry showing altered rheology.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ildikó; Balázs, Margit; Tombácz, Etelka; Babcsán, Norbert; Kesserű, Péter; Kiss, István; Szvetnik, Attila

    2012-04-01

    Kaolin is an important industrial raw material and a basis of a range of different products. Microbial spoilage is a detrimental process observed especially in kaolin slurries, leading to low quality products and economic loss. Although the alteration of kaolin slurries in ceramic industry was observed, the process and the microbial background have not been analyzed in details. This study provides the first data using a cultivation independent molecular biological approach (PCR-DGGE) regarding the bacterial composition of an altered kaolin slurry. The results show that potential exopolymer (EPS) producer bacteria (e.g. Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas) appear in the altered kaolin slurry, which may have an important role in the modification of kaolin slurries.

  9. Alteration textures in terrestrial volcanic glass and the associated bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S; Olsson-Francis, K; Herrera, A; Meunier, A

    2009-01-01

    Alteration textures were examined in subglacial (hyaloclastite) deposits at Valafell, Southern Iceland. Pitted and 'elongate' alteration features are observed in the glass similar to granular and tubular features reported previously in deep-ocean basaltic glasses, but elongate features generally did not have a length to width ratio greater than five. Elongate features were found in only 7% of surfaces. Crystalline basalt clasts, which are incorporated into the hyaloclastite, did not display elongate structures. Pitted alteration features were poorly defined in crystalline basalt, comprising only 4% of the surface compared to 47% in the case of basaltic glass. Examination of silica-rich glass (obsidian) and rhyolite similarly showed poorly defined pitted textures that comprised less than 15% of the surface and no elongate features were observed. These data highlight the differences in alteration textures between terrestrial basaltic glass and previously studied deep-ocean and subsurface basaltic glass, and the important role of mineralogy in controlling the type and abundance of alteration features. The hyaloclastite contains a diverse and abundant bacterial population, as determined by 16S rDNA analysis, which could be involved in weathering the glass. Despite the presence of phototrophs, we show that they were not involved in the production of most alteration textures in the basaltic glass materials we examined.

  10. Microencapsulation of a putative probiotic Enterobacter species, C6-6, to protect rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), against bacterial coldwater disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, B; Cain, K D; Nowak, B F; Bridle, A R

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial coldwater disease (BCWD), which has a major impact on salmonid aquaculture globally. An Enterobacter species, C6-6, isolated from the gut of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), has been identified as a potential probiotic species providing protection against BCWD. This study examined the effects of alginate microencapsulation on the protective efficacy of C6-6 against BCWD in vivo when administered to rainbow trout fry orally or by intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Viable C6-6 bacteria were microencapsulated successfully, and this process (microencapsulation) did not significantly deteriorate its protective properties as compared to the administration of non-microencapsulated C6-6 bacteria. Both oral and IP delivery of C6-6 achieved significantly better protection than control treatments that did not contain C6-6 bacteria. The highest relative percent survival (RPS) resulted from IP delivery (71.4%) and was significantly greater than the highest oral RPS (38.6%). Successful intestinal colonization was not critical to protective effects of C6-6. The study showed that C6-6 administration, with or without encapsulation, was a viable choice for protecting fry from BCWD especially when administered intraperitoneally.

  11. Influence of Trace Elements Mixture on Bacterial Diversity and Fermentation Characteristics of Liquid Diet Fermented with Probiotics under Air-Tight Condition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolan; Wang, Chengwei; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− are often supplemented to the diet of suckling and early weaning piglets, but little information is available regarding the effects of different Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− mixtures on bacteria growth, diversity and fermentation characteristics of fermented liquid diet for piglets. Pyrosequencing was performed to investigate the effect of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− mixtures on the diversity, growth and fermentation characteristics of bacteria in the liquid diet fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis under air-tight condition. Results showed that the mixtures of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− at different concentrations promoted Bacillus growth, increased bacterial diversity and lactic acid production and lowered pH to about 5. The importance of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− is different for Bacillus growth with the order Zn2+> Fe2+>Cu2+> I− in a 21-d fermentation and Cu2+>I−>Fe2+>Zn2+ in a 42-d fermentation. Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I− is recommended at a level of 150, 60, 150 and 0.6 mg/kg respectively for the production of fermented liquid diet with Bacillus subtilis. The findings improve our understanding of the influence of trace elements on liquid diet fermentation with probiotics and support the proper use of trace elements in the production of fermented liquid diet for piglets. PMID:25486254

  12. Influence of trace elements mixture on bacterial diversity and fermentation characteristics of liquid diet fermented with probiotics under air-tight condition.

    PubMed

    He, Yuyong; Chen, Zhiyu; Liu, Xiaolan; Wang, Chengwei; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- are often supplemented to the diet of suckling and early weaning piglets, but little information is available regarding the effects of different Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- mixtures on bacteria growth, diversity and fermentation characteristics of fermented liquid diet for piglets. Pyrosequencing was performed to investigate the effect of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- mixtures on the diversity, growth and fermentation characteristics of bacteria in the liquid diet fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis under air-tight condition. Results showed that the mixtures of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- at different concentrations promoted Bacillus growth, increased bacterial diversity and lactic acid production and lowered pH to about 5. The importance of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- is different for Bacillus growth with the order Zn2+> Fe2+>Cu2+> I- in a 21-d fermentation and Cu2+>I->Fe2+>Zn2+ in a 42-d fermentation. Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and I- is recommended at a level of 150, 60, 150 and 0.6 mg/kg respectively for the production of fermented liquid diet with Bacillus subtilis. The findings improve our understanding of the influence of trace elements on liquid diet fermentation with probiotics and support the proper use of trace elements in the production of fermented liquid diet for piglets.

  13. Probiotics may delay the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by restoring the gut microbiota structure and improving intestinal endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Li; He, Juntao; Gao, Ning; Lu, Xiaolan; Li, Ming; Wu, Xiaokang; Liu, Zeshi; Jin, Yaofeng; Liu, Jiali; Xu, Jiru; Geng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Gut-derived bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent hepatic toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation have been recognized to be involved in the onset of diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but little is known about the variation of LPS and TLR4 during the progression of NAFLD. Probiotics were able to inhibit proliferation of harmful bacteria and improve gastrointestinal barrier function. However, it’s unclear whether LPS/TLR4 is involved in the protection effect of probiotics on NAFLD. In this study, we described characteristic of gut microbiota structure in the progression of NAFLD, and we also analyzed the relationship between gut microbiota and LPS/TLR4 in this process. Furthermore, we applied probiotics intervention to investigate the effect of probiotics on gut flora structure, intestinal integrity, serum LPS, liver TLR4 and liver pathology. Our results showed that serum LPS and liver TLR4 were highly increased during progression of NAFLD, with gut flora diversity and gut mircobiological colonization resistance (B/E) declining. Furthermore, probiotics could improve gut microbiota structure and liver pathology. Probiotics could also downregulate serum LPS and liver TLR4. Our results suggested that both gut flora alteration and endotoxemia may be involved in the progression of NAFLD. Probiotics may delay the progression of NAFLD via LPS/TLR4 signaling. PMID:28349964

  14. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    PubMed

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  15. Gyramides Prevent Bacterial Growth by Inhibiting DNA Gyrase and Altering Chromosome Topology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division. PMID:24712739

  16. Supplemental Dietary Inulin of Variable Chain Lengths Alters Intestinal Bacterial Populations in Young Pigs123

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Jannine K.; Yasuda, Koji; Welch, Ross M.; Miller, Dennis D.; Lei, Xin Gen

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we showed that supplementation of diets with short-chain inulin (P95), long-chain inulin (HP), and a 50:50 mixture of both (Synergy 1) improved body iron status and altered expression of the genes involved in iron homeostasis and inflammation in young pigs. However, the effects of these 3 types of inulin on intestinal bacteria remain unknown. Applying terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, we determined the abundances of luminal and adherent bacterial populations from 6 segments of the small and large intestines of pigs (n = 4 for each group) fed an iron-deficient basal diet (BD) or the BD supplemented with 4% of P95, Synergy 1, or HP for 5 wk. Compared with BD, all 3 types of inulin enhanced (P < 0.05) the abundance of beneficial bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the microbiota adherent to intestinal mucus of various gut segments of pigs. These changes were seen as proximal as in the jejunum with P95 but did not appear until the distal ileum or cecum with HP. Similar effects of inulin on bacterial populations in the lumen contents were found. Meanwhile, all 3 types of inulin suppressed the less desirable bacteria Clostridium spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae in the lumen and mucosa of various gut segments. Our findings suggest that the ability of dietary inulin to alter intestinal bacterial populations may partially account for its iron bioavailability-promoting effect and possibly other health benefits. PMID:20980641

  17. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Shen, Hong; He, Xinhua; Thomas, Ben W; Lupwayi, Newton Z; Hao, Xiying; Thomas, Matthew C; Shi, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007-2014) of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8), near-neutral (pH 6.8) or alkaline (pH 8.4) Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (%) of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%), Actinobacteria (19.7%), Chloroflexi (15.3%) and Acidobacteria (12.6%); the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%), Planctomycetes (4.8%), Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%), Firmicutes (3.4%), Cyanobacteria (2.1%), Nitrospirae (1.8%), and candidate division TM7 (1

  18. Health effects of probiotics on the skin.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, M Rahmati; Karimi, R; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the largest organ of the body and is constantly exposed to physical, chemical, bacterial, and fungal challenges. It is well known that probiotics are helpful for specific disorders and different clinical studies have indicated that probiotics have special effects in cutaneous apparatus directly or indirectly that can be considerable from versatile aspects. Probiotic bacteriotherapy can have great potential in preventing and treating the skin diseases including eczema, atopic dermatitis, acne, and allergic inflammation or in skin hypersensitivity, UV-induced skin damage, wound protection, and as a cosmetic product. The current paper comprehensively reviews the different health effects of probiotics on the skin.

  19. Use of probiotics in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Martínez Cruz, Patricia; Ibáñez, Ana L; Monroy Hermosillo, Oscar A; Ramírez Saad, Hugo C

    2012-01-01

    The growth of aquaculture as an industry has accelerated over the past decades; this has resulted in environmental damages and low productivity of various crops. The need for increased disease resistance, growth of aquatic organisms, and feed efficiency has brought about the use of probiotics in aquaculture practices. The first application of probiotics occurred in 1986, to test their ability to increase growth of hydrobionts (organisms that live in water). Later, probiotics were used to improve water quality and control of bacterial infections. Nowadays, there is documented evidence that probiotics can improve the digestibility of nutrients, increase tolerance to stress, and encourage reproduction. Currently, there are commercial probiotic products prepared from various bacterial species such as Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., Enterococcus sp., Carnobacterium sp., and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among others, and their use is regulated by careful management recommendations. The present paper shows the current knowledge of the use of probiotics in aquaculture, its antecedents, and safety measures to be carried out and discusses the prospects for study in this field.

  20. Use of Probiotics in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Cruz, Patricia; Ibáñez, Ana L.; Monroy Hermosillo, Oscar A.; Ramírez Saad, Hugo C.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of aquaculture as an industry has accelerated over the past decades; this has resulted in environmental damages and low productivity of various crops. The need for increased disease resistance, growth of aquatic organisms, and feed efficiency has brought about the use of probiotics in aquaculture practices. The first application of probiotics occurred in 1986, to test their ability to increase growth of hydrobionts (organisms that live in water). Later, probiotics were used to improve water quality and control of bacterial infections. Nowadays, there is documented evidence that probiotics can improve the digestibility of nutrients, increase tolerance to stress, and encourage reproduction. Currently, there are commercial probiotic products prepared from various bacterial species such as Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., Enterococcus sp., Carnobacterium sp., and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among others, and their use is regulated by careful management recommendations. The present paper shows the current knowledge of the use of probiotics in aquaculture, its antecedents, and safety measures to be carried out and discusses the prospects for study in this field. PMID:23762761

  1. Structural alterations of faecal and mucosa-associated bacterial communities in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durbán, Ana; Abellán, Juan J; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Salgado, Patricia; Ponce, Marta; Ponce, Julio; Garrigues, Vicente; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2012-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder in western countries. Previous studies on IBS, mostly based on faecal samples, suggest alterations in the intestinal microbiota. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the association between specific bacteria and IBS. We explore the alterations of intestinal bacterial communities in IBS using massive sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA genes. Mucosal biopsies of the ascending and descending colon and faeces from 16 IBS patients and 9 healthy controls were analysed. Strong inter-individual variation was observed in the composition of the bacterial communities in both patients and controls. These communities showed less diversity in IBS cases. There were larger differences in the microbiota composition between biopsies and faeces than between patients and controls. We found a few over-represented and under-represented taxa in IBS cases with respect to controls. The detected alterations varied by site, with no changes being consistent across sample types. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean’s largest oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beman, J. Michael; Carolan, Molly T.

    2013-10-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans’ largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  3. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean's largest oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Beman, J Michael; Carolan, Molly T

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans' largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  4. [Probiotics. A review].

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Pier Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are defined viable microorganisms which in sufficient amount reach the intestine in an active state, to be able to exert positive health benefit on the host. Thus far, they have shown particular promise on prevention or treatment of various pathologic conditions. Our aim has been to report the most recent articles (until October 2008), resulting from randomized, double controlled trials, according to the conventional and molecular methods. In this review we have taken into consideration almost all the fields in which the probiotics have been given, either with a prophylactic or therapeutic intent. So far we have summarized the actual results concerning lactose intolerance, acute rotavirus diarrhea, traveller's diarrhea, antibiotic associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infection, and the role as adjuvant in Helicobacter pylori eradication. Furthermore, we have synthesised articles concerning the probiotic connection in irritable bowel syndrome, and in inflammatory bowel diseases. Last but not least, the prevention by probiotics of allergic diseases, of bacterial vaginosis, of respiratory infections, and the possible advantage in hypercholesteremic subjects.

  5. Probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM® modifies subpopulations of fecal lactobacilli and Clostridium difficile in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lahtinen, Sampo J; Forssten, Sofia; Aakko, Juhani; Granlund, Linda; Rautonen, Nina; Salminen, Seppo; Viitanen, Matti; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2012-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiota and with immunosenescence. Probiotics have the potential to modify a selected part of the intestinal microbiota as well as improve immune functions and may, therefore, be particularly beneficial to elderly consumers. In this randomized, controlled cross-over clinical trial, we assessed the effects of a probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on the intestinal microbiota and fecal immune markers of 31 elderly volunteers and compared these effects with the administration of the same cheese without probiotics. The probiotic cheese was found to increase the number of L. rhamnosus and L. acidophilus NCFM in the feces, suggesting the survival of the strains during the gastrointestinal transit. Importantly, probiotic cheese administration was associated with a trend towards lower counts of Clostridium difficile in the elderly, as compared with the run-in period with the plain cheese. The effect was statistically significant in the subpopulation of the elderly who harbored C. difficile at the start of the study. The probiotic cheese was not found to significantly alter the levels of the major microbial groups, suggesting that the microbial changes conferred by the probiotic cheese were limited to specific bacterial groups. Despite that the administration of the probiotic cheese to the study population has earlier been shown to significantly improve the innate immunity of the elders, we did not observe measurable changes in the fecal immune IgA concentrations. No increase in fecal calprotectin and β-defensin concentrations suggests that the probiotic treatment did not affect intestinal inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the administration of probiotic cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM, was associated with specific changes in the intestinal microbiota, mainly affecting specific subpopulations of intestinal lactobacilli and C

  6. Selective enumeration of probiotic microorganisms in cheese.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Reza; Mortazavian, Amir M; Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh

    2012-02-01

    Cheese is a dairy product which has a good potential for delivery of probiotic microorganisms into the human intestine. To be considered to offer probiotic health benefits, probiotics must remain viable in food products above a threshold level (e.g., 10(6) cfu g(-1)) until the time of consumption. In order to ensure that a minimal number of probiotic bacteria is present in the cheese, reliable methods for enumeration are required. The choice of culture medium for selective enumeration of probiotic strains in combination with starters depends on the product matrix, the target group and the taxonomic diversity of the bacterial background flora in the product. Enumeration protocol should be designed as a function of the target microorganism(s) to be quantified in the cheese. An overview of some series of culture media for selective enumeration of commercial probiotic cultures is presented in this review.

  7. Gut microbiome, surgical complications and probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, George; Kotzampassi, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    The trigger for infectious complications in patients following major abdominal operations is classically attributed to endogenous enteral bacterial translocation, due to the critical condition of the gut. Today, extensive gut microbiome analysis has enabled us to understand that almost all “evidence-based” surgical or medical intervention (antibiotics, bowel preparation, opioids, deprivation of nutrition), in addition to stress-released hormones, could affect the relative abundance and diversity of the enteral microbiome, allowing harmful bacteria to proliferate in the place of depressed beneficial species. Furthermore, these bacteria, after tight sensing of host stress and its consequent humoral alterations, can and do switch their virulence accordingly, towards invasion of the host. Probiotics are the exogenously given, beneficial clusters of live bacteria that, upon digestion, seem to succeed in partially restoring the distorted microbial diversity, thus reducing the infectious complications occurring in surgical and critically ill patients. This review presents the latest data on the interrelationship between the gut microbiome and the occurrence of complications after colon surgery, and the efficacy of probiotics as therapeutic instruments for changing the bacterial imbalance. PMID:28042237

  8. Inactivation of bacterial pathogens in yoba mutandabota, a dairy product fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Augustine; Linnemann, Anita R; Nout, Martinus J R; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J; den Besten, Heidy M W

    2016-01-18

    Mutandabota is a dairy product consumed as a major source of proteins and micronutrients in Southern Africa. In this study the microbial safety of traditional and a variant of mutandabota fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba (yoba mutandabota) was investigated by challenging the products with five important food pathogens: Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Bacillus cereus. Pasteurized full-fat cow's milk was used for producing traditional and yoba mutandabota, and was inoculated with a cocktail of strains of the pathogens at an inoculum level of 5.5 log cfu/mL. Survival of the pathogens was monitored over a potential consumption time of 24h for traditional mutandabota, and over 24h of fermentation followed by 24h of potential consumption time for yoba mutandabota. In traditional mutandabota (pH3.4 ± 0.1) no viable cells of B. cereus and C. jejuni were detected 3h after inoculation, while L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. significantly declined (P<0.05), but could still be detected (<3.5 log inactivation) at the end of the potential consumption time. This indicated that consumption of traditional mutandabota exposes consumers to the risk of food-borne microbial infections. In yoba mutandabota, L. rhamnosus yoba grew from 5.5 ± 0.1 log cfu/mL to 9.1 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL in the presence of pathogens. The pH of yoba mutandabota dropped from 4.2 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.1 after 24h of fermentation, mainly due to organic acids produced during fermentation. Only Salmonella spp. was able to grow in yoba mutandabota during the first 9h of fermentation, but then decreased in viable plate count. None of the tested pathogens were detected (>3.5 log inactivation) after 3h into potential consumption time of yoba mutandabota. Inactivation of pathogens in mutandabota is of public health significance because food-borne pathogens endanger public health upon consumption of contaminated food

  9. Cerebral vasculature is the major target of oxidative protein alterations in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Manuela; Gergely, Suzanne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Zbären, Jakob; Leib, Stephen L; Täuber, Martin G; Christen, Stephan

    2002-07-01

    We have previously shown that antioxidants such as a-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone or N-acetylcysteine attenuate cortical neuronal injury in infant rats with bacterial meningitis, suggesting that oxidative alterations play an important role in this disease. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which antioxidants inhibit this injury remain(s) unclear. We therefore studied the extent and location of protein oxidation in the brain using various biochemical and immunochemical methods. In cortical parenchyma, a trend for increased protein carbonyls was not evident until 21 hours after infection and the activity of glutamine synthetase (another index of protein oxidation) remained unchanged. Consistent with these results, there was no evidence for oxidative alterations in the cortex by various immunohistochemical methods even in cortical lesions. In contrast, there was a marked increase in carbonyls, 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts and manganese superoxide dismutase in the cerebral vasculature. Elevated lipid peroxidation was also observed in cerebrospinal fluid and occasionally in the hippocampus. All of these oxidative alterations were inhibited by treatment of infected animals with N-acetylcysteine or alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone. Because N-acetylcysteine does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier and has no effect on the loss of endogenous brain antioxidants, its neuroprotective effect is likely based on extraparenchymal action such as inhibition of vascular oxidative alterations.

  10. Altering plant-microbe interaction through artificially manipulating bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Fray, Rupert G

    2002-03-01

    Many bacteria regulate diverse physiological processes in concert with their population size. Bacterial cell-to-cell communication utilizes small diffusible signal molecules, which the bacteria both produce and perceive. The bacteria couple gene expression to cell density by eliciting a response only when the signalling molecules reach a critical threshold (a point at which the population is said to be 'quorate'). The population as a whole is thus able to modify its behaviour as a single unit. Amongst Gram-negative bacteria, the quorum sensing signals most commonly used are N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). It is now apparent that AHLs are used for regulating diverse behaviours in epiphytic, rhizosphere-inhabiting and plant pathogenic bacteria and that plants may produce their own metabolites that interfere with this signalling. Transgenic plants that produce high levels of AHLs or which can degrade bacterial-produced AHLs have been made. These plants have dramatically altered susceptibilities to infection by pathogenic Erwinia species. In addition, such plants will prove useful tools in determining the roles of AHL-regulated density-dependent behaviour in growth promoting, biological control and pathogenic plant-associated bacterial species.

  11. Bioaugmentation of Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B affects hydrogen production through altering indigenous bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Shi, Xiaoshuang; He, Shuai; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Qiu, Yanling; Dang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-07-01

    Bioaugmentation can facilitate hydrogen production from complex organic substrates, but it still is unknown how indigenous microbial communities respond to the added bacteria. Here, using a Hydrogenispora ethanolica LX-B (named as LX-B) bioaugmentation experiments, the distribution of metabolites and the responses of indigenous bacterial communities were investigated via batch cultivation (BC) and repeated batch cultivation (RBC). In BC the LX-B/sludge ratio of 0.12 achieved substantial high hydrogen yield, which was over twice that of control. In RBC one-time bioaugmentation and repeated batch bioaugmentation of LX-B resulted in the hydrogen yield that was average 1.2-fold and 0.8-fold higher than that in control, respectively. This improved hydrogen production performance mainly benefited from a shift in composition of the indigenous bacterial community caused by LX-B bioaugmentation. The findings represented an important step in understanding the relationship between bioaugmentation, a shift in bacterial communities, and altered bioreactor performance.

  12. Choice of bacterial growth medium alters the transcriptome and phenotype of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Bailey, Andrew M; Ivens, Al; Piddock, Laura J V

    2013-01-01

    The type of bacterial culture medium is an important consideration during design of any experimental protocol. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of medium choice on bacterial gene expression and physiology by comparing the transcriptome of Salmonella enterica SL1344 after growth in the widely used LB broth or the rationally designed MOPS minimal medium. Transcriptomics showed that after growth in MOPS minimal media, compared to LB, there was increased expression of 42 genes involved in amino acid synthesis and 23 genes coding for ABC transporters. Seven flagellar genes had decreased expression after growth in MOPS minimal medium and this correlated with a decreased motility. In both MOPS minimal medium and MEM expression of genes from SPI-2 was increased and the adhesion of S. Typhimurium to intestinal epithelial cells was higher compared to the levels after growth in LB. However, SL1344 invasion was not significantly altered by growth in either MOPs minimal media or MEM. Expression of SPI-2 was also measured using chromosomal GFP reporter fusions followed by flow cytometry which showed, for the first time, that the reduction in SPI-2 transcript after growth in different media related to a reduction in the proportion of the bacterial population expressing SPI-2. These data highlight the profound differences in the global transcriptome after in vitro growth in different media and show that choice of medium should be considered carefully during experimental design, particularly when virulence related phenotypes are being measured.

  13. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil.

    PubMed

    Kielak, Anna M; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Semenov, Alexander V; Sørensen, Søren J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Chitin amendment is a promising soil management strategy that may enhance the suppressiveness of soil toward plant pathogens. However, we understand very little of the effects of added chitin, including the putative successions that take place in the degradative process. We performed an experiment in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA and chiA genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected by the addition of chitin at different prevailing soil pH values. Interestingly, a major role of Gram-negative bacteria versus a minor one of Actinobacteria in the immediate response to the added chitin (based on 16S rRNA gene abundance and chiA gene types) was indicated. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the response of the soil bacterial communities to chitin and are of use for both the understanding of soil suppressiveness and the possible mining of soil for novel enzymes.

  14. Lactic acid bacteria colonization and clinical outcome after probiotic supplementation in conventionally treated bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ehrström, Sophia; Daroczy, Katalin; Rylander, Eva; Samuelsson, Carolina; Johannesson, Ulrika; Anzén, Bo; Påhlson, Carl

    2010-09-01

    This randomized double-blind placebo controlled study assessed the vaginal colonization of lactic acid bacteria and clinical outcome. Vaginal capsules containing L gasseri LN40, Lactobacillus fermentum LN99, L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LN113 and P. acidilactici LN23, or placebos were administered for five days to 95 women after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis and/or vulvovaginal candidiasis. Vulvovaginal examinations and vaginal samplings were performed before and after administration, after the first and second menstruation, and after six months. Presence of LN strains was assessed using RAPD analysis. LN strains were present 2-3 days after administration in 89% of the women receiving LN strains (placebo: 0%, p < 0.0001). After one menstruation 53% were colonized by at least one LN strain. Nine percent were still colonized six months after administration. Ninety-three percent of the women receiving LN strains were cured 2-3 days after administration (placebo: 83%), and 78% after one menstruation (placebo: 71%) (ns). The intervention group experienced less malodorous discharge 2-3 days after administration (p = 0.03) and after the second menstruation (p = 0.04), compared with placebo. In summary, five days of vaginal administration of LN strains after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis and/or vulvovaginal candidiasis lead to vaginal colonization, somewhat fewer recurrences and less malodorous discharge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of a bacterial probiotic on ruminal pH and volatile fatty acids during subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Hiroko; QADIS, Abdul Qadir; KIM, Yo-Han; IKUTA, Kentaro; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; SATO, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Effects of a bacterial probiotic (BP) on ruminal fermentation and plasma metabolites were evaluated in four Holstein cattle (body weight, 645 ± 62 kg; mean ± SD) with induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). SARA was induced by feeding a SARA-inducing diet, and thereafter, 20, 50 or 100 g per head of a commercial BP was administered for 7 consecutive days during the morning feeding. Cattle without BP served as the control. The 24-hr mean ruminal pH in the control was lower, whereas those in the BP groups administered 20 or 50 g were significantly higher compared to the control from days 2 to 7. Circadian patterns of the 1-hr mean ruminal pH were identical (6.4–6.8) among all cattle receiving BP. Although the mean minimum pH in the control on day –7 and day 0 was <5.8, the pH in the treatment groups on day 7 was >5.8 and significantly higher than that of the control group ( >5.2). Ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were not affected by BP treatment; however, the BP groups had lower lactic acid levels compared with the control group at 20:00 on day 7. Additionally, non-esterified fatty acid levels decreased from 8:00 to 20:00 in all BP groups on day 7. These results suggest that administration of 20 to 50 g of a multi-strain BP for 7 days might improve the low pH and high lactic acid level of the ruminal fluid in SARA cattle. PMID:27430197

  16. Increasing the Size of the Microbial Biomass Altered Bacterial Community Structure which Enhances Plant Phosphorus Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pu; Murphy, Daniel Vaughan; George, Suman J.; Lapis-Gaza, Hazel; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural production can be limited by low phosphorus (P) availability, with soil P being constrained by sorption and precipitation reactions making it less available for plant uptake. There are strong links between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability and P cycling within soil P pools, with microorganisms being an integral component of soil P cycling mediating the availability of P to plants. Here we tested a conceptual model that proposes (i) the addition of readily-available organic substrates would increase the size of the microbial biomass thus exhausting the pool of easily-available P and (ii) this would cause the microbial biomass to access P from more recalcitrant pools. In this model it is hypothesised that the size of the microbial population is regulating access to less available P rather than the diversity of organisms contained within this biomass. To test this hypothesis we added mixtures of simple organic compounds that reflect typical root exudates at different C:N ratios to a soil microcosm experiment and assessed changes in soil P pools, microbial biomass and bacterial diversity measures. We report that low C:N ratio (C:N = 12.5:1) artificial root exudates increased the size of the microbial biomass while high C:N ratio (C:N = 50:1) artificial root exudates did not result in a similar increase in microbial biomass. Interestingly, addition of the root exudates did not alter bacterial diversity (measured via univariate diversity indices) but did alter bacterial community structure. Where C, N and P supply was sufficient to support plant growth the increase observed in microbial biomass occurred with a concurrent increase in plant yield. PMID:27893833

  17. Blueberry husks and probiotics attenuate colorectal inflammation and oncogenesis, and liver injuries in rats exposed to cycling DSS-treatment.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Asa; Bränning, Camilla; Molin, Göran; Adawi, Diya; Hagslätt, Marie-Louise; Jeppsson, Bengt; Nyman, Margareta; Ahrné, Siv

    2012-01-01

    Long-term colonic inflammation promotes carcinogenesis and histological abnormalities of the liver, and colorectal tumours frequently arise in a background of dysplasia, a precursor of adenomas. Altered colonic microbiota with an increased proportion of bacteria with pro-inflammatory characteristics, have been implicated in neoplastic progression. The composition of the microbiota can be modified by dietary components such as probiotics, polyphenols and dietary fibres. In the present study, the influence of probiotics in combination with blueberry husks on colorectal carcinogenesis and subsequent liver damage was evaluated.Colorectal tumours were induced in rats by cyclic treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Blueberry husks and a mixture of three probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15159, Lactobacillus gasseri, DSM 16737 and Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313) supplemented a basic diet fortified with oats. The condition of the rats was monitored using a disease activity index (DAI). A qualitative and quantitative histological judgement was performed on segments of distal colon and rectum and the caudate lobe of the liver. The formation of short-chain fatty acids, bacterial translocation, the inflammatory reaction and viable count of lactobacilli and Enterobaceriaceae were addressed.Blueberry husks with or without probiotics significantly decreased DAI, and significantly reduced the number of colonic ulcers and dysplastic lesions. With a decreased proportion of blueberry husk in the diet, the probiotic supplement was needed to achieve a significant decrease in numbers of dysplastic lesions. Probiotics decreased faecal viable count of Enterobacteriaceae and increased that of lactobacilli. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics lowered the proportion of butyric acid in distal colon, and decreased the haptoglobin levels. Probiotics mitigated hepatic injuries by decreasing parenchymal infiltration and the incidence of stasis and translocation

  18. Blueberry Husks and Probiotics Attenuate Colorectal Inflammation and Oncogenesis, and Liver Injuries in Rats Exposed to Cycling DSS-Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Åsa; Bränning, Camilla; Molin, Göran; Adawi, Diya; Hagslätt, Marie-Louise; Jeppsson, Bengt; Nyman, Margareta; Ahrné, Siv

    2012-01-01

    Long-term colonic inflammation promotes carcinogenesis and histological abnormalities of the liver, and colorectal tumours frequently arise in a background of dysplasia, a precursor of adenomas. Altered colonic microbiota with an increased proportion of bacteria with pro-inflammatory characteristics, have been implicated in neoplastic progression. The composition of the microbiota can be modified by dietary components such as probiotics, polyphenols and dietary fibres. In the present study, the influence of probiotics in combination with blueberry husks on colorectal carcinogenesis and subsequent liver damage was evaluated. Colorectal tumours were induced in rats by cyclic treatment with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Blueberry husks and a mixture of three probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium infantis DSM 15159, Lactobacillus gasseri, DSM 16737 and Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 15313) supplemented a basic diet fortified with oats. The condition of the rats was monitored using a disease activity index (DAI). A qualitative and quantitative histological judgement was performed on segments of distal colon and rectum and the caudate lobe of the liver. The formation of short-chain fatty acids, bacterial translocation, the inflammatory reaction and viable count of lactobacilli and Enterobaceriaceae were addressed. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics significantly decreased DAI, and significantly reduced the number of colonic ulcers and dysplastic lesions. With a decreased proportion of blueberry husk in the diet, the probiotic supplement was needed to achieve a significant decrease in numbers of dysplastic lesions. Probiotics decreased faecal viable count of Enterobacteriaceae and increased that of lactobacilli. Blueberry husks with or without probiotics lowered the proportion of butyric acid in distal colon, and decreased the haptoglobin levels. Probiotics mitigated hepatic injuries by decreasing parenchymal infiltration and the incidence of stasis and translocation

  19. Probiotics and functional foods in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Floch, M H; Hong-Curtiss, J

    2001-08-01

    Probiotics are live microbial food supplements that benefit the host animal by improving intestinal microbial balance. When they are fed in yogurts, they can fall into the category of functional foods. Functional foods include these probiotics, prebiotics, and, to a certain extent, dietary fiber. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients or supplements that alter the intestinal flora and stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria. Dietary fibers are part of plant foods that are nonstarch polysaccharides and are poorly digested or not digested by human enzymes. The physiologic process in which probiotics and functional foods affect the intestinal flora is through the balance of the intestinal microecology. This review looks at the four major components of intestinal microecology and describes the probiotics in use today and their clinical relevance. Although probiotics hold great promise and appear to be useful in some settings, more clinical study is needed to firmly establish the relevance of probiotic therapy.

  20. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics- a review.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kavita R; Naik, Suresh R; Vakil, Babu V

    2015-12-01

    The health benefits imparted by probiotics and prebiotics as well as synbiotics have been the subject of extensive research in the past few decades. These food supplements termed as functional foods have been demonstrated to alter, modify and reinstate the pre-existing intestinal flora. They also facilitate smooth functions of the intestinal environment. Most commonly used probiotic strains are: Bifidobacterium, Lactobacilli, S. boulardii, B. coagulans. Prebiotics like FOS, GOS, XOS, Inulin; fructans are the most commonly used fibers which when used together with probiotics are termed synbiotics and are able to improve the viability of the probiotics. Present review focuses on composition and roles of Probiotics, Prebiotics and Synbiotics in human health. Furthermore, additional health benefits like immune-modulation, cancer prevention, inflammatory bowel disease etc. are also discussed. Graphical abstractPictorial summary of health benefits imparted by probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics.

  1. The effect of non-standard heat treatment of sheep's milk on physico-chemical properties, sensory characteristics, and the bacterial viability of classical and probiotic yogurt.

    PubMed

    Zamberlin, Šimun; Samaržija, Dubravka

    2017-06-15

    Classical and probiotic set yogurt were made using non-standard heat treatment of sheep's milk at 60°C/5min. Physico-chemical properties, sensory characteristics, and the viability of bacteria that originated from cultures in classical and probiotic yogurt were analysed during 21days of storage at 4°C. For the production of yogurt, a standard yogurt culture and a probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were used. At the end of storage time of the classical and probiotic yogurt the totals of non-denatured whey proteins were 92.31 and 91.03%. The viability of yogurt culture bacteria and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were higher than 10(6)cfu/g. The total sensory score (maximum - 20) was 18.49 for the classical and 18.53 for the probiotic. In nutritional and functional terms it is possible to produce classical and probiotic sheep's milk yogurt by using a non-standard temperature of heat treatment with a shelf life of 21days.

  2. Probiotics in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit C.; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Gut microflora contribute greatly to immune and nutritive functions and act as a physical barrier against pathogenic organisms across the gut mucosa. Critical illness disrupts the balance between host and gut microflora, facilitating colonization, overgrowth, and translocation of pathogens and microbial products across intestinal mucosal barrier and causing systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Commonly used probiotics, which have been developed from organisms that form gut microbiota, singly or in combination, can restore gut microflora and offer the benefits similar to those offered by normal gut flora, namely immune enhancement, improved barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and prevention of bacterial translocation. Enteral supplementation of probiotic strains containing either Lactobacillus alone or in combination with Bifidobacterium reduced the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in preterm infants. Orally administered Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were effective in the prevention of late-onset sepsis and GIT colonization by Candida in preterm very low birth weight infants. In critically ill children, probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Oral administration of a mix of probiotics for 1 week to children on broad-spectrum antibiotics in a pediatric intensive care unit decreased GIT colonization by Candida, led to a 50% reduction in candiduria, and showed a trend toward decreased incidence of candidemia. However, routine use of probiotics cannot be supported on the basis of current scientific evidence. Safety of probiotics is also a concern; rarely, probiotics may cause bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis in immunocompromised critically ill children. More studies are needed to answer questions on the effectiveness of a mix versus single-strain probiotics, optimum dosage regimens

  3. Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Joshua Z; Lytvyn, Lyubov; Steurich, Justin; Parkin, Patricia; Mahant, Sanjay; Johnston, Bradley C

    2015-12-22

    Antibiotics are frequently prescribed in children. They alter the microbial balance within the gastrointestinal tract, commonly resulting in antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Probiotics may prevent AAD via restoration of the gut microflora. The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose) used for the prevention of AAD in children. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, AMED, and the Web of Science (inception to November 2014) were searched along with specialized registers including the Cochrane IBD/FBD review group, CISCOM (Centralized Information Service for Complementary Medicine), NHS Evidence, the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements as well as trial registries. Letters were sent to authors of included trials, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical companies, and experts in the field requesting additional information on ongoing or unpublished trials. Conference proceedings, dissertation abstracts, and reference lists from included and relevant articles were also searched. Randomized, parallel, controlled trials in children (0 to 18 years) receiving antibiotics, that compare probiotics to placebo, active alternative prophylaxis, or no treatment and measure the incidence of diarrhea secondary to antibiotic use were considered for inclusion. Study selection, data extraction as well as methodological quality assessment using the risk of bias instrument was conducted independently and in duplicate by two authors. Dichotomous data (incidence of diarrhea, adverse events) were combined using a pooled risk ratio (RR) or risk difference (RD), and continuous data (mean duration of diarrhea, mean daily stool frequency) as mean difference (MD), along with their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). For overall pooled results on the incidence of diarrhea, sensitivity analyses included available case versus extreme-plausible analyses and random- versus fixed-effect models. To explore

  4. Bdellovibrio and Like Organisms Enhanced Growth and Survival of Penaeus monodon and Altered Bacterial Community Structures in Its Rearing Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Cheng; Sun, Qiuping; Liu, Renliang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 96-h laboratory reduction test was conducted with strain BDHSH06 (GenBank accession no. EF011103) as the test strain for Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) and 20 susceptible marine bacterial strains forming microcosms as the targets. The results showed that BDHSH06 reduced the levels of approximately 50% of prey bacterial strains within 96 h in the seawater microcosms. An 85-day black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) rearing experiment was performed. The shrimp survival rate, body length, and weight in the test tanks were 48.1% ± 1.2%, 99.8 ± 10.0 mm, and 6.36 ± 1.50 g, respectively, which were values significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those for the control, viz., 31.0% ± 2.1%, 86.0 ± 11.1 mm, and 4.21 ± 1.56 g, respectively. With the addition of BDHSH06, total bacterial and Vibrio numbers were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 1.3 to 4.5 log CFU · ml−1 and CFU · g−1 in both water and shrimp intestines, respectively, compared to those in the control. The effect of BDHSH06 on bacterial community structures in the rearing water was also examined using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles of rearing water samples from the control and test tanks revealed that the amounts of 44% of the bacterial species were reduced when BDHSH06 was added to the rearing water over the 85-day rearing period, and among these, approximately 57.1% were nonculturable. The results of this study demonstrated that BDHSH06 can be used as a biocontrol/probiotic agent in P. monodon culture. PMID:25107962

  5. Efficacy of Oral Metronidazole with Vaginal Clindamycin or Vaginal Probiotic for Bacterial Vaginosis: Randomised Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Pirotta, Marie; De Guingand, Deborah; Hocking, Jane S.; Morton, Anna N.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Fehler, Glenda; Morrow, Andrea; Walker, Sandra; Vodstrcil, Lenka A.; Fairley, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine if oral metronidazole (MTZ-400mg bid) with 2% vaginal clindamycin-cream (Clind) or a Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal-probiotic containing oestriol (Prob) reduces 6-month bacterial vaginosis (BV) recurrence. Methods Double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group single-site study with balanced randomization (1∶1∶1) conducted at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Participants with symptomatic BV [Nugent Score (NS) = 7–10 or ≥3 Amsel's criteria and NS = 4–10], were randomly allocated to MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob or MTZ-Placebo and assessed at 1,2,3 and 6 months. MTZ and Clind were administered for 7 days and Prob and Placebo for 12 days. Primary outcome was BV recurrence (NS of 7–10) on self-collected vaginal-swabs over 6-months. Cumulative BV recurrence rates were compared between groups by Chi-squared statistics. Kaplan-Meier, log rank and Cox regression analyses were used to compare time until and risk of BV recurrence between groups. Results 450 18–50 year old females were randomized and 408 (91%), equally distributed between groups, provided ≥1 NS post-randomization and were included in analyses; 42 (9%) participants with no post-randomization data were excluded. Six-month retention rates were 78% (n = 351). One-month BV recurrence (NS 7–10) rates were 3.6% (5/140), 6.8% (9/133) and 9.6% (13/135) in the MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob and MTZ-Placebo groups respectively, p = 0.13. Hazard ratios (HR) for BV recurrence at one-month, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy, were 0.43 (95%CI 0.15–1.22) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.32–1.76) in the MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob groups compared to MTZ-Plac respectively. Cumulative 6-month BV recurrence was 28.2%; (95%CI 24.0–32.7%) with no difference between groups, p = 0.82; HRs for 6-month BV recurrence for MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob compared to MTZ-Plac, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy were 1.09(95% CI = 0.70–1.70) and 1.03(95% CI = 0.65–1

  6. Efficacy of oral metronidazole with vaginal clindamycin or vaginal probiotic for bacterial vaginosis: randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catriona S; Pirotta, Marie; De Guingand, Deborah; Hocking, Jane S; Morton, Anna N; Garland, Suzanne M; Fehler, Glenda; Morrow, Andrea; Walker, Sandra; Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Fairley, Christopher K

    2012-01-01

    To determine if oral metronidazole (MTZ-400 mg bid) with 2% vaginal clindamycin-cream (Clind) or a Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal-probiotic containing oestriol (Prob) reduces 6-month bacterial vaginosis (BV) recurrence. Double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group single-site study with balanced randomization (1:1:1) conducted at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Participants with symptomatic BV [Nugent Score (NS) = 7-10 or ≥3 Amsel's criteria and NS = 4-10], were randomly allocated to MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob or MTZ-Placebo and assessed at 1,2,3 and 6 months. MTZ and Clind were administered for 7 days and Prob and Placebo for 12 days. Primary outcome was BV recurrence (NS of 7-10) on self-collected vaginal-swabs over 6-months. Cumulative BV recurrence rates were compared between groups by Chi-squared statistics. Kaplan-Meier, log rank and Cox regression analyses were used to compare time until and risk of BV recurrence between groups. 450 18-50 year old females were randomized and 408 (91%), equally distributed between groups, provided ≥1 NS post-randomization and were included in analyses; 42 (9%) participants with no post-randomization data were excluded. Six-month retention rates were 78% (n = 351). One-month BV recurrence (NS 7-10) rates were 3.6% (5/140), 6.8% (9/133) and 9.6% (13/135) in the MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob and MTZ-Placebo groups respectively, p = 0.13. Hazard ratios (HR) for BV recurrence at one-month, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy, were 0.43 (95%CI 0.15-1.22) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.32-1.76) in the MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob groups compared to MTZ-Plac respectively. Cumulative 6-month BV recurrence was 28.2%; (95%CI 24.0-32.7%) with no difference between groups, p = 0.82; HRs for 6-month BV recurrence for MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob compared to MTZ-Plac, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy were 1.09(95% CI = 0.70-1.70) and 1.03(95% CI = 0.65-1.63), respectively. No serious adverse events occurred. Combining

  7. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  8. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets.

    PubMed

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  9. An improved assay for the detection of alterations in bacterial DNA supercoiling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abu Mraheil, M; Heisig, A; Heisig, P

    2013-07-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance and the yet low output of the genomics-based drug discovery approach novel strategies are urgently needed to detect new antibiotics. One such strategy uses known ubiquitous targets like DNA topoisomerases. However, to detect inhibitors of these enzymes by an in vitro assay time-consuming isolation of enzymes and DNA followed by electrophoretic separation of topoisomers are required. Instead, this study aimed at developing an in vivo assay for the detection of alterations in DNA supercoiling indicative of topoisomerase inhibition by a reporter gene assay. A pair of plasmids was developed which carry the reporter gene luc for firefly luciferase under control of either promoter ptopA (pPHB90) or pgyrA (pPHB91), whose activities are reciprocally affected by alterations of the supercoiling degree. Each plasmid is individually transferred into E. coli cells. The quotient of the luciferase activities determined using cells with either plasmid was taken as relative measure of the global supercoiling degree Qsc (quotient of supercoiling). Using isogenic reference strains with known alterations of the global DNA supercoiling degree due to mutations in either gyrB or topA, the reporter gene system was able to detect both a decrease and an increase of the negative supercoiling degree compared to the isogenic parent strain. Treating cells with known inhibitors of DNA gyrase, like fluoroquinolones, novobiocin as well as simocyclinone D8 from Streptomyces antibioticus which has been identified as an inhibitor of DNA gyrase in vitro, also caused decreases of the Qsc value in vivo. The suitability of this reporter gene system to screen for anti-topoisomerase I and II compounds from various natural sources like plant extracts by sensing alterations of the DNA supercoiling was demonstrated and offers a new application to identify novel compounds active against bacterial topoisomerases I and gyrase.

  10. Alteration of a Salt Marsh Bacterial Community by Fertilization with Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hamlett, Nancy V.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of long-term fertilization with sewage sludge on the aerobic, chemoheterotrophic portion of a salt marsh bacterial community were examined. The study site in the Great Sippewissett Marsh, Cape Cod, Mass., consisted of experimental plots that were treated with different amounts of commercial sewage sludge fertilizer or with urea and phosphate. The number of CFUs, percentage of mercury- and cadmium-resistant bacteria, and percentage of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were all increased in the sludge-fertilized plots. Preliminary taxonomic characterization showed that sludge fertilization markedly altered the taxonomic distribution and reduced diversity within both the total heterotrophic and the mercury-resistant communities. In control plots, the total heterotrophic community was fairly evenly distributed among taxa and the mercury-resistant community was dominated by Pseudomonas spp. In sludge-fertilized plots, both the total and mercury-resistant communities were dominated by a single Cytophaga sp. PMID:16347183

  11. Activation of the Jasmonic Acid Plant Defence Pathway Alters the Composition of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhais, Lilia C.; Dennis, Paul G.; Badri, Dayakar V.; Tyson, Gene W.; Vivanco, Jorge M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling plays a central role in plant defences against necrotrophic pathogens and herbivorous insects, which afflict both roots and shoots. This pathway is also activated following the interaction with beneficial microbes that may lead to induced systemic resistance. Activation of the JA signalling pathway via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) alters the composition of carbon containing compounds released by roots, which are implicated as key determinants of rhizosphere microbial community structure. In this study, we investigated the influence of the JA defence signalling pathway activation in Arabidopsis thaliana on the structure of associated rhizosphere bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Application of MeJA did not directly influence bulk soil microbial communities but significant changes in rhizosphere community composition were observed upon activation of the jasmonate signalling pathway. Our results suggest that JA signalling may mediate plant-bacteria interactions in the soil upon necrotrophic pathogen and herbivorous insect attacks. PMID:23424661

  12. Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2014-07-28

    In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (P< 0.001) by LPS challenge, and the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids and amino N increased linearly (P< 0.001) according to the LPS dose. LPS infusion linearly decreased (P< 0.001) the organic matter degradability of alfalfa hay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity.

  13. Pharmaceuticals suppress algal growth and microbial respiration and alter bacterial communities in stream biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kincaid, Dustin W; Bechtold, Heather A; Royer, Todd V; Rojas, Miguel; Kelly, John J

    2013-04-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products are ubiquitous in surface waters but their effects on aquatic biofilms and associated ecosystem properties are not well understood. We measured in situ responses of stream biofilms to six common pharmaceutical compounds (caffeine, cimetidine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, metformin, ranitidine, and a mixture of each) by deploying pharmaceutical-diffusing substrates in streams in Indiana, Maryland, and New York. Results were consistent across seasons and geographic locations. On average, algal biomass was suppressed by 22%, 4%, 22%, and 18% relative to controls by caffeine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, and the mixed treatment, respectively. Biofilm respiration was significantly suppressed by caffeine (53%), cimetidine (51%), ciprofloxacin (91%), diphenhydramine (63%), and the mixed treatment (40%). In autumn in New York, photosynthesis was also significantly suppressed by diphenhydramine (99%) and the mixed treatment (88%). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the effects of caffeine and diphenhydramine on biofilm bacterial community composition at the three sites. Relative to the controls, diphenhydramine exposure significantly altered bacterial community composition and resulted in significant relative increases in Pseudomonas sp. and decreases in Flavobacterium sp. in all three streams. These ubiquitous pharmaceuticals, alone or in combination, influenced stream biofilms, which could have consequences for higher trophic levels and important ecosystem processes.

  14. Soil bacterial community composition altered by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Akihiro; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Simpson, Rodney T; Moore, John C

    2014-01-01

    The pool of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the Arctic is disproportionally large compared to those in other biomes. This large quantity of SOC accumulated over millennia due to slow rates of decomposition relative to net primary productivity. Decomposition is constrained by low temperatures and nutrient concentrations, which limit soil microbial activity. We investigated how nutrients limit bacterial and fungal biomass and community composition in organic and mineral soils within moist acidic tussock tundra ecosystems. We sampled two experimental arrays of moist acidic tussock tundra that included fertilized and non-fertilized control plots. One array included plots that had been fertilized annually since 1989 and the other since 2006. Fertilization significantly altered overall bacterial community composition and reduced evenness, to a greater degree in organic than mineral soils, and in the 1989 compared to the 2006 site. The relative abundance of copiotrophic α-Proteobacteria and β-Proteobacteria was higher in fertilized than control soils, and oligotrophic Acidobacteria were less abundant in fertilized than control soils at the 1989 site. Fungal community composition was less sensitive to increased nutrient availability, and fungal responses to fertilization were not consistent between soil horizons and sites. We detected two ectomycorrhizal genera, Russula and Cortinarius spp., associated with shrubs. Their relative abundance was not affected by fertilization despite increased dominance of their host plants in the fertilized plots. Our results indicate that fertilization, which has been commonly used to simulate warming in Arctic tundra, has limited applicability for investigating fungal dynamics under warming.

  15. Probiotics to counteract biofilm-associated infections: promising and conflicting data

    PubMed Central

    Vuotto, Claudia; Longo, Francesca; Donelli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Altered bowel flora is currently thought to play a role in a variety of disease conditions, and the use of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. as probiotics has been demonstrated to be health-promoting, even if the success of their administration depends on the applied bacterial strain(s) and the targeted disease. In the last few decades, specific probiotics have been shown to be effective in the treatment or the prevention of acute viral gastroenteritis, pediatric post-antibiotic-associated diarrhea, some pediatric allergic disorders, necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, inflammatory bowel diseases and postsurgical pouchitis. The potential application of probiotics is continuously widening, with new evidence accumulating to support their effect on the prevention and treatment of other disease conditions, including several oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and oral malodor, as well as genitourinary and wound infections. Considering the increasingly widespread ability of pathogens to generate persistent biofilm-related infections, an even more attractive proposal is to administer probiotics to prevent or counteract biofilm development. The response of biofilm-based oral, intestinal, vaginal and wound infections to probiotics treatment will be reviewed here in light of the most recent results obtained in this field. PMID:25257882

  16. Probiotics and prebiotics in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dan W; Greer, Frank R

    2010-12-01

    This clinical report reviews the currently known health benefits of probiotic and prebiotic products, including those added to commercially available infant formula and other food products for use in children. Probiotics are supplements or foods that contain viable microorganisms that cause alterations of the microflora of the host. Use of probiotics has been shown to be modestly effective in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in (1) treating acute viral gastroenteritis in healthy children; and (2) preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in healthy children. There is some evidence that probiotics prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in very low birth weight infants (birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g), but more studies are needed. The results of RCTs in which probiotics were used to treat childhood Helicobacter pylori gastritis, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic ulcerative colitis, and infantile colic, as well as in preventing childhood atopy, although encouraging, are preliminary and require further confirmation. Probiotics have not been proven to be beneficial in treating or preventing human cancers or in treating children with Crohn disease. There are also safety concerns with the use of probiotics in infants and children who are immunocompromised, chronically debilitated, or seriously ill with indwelling medical devices. Prebiotics are supplements or foods that contain a nondigestible food ingredient that selectively stimulates the favorable growth and/or activity of indigenous probiotic bacteria. Human milk contains substantial quantities of prebiotics. There is a paucity of RCTs examining prebiotics in children, although there may be some long-term benefit of prebiotics for the prevention of atopic eczema and common infections in healthy infants. Confirmatory well-designed clinical research studies are necessary.

  17. Recombinant probiotic therapy in experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gardlik, R; Palffy, R; Celec, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, high interest has been attracted to the research of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Recombinant probiotic bacteria may represent an interesting way to influence the course of IBD. Their benefits include cheap and simple production and easy manipulation of the genetic material. Several gene therapy and probiotic approaches already showed promising results in the past. The aim of this study was to test the probiotic potential of IL-10-expressing Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in a mouse model of IBD and to compare it with control bacterial strains. The dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) model of colitis was examined for this purpose. Animals received control probiotic bacteria or modified probiotics (expressing IL-10) via gastric gavage. Body weight, stool consistency, food and water consumption were monitored. At the end of the experiment, the parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and carbonyl stress were analysed in the samples and statistical analysis was performed. We prepared an anti-inflammatory probiotic Escherichia coli strain that we designated Nissle 1917/pMEC-IL10 and proved its anti-inflammatory properties, which are similar to those of the control probiotic strains Nissle 1917 and Lactococcus lactis/pMEC-IL10 in vivo. The probiotic therapy was successful according to several parameters, including colon length, and oxidative and carbonyl stress. Bacterially produced IL-10 was detected in the plasma. The potential of bacterial anti-inflammatory therapy of IBD using modified probiotics was outlined. The results opened a way for upcoming studies using modified probiotics for therapy of systemic diseases.

  18. A single natural nucleotide mutation alters bacterial pathogen host-tropism

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Melissa J.; Selva, Laura; Guinane, Caitriona M.; González-Muñoz, Beatriz M.; Tristan, Anne; Foster, Simon J; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Penadés, José R.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of microbial pathogens to alter their host-tropism leading to epidemics in distinct host-species populations is a global public and veterinary health concern. In order to investigate the molecular basis of a bacterial host-switching event in a tractable host-species, we traced the evolutionary trajectory of the common rabbit clone of Staphylococcus aureus. We report that it evolved through a likely human-to-rabbit host jump over 40 years ago, and that only a single natural nucleotide mutation was required and sufficient to convert a human-specific S. aureus strain into one which could infect rabbits. Related mutations were identified at the same locus in other rabbit strains of distinct clonal origin, consistent with convergent evolution. This first report of a single mutation that was sufficient to alter the host-tropism of a micro-organism during its evolution highlights the capacity of some pathogens to readily expand into novel host-species populations. PMID:25685890

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans Bacterial Pathogen Resistant bus-4 Mutants Produce Altered Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Lisa M.; Mizanur, Rahman M.; Jankowska, Ewa; Hodgkin, Jonathan; O′Rourke, Delia; Stroud, Dave; Ghosh, Salil; Cipollo, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorabditis elegans bus-4 glycosyltransferase mutants are resistant to infection by Microbacterium nematophilum, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and have altered susceptibility to two Leucobacter species Verde1 and Verde2. Our objective in this study was to define the glycosylation changes leading to this phenotype to better understand how these changes lead to pathogen resistance. We performed MALDI-TOF MS, tandem MS and GC/MS experiments to reveal fine structural detail for the bus-4 N- and O-glycan pools. We observed dramatic changes in O-glycans and moderate ones in N-glycan pools compared to the parent strain. Ce core-I glycans, the nematode's mucin glycan equivalent, were doubled in abundance, halved in charge and bore shifts in terminal substitutions. The fucosyl O-glycans, Ce core-II and neutral fucosyl forms, were also increased in abundance as were fucosyl N-glycans. Quantitative expression analysis revealed that two mucins, let-653 and osm-8, were upregulated nearly 40 fold and also revealed was a dramatic increase in GDP-Man 4,6 dehydratease expression. We performed detailed lectin binding studies that showed changes in glycoconjugates in the surface coat, cuticle surface and intestine. The combined changes in cell surface glycoconjugate distribution, increased abundance and altered properties of mucin provide an environment where likely the above pathogens are not exposed to normal glycoconjugate dependent cues leading to barriers to these bacterial infections. PMID:25296196

  20. Eukaryotic-microbiota crosstalk: potential mechanisms for health benefits of prebiotics and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2008-01-01

    The ability to link dietary consumption of prebiotic food ingredients and probiotic microorganisms to health benefits rests, in part, on our ability to identify both the extent to which these factors alter human microbiome activity and/or structure and the ability to engage eukaryotic cells necessary to transduce signals originating from the microbiome. The human microbiome consists of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal components that reside in mucosal surfaces of the gut, the airways, and the urogenital tract. Characterization of the symbiotic nature of the relationship between eukaryotic cells and the bacterial and archaeal components of the microbiota has revealed significant contributions in energy balance, bowel function, immunologic function, sensory perception, glycemic control, and blood pressure regulation. Elucidating the complex interactions between the microbiota and their associated epithelial, immune, and neural cells may provide mechanistic insights and a rational basis for our belief that dietary consumption of probiotic microorganisms and prebiotics produces health benefits.

  1. Food formats for effective delivery of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Marco, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria are increasingly incorporated into food products intended to confer health benefits in the human gut and beyond. Little is known about how the food matrix and product formulation impacts probiotic functionality, even though such information is essential to scientific understanding and regulatory substantiation of health benefits. The food format has the potential to affect probiotic survival, physiology, and potentially efficacy, but few comparative studies in humans have been conducted. Human studies should account for the effects of the food base on human health and the bioactive components present in the foods that may augment or diminish interactions of the probiotic with the human host. Some studies show that food ingredients such as prebiotics and milk components can improve probiotic survival during the shelf life of foods, which may enhance probiotic efficacy through increased dose effects. Furthermore, there are indications that synbiotic products are more effective than either probiotics or prebiotics alone. Identification of probiotic adaptations to the food and gut environments holds promise for determining the specific cell components and potential bacterial-food interactions necessary for health benefits and determining how these factors are affected by changes in food formulation and host diet. These studies, combined with controlled human studies, are important future research activities for advancing this field.

  2. Altered Colonic Bacterial Fermentation as a Potential Pathophysiological Factor in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Choi, Chang Hwan; Temas, Daniel; Kim, Ari; Maier, Daniele M; Scott, Karen; Galanko, Joseph A; Ringel, Yehuda

    2015-09-01

    Dysbiosis leading to abnormal intestinal fermentation has been suggested as a possible etiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We aimed to investigate the location and magnitude of altered intestinal bacterial fermentation in IBS and its clinical subtypes. IBS patients who satisfied the Rome III criteria (114) and 33 healthy controls (HC) were investigated. Intestinal fermentation was assessed using two surrogate measures: intestinal intraluminal pH and fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Intraluminal pH and intestinal transit times were measured in the small and large bowel using a wireless motility capsule (SmartPill) in 47 IBS and 10 HC. Fecal SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and lactate were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography in all enrolled subjects. Correlations between intestinal pH, fecal SCFAs, intestinal transit time, and IBS symptom scores were analyzed. Colonic intraluminal pH levels were significantly lower in IBS patients compared with HC (total colonic pH, 6.8 for IBS vs. 7.3 for HC, P=0.042). There were no differences in total and segmental pH levels in the small bowel between IBS patients and HC (6.8 vs. 6.8, P=not significant). The intraluminal colonic pH differences were consistent in all IBS subtypes. Total SCFA level was significantly lower in C-IBS patients than in D-IBS and M-IBS patients and HC. The total SCFA level in all IBS subjects was similar with that of HC. Colonic pH levels correlated positively with colon transit time (CTT) and IBS symptoms severity. Total fecal SCFAs levels correlated negatively with CTT and positively with stool frequency. Colonic intraluminal pH is decreased, suggesting higher colonic fermentation, in IBS patients compared with HC. Fecal SCFAs are not a sensitive marker to estimate intraluminal bacterial fermentation.

  3. Altering the thermal resistance of foodborne bacterial pathogens with an eggshell membrane waste by-product.

    PubMed

    Poland, A L; Sheldon, B W

    2001-04-01

    Eggshells from egg-breaking operations are a significant waste disposal problem. Thus, the development of value-added by-products from this waste would be welcomed by the industry. The ability of extracted eggshell membranes containing, several bacteriolytic enzymes (i.e., lysozyme and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase) or other membrane components to alter the thermal resistance of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Mid-log phase cells of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC), Listeria monocytogenes Scott A (LM), and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) were suspended in 100 ml of 0.1% peptone water (pH 6.9, 10(7-8) CFU/ml) containing either 0 (control) or 10 g of an eggshell membrane extract and incubated at 37 degrees C for 45 min. Following exposure, membrane-free samples (1.5 ml) were heated in a 56 degrees C (LM, SA), 54 degrees C (SE, ST), or 52 degrees C (EC) water bath from 0 to 14 min in sealed glass reaction vials (12 by 32 mm), and the survivors were recovered on brain heart infusion agar. Population reductions ranging from 27.6% (SA) to 99.8% (LM) (ST, 43.8%; SE, 47.5%; EC, 71.8%) were observed for cells treated for 45 min with extracted membrane, as compared to controls. D-value reductions ranging from 0 (LM) to 87.2% (SE) (SA, 36.7%; EC, 83.3%; ST, 86.3%) were observed when membrane-treated cells were subsequently heat inactivated. The effects of exposure pH, time, temperature, and organic load on membrane activity were also evaluated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Exposure pH (5.0 versus 6.9), time (15 versus 45 min), and temperature (4 degrees C versus 37 degrees C) did not significantly reduce the impact of eggshell membranes on D-values. However, the presence of organic matter (0.1% peptone water versus skim milk) significantly reduced the thermal resistance-reducing capacity of the membranes. These preliminary findings provide information on the potential use of extracted eggshell

  4. Probiotic Pre-treatment Reduces Gliclazide Permeation (ex vivo) in Healthy Rats but Increases It in Diabetic Rats to the Level Seen in Untreated Healthy Rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Salami, Hani; Butt, Grant; Tucker, Ian; Skrbic, Ranko; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Mikov, Momir

    2008-07-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of probiotic pre-treatment on the permeation of the antidiabetic drug gliclazide in healthy and diabetic rats. METHODS: Wistar rats (age 2-3 months, weight 350 +/- 50 g) were randomly allocated into one of 4 groups (N = 16 each group): healthy control, healthy probiotic, diabetic control, and diabetic probiotic. Probiotics (75 mg/kg, equal quantities of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus) were administered twice a day for three days to the appropriate groups after diabetes had been induced with alloxan i.v. 30 mg/kg. Rats were sacrificed, ileal tissues mounted in Ussing chambers and gliclazide (200 microg/mL) was administered for the measurement of the mucosal to serosal absorption Jss((MtoS)) and serosal to mucosal secretion Jss((StoM)) of gliclazide. RESULTS: Treatment of healthy rats with probiotics reduced Jss((MtoS)) of gliclazide from 1.2 +/- 0.3 to 0.3 +/- 0.1 microg/min/cm(2) (P < 0.01) and increased Jss((StoM))from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.4 +/- 0.3 (P < 0.01) resulting in net secretion while, in diabetic tissues, treatment with probiotics increased both Jss((MtoS)) and Jss((StoM))fluxes of gliclazide to the comparable levels of healthy tissues resulting in net absorption. DISCUSSION: In healthy rats, the reduction in Jss((MtoS)) after probiotics administration could be explained by the production of bacterial metabolites that upregulate the mucosal efflux drug transporters Mrp2 that control gliclazide transport. In diabetic rats, the restored fluxes of gliclazide after probiotic treatment, suggests the normalization of the functionality of the drug transporters resulting in a net absorption. CONCLUSION: Probiotics may alter gliclazide transport across rat ileal tissue studied ex vivo.

  5. Effect of dietary probiotics on clownfish: a molecular approach to define how lactic acid bacteria modulate development in a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Avella, Matteo A; Olivotto, Ike; Silvi, Stefania; Place, Allen R; Carnevali, Oliana

    2010-02-01

    We set out to determine whether probiotic addition would improve larval development in the false percula clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris and to determine what molecular responses could be observed in the larvae following probiotic exposure. We supplied the probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501 to clownfish larvae from the first day posthatch simultaneously by live prey and with addition to rearing water (group 2) and exclusively by live prey (group 3). We observed twofold higher body weight in both clownfish larvae and juveniles when probiotics were supplied via live prey and added to the rearing water. In addition, development was accelerated with metamorphosis occurring 3 days earlier in fingerlings treated with probiotic. Alteration in molecular biomarkers supported the faster growth observation. There was significantly increased gene expression of factors involved in growth and development (insulin-like growth factors I and II, myostatin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and beta, vitamin D receptor alpha, and retinoic acid receptor gamma) when probiotics were delivered via live prey and added to the rearing water. Moreover, probiotic treatment lessened the severity of the general stress response as exhibited by lower levels of glucocorticoid receptor and 70-kDa heat shock protein gene expression. Furthermore, an improvement of skeletal head development was observed, with a 10-20% reduction in deformities for juveniles treated with probiotic. All data suggest a potent effect on development resulting from the administration of lactic acid bacteria to larval clownfish, and this study provides a preliminary molecular entry path into the investigation of mechanisms responsible for probiotic enhancement in fish development.

  6. Probiotics History.

    PubMed

    Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Bonvicini, Fiorenza; Gramenzi, Annagiulia

    Gut microbiota promotes healthy effects on the host and prevents diseases. Probiotic (probios, for life) are defined as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host." At the beginning of 1900s Louis Pasteur identified the microorganisms responsible for the process of fermentation, whereas E. Metchnikoff associated the enhanced longevity of Bulgarian rural people to the regular consumption of fermented dairy products such as yogurt. He suggested that lactobacilli might counteract the putrefactive effects of gastrointestinal metabolism that contributed to illness and aging. Hippocrates declared, 2000 years earlier, that "death sits in the bowels." Metchnikoff considered the lactobacilli as probiotics ("probios," conducive to life of the host as opposed to antibiotics); probiotics could have a positive influence on health and prevent aging. During the neolitic period of the age of the stone, the domestication of animals occurred and man began to get fermented food. Probably serendipitous contaminations in favorable environments played a major role. Fecal microbiota transplantation dates to a fourth-century Chinese handbook for food poisoning or severe diarrhea. To date fecal transplant cures Clostridium difficile infections with more efficacy than vancomycin, and prevents recurrence.

  7. Soil Fungal:Bacterial Ratios Are Linked to Altered Carbon Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Chowdhury, Somak; Schlager, Veronika; Oliver, Anna; Puissant, Jeremy; Vazquez, Perla G. M.; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Griffiths, Robert I.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other). Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the F:B dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the F:B dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential. PMID:27555839

  8. Potential of goat probiotic to bind mutagens.

    PubMed

    Apás, Ana Lidia; González, Silvia Nelina; Arena, Mario Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    The mutagen binding ability of the goat probiotics (Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum DDBA) was evaluated. The oral administration of these probiotics reduced fecal mutagens and intestinal cancer markers in goats. Secondly, the effects of probiotics against the mutagenesis induced by sodium azide (SA), and Benzopyrene (B[α]P) by performing the modified Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 was investigated. The capacity to bind benzopyrene and the stability of the bacterial-mutagen complex was analyzed by HPLC. The dismutagenic potential against both mutagens was proportional to probiotic concentration. Results showed that probiotic antimutagenic capacity against SA was ranging from 13 to 78%. The mixture of four goat probiotics (MGP) displayed higher antimutagenic activity against SA than any individual strains at the same cell concentration. This study shows that the highest diminution of mutagenicity in presence of B[α]P (74%) was observed in presence of MGP. The antimutagenic activity of nearly all the individual probiotic and the MGP were in concordance with the B[α]P binding determined by HPLC. According to our results, the B[α]P binding to probiotic was irreversible still after being washed with DMSO solution. The stability of the toxic compounds-bacterial cell binding is a key consideration when probiotic antimutagenic property is evaluated. MGP exhibits the ability to bind and detoxify potent mutagens, and this property can be useful in supplemented foods for goats since it can lead to the removal of potent mutagens and protect and enhance ruminal health and hence food safety of consumers.

  9. Probiotics and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize observed effects of probiotics with respect to oral health. The review focuses on probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, genera that are most used in various probiotic products. PMID:20613927

  10. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases: novel sequence alterations in pathogenic eukaryotes and peculiar features of bacterial sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, "bacterial-like" enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the "eukaryotic-like" phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research.

  11. Technology and potential applications of probiotic encapsulation in fermented milk products.

    PubMed

    Iravani, Siavash; Korbekandi, Hassan; Mirmohammadi, Seyed Vahid

    2015-08-01

    Fermented milk products containing probiotics and prebiotics can be used in management, prevention and treatment of some important diseases (e.g., intestinal- and immune-associated diseases). Microencapsulation has been used as an efficient method for improving the viability of probiotics in fermented milks and gastrointestinal tract. Microencapsulation of probiotic bacterial cells provides shelter against adverse conditions during processing, storage and gastrointestinal passage. Important challenges in the field include survival of probiotics during microencapsulation, stability of microencapsulated probiotics in fermented milks, sensory quality of fermented milks with microencapsulated probiotics, and efficacy of microencapsulation to deliver probiotics and their controlled or targeted release in the gastrointestinal tract. This study reviews the current knowledge, and the future prospects and challenges of microencapsulation of probiotics used in fermented milk products. In addition, the influence of microencapsulation on probiotics viability and survival is reviewed.

  12. Characterization of the Microbial Diversity and Chemical Composition of Gouda Cheese Made by Potential Probiotic Strains as an Adjunct Starter Culture.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Su; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sae Hun; Kim, Younghoon

    2016-10-05

    This study characterized the microbial diversity and chemical properties of Gouda cheese made by probiotics during ripening periods. Lactobacillus plantarum H4 (H4) and Lactobacillus fermentum H9 (H9), which demonstrate probiotic properties and bioactivity, were used as adjunct starter cultures. Gouda cheese made with H4 (GCP1) and H9 (GCP2) demonstrated the highest production of formic acid and propionic acid, respectively. Moreover, the bacterial diversity, including richness and evenness of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), increased in probiotic cheeses. Specifically, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Streptococcaceae were present at higher concentrations in probiotic cheeses than in control Gouda cheese (GCC). The proportion of H4 in GCP1 increased and culminated at 1.76%, whereas H9 in GCP2 decreased during ripening. Peptide profiles were altered by the addition of probiotics and included various bioactive peptides. In particular, three peptide fragments are newly detected. Therefore, Gouda cheese could be used as an effective probiotic carrier for H4 and H9.

  13. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Alter Soil Bacterial Community and Enhance Polychlorinated Biphenyls Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hua; Brookes, Philip C.; Xu, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) hyphae in alternation of soil microbial community and Aroclor 1242 dissipation. A two-compartment rhizobox system with double nylon meshes in the central was employed to exclude the influence of Cucurbita pepo L. root exudates on hyphal compartment soil. To assess the quantitative effect of AMF hyphae on soil microbial community, we separated the hyphal compartment soil into four horizontal layers from the central mesh to outer wall (e.g., L1–L4). Soil total PCBs dissipation rates ranged from 35.67% of L4 layer to 57.39% of L1 layer in AMF inoculated treatment, which were significant higher than the 17.31% of the control (P < 0.05). The dissipation rates of tri-, tetrachlorinated biphenyls as well as the total PCBs were significantly correlated with soil hyphal length (P < 0.01). Real-time quantitative PCR results indicated that the Rhodococcus-like bphC gene was 2–3 orders of magnitude more than that of Pseudomonas-like bphC gene, and was found responded positively to AMF. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rDNA sequenced by the Illumina Miseq sequencing platform indicated that AMF hyphae altered bacterial community compositions. The phylum Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were dominated in the soil, while Burkholderiales and Actinomycetales were dominated at the order level. Taxa from the Comamonadaceae responded positively to AMF and trichlorinated biphenyl dissipation, while taxa from the Oxalobacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae responded negatively to AMF and PCB congener dissipation. Our results suggested that the AMF hyphal exudates as well as the hyphae per se did have quantitative effects on shaping soil microbial community, and could modify the PCBs dissipation processes consequently. PMID:27379068

  14. Candida albicans alters the bacterial microbiome of early in vitro oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Janus, M. M.; Crielaard, W.; Volgenant, C. M. C.; van der Veen, M. H.; Brandt, B. W.; Krom, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Candida albicans is an oral commensal microorganism, occurring in the oral cavity of 50–70% of healthy individuals. Its effect on oral ecology has mostly been studied using dual-species models, which disregards the complex nature of oral biofilms. The aim of this study was to culture C. albicans in a complex model to study its effect on oral biofilms. Biofilms, inoculated using pooled stimulated saliva with or without addition of C. albicans, were grown under anaerobic, aerobic, or aerobic +5% CO2 conditions. Red autofluorescence was quantified using a spectrophotometer and visualized in fluorescence photographs. The microbiome of 5 h biofilms was determined using 16S rDNA sequencing. C. albicans was only able to proliferate in biofilms grown under aerobic conditions. After 48 h, C. albicans did not induce differences in total biofilm formation, lactic acid accumulation (cariogenic phenotype) or protease activity (periodontitis phenotype). In vitro, anaerobically grown biofilms developed red autofluorescence, irrespective of inoculum. However, under aerobic conditions, only C. albicans–containing biofilms showed red autofluorescence. Facultative or strict anaerobic Veillonella, Prevotella, Leptotrichia, and Fusobacterium genera were significantly more abundant in biofilms with C. albicans. Biofilms without C. albicans contained more of the aerobic and facultative anaerobic genera Neisseria, Rothia, and Streptococcus. The presence of C. albicans alters the bacterial microbiome in early in vitro oral biofilms, resulting in the presence of strictly anaerobic bacteria under oxygen-rich conditions. This in vitro study illustrates that C. albicans should not be disregarded in healthy oral ecosystems, as it has the potential to influence bacteria significantly. PMID:28326152

  15. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics.

    PubMed

    de Vrese, Michael; Schrezenmeir, J

    2008-01-01

    According to the German definition, probiotics are defined viable microorganisms, sufficient amounts of which reach the intestine in an active state and thus exert positive health effects. Numerous probiotic microorganisms (e.g. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri, bifidobacteria and certain strains of L. casei or the L. acidophilus-group) are used in probiotic food, particularly fermented milk products, or have been investigated--as well as Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917, certain enterococci (Enterococcus faecium SF68) and the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii--with regard to their medicinal use. Among the numerous purported health benefits attributed to probiotic bacteria, the (transient) modulation of the intestinal microflora of the host and the capacity to interact with the immune system directly or mediated by the autochthonous microflora, are basic mechanisms. They are supported by an increasing number of in vitro and in vivo experiments using conventional and molecular biologic methods. In addition to these, a limited number of randomized, well-controlled human intervention trials have been reported. Well-established probiotic effects are: 1. Prevention and/or reduction of duration and complaints of rotavirus-induced or antibiotic-associated diarrhea as well as alleviation of complaints due to lactose intolerance. 2. Reduction of the concentration of cancer-promoting enzymes and/or putrefactive (bacterial) metabolites in the gut. 3. Prevention and alleviation of unspecific and irregular complaints of the gastrointestinal tracts in healthy people. 4. Beneficial effects on microbial aberrancies, inflammation and other complaints in connection with: inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, Helicobacter pylori infection or bacterial overgrowth. 5. Normalization of passing stool and stool consistency in subjects suffering from obstipation or an irritable colon. 6. Prevention or alleviation of allergies and atopic diseases in infants. 7

  16. Early intestinal development and mucin transcription in the young poult with probiotic and mannan oligosaccharide prebiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hutsko, S L; Meizlisch, K; Wick, M; Lilburn, M S

    2016-05-01

    Alternative and adjunctive approaches to decreasing the use of dietary antibiotics are becoming popular areas of study. Supplemental probiotics (commensal microbes) and prebiotics (indigestible complex carbohydrates) are 2 dietary approaches to facilitating the intestinal colonization of beneficial bacteria to compete with potential pathogens, thus creating a healthy mucosal environment. The intestinal mucosa is composed of mucin glycoproteins, which play a key role in preventing the attachment of pathogenic bacteria. At hatch, the neonatal turkey intestine is relatively aseptic and vulnderable to bacterial colonization by both commensal and pathogenic microbes. In the current study, we determined the transcription of MUC2, the primary mucin protein produced by goblet cells within the small intestine, and we also measured intestinal morphology immediately post-hatch through d 11. Poults were fed a conventional starter diet, the starter diet supplemented with one of 2 commercial probiotics (A, B), or a commercial mannan oligosaccharide. MUC2 transcription increased from d zero to d 4 post-hatch (P< 0.05), but there was no effect of probiotic or prebiotic supplementation. Villus height and villus area both increased with Probiotic B and mannan oligosaccharide supplementation (P<0.05) and there was a significant d X treatment interaction effect for crypt depth (P=0.007). These results suggest that probiotic and prebiotic supplementation can positively alter the intestinal microenvironment.

  17. Protective efficacy of probiotic alone or in conjunction with a prebiotic in Salmonella-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Praveen; Mavi, Swapandeep Kaur; Bharrhan, Sushma; Shukla, Geeta; Tewari, Rupinder

    2009-08-01

    In view of the increasing interest in the bioecological and nutritional control of diseases, use of probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics (synbiotics) appears as a therapeutic option for various diseases. In this study, an attempt was made to explore the protective potential of Lactobacillus acidophilus as a probiotic, inulin as a prebiotic and both L. acidophilus and inulin as synbiotic against Salmonella-induced liver damage in a murine model. The probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic supplementation resulted in decreased bacterial translocation in the liver of mice challenged with Salmonella typhimurium and decreased levels of serum aminotransferases, suggesting their protective role against Salmonella infection. Mice supplemented with these preparations before Salmonella challenge also revealed decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, increased levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione, along with reduced levels of nitric oxide. Thus, bacteriological and biochemical alterations correlated well with the histological evidence. Protection afforded by supplementation with the probiotic alone was found to be more effective. None of the observations was suggestive of the synergistic effect in the synbiotic-supplemented animals. Thus, it is indicated that the probiotic and the prebiotic used in the present study may act by different mechanisms involved in affording protection against Salmonella-induced liver damage.

  18. Probiotics and allergy.

    PubMed

    Furrie, Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    Allergy is caused by an immune reaction that is out of all proportion to the antigenic stimuli. Classical allergy is a type I hypersensitivity reaction mediated by the interaction of mast cells (and eosinophils) coated with allergen-specific IgE and a cross-linking allergen. The physiological outcome is inflammation commonly displayed by urticaria, rhinitis, vomiting and diarrhoea, depending on the route of allergen entry. In extreme reactions anaphylactic shock can result that may lead to death. Chronic allergic responses most commonly present themselves as asthma and eczema. All these symptoms are the consequence of an imbalanced immune system making an unsuitable response to an environmental or food antigen. On bacterial colonisation of the colon after birth the appropriate microbiological stimuli is essential to redress the balance of the skewed T-helper 2 immune response present in the newborn. This normal interaction between baby and microbes is thought to be compromised in the Western world, with a reduction in bifidobacteria and an increase in clostridial species, particularly in bottle-fed infants. The use of probiotic therapy to prevent allergic disease has been demonstrated in two studies using a probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in neonates. A long-term reduction in allergy has been shown in the test group, with lactobacillus reducing the incidence of atopic eczema. Management of allergy through probiotics has also been demonstrated in infants, using lactobacilli to control atopic eczema and cow's milk allergy. Unfortunately, these positive results have not been repeated in studies with older children and young adults.

  19. Long-Term Nitrogen Amendment Alters the Diversity and Assemblage of Soil Bacterial Communities in Tallgrass Prairie

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Timothy C.; Blair, John M.; Herman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes are altering the environmental conditions and the biota of ecosystems worldwide. In many temperate grasslands, such as North American tallgrass prairie, these changes include alteration in historically important disturbance regimes (e.g., frequency of fires) and enhanced availability of potentially limiting nutrients, particularly nitrogen. Such anthropogenically-driven changes in the environment are known to elicit substantial changes in plant and consumer communities aboveground, but much less is known about their effects on soil microbial communities. Due to the high diversity of soil microbes and methodological challenges associated with assessing microbial community composition, relatively few studies have addressed specific taxonomic changes underlying microbial community-level responses to different fire regimes or nutrient amendments in tallgrass prairie. We used deep sequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene to explore the effects of contrasting fire regimes and nutrient enrichment on soil bacterial communities in a long-term (20 yrs) experiment in native tallgrass prairie in the eastern Central Plains. We focused on responses to nutrient amendments coupled with two extreme fire regimes (annual prescribed spring burning and complete fire exclusion). The dominant bacterial phyla identified were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria and made up 80% of all taxa quantified. Chronic nitrogen enrichment significantly impacted bacterial community diversity and community structure varied according to nitrogen treatment, but not phosphorus enrichment or fire regime. We also found significant responses of individual bacterial groups including Nitrospira and Gammaproteobacteria to long-term nitrogen enrichment. Our results show that soil nitrogen enrichment can significantly alter bacterial community diversity, structure, and individual taxa abundance, which have important

  20. Phylogenetic and functional alterations in bacterial community compositions in broiler ceca as a result of mannan oligosaccharide supplementation.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, A; de Leeuw, Marcel; Penaud-Frézet, Stéphanie; Dimova, Diliana; Murphy, R A

    2015-05-15

    This study focused on identifying reproducible effects of dietary supplementation with a mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on the broiler cecal bacterial community structure and function in a commercial production setting. Two separate trials, each with a control and a supplemented group, were carried out in the same commercial location and run concurrently. Approximately 10,000 birds from the same commercial hatchery were mirror imaged into each of four commercial broiler sheds and fed either a control or supplemented diet. Cecal contents were obtained on days 7, 21, and 35 posthatch from 12 randomly caught broilers from each group. Bacterial pyrosequencing was performed on all samples, with approximately 250,000 sequences obtained per treatment per time point. The predominant phyla identified at all three time points in both trials were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Tenericutes, representing >99% of all sequences. MOS supplementation altered the bacterial community composition from 7 days supplementation through 35 days supplementation. Bacteroidetes appeared to be replacing Firmicutes as a result of supplementation, with the most noticeable effects after 35 days. The effects of supplementation were reproducible across both trials. PICRUSt was used to identify differences between the functional potentials of the bacterial communities as a result of MOS supplementation. Using level 3 KEGG ortholog function predictions, differences between control and supplemented groups were observed, with very strong segregation noted on day 35 posthatch in both trials. This indicated that alterations of bacterial communities as a result of MOS are likely to alter the functional capability of the cecum. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Probiotics in animal nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Durand, H

    2010-03-01

    The use of probiotics for farm animals has increased considerably over the last 15 years. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which can confer a health benefit for the host when administered in appropriate and regular quantities. Once ingested, the probiotic microorganisms can modulate the balance and activities of the gastrointestinal microbiota, whose role is fundamental to gut homeostasis. It has been demonstrated that numerous factors, such as dietary and management constraints, can strongly affect the structure and activities of the gut microbial communities, leading to impaired health and performance in livestock animals. In this review, the most important benefits of yeast and bacterial probiotics upon the gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem in ruminants and monogastric animals (equines, pigs, poultry, fish) reported in the recent scientific literature are described, as well as their implications in terms of animal nutrition and health. Additional knowledge on the possible mechanisms of action is also provided.

  2. Developing oral probiotics from Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Wescombe, Philip A; Hale, John D F; Heng, Nicholas C K; Tagg, John R

    2012-12-01

    Considerable human illness can be linked to the development of oral microbiota disequilibria. The predominant oral cavity commensal, Streptococcus salivarius has emerged as an important source of safe and efficacious probiotics, capable of fostering more balanced, health-associated oral microbiota. Strain K12, the prototype S. salivarius probiotic, originally introduced to counter Streptococcus pyogenes infections, now has an expanded repertoire of health-promoting applications. K12 and several more recently proposed S. salivarius probiotics are now being applied to control diverse bacterial consortia infections including otitis media, halitosis and dental caries. Other potential applications include upregulation of immunological defenses against respiratory viral infections and treatment of oral candidosis. An overview of the key steps required for probiotic development is also presented.

  3. Interactions between Innate Immunity, Microbiota, and Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, GianMarco; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Fabiocchi, Federica; Ricci, Salvatore; Flamini, Paolo; Sandri, Giancarlo; Trotta, Maria Cristina; Elisei, Walter; Penna, Antonio; Lecca, Piera Giuseppina; Picchio, Marcello; Tursi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The term "microbiota" means genetic inheritance associated with microbiota, which is about 100 times larger than the guest. The tolerance of the resident bacterial flora is an important key element of immune cell function. A key role in the interaction between the host and the microbiota is played by Paneth cell, which is able to synthesize and secrete proteins and antimicrobial peptides, such as α/β defensins, cathelicidin, 14 β-glycosidases, C-type lectins, and ribonuclease, in response to various stimuli. Recent studies found probiotics able to preserve intestinal homeostasis by downmodulating the immune response and inducing the development of T regulatory cells. Specific probiotic strain, as well as probiotic-driven metabolic products called "postbiotics," has been recently recognized and it is able to influence innate immunity. New therapeutic approaches based on probiotics are now available, and further treatments based on postbiotics will come in the future.

  4. Impact of a probiotic, inulin, or their combination on the piglets' microbiota at different intestinal locations.

    PubMed

    Sattler, V A; Bayer, K; Schatzmayr, G; Haslberger, A G; Klose, V

    2015-01-01

    Natural feed additives are used to maintain health and to promote performance of pigs without antibiotics. Effects of a probiotic, inulin, and their combination (synbiotic), on the microbial diversity and composition at different intestinal locations were analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time PCR, and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Bacterial diversity assessed by DGGE and/or pyrosequencing was increased by inulin in all three gut locations and by the synbiotic in the caecum and colon. In contrast, the probiotic did only affect the microbiota diversity in the ileum. Shifts in the DGGE microbiota profiles of the caecum and colon were detected for the pro- and synbiotic fed animals, whereas inulin profiles were more similar to the ones of the control. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed that all three additives could reduce Escherichia species in each gut location, indicating a potential beneficial effect on the gut microbiota. An increase of relative abundance of Clostridiaceae in the large intestine was found in the inulin group and of Enterococcaceae in the ileum of probiotic fed pigs. Furthermore, real-time PCR results showed that the probiotic and synbiotic increased bifidobacterial numbers in the ileum, which was supported by sequencing results. The probiotic and inulin, to different extents, changed the diversity, relative abundance of phylotypes, and community profiles of the porcine microbiota. However, alterations of the bacterial community were not uniformly between gut locations, demonstrating that functionality of feed additives is site specific. Therefore, gut sampling from various locations is crucial when investigations aim to identify the composition of a healthy gut microbiota after its manipulation through feed additives.

  5. The Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Funneliformis mosseae Alters Bacterial Communities in Subtropical Forest Soils during Litter Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gui, Heng; Purahong, Witoon; Hyde, Kevin D; Xu, Jianchu; Mortimer, Peter E

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial communities and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) co-occur in the soil, however, the interaction between these two groups during litter decomposition remains largely unexplored. In order to investigate the effect of AMF on soil bacterial communities, we designed dual compartment microcosms, where AMF (Funneliformis mosseae) was allowed access (AM) to, or excluded (NM) from, a compartment containing forest soil and litterbags. Soil samples from this compartment were analyzed at 0, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days. For each sample, Illumina sequencing was used to assess any changes in the soil bacterial communities. We found that most of the obtained operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from both treatments belonged to the phylum of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The community composition of bacteria at phylum and class levels was slightly influenced by both time and AMF. In addition, time and AMF significantly affected bacterial genera (e.g., Candidatus Solibacter, Dyella, Phenylobacterium) involved in litter decomposition. Opposite to the bacterial community composition, we found that overall soil bacterial OTU richness and diversity are relatively stable and were not significantly influenced by either time or AMF inoculation. OTU richness at phylum and class levels also showed consistent results with overall bacterial OTU richness. Our study provides new insight into the influence of AMF on soil bacterial communities at the genus level.

  6. Probiotics and gut health: a special focus on liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S

    2010-01-28

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune stimulation by probiotics through processes involving dendritic cells might also be beneficial to the host immunological status and help prevent pathogen translocation. Hepatic fat metabolism also seems to be influenced by the presence of commensal bacteria, and potentially by probiotics; although the mechanisms by which probiotic might act on the liver are still unclear. However, this might be of major importance in the future because low-grade inflammation, hepatic fat infiltration, and hepatitis might become more prevalent as a result of high fat intake and the increased prevalence of obesity.

  7. The use of a probiotic in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Koeppel, K N; Bertschinger, H; van Vuuren, M; Picard, J; Steiner, J; Williams, D; Cardwell, J

    2006-09-01

    Juvenile captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) often present with diarrhoea that is commonly associated with bacterial infections. A species-specific probiotic containing Lactobacillus Group 2 and Enterococcus faecium was prepared from healthy adult cheetahs. Juvenile cheetahs (n = 27) between 8 and 13 months of age were included in the probiotic trial. The animals were observed prior to and after feeding of the probiotic which was made available for 28 days. Feeding of the probiotic resulted in a significantly increased body weight in the treatment group (P = 0.026), while there was no increase in the control group. A relative improvement in the faecal quality in the probiotic group during the treatment period compared with the pre-treatment (P = 0.0363) and post-treatment (P = 0.004) period was observed. This was accompanied by an absence of blood and mucus in the faeces during the treatment period in the probiotic group.

  8. Probiotics and prebiotics: role in prevention of nosocomial sepsis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vrinda; Soraisham, Amuchou S

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial sepsis is associated with increased mortality and morbidity including neurodevelopmental impairment and prolonged hospital stay. Prevention of sepsis especially in the preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit remains a major challenge. The gastrointestinal tract is an important source of potential pathogens causing nosocomial sepsis as the immature intestinal epithelium can permit translocation of bacteria and yeast. The intestinal tract and its microflora play an important role in the immunity. Altering the gut microflora has been extensively studied for immunomodulation in preterm infants. Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Probiotics have been used for prevention and treatment of various medical conditions in children and adults. Studies on probiotics in premature infants have focused on normalizing intestinal flora, improvement in feeding intolerance, prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis. In this paper, we discuss the intestinal bacterial colonization pattern; the rational for probiotics and prebiotic therapy with special focus on the prevention of nosocomial sepsis in preterm infants.

  9. [The role of intestinal microflora and probiotic bacteria in prophylactic and development of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Ewa; Złotkowska, Dagmara; Pijagin, Mariola E

    2013-08-09

    The gut microbiota comprises a large and diverse range of microorganisms whose activities have a significant impact on health. It interacts with its host at both the local and systemic level, resulting in a broad range of beneficial or detrimental outcomes for nutrition, infections, xenobiotic metabolism, and cancer. The current paper reviews research on the role of intestinal microflora in colorectal cancer development. Especially a protective effect of beneficial bacteria and probiotics on the risk of cancer development is highly discussed. There is substantial experimental evidence that the beneficial gut bacteria and their metabolism have the potential to inhibit the development and progression of neoplasia in the large intestine. Most of the data derive, however, from experimental and animal trials. Over a dozen well-documented animal studies have been published, wherein it has been clearly revealed that some lactic acid bacteria, especially lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, inhibit initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. Studies on cancer suppression in humans as a result of the consumption of probiotics are still sparse. Nevertheless, some epidemiological and interventional studies seem to confirm the bacterial anticancerogenic activity also in human gut. The mechanism by which probiotics may inhibit cancer development is unknown. Probiotics increase the amount of beneficial bacteria and decrease the pathogen level in the gut, consequently altering metabolic, enzymatic and carcinogenic activity in the intestine, decreasing inflammation and enhancing immune function, which may contribute to cancer defense.

  10. Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Krishnan, Kannan; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of inorganic mercury (Hg) on bacterial community and diversity in different soils. Three soils-neutral, alkaline and acidic-were spiked with six different concentrations of Hg ranging from 0 to 200 mg kg(-1) and aged for 90 days. At the end of the ageing period, 18 samples from three different soils were investigated for bacterial community structure and soil physicochemical properties. Illumina MiSeq-based 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing revealed the alteration in the bacterial community between un-spiked control soils and Hg-spiked soils. Among the bacterial groups, Actinobacteria (22.65%) were the most abundant phyla in all samples followed by Proteobacteria (21.95%), Bacteroidetes (4.15%), Firmicutes (2.9%) and Acidobacteria (2.04%). However, the largest group showing increased abundance with higher Hg doses was the unclassified group (45.86%), followed by Proteobacteria. Mercury had a considerable negative impact on key soil functional bacteria such as ammonium oxidizers and nitrifiers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that among the measured soil properties, Hg had a major influence on bacterial community structure. Furthermore, nonlinear regression analysis confirmed that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial alpha diversity in lower organic carbon containing neutral and alkaline soils, whereas in acidic soil with higher organic carbon there was no significant correlation. EC20 values obtained by a nonlinear regression analysis indicated that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial diversity in concentrations lower than several guideline values.

  11. Use of probiotics in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lundell, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated that the use of probiotics and synbiotics in patients undergoing abdominal surgery might be beneficial in preventing postoperative infectious complications. However, other investigators report that there is no evidence supporting any benefits from preoperative use of pre- and probiotics (synbiotics) in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery, and that in some cases there is even an increased risk of mortality. Possible explanations behind these controversies may be found in the postoperative period of administration (median time of 4 days), the oral (instead of jejunal) route of administration with the accompanying unclear survival rate of the probiotics in the stomach due to low pH, and the high-risk operations such as complicated colectomies resulting in a high overall rate of bacterial translocation and infections. In recent years, three important randomized studies on the effects of probiotics in patients undergoing colorectal surgery have reported that the use of probiotics markedly improved intestinal microbial populations and significantly decreased the incidence of further infectious complications. Furthermore, the patients' quality of life was also improved by shortening the duration of postoperative hospital stay and the period needed for antibiotics administration. Improvements in infection-related complications and gut defecation function have also been reported in patients receiving perioperative oral probiotics treatment, suggesting that the use of probiotics could reduce the extent of damage to colon mucosa after surgery. Probiotics can improve the integrity of the gut mucosal barrier as well as the balance of the gut microbiota, and they play a role in decreasing the rate of infection. This area, however, requires more research before preoperative oral intake of probiotics combined with postoperative treatment can be recommended for patients in need of gastrointestinal surgery. Copyright © 2011 S

  12. Effects of metronidazole combined probiotics over metronidazole alone for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongying; Fu, Yunque; Yang, Chunlin; Ma, Jianting

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the curative effect of metronidazole combined probiotics over metronidazole alone in the treatment of BV. We are searching randomized controlled trials on major online databases including PubMed, Science Direct, and Cochrane Database between 1990 and 2015. The primary outcome measure was the cure rate of BV. Cochran's Chi-square test (Q test) was used to test for heterogeneity among trials, and the I (2) index. We used mixed-effects modeling for parameters of the summary hazard ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Analysis suggests the cure rate of BV [RR = 1.12, 95% CI (0.94-1.32), p = 0.20], and the I (2) index was 83%. The value of I (2) index decreased to 16% after removing the study of Anukam et al., and Amsel 1.04 (95% CI 0.96-1.13) (p = 0.35), Nugent 1.02 (95% CI 0.94-1.11), short-term 1.01 (95% CI 0.93-1.10) (p = 0.79), long-term 1.06 (95% CI 0.98-1.14) (p = 0.13), Europe 1.06 (95% CI 0.95-1.19) (p = 0.32), Non-Europe 0.99 (95% CI 0.94-1.05) (p = 0.83). When the two same groups data were combined, respectively, the RRs for all studies were the same as 1.03 (95% CI 0.96-1.09) (p = 0.42) showing that there is not statistically significant in relevant stratums. The result has showed an overall little significance for the efficacy of metronidazole combined probiotics over metronidazole alone for the treatment of BV. We need more further studies to provide enough evidence to confirm the benefits of probiotics in the treatment of BV.

  13. The probiotic content of commercial yogurts in west virginia.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Brian S; Yu, Hongwei; Elitsur, Yoram

    2009-06-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that can confer health benefits. Current recommendations for probiotic dosing in pediatrics for acute gastroenteritis range from 109 to 1011 colony forming units (CFUs)/day. In the present study, commercial yogurts were investigated for probiotic content and concentration. A total of 10 yogurts and 1 probiotic supplement were tested. Culture and enumeration were performed on Lactobacillus specific agar, and presence of gram positive rods were confirmed with gram staining. Various PCR techniques were also used to identify different Lactobacillus species. Good colony growth was noted on all cultures, with enumeration results ranging from 4.8 x 109 to 9.5 x 1010 CFU in a single 100mL serving. A wide variety of bacterial species was noted, including unidentified bacteria. All yogurt samples had enough probiotic content to meet current recommendations for treatment of acute gastroenteritis. Physicians should use yogurts with caution in this setting until full bacterial repertoires are available for commercial yogurts.

  14. Antibacterial Compounds-Macrolactin Alters the Soil Bacterial Community and Abundance of the Gene Encoding PKS

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun; Zhao, Mengli; Li, Rong; Huang, Qiwei; Rensing, Christopher; Raza, Waseem; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Macrolactin produced by many soil microbes has been shown to be an efficient antibacterial agent against many bacterial pathogens. However, studies examining the effect of macrolactin on both the soil bacterial community and the intrinsic bacterial species that harbor genes responsible for the production of this antibiotic have not been conducted so far. In this study, a mixture of macrolactin was isolated from the liquid culture of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6, and applied to the soil once a week for four weeks. 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq sequencing showed that continuous application of macrolactin reduced the α-diversity of the soil bacterial community and thereby changed the relative abundance of microbes at both the phylum and genus level. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes was significantly increased along with a significant decrease in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria. However, the application of macrolactins had an insignificant effect on the total numbers of bacteria. Further, the native gene responsible for the production of macrolactin, the gene encoding polyketide synthase was reduced in copy number after the application of macrolactin. The results of this study suggested that a bactericide from a microbial source could decrease the diversity of the soil bacterial community and change the bacterial community structure. Moreover, the populations of the intrinsic bacterial species which harbor genes responsible for macrolactin production were inhibited when the external source antibiotic was applied. PMID:27965639

  15. Metabolic engineering of Serratia marcescens with the bacterial hemoglobin gene: alterations in fermentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Wei, M L; Webster, D A; Stark, B C

    1998-09-05

    Serratia marcescens was transformed with plasmid vector pUC8 or pUC8 containing the bacterial (Vitreoscilla) hemoglobin gene (vgb) on either a 2.3-kb fragment (pUC8:15) or 1.4-kb fragment (pUC8:16) of Vitreoscilla DNA. The vgb-bearing strains were compared with the pUC8 transformant and untransformed S. marcescens with respect to growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth supplemented with glucose or casein acid hydrolysate. Growth (on a viable cell basis) was similar to that in unsupplemented LB. Total acid excretion (as estimated by medium pH) was similar for all strains in both LB plus 2% casein acid hydrolysate and LB without additions. Acid excretion in LB plus 2% glucose was somewhat greater at up to 10 h in culture for the two vgb-bearing strains; from 10 to 26 h in culture, the pHs of these cultures continued to decrease (to 4.1-4.2), whereas those of the non-vgb-bearing strains returned to near the starting pH (7.4-7.8). Concomitantly, after 26 h of culture in LB plus 2% glucose, the non-vgb-bearing strains had produced about 15 times as much acetoin and about three to four times as much 2,3-butanediol as the vgb-bearing strains. In general, for all strains, much more acetoin and 2,3-butanediol were produced in LB plus 2% glucose than in unsupplemented LB. The exception was acetoin production by the strain bearing vgb on plasmid pUC8:15; after 26 h of culture in LB without supplementation it was between three and four times that of the other strains, and about 50% higher than its level in LB plus 2% glucose. When grown with the 2% casein acid hydrolysate supplement, the strain bearing vgb on plasmid pUC8:15 produced much more acetoin and 2,3-butanediol than the other strains after 26 hours in culture. The results confirm that vgb can significantly alter carbon metabolism and suggest that the use of vgb technology for directed metabolic engineering may be a complicated process, depending in part on medium composition. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Alteration of Bacterial Antibiotic Sensitivity After Short-Term Exposure to Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Darvish, Leili; Abounajmi, Mohammad; Zarei, Samira; Zare, Tahereh; Taheri, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background Many pathogenic bacteria show different levels of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, a lot of hospital-acquired infections are caused by highly resistant or multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. According to WHO, patients with drug-resistant infections have higher morbidity and mortality. Moreover, patients infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics considerably consume more healthcare resources. Objectives In this study, we explored a physical method of converting drug-resistant bacteria to drug-sensitive ones. Materials and Methods This is an in vitro case-control study, performed at the Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), Shiraz, Iran in 2014. All experiments were carried out using Gram-negative bacteria Klebsiella pneumonia and E. coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus group A, isolated from hospitalized patients. The bacterial strains were obtained from the Persian Type Culture Collection, IROST, Iran (Klebsiella pneumonia PTCC 1290) and Bacteriology Department of Shahid Faghihi Teaching Hospital, Shiraz, Iran (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus group A). The bacteria in culture plates were exposed to diagnostic ultrasound using a MyLab70XVG sonography system for 5 minutes. Then, the bacteria were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar and incubated at 35°C for 18 hours. Finally, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed and the inhibition zone in both control and exposed groups were measured. Three replicate agar plates were used for each test and the inhibition zones of the plates were recorded. Results Compared with the results obtained from unexposed bacteria, statistically significant variations of sensitivity to antibiotics were found in some strains after short-term exposure. In particular, we found major differences (making antibiotic-resistant bacteria susceptible or vice versa) in the diameters of

  17. From the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to the kidneys: live bacterial cultures (probiotics) mediating reductions of uremic toxin levels via free radical signaling.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Linnane, Anthony W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2013-11-07

    A host of compounds are retained in the body of uremic patients, as a consequence of progressive renal failure. Hundreds of compounds have been reported to be retention solutes and many have been proven to have adverse biological activity, and recognized as uremic toxins. The major mechanistic overview considered to contribute to uremic toxin overload implicates glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hexosamine, increased polyol pathway activity and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Until recently, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and its associated micro-biometabolome was a neglected factor in chronic disease development. A systematic underestimation has been to undervalue the contribution of GIT dysbiosis (a gut barrier-associated abnormality) whereby low-level pro-inflammatory processes contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) development. Gut dysbiosis provides a plausible clue to the origin of systemic uremic toxin loads encountered in clinical practice and may explain the increasing occurrence of CKD. In this review, we further expand a hypothesis that posits that environmentally triggered and maintained microbiome perturbations drive GIT dysbiosis with resultant uremia. These subtle adaptation responses by the GIT microbiome can be significantly influenced by probiotics with specific metabolic properties, thereby reducing uremic toxins in the gut. The benefit translates to a useful clinical treatment approach for patients diagnosed with CKD. Furthermore, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different anatomical locales is highlighted as a positive process. Production of ROS in the GIT by the epithelial lining and the commensal microbe cohort is a regulated process, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide which acts as an essential second messenger required for normal cellular homeostasis and physiological function. Whilst this critical review has focused on end-stage CKD (type 5), our aim was to build a plausible hypothesis

  18. Microencapsulation of probiotic bacteria: technology and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kailasapathy, Kaila

    2002-09-01

    In the recent past, there has been an explosion of probiotic health-based products. Many reports indicated that there is poor survival of probiotic bacteria in these products. Further, the survival of these bacteria in the human gastro-intestinal system is questionable. Providing probiotic living cells with a physical barrier against adverse environmental conditions is therefore an approach currently receiving considerable interest. The technology of micro-encapsulation of probiotic bacterial cells evolved from the immobilised cell culture technology used in the biotechnological industry. Several methods of micro-encapsulation of probiotic bacteria have been reported and include spray drying, extrusion, emulsion and phase separation. None of these reported methods however, has resulted in the large numbers of shelf-stable, viable probiotic bacterial cells necessary for use in industry for development of new probiotic products. The most commonly reported micro-encapsulation procedure is based on the calcium-alginate gel capsule formation. Kappa-carrageenan, gellan gum, gelatin and starch are also used as excipients for the micro-encapsulation of probiotic bacteria. The currently available equipment for micro-encapsulation is not able to generate large quantities of uniform sized micro or nano capsules. There is a need to design and develop equipment that will be able to generate precise and uniform micro or nano capsules in large quantities for industrial applications. The reported food vehicles for delivery of encapsulated probiotic bacteria are yoghurt, cheese, ice cream and mayonnaise. Studies need to be done on the application of micro-encapsulation of probiotic bacteria in other food systems. The number of probiotic supplements will increase in the future. More studies, however, need to be conducted on the efficacy of micro-encapsulation to deliver probiotic bacteria and their controlled or targeted release in the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  20. Probiotics and the immune response to vaccines.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Thomas T; Bell, Iona

    2010-08-01

    Probiotics are bacteria, but sometimes fungi, which when taken by the oral route may give some health benefits. The most compelling evidence for beneficial effects of probiotics is in the prevention and reduction in the duration of symptoms related to gut infectious disease. There is also evidence to show that some specific probiotics are beneficial in Clostridium difficile diarrhoea in the elderly. As further and better controlled clinical studies have appeared, some specific probiotics also appear to have beneficial effects in perhaps preventing and reducing the duration of symptoms due to acquired upper respiratory tract infections. In an attempt to explain these effects, attention has turned to the effects of some specific probiotics on the immune system. There is evidence that some specific probiotics can alter monocyte and natural killer cell function in the blood. Evidence is also accumulating that taking some specific probiotics can boost antibody responses to oral and systemically administered vaccines. The effect when shown is modest and is not always seen in different studies to all vaccines, but there is enough of a trend to make the area worthy of further investigation, particularly to tease out the mechanisms involved.

  1. Unraveling mechanisms of action of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Philip M; Ossa, Juan C; Johnson-Henry, Kathene

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as living organisms that, when administered in sufficient numbers, are of benefit to the host. Current evidence indicates that varying probiotic strains mediate their effects by a variety of different effects that are dependent on the dosage employed as well as the route and frequency of delivery. Some probiotics act in the lumen of the gut by elaborating antibacterial molecules such as bacteriocins; others enhance the mucosal barrier by increasing the production of innate immune molecules, including goblet cell-derived mucins and trefoil factors and defensins produced by intestinal Paneth cells; and other probiotics mediate their beneficial effects by promoting adaptive immune responses (secretory immune globulin A, regulatory T cells, interleukin-10). Some probiotics have the capacity to activate receptors in the enteric nervous system, which could be used to promote pain relief in the setting of visceral hyperalgesia. Future development of the effective use of probiotics in treating various gastroenterological disorders in human participants should take advantage of this new knowledge. The creation of novel formulations of probiotics could be directed to effectively target certain mechanisms of actions that are altered in specific disease states.

  2. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  3. Photochemical alteration of dissolved organic matter and the subsequent effects on bacterial carbon cycling and diversity.

    PubMed

    Lønborg, Christian; Nieto-Cid, Mar; Hernando-Morales, Victor; Hernández-Ruiz, Marta; Teira, Eva; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón

    2016-05-01

    The impact of solar radiation on dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from 3 different sources (seawater, eelgrass leaves and river water) and the effect on the bacterial carbon cycling and diversity were investigated. Seawater with DOM from the sources was first either kept in the dark or exposed to sunlight (4 days), after which a bacterial inoculum was added and incubated for 4 additional days. Sunlight exposure reduced the coloured DOM and carbon signals, which was followed by a production of inorganic nutrients. Bacterial carbon cycling was higher in the dark compared with the light treatment in seawater and river samples, while higher levels were found in the sunlight-exposed eelgrass experiment. Sunlight pre-exposure stimulated the bacterial growth efficiency in the seawater experiments, while no impact was found in the other experiments. We suggest that these responses are connected to differences in substrate composition and the production of free radicals. The bacterial community that developed in the dark and sunlight pre-treated samples differed in the seawater and river experiments. Our findings suggest that impact of sunlight exposure on the bacterial carbon transfer and diversity depends on the DOM source and on the sunlight-induced production of inorganic nutrients. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron

    2016-02-01

    The ideal treatment regimen for the eradication Helicobacter pylori infection has yet to be identified. Probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces, have been suggested as adjuncts to antibiotics for the treatment of H. pylori. There is in vitro evidence that probiotics dampen the Th1 response triggered by H. pylori, attenuate H. pylori associated hypochlorhydria and secrete bacteriocidal metabolites. Probiotics interact with the innate host immune system through adherence to the gastric epithelium and secretion of bacterial adhesins. In prospective human studies, probiotic monotherapy effectively decrease H. pylori density (expired (13)CO2) by 2.0%-64.0%. Probiotic monotherapy has also been shown to eradicate H. pylori in up to 32.5%, although subsequent recrudescence is likely. Eleven meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of probiotics as adjuvants to antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. The addition of a probiotic increased treatment efficacy, OR 1.12-2.07. This benefit is probably strain-specific and may only be significant with relatively ineffective antibiotic regimens. The pooled prevalence of adverse effects was 12.9%-31.5% among subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with 24.3%-45.9% among controls. Diarrhea in particular was significantly reduced in subjects receiving adjuvant probiotics, compared with controls (OR 0.16-0.47). A reduction in adverse events other than diarrhea is variable. Despite the apparent benefit on efficacy and side effects conferred by probiotics, the optimal probiotic species, dose and treatment duration has yet to be determined. Further studies are needed to identify the probiotic, antibiotic and patient factors which might predict benefit from probiotic supplementation.

  5. Impact of consumption of probiotic lactobacilli-containing yogurt on microbial composition in human feces.

    PubMed

    Uyeno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-02-29

    An in vivo study was carried out to determine the effect of consuming probiotic lactobacilli-containing yogurt on the composition of microbiota in the human gut. Fifteen healthy adults ingested a daily serving of one of three commercial yogurts (two of the products contained a probiotic lactobacilli strain) for 20 days. Fecal samples at defined time points before, during, and after the period of yogurt ingestion were collected and analyzed. The fecal population of lactobacilli was determined by a culture-based method and subsequent colony PCR for the identification of species. Six predominant bacterial groups in the fecal samples were quantitatively determined based on a sequence-specific SSU rRNA cleavage method coupled with a suite of oligonucleotide probes, which was optimized for the target-specific detection of bacterial groups inhabiting human feces. In the ingestion period, one probiotic strain was detected in the feces of all five subjects who consumed the yogurt containing the strain, while the other strain was detected in three of another five subjects. The population levels of the two major groups (Bacteroides and Prevotella, and the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group) in the fecal samples tended to change in response to the ingestion but the change did not seem to be dependent on the product-specific property of each yogurt. These results suggest that the human fecal bacterial community could be altered by ingesting yogurt, although whether probiotic lactobacilli are present or absent in the yogurt does not seem to be a factor in this change.

  6. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, Ger; Severijnen, René; Timmerman, Harro

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics and lactulose. This influenced our view of the effect of antibiotics, prebiotics, e.g., lactulose, and probiotics on intestinal bacteria in the treatment of HE. Intestinal ammonia arises from aminoacids after bacterial de-amination and not from urea making urease-positive bacteria irrelevant. Antibiotics are not preferred in the treatment of HE, since ammonia-producing antibiotic-resistant bacteria may survive and replace ammonia-producing antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. Intestinal prebiotics are carbohydrate-like compounds, such as lactulose and resistant starch, that beneficially affects host's health in a different manner than normal food. In the small bowel prebiotics are not absorbed and digested, but are fermented in the colon by colonic bacteria. Fermentation of prebiotics yields lactic, acetic and butyric acids, as well as gas especially hydrogen (H2). The massive H2 volumes cause rapid intestinal hurry and thus massive amounts of colonic bacteria, not only urease-positive bacteria, but also deaminating bacteria, are removed and intestinal uptake of toxic bacterial metabolites, e.g., ammonia, reduced. As living non-pathogenic micro-organisms, probiotics beneficially affect the host's health by fermenting non-absorbed sugars, especially in the small bowel. Thus, they reduce the substrate of the other bacteria, and simultaneously they create a surplus of fermentation products which may affect the non-probiotic flora. Regarding the fermentation products (lactic acid, ethanol, acetic acid and CO2) five groups of probiotic micro-organisms are known. It is argued that probiotic, CO2-producing (facultatively) heterolactic lactobacilli, i.e., lactobacilli, that produce

  7. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Blanarova, C; Galovicova, A; Petrasova, D

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics can be applied in therapy and mainly in prevention of many civilization disorders. Experimental studies in animal models and clinical trials of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have consistently shown that the use of probiotic organisms may effectively down-modulate the severity of intestinal inflammation by altering the composition and metabolic and functional properties of indigenous flora of the gut. Previous studies showed a protective effect of probiotic administration after radiation therapy, and probiotic may play an important role in the pathogenesis of radiation enteropathy. These studies indicate that probiotics may decrease the risk of accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in host organisms and could potentially be used as probiotic food supplements to reduce oxidative stress (Tab. 2, Ref. 47). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  8. Tolerogenic probiotics: potential immunoregulators in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Seyed-Alireza; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Doulabi, Hassan; Rastin, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics are commensal or nonpathogenic microbes that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and confer beneficial effects on the host through several mechanisms such as competitive exclusion, anti-bacterial effects, and modulation of immune responses. There is growing evidence supporting the immunomodulatory ability of some probiotics. Several experimental and clinical studies have been shown beneficial effect of some probiotic bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria strains, on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is mainly characterized by immune intolerance towards self-antigens. Some immunomodulatory probiotics have been found to regulate immune responses via tolerogenic mechanisms. Dendritic and T regulatory (Treg) cells, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 can be considered as the most determinant dysregulated mediators in tolerogenic status. As demonstrated by documented experimental and clinical trials on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, a number of probiotic bacterial strains can restore tolerance in host through modification of such dysregulated mediators. Since there are limited reports regarding to impact of probiotic supplementation in SLE patients, the preset review was aimed to suggest a number of probiotics bacteria, mainly from Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus strains that are able to ameliorate immune responses. The aim was followed through literature survey on immunoregulatory probiotics that can restore tolerance and also modulate the important dysregulated pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Inability of probiotic bacterial strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 to induce human platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Rutherfurd, K J; Gill, H S

    2005-11-01

    Platelet aggregation contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis, and aggregation of platelets induced by lactobacilli is thought to be an important contributory factor in the development and progression of Lactobacillus endocarditis. The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of immunity-enhancing probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 on the activation and aggregation of human blood platelets. Whole blood samples from healthy individuals were incubated in vitro with HN001 or HN019 and subsequently labeled with platelet-specific monoclonal antibodies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-CD41a (expressed on normal platelets), and phycoerythrin-streptavidin-conjugated anti-CD62p (expressed on activated platelets) before analysis by flow cytometry. Platelet-rich plasma was used to assist the gating of the platelet cluster. ADP and epinephrine were used as the physiological platelet activation agonists. Platelet aggregation-inducing strain Streptococcus sanguis 133-79 was used as a positive control strain. The mean fluorescence intensity of phycoerythrin and the percentage of platelets expressing the CD62p marker were used to assess the degree of platelet activation. The percentage of CD62p-positive platelets and the light scatter profiles of the agonist-activated platelets were used to identify the occurrence and degree of platelet aggregation. HN001 and HN019 had no effect on spontaneous platelet activation and aggregation; they also failed to exacerbate the platelet aggregation activity induced by ADP and epinephrine. Therefore, these test probiotic strains HN001 and HN019 are less likely to participate in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis or other thrombotic disorders with regard to platelet aggregation factors.

  10. Yeast supplementation altered the metabolic response to a combined viral-bacterial challenge in feedlot heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two treatments were evaluated in feedlot heifers to determine the effects of feeding a yeast supplement on metabolic responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge. Thirty-two beef heifers (325 +/- 19.2 kg) were selected and randomly assigned to one of two treatments: 1) Contr...

  11. Feeding cessation alters host morphology and bacterial communities in the ascidian Pseudodistoma crucigaster.

    PubMed

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Turon, Xavier; Erwin, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians can associate with abundant and diverse consortia of microbial symbionts, yet these communities remain unexamined for the majority of host ascidians and little is known about host-symbiont interactions. We coupled electron microscopy and 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the bacterial communities associated with the colonial ascidian Pseudodistoma crucigaster, a species endemic to the Mediterranean Sea that has a life cycle with two phases: actively-filtering (active) and non-filtering (resting) forms. Resting colonies exhibited a reduced branchial sac (feeding apparatus) and a thickened cuticle. Electron microscope images also suggested higher abundance of colonizing microorganisms on surfaces of resting colonies. Accordingly, bacterial sequences associated with environmental sources (sediment and biofilms, >99 % similarity) were detected exclusively in resting colonies. Bacterial communities of P. crucigaster colonies (active and resting) were dominated by 3 core taxa affiliated (>94 % similarity) with previously described symbiotic Alphaproteobacteria in marine invertebrates. Shifts in rare bacteria were detected when ascidians entered the resting phase, including the appearance of strictly anaerobic lineages and nitrifying bacterial guilds. These findings suggest that physical (thickened cuticle) and metabolic (feeding cessation) changes in host ascidians have cascading effects on associated bacteria, where modified oxygen concentrations and chemical substrates for microbial metabolism may create anaerobic microhabitats and promote colonization by environmental microorganisms.

  12. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA.

    PubMed

    Turlapati, Swathi A; Minocha, Rakesh; Bhiravarasa, Premsai S; Tisa, Louis S; Thomas, William K; Minocha, Subhash C

    2013-02-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments × two horizons × five subplots) collected from untreated (control), low N-amended (50 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N-amended (150 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) plots. A total of 1.3 million sequences were processed using qiime. Although Acidobacteria represented the most abundant phylum based on the number of sequences, Proteobacteria were the most diverse in terms of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). UniFrac analyses revealed that the bacterial communities differed significantly among soil horizons and treatments. Microsite variability among the five subplots was also evident. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of normalized OTU data followed by permutational manova further confirmed these observations. Richness indicators and indicator species analyses revealed higher bacterial diversity associated with N amendment. Differences in bacterial diversity and community composition associated with the N treatments were also observed at lower phylogenetic levels. Only 28-35% of the 6 936 total OTUs identified were common to three treatments, while the rest were specific to one treatment or common to two.

  13. Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, MA, USA

    Treesearch

    Swathi A. Turlapati; Rakesh Minocha; Premsai S. Bhiravarasa; Louise S. Tisa; William K. Thomas; Subhash C. Minocha

    2013-01-01

    At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments x two horizons x five subplots) collected from untreated (...

  14. Dietary format alters fecal bacterial populations in the domestic cat (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N; Young, Wayne; Kittelmann, Sandra; Kerr, Katherine R; Swanson, Kelly S; Roy, Nicole C; Thomas, David G

    2013-01-01

    The effects of short-term (5-week) exposure to wet or dry diets on fecal bacterial populations in the cat were investigated. Sixteen mixed-sex, neutered, domestic short-haired cats (mean age = 6 years; mean bodyweight = 3.4 kg) were randomly allocated to wet or dry diets in a crossover design. Fecal bacterial DNA was isolated and bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons generated and analyzed by 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. Cats fed dry diets had higher abundances (P < 0.05) of Actinobacteria (16.5% vs. 0.1%) and lower abundances of Fusobacteria (0.3% vs. 23.1%) and Proteobacteria (0.4% vs. 1.1%) compared with cats fed the wet diet. Of the 46 genera identified, 30 were affected (P < 0.05) by diet, with higher abundances of Lactobacillus (31.8% vs. 0.1%), Megasphaera (23.0% vs. 0.0%), and Olsenella (16.4% vs. 0.0%), and lower abundances of Bacteroides (0.6% vs. 5.7%) and Blautia (0.3% vs. 2.3%) in cats fed the dry diet compared with cats fed the wet diet. These results demonstrate that short-term dietary exposure to diet leads to large shifts in fecal bacterial populations that have the potential to affect the ability of the cat to process macronutrients in the diet. PMID:23297252

  15. Validation of a predictive model for identifying febrile young infants with altered urinalysis at low risk of invasive bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Gómez, B; Hernández-Bou, S; Olaciregui, I; de la Torre, M; González, A; Rivas, A; Durán, I; Rubio, A

    2017-02-01

    In 2015, a predictive model for invasive bacterial infection (IBI) in febrile young infants with altered urine dipstick was published. The aim of this study was to externally validate a previously published set of low risk criteria for invasive bacterial infection in febrile young infants with altered urine dipstick. Retrospective multicenter study including nine Spanish hospitals. Febrile infants ≤90 days old with altered urinalysis (presence of leukocyturia and/or nitrituria) were included. According to our predictive model, an infant is classified as low-risk for IBI when meeting all the following: appearing well at arrival to the emergency department, being >21 days old, having a procalcitonin value <0.5 ng/mL and a C-reactive protein value <20 mg/L. IBI was considered as secondary to urinary tract infection if the same pathogen was isolated in the urine culture and in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture. A total of 391 patients with altered urine dipstick were included. Thirty (7.7 %) of them developed an IBI, with 26 (86.7 %) of them secondary to UTI. Prevalence of IBI was 2/104 (1.9 %; CI 95% 0.5-6.7) among low-risk patients vs 28/287 (9.7 %; CI 95% 6.8-13.7) among high-risk patients (p < 0.05). Sensitivity of the model was 93.3 % (CI 95% 78.7-98.2) and negative predictive value was 98.1 % (93.3-99.4). Although our predictive model was shown to be less accurate in the validation cohort, it still showed a good discriminatory ability to detect IBI. Larger prospective external validation studies, taking into account fever duration as well as the role of ED observation, should be undertaken before its implementation into clinical practice.

  16. Febrile young infants with altered urinalysis at low risk for invasive bacterial infection. a Spanish Pediatric Emergency Research Network's Study.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Roberto; Benito, Helvia; Mozún, Rebeca; Trujillo, Juan E; Merino, Pedro A; Mintegi, Santiago; Tiago, San

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection (SBI) in infants younger than 90 days of age. Many physicians admit infants younger than 90 days old because of their greater risk of developing invasive bacterial infections (IBIs), secondary to UTI. The primary objective of this study was to design a prediction model to identify febrile infants younger than 90 days old with an altered urinalysis who were at low risk for IBI and suitable for outpatient management : Prospective multicenter study included 19 hospitals that are members of the Spanish Pediatric Emergency Research Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Emergencies. Febrile infants younger than 90 days old with altered urinalysis were included. A total of 766 (22.5%) infants with altered urine dipstick were analyzed. Fifty (6.5%) of them developed IBI, 39 (78.0%) secondary to UTI. Patients were at low risk for IBI if they were well appearing at arrival to the emergency department, were older than 21 days and had procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) blood values lower than 0.5 ng/mL and 20 mg/L, respectively. These factors were used to create a prediction model for IBI secondary to UTI, with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 89.3-100) and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 97.5-100). We have derived a highly accurate prediction model for IBI in febrile infants with altered urinalysis. Given these results, outpatient management might be suitable for 1 of each 4 infants diagnosed, with a considerable improvement in resource utilization.

  17. Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 Reduces Depression Scores and Alters Brain Activity: A Pilot Study in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Hall, Geoffrey B; Ghajar, Kathy; Nardelli, Andrea; Bolino, Carolina; Lau, Jennifer T; Martin, Francois-Pierre; Cominetti, Ornella; Welsh, Christopher; Rieder, Amber; Traynor, Jenna; Gregory, Caitlin; De Palma, Giada; Pigrau, Marc; Ford, Alexander C; Macri, Joseph; Berger, Bernard; Bergonzelli, Gabriela; Surette, Michael G; Collins, Stephen M; Moayyedi, Paul; Bercik, Premysl

    2017-08-01

    Probiotics can reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but little is known about their effects on psychiatric comorbidities. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the effects of Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 (BL) on anxiety and depression in patients with IBS. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 44 adults with IBS and diarrhea or a mixed-stool pattern (based on Rome III criteria) and mild to moderate anxiety and/or depression (based on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale) at McMaster University in Canada, from March 2011 to May 2014. At the screening visit, clinical history and symptoms were assessed and blood samples were collected. Patients were then randomly assigned to groups and given daily BL (n = 22) or placebo (n = 22) for 6 weeks. At weeks 0, 6, and 10, we determined patients' levels of anxiety and depression, IBS symptoms, quality of life, and somatization using validated questionnaires. At weeks 0 and 6, stool, urine and blood samples were collected, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) test was performed. We assessed brain activation patterns, fecal microbiota, urine metabolome profiles, serum markers of inflammation, neurotransmitters, and neurotrophin levels. At week 6, 14 of 22 patients in the BL group had reduction in depression scores of 2 points or more on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, vs 7 of 22 patients in the placebo group (P = .04). BL had no significant effect on anxiety or IBS symptoms. Patients in the BL group had a mean increase in quality of life score compared with the placebo group. The fMRI analysis showed that BL reduced responses to negative emotional stimuli in multiple brain areas, including amygdala and fronto-limbic regions, compared with placebo. The groups had similar fecal microbiota profiles, serum markers of inflammation, and levels of neurotrophins and neurotransmitters, but the BL group had reduced urine levels of methylamines and

  18. Microbial characterization of probiotics--advisory report of the Working Group "8651 Probiotics" of the Belgian Superior Health Council (SHC).

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Delvigne, Frank; De Vuyst, Luc; Heyndrickx, Marc; Pot, Bruno; Dubois, Jean-Jacques; Daube, Georges

    2013-08-01

    When ingested in sufficient numbers, probiotics are expected to confer one or more proven health benefits on the consumer. Theoretically, the effectiveness of a probiotic food product is the sum of its microbial quality and its functional potential. Whereas the latter may vary much with the body (target) site, delivery mode, human target population, and health benefit envisaged microbial assessment of the probiotic product quality is more straightforward. The range of stakeholders that need to be informed on probiotic quality assessments is extremely broad, including academics, food and biotherapeutic industries, healthcare professionals, competent authorities, consumers, and professional press. In view of the rapidly expanding knowledge on this subject, the Belgian Superior Health Council installed Working Group "8651 Probiotics" to review the state of knowledge regarding the methodologies that make it possible to characterize strains and products with purported probiotic activity. This advisory report covers three main steps in the microbial quality assessment process, i.e. (i) correct species identification and strain-specific typing of bacterial and yeast strains used in probiotic applications, (ii) safety assessment of probiotic strains used for human consumption, and (iii) quality of the final probiotic product in terms of its microbial composition, concentration, stability, authenticity, and labeling.

  19. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  20. Identification of the Atlantic cod L-amino acid oxidase and its alterations following bacterial exposure.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Yoichiro; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Kiron, Viswanath

    2015-06-01

    Antibacterial factors that are present in epidermal mucus of fish have a potential role in the first line of host defence to bacterial pathogens. This study reports the identification of L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) in Atlantic cod (GmLao) and the changes in the molecule following bacterial exposure. The gmlao transcripts and LAO activity were present on both the body surface and in the internal organs of the fish. Relative mRNA level of gmlao increased significantly in the gills, the spleen and the head kidney (up to 8-fold) of fish that were challenged with the pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. The gmlao expression in skin was 4-fold higher in challenged fish. Our data indicate that LAO may be an important effector of antibacterial defence in Atlantic cod.

  1. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs. PMID:28382025

  2. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of alpha

  3. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, But Not Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jichen; Xue, Chao; Song, Yang; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer (OF) regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF), chemical fertilizer (CF), organic–inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF), and OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA) of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments) significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with OF application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR vs. sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the α- and β- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil microbial community structure, but not total levels of

  4. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Ming-Zhao; Zhou, Yuan-Da; Yang, Jing; He, Hai-Xia; He, Yue; Zeng, Yang

    2013-01-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli (ATCC25922). A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin, n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents, n=48). Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood, liver, kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration. The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program. There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin, including the halftime (t1/2), time to peak (tpeak), clearance rate (CL), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0∼12), in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats. However, in the prostatic tissues, tamsulosin increased the Cmax, prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05). These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney. PMID:23353720

  5. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Ming-Zhao; Zhou, Yuan-Da; Yang, Jing; He, Hai-Xia; He, Yue; Zeng, Yang

    2013-03-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli (ATCC25922). A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin, n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents, n=48). Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood, liver, kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration. The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program. There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin, including the halftime (t1/2), time to peak (tpeak), clearance rate (CL), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0∼12), in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats. However, in the prostatic tissues, tamsulosin increased the Cmax, prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05). These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  6. Grain-rich diets altered the colonic fermentation and mucosa-associated bacterial communities and induced mucosal injuries in goats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Huimin; Liu, Junhua; Feng, Panfei; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Remarkably little information is available about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on colonic mucosa-associated bacteria and mucosal morphology. In the present study, 12 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (n = 6) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 6) to characterise the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in colonic mucosa and the mucosal morphology of the colon. The results showed that HG feeding decreased the colonic pH and increased the concentrations of total short chain fatty acids and lipopolysaccharides in colonic digesta. The principal coordinate analysis results showed that the HG diet altered the colonic mucosal bacterial communities, with an increase in the abundance of genus Blautia and a decrease in the abundance of genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus. The HG-fed goats showed sloughing of the surface layer epithelium, intercellular tight junction erosion, cell mitochondrial damage, and upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in colonic mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that HG feeding induced changes in colonic mucosal morphology and cytokines expression that might be caused by excessive fermentation and dramatic shifts in the bacterial populations in the colon. PMID:26841945

  7. Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition†

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Claudia; Conde, Daniel; Pernthaler, Jakob; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of photochemical alterations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on bacterial abundance, activity and community composition in a coastal lagoon of the Atlantic Ocean with high dissolved organic carbon concentration. On two occasions during the austral summer, bacteria-free water of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR) or kept in the dark. Subsequently, dilution cultures were established with bacterioplankton from the lagoon that were incubated in the pre-exposed water for 5 h in the dark. Cell abundance, activity, and community composition of bacterioplankton were assessed before and after incubation in the different treatments. Changes in absorption, fluorescence, and DOC concentration were used as proxies for CDOM photoalteration. We found a significant CDOM photobleaching signal, DOC loss, as well as a stimulation of bacterial activity in the treatments pre-exposed to UV radiation, suggesting increased bioavailability of DOM. Bacterial community analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that this stimulation was mainly accompanied by the specific enrichment of Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. Thus, our results suggest that CDOM photoalteration not only stimulates bacterioplankton growth, but also induces rapid changes in bacterioplankton composition, which can be of relevance for ecosystem functioning, particularly considering present and future changes in the input of terrestrial CDOM to aquatic systems. PMID:19707620

  8. Site-specific mouth rinsing can improve oral odor by altering bacterial counts

    PubMed Central

    Alqumber, Mohammed A.; Arafa, Khaled A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether site-specific mouth rinsing with oral disinfectants can improve oral odor beyond the traditional panoral mouth disinfection with mouth rinses by targeting specifically oral malodor implicated anaerobic bacteria Methods: Twenty healthy fasting subjects volunteered for a blinded prospective, descriptive correlational crossover cross-section clinical trial conducted during the month of Ramadan between July and August 2013 in Albaha province in Saudi Arabia involving the application of Listerine® Cool Mint® mouth rinse by either the traditional panoral rinsing method, or a site-specific disinfection method targeting the subgingival and supragingival plaque and the posterior third of the tongue dorsum, while avoiding the remaining locations within the oral cavity. The viable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial counts, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) levels, organoleptic assessment of oral odor, and the tongue-coating index were compared at baseline, one, 5, and 9 hours after the treatment. Results: The site-specific disinfection method reduced the VSCs and anaerobic bacterial loads while keeping the aerobic bacterial numbers higher than the traditional panoral rinsing method. Conclusion: Site-specific disinfection can more effectively maintain a healthy oral cavity by predominantly disinfecting the niches of anaerobic bacteria within the oral cavity. PMID:25399224

  9. Watershed Urbanization Alters the Composition and Function of Stream Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Yi; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Wright, Justin P.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2011-01-01

    Watershed urbanization leads to dramatic changes in draining streams, with urban streams receiving a high frequency of scouring flows, together with the nutrient, contaminant, and thermal pollution associated with urbanization. These changes are known to cause significant losses of sensitive insect and fish species from urban streams, yet little is known about how these changes affect the composition and function of stream microbial communities. Over the course of two years, we repeatedly sampled sediments from eight central North Carolina streams affected to varying degrees by watershed urbanization. For each stream and sampling date, we characterized both overall and denitrifying bacterial communities and measured denitrification potentials. Denitrification is an ecologically important process, mediated by denitrifying bacteria that use nitrate and organic carbon as substrates. Differences in overall and denitrifying bacterial community composition were strongly associated with the gradient in urbanization. Denitrification potentials, which varied widely, were not significantly associated with substrate supply. By incorporating information on the community composition of denitrifying bacteria together with substrate supply in a linear mixed-effects model, we explained 45% of the variation in denitrification potential (p-value<0.001). Our results suggest that (1) the composition of stream bacterial communities change in response to watershed urbanization and (2) such changes may have important consequences for critical ecosystem functions such as denitrification. PMID:21857975

  10. Atmospheric N deposition alters connectance, but not functional potential among saprotrophic bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Zachary B; Zak, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    The use of co-occurrence patterns to investigate interactions between micro-organisms has provided novel insight into organismal interactions within microbial communities. However, anthropogenic impacts on microbial co-occurrence patterns and ecosystem function remain an important gap in our ecological knowledge. In a northern hardwood forest ecosystem located in Michigan, USA, 20 years of experimentally increased atmospheric N deposition has reduced forest floor decay and increased soil C storage. This ecosystem-level response occurred concomitantly with compositional changes in saprophytic fungi and bacteria. Here, we investigated the influence of experimental N deposition on biotic interactions among forest floor bacterial assemblages by employing phylogenetic and molecular ecological network analysis. When compared to the ambient treatment, the forest floor bacterial community under experimental N deposition was less rich, more phylogenetically dispersed and exhibited a more clustered co-occurrence network topology. Together, our observations reveal the presence of increased biotic interactions among saprotrophic bacterial assemblages under future rates of N deposition. Moreover, they support the hypothesis that nearly two decades of experimental N deposition can modify the organization of microbial communities and provide further insight into why anthropogenic N deposition has reduced decomposition, increased soil C storage and accelerated phenolic DOC production in our field experiment.

  11. Alteration of bacterial communities and organic matter in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) supplied with soil and organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Mocali, Stefano; Galeffi, Carlo; Perrin, Elena; Florio, Alessandro; Migliore, Melania; Canganella, Francesco; Bianconi, Giovanna; Di Mattia, Elena; Dell'Abate, Maria Teresa; Fani, Renato; Benedetti, Anna

    2013-02-01

    The alteration of the organic matter (OM) and the composition of bacterial community in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) supplied with soil (S) and a composted organic fertilizer (A) was examined at the beginning and at the end of 3 weeks of incubation under current-producing as well as no-current-producing conditions. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed a significant alteration of the microbial community structure in MFCs generating electricity as compared with no-current-producing MFCs. The genetic diversity of cultivable bacterial communities was assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 106 bacterial isolates obtained by using both generic and elective media. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the more representative RAPD groups indicated that over 50.4% of the isolates from MFCs fed with S were Proteobacteria, 25.1% Firmicutes, and 24.5% Actinobacteria, whereas in MFCs supplied with A 100% of the dominant species belonged to γ-Proteobacteria. The chemical analysis performed by fractioning the OM and using thermal analysis showed that the amount of total organic carbon contained in the soluble phase of the electrochemically active chambers significantly decreased as compared to the no-current-producing systems, whereas the OM of the solid phase became more humified and aromatic along with electricity generation, suggesting a significant stimulation of a humification process of the OM. These findings demonstrated that electroactive bacteria are commonly present in aerobic organic substrates such as soil or a fertilizer and that MFCs could represent a powerful tool for exploring the mineralization and humification processes of the soil OM.

  12. Coordinate expression of multiple bacterial carotenoid genes in canola leading to altered carotenoid production.

    PubMed

    Ravanello, Monica P; Ke, Dangyang; Alvarez, Julie; Huang, Bihua; Shewmaker, Christine K

    2003-10-01

    Carotenoids have drawn much attention recently because of their potentially positive benefits to human health as well as their utility in both food and animal feed. Previous work in canola (Brassica napus) seed over-expressing the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (crtB) demonstrated a change in carotenoid content, such that the total levels of carotenoids, including phytoene and downstream metabolites like beta-carotene, were elevated 50-fold, with the ratio of beta- to alpha-carotene being 2:1. This result raised the possibility that the composition of metabolites in this pathway could be modified further in conjunction with the increased flux obtained with crtB. Here we report on the expression of additional bacterial genes for the enzymes geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (crtE), phytoene desaturase (crtI) and lycopene cyclase (crtY and the plant B. napus lycopene beta-cyclase) engineered in conjunction with phytoene synthase (crtB) in transgenic canola seed. Analysis of the carotenoid levels by HPLC revealed a 90% decrease in phytoene levels for the double construct expressing crtB in conjunction with crtI. The transgenic seed from all the double constructs, including the one expressing the bacterial crtB and the plant lycopene beta-cyclase showed an increase in the levels of total carotenoid similar to that previously observed by expressing crtB alone but minimal effects were observed with respect to the ratio of beta- to alpha-carotene compared to the original construct. However, the beta- to alpha-carotene ratio was increased from 2:1 to 3:1 when a triple construct consisting of the bacterial phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase and lycopene cyclase genes were expressed together. This result suggests that the bacterial genes may form an aggregate complex that allows in vivo activity of all three proteins through substrate channeling. This finding should allow further manipulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway for downstream products with

  13. Probiotics or antibiotics: future challenges in medicine.

    PubMed

    Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Babak; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Radiah, Dayang; Rosli, Rozita; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2015-02-01

    Genetic and environmental factors can affect the intestinal microbiome and microbial metabolome. Among these environmental factors, the consumption of antibiotics can significantly change the intestinal microbiome of individuals and consequently affect the corresponding metagenome. The term 'probiotics' is related to preventive medicine rather than therapeutic procedures and is, thus, considered the opposite of antibiotics. This review discusses the challenges between these opposing treatments in terms of the following points: (i) antibiotic resistance, the relationship between antibiotic consumption and microbiome diversity reduction, antibiotic effect on the metagenome, and disease associated with antibiotics; and (ii) probiotics as living drugs, probiotic effect on epigenetic alterations, and gut microbiome relevance to hygiene indulgence. The intestinal microbiome is more specific for individuals and may be affected by environmental alterations and the occurrence of diseases. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome, gut microbiota and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2011-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder characterized by abdominal symptoms including chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS is multifactorial, as abnormal gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed neural function of the brain-gut axis and an abnormal autonomic nervous system are all implicated in disease progression. Based on recent experimental and clinical studies, it has been suggested that additional etiological factors including low-grade inflammation, altered gut microbiota and alteration in the gut immune system play important roles in the pathogenesis of IBS. Therefore, therapeutic restoration of altered intestinal microbiota may be an ideal treatment for IBS. Probiotics are live organisms that are believed to cause no harm and result in health benefits for the host. Clinical efficacy of probiotics has been shown in the treatment or prevention of some gastrointestinal inflammation-associated disorders including traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics-associated diarrhea, pouchitis of the restorative ileal pouch and necrotizing enterocolitis. The molecular mechanisms, as cause of IBS pathogenesis, affected by altered gut microbiota and gut inflammation-immunity are reviewed. The effect of probiotics on the gut inflammation-immune systems and the results from clinical trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS are also summarized.

  15. Vaginal lactobacilli, probiotics, and IVF.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Hans; Senok, Abiola C

    2005-12-01

    Perturbation of the normal lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microflora is associated with reproductive failure and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ranging from early pregnancy loss to late miscarriage and preterm birth. As high rates of bacterial vaginosis are observed with IVF patients, abnormal vaginal microflora presumably explain, at least to some extent, reproductive failure as well as the increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome seen in these patients. Accordingly, there may be a window of opportunity for improving IVF success rates and outcomes. At present, a screen-and-treat procedure to restore the normal vaginal microflora is not a routine part of the infertility work-up and treatment. While Gram staining of vaginal smears would offer an inexpensive and validated means for screening and diagnosis, probiotics that contain live lactobacilli capable of re-colonizing the vagina may offer an elegant and safe choice of treatment. Carefully designed trials using well characterized probiotic strains and treatment regimens are still required to evaluate the effect of probiotics on IVF-embryo transfer pregnancy rates.

  16. Probiotics, gut microbiota and health.

    PubMed

    Butel, M-J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is a huge complex ecosystem where microbiota, nutrients, and host cells interact extensively, a process crucial for the gut homeostasis and host development with a real partnership. The various bacterial communities that make up the gut microbiota have many functions including metabolic, barrier effect, and trophic functions. Hence, any dysbiosis could have negative consequences in terms of health and many diseases have been associated to impairment of the gut microbiota. These close relationships between gut microbiota, health, and disease, have led to great interest in using probiotics (i.e. live micro-organisms), or prebiotics (i.e. non-digestible substrates) to positively modulate the gut microbiota to prevent or treat some diseases. This review focuses on probiotics, their mechanisms of action, safety, and major health benefits. Health benefits remain to be proven in some indications, and further studies on the best strain(s), dose, and algorithm of administration to be used are needed. Nevertheless, probiotic administration seems to have a great potential in terms of health that justifies more research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A breakthrough in probiotics: Clostridium butyricum regulates gut homeostasis and anti-inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Takanori; Mikami, Yohei; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by gut microbiota, including beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms. Imbalance in gut bacterial constituents provokes host proinflammatory responses causing diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The development of next-generation sequencing technology allows the identification of microbiota alterations in IBD. Several studies have shown reduced diversity in the gut microbiota of patients with IBD. Advances in gnotobiotic technology have made possible analysis of the role of specific bacterial strains in immune cells in the intestine. Using these techniques, we have shown that Clostridium butyricum as a probiotic induces interleukin-10-producing macrophages in inflamed mucosa via the Toll-like receptor 2/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 pathway to prevent acute experimental colitis. In this review, we focus on the new approaches for the role of specific bacterial strains in immunological responses, as well as the potential of bacterial therapy for IBD treatments.

  18. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial manipulation of the rat dam changes bacterial colonization and alters properties of the gut in her offspring.

    PubMed

    Fåk, Frida; Ahrné, Siv; Molin, Göran; Jeppsson, Bengt; Weström, Björn

    2008-01-01

    The impact of an altered bacterial colonization on gut development has not been thoroughly studied, despite the increased risk of certain diseases with a disturbed microbiota after birth. This study was conducted to determine the effect of microbial manipulation, i.e., antibiotic treatment or Escherichia coli exposure, of the dam on bacterial colonization and gut development in the offspring. Pregnant rats were administered either broad-spectrum antibiotics 3 days before parturition or live nonpathogenic E. coli Culture Collection of University of Göteborg, Sweden type strain (CCUG 29300(T)) 1 wk before parturition and up to 14 days of lactation in the drinking water. Cecal bacterial levels, gut growth, intestinal permeability, digestive enzyme levels, and intestinal inflammation were studied in 2-wk-old rats. Pups from dams that were antibiotic-treated had higher densities of Enterobacteriaceae, which correlated with a decreased stomach growth and function, lower pancreatic protein levels, higher intestinal permeability, and increased plasma levels of the acute phase protein, haptoglobin, compared with pups from untreated mothers. Exposure of pregnant/lactating mothers to E. coli CCUG 29300(T), also resulting in increased Enterobacteriaceae levels, gave in the offspring similar results on the stomach and an increased small intestinal growth compared with the control pups. Furthermore, E. coli pups showed increased mucosal disaccharidase activities, increased liver, spleen, and adrenal weights, as well as increased plasma concentrations of haptoglobin. These findings indicate that disturbing the normal bacterial colonization after birth, by increasing the densities of cecal Enterobacteriaceae, appears to have lasting effects on the postnatal microflora, which affects gut growth and function.

  20. Soil bacterial community and functional shifts in response to altered snowpack in moist acidic tundra of northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Michael P.; Poretsky, Rachel S.; Welker, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.

    2016-09-01

    . Bacterial functional potential was inferred using ancestral state reconstruction to approximate functional gene abundance, revealing a decreased abundance of genes required for soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in the organic layers of the deep snow accumulation zones. These results suggest that predicted climate change scenarios may result in altered soil bacterial community structure and function, and indicate a reduction in decomposition potential, alleviated temperature limitations on extracellular enzymatic efficiency, or both. The fate of stored C in Arctic soils ultimately depends on the balance between these mechanisms.

  1. Microorganisms with Claimed Probiotic Properties: An Overview of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fijan, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Health benefits have mainly been demonstrated for specific probiotic strains of the following genera: Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Escherichia coli. The human microbiota is getting a lot of attention today and research has already demonstrated that alteration of this microbiota may have far-reaching consequences. One of the possible routes for correcting dysbiosis is by consuming probiotics. The credibility of specific health claims of probiotics and their safety must be established through science-based clinical studies. This overview summarizes the most commonly used probiotic microorganisms and their demonstrated health claims. As probiotic properties have been shown to be strain specific, accurate identification of particular strains is also very important. On the other hand, it is also demonstrated that the use of various probiotics for immunocompromised patients or patients with a leaky gut has also yielded infections, sepsis, fungemia, bacteraemia. Although the vast majority of probiotics that are used today are generally regarded as safe and beneficial for healthy individuals, caution in selecting and monitoring of probiotics for patients is needed and complete consideration of risk-benefit ratio before prescribing is recommended. PMID:24859749

  2. Microorganisms with claimed probiotic properties: an overview of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Fijan, Sabina

    2014-05-05

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Health benefits have mainly been demonstrated for specific probiotic strains of the following genera: Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Escherichia coli. The human microbiota is getting a lot of attention today and research has already demonstrated that alteration of this microbiota may have far-reaching consequences. One of the possible routes for correcting dysbiosis is by consuming probiotics. The credibility of specific health claims of probiotics and their safety must be established through science-based clinical studies. This overview summarizes the most commonly used probiotic microorganisms and their demonstrated health claims. As probiotic properties have been shown to be strain specific, accurate identification of particular strains is also very important. On the other hand, it is also demonstrated that the use of various probiotics for immunocompromised patients or patients with a leaky gut has also yielded infections, sepsis, fungemia, bacteraemia. Although the vast majority of probiotics that are used today are generally regarded as safe and beneficial for healthy individuals, caution in selecting and monitoring of probiotics for patients is needed and complete consideration of risk-benefit ratio before prescribing is recommended.

  3. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  4. Safety Assessment of Probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

    Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

  5. Clinical Uses of Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Islam, Saif Ul

    2016-02-01

    Probiotics are live nonpathogenic microorganisms. Many of these microorganisms are part of the normal human gut flora, where they live in a symbiotic relationship. Probiotics have been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI medical conditions. However, the data supporting their use are often conflicting, especially for non-GI-associated illnesses. The strongest evidence supporting the use of probiotics is related to the treatment of acute diarrhea and pouchitis. Atopic eczema in children and genitourinary infections are the only non-GI-related medical conditions where probiotics may have some beneficial effects. Product selection and dosing are not the same in all conditions, and the beneficial effects of each probiotic strain cannot be generalized.The purpose of this article is to provide most recent information about probiotics and its uses. In contrast with previously published reviews on probiotics, we also discuss the composition of various products (Table 1), indications for their use (Table 2), product selection, and dosing of probiotics.Probiotics are safe and appear to exert some beneficial effects in GI-related illnesses. The use of probiotics in non-GI illnesses is not sufficiently supported by current data.

  6. Clinical Uses of Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Saif Ul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Probiotics are live nonpathogenic microorganisms. Many of these microorganisms are part of the normal human gut flora, where they live in a symbiotic relationship. Probiotics have been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI medical conditions. However, the data supporting their use are often conflicting, especially for non-GI-associated illnesses. The strongest evidence supporting the use of probiotics is related to the treatment of acute diarrhea and pouchitis. Atopic eczema in children and genitourinary infections are the only non-GI-related medical conditions where probiotics may have some beneficial effects. Product selection and dosing are not the same in all conditions, and the beneficial effects of each probiotic strain cannot be generalized. The purpose of this article is to provide most recent information about probiotics and its uses. In contrast with previously published reviews on probiotics, we also discuss the composition of various products (Table 1), indications for their use (Table 2), product selection, and dosing of probiotics. Probiotics are safe and appear to exert some beneficial effects in GI-related illnesses. The use of probiotics in non-GI illnesses is not sufficiently supported by current data. PMID:26844491

  7. Does penile tourniquet application alter bacterial adhesion to rat urethral cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Boybeyi-Turer, Ozlem; Kacmaz, Birgul; Arat, Esra; Atasoy, Pınar; Kisa, Ucler; Gunal, Yasemin Dere; Aslan, Mustafa Kemal; Soyer, Tutku

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the effects of penile tourniquet (PT) application on bacterial adhesion to urothelium. Fifty-six rats were allocated into control group (CG), sham group (SG), PT group (PTG). No intervention was applied in CG. A 5mm-length urethral repair was performed in SG and PTG. In PTG, a 10-min duration of PT was applied during the procedure and the tissue oxygenation monitor was used to adjust the same degree of ischemia in all subjects. Samples were examined for wound healing parameters and tissue levels of inflammatory markers, eNOS, e-selectin, and ICAM-1antibodies. The adhesion of Escherichia coli to urothelium was investigated with in vitro adhesion assay. Inflammation was higher and wound healing was worse in SG than CG and in PTG in comparison to CG and SG (p<0.05). The endothelial damage, as shown by eNOS expression, was significantly higher in PTG compared to CG and SG (p<0.05). The staining with ICAM-1 and e-selectin antibodies, showing increased inflammatory response to bacterial adhesion, was significantly higher in PTG compared to CG and SG (p<0.05). In vitro urethral cell proliferation was achieved only in CG and SG revealing significantly increased adhesion in SG compared to CG (p<0.05). The PT application caused endothelial corruption and prevented cell proliferation in cell culture. The PT application does not improve wound healing and increases bacterial adhesion molecules in penile tissue. The in vitro assays showed that PT causes severe endothelial damage and inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Permeable Reactive Barriers Designed To Mitigate Eutrophication Alter Bacterial Community Composition and Aquifer Redox Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Kenly A.; Foreman, Kenneth H.; Weisman, David

    2015-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) consist of a labile carbon source that is positioned to intercept nitrate-laden groundwater to prevent eutrophication. Decomposition of carbon in the PRB drives groundwater anoxic, fostering microbial denitrification. Such PRBs are an ideal habitat to examine microbial community structure under high-nitrate, carbon-replete conditions in coastal aquifers. We examined a PRB installed at the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Falmouth, MA. Groundwater within and below the PRB was depleted in oxygen compared to groundwater at sites upgradient and at adjacent reference sites. Nitrate concentrations declined from a high of 25 μM upgradient and adjacent to the barrier to <0.1 μM within the PRB. We analyzed the total and active bacterial communities filtered from groundwater flowing through the PRB using amplicons of 16S rRNA and of the 16S rRNA genes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes collected from the PRB showed that the total bacterial community had high relative abundances of bacteria thought to have alternative metabolisms, such as fermentation, including candidate phyla OD1, OP3, TM7, and GN02. In contrast, the active bacteria had lower abundances of many of these bacteria, suggesting that the bacterial taxa that differentiate the PRB groundwater community were not actively growing. Among the environmental variables analyzed, dissolved oxygen concentration explained the largest proportion of total community structure. There was, however, no significant correlation between measured environmental parameters and the active microbial community, suggesting that controls on the active portion may differ from the community as a whole. PMID:26231655

  9. Permeable Reactive Barriers Designed To Mitigate Eutrophication Alter Bacterial Community Composition and Aquifer Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Kenly A; Foreman, Kenneth H; Weisman, David; Bowen, Jennifer L

    2015-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) consist of a labile carbon source that is positioned to intercept nitrate-laden groundwater to prevent eutrophication. Decomposition of carbon in the PRB drives groundwater anoxic, fostering microbial denitrification. Such PRBs are an ideal habitat to examine microbial community structure under high-nitrate, carbon-replete conditions in coastal aquifers. We examined a PRB installed at the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Falmouth, MA. Groundwater within and below the PRB was depleted in oxygen compared to groundwater at sites upgradient and at adjacent reference sites. Nitrate concentrations declined from a high of 25 μM upgradient and adjacent to the barrier to <0.1 μM within the PRB. We analyzed the total and active bacterial communities filtered from groundwater flowing through the PRB using amplicons of 16S rRNA and of the 16S rRNA genes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes collected from the PRB showed that the total bacterial community had high relative abundances of bacteria thought to have alternative metabolisms, such as fermentation, including candidate phyla OD1, OP3, TM7, and GN02. In contrast, the active bacteria had lower abundances of many of these bacteria, suggesting that the bacterial taxa that differentiate the PRB groundwater community were not actively growing. Among the environmental variables analyzed, dissolved oxygen concentration explained the largest proportion of total community structure. There was, however, no significant correlation between measured environmental parameters and the active microbial community, suggesting that controls on the active portion may differ from the community as a whole.

  10. Differential Alterations in Host Peripheral Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Chemiluminescence During the Course of Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James P.; Bodroghy, Robert S.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Sobocinski, Philip Z.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of the oxidative metabolism in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by in vitro phagocytosis of various microorganisms results in photon emission, termed chemiluminescence (CL). Studies were conducted to determine whether bacterial and viral infections induce enhanced basal endogenous host peripheral PMN CL in the absence of in vitro phagocytic stimulation. Nonimmune rats and guinea pigs as well as immune rats were inoculated with various doses (105 to 107) of live vaccine strain Francisella tularensis (per 100 g of body weight). In addition, nonimmune guinea pigs were inoculated with 40,000 plaque-forming units of Pichinde virus. Luminol-assisted endogenous PMN CL was measured at various time intervals after inoculation of microorganisms. Enhanced endogenous PMN CL was detected as early as the appearance of fever (12 h) in nonimmune animals infected with F. tularensis. Addition of sodium azide, N-ethylmaleimide, superoxide dismutase, or catalase to the CL reaction mixture containing PMN from infected animals significantly decreased the CL response. Immune rats challenged with F. tularensis exhibited resistance to infection and a decreased PMN CL compared with nonimmune rats 24 and 48 h after inoculation. However, the CL response from immune rats was significantly elevated, compared with control values. In contrast to the results obtained with the model bacterial infection, PMN isolated from guinea pigs inoculated with Pichinde virus failed to exhibit enhanced CL, compared with controls, despite significant viremia and fever. Results suggest that enhanced endogenous CL during bacterial infection occurs through mechanisms involving increased PMN oxidative metabolism and the subsequent generation of microbicidal forms of oxygen. Further, measurement of endogenous PMN CL may have diagnostic and prognostic value in infectious diseases. PMID:7228389

  11. Administration of two probiotic strains during early childhood does not affect the endogenous gut microbiota composition despite probiotic proliferation.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Laursen, Rikke Pilmann; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2017-08-17

    Probiotics are increasingly applied to prevent and treat a range of infectious, immune related and gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, the mechanisms behind the putative effects of probiotics are poorly understood. One of the suggested modes of probiotic action is modulation of the endogenous gut microbiota, however probiotic intervention studies in adults have failed to show significant effects on gut microbiota composition. The gut microbiota of young children is known to be unstable and more responsive to external factors than that of adults. Therefore, potential effects of probiotic intervention on gut microbiota may be easier detectable in early life. We thus investigated the effects of a 6 month placebo-controlled probiotic intervention with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB-12®) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG®) on gut microbiota composition and diversity in more than 200 Danish infants (N = 290 enrolled; N = 201 all samples analyzed), as assessed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Further, we evaluated probiotic presence and proliferation by use of specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Probiotic administration did not significantly alter gut microbiota community structure or diversity as compared to placebo. The probiotic strains were detected in 91.3% of the fecal samples from children receiving probiotics and in 1% of the placebo treated children. Baseline gut microbiota was not found to predict the ability of probiotics to establish in the gut after the 6 month intervention. Within the probiotics group, proliferation of the strains LGG® and BB-12® in the gut was detected in 44.7% and 83.5% of the participants, respectively. A sub-analysis of the gut microbiota including only individuals with detected growth of the probiotics LGG® or BB-12® and comparing these to placebo revealed no differences in community structure or diversity. Six months of probiotic administration during early life did not change gut

  12. Preventive effects of different probiotic formulations on travelers' diarrhea model in wistar rats : preventive effects of probiotics on TD.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Rozan, Pascale; Messaoudi, Michaël

    2010-04-01

    A new animal model of travelers' diarrhea has been developed by infecting rats orally with a strain of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in order to assess the efficacy of three probiotic formulations for the prevention of travelers' diarrhea. Five groups of six rats were given daily (by oral gavage) either a placebo (negative and positive control groups), the suspension of bacterial probiotics called FF1, the yeast probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii, or a combination of both, called Protecflor(TM). After 14 days of treatment, all groups except the negative control one were infected by oral administration of E. coli. Body temperature, body weight, food and water consumption, stools consistency, behavior, and cytokines secretion were disturbed following E. coli infection. Probiotics-treated groups generally displayed less-pronounced symptoms, the combination of probiotics Protecflor(TM) being the most effective.

  13. The Gut Microbiota and Human Health with an Emphasis on the Use of Microencapsulated Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Cantor, Arielle

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in maintaining health. Alterations of the gut bacterial population have been associated with a number of diseases. Past and recent studies suggest that one can positively modify the contents of the gut microbiota by introducing prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, and other therapeutics. This paper focuses on probiotic modulation of the gut microbiota by their delivery to the lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT). There are numerous obstacles to overcome before microorganisms can be utilized as therapeutics. One important limitation is the delivery of viable cells to the lower GIT without a significant loss of cell viability and metabolic features through the harsh conditions of the upper GIT. Microencapsulation has been shown to overcome this, with various types of microcapsules available for resolving this limitation. This paper discusses the gut microbiota and its role in disease, with a focus on microencapsulated probiotics and their potentials and limitations. PMID:21772792

  14. The microbiome and probiotics in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Michael Harrison

    2014-01-01

    Infants, from the moment of birth, are colonized by large numbers of microbes. This colonization continues throughout childhood and from preliminary studies seems to be a highly dynamic process, even during the usual physiologic state we refer to as health. In this context, the persistence of bacterial and fungal species in and on the human body likely confers various benefits to the host. One specific approach to modulate such beneficial effects is the administration of probiotics, also known as beneficial microbes. Herein, we outline the highest level evidence in regard to the evolution of the microbiome during childhood and its manipulation by probiotics for genitourinary, enteric, and allergic and atopic disorders. Thus, probiotic approaches are promising alternatives and adjuvants to traditional vaccines and antibiotics. This may usher in a new age in which vaccine and antibiotic side effects and antibiotic resistance are minimal issues in the setting of maintaining children's health and prevention of disease.

  15. CRISPR Perturbation of Gene Expression Alters Bacterial Fitness under Stress and Reveals Underlying Epistatic Constraints.

    PubMed

    Otoupal, Peter B; Erickson, Keesha E; Escalas-Bordoy, Antoni; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2017-01-20

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance has engendered an impending global health crisis that necessitates a greater understanding of how resistance emerges. The impact of nongenetic factors and how they influence the evolution of resistance is a largely unexplored area of research. Here we present a novel application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology for investigating how gene expression governs the adaptive pathways available to bacteria during the evolution of resistance. We examine the impact of gene expression changes on bacterial adaptation by constructing a library of deactivated CRISPR-Cas9 synthetic devices to tune the expression of a set of stress-response genes in Escherichia coli. We show that artificially inducing perturbations in gene expression imparts significant synthetic control over fitness and growth during stress exposure. We present evidence that these impacts are reversible; strains with synthetically perturbed gene expression regained wild-type growth phenotypes upon stress removal, while maintaining divergent growth characteristics under stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate a prevailing trend toward negative epistatic interactions when multiple gene perturbations are combined simultaneously, thereby posing an intrinsic constraint on gene expression underlying adaptive trajectories. Together, these results emphasize how CRISPR-Cas9 can be employed to engineer gene expression changes that shape bacterial adaptation, and present a novel approach to synthetically control the evolution of antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Insect Gut Symbiont Susceptibility to Host Antimicrobial Peptides Caused by Alteration of the Bacterial Cell Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Son, Dae Woo; Kim, Chan-Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Park, Ha Young; Huh, Ye Rang; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of symbionts is pivotal for understanding the cross-talk between symbionts and hosts. In addition to valuable knowledge obtained from symbiont genomic studies, the biochemical characterization of symbionts is important to fully understand symbiotic interactions. The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) has been recognized as a useful experimental insect gut symbiosis model system because of its cultivatable Burkholderia symbionts. This system is greatly advantageous because it allows the acquisition of a large quantity of homogeneous symbionts from the host midgut. Using these naïve gut symbionts, it is possible to directly compare in vivo symbiotic cells with in vitro cultured cells using biochemical approaches. With the goal of understanding molecular changes that occur in Burkholderia cells as they adapt to the Riptortus gut environment, we first elucidated that symbiotic Burkholderia cells are highly susceptible to purified Riptortus antimicrobial peptides. In search of the mechanisms of the increased immunosusceptibility of symbionts, we found striking differences in cell envelope structures between cultured and symbiotic Burkholderia cells. The bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigen was absent from symbiotic cells examined by gel electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses, and their membranes were more sensitive to detergent lysis. These changes in the cell envelope were responsible for the increased susceptibility of the Burkholderia symbionts to host innate immunity. Our results suggest that the symbiotic interactions between the Riptortus host and Burkholderia gut symbionts induce bacterial cell envelope changes to achieve successful gut symbiosis. PMID:26116716

  17. Efficacy of a commercial probiotic relative to oxytetracycline as Gram-negative bacterial control agents in a rotifer (Brachionus plicatilis) batch culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate two gram-negative bacterial control strategies in batch cultures of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. In the first trial, rotifers at an initial density of 47/mL were cultured for 5 d and dosed with a 10-mg/L solution of either oxytetracycline or a commercial p...

  18. Role of Endogenous Microbiota, Probiotics and Their Biological Products in Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Gordon S.; Wang, Hanru

    2013-01-01

    Although gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, mucositis and the alimentary cancers share similar pathogenetic features, further investigation is required into new treatment modalities. An imbalance in the gut microbiota, breached gut integrity, bacterial invasion, increased cell apoptosis to proliferation ratio, inflammation and impaired immunity may all contribute to their pathogenesis. Probiotics are defined as live bacteria, which when administered in sufficient amounts, exert beneficial effects to the gastrointestinal tract. More recently, probiotic-derived factors including proteins and other molecules released from living probiotics, have also been shown to exert beneficial properties. In this review we address the potential for probiotics, with an emphasis on probiotic-derived factors, to reduce the severity of digestive diseases and further discuss the known mechanisms by which probiotics and probiotic-derived factors exert their physiological effects. PMID:23306189

  19. Role of endogenous microbiota, probiotics and their biological products in human health.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Gordon S; Wang, Hanru

    2013-01-10

    Although gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, mucositis and the alimentary cancers share similar pathogenetic features, further investigation is required into new treatment modalities. An imbalance in the gut microbiota, breached gut integrity, bacterial invasion, increased cell apoptosis to proliferation ratio, inflammation and impaired immunity may all contribute to their pathogenesis. Probiotics are defined as live bacteria, which when administered in sufficient amounts, exert beneficial effects to the gastrointestinal tract. More recently, probiotic-derived factors including proteins and other molecules released from living probiotics, have also been shown to exert beneficial properties. In this review we address the potential for probiotics, with an emphasis on probiotic-derived factors, to reduce the severity of digestive diseases and further discuss the known mechanisms by which probiotics and probiotic-derived factors exert their physiological effects.

  20. Cross-talk between probiotic lactobacilli and host immune system.

    PubMed

    Kemgang, T S; Kapila, S; Shanmugam, V P; Kapila, R

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which probiotic lactobacilli affect the immune system is strain specific. As the immune system is a multicompartmental system, each strain has its way to interact with it and induce a visible and quantifiable effect. This review summarizes the interplay existing between the host immune system and probiotic lactobacilli, that is, with emphasis on lactobacilli as a prototype probiotic genus. Several aspects including the bacterial-host cross-talk with the mucosal and systemic immune system are presented, as well as short sections on the competing effect towards pathogenic bacteria and their uses as delivery vehicle for antigens. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Space flight alters bacterial gene expression and virulence and reveals a role for global regulator Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zu Bentrup, K. Höner; Ramamurthy, R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClelland, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumars, P.; Norwood, K.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.; Goulart, C.; Rupert, M.; Stodieck, L.; Stafford, P.; Catella, L.; Schurr, M. J.; Buchanan, K.; Morici, L.; McCracken, J.; Allen, P.; Baker-Coleman, C.; Hammond, T.; Vogel, J.; Nelson, R.; Pierson, D. L.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, H. M.; Nickerson, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the space flight environment has never been accomplished because of significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of space flight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared with identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground-based microgravity culture model. Space flight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during space flight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth. PMID:17901201

  2. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; hide

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  3. Space flight alters bacterial gene expression and virulence and reveals a role for global regulator Hfq.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J W; Ott, C M; Höner zu Bentrup, K; Ramamurthy, R; Quick, L; Porwollik, S; Cheng, P; McClelland, M; Tsaprailis, G; Radabaugh, T; Hunt, A; Fernandez, D; Richter, E; Shah, M; Kilcoyne, M; Joshi, L; Nelman-Gonzalez, M; Hing, S; Parra, M; Dumars, P; Norwood, K; Bober, R; Devich, J; Ruggles, A; Goulart, C; Rupert, M; Stodieck, L; Stafford, P; Catella, L; Schurr, M J; Buchanan, K; Morici, L; McCracken, J; Allen, P; Baker-Coleman, C; Hammond, T; Vogel, J; Nelson, R; Pierson, D L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, H M; Nickerson, C A

    2007-10-09

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the space flight environment has never been accomplished because of significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of space flight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared with identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground-based microgravity culture model. Space flight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during space flight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  4. Alterations in the major heterotrophic bacterial populations isolated from a still bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Morais, P V; da Costa, M S

    1990-11-01

    The heterotrophic bacterial population of a bottled mineral water stored in returnable glass bottles and in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bottles at room temperature was studied over 9-12 months. The plate counts in R2A medium incubated at 22 degrees and 37 degrees C were low initially, increasing to 10(4)-10(5) cfu/ml within a few days of bottling. The number of bacteria recovered at 22 degrees C from PVC bottles was fairly constant during the storage period, but the population isolated at 37 degrees C decreased markedly after storage for 1 year. The major components of the population were Pseudomonas strains, one of which was identified as Pseudomonas vesicularis. Major changes took place during storage; two groups of bacteria (B and C) were dominant initially, but during the latter period of storage other groups (F, G and H) increased in number.

  5. Taxonomy of Probiotic Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Giovanna E.; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    When referring to probiotics, one refers to probiotic strains, i.e., the microbial individuals, sub-cultures of billion of almost identical cells ideally derived from the same mother cell. Therefore, beneficial effects attributed to probiotics are ascribed in fact to specific strains. However, these strains have to be, by law, clearly identified at the species level (Pineiro and Stanton, 2007). In fact, probiotics have to be safe for consumption, and the evaluation of QPS - qualified presumption of safety - status by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) (Opinion, 2007) is discussed for species, not for single strains.

  6. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  7. Specific inflammatory response of Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria) after bacterial injection causes tissue reaction and enzymatic activity alteration.

    PubMed

    Trapani, M R; Parisi, M G; Parrinello, D; Sanfratello, M A; Benenati, G; Palla, F; Cammarata, M

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms was marked by adaptations to protect against pathogens. The mechanisms for discriminating the ''self'' from ''non-self" have evolved into a long history of cellular and molecular strategies, from damage repair to the co-evolution of host-pathogen interactions. We investigated the inflammatory response in Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) following injection of substances that varied in type and dimension, and observed clear, strong and specific reactions, especially after injection of Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Moreover, we analyzed enzymatic activity of protease, phosphatase and esterase, showing how the injection of different bacterial strains alters the expression of these enzymes and suggesting a correlation between the appearance of the inflammatory reaction and the modification of enzymatic activities. Our study shows for the first time, a specific reaction and enzymatic responses following injection of bacteria in a cnidarian.

  8. Alteration of intracellular protein expressions as a key mechanism of the deterioration of bacterial denitrification caused by copper oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    The increasing production and utilization of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) result in the releases into the environment. However, the influence of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification, one of the most important pathways to transform nitrate to dinitrogen in environment, has seldom been studied. Here we reported that CuO NPs caused a significant alteration of key protein expressions of a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans, leading to severe inhibition to denitrification. Total nitrogen removal efficiency was decreased from 98.3% to 62.1% with the increase of CuO NPs from 0.05 to 0.25 mg/L. Cellular morphology and integrity studies indicated that nanoparticles entered the cells. The proteomic bioinformatics analysis showed that CuO NPs caused regulation of proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism, electron transfer and substance transport. The down-regulation of GtsB protein (responsible for glucose transport) decreased the production of NADH (electron donor for denitrification). Also, the expressions of key electron-transfer proteins (including NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome) were suppressed by CuO NPs, which adversely affected electrons transfer for denitrification. Further investigation revealed that CuO NPs significantly inhibited the expressions and catalytic activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results provided a fundamental understanding of the negative influences of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification. PMID:26508362

  9. Alteration of intracellular protein expressions as a key mechanism of the deterioration of bacterial denitrification caused by copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun

    2015-10-28

    The increasing production and utilization of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) result in the releases into the environment. However, the influence of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification, one of the most important pathways to transform nitrate to dinitrogen in environment, has seldom been studied. Here we reported that CuO NPs caused a significant alteration of key protein expressions of a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans, leading to severe inhibition to denitrification. Total nitrogen removal efficiency was decreased from 98.3% to 62.1% with the increase of CuO NPs from 0.05 to 0.25 mg/L. Cellular morphology and integrity studies indicated that nanoparticles entered the cells. The proteomic bioinformatics analysis showed that CuO NPs caused regulation of proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism, electron transfer and substance transport. The down-regulation of GtsB protein (responsible for glucose transport) decreased the production of NADH (electron donor for denitrification). Also, the expressions of key electron-transfer proteins (including NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome) were suppressed by CuO NPs, which adversely affected electrons transfer for denitrification. Further investigation revealed that CuO NPs significantly inhibited the expressions and catalytic activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results provided a fundamental understanding of the negative influences of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification.

  10. Alteration of intracellular protein expressions as a key mechanism of the deterioration of bacterial denitrification caused by copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun

    2015-10-01

    The increasing production and utilization of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) result in the releases into the environment. However, the influence of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification, one of the most important pathways to transform nitrate to dinitrogen in environment, has seldom been studied. Here we reported that CuO NPs caused a significant alteration of key protein expressions of a model denitrifier, Paracoccus denitrificans, leading to severe inhibition to denitrification. Total nitrogen removal efficiency was decreased from 98.3% to 62.1% with the increase of CuO NPs from 0.05 to 0.25 mg/L. Cellular morphology and integrity studies indicated that nanoparticles entered the cells. The proteomic bioinformatics analysis showed that CuO NPs caused regulation of proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism, electron transfer and substance transport. The down-regulation of GtsB protein (responsible for glucose transport) decreased the production of NADH (electron donor for denitrification). Also, the expressions of key electron-transfer proteins (including NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome) were suppressed by CuO NPs, which adversely affected electrons transfer for denitrification. Further investigation revealed that CuO NPs significantly inhibited the expressions and catalytic activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results provided a fundamental understanding of the negative influences of CuO NPs on bacterial denitrification.

  11. Symbiotic bacterial communities in ants are modified by invasion pathway bottlenecks and alter host behavior.

    PubMed

    Lester, Philip J; Sébastien, Alexandra; Suarez, Andrew V; Barbieri, Rafael F; Gruber, Monica A M

    2017-03-01

    Biological invasions are a threat to global biodiversity and provide unique opportunities to study ecological processes. Population bottlenecks are a common feature of biological invasions and the severity of these bottlenecks is likely to be compounded as an invasive species spreads from initial invasion sites to additional locations. Despite extensive work on the genetic consequences of bottlenecks, we know little about how they influence microbial communities of the invaders themselves. Due to serial bottlenecks, invasive species may lose microbial symbionts including pathogenic taxa (the enemy release hypothesis) and/or may accumulate natural enemies with increasing time after invasion (the pathogen accumulation and invasive decline hypothesis). We tested these alternate hypotheses by surveying bacterial communities of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile). We found evidence for serial symbiont bottlenecks: the bacterial community richness declined over the invasion pathway from Argentina to New Zealand. The abundance of some genera, such as Lactobacillus, also significantly declined over the invasion pathway. Argentine ants from populations in the United States shared the most genera with ants from their native range in Argentina, while New Zealand shared the least (120 vs. 57, respectively). Nine genera were present in all sites around the globe possibly indicating a core group of obligate microbes. In accordance with the pathogen accumulation and invasive decline hypothesis, Argentine ants acquired genera unique to each specific invaded country. The United States had the most unique genera, though even within New Zealand these ants acquired symbionts. In addition to our biogeographic sampling, we administered antibiotics to Argentine ants to determine if changes in the micro-symbiont community could influence behavior and survival in interspecific interactions. Treatment with the antibiotics spectinomycin and kanamycin only slightly increased Argentine ant

  12. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-10-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects.

  13. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects. PMID:26457024

  14. Role of Probiotics in Crohn's Disease and in Pouchitis.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The alterations in the gut microbiota observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in particular in Crohn's disease and in ulcerative colitis patients with pouchitis, provide the rationale for administering probiotic agents in the medical treatment of those conditions. In the maintenance treatment of inactive Crohn's disease probiotics, when administered alone, were found ineffective in preventing clinical and/or endoscopic recurrence. By contrast, a combination of a probiotic agent (eg, Saccharomyces boulardii) with standard pharmacological therapy can promote clinical benefit. In patients with pouchitis, so far only the probiotic mixture VSL #3 proved to effectively prevent relapses after successful antibiotic treatment of active inflammation. Further controlled studies, enrolling higher numbers of patients, are needed to better identify the exact role of probiotics in this area.

  15. Bacterial Flagellar Motor Switch in Response to CheY-P Regulation and Motor Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is a molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments and propels the bacteria swimming toward favorable conditions. In our previous works, we built a stochastic conformational spread model to explain the dynamic and cooperative behavior of BFM switching. Here, we extended this model to test whether it can explain the latest experimental observations regarding CheY-P regulation and motor structural adaptivity. We show that our model predicts a strong correlation between rotational direction and the number of CheY-Ps bound to the switch complex, in agreement with the latest finding from Fukuoka et al. It also predicts that the switching sensitivity of the BFM can be fine-tuned by incorporating additional units into the switch complex, as recently demonstrated by Yuan et al., who showed that stoichiometry of FliM undergoes dynamic change to maintain ultrasensitivity in the motor switching response. In addition, by locking some rotor switching units on the switch complex into the stable clockwise-only conformation, our model has accurately simulated recent experiments expressing clockwise-locked FliG(ΔPAA) into the switch complex and reproduced the increased switching rate of the motor. PMID:27028650

  16. Meat, dairy and plant proteins alter bacterial composition of rat gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Zhao, Fan; Shi, Xuebin; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Zhu, Weiyun; Xu, Xinglian; Lu, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Long-term consumption of red meat has been considered a potential risk to gut health, but this is based on clinic investigations, excessive intake of fat, heme and some injurious compounds formed during cooking or additions to processed meat products. Whether intake of red meat protein affects gut bacteria and the health of the host remains unclear. In this work, we compared the composition of gut bacteria in the caecum, by sequencing the V4-V5 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene, obtained from rats fed with proteins from red meat (beef and pork), white meat (chicken and fish) and other sources (casein and soy). The results showed significant differences in profiles of gut bacteria between the six diet groups. Rats fed with meat proteins had a similar overall structure of caecal bacterial communities separated from those fed non-meat proteins. The beneficial genus Lactobacillus was higher in the white meat than in the red meat or non-meat protein groups. Also, rats fed with meat proteins and casein had significantly lower levels of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, suggesting that the intake of meat proteins may maintain a more balanced composition of gut bacteria, thereby reducing the antigen load and inflammatory response in the host. PMID:26463271

  17. Meat, dairy and plant proteins alter bacterial composition of rat gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Zhao, Fan; Shi, Xuebin; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Zhu, Weiyun; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Lu, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-10-14

    Long-term consumption of red meat has been considered a potential risk to gut health, but this is based on clinic investigations, excessive intake of fat, heme and some injurious compounds formed during cooking or additions to processed meat products. Whether intake of red meat protein affects gut bacteria and the health of the host remains unclear. In this work, we compared the composition of gut bacteria in the caecum, by sequencing the V4-V5 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene, obtained from rats fed with proteins from red meat (beef and pork), white meat (chicken and fish) and other sources (casein and soy). The results showed significant differences in profiles of gut bacteria between the six diet groups. Rats fed with meat proteins had a similar overall structure of caecal bacterial communities separated from those fed non-meat proteins. The beneficial genus Lactobacillus was higher in the white meat than in the red meat or non-meat protein groups. Also, rats fed with meat proteins and casein had significantly lower levels of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, suggesting that the intake of meat proteins may maintain a more balanced composition of gut bacteria, thereby reducing the antigen load and inflammatory response in the host.

  18. Pretreatment of Epithelial Cells with Rifaximin Alters Bacterial Attachment and Internalization Profiles▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric L.; Xue, Qiong; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Yi; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2010-01-01

    Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed semisynthetic antibiotic derivative of rifampin licensed for use in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Rifaximin reduces the symptoms of enteric infection, often without pathogen eradication and with limited effects on intestinal flora. Epithelial cells (HEp-2 [laryngeal], HCT-8 [ileocecal], A549 [lung], and HeLa [cervical]) were pretreated with rifaximin (or control antibiotics) prior to the addition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). EAEC adherence was significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment compared to pretreatment with rifampin or doxycycline for three of the four cell lines tested. The rifaximin-mediated changes to epithelial cells were explored further by testing the attachment and internalization of either Bacillus anthracis or Shigella sonnei into A549 or HeLa cells, respectively. The attachment and internalization of B. anthracis were significantly reduced following rifaximin pretreatment. In contrast, neither the attachment nor the internalization of S. sonnei was affected by rifaximin pretreatment of HeLa cells, suggesting that rifaximin-mediated modulation of host cell physiology affected bacteria utilizing distinct attachment/internalization mechanisms differently. In addition, rifaximin pretreatment of HEp-2 cells led to reduced concentrations of inflammatory cytokines from uninfected cells. The study provides evidence that rifaximin-mediated changes in epithelial cell physiology are associated with changes in bacterial attachment/internalization and reduced inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:19858255

  19. Probiotic Bacteria Influence the Composition and Function of the Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Paul W.; Cooney, Jakki C.

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics have a range of proposed health benefits for the consumer, which may include modulating the levels of beneficial elements in the microbiota. Recent investigations using molecular approaches have revealed a human intestinal microbiota comprising over 1000 phylotypes. Mechanisms whereby probiotics impact on the intestinal microbiota include competition for substrates, direct antagonism by inhibitory substances, competitive exclusion, and potentially host-mediated effects such as improved barrier function and altered immune response. We now have the microbial inventories and genetic blueprints to begin tackling intestinal microbial ecology at an unprecedented level of detail, aided by the understanding that dietary components may be utilized differentially by individual phylotypes. Controlled intervention studies in humans, utilizing latest molecular technologies, are required to consolidate evidence for bacterial species that impact on the microbiota. Mechanistic insights should be provided by metabolomics and other analytical techniques for small molecules. Rigorous characterization of interactions between the diet, microbiota, and probiotic bacteria will provide new opportunities for modulating the microbiota towards improving human health. PMID:19277099

  20. Effect of probiotic bacteria on microbial host defense, growth, and immune function in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  1. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Microbial Host Defense, Growth, and Immune Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  2. Influence of a probiotic Enterococcus faecium strain on development of the immune system of sows and piglets.

    PubMed

    Scharek, L; Guth, J; Reiter, K; Weyrauch, K D; Taras, D; Schwerk, P; Schierack, P; Schmidt, M F G; Wieler, L H; Tedin, K

    2005-05-01

    The influence of the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium SF68 on the immune system and the intestinal colonization of pigs were determined in a feeding experiment with sows and piglets. Mucosal immunity of the developing piglets was monitored by isolation and detection of intestinal lymphocyte cell populations from the proximal jejunal epithelium and the continuous Peyers patches by the use of flow cytometry. The levels of intestinal IgA in both groups of piglets were compared, as well as total IgG in the serum of sows and piglets. Feces of the sows and intestinal contents of the piglets were taken for determination of total anaerobe and coliform bacterial counts in both probiotic and control groups. Villus length and depth of the crypts were measured in the jejunum of sacrificed piglets to monitor the development of the intestinal mucosal surface amplification. Total serum IgG of the sows appeared to be unaffected. Piglets of both groups showed similar IgG levels up to 5 weeks after birth with a slight tendency toward lower values in the probiotic group. At an age of 8 weeks the total IgG levels of the probiotic animals were significantly lower (p<0.01). No differences were observed in the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the Peyers patches. However, the levels of cytotoxic T cells (CD8+) in the jejunal epithelium of piglets of the probiotic group were significantly reduced. The depth of the jejunal crypts and length of the villi were similar in both groups, suggesting the relative T-cell population differences were not due to alterations in the epithelial cell numbers. The total anaerobe and coliform bacterial populations were not significantly affected by the probiotic treatment, either in sows or in the piglets. However, a remarkable decline in the frequency of beta-haemolytic and O141 serovars of Escherichia coli was observed in the intestinal contents of probiotic piglets, suggesting an explanation for the reduction in cytotoxic T-cell populations.

  3. Tomato mutants altered in bacterial disease resistance provide evidence for a new locus controlling pathogen recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Barker, S J; Carland, F M; Mehta, A Y; Staskawicz, B J

    1994-01-01

    We have employed a genetic approach to study the resistance of tomato to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. Resistance to P. s. tomato depends upon expression of the Pto locus in tomato, which encodes a protein with similarity to serine/threonine protein kinases and recognizes pathogen strains expressing the avirulence gene avrPto. Eleven tomato mutants were isolated with altered resistance to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. We identified mutations both in the Pto resistance locus and in a new locus designated Prf (for Pseudomonas resistance and fenthion sensitivity). The genetic approach allowed us to dissect the roles of these loci in signal transduction in response to pathogen attack. Lines carrying mutations in the Pto locus vary 200-fold in the degree to which they are susceptible to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. The pto mutants retain sensitivity to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion; this trait segregates with Pto in genetic crosses. This result suggested that contrary to previous hypotheses, the Pto locus controls pathogen recognition but not fenthion sensitivity. Interestingly, mutations in the prf locus result in both complete susceptibility to P. s. tomato and insensitivity to fenthion, suggesting that Prf plays a role in tomato signaling in response to both pathogen elicitors and fenthion. Because pto and prf mutations do not alter recognition of Xanthomonas campestris strains expressing avrBsP, an avirulence gene recognized by all tested tomato cultivars, Prf does not play a general role in disease resistance but possibly functions specifically in resistance against P. s. tomato. Genetic analysis of F2 populations from crosses of pto and prf homozygotes indicated that the Pto and Prf loci are tightly linked. PMID:7911348

  4. A human prostatic bacterial isolate alters the prostatic microenvironment and accelerates prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Brian W; Durham, Nicholas M; Bruno, Tullia C; Grosso, Joseph F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Ross, Ashley E; Hurley, Paula J; Berman, David M; Drake, Charles G; Thumbikat, Praveen; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with several diseases of the prostate including benign enlargement and cancer, but a causal relationship has not been established. Our objective was to characterize the prostate inflammatory microenvironment after infection with a human prostate-derived bacterial strain and to determine the effect of inflammation on prostate cancer progression. To this end, we mimicked typical human prostate infection with retrograde urethral instillation of CP1, a human prostatic isolate of Escherichia coli. CP1 bacteria were tropic for the accessory sex glands and induced acute inflammation in the prostate and seminal vesicles, with chronic inflammation lasting at least 1 year. Compared to controls, infection induced both acute and chronic inflammation with epithelial hyperplasia, stromal hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In areas of inflammation, epithelial proliferation and hyperplasia often persist, despite decreased expression of androgen receptor (AR). Inflammatory cells in the prostates of CP1-infected mice were characterized at 8 weeks post-infection by flow cytometry, which showed an increase in macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly Th17 cells. Inflammation was additionally assessed in the context of carcinogenesis. Multiplex cytokine profiles of inflamed prostates showed that distinct inflammatory cytokines were expressed during prostate inflammation and cancer, with a subset of cytokines synergistically increased during concurrent inflammation and cancer. Furthermore, CP1 infection in the Hi-Myc mouse model of prostate cancer accelerated the development of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma, with 70% more mice developing cancer by 4.5 months of age. This study provides direct evidence that prostate inflammation accelerates prostate cancer progression and gives insight into the microenvironment changes induced by inflammation that may accelerate tumour initiation or progression. PMID:25348195

  5. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  6. Alterations in the virulence potential of enteric pathogens and bacterial-host cell interactions under simulated microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Chopra, V; Fadl, A A; Sha, J; Chopra, S; Galindo, C L; Chopra, A K

    2006-07-01

    Host immune mechanisms were proposed to decline under microgravity conditions during spaceflights, which might result in severe infections in astronauts. Therefore, it was important to investigate the effects of microgravity on infecting organisms and their interaction with host cells. Data showed that simulated microgravity (SMG) conditions markedly increased production of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) heat-labile enterotoxin, which induced fluid secretory responses in a mouse model. SMG also enhanced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in murine macrophages infected with enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). In a similar fashion, simulated microgravity conditions augmented the invasive potential of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium and enhanced production of tumor necrosis-factor alpha in S. typhimurium-infected epithelial cells. Furthermore, coculturing of macrophages and S. typhimurium in a simulated microgravity environment resulted in activation of stress-associated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4. Using the antiorthostatic tail suspension mouse model, which simulates some aspects of microgravity, oral inoculation of S. typhimurium markedly reduced the 50% lethal dose compared to mice infected under normal gravitational conditions. Microarray analysis revealed simulated microgravity-induced alterations in the expression of 22 genes in S. typhimurium, and protein expression profiles were altered in both EPEC and S. typhimurium, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These studies indicated alterations in the virulence potential of bacteria and in host responses to these pathogens under simulated microgravity conditions, which may represent an important environmental signal. Such studies are essential for better understanding bacterial-host cell interactions, particularly in the context of spaceflights and space habitations of long duration.

  7. [Probiotics and their future].

    PubMed

    Pardio Sedas, V T; Waliszewski Kubiak, K N; Robledo López, G R

    1996-03-01

    This review examines recent scientific information about probiotics, their microbiological composition, general characteristics, function and methods of action as well as factor which determine their activity. The principal producers of probiotics and their future in human and animal nutrition are also discussed.

  8. Probiotics: facts and myths.

    PubMed

    Senok, A C; Ismaeel, A Y; Botta, G A

    2005-12-01

    In recent years there has been a significant upsurge in research on the characterisation and verification of the potential health benefits associated with the use of probiotics. In addition, the market for probiotics continues to expand exponentially as consumers (mostly healthy individuals) rely on health claims made by manufacturers to make their choices. This review appraises the available evidence for and against the health claims associated with probiotics. The use of probiotics in promoting gastrointestinal health and immunity, and their use in the prevention of urogenital infections, allergies and cancer are reviewed. Furthermore, issues surrounding the use of probiotics in healthy individuals, the safety of probiotics and regulatory concerns are addressed. There is scientific evidence that specific strains of probiotic microorganisms confer health benefits on the host and are safe for human use. However, this evidence cannot be extrapolated to other strains, as these effects are strain-specific. Probiotics have potential health benefits for conditions such as gastrointestinal infections, genitourinary infections, allergies and certain bowel disorders, all of which afflict a considerable proportion of the global population. However, considerable work is still needed to confirm these potential health benefits.

  9. Probiotics and microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2016-06-02

    Accumulated evidence, corroborated by a new systematic review by Kristensen et al. (Genome Med 8:52, 2016), suggests that probiotics do not significantly impact the fecal microbiota composition of healthy subjects. Nevertheless, physiological benefits have been associated with probiotic consumption by healthy people. Some studies have suggested that probiotics may impact the function of colonizing microbes, although this needs to be further studied. An alternative hypothesis is that probiotics may promote homeostasis of the gut microbiota, rather than change its composition. This hypothesis warrants investigation as a possible mechanism for how probiotics may benefit healthy people.Please see related article: http://genomemedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13073-016-0300-5 .

  10. Probiotics against Campylobacter Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova; Kirik; Pinchuk

    1997-12-01

    Background: The subject matter of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the immediate-preventive effect of probiotics, composed of bacillus species, in a murine model of Campylobacter infection. Methods: An established model of Campylobacter infection in mice with a defined LD50 was utilized to assess the protective effect of probiotics. Results: The results obtained demonstrate that the level of animal protection, after a single administration of the new probiotics biosporin and subalin, reached 90-100% at LD50 and 80% at LD100. Conclusions: Such efficacy of probiotics is considered to be due to their high antagonistic activity against those pathogens registered in vitro. Antagonistic activity of other tested probiotics (bactisubtil and cereobiogen) to different cultures of Campylobacter was not manifested.

  11. Genome sequence of the bacteriocin-producing oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius strain M18.

    PubMed

    Heng, Nicholas C K; Haji-Ishak, Nurul S; Kalyan, Alaina; Wong, Andrew Y C; Lovric, Marija; Bridson, Joanna M; Artamonova, Julia; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Wescombe, Philip A; Burton, Jeremy P; Cullinan, Mary P; Tagg, John R

    2011-11-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a Gram-positive bacterial commensal and pioneer colonizer of the human oral cavity. Many strains produce ribosomally synthesized proteinaceous antibiotics (bacteriocins), and some strains have been developed for use as oral probiotics. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the bacteriocin-producing oral probiotic S. salivarius strain M18.

  12. Probiotics: a complementary approach in the treatment and prevention of pediatric atopic disease.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Neeta S; Bielory, Leonard

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this article is to review recent primary research and developments in the area of probiotics and pediatric atopic disease. Research developments in probiotics summarized in this article include the following: (1) the role of probiotics in primary prevention of atopic disease, (2) the effect of probiotics on cytokines involved in the allergic immune response, (3) the long-term effects of peri-natal probiotic use and (4) the relationship between the gut microflora and atopic dermatitis. Probiotics continue to be an area of active investigation as our understanding evolves of the gut microbiota's role in the altered immune response of atopic patients. Physicians should be aware of these developments as probiotics may be an important complementary approach in the treatment and the natural and long-term course of various pediatric diseases. This article summarizes the research conducted over the past 10 years with a primary focus on the literature published since January 2003.

  13. Probiotics in human milk and probiotic supplementation in infant nutrition: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Henrike; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Salminen, Seppo; Szajewska, Hania

    2014-10-14

    Probiotics in human milk are a very recent field of research, as the existence of the human milk microbiome was discovered only about a decade ago. Current research is focusing on bacterial diversity and the influence of the maternal environment as well as the mode of delivery on human milk microbiota, the pathways of bacterial transfer to milk ducts, possible benefits of specific bacterial strains for the treatment of mastitis in mothers, and disease prevention in children. Recent advances in the assessment of early host-microbe interactions suggest that early colonisation may have an impact on later health. This review article summarises a scientific workshop on probiotics in human milk and their implications for infant health as well as future perspectives for infant feeding.

  14. Human milk: mother nature's prototypical probiotic food?

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "probiotic" is generally attributed to Dr. Ilya Mechnikov, who hypothesized that longevity could be enhanced by manipulating gastrointestinal microbes using naturally fermented foods. In 2001, a report of the FAO and WHO (2001 Oct, http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/fs_-management/en/probiotics.pdf) proposed a more restrictive definition of probiotic, as follows: "a live micro-organism which, when administered in adequate amounts, confers a health benefit on the host." As such, answering the fundamental question posed here-"Is human milk a probiotic?"-requires first grappling with the concept and meaning of the term probiotic. Nonetheless, one must also be convinced that human milk contains bacteria. Indeed, there are scores of publications providing evidence of a paradigm shift in this regard. Variation in the human-milk microbiome may be associated with maternal weight, mode of delivery, lactation state, gestation age, antibiotic use, and maternal health. Milk constituents (e.g., fatty acids and complex carbohydrates) might also be related to the abundance of specific bacterial taxa in milk. Whether these bacteria affect infant health is likely, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. In summary, a growing literature suggests that human milk, like all other fluids produced by the body, indeed contains viable bacteria. As such, and recognizing the extensive literature relating breastfeeding to optimal infant health, we propose that human milk should be considered a probiotic food. Determining factors that influence which bacteria are present in milk and if and how they influence the mother's and/or the recipient infant's health remain basic science and public health realms in which almost nothing is known.

  15. Functional foods as carriers for SYNBIO®, a probiotic bacteria combination.

    PubMed

    Coman, Maria Magdalena; Cecchini, Cinzia; Verdenelli, Maria Cristina; Silvi, Stefania; Orpianesi, Carla; Cresci, Alberto

    2012-07-16

    The popularity of functional foods continues to increase as consumers desire flavorful foods that will fulfil their health needs. Among these foods, probiotics may exert positive effects on the composition of gut microbiota and overall health. However, in order to be beneficial, the bacterial cultures have to remain live and active at the time of consumption. The aim of this study was to develop new probiotic food products, such as seasoned cheeses, salami, chocolate and ice-cream with a final probiotic concentration of approximately 10⁹CFU/daily dose of Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501® and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502® mixed 1:1 (SYNBIO®). The survival and viability of probiotics were determined during the foods shelf-life. The values of viable probiotic bacteria of all dairy and non-dairy foods were between 10⁷ and 10⁹CFU/g of food at the end of the shelf-life and for some of them the values were maintained even after the expiry date. Based on the results of the current study, all the dairy ("Caciotta" cheese, "Pecorino" cheese, "Büscion" Swiss cheese and "Fiordilatte" ice-cream) and non-dairy ("Ciauscolo" salami, Larded salami, Swiss small salami, milk chocolate, dark chocolate, organic jam and chocolate mousse) food products studied would be excellent vehicles to deliver the probiotic health effects because of the high viability of probiotics during the shelf-life of foods and in some cases even after their expiry date.

  16. The role of probiotics in prevention of oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Janczarek, Magdalena; Bachanek, Teresa; Mazur, Elżbieta; Chałas, Renata

    2016-01-04

    The dynamic development of knowledge in the field of probiotics was commenced at the beginning of the 20th century. Since then, many ways of their possible usage in medicine have been established. In accordance with the WHO, probiotics are live microorganisms, which if applied in adequate amounts may benefit the host. Among probiotics, fungi and bacteria are distinguished, and mechanisms of action of these organisms in the oral cavity and gut are parallel. Application in dentistry, in prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases is still not well known. Most commonly, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium are applied. The aim of the study was to collect and systematize the latest information about probiotics and their role in pathomechanisms of dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, candidiasis, and malodour. Based on the analyzed literature, it can be concluded that mechanisms of cariogenic pathogen inhibition using probiotics are still not well understood. The new research trend is based on application of probiotics which can naturally displace cariogenic bacteria in the oral cavity and influence oral health in adults and children. The results of studies also confirmed the beneficial role of probiotics in reduction of the bacterial population in periodontitis and halitosis. Long-term observation and a properly designed study protocol will allow us to answer many questions concerning substitution of one strain of bacteria by another.

  17. Human Gut Bacterial Communities Are Altered by Addition of Cruciferous Vegetables to a Controlled Fruit- and Vegetable-Free Diet1–3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Hullar, Meredith A. J.; Schwarz, Yvonne; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2009-01-01

    In the human gut, commensal bacteria metabolize food components that typically serve as energy sources. These components have the potential to influence gut bacterial community composition. Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage, contain distinctive compounds that can be utilized by gut bacteria. For example, glucosinolates can be hydrolyzed by certain bacteria, and dietary fibers can be fermented by a range of species. We hypothesized that cruciferous vegetable consumption would alter growth of certain bacteria, thereby altering bacterial community composition. We tested this hypothesis in a randomized, crossover, controlled feeding study. Fecal samples were collected from 17 participants at the end of 2 14-d intake periods: a low-phytochemical, low-fiber basal diet (i.e. refined grains without fruits or vegetables) and a high (“double”) cruciferous vegetable diet [basal diet + 14 g cruciferous vegetables/(kg body weight⋅d)]. Fecal bacterial composition was analyzed by the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (tRFLP) method using the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene and nucleotide sequencing. Using blocked multi-response permutation procedures analysis, we found that overall bacterial community composition differed between the 2 consumption periods (δ = 0.603; P = 0.011). The bacterial community response to cruciferous vegetables was individual-specific, as revealed by nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination analysis. Specific tRFLP fragments that characterized each of the diets were identified using indicator species analysis. Putative species corresponding to these fragments were identified through gene sequencing as Eubacterium hallii, Phascolarctobacterium faecium, Burkholderiales spp., Alistipes putredinis, and Eggerthella spp. In conclusion, human gut bacterial community composition was altered by cruciferous vegetable consumption, which could ultimately influence gut metabolism of bioactive food components and host

  18. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Natalia Pimentel; Moreno, Renaldo Duarte; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco). A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars); bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103). There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  19. Oral probiotic treatment of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35(®) prevents visceral hypersensitivity to a colonic inflammation and an acute psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Darbaky, Y; Evrard, B; Patrier, S; Falenta, J; Garcin, S; Tridon, A; Dapoigny, M; Silberberg, C; Nivoliez, A; Diop, L

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a repeated oral treatment with two active pharmaceutical ingredients (Lcr Lenio(®) and Lcr Restituo(®) ) derivated from the probiotic bacterial strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35(®) in two animal models mimicking different features of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is characterized by visceral pain associated with alteration of bowel transit. IBS patients present visceral hypersensitivity with peripheral and central origins. The injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon as well as an acute partial restraint stress (PRS) produces colonic hypersensitivity measured in conscious rats by a decrease in pain threshold in response to distal colonic distension. Visceral hypersensitivity was produced by injection of TNBS 7 days before colonic distension or by acute PRS on testing day. Treatments were performed once a day during eight consecutive days. This study indicates that an 8-day probiotic treatment (Lcr Lenio and Lcr Restituo) produces an antihypersensitivity activity in both TNBS and PRS visceral pain models. As this probiotic strain attenuates peripherally and centrally induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats, it may be active in treatment of IBS symptoms. An immunomodulatory effect of the probiotics was highlighted in the TNBS model on the IL-23 secretion, suggesting a mechanism of action involving a regulation of the local IL-23/Th17 immune activation. Two formulas of Lcr35(®) probiotic strain show very encouraging results for the treatment of IBS patients. Further studies are needed to better understand the role and mechanisms of probiotics on the pathogenesis of IBS. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. The Role of Probiotics in the Poultry Industry

    PubMed Central

    Lutful Kabir, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    The increase of productivity in the poultry industry has been accompanied by various impacts, including emergence of a large variety of pathogens and bacterial resistance. These impacts are in part due to the indiscriminate use of chemotherapeutic agents as a result of management practices in rearing cycles. This review provides a summary of the use of probiotics for prevention of bacterial diseases in poultry, as well as demonstrating the potential role of probiotics in the growth performance and immune response of poultry, safety and wholesomeness of dressed poultry meat evidencing consumer’s protection, with a critical evaluation of results obtained to date. PMID:20111681

  1. Applications of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopies to Probiotic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mauricio I.; Gerbino, Esteban; Tymczyszyn, Elizabeth; Gomez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we overview the most important contributions of vibrational spectroscopy based techniques in the study of probiotics and lactic acid bacteria. First, we briefly introduce the fundamentals of these techniques, together with the main multivariate analytical tools used for spectral interpretation. Then, four main groups of applications are reported: (a) bacterial taxonomy (Subsection 4.1); (b) bacterial preservation (Subsection 4.2); (c) monitoring processes involving lactic acid bacteria and probiotics (Subsection 4.3); (d) imaging-based applications (Subsection 4.4). A final conclusion, underlying the potentialities of these techniques, is presented. PMID:28231205

  2. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Probiotic use in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit C; Baranwal, A

    2008-06-01

    Probiotics are "live microbes which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host" (FAO/WHO joint group). Their potential role in bio-ecological modification of pathological internal milieu of the critically ill is under evaluation. Probiotics are available as single microbial strain (e.g., Bacillus clausii, Lactobacillus) or as a mix of multiple strains of Lactobacillus (acidophilus, sporogenes, lactis, reuteri RC-14, GG, and L. plantarum 299v), Bifidobacterium (bifidum, longum, infantis), Streptococcus (thermophillus, lactis, fecalis), Saccharomyces boulardii etc. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria are gram-positive, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria. These are normal inhabitant of human gut and colonize the colon better than others. Critical illness and its treatment create hostile environment in the gut and alters the micro flora favoring growth of pathogens. Therapy with probiotics is an effort to reduce or eliminate potential pathogens and toxins, to release nutrients, antioxidants, growth factors and coagulation factors, to stimulate gut motility and to modulate innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms via the normalization of altered gut flora. Scientific evidence shows that use of probiotics is effective in prevention and therapy of antibiotic associated diarrhea. However, available probiotics strains in currently used doses do not provide much needed early benefits, and need long-term administration to have clinically beneficial effects (viz, a reduction in rate of infection, severe sepsis, ICU stay, ventilation days and mortality) in critically ill surgical and trauma patients. Possibly, available strains do not adhere to intestinal mucosa early, or may require higher dose than what is used. Gap exists in our knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of different probiotics, most effective strains--single or multiple, cost effectiveness, risk-benefit potential, optimum dose, frequency and duration of treatment etc. More

  4. The dual role of bacteriocins as anti- and probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gillor, O.; Etzion, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria employed in probiotic applications help to maintain or restore a host's natural microbial floral. The ability of probiotic bacteria to successfully outcompete undesired species is often due to, or enhanced by, the production of potent antimicrobial toxins. The most commonly encountered of these are bacteriocins, a large and functionally diverse family of antimicrobials found in all major lineages of Bacteria. Recent studies reveal that these proteinaceous toxins play a critical role in mediating competitive dynamics between bacterial strains and closely related species. The potential use of bacteriocin-producing strains as probiotic and bioprotective agents has recently received increased attention. This review will report on recent efforts involving the use of such strains, with a particular focus on emerging probiotic therapies for humans, livestock, and aquaculture. PMID:18853155

  5. Probiotics in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Leah; Jacobs, Susan E; Garland, Suzanne M

    2012-09-01

    Probiotics are micro-organisms that confer health benefits on the host. Postulated mechanisms include: increasing resistance of the mucosal barrier to migration of bacteria and their toxins by strengthening intestinal cell junctions, modification of host response to microbial products, augmentation of immunoglobulin A mucosal responses, enhancement of enteral nutrition to inhibit the growth of pathogens; production of antimicrobial proteins; and competitive exclusion of potential pathogens. Published meta-analyses and systematic reviews report the effects of probiotics on important clinical outcomes in neonates. This paper will review the evidence for probiotic supplementation in neonatology, with a focus on preterm infants.

  6. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of probiotics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Liu, Xiumei; Yang, Baolan; Li, Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse the antibiotic susceptibility of 31 probiotics strains, including 9 Bifidobacterium and 22 Lactobacillus used for the manufacture of various fermented foods in China. Probiotics are tested for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 24 kinds of antibiotics by broth dilution method on cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with lysed horse blood. 31 strains of probiotics were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, imipenem, gentamicine, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gatifloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and resistant to nalidixic acid, vancomycine, fosfomycin.

  7. Rat brain docosahexaenoic acid metabolism is not altered by a 6 day intracerebral ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Thad A.; Villacreses, Nelly E.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    In a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebral ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we reported that the brain concentrations of non-esterified brain arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4 n-6) and its eicosanoid products PGE2 and PGD2 were increased, as were AA turnover rates in certain brain phospholipids and the activity of AA-selective cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). The activity of Ca2+-independent iPLA2, which is thought to be selective for the release of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) from membrane phospholipid, was unchanged. In the present study, we measured parameters of brain DHA metabolism in comparable artificial cerebrospinal fluid (control) and LPS-infused rats. In contrast to the reported changes in markers of AA metabolism, the brain non-esterified DHA concentration and DHA turnover rates in individual phospholipids were not significantly altered by LPS infusion. The formation rates of AA-CoA and DHA-CoA in a microsomal brain fraction were also unaltered by the LPS infusion. These observations indicate that LPS-treatment upregulates markers of brain AA but not DHA metabolism. All of which are consistent with other evidence that suggest different sets of enzymes regulate AA and DHA recycling within brain phospholipids and that only selective increases in brain AA metabolism occur following a 6 day LPS infusion. PMID:20026368

  8. Analysis of commercial kidney stone probiotic supplements

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Melissa L.; Shaw, Karen J.; Jackson, Shelby B.; Daniel, Steven L.; Knight, John

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the levels of Oxalobacter formigenes in probiotic supplements marketed by ™PRO Lab, Ltd, Toronto, Canada, and capsules of Oxalo™ purchased from Sanzyme Ltd, Hyderabad, India, and to measure the ability of these preparations to degrade oxalate in vitro. METHODS Probiotic supplements and pure cultures of O. formigenes were cultured in a number of media containing oxalate. OD595 was used to measure bacterial growth and ion chromatography was used to measure loss of oxalate in culture media. O. formigenes specific and degenerate Lactobacillus primers to the oxalate decarboxylase gene (oxc) were used in PCR. RESULTS Incubating probiotic supplements in different media did not result in growth of oxalate-degrading organisms. PCR indicated the absence of organisms harboring the oxc gene. Culture and 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated the ™PRO Lab supplement contained viable Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (GenBank accession no. KJ095656.1), while Oxalo™ contained several Bacillus species and Lactobacillus plantarum. CONCLUSION The probiotic supplement sold over the internet by ™PRO Lab, Ltd and Sanzyme Ltd did not contain identifiable O. formigenes or viable oxalate-degrading organisms, and they are unlikely to be of benefit to calcium oxalate kidney stone patients. PMID:25733259

  9. Prebiotics and probiotics: some thoughts on demonstration of efficacy within the regulatory sphere.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stephen P J; Kalmokoff, Martin L

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics present regulators with challenges because they require a demonstrated positive health outcome and proof that the prebiotic or probiotic is the agent of action once safety aspects have been satisfied. Thus, probiotic and prebiotic definitions are important because they will set the criteria by which these materials will be judged within the regulatory sphere. Use of the terms probiotic and prebiotic are, themselves, considered health claims in some jurisdictions, so that both product health claims and product content labeling may be regulated. Currently accepted definitions of prebiotic and probiotic make it easier to draw a straight line between ingestion and health outcome for probiotics but much more difficult for prebiotics, where a health outcome must be linked to changes in specific bacterial species within the gut microbial community. These challenges highlight the difficulties facing regulatory bodies and the scientific community when emerging science is turned into consumable product.

  10. Evaluation of Potential Probiotics Isolated from Human Milk and Colostrum.

    PubMed

    Damaceno, Quésia S; Souza, Jaqueline P; Nicoli, Jacques R; Paula, Raquel L; Assis, Gabriela B; Figueiredo, Henrique C; Azevedo, Vasco; Martins, Flaviano S

    2017-04-03

    Several studies have demonstrated a diversity of bacterial species in human milk, even in aseptically collected samples. The present study evaluated potential probiotic bacteria isolated from human milk and associated maternal variables. Milk samples were collected from 47 healthy women and cultured on selective and universal agar media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Bacterial isolates were counted and identified by Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometry and then tested for probiotic properties. Total bacteria in human milk ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 log10 CFU/mL. The higher bacterial counts were found in colostrum (mean = 3.9 log10 CFU/mL, 95% CI 3.14-4.22, p = 0.00001). The most abundant species was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 76). The potential probiotic candidates were Lactobacillus gasseri (n = 4), Bifidobacterium breve (n = 1), and Streptococcus salivarius (n = 4). Despite the small sample size, L. gasseri was isolated only in breast milk from mothers classified into a normal weight range and after a vaginally delivered partum. No potential probiotics showed antagonism against pathogens, but all of them agglutinated different pathogens. Nine bacterial isolates belonging to the species L. gasseri, B. breve, and S. salivarius were selected as potential probiotics. The present study confirms the presence in breast milk of a bacterial microbiota that could be the source of potential probiotic candidates to be used in the formula of simulated maternal milk.

  11. Chicken intestinal microbiota function with a special emphasis on the role of probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cisek, A A; Binek, M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of the chicken gut by environmental microbes begins immediately after hatching. Composition of the intestinal microbiota is dependent on the surrounding environment, diet variation, pathological conditions, antibiotic therapy, and others. The genomes of all these intestinal microbes form a microbiome which by far outnumbers the host's genome. As a consequence, the microbiome provides additional metabolic functions to the host, including nutrient utilization and absorption, fermentation of non-digestible dietary fiber, synthesis of some vitamins, biotransformation of bile acids, and the well-being of their chicken host. Microorganisms can also directly interact with the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, which may alter the physiology and immunological status of the bird. Since newly hatched broiler chickens demonstrate delayed commensal colonization and low bacterial diversity, the most effective and harmless method available to control the development and composition of the intestinal microbiota is a competitive exclusion treatment by applying probiotic bacteria. Additionally, recent research has shown that probiotic bacteria have a variety of beneficial effects, including counteraction of dysbiosis, promotion of gut health and homeostasis, enhancement of immune defenses and antagonization of infectious agents.

  12. Probiotics: In Depth

    MedlinePlus

    ... the 30 days before the survey. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Probiotics Researchers have ... FDA before it can be sold. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ...

  13. Probiotics: "living drugs".

    PubMed

    Elmer, G W

    2001-06-15

    The uses, mechanisms of action, and safety of probiotics are discussed. Probiotics are live microorganisms or microbial mixtures administered to improve the patient's microbial balance, particularly the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and the vagina. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii and the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, strain GG, have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Other probiotics that have demonstrated at least some promise as prophylaxis for this type of diarrhea are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, and Enterococcus faecium. The use of S. boulardii as an adjunctive treatment to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin has been found in controlled studies to decrease further recurrences of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Other gastrointestinal disorders for which probiotics have been studied include traveler's diarrhea, acute infantile diarrhea, and acute diarrhea in adults. Several Lactobacillus species given in yogurt or in tablet or suppository form have shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for vaginal infections. Lactobacillus strains have also been examined as a treatment for urinary-tract infections. Putative mechanisms of action of probiotics include production of pathogen-inhibitory substances, inhibition of pathogen attachment, inhibition of the action of microbial toxins, stimulation of immunoglobulin A, and trophic effects on intestinal mucosa. The available probiotics are considered nonpathogenic, but even benign microorganisms can be infective when a patient is severely debilitated or immunosuppressed. Probiotics have demonstrated an ability to prevent and treat some infections. Effective use of probiotics could decrease patients' exposure to antimicrobials. Additional controlled studies are needed to clearly define the safety and efficacy of these agents.

  14. Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Probiotic Products Used in Shrimp Culture

    PubMed Central

    Noor Uddin, Gazi Md.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Christensen, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Phu, Tran Minh; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used in aquaculture to control diseases and improve feed digestion and pond water quality; however, little is known about the antimicrobial resistance properties of such probiotic bacteria and to what extent they may contribute to the development of bacterial resistance in aquaculture ponds. Concerns have been raised that the declared information on probiotic product labels are incorrect and information on bacterial composition are often missing. We therefore evaluated seven probiotics commonly used in Vietnamese shrimp culture for their bacterial species content, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance and associated transferable resistance genes. The bacterial species was established by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 125 representative bacterial isolates. MIC testing was done for a range of antimicrobials and whole genome sequencing of six multiple antimicrobial resistant Bacillus spp. used to identify resistance genes and genetic elements associated with horizontal gene transfer. Thirteen bacterial species declared on the probiotic products could not be identified and 11 non-declared Bacillus spp. were identified. Although our culture-based isolation and identification may have missed a few bacterial species present in the tested products this would represent minor bias, but future studies may apply culture independent identification methods like pyro sequencing. Only 6/60 isolates were resistant to more than four antimicrobials and whole genome sequencing showed that they contained macrolide (ermD), tetracycline (tetL), phenicol (fexA) and trimethoprim (dfrD, dfrG and dfrK) resistance genes, but not known structures associated with horizontal gene transfer. Probiotic bacterial strains used in Vietnamese shrimp culture seem to contribute with very limited types and numbers of resistance genes compared to the naturally occurring bacterial species in aquaculture environments. Approval procedures of probiotic products must be strengthened

  15. Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Probiotic Products Used in Shrimp Culture.

    PubMed

    Noor Uddin, Gazi Md; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Christensen, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M; Phu, Tran Minh; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used in aquaculture to control diseases and improve feed digestion and pond water quality; however, little is known about the antimicrobial resistance properties of such probiotic bacteria and to what extent they may contribute to the development of bacterial resistance in aquaculture ponds. Concerns have been raised that the declared information on probiotic product labels are incorrect and information on bacterial composition are often missing. We therefore evaluated seven probiotics commonly used in Vietnamese shrimp culture for their bacterial species content, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance and associated transferable resistance genes. The bacterial species was established by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 125 representative bacterial isolates. MIC testing was done for a range of antimicrobials and whole genome sequencing of six multiple antimicrobial resistant Bacillus spp. used to identify resistance genes and genetic elements associated with horizontal gene transfer. Thirteen bacterial species declared on the probiotic products could not be identified and 11 non-declared Bacillus spp. were identified. Although our culture-based isolation and identification may have missed a few bacterial species present in the tested products this would represent minor bias, but future studies may apply culture independent identification methods like pyro sequencing. Only 6/60 isolates were resistant to more than four antimicrobials and whole genome sequencing showed that they contained macrolide (ermD), tetracycline (tetL), phenicol (fexA) and trimethoprim (dfrD, dfrG and dfrK) resistance genes, but not known structures associated with horizontal gene transfer. Probiotic bacterial strains used in Vietnamese shrimp culture seem to contribute with very limited types and numbers of resistance genes compared to the naturally occurring bacterial species in aquaculture environments. Approval procedures of probiotic products must be strengthened

  16. Use of Probiotics to Control Aflatoxin Production in Peanut Grains.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira; Peluzio, Joenes Mucci; Prado, Guilherme; Madeira, Jovita Eugênia Gazzinelli Cruz; Silva, Marize Oliveira; de Morais, Paula Benevides; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, S. cerevisiae UFMG 905, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20) were evaluated as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin and spore production by Aspergillus parasiticus IMI 242695 in peanut. Suspensions containing the probiotics alone or in combinations were tested by sprinkling on the grains followed by incubation for seven days at 25°C. All probiotic microorganisms, in live and inactivated forms, significantly reduced A. parasiticus sporulation, but the best results were obtained with live cells. The presence of probiotics also altered the color of A. parasiticus colonies but not the spore morphology. Reduction in aflatoxin production of 72.8 and 65.8% was observed for S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae, respectively, when inoculated alone. When inoculated in pairs, all probiotic combinations reduced significantly aflatoxin production, and the best reduction was obtained with S. boulardii plus L. delbrueckii (96.1%) followed by S. boulardii plus S. cerevisiae and L. delbrueckii plus S. cerevisiae (71.1 and 66.7%, resp.). All probiotics remained viable in high numbers on the grains even after 300 days. The results of the present study suggest a different use of probiotics as an alternative treatment to prevent aflatoxin production in peanut grains.

  17. Use of Probiotics to Control Aflatoxin Production in Peanut Grains

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira; Peluzio, Joenes Mucci; Madeira, Jovita Eugênia Gazzinelli Cruz; Silva, Marize Oliveira; de Morais, Paula Benevides; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, S. cerevisiae UFMG 905, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20) were evaluated as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin and spore production by Aspergillus parasiticus IMI 242695 in peanut. Suspensions containing the probiotics alone or in combinations were tested by sprinkling on the grains followed by incubation for seven days at 25°C. All probiotic microorganisms, in live and inactivated forms, significantly reduced A. parasiticus sporulation, but the best results were obtained with live cells. The presence of probiotics also altered the color of A. parasiticus colonies but not the spore morphology. Reduction in aflatoxin production of 72.8 and 65.8% was observed for S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae, respectively, when inoculated alone. When inoculated in pairs, all probiotic combinations reduced significantly aflatoxin production, and the best reduction was obtained with S. boulardii plus L. delbrueckii (96.1%) followed by S. boulardii plus S. cerevisiae and L. delbrueckii plus S. cerevisiae (71.1 and 66.7%, resp.). All probiotics remained viable in high numbers on the grains even after 300 days. The results of the present study suggest a different use of probiotics as an alternative treatment to prevent aflatoxin production in peanut grains. PMID:26221629

  18. Metabolites produced by probiotic Lactobacilli rapidly increase glucose uptake by Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although probiotic bacteria and their metabolites alter enterocyte gene expression, rapid, non-genomic responses have not been examined. The present study measured accumulation of tracer (2 μM) glucose by Caco-2 cells after exposure for 10 min or less to a chemically defined medium (CDM) with different monosaccharides before and after anaerobic culture of probiotic Lactobacilli. Results Growth of L. acidophilus was supported by CDM with 110 mM glucose, fructose, and mannose, but not with arabinose, ribose, and xylose or the sugar-free CDM. Glucose accumulation was reduced when Caco-2 cells were exposed for 10 min to sterile CDM with glucose (by 92%), mannose (by 90%), fructose (by 55%), and ribose (by 16%), but not with arabinose and xylose. Exposure of Caco-2 cells for 10 min to bacteria-free supernatants prepared after exponential (48 h) and stationary (72 h) growth phases of L. acidophilus cultured in CDM with 110 mM fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83% and 45%, respectively; exposure to a suspension of the bacteria had no effect. The increase in glucose accumulation was diminished by heat-denaturing the supernatant, indicating the response of Caco-2 cells is triggered by as yet unknown heat labile bacterial metabolites, not by a reduction in CDM components that decrease glucose uptake. Supernatants prepared after anaerobic culture of L. gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, and L. johnsonii in the CDM with fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83%, 32%, 27%, and 14%, respectively. Conclusion The rapid, non-genomic upregulation of SGLT1 by bacterial metabolites is a heretofore unrecognized interaction between probiotics and the intestinal epithelium. PMID:20089192

  19. Metabolites produced by probiotic Lactobacilli rapidly increase glucose uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rooj, Arun K; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Buddington, Randal K

    2010-01-20

    Although probiotic bacteria and their metabolites alter enterocyte gene expression, rapid, non-genomic responses have not been examined. The present study measured accumulation of tracer (2 microM) glucose by Caco-2 cells after exposure for 10 min or less to a chemically defined medium (CDM) with different monosaccharides before and after anaerobic culture of probiotic Lactobacilli. Growth of L. acidophilus was supported by CDM with 110 mM glucose, fructose, and mannose, but not with arabinose, ribose, and xylose or the sugar-free CDM. Glucose accumulation was reduced when Caco-2 cells were exposed for 10 min to sterile CDM with glucose (by 92%), mannose (by 90%), fructose (by 55%), and ribose (by 16%), but not with arabinose and xylose. Exposure of Caco-2 cells for 10 min to bacteria-free supernatants prepared after exponential (48 h) and stationary (72 h) growth phases of L. acidophilus cultured in CDM with 110 mM fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83% and 45%, respectively; exposure to a suspension of the bacteria had no effect. The increase in glucose accumulation was diminished by heat-denaturing the supernatant, indicating the response of Caco-2 cells is triggered by as yet unknown heat labile bacterial metabolites, not by a reduction in CDM components that decrease glucose uptake. Supernatants prepared after anaerobic culture of L. gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, and L. johnsonii in the CDM with fructose increased glucose accumulation by 83%, 32%, 27%, and 14%, respectively. The rapid, non-genomic upregulation of SGLT1 by bacterial metabolites is a heretofore unrecognized interaction between probiotics and the intestinal epithelium.

  20. Modulation of gut microbiota during probiotic-mediated attenuation of metabolic syndrome in high fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Tang, Huang; Zhang, Chenhong; Zhao, Yufeng; Derrien, Muriel; Rocher, Emilie; van-Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Strissel, Katherine; Zhao, Liping; Obin, Martin; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Structural disruption of gut microbiota and associated inflammation are considered important etiological factors in high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome (MS). Three candidate probiotic strains, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4270 (LC), L. rhamnosus I-3690 (LR) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis I-2494 (BA), were individually administered to HFD-fed mice (10(8) cells day(-1)) for 12 weeks. Each strain attenuated weight gain and macrophage infiltration into epididymal adipose tissue and markedly improved glucose-insulin homeostasis and hepatic steatosis. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis based on 454 pyrosequencing of fecal bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that the probiotic strains shifted the overall structure of the HFD-disrupted gut microbiota toward that of lean mice fed a normal (chow) diet. Redundancy analysis revealed that abundances of 83 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were altered by probiotics. Forty-nine altered OTUs were significantly correlated with one or more host MS parameters and were designated 'functionally relevant phylotypes'. Thirteen of the 15 functionally relevant OTUs that were negatively correlated with MS phenotypes were promoted, and 26 of the 34 functionally relevant OTUs that were positively correlated with MS were reduced by at least one of the probiotics, but each strain changed a distinct set of functionally relevant OTUs. LC and LR increased cecal acetate but did not affect circulating lipopolysaccharide-binding protein; in contrast, BA did not increase acetate but significantly decreased adipose and hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression. These results suggest that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium differentially attenuate obesity comorbidities in part through strain-specific impacts on MS-associated phylotypes of gut microbiota in mice.

  1. Modulation of gut microbiota during probiotic-mediated attenuation of metabolic syndrome in high fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Tang, Huang; Zhang, Chenhong; Zhao, Yufeng; Derrien, Muriel; Rocher, Emilie; van-Hylckama Vlieg, Johan ET; Strissel, Katherine; Zhao, Liping; Obin, Martin; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Structural disruption of gut microbiota and associated inflammation are considered important etiological factors in high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome (MS). Three candidate probiotic strains, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4270 (LC), L. rhamnosus I-3690 (LR) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis I-2494 (BA), were individually administered to HFD-fed mice (108 cells day−1) for 12 weeks. Each strain attenuated weight gain and macrophage infiltration into epididymal adipose tissue and markedly improved glucose–insulin homeostasis and hepatic steatosis. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis based on 454 pyrosequencing of fecal bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that the probiotic strains shifted the overall structure of the HFD-disrupted gut microbiota toward that of lean mice fed a normal (chow) diet. Redundancy analysis revealed that abundances of 83 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were altered by probiotics. Forty-nine altered OTUs were significantly correlated with one or more host MS parameters and were designated ‘functionally relevant phylotypes'. Thirteen of the 15 functionally relevant OTUs that were negatively correlated with MS phenotypes were promoted, and 26 of the 34 functionally relevant OTUs that were positively correlated with MS were reduced by at least one of the probiotics, but each strain changed a distinct set of functionally relevant OTUs. LC and LR increased cecal acetate but did not affect circulating lipopolysaccharide-binding protein; in contrast, BA did not increase acetate but significantly decreased adipose and hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression. These results suggest that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium differentially attenuate obesity comorbidities in part through strain-specific impacts on MS-associated phylotypes of gut microbiota in mice. PMID:24936764

  2. Bioactives from probiotics for dermal health: functions and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lew, L-C; Liong, M-T

    2013-05-01

    Probiotics have been extensively reviewed for decades, emphasizing on improving general gut health. Recently, more studies showed that probiotics may exert other health-promoting effects beyond gut well-being, attributed to the rise of the gut-brain axis correlations. Some of these new benefits include skin health such as improving atopic eczema, atopic dermatitis, healing of burn and scars, skin-rejuvenating properties and improving skin innate immunity. Increasing evidence has also showed that bacterial compounds such as cell wall fragments, their metabolites and dead bacteria can elicit certain immune responses on the skin and improve skin barrier functions. This review aimed to underline the mechanisms or the exact compounds underlying the benefits of bacterial extract on the skin based on evidences from in vivo and in vitro studies. This review could be of help in screening of probiotic strains with potential dermal enhancing properties for topical applications.

  3. Probiotics in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, and Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Amir A

    2015-01-01

    With the growing epidemic of obesity, the incidence of both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing. The intestinal microbiota differs between individuals who are obese or have normal body mass indices. Animal studies have shown increased intestinal permeability in NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. This increases the risk of oxidative and inflammatory injury to the liver from intestinal microbacteria. It may also increase the risk of fatty acid injury and fatty deposition. Bacterial translocation is associated with increased portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis. By preventing bacterial adhesion and translocation, probiotics may have a role in the management of patients with NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. Multiple small studies have suggested that probiotics improve some of the clinical markers of activity in patients with NAFL and NASH. Controlled studies have also shown improved outcomes in patients with cirrhosis who were treated with probiotics.

  4. VSL#3 probiotic modifies mucosal microbial composition but does not reduce colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Sha, Wei; Tomkovich, Sarah; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although probiotics have shown success in preventing the development of experimental colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), beneficial effects of interventional treatment are relatively unknown. Here we show that interventional treatment with VSL#3 probiotic alters the luminal and mucosally-adherent microbiota, but does not protect against inflammation or tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane (AOM)/Il10−/− mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. VSL#3 (109 CFU/animal/day) significantly enhanced tumor penetrance, multiplicity, histologic dysplasia scores, and adenocarcinoma invasion relative to VSL#3-untreated mice. Illumina 16S sequencing demonstrated that VSL#3 significantly decreased (16-fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to genus Clostridium in the mucosally-adherent microbiota. Mediation analysis by linear models suggested that this taxon was a contributing factor to increased tumorigenesis in VSL#3-fed mice. We conclude that VSL#3 interventional therapy can alter microbial community composition and enhance tumorigenesis in the AOM/Il10−/− model. PMID:24100376

  5. Long-term nickel exposure altered the bacterial community composition but not diversity in two contrasting agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hu, Hang-Wei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Rong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Nickel pollution imposes deleterious effects on soil ecosystem. The responses of soil microorganisms to long-term nickel pollution under field conditions remain largely unknown. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to elucidate the impacts of long-term nickel pollution on soil bacterial communities in two contrasting agricultural soils. Our results found that the soil microbial biomass carbon consistently decreased along the nickel gradients in both soils. Nickel pollution selectively favored or impeded the prevalence of several dominant bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes displayed sensitivity. Despite the apparent shifts in the bacterial community composition, no clear tendency in the bacterial diversity and abundance was identified along the nickel gradients in either soil. Collectively, we provide evidence that long-term nickel pollution shifted the soil bacterial communities, resulting in the decrease of microbial biomass although the bacterial diversity was not significantly changed.

  6. Exposure to Bacterial Signals Does Not Alter Pea Aphids’ Survival upon a Second Challenge or Investment in Production of Winged Offspring

    PubMed Central

    ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M.; Altincicek, Boran; Parker, Benjamin J.; Gerardo, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections. PMID:24009760

  7. Fine-scale transition to lower bacterial diversity and altered community composition precedes shell disease in laboratory-reared juvenile American lobster.

    PubMed

    Feinman, Sarah G; Unzueta Martínez, Andrea; Bowen, Jennifer L; Tlusty, Michael F

    2017-03-30

    The American lobster Homarus americanus supports a valuable commercial fishery in the Northeastern USA and Maritime Canada; however, stocks in the southern portion of the lobster's range have shown declines, in part due to the emergence of shell disease. Epizootic shell disease is a bacterially induced cuticular erosion that renders even mildly affected lobsters unmarketable because of their appearance, and in more severe cases can cause mortality. Despite the importance of this disease, the associated bacterial communities have not yet been fully characterized. We sampled 2 yr old, laboratory-reared lobsters that displayed signs of shell disease at the site of disease as well as at 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm away from the site of disease to determine how the bacterial community changed over this fine spatial scale. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a distinct bacterial community at the site of disease, with significant reductions in bacterial diversity and richness compared to more distant sampling locations. The bacterial community composition 0.5 cm from the site of disease was also altered, and there was an observable decrease in bacterial diversity and richness, even though there were no signs of disease at that location. Given the distinctiveness of the bacterial community at the site of disease and 0.5 cm from the site of disease, we refer to these communities as affected and transitionary, and suggest that these bacteria, including the previously proposed causative agent, Aquimarina 'homaria', are important for the initiation and progression of this laboratory model of shell disease.

  8. Exposure to bacterial signals does not alter pea aphids' survival upon a second challenge or investment in production of winged offspring.

    PubMed

    ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M; Altincicek, Boran; Parker, Benjamin J; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Pea aphids have an obligate nutritional symbiosis with the bacteria Buchneraaphidicola and frequently also harbor one or more facultative symbionts. Aphids are also susceptible to bacterial pathogen infections, and it has been suggested that aphids have a limited immune response towards such pathogen infections compared to other, more well-studied insects. However, aphids do possess at least some of the genes known to be involved in bacterial immune responses in other insects, and immune-competent hemocytes. One possibility is that immune priming with microbial elicitors could stimulate immune protection against subsequent bacterial infections, as has been observed in several other insect systems. To address this hypothesis we challenged aphids with bacterial immune elicitors twenty-four hours prior to live bacterial pathogen infections and then compared their survival rates to aphids that were not pre-exposed to bacterial signals. Using two aphid genotypes, we found no evidence for immune protection conferred by immune priming during infections with either Serratia marcescens or with Escherichia coli. Immune priming was not altered by the presence of facultative, beneficial symbionts in the aphids. In the absence of inducible immune protection, aphids may allocate energy towards other defense traits, including production of offspring with wings that could escape deteriorating conditions. To test this, we monitored the ratio of winged to unwinged offspring produced by adult mothers of a single clone that had been exposed to bacterial immune elicitors, to live E. coli infections or to no challenge. We found no correlation between immune challenge and winged offspring production, suggesting that this mechanism of defense, which functions upon exposure to fungal pathogens, is not central to aphid responses to bacterial infections.

  9. Probiotic (VSL#3) for Gulf War Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Gastroenteritis plays a major role in changing the gut microflora. Gut microflora are also known to change with travel, stress and diet changes- factors which...are relevant to GW Veterans. Altered gut flora may be the etiological factor for IBS and GW Illness. Probiotics are living organisms that improve...health by re-establishing a normal gut flora. The overall objective of the study was to determine whether Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 (Align

  10. Antipathogenic activity of probiotics against Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile in anaerobic batch culture systems: is it due to synergies in probiotic mixtures or the specificity of single strains?

    PubMed

    Tejero-Sariñena, Sandra; Barlow, Janine; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn R; Rowland, Ian

    2013-12-01

    Probiotics are currently being investigated for prevention of infections caused by enteric pathogens. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of three single probiotics: Lactobacillus casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30184 (PXN 35), Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) and a probiotic mixture containing the above strains plus twelve other strains belonging to the Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Lactococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus genera on the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile using pH-controlled anaerobic batch cultures containing mixed faecal bacteria. Changes in relevant bacterial groups and effects of probiotic addition on survival of the two pathogens were assessed over 24 h. Quantitative analysis of bacterial populations revealed that there was a significant increase in lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria numbers, depending on probiotic addition, compared with the control (no added probiotic). There was also a significant reduction in S. Typhimurium and C. difficile numbers in the presence of certain probiotics compared with controls. Of the probiotic treatments, two single strains namely L. casei NCIMB 30185 (PXN 37), and B. breve NCIMB 30180 (PXN 25) were the most potent in reducing the numbers of S. Typhimurium and C. difficile. In addition, the supplementation with probiotics into the systems influenced some fermentations parameters. Acetate was found in the largest concentrations in all vessels and lactate and formate were generally detected in higher amounts in vessels with probiotic addition compared to controls.

  11. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-20

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  12. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  13. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire. PMID:26787458

  14. [Autochthonous microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Juan Evaristo

    2015-02-07

    The autochthonous microbiota is the community of microorganisms that colonizes the skin and mucosal surfaces. The symbiosis is, generally, mutualistic but it can become parasitic due to immune response alterations. The skin microbiota includes bacteria (95%), lipophilic fungi and mites. In the digestive apparatus, each cavity presents its own microbiota, which reaches its target organ during the perinatal period, originating complex and stable communities (homeostasis). The vaginal microbiota varies with the endocrine activity, significantly increasing during the fertile and pregnancy periods, when lactobacilli are the most abundant organisms. Four are the main benefits of the autochthonous microbiota: i) delivery of essential nutrients, such as vitamins and some amino acids; ii) utilization of undigestible diet components, the colonic microbiota degrades complex glycans and fulfils almost 20% of the calories present in a normal diet; iii) development of the immune system: the continuous contact with the immune system maintains it alert and in good shape to repel pathogens efficaciously and iv) microbial antagonism, hinders colonization of our mucosal surfaces by alochthonous, potentially pathogenic, organisms. This works through three mechanisms: colonization interference, production of antimicrobials and co-aggregation with the potential pathogens. The microbiota can, sporadically, produce damages: opportunistic endogenous infections and generation of carcinogenic compounds. Probiotics are "live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the consumer". Prebiotics are undigestible glycans that enhance the growth or activity of the intestinal microbiota, thus generating a health benefit. Synbiotics are mixes of probiotics and prebiotics that exert a synergistic health effect.

  15. Probiotics in functional bowel disorders.

    PubMed

    Hod, Keren; Ringel, Yehuda

    2016-02-01

    Functional bowel disorders (FBDs) are the most common gastrointestinal (GI) disorders seen by gastroenterologists and primary care physicians. The disorders affect patients functioning and quality of life (QOL) and are associated with significant healthcare burden. The current theory regarding the development of FBDs suggests brain-gut axis dysfunctions associated abnormal GI motility and sensation. Recent data suggest that alterations in the intestinal microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of FBDs; or at least have the potential to affect intestinal functions that are thought to be relevant to the development of functional GI symptoms. This has led to growing interest of healthcare providers and patients in targeting the intestinal microbiota for the treatment of FBDs. In this article we discuss the potential role probiotic interventions in the treatment of FBDs. We review the evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies and discuss the current recommendations for the use of probiotics for FBDs in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut.

  17. Probiotics in the Treatment of Diverticular Disease. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lahner, Edith; Bellisario, Cristina; Hassan, Cesare; Zullo, Angelo; Esposito, Gianluca; Annibale, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Diverticular disease is a common gastrointestinal condition. Low-grade inflammation and altered intestinal microbiota have been identified as factors contributing to abdominal symptoms. Probiotics may lead to symptoms improvement by modifying the gut microbiota and are promising treatments for diverticular disease. The aim of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of probiotics in diverticular disease in terms of remission of abdominal symptoms and prevention of acute diverticulitis. According to PRISMA, we identified studies on diverticular disease patients treated with probiotics (Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane). The quality of these studies was evaluated by the Jadad scale. Main outcomes measures were remission of abdominal symptoms and prevention of acute diverticulitis. 11 studies (2 double-blind randomized placebo-controlled, 5 open randomized, 4 non-randomized open studies) were eligible. Overall, diverticular disease patients were 764 (55.1% females, age 58-75 years). Three studies included patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease, 4 studies with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in remission, 4 studies with complicated or acute diverticulitis. Mainly (72.7%) single probiotic strains had been used, most frequently Lactobacilli. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 24 months. Interventions were variable: in 8 studies the probiotic was administered together with antibiotic or anti-inflammatory agents and compared with the efficacy of the drug alone; in 3 studies the probiotic was compared with a high-fibre diet or used together with phytoextracts. As an outcome measure, 4 studies evaluated the occurrence rate of acute diverticulitis, 6 studies the reduction of abdominal symptoms, and 6 studies the recurrence of abdominal symptoms. Meta-analysis on the efficacy of probiotics in diverticular disease could not be performed due to the poor quality of retrieved studies. This systematic review showed that high-quality data on the

  18. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    PubMed

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs.

  19. Current status of practical applications: Probiotics in dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gastrointestinal microbial population of dairy cattle is dense and diverse, and can be utilized to reduce pathogenic bacterial populations as well as improve animal productivity and environmental impacts. Because of the nature of the dairy industry, probiotic products have been widely used to e...

  20. Probiotic-Associated Aspiration Pneumonia Due to Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sean T.; Afolabi, Folashade; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are low-virulence, commensal organisms of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and are commonly used as “probiotic supplements.” Herein, we describe an episode of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis with bacterial superinfection secondary to administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in an 11-month-old female with trisomy 21. PMID:24899028

  1. Incorporation of citrus fibers in fermented milk containing probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sendra, Esther; Fayos, Patricia; Lario, Yolanda; Fernández-López, Juana; Sayas-Barberá, Estrella; Pérez-Alvarez, José Angel

    2008-02-01

    The incorporation of Lactobacillus acidophilus CECT 903, Lactobacillus casei CECT 475 and Bifidobacterium bifidum CECT 870 together with lemon (LF) and orange (OF) fibers obtained from juice by-products were tested in (i) a model system: fiber enriched with de Man Rogosa Sharp (MRS) broth cultured with each probiotic bacteria and (ii) evaluation of populations of probiotic bacteria in fermented milks formulated with citrus fibers. Citrus fibers enhanced L. acidophilus CECT 903, and L. casei CECT 475 survival in MRS during refrigerated storage, whereas erratic results were obtained for B. bifidum CECT 870, OF enhanced its growth and LF had inhibitory effect. Populations of probiotic bacteria decreased with storage time in MRS broth. The presence of yogurt starter bacteria in probiotic fermented milks favored the growth and survival of L. acidophilus and B. bifidum. Citrus fiber presence in fermented milks also enhanced bacterial growth and survival of the tested probiotic bacteria. This study indicates that citrus fiber enriched fermented milk have good acceptability and are good vehicles for a variety of commercial probiotics but survival of B. bifidum will need to be improved.

  2. Probiotics and gut health: A special focus on liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune stimulation by probiotics through processes involving dendritic cells might also be beneficial to the host immunological status and help prevent pathogen translocation. Hepatic fat metabolism also seems to be influenced by the presence of commensal bacteria, and potentially by probiotics; although the mechanisms by which probiotic might act on the liver are still unclear. However, this might be of major importance in the future because low-grade inflammation, hepatic fat infiltration, and hepatitis might become more prevalent as a result of high fat intake and the increased prevalence of obesity. PMID:20101763

  3. Effect of special Hungarian probiotic kefir on faecal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Figler, Mária; Mózsik, Gyula; Schaffer, Béla; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Ács, Pongrác; Szili, Béla; Rab, Regina; Szakály, Sándor

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a four-week consumption of a special Hungarian probiotic agent (Biofir®) on the faecal microflora in human healthy subjects. METHODS: The effect of Biofir® with 106/cm3 initial germs on the faecal microflora was studied in 120 healthy volunteers (71 females, 49 males). The traditional Russian type kefir was used as control. The various germ groups and pH values were determined in wk 2, 4 and 6. RESULTS: The number of all microbes increased during the 4-week probiotic treatment. The number of microbes increased 4.3-fold in the control group and 6.8-fold in Biofir-treated group. The probiotic kefir caused multiplication of the probiotic flora, meanwhile the undesired bacteria multiplied in the control group. No significant change of pH values of the faeces was found in both groups. CONCLUSION: The Hungarian probiotic kefir (Biofir®) is capable of promoting multiplication of probiotic bacterial flora in the large bowel. PMID:16534858

  4. Evaluation of Probiotic Diversity from Soybean (Glycine max) Seeds and Sprouts Using Illumina-Based Sequencing Method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yali; Zhang, Miaomiao; Deng, Zujun; Cao, Lixiang

    2017-07-24

    There is increasing interest in the use of plant probiotics as environmental-friendly and healthy biofertilizers. The study aimed at selecting for novel probiotic candidates of soybean (Glycine max). The bacteriome and mycobiome of soybean sprouts and seeds were analyzed by Illumina-based sequencing. Seeds contained more diverse bacteria than those in sprouts. The seeds contained similar fungal diversity with sprouts. Total 15 bacterial OTUs and 4 fungal OTUs were detected in seeds and sprouts simultaneously, suggesting that the sprouts contained bacterial and fungal taxa transmitted from seeds. The Halothiobacillus was the most dominant bacterial genus observed and coexisted in seeds and sprouts. The OTUs belonged to Ascomycota were the most dominant fungal taxa observed in seeds and sprouts. Halothiobacillus was firstly identified as endophytic probiotics of soybean. The results suggested that sprouts might contain diverse plant probiotics of mature plants and Illumina-based sequencing can be used to screen for probiotic candidates.

  5. Reduction of rainbow trout spleen size by splenectomy does not alter resistance against bacterial cold water disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In lower vertebrates, the contribution of the spleen to anti-bacterial immunity is poorly understood. Researchers have previously reported a phenotypic and genetic correlation between resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) and spleen so...

  6. Traditional and high potency probiotic preparations for oral bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Famularo, G; De Simone, C; Matteuzzi, D; Pirovano, F

    1999-12-01

    Current research continues to improve the treatment options available to clinicians for oral bacteriotherapy. Recently, a greater understanding of the role of endogenous digestive microflora has generated renewed interest in the potential of oral bacteriotherapy for the management of a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic disorders. Several treatment strategies for oral bacteriotherapy have already entered clinical trials and it is hoped that some of these strategies will become widely available in the near future. This review summarises the current status of oral probiotic preparations for bacteriotherapy and discusses any obstacles to their successful clinical development. Newer probiotic preparations include high potency preparations that are greatly enriched in lactic acid bacteria, both in terms of bacterial concentrations and the number of bacterial strains. These preparations have a greater potential for clinical effectiveness than traditional preparations and are entering clinical evaluation especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and pouchitis, irritable bowel syndrome, or cryptosporidiosis. The pitfalls of previous clinical investigations of traditional probiotic preparations and the perils of future clinical trials with high potency preparations are discussed in the context of unmet needs and realistic expectations of success. Although considerable progress has been made in oral bacteriotherapy, focused efforts by basic scientists and clinical investigators and continued support from pharmaceutical companies is required to successfully develop probiotics for use in clinical medicine. Newer high potency probiotic preparations appear to have a great advantage over traditional preparations and should be the area of most active biomedical research in the field.

  7. Probiotics and prebiotics in animal feeding for safe food production.

    PubMed

    Gaggìa, Francesca; Mattarelli, Paola; Biavati, Bruno

    2010-07-31

    Recent outbreaks of food-borne diseases highlight the need for reducing bacterial pathogens in foods of animal origin. Animal enteric pathogens are a direct source for food contamination. The ban of antibiotics as growth promoters (AGPs) has been a challenge for animal nutrition increasing the need to find alternative methods to control and prevent pathogenic bacterial colonization. The modulation of the gut microbiota with new feed additives, such as probiotics and prebiotics, towards host-protecting functions to support animal health, is a topical issue in animal breeding and creates fascinating possibilities. Although the knowledge on the effects of such feed additives has increased, essential information concerning their impact on the host are, to date, incomplete. For the future, the most important target, within probiotic and prebiotic research, is a demonstrated health-promoting benefit supported by knowledge on the mechanistic actions. Genomic-based knowledge on the composition and functions of the gut microbiota, as well as its deviations, will advance the selection of new and specific probiotics. Potential combinations of suitable probiotics and prebiotics may prove to be the next step to reduce the risk of intestinal diseases and remove specific microbial disorders. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on the contribution of the gut microbiota to host well-being. Moreover, we review available information on probiotics and prebiotics and their application in animal feeding.

  8. [Pre- and probiotics].

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Lochs, H

    2007-03-01

    Nowadays, the regular consumption of pre- and probiotics is recommended to provide various positive health benefits. The in vitro and in vivo demonstrated actions on the intestinal microflora, the mucosal barrier and the immunological system are very interesting to propose beneficial health effects, but the scientific proof in humans is not demonstrated yet. Pre- and probiotics are very active in the intestinal tract (mainly in the colon) by maintaining a healthy gut microflora and influencing metabolic, trophic and protective mechanism. Prebiotics stimulates the growth of apathogen bacteria and increase the short chain fatty acid concentration by fermentation. Short chain fatty acids are necessary substrates for a healthy gut. Probiotics inhibit the growth of pathogen bacteria, reduce the translocation of bacteria and toxins and modulate the intestinal immune system. For some specific clinical diseases (ulcerative colitis, pouchitis, diarrhoea) a therapeutic and prophylactic effect with pre- and probiotics was shown. In the near future more indications for pre- and probiotics (used as a single strain or as in a combination) will be added. Promising results are already shown in irritable bowel syndrome, prevention of antibiotic induced diarrhoea, in surgical and in intensive care patients. Future studies should focus to determine the characteristics of a healthy gut and the evaluation of specific health benefits by well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration.

  9. Beneficial Properties of Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lye Huey; Balakrishnan, Kunasundari; Thiagarajah, Kokila; Mohd Ismail, Nor Ismaliza; Yin, Ooi Shao

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that can be found in fermented foods and cultured milk, and are widely used for the preparation of infant food. They are well-known as “health friendly bacteria”, which exhibit various health beneficial properties such as prevention of bowel diseases, improving the immune system, for lactose intolerance and intestinal microbial balance, exhibiting antihypercholesterolemic and antihypertensive effects, alleviation of postmenopausal disorders, and reducing traveller’s diarrhoea. Recent studies have also been focused on their uses in treating skin and oral diseases. In addition to that, modulation of the gut-brain by probiotics has been suggested as a novel therapeutic solution for anxiety and depression. Thus, this review discusses on the current probiotics-based products in Malaysia, criteria for selection of probiotics, and evidences obtained from past studies on how probiotics have been used in preventing intestinal disorders via improving the immune system, acting as an antihypercholesterolemic factor, improving oral and dermal health, and performing as anti-anxiety and anti-depressive agents. PMID:27688852

  10. Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: The Science and the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-01-01

    Although probiotics have been used for many years by those who suffer from what would now be defined as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a scientific rationale for their use in this indication and clinical evidence to support their benefits have only emerged very recently. Evidence to support considering strategies, such as probiotics, that modulate the gut microbiome, in IBS, has been provided by laboratory studies implicating the microbiome and the host response to the enteric microenvironment in IBS, as well as in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating the ability of various commensal bacteria to influence such relevant functions as motility, visceral sensation, gut barrier integrity, and brain-gut interactions. Clinical studies supporting a role for probiotics in the management of IBS predated such experimental data, and randomized controlled trials of probiotics in IBS continue to be reported. Their interpretation is hampered by the less than optimal quality of many studies; nevertheless, it is apparent that probiotics, as a category, do exert significant effects in IBS. Defining the optimal strain, dose, formulation, and duration of therapy is more challenging given the limitations of available data. There is also an urgent need for appropriately powered and rigorously designed clinical trials of appropriate duration of probiotics in IBS; such studies should also help to define those who are most likely to respond to probiotics. Future laboratory and translational research should attempt to define the mechanism(s) of action of probiotics in IBS and explore the response to bacterial components or products in this common and oftentimes troublesome disorder.

  11. Probiotics in 2015: Their Scope and Use.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The field of probiotics continues to evolve and progress. This paper reviews several situations within the probiotic field that are of current interest, including review of the scope of the proper use of the term "probiotic," use of systematic reviews and meta-analyses for probiotics, regulatory challenges to doing human research on probiotics in the United States, medical recommendations for probiotic use, and safety assurance for probiotics used for vulnerable populations. The greatest need in the probiotic field remains well-conducted and well-reported human trials, to better define the functionality of probiotics for different indications and populations.

  12. Probiotics for allergy prevention.

    PubMed

    West, C E

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics, given either as a supplement or in infant foods, have been evaluated in randomised controlled trials for allergy prevention. Here, the aim is to give an overview of the results from these primary prevention studies and to discuss current strategies. In most studies, single strains or a mixture of strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have been used--prenatally, postnatally or perinatally. Several meta-analyses have reported a moderate benefit of probiotics for eczema prevention, and the most consistent effect has been observed with a combined perinatal intervention in infants at high risk of allergic disease due to familial predisposition. In a recent meta-analysis, the use of multi-strain probiotics appeared to be most effective for eczema prevention. No preventive effect has been shown for other allergic manifestations. As long-term follow-up data on later onset allergic conditions (asthma and allergic rhinitis) are available only from a few of the initiated studies, reports from ongoing follow-up studies that are adequately powered to examine long-term outcomes are anticipated to provide more insight. Arguably, the differences in many aspects of study design and the use of different probiotic strains and combinations have made direct comparison difficult. To date, expert bodies do not generally recommend probiotics for allergy prevention, although the World Allergy Organization (WAO) in their recently developed guidelines suggests considering using probiotics in pregnant women, during breastfeeding and/or to the infant if at high risk of developing allergic disease (based on heredity). However, in concordance with other expert bodies, the WAO guideline panel stressed the low level of evidence and the need for adequately powered randomised controlled trials and a more standardised approach before clinical recommendations on specific strains, dosages and timing can be given.

  13. Probiotics and food allergy.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Anna Maria; Valsecchi, Chiara; Caimmi, Silvia; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Alessia; Leoni, Maria Chiara; Caimmi, Davide; Miraglia del Giudice, Michele; Leonardi, Salvatore; La Rosa, Mario; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2013-07-29

    The exact prevalence of food allergy in the general population is unknown, but almost 12% of pediatric population refers a suspicion of food allergy. IgE mediated reactions to food are actually the best-characterized types of allergy, and they might be particularly harmful especially in children. According to the "hygiene hypothesis" low or no exposure to exogenous antigens in early life may increase the risk of allergic diseases by both delaying the development of the immune tolerance and limiting the Th2/Th1 switch. The critical role of intestinal microbiota in the development of immune tolerance improved recently the interest on probiotics, prebiotics, antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acid, folate and vitamins, which seem to have positive effects on the immune functions.Probiotics consist in bacteria or yeast, able to re-colonize and restore microflora symbiosis in intestinal tract. One of the most important characteristics of probiotics is their safety for human health. Thanks to their ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and to modulate and stabilize the composition of gut microflora, probiotics bacteria may play an important role in the regulation of intestinal and systemic immunity. They actually seem capable of restoring the intestinal microbic equilibrium and modulating the activation of immune cells.Several studies have been recently conducted on the role of probiotics in preventing and/or treating allergic disorders, but the results are often quite contradictory, probably because of the heterogeneity of strains, the duration of therapy and the doses administered to patients. Therefore, new studies are needed in order to clarify the functions and the utility of probiotics in food allergies and ion other types of allergic disorders.

  14. Inoculation of a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium reduces the phenanthrene level and alters the bacterial community structure in wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Xiang, Yanbing; Zhang, Zhiming; Ling, Wanting; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-03-28

    Colonization by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading endophytic bacteria (PAHDEB) can reduce the PAH contamination risk in plant. However, little information is available on the impact of PAHDEB colonization on the endophytic bacterial community of inner plant tissues. A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium (PDEB), Massilia sp. Pn2, was inoculated onto the roots of wheat and subjected to greenhouse container experiments. The endophytic bacterial community structure in wheat was investigated using high-throughput sequencing technology. The majority of endophytic bacteria in wheat were Proteobacteria, and the dominant genus was Pseudomonas. Phenanthrene contamination clearly increased the diversity of endophytic bacteria in wheat. The cultivable endophytic bacteria counts in wheat decreased with increasing the level of phenanthrene contamination; the endophytic bacterial community structure changed correspondingly, and the bacterial richness first increased and then decreased. Inoculation of strain Pn2 reduced the phenanthrene contamination in wheat, enlarged the biomass of wheat roots, changed the bacterial community structure and enhanced the cell counts, diversity and richness of endophytic bacteria in phenanthrene-contaminated wheat in a contamination level-dependent manner. The findings of this investigation provide insight into the responses of endophytic bacterial community in plant to external PAH contamination and PAHDEB colonization.

  15. Is There a Role for Probiotics in the Prevention of Preterm Birth?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Siwen; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R. G.; Kim, Sung O.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Bocking, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) continues to be a global health challenge. An over-production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as an altered maternal vaginal microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammation/infection-associated PTB. Lactobacillus represents the dominant species in the vagina of most healthy pregnant women. The depletion of Lactobacillus in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been associated with an increased risk of PTB. It remains unknown at what point an aberrant vaginal microbiome composition specifically induces the cascade leading to PTB. The ability of oral or vaginal lactobacilli probiotics to reduce BV occurrence and/or dampen inflammation is being considered as a means to prevent PTB. Certain anti-inflammatory properties of lactobacilli suggest potential mechanisms. To date, clinical studies have not been powered with sufficiently high rates of PTB, but overall, there is merit in examining this promising area of clinical science. PMID:25741339

  16. Probiotics in the Treatment of Chronic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Matthias F.; Heath, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (CRS) are relevant health conditions affecting significant percentages of the western population. They are frequently coexisting and aggravating diseases. Both are chronic, noninfectious, and inflammatory conditions sharing to a certain extent important pathophysiologic similarities. Beneficial effects of probiotics are long known to mankind. Research is beginning to unravel the true nature of the human microbiome and its interaction with the immune system. The growing prevalence of atopic diseases in the developed world led to the proposition of the “hygiene hypothesis.” Dysbiosis is linked to atopic diseases; probiotic supplementation is able to alter the microbiome and certain probiotic strains have immunomodulatory effects in favour of a suppression of Th-2 and stimulation of a Th1 profile. This review focuses on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating clinical parameters in the treatment of chronic rhinitis and CRS. An emerging number of publications demonstrate beneficial effects using probiotics in clinical double-blind placebo-controlled (dbpc) trials in allergic rhinitis (AR). Using probiotics as complementary treatment options in AR seems to be a promising concept although the evidence is of a preliminary nature to date and more convincing trials are needed. There are no current data to support the use of probiotics in non-AR or CRS. PMID:24872820

  17. [Role of probiotics in obesity management].

    PubMed

    Prados-Bo, Andreu; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Nova, Esther; Marcos, Ascensión

    2015-02-07

    Obesity is a major public health issue as it is related to several chronic disorders, including type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, dyslipemia, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, among others. Novel research shows that the gut microbiota is involved in obesity and metabolic disorders, revealing that obese animal and human subjects have alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota compared to their lean counterparts. Moreover, it has been observed in germ-free mice that transplantation of the microbiota of either obese or lean mice influences body weight, suggesting that the gut ecosystem is a relevant target for weight management. Certain strains of probiotics may regulate body weight by influencing the host's metabolic, neuroendocrine and immune functions. Taken together, our knowledge about the influence of gut microbiota on obesity is progressing. Therefore, modulation of its composition through probiotics may provide new opportunities to manage overweight and obesity.

  18. The underexposed role of food matrices in probiotic products: Reviewing the relationship between carrier matrices and product parameters.

    PubMed

    Flach, Joost; van der Waal, Mark B; van den Nieuwboer, Maurits; Claassen, Eric; Larsen, Olaf F A

    2017-06-13

    Probiotic microorganisms are increasingly incorporated into food matrices in order to confer proposed health benefits on the consumer. It is important that the health benefits, sensory properties, shelf-life and probiotic gastrointestinal tract (GIT) survival of these products are carefully balanced as they determine functionality and drive consumer acceptance. The strain-specific effects of probiotic species are imperative in this process but carrier matrices may play a pivotal role as well. This study therefore recapitulates the wealth of knowledge on carrier matrices and their interaction with probiotic strains. The most substantiated carrier matrices, factors that influence probiotic functionality and matrix effects on shelf-life, GIT survival and clinical efficacy are reviewed. Results indicate that carrier matrices have a significant impact on the quality of probiotic products. Matrix components, such as proteins, carbohydrates and flavoring agents are shown to alter probiotic efficacy and viability. In vivo studies furthermore revealed strain-dependent matrix effects on the GIT survival of probiotic bacteria. However, only a limited number of studies have specifically addressed the effects of carrier matrices on the aforementioned product-parameters; most studies seem to focus solely on the strain-specific effects of probiotic microorganisms. This hampers the innovation of probiotic products. More human studies, comparing not only different probiotic strains but different carrier matrices as well, are needed to drive the innovation cycle.

  19. Mechanism of Action of Probiotic Bacteria on Intestinal and Systemic Immunities and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Shah, Nagendra P; Kirjavainen, Pirkka; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-05-03

    Immunomodulation has been shown to be one of the major functions of probiotic bacteria. This review is presented to provide detailed information on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in various animal models and clinical practices. Probiotics can regulate helper T (Th) responses and release of cytokines in a strain-specific manner. For example, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG can induce beneficial Th1 immunomodulatory effect in infants with cow's milk allergy and relieve intestinal inflammation in atopic children by promoting IL-10 generation. Mechanism of action of probiotics on antigen-presenting cells at gastrointestinal tract is also postulated in this review. Probiotic bacterial cells and their soluble factors may activate dendritic cells, macrophages, and to certain extent monocytes via toll-like-receptor recognition and may further provoke specific Th responses. They are speculated to elicit immunomodulatory effects on intestinal and systemic immunities.

  20. Alterations in the airborne bacterial community during Asian dust events occurring between February and March 2015 in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seho; Lee, Dongwook; Jang, Jun Hyeong; Lim, Sora; Yang, Dahye; Seo, Taegun

    2016-01-01

    During Asian dust events, a relatively high concentration of particulate matter is transported by wind from arid and semi-arid regions, such as the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts, to nearby countries, including China, Korea, and Japan. The dust particles contain various microorganisms, which can affect human health as well as the environmental microbe population. In the current study, we investigated the characteristics of the airborne bacterial community during Asian dust events between February and March 2015 in South Korea. Bacterial diversity indexes such as operational taxonomic units, Chao1 and Inverse Simpson index were increased, along with total 16S rRNA gene copy number during Asian dust events. The bacterial community structure during Asian dust events was clearly distinguishable from that during non-Asian dust days. The genera Bacillus and Modestobacter were increased 3.9- and 2.7-fold, respectively, while Escherichia-Shigella was decreased by 89.8%. A non-metric multidimensional scaling plot with metadata analysis revealed association of particulate matter concentration, but not temperature, humidity or wind speed, with bacterial community structure, suggesting that the newly transported dust particles contain various microorganisms that influence the airborne bacterial environment. PMID:27849049

  1. Alterations in the airborne bacterial community during Asian dust events occurring between February and March 2015 in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seho; Lee, Dongwook; Jang, Jun Hyeong; Lim, Sora; Yang, Dahye; Seo, Taegun

    2016-11-16

    During Asian dust events, a relatively high concentration of particulate matter is transported by wind from arid and semi-arid regions, such as the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts, to nearby countries, including China, Korea, and Japan. The dust particles contain various microorganisms, which can affect human health as well as the environmental microbe population. In the current study, we investigated the characteristics of the airborne bacterial community during Asian dust events between February and March 2015 in South Korea. Bacterial diversity indexes such as operational taxonomic units, Chao1 and Inverse Simpson index were increased, along with total 16S rRNA gene copy number during Asian dust events. The bacterial community structure during Asian dust events was clearly distinguishable from that during non-Asian dust days. The genera Bacillus and Modestobacter were increased 3.9- and 2.7-fold, respectively, while Escherichia-Shigella was decreased by 89.8%. A non-metric multidimensional scaling plot with metadata analysis revealed association of particulate matter concentration, but not temperature, humidity or wind speed, with bacterial community structure, suggesting that the newly transported dust particles contain various microorganisms that influence the airborne bacterial environment.

  2. Evidence of the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics in Intestinal Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Vilchez-Padial, Laura Maria; Gil, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics and synbiotics are used to treat chronic diseases, principally due to their role in immune system modulation and the anti-inflammatory response. The present study reviewed the effects of probiotics and synbiotics on intestinal chronic diseases in in vitro, animal, and human studies, particularly in randomized clinical trials. The selected probiotics exhibit in vitro anti-inflammatory properties. Probiotic strains and cell-free supernatants reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines via action that is principally mediated by toll-like receptors. Probiotic administration improved the clinical symptoms, histological alterations, and mucus production in most of the evaluated animal studies, but some results suggest that caution should be taken when administering these agents in the relapse stages of IBD. In addition, no effects on chronic enteropathies were reported. Probiotic supplementation appears to be potentially well tolerated, effective, and safe in patients with IBD, in both CD and UC. Indeed, probiotics such as Bifidobacterium longum 536 improved the clinical symptoms in patients with mild to moderate active UC. Although it has been proposed that probiotics can provide benefits in certain conditions, the risks and benefits should be carefully assessed before initiating any therapy in patients with IBD. For this reason, further studies are required to understand the precise mechanism by which probiotics and synbiotics affect these diseases. PMID:28555037

  3. Evidence of the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics in Intestinal Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Vilchez-Padial, Laura Maria; Gil, Angel

    2017-05-28

    Probiotics and synbiotics are used to treat chronic diseases, principally due to their role in immune system modulation and the anti-inflammatory response. The present study reviewed the effects of probiotics and synbiotics on intestinal chronic diseases in in vitro, animal, and human studies, particularly in randomized clinical trials. The selected probiotics exhibit in vitro anti-inflammatory properties. Probiotic strains and cell-free supernatants reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines via action that is principally mediated by toll-like receptors. Probiotic administration improved the clinical symptoms, histological alterations, and mucus production in most of the evaluated animal studies, but some results suggest that caution should be taken when administering these agents in the relapse stages of IBD. In addition, no effects on chronic enteropathies were reported. Probiotic supplementation appears to be potentially well tolerated, effective, and safe in patients with IBD, in both CD and UC. Indeed, probiotics such as Bifidobacterium longum 536 improved the clinical symptoms in patients with mild to moderate active UC. Although it has been proposed that probiotics can provide benefits in certain conditions, the risks and benefits should be carefully assessed before initiating any therapy in patients with IBD. For this reason, further studies are required to understand the precise mechanism by which probiotics and synbiotics affect these diseases.

  4. Changes in vaginal microbiota following antimicrobial and probiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Macklaim, Jean M.; Clemente, Jose C.; Knight, Rob; Gloor, Gregory B.; Reid, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background The composition of the vaginal microbiota is known to be important for health. When infections occur, antimicrobial therapy is often poorly efficacious. Objective and design We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize changes in the bacterial microbiota following oral antimicrobial and probiotic interventions. Results While the bacterial vaginal profiles of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were dominated by lactobacilli as in healthy women, and unchanged by therapy, Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella, Atopobium, Sneathia, and Megasphaera dominated the vagina of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV), and treatment with tinidazole plus Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14+L. rhamnosus GR-1 resulted in an increased relative abundance of indigenous L. iners or L. crispatus. Conclusions The ability to restore homeostasis provides a rationale for conjoint use of probiotics with antibiotic treatment of BV. PMID:26282697

  5. Probiotics as an Immune Modulator.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Ji; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are nonpathogenic live microorganism that can provide a diverse health benefits on the host when consumed in adequate amounts. Probiotics are consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, underlying mechanism of action is still unclear and efficacy of probiotic administration is quite different depending on the type of strains and the amounts of doses. We and others have suggested that live probiotics or their metabolites could interact with diverse immune cells (antigen presenting cells and T cells) and confer them to have immunoregulatory functions. Through this interaction, probiotics could contribute to maintaining immune homeostasis by balancing pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. However, the effect of probiotics in prevention or modulation of ongoing disease is quite diverse even within a same species. Therefore, identification of functional probiotics with specific immune regulatory property is a certainly important issue. Herein, we briefly review selection methods for immunomodulatory probiotic strains and the mechanism of action of probiotics in immune modulation.

  6. Safety and Immunomodulatory Effects of Three Probiotic Strains Isolated from the Feces of Breast-Fed Infants in Healthy Adults: SETOPROB Study

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Campaña-Martin, Laura; Matencio, Esther; Ortuño, Inmaculada; Martínez-Silla, Rosario; Gomez-Gallego, Carlos; Periago, Maria Jesús; Ros, Gaspar; Chenoll, Empar; Genovés, Salvador; Casinos, Beatriz; Silva, Ángela; Corella, Dolores; Portolés, Olga; Romero, Fernando; Ramón, Daniel; Perez de la Cruz, Antonio; Gil, Angel; Fontana, Luis

    2013-01-01

    We previously described the isolation and characterization of three probiotic strains from the feces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants: Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. These strains were shown to adhere to intestinal mucus in vitro, to be sensitive to antibiotics and to resist biliary salts and low pH. In the present study, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 100 healthy volunteers in three Spanish cities was carried out to evaluate the tolerance, safety, gut colonization and immunomodulatory effects of these three probiotics. Volunteers underwent a 15-day washout period, after which they were randomly divided into 5 groups that received daily a placebo, a capsule containing one of the 3 strains or a capsule containing a mixture of two strains for 30 days. The intervention was followed by another 15-day washout period. Patients did not consume fermented milk for the entire duration of the study. Gastrointestinal symptoms, defecation frequency and stool consistency were not altered by probiotic intake. No relevant changes in blood and serum, as well as no adverse events occurred during or after treatment. Probiotic administration slightly modified bacterial populations in the volunteers’ feces. Intestinal persistence occurred in volunteers who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. Administration of B. breve CNCM I-4035 resulted in a significant increase in fecal secretory IgA content. IL-4 and IL-10 increased, whereas IL-12 decreased in the serum of volunteers treated with any of the three strains. These results demonstrate that the consumption of these three bacterial strains was safe and exerted varying degrees of immunomodulatory effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01479543 PMID:24205115

  7. Safety and immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains isolated from the feces of breast-fed infants in healthy adults: SETOPROB study.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Campaña-Martin, Laura; Matencio, Esther; Ortuño, Inmaculada; Martínez-Silla, Rosario; Gomez-Gallego, Carlos; Periago, Maria Jesús; Ros, Gaspar; Chenoll, Empar; Genovés, Salvador; Casinos, Beatriz; Silva, Angela; Corella, Dolores; Portolés, Olga; Romero, Fernando; Ramón, Daniel; Perez de la Cruz, Antonio; Gil, Angel; Fontana, Luis

    2013-01-01

    We previously described the isolation and characterization of three probiotic strains from the feces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants: Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. These strains were shown to adhere to intestinal mucus in vitro, to be sensitive to antibiotics and to resist biliary salts and low pH. In the present study, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 100 healthy volunteers in three Spanish cities was carried out to evaluate the tolerance, safety, gut colonization and immunomodulatory effects of these three probiotics. Volunteers underwent a 15-day washout period, after which they were randomly divided into 5 groups that received daily a placebo, a capsule containing one of the 3 strains or a capsule containing a mixture of two strains for 30 days. The intervention was followed by another 15-day washout period. Patients did not consume fermented milk for the entire duration of the study. Gastrointestinal symptoms, defecation frequency and stool consistency were not altered by probiotic intake. No relevant changes in blood and serum, as well as no adverse events occurred during or after treatment. Probiotic administration slightly modified bacterial populations in the volunteers' feces. Intestinal persistence occurred in volunteers who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. Administration of B. breve CNCM I-4035 resulted in a significant increase in fecal secretory IgA content. IL-4 and IL-10 increased, whereas IL-12 decreased in the serum of volunteers treated with any of the three strains. These results demonstrate that the consumption of these three bacterial strains was safe and exerted varying degrees of immunomodulatory effects. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01479543.

  8. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  9. Properties of probiotics and encapsulated probiotics in food.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, V Hazal; Ötles, Semih

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms which confer health benefits upon application in sufficiently-high viable cell amounts. Probiotics are typically members of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species commonly associated with human gastrointestinal tracts. In the recent past, there has been a rising interest in producing functional foods containing encapsulated probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have been reported using dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream as food carrier, and non-dairy products like meat, fruits, cereals, chocolate, etc. However, the industrial sector contains only few encapsulated probiotic products. Probiotics have been developed by several companies in a capsule or a tablet form. The review compiles probiotics, encapsulation technology and cell life in the food matrices.

  10. Probiotic fermented sausage: viability of probiotic microorganisms and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rouhi, M; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are from functional foods that bring health benefits for humans. Nowadays, a major development in functional foods is related to food containing probiotic cultures, mainly lactic acid bacteria or bifidobacteria. Probiotics must be alive and ingested in sufficient amounts to exert the positive effects on the health and the well-being of the host. Therefore, viability of probiotic products (the minimum viable probiotic cells in each gram or milliliter of product till the time of consumption) is their most important characteristic. However, these organisms often show poor viability in fermented products due to their detrimental conditions. Today, the variety of fermented meat products available around the world is nearly equal to that of cheese. With meat products, raw fermented sausages could constitute an appropriate vehicle for such microorganisms into the human gastrointestinal tract. In present article, the viability of probiotic microorganisms in fermented sausage, the main factors affect their viability, and the sensorial characteristics of final product are discussed.

  11. Selection for Cu-tolerant bacterial communities with altered composition, but unaltered richness, via long-term Cu exposure.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jeanette; Brandt, Kristian K; Al-Soud, Waleed A; Holm, Peter E; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Nybroe, Ole

    2012-10-01

    Toxic metal pollution affects the composition and metal tolerance of soil bacterial communities. However, there is virtually no knowledge concerning the responses of members of specific bacterial taxa (e.g., phyla or classes) to metal toxicity, and contradictory results have been obtained regarding the impact of metals on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. We used tag-coded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to elucidate the impacts of copper (Cu) on bacterial community composition and diversity within a well-described Cu gradient (20 to 3,537 μg g(-1)) stemming from industrial contamination with CuSO(4) more than 85 years ago. DNA sequence information was linked to analysis of pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) to Cu, as determined by the [(3)H]leucine incorporation technique, and to chemical characterization of the soil. PICT was significantly correlated to bioavailable Cu, as determined by the results seen with a Cu-specific bioluminescent biosensor strain, demonstrating a specific community response to Cu. The relative abundances of members of several phyla or candidate phyla, including the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrumicrobia, Chloroflexi, WS3, and Planctomycetes, decreased with increasing bioavailable Cu, while members of the dominant phylum, the Actinobacteria, showed no response and members of the Acidobacteria showed a marked increase in abundance. Interestingly, changes in the relative abundances of classes frequently deviated from the responses of the phyla to which they belong. Despite the apparent Cu impacts on Cu resistance and community structure, bioavailable Cu levels did not show any correlation to bacterial OTU richness (97% similarity level). Our report highlights several bacterial taxa responding to Cu and thereby provides new guidelines for future studies aiming to explore the bacterial domain for members of metal-responding taxa.

  12. Selection for Cu-Tolerant Bacterial Communities with Altered Composition, but Unaltered Richness, via Long-Term Cu Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jeanette; Brandt, Kristian K.; Al-Soud, Waleed A.; Holm, Peter E.; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic metal pollution affects the composition and metal tolerance of soil bacterial communities. However, there is virtually no knowledge concerning the responses of members of specific bacterial taxa (e.g., phyla or classes) to metal toxicity, and contradictory results have been obtained regarding the impact of metals on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. We used tag-coded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to elucidate the impacts of copper (Cu) on bacterial community composition and diversity within a well-described Cu gradient (20 to 3,537 μg g−1) stemming from industrial contamination with CuSO4 more than 85 years ago. DNA sequence information was linked to analysis of pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) to Cu, as determined by the [3H]leucine incorporation technique, and to chemical characterization of the soil. PICT was significantly correlated to bioavailable Cu, as determined by the results seen with a Cu-specific bioluminescent biosensor strain, demonstrating a specific community response to Cu. The relative abundances of members of several phyla or candidate phyla, including the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrumicrobia, Chloroflexi, WS3, and Planctomycetes, decreased with increasing bioavailable Cu, while members of the dominant phylum, the Actinobacteria, showed no response and members of the Acidobacteria showed a marked increase in abundance. Interestingly, changes in the relative abundances of classes frequently deviated from the responses of the phyla to which they belong. Despite the apparent Cu impacts on Cu resistance and community structure, bioavailable Cu levels did not show any correlation to bacterial OTU richness (97% similarity level). Our report highlights several bacterial taxa responding to Cu and thereby provides new guidelines for future studies aiming to explore the bacterial domain for members of metal-responding taxa. PMID:22904046

  13. Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Bradley C; Goldenberg, Joshua Z; Vandvik, Per O; Sun, Xin; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2011-11-09

    Antibiotics alter the microbial balance within the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics may prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) via restoration of the gut microflora. Antibiotics are prescribed frequently in children and AAD is common in this population. The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose) used for the prevention of AAD in children. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, AMED, and the Web of Science (inception to May 2010) were searched along with specialized registers including the Cochrane IBD/FBD review group, CISCOM (Centralized Information Service for Complementary Medicine), NHS Evidence, the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements as well as trial registries. Letters were sent to authors of included trials, nutra/pharmaceutical companies, and experts in the field requesting additional information on ongoing or unpublished trials. Conference proceedings, dissertation abstracts, and reference lists from included and relevant articles were also searched. Randomized, parallel, controlled trials in children (0 to 18 years) receiving antibiotics, that compare probiotics to placebo, active alternative prophylaxis, or no treatment and measure the incidence of diarrhea secondary to antibiotic use were considered for inclusion. Study selection, data extraction as well as methodological quality assessment using the risk of bias instrument was conducted independently and in duplicate by two authors. Dichotomous data (incidence of diarrhea, adverse events) were combined using a pooled relative risk and risk difference (adverse events), and continuous data (mean duration of diarrhea, mean daily stool frequency) as weighted mean differences, along with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals. For overall pooled results on the incidence of diarrhea, sensitivity analyses included available case versus extreme-plausible analyses and random- versus fixed-effect models. To

  14. Probiotics can induce follicle maturational competence: the Danio rerio case.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Giorgia; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Merrifield, Daniel L; Hardiman, Gary; Borini, Andrea; Vaccari, Lisa; Carnevali, Oliana

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501 on the acquisition of oocyte maturational competence was examined in zebrafish (Danio rerio). L. rhamnosus administration induced the responsiveness of incompetent follicles (stage IIIa) to 17,20-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one and their in vitro maturation. Acquisition of competence by the stage IIIa follicles was further validated by changes of lhr, mprb, inhbaa (activin betaA1), tgfb1, and gdf9 gene expression, which have recently emerged as key regulators of oocyte acquisition of maturational competence, and pou5f1 gene expression, which in other models has been shown to govern the establishment of developmental competence of oocytes. In addition, a DNA microarray experiment was conducted using the same follicles, and with relative gene ontology (GO) data analysis, the molecular effects of probiotic administration emerged. Molecular analysis using PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) approach, providing information about only the most abundant bacterial members of the microbial community, revealed that the probiotic was able to populate the gastrointestinal tract and modulate the microbial communities, causing a clear shift in them and specifically enhancing the presence of the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus. At the same time, PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the probiotic was not directly associated with the ovaries. Finally, the effects of probiotic treatment on zebrafish follicle development were also analyzed by FPA (focal plane array) Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) imaging, a technique that provides the overall biochemical composition of samples. Changes were found above all in stage IIIa follicles from probiotic-exposed females; the modifications, observed in protein secondary structures as well as in hydration and in bands related to phosphate moieties, allowed us to hypothesize that probiotics act at this follicle stage, affecting the

  15. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil.

  16. Meta-Analysis: Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Lipid Profiles in Normal to Mildly Hypercholesterolemic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Mikiko; Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Tamura, Hiro-omi; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent experimental and clinical studies have suggested that probiotic supplementation has beneficial effects on serum lipid profiles. However, there are conflicting results on the efficacy of probiotic preparations in reducing serum cholesterol. Objective To evaluate the effects of probiotics on human serum lipid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of interventional studies. Methods Eligible reports were obtained by searches of electronic databases. We included randomized, controlled clinical trials comparing probiotic supplementation with placebo or no treatment (control). Statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.3.3. Subanalyses were also performed. Results Eleven of 33 randomized clinical trials retrieved were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. No participant had received any cholesterol-lowering agent. Probiotic interventions (including fermented milk products and probiotics) produced changes in total cholesterol (TC) (mean difference –0.17 mmol/L, 95% CI: –0.27 to –0.07 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (mean difference –0.22 mmol/L, 95% CI: –0.30 to –0.13 mmol/L). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not differ significantly between probiotic and control groups. In subanalysis, long-term (>4-week) probiotic intervention was statistically more effective in decreasing TC and LDL-C than short-term (≤4-week) intervention. The decreases in TC and LDL-C levels with probiotic intervention were greater in mildly hypercholesterolemic than in normocholesterolemic individuals. Both fermented milk product and probiotic preparations decreased TC and LDL-C levels. Gaio and the Lactobacillus acidophilus strain reduced TC and LDL-C levels to a greater extent than other bacterial strains. Conclusions In conclusion, this meta-analysis showed that probiotic supplementation could be useful in the primary prevention of hypercholesterolemia and may lead to reductions in risk

  17. Meta-Analysis: Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Lipid Profiles in Normal to Mildly Hypercholesterolemic Individuals.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mikiko; Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Tamura, Hiro-omi; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies have suggested that probiotic supplementation has beneficial effects on serum lipid profiles. However, there are conflicting results on the efficacy of probiotic preparations in reducing serum cholesterol. To evaluate the effects of probiotics on human serum lipid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of interventional studies. Eligible reports were obtained by searches of electronic databases. We included randomized, controlled clinical trials comparing probiotic supplementation with placebo or no treatment (control). Statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.3.3. Subanalyses were also performed. Eleven of 33 randomized clinical trials retrieved were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. No participant had received any cholesterol-lowering agent. Probiotic interventions (including fermented milk products and probiotics) produced changes in total cholesterol (TC) (mean difference -0.17 mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.27 to -0.07 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (mean difference -0.22 mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.13 mmol/L). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not differ significantly between probiotic and control groups. In subanalysis, long-term (> 4-week) probiotic intervention was statistically more effective in decreasing TC and LDL-C than short-term (≤ 4-week) intervention. The decreases in TC and LDL-C levels with probiotic intervention were greater in mildly hypercholesterolemic than in normocholesterolemic individuals. Both fermented milk product and probiotic preparations decreased TC and LDL-C levels. Gaio and the Lactobacillus acidophilus strain reduced TC and LDL-C levels to a greater extent than other bacterial strains. In conclusion, this meta-analysis showed that probiotic supplementation could be useful in the primary prevention of hypercholesterolemia and may lead to reductions in risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  18. Zinc source and concentration altered physiological responses of beef heifers during a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three treatments were evaluated in feedlot heifers to determine the effects of zinc supplementation on the immune response to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge. Thirty-two beef heifers (255+/-15 kg) were subjected to a 30d period of Zn depletion, then randomly assigned to one ...

  19. Whole corn and wet distiller's grains substitution in steam-flaked corn diet alters rumen fermentation and bacterial dynamics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study evaluated effects of whole shelled corn (WSC) in steam-flaked corn (SFC) finishing diets containing differing amounts of wet distiller's grains with solubles (WDGS) on ruminal fermentation and shifts in ruminal bacterial populations. A total of 642 heifers (initial body weight (BW) = 412 +/-...

  20. Increases in mean annual temperature do not alter soil bacterial community structure in tropical montane wet forests

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Selmants; Karen L. Adair; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Egbert Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a key role in regulating terrestrial biogeochemical cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere continuum. Despite their importance to ecosystem functioning, we lack a general understanding of how bacterial communities respond to climate change, especially in relatively understudied ecosystems like tropical montane wet...

  1. Risk and safety of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Doron, Shira; Snydman, David R

    2015-05-15

    Probiotics have been used safely for years. Safety outcomes are inconsistently reported in published clinical trials. In 2011, a report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concluded that, although the existing probiotic clinical trials reveal no evidence of increased risk, "the current literature is not well equipped to answer questions on the safety of probiotics in intervention studies with confidence." Critics point out that the preponderance of evidence, including the long history of safe probiotic use as well as data from clinical trials, and animal and in vitro studies all support the assumption that probiotics are generally safe for most populations. Theoretical risks have been described in case reports, clinical trial results and experimental models, include systemic infections, deleterious metabolic activities, excessive immune stimulation in susceptible individuals, gene transfer and gastrointestinal side effects. More research is needed to properly describe the incidence and severity of adverse events related to probiotics.

  2. Microbiologic evaluation of commercial probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott

    2002-03-15

    To evaluate contents of commercial probiotic products marketed for veterinary or human administration. Microbiologic culture assay. 8 veterinary probiotics and 5 human probiotics. Quantitative bacteriologic culture was performed on all products, and isolates were identified via biochemical characteristics. Comparison of actual contents versus label claims was performed. Label descriptions of organisms and concentrations accurately described the actual contents of only 2 of 13 products. Five veterinary products did not specifically list their contents. Most products contained low concentrations of viable organisms. Five products did not contain 1 or more of the stated organisms, and 3 products contained additional species. Some products contained organisms with no reported probiotic effects; some of these organisms could be pathogens. Most commercial veterinary probiotic preparations are not accurately represented by label claims. Quality control appears to be poor for commercial veterinary probiotics.

  3. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases.

  4. The future of probiotics for disorders of the brain-gut axis.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M; Shanahan, Fergus

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics, or at the very least products that might have probiotic properties, have been with us for decades, if not centuries, but it has only been in recent years that they have been subjected to serious scientific study. This surge in interest in probiotics has coincided with the era of the microbiome; as more and more is understood about the gut microbiota in health and disease, the therapeutic option of modulating the microbiota through the administration of probiotics has gained a more secure foundation. Regrettably, while a vast literature attests to the beneficial impact of probiotics in a variety of animal models and the mechanisms underlying such positive effects have been dissected in great detail, the data base on probiotics in man remains pretty slender.To make progress, a number of basic issues need to be addressed: strain characterization and other aspects of quality control need to be rigorously applied and additional steps such as dose optimization, definition of desired site of effect and tailoring of formulation accordingly accomplished before large scale trials, based on appropriately selected study endpoints and employing a clinically meaningful study duration, are embarked upon. Meantime, it is to be hoped that the regulatory climate will have been clarified and appropriate guidelines for the evaluation of probiotics, whether as food or drug, developed. Ultimately, the current terminology may have to be abandoned as evidence for biological and clinical activity for dead bacteria, bacterial components and bacterial products accumulates.

  5. Oral Administration of Fermented Probiotics Improves the Condition of Feces in Adult Horses

    PubMed Central

    ISHIZAKA, Saori; MATSUDA, Akira; AMAGAI, Yosuke; OIDA, Kumiko; JANG, Hyosun; UEDA, Yuko; TAKAI, Masaki; TANAKA, Akane; MATSUDA, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of probiotics on horses are still controversial. The present study was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study designed to evaluate the ability of probiotics to improve intestinal conditions in adult horses. Fermented probiotics were administered to 10 healthy adult geldings for 28 days. The clinical condition of the horses was monitored daily, and the blood and feces were biochemically analyzed every 14 days. In the probiotic-treated group, the concentration of carboxylic acids in the feces was increased at days 14 and 28. In contrast to the fecal pH in the control group, which increased at days 14 and 28, the fecal pH in the probiotic-treated group did not increase. Additionally, the relative amounts of enteropathogenic bacterial DNA were diminished in the probiotic-treated group. These results suggest that probiotic bacteria proliferated in the equine intestine. No instances of abnormal clinical conditions or abnormal values in blood tests were observed throughout the study. Oral administration of fermented probiotics may have the ability to improve the intestinal environment biochemically and microbiologically without the risk of adverse effects. PMID:25558179

  6. The Protective Effects of Probiotic Bacteria on Cadmium Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Djurasevic, Sinisa; Jama, Adel; Jasnic, Nebojsa; Vujovic, Predrag; Jovanovic, Milos; Mitic-Culafic, Dragana; Knezevic-Vukcevic, Jelena; Cakic-Milosevic, Maja; Ilijevic, Konstantin; Djordjevic, Jelena

    2017-02-01

    One of the useful properties of probiotic bacteria is their capacity to bind different targets, thus eliminating them through feces. It is supposed that one of these targets could be cadmium, a widespread environmental toxicant that causes various disturbances in biological systems. This study examined the protective effects of probiotic supplementation against cadmium-induced toxicity in the rat. The experiment was conducted in the course of 5 weeks. Animals were divided into four groups: (1) controls, (2) probiotics treated, (3) cadmium treated, and (4) probiotics + cadmium treated. The cadmium concentration was measured in the blood, liver, kidney, and feces, as well as the blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as biomarkers of the liver function. Histomorphological changes in the liver and kidney were also determined. Our results revealed that probiotics combined with cadmium increase this metal concentration in feces. As a result, blood, liver, and kidney Cd levels, as well as blood ALT and AST activities were lessened compared to the rat group treated with cadmium only. Besides, probiotics consumed simultaneously with cadmium attenuated histomorphological changes in the liver and kidney caused by cadmium. The rise in lactobacilli number in feces of rats treated simultaneously with cadmium and probiotics results in strong correlation with the increase of Cd concentration in their feces and the decrease of Cd concentration in their blood. We speculate that probiotics actively contribute to cadmium excretion through feces, probably, by its binding to their bacterial cell wall.

  7. Vitamin D/VDR, Probiotics, and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shang, Mei; Sun, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important factor in regulating inflammation, immune responses, and carcinoma inhibition via action of its receptor, vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent studies have demonstrated the role of vitamin D/VDR in regulating host-bacterial interactions. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria with the power of supporting or favoring life on the host. In the current review, we will discuss the recent progress on the roles of vitamin D/VDR in gut microbiome and inflammation. We will summarize evidence of probiotics in modulating vitamin D/VDR and balancing gut microbiota in health and gastrointestinal diseases. Moreover, we will review the clinical application of probiotics in prevention and therapy of IBD or colon cancer. Despite of the gains, there remain several barriers to advocate broad use of probiotics in clinical therapy. We will also discuss the limits and future direction in scientific understanding of probiotics, vitamin D/VDR, and host responses. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Oral Bacteria as Potential Probiotics for the Pharyngeal Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Stuknyte, Milda; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The research described here was aimed at the selection of oral bacteria that displayed properties compatible with their potential use as probiotics for the pharyngeal mucosa. We included in the study 56 bacteria newly isolated from the pharynges of healthy donors, which were identified at the intraspecies level and characterized in vitro for their probiotic potential. The experiments led us to select two potential probiotic bacterial strains (Streptococcus salivarius RS1 and ST3) and to compare them with the prototype oral probiotic S. salivarius strain K12. All three strains efficiently bound to FaDu human epithelial pharyngeal cells and thereby antagonized Streptococcus pyogenes adhesion and growth. All were sensitive to a variety of antibiotics routinely used for the control of upper respiratory tract infections. Immunological in vitro testing on a FaDu layer revealed different responses to RS1, ST3, and K12. RS1 and ST3 modulated NF-κB activation and biased proinflammatory cytokines at baseline and after interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induction. In conclusion, we suggest that the selected commensal streptococci represent potential pharyngeal probiotic candidates. They could display a good degree of adaptation to the host and possess potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:20418429

  9. Oral bacteria as potential probiotics for the pharyngeal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Stuknyte, Milda; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-06-01

    The research described here was aimed at the selection of oral bacteria that displayed properties compatible with their potential use as probiotics for the pharyngeal mucosa. We included in the study 56 bacteria newly isolated from the pharynges of healthy donors, which were identified at the intraspecies level and characterized in vitro for their probiotic potential. The experiments led us to select two potential probiotic bacterial strains (Streptococcus salivarius RS1 and ST3) and to compare them with the prototype oral probiotic S. salivarius strain K12. All three strains efficiently bound to FaDu human epithelial pharyngeal cells and thereby antagonized Streptococcus pyogenes adhesion and growth. All were sensitive to a variety of antibiotics routinely used for the control of upper respiratory tract infections. Immunological in vitro testing on a FaDu layer revealed different responses to RS1, ST3, and K12. RS1 and ST3 modulated NF-kappaB activation and biased proinflammatory cytokines at baseline and after interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induction. In conclusion, we suggest that the selected commensal streptococci represent potential pharyngeal probiotic candidates. They could display a good degree of adaptation to the host and possess potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties.

  10. Mismatch between Probiotic Benefits in Trials versus Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Scourboutakos, Mary J.; Franco-Arellano, Beatriz; Murphy, Sarah A.; Norsen, Sheida; Comelli, Elena M.; L’Abbé, Mary R.

    2017-01-01

    Probiotic food products contain a variety of different bacterial strains and may offer different health effects. The objective was to document the prevalence and dosage of probiotic strains in the Canadian food supply and to review the literature investigating these strains in order to understand what health benefits these products may offer. The Food Label Information Program was used to identify probiotic-containing products in the food supply. PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for randomized controlled trials that tested the health effects of these strains in humans. There were six probiotic strains/strain combinations identified in the food supply. Thirty-one studies investigated these strains and found that they are associated with decreased diarrhea and constipation, improved digestive symptoms, glycemic control, antioxidant status, blood lipids, oral health, and infant breastfeeding outcomes, as well as enhanced immunity and support for Helicobacter pylori eradication. There were a limited number of studies investigating these strains. Many studies were funded by the food industry and tested dosages that were up to twenty-five times the dosage found in most food products. Probiotic food products could have health benefits not currently reported on their labels. However, many dosages are too low to provide the benefits demonstrated in clinical trials. Further research is needed to enable more effective use of these functional foods. PMID:28422059

  11. Bacterial stress response to environmental radiation relating to the Fukushima radiation discharge event, Japan: will environmental bacteria alter their antibiotic susceptibility profile?

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Shigeyuki; Moore, John E; Matsuda, Motoo; Goldsmith, Colin E; Coulter, Wilson A; Rao, Juluri R

    2012-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance in clinical pathogens in humans may be traced back to resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria and any factors, which are likely to alter (upregulate) resistance in environmental organisms, is of potential and eventual consequence to human pathogens. Furthermore, sublethal doses of gamma radiation to environmental organisms may cause sublethal stress and a selective pressure, which may lead to mutational events that alter the bacterium's susceptibility profile. A gamma (γ) radiation simulation experiment was performed to emulate the exposure of four environmental bacteria, including Listeria innocua, Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to levels of radiation in and around Fukushima, Japan, equating to 1, 10 and 100 years equivalence exposure. Alteration to susceptibility to 14 antibiotics was measured as the primary endpoint. There was no significant alteration in the susceptibility of the Gram-positive organisms, whereas both Gram-negative organisms became slightly more susceptible to the antibiotics tested over time. These data indicate that such radiation exposure will not increase the antibiotic resistance profile of these organisms and hence not add to the global public health burden of increased antibiotic resistance in human bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Macrophages overexpressing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase show altered profile of free radical production and enhanced capacity of bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Räisänen, Seija R; Alatalo, Sari L; Ylipahkala, Hannele; Halleen, Jussi M; Cassady, A Ian; Hume, David A; Väänänen, H Kalervo

    2005-05-27

    Activated macrophages and osteoclasts express high amounts of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP, acp5). TRACP has a binuclear iron center with a redox-active iron that has been shown to catalyze the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Fenton's reaction. Previous studies suggest that ROS generated by TRACP may participate in degradation of endocytosed bone matrix products in resorbing osteoclasts and degradation of foreign compounds during antigen presentation in activated macrophages. Here we have compared free radical production in macrophages of TRACP overexpressing (TRACP+) and wild-type (WT) mice. TRACP overexpression increased both ROS levels and superoxide production. Nitric oxide production was increased in activated macrophages of WT mice, but not in TRACP+ mice. Macrophages from TRACP+ mice showed increased capacity of bacterial killing. Recombinant TRACP enzyme was capable of bacterial killing in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that TRACP has an important biological function in immune defense system.

  13. [Altered gut bacterial flora and organic acids in feces of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Morotomi, Masami; Ishizuka, Naoki; Miwa, Akiyoshi; O Yoshida, Takato

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity and various infections are serious problems associated with high-dose chemotherapy. Antibacterial chemoprophylaxis reduces the incidence of gram-negative bacterial infection; however, it may affect the normal intestinal flora and induce drug resistance in organisms. We evaluated the chronological changes in fecal bacteria and organic acids in 6 patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based chemoprophylaxis. All patients developed grade 2-3 diarrhea. Four patients developed grade 3 febrile neutropenia. The total count of obligatory anaerobic bacteria was significantly decreased on Day 7, but total facultative anaerobic bacterial count did not change throughout transplantation. However, Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacillus were decreased on Day 7 and Staphylococcus was increased after transplantation. Total organic acid concentration and short-chain fatty acids were decreased on Day 7. The bacterial flora and organic acids in the gut were significantly altered in patients who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolonebased chemoprophylaxis. These changes may contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity and infections.

  14. Site-specific mouth rinsing can improve oral odor by altering bacterial counts. Blind crossover clinical study.

    PubMed

    Alqumber, Mohammed A; Arafa, Khaled A

    2014-11-01

    To determine whether site-specific mouth rinsing with oral disinfectants can improve oral odor beyond the traditional panoral mouth disinfection with mouth rinses by targeting specifically oral malodor implicated anaerobic bacteria. Twenty healthy fasting subjects volunteered for a blinded prospective, descriptive correlational crossover cross-section clinical trial conducted during the month of Ramadan between July and August 2013 in Albaha province in Saudi Arabia involving the application of Listerine Cool Mint mouth rinse by either the traditional panoral rinsing method, or a site-specific disinfection method targeting the subgingival and supragingival plaque and the posterior third of the tongue dorsum, while avoiding the remaining locations within the oral cavity. The viable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial counts, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) levels, organoleptic assessment of oral odor, and the tongue-coating index were compared at baseline, one, 5, and 9 hours after the treatment. The site-specific disinfection method reduced the VSCs and anaerobic bacterial loads while keeping the aerobic bacterial numbers higher than the traditional panoral rinsing method. Site-specific disinfection can more effectively maintain a healthy oral cavity by predominantly disinfecting the niches of anaerobic bacteria within the oral cavity.

  15. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: insights from meta-analysis and theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Waring, Bonnie G; Averill, Colin; Hawkes, Christine V

    2013-07-01

    Since fungi and bacteria are the dominant decomposers in soil, their distinct physiologies are likely to differentially influence rates of ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. We used meta-analysis and an enzyme-driven biogeochemical model to explore the drivers and biogeochemical consequences of changes in the fungal-to-bacterial ratio (F : B). In our meta-analysis data set, F : B increased with soil C : N ratio (R(2) = 0.224, P < 0.001), a relationship predicted by our model. We found that differences in biomass turnover rates influenced F : B under conditions of C limitation, while differences in biomass stoichiometry set the upper bounds on F : B once a nutrient limitation threshold was reached. Ecological interactions between the two groups shifted along a gradient of resource stoichiometry. At intermediate substrate C : N, fungal N mineralisation fuelled bacterial growth, increasing total microbial biomass and decreasing net N mineralisation. Therefore, we conclude that differences in bacterial and fungal physiology may have large consequences for ecosystem-scale C and N cycling.

  16. Latest Developments in Probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Frédéric; Falony, Gwen; Vuyst, Luc De

    Probiotic foods are a group of health-promoting, so-called functional foods, with large commercial interest and growing market shares (Arvanitoyannis & van Houwelingen-Koukaliaroglou, 2005). In general, their health benefits are based on the presence of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), that, when taken up in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. They are administered mostly through the consumption of fermented milks or yoghurts (Mercenier, Pavan, & Pot, 2003). In addition to their common use in the dairy industry, probiotic LAB strains may be used in other food products too, including fermented meats (Hammes & Hertel, 1998; Incze, 1998; Kröckel, 2006; Työppönen, Petäjä,& Mattila- Sandholm, 2003).

  17. Probiotics in children.

    PubMed

    Kligler, Benjamin; Hanaway, Patrick; Cohrssen, Andreas

    2007-12-01

    The gastrointestinal flora plays a complex and important role in the development of healthy immunologic and digestive function in children. Probiotics are safe in healthy children and effective in reducing the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the duration of acute infectious diarrhea. Probiotics may also be effective in preventing community-acquired diarrheal infections, in reducing the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants, and in the prevention and treatment of atopic dermatitis. The exact strain or combination of strains most effective for common clinical indications has yet to be determined, but the exact strain used seems less important than whether an adequate dose is used (typically 5 to 10 billion CFUs per day or higher). Clinicians should familiarize themselves with the products available because there is a wide range in their quality.

  18. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  19. Effect of dietary supplementation of probiotics and palm fruits extracts on the antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the mucosae of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Esteban, M A; Cordero, H; Martínez-Tomé, M; Jiménez-Monreal, A M; Bakhrouf, A; Mahdhi, A

    2014-08-01

    Antioxidant activity is particularly important, since oxidation is an unavoidable reaction in all living bodies. At present, natural antioxidants to be used on food as an alternative to synthetic ones are being sought. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) specimens were fed for 4 weeks with diets enriched with bacterial probiotics (Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 and Bacillus sp), single or in combination with Tunisian dates palm fruit extracts. The expression of the main antioxidant enzyme genes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in the mucosae (gut, skin and gill) was evaluated after 2 and 4 weeks. Previously, free radical scavenging and several antioxidant assays were developed to know the antioxidant properties present on the palm fruits extracts. The results demonstrated that experimental diets alter the expression of the studied antioxidant genes, primarily in the gill and skin. Furthermore, the tested probiotics and mainly, the aqueous date palm fruits extracts had significant antioxidant properties based on their protective effect against the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, especially when administering during 4 weeks. For this reason, probiotics and date palm fruit extracts may serve as good natural antioxidants and could potentially be considered as a functional food ingredient for fish in farms.

  20. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced fr