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Sample records for process hpip volume

  1. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 3, Development documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program.

  2. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 2, Investigators`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique.

  3. Expression of HPIP in epithelial ovarian carcinoma: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuping; Meng, Fanling; Liu, Yunduo; Chen, Xiuwei

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hematopoietic pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor (PBX)-interacting protein (HPIP) plays an important role in cancer invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of HPIP in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Patients and methods Immunohistochemical method was performed using 42 normal ovarian specimens and 145 specimens with EOC. The correlations of HPIP expression with the clinicopathological factors and prognosis of EOC patients were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-square test, multivariate Cox proportional hazard, and Kaplan–Meier method. Results HPIP expression in EOC was higher than that in normal tissues (P<0.001). HPIP expression was significantly associated with histological grade, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and lymphatic metastasis of EOC (P<0.05). Patients with high HPIP expression had poorer overall survival and disease-free survival (P<0.001) compared with patients with low HPIP expression. Multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that HPIP was an independent factor for overall survival and disease-free survival (P<0.05). Conclusion HPIP may be a valuable biomarker for predicting the prognosis of EOC patients and may serve as a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:28053543

  4. DNA-binding studies and antitumor evaluation of novel water soluble organic pip and hpip analogs.

    PubMed

    Coban, Burak; Yildiz, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    Two new water-soluble pip and hpip analogs, 1 and 2 pip = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1, 10]phenanthroline; hpip = 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1, 10]phenanthroline, have been synthesized and fully characterized by CHN analysis, MALDI-TOF MS, (1)H-NMR, IR (ATR), and UV-Vis methods. The DNA-binding behaviors of both compounds have been studied by viscosity measurements, spectroscopic methods, and gel electrophoresis studies, and potential for antitumor activity was evaluated by measuring their ability to inhibit DNA transcription. The results indicate that both compounds show some strong binding to DNA in a mixture of electrostatic and intercalative mode resulting in the intrinsic binding constants Kb of (4.0 ± 0.5) × 10(5) M(-1) and (7.5 ± 0.5) × 10(5) M(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. These strong binding affinities for DNA are comparable for that seen for many transition metal-based intercalators. Comparatively, observed difference in the DNA-binding affinities of two complexes can be reasonably explained by the presence of an intra-molecular hydrogen-bonding between the ortho-phenolic group and the nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring. The extended co-planarity of 2 due to the intramolecular hydrogen bonding may lead to an enhancement of DNA binding affinity of 2. In addition, 2 can promote cleavage of pBR322 DNA upon irradiation, it inhibits DNA transcription and it is more cytotoxic at lower concentrations in comparison to 1, as revealed by the spectroscopic measurements.

  5. Industrial waste treatment process engineering. Volume 2: Biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Celenza, G.J.

    1999-11-01

    Industrial Waste Treatment Process Engineering is a step-by-step implementation manual in three volumes, detailing the selection and design of industrial liquid and solid waste treatment systems. It consolidates all the process engineering principles required to evaluate a wide range of industrial facilities, starting with pollution prevention and source control and ending with end-of-pipe treatment technologies. This three-volume set is a practical guide for environmental engineers with process implementation responsibilities; a one-stop resource for process engineering requirements--from plant planning to implementing specific treatment technologies for unit operations; a comprehensive reference for industrial waste treatment technologies; and includes calculations and worked problems based on industry cases. The contents of Volume 2 include: aeration; aerobic biological oxidation; activated sludge system; biological oxidation: lagoons; biological oxidation: fixed film processes; aerobic digesters; anaerobic waste treatment, anaerobic sludge treatment; and sedimentation.

  6. USAF Logistics Process Optimization Study for the Aircraft Asset Sustainment Process. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Process." Volume II, "ACC To Be Model ", contains the To-Be Retail Asset Sustainment Process Model displaying the activities and functions related to the...adoption. Volume III, "Future To Be Asset Sustainment Process Model ," is published as a stand-alone volume of this report. Volume III contains a discussion...of the Reengineering Team’s efforts in the development of a logistics process model for a more distant future retail aircraft asset sustainment

  7. Data Processing Volume I. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittetoe, Jerry

    These instructional materials are intended as a guide for the instructor of a block course in introductory vocational data processing. A textbook and supplementary materials of the instructor's choice would probably be used in conjunction with these materials. Topics covered in the 11 units are background and uses of data processing, input/output…

  8. Ironmaking Process Alternative Screening Study, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood Greene, . .

    2005-01-06

    Iron in the United States is largely produced from iron ore mined in the United States or imported from Canada or South America. The iron ore is typically smelted in Blast Furnaces that use primarily iron ore, iron concentrate pellets metallurgical coke, limestone and lime as the raw materials. Under current operating scenarios, the iron produced from these Blast Furnaces is relatively inexpensive as compared to current alternative iron sources, e.g. direct iron reduction, imported pig iron, etc. The primary problem the Blast Furnace Ironmaking approach is that many of these Blast furnaces are relatively small, as compared to the newer, larger Blast Furnaces; thus are relatively costly and inefficient to operate. An additional problem is also that supplies of high-grade metallurgical grade coke are becoming increasingly in short supply and costs are also increasing. In part this is due to the short supply and costs of high-grade metallurgical coals, but also this is due to the increasing necessity for environmental controls for coke production. After year 2003 new regulations for coke product environmental requirement will likely be promulgated. It is likely that this also will either increase the cost of high-quality coke production or will reduce the available domestic U.S. supply. Therefore, iron production in the United States utilizing the current, predominant Blast Furnace process will be more costly and would likely be curtailed due to a coke shortage. Therefore, there is a significant need to develop or extend the economic viability of Alternate Ironmaking Processes to at least partially replace current and declining blast furnace iron sources and to provide incentives for new capacity expansion. The primary conclusions of this comparative Study of Alternative Ironmaking Process scenarios are: (1) The processes with the best combined economics (CAPEX and OPEX impacts in the I.R.R. calculation) can be grouped into those Fine Ore based processes with no scrap

  9. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-04-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  10. Fuel quality processing study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Syverson, H. T.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, R. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel quality processing study to provide a data base for an intelligent tradeoff between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality, and also, to guide the development of specifications of future synthetic fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985 to 2000 is given. Four technical performance tests are discussed: on-site pretreating, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and data evaluation. The base case refinery is a modern Midwest refinery processing 200,000 BPD of a 60/40 domestic/import petroleum crude mix. The synthetic crudes used for upgrading to marketable products and turbine fuel are shale oil and coal liquids. Of these syncrudes, 50,000 BPD are processed in the existing petroleum refinery, requiring additional process units and reducing petroleum feed, and in a new refinery designed for processing each syncrude to produce gasoline, distillate fuels, resid fuels, and turbine fuel, JPGs and coke. An extensive collection of synfuel properties and upgrading data was prepared for the application of a linear program model to investigate the most economical production slate meeting petroleum product specifications and turbine fuels of various quality grades. Technical and economic projections were developed for 36 scenarios, based on 4 different crude feeds to either modified existing or new refineries operated in 2 different modes to produce 7 differing grades of turbine fuels. A required product selling price of turbine fuel for each processing route was calculated. Procedures and projected economics were developed for on-site treatment of turbine fuel to meet limitations of impurities and emission of pollutants.

  11. Large volume leukapheresis: Efficacy and safety of processing patient's total blood volume six times.

    PubMed

    Bojanic, Ines; Dubravcic, Klara; Batinic, Drago; Cepulic, Branka Golubic; Mazic, Sanja; Hren, Darko; Nemet, Damir; Labar, Boris

    2011-04-01

    Large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) differs from standard leukapheresis by increased blood flow and an altered anticoagulation regimen. An open issue is to what degree a further increase in processed blood volume is reasonable in terms of higher yields and safety. In 30 LVL performed in patients with hematologic malignancies, 6 total blood volumes were processed. LVL resulted in a higher CD34+ cell yield without a change in graft quality. Although a marked platelet decrease can be expected, LVL is safe and can be recommended as the standard procedure for patients who mobilize low numbers of CD34+ cells and when high number of CD34+ cells are required.

  12. TOPEX SDR Processing, October 1998. Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Lockwood, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    This document is a compendium of the WFF TOPEX Software Development Team's knowledge regarding Sensor Data Record (SDR) Processing. It includes many elements of a requirements document, a software specification document, a software design document, and a user's manual. In the more technical sections, this document assumes the reader is familiar with TOPEX and instrument files.

  13. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 5: Process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B.; Alexander, P.; Burger, D.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the Process Development Area, as part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, was to develop and demonstrate solar cell fabrication and module assembly process technologies required to meet the cost, lifetime, production capacity, and performance goals of the FSA Project. R&D efforts expended by Government, Industry, and Universities in developing processes capable of meeting the projects goals during volume production conditions are summarized. The cost goals allocated for processing were demonstrated by small volume quantities that were extrapolated by cost analysis to large volume production. To provide proper focus and coverage of the process development effort, four separate technology sections are discussed: surface preparation, junction formation, metallization, and module assembly.

  14. Process Diagnostics: Materials, Combustion Fusion. Volume 117. Materials Research Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    reference volume for professionals working in the area of materials process control as well as a graduate level textbook for a course in applied ... spectroscopy or process engineering that might be given as part of a chemistry, physics, chemical or materials engineering curriculum.

  15. Data Processing (Advanced Business Programming) Volume II. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litecky, Charles R.; Lamkin, Tim

    This curriculum guide for an advanced course in data processing is for use as a companion publication to a textbook or textbooks; references to appropriate textbooks are given in most units. Student completion of assignments in Volume I, available separately (see ED 220 604), is a prerequisite. Topics covered in the 18 units are introduction,…

  16. STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP). Volume 2: application Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    This document, STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP), Volume II: Application, Version 1.0, is Volume II of the two-volume STARS CFRP...document set. It provides initial guidance in how to apply the STARS CFRP, as defined in the companion volume, STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP), Volume I: Definition, Version 3.0

  17. Industrial process heat data analysis and evaluation. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A; Gee, R; May, K

    1984-07-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has modeled seven of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored solar Industrial Process Heat (IPH) field experiments and has generated thermal performance predictions for each project. Additionally, these performance predictions have been compared with actual performance measurements taken at the projects. Predictions were generated using SOLIPH, an hour-by-hour computer code with the capability for modeling many types of solar IPH components and system configurations. Comparisons of reported and predicted performance resulted in good agreement when the field test reliability and availability was high. Volume I contains the main body of the work; objective model description, site configurations, model results, data comparisons, and summary. Volume II contains complete performance prediction results (tabular and graphic output) and computer program listings.

  18. Modeling of turbulent transport as a volume process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mark J.; Morel, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    An alternative type of modeling was proposed for the turbulent transport terms in Reynolds-averaged equations. One particular implementation of the model was considered, based on the two-point velocity correlations. The model was found to reproduce the trends but not the magnitude of the nonisotropic behavior of the turbulent transport. Some interesting insights were developed concerning the shape of the contracted two-point correlation volume. This volume is strongly deformed by mean shear from the spherical shape found in unstrained flows. Of particular interest is the finding that the shape is sharply waisted, indicating preferential lines of communication, which should have a direct effect on turbulent transfer and on other processes.

  19. Automated Force Volume Image Processing for Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junbo; Duval, Jérôme F. L.; Brie, David; Francius, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature) which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image. PMID:21559483

  20. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

  1. Realistic fetus skin color processing for ultrasound volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Kim, Kyuhong; Park, Sung-Chan; Kang, Jooyoung; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes realistic fetus skin color processing using a 2D color map and a tone mapping function (TMF) for ultrasound volume rendering. The contributions of this paper are a 2D color map generated through a gamut model of skin color and a TMF that depends on the lighting position. First, the gamut model of fetus skin color is calculated by color distribution of baby images. The 2D color map is created using a gamut model for tone mapping of ray casting. For the translucent effect, a 2D color map in which lightness is inverted is generated. Second, to enhance the contrast of rendered images, the luminance, color, and tone curve TMF parameters are changed using 2D Gaussian function that depends on the lighting position. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better realistic skin color reproduction than the conventional method.

  2. Frothing in flotation. Volume 2: Recent advances in coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, J.S.; Woodburn, E.T.

    1998-11-01

    This volume summarizes the achievements on various aspects of flotation froth properties and behavior, and relationship between froth appearance and flotation performance. Flotation kinetics involves a number of mass transfer processes with some of them being critically determined by the behavior of froth. Since froth is complex, and controlled experimentation is difficult, the froth phase was, until recently, either ignored or treated entirely empirically. With wide applications of flotation columns, the behavior of the froth is now often recognized as being dominant in determining flotation performance, and the research in this area is one of the most actively pursued. Contents include: Frothers and frothing; Effect of particle and bubble size on flotation kinetics; Water content and distribution in flotation froths; Mechanisms operating in flotation froths; Characterization of flotation froth; Simultaneous determination of collection zone rate constant and froth zone recovery factor; Modelling of froth dynamics with implications for feed-back control; The interrelationship between flotation variables and froth appearance; Froth image analysis in a flotation control system; Kinetic flotation modelling using froth imaging data; and Dependence of froth behavior on galvanic interactions.

  3. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Fuel quality-processing study. Volume 1: Overview and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The methods whereby the intermediate results were obtained are outlined, and the evaluation of the feasible paths from liquid fossil fuel sources to generated electricity is presented. The segments from which these paths were built are the results from the fuel upgrading schemes, on-site treatments, and exhaust gas treatments detailed in the subsequent volumes. The salient cost and quality parameters are included.

  5. STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process (CFRP). Volume 1. Definition. Version 3.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-25

    This document, STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP), Volume I: Definition, Version 3.0, defines version 3.0 of the STARS CFRP. It...supercedes an earlier CFRP definition document, STARS Reuse Concepts, Volume I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process (CFRP), Version 2.0. This

  6. Process for reduction of volume of contaminated soil by compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Johanan, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    Burial costs for low-level radioactive waste are assessed by the volume of the waste. These costs are presently at $10 per cubic foot and will continue to increase with time. A reduction in waste volume can be directly converted to a reduction in burial costs. A large amount of low-level contaminated soil exists throughout the DOE complex. The Nuclear Complex Modernization Task Force has identified over 5 million cubic feet of contaminated soil for eventual clean-up at the Mound site ($50,000,000 to bury at FY 1991 costs). By using a combination of a rock separator (trommel), crusher, clay soil compactor, automatic loading system, specially designed dust enclosures, and specifically designed containers for both on-site haulage and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the total waste volume, and burial cost, can be reduced by up to 30% by compacting the soil into high-density bricks (depending upon the compaction quality of the soil). Several tests have been performed on Mound`s cold on-site soils, with resulting densities of 131 pounds per cubic foot. When this is compared to normal LSA metal box filling of 80--90 pounds per cubic foot, one can readily see the savings.

  7. Contexts of Reading. Advances in Discourse Processes Series. Volume XVIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley, Carolyn N., Ed.; Baratta, Anthony N., Ed.

    Focusing on the reading-thinking-learning process, the classrooms in which such processes occur, and the means for studying these processes, this book presents essays on teaching, learning, and assessing the reading process. The first section contains essays on learning contexts that are interactive and participatory, while essays in the second…

  8. System Engineering Concept Demonstration, Process Model. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    the results of SECD Process Model Task. The SECD Process Model is a system acquisition and development model that emphasizes System Engineering...activities over the entire system lifecycle. The Process model is a graphical representation of the System Engineering Lifecycle activities, agents, flows...feedbacks, and work products. This interactive Process Model provides a multi- dimensional view of government acquisition and contractor development

  9. Development and Utility of Automatic Language Processing Technologies. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    translation (MT), natural language processing ( NLP ), speech synthesis (TTS) and other speech and language processing technologies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...Automatic speech recognition (ASR), machine translation (MT), natural language processing ( NLP ), and speech synthesis (TTS). 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...investigating the development and utility of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR), Machine Translation (MT), Natural Language Processing ( NLP ), Speech Synthesis

  10. Description of ground motion data processing codes: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.L.

    1988-02-01

    Data processing codes developed to process ground motion at the Nevada Test Site for the Weapons Test Seismic Investigations Project are used today as part of the program to process ground motion records for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. The work contained in this report documents and lists codes and verifies the ``PSRV`` code. 39 figs.

  11. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 2: Industrial process characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information and data for 26 industrial processes are presented. The following information is given for each process: (1) a description of the process including the annual energy consumption and product production and plant capacity; (2) the energy requirements of the process for each unit of production and the detailed data concerning electrical energy requirements and also hot water, steam, and direct fired thermal requirements; (3) anticipated trends affecting energy requirements with new process or production technologies; and (4) representative plant data including capacity and projected requirements through the year 2000.

  12. UT40 STARS Reuse Concept. Volume 1. Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-12

    1 TASK: UT40 UT40- CDRL:040402/14/92 AD-A247 267 STARS Reuse Concept 24 t i Vol u me I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process Version 1.0 Informal...3For The SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS 3 (STARS) STARS Reuse Concepts Volume I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process -ccesion...STARS Reuse Concepts Volume I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes I Version 1.0 Approvals: Boeing Reuse Technical Lead Margaret Davis Date IBM

  13. Gasoline from coal in the state of Illinois: feasibility study. Volume I. Design. [KBW gasification process, ICI low-pressure methanol process and Mobil M-gasoline process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 describes the proposed plant: KBW gasification process, ICI low-pressure methanol process and Mobil M-gasoline process, and also with ancillary processes, such as oxygen plant, shift process, RECTISOL purification process, sulfur recovery equipment and pollution control equipment. Numerous engineering diagrams are included. (LTN)

  14. Direct Certification Process. Nourishing News. Volume 4, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter discusses the Electronic Direct Certification process and provides additional insight as needed. Under this New Direct Certification process school districts compare information from their student information system to Idaho State Department of Health and Welfare database to certify children receiving Food Stamps or TAFI as…

  15. Automated Space Processing Payloads Study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is described which examined the extent to which the experiment hardware and operational requirements can be met by automatic control and material handling devices; payload and system concepts are defined which make extensive use of automation technology. Topics covered include experiment requirements and hardware data, capabilities and characteristics of industrial automation equipment and controls, payload grouping, automated payload conceptual design, space processing payload preliminary design, automated space processing payloads for early shuttle missions, and cost and scheduling.

  16. North American Fuzzy Logic Processing Society (NAFIPS 1992), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the NAFIPS '92 North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society Conference. More than 75 papers were presented at this Conference, which was sponsored by NAFIPS in cooperation with NASA, the Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, the Indian Society for Fuzzy Mathematics and Information Processing (ISFUMIP), the Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), the International Fuzzy Systems Association (IFSA), the Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory and Systems, and the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). The fuzzy set theory has led to a large number of diverse applications. Recently, interesting applications have been developed which involve the integration of fuzzy systems with adaptive processes such as neural networks and genetic algorithms. NAFIPS '92 was directed toward the advancement, commercialization, and engineering development of these technologies.

  17. North American Fuzzy Logic Processing Society (NAFIPS 1992), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the NAFIPS '92 North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society Conference. More than 75 papers were presented at this Conference, which was sponsored by NAFIPS in cooperation with NASA, the Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, the Indian Society for Fuzzy Mathematics and Information Processing (ISFUMIP), the Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), the International Fuzzy Systems Association (IFSA), the Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory and Systems, and the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). The fuzzy set theory has led to a large number of diverse applications. Recently, interesting applications have been developed which involve the integration of fuzzy systems with adaptive processes such a neural networks and genetic algorithms. NAFIPS '92 was directed toward the advancement, commercialization, and engineering development of these technologies.

  18. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-08-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  19. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  20. Fuel quality-processing study. Volume 2: Literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Amero, R.; Murthy, B.; Cutrone, M.

    1981-01-01

    The validity of initial assumptions about raw materials choices and relevant upgrading processing options was confirmed. The literature survey also served to define the on-site (at the turbine location) options for fuel treatment and exhaust gas treatment. The literature survey also contains a substantial compilation of specification and physical property information about liquid fuel products relevant to industrial gas turbines.

  1. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-04-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  2. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Syverson, H T; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This report presents the results of the Fuel Quality/Processing Study project for production of gas turbine fuels. The objective was to provide a data base for establishing intelligent trade-off between advanced turbine technology and liquid fuel quality. Synthetic fuels to be emphasized include those derived from coal and shale. The intent is to use the data base produced to guide the development of specifications for future synthetic liquid fuels anticipated for use in the time period 1985-2000. It is also to be used as a basis for evaluating the value and benefits of federally sponsored R and D efforts in the field of advanced gas turbine technology. The project assessed relative fuel costs, quality and energy efficiency for a number of fuel sources and processing alternatives. An objective was to accelerate implementation of fuel-flexible combustors for industrial and utility stationary gas turbine systems. This is to be accomplished by generating and demonstrating the technology base for development of reliable gas turbine combustors capable of sustained environmentally acceptable operation when using minimally processed synthetic fuels. The key program results are summarized for the following subject areas: literature survey, on-site fuel pretreatment, existing refineries to upgrade fuels, new refineries to upgrade fuels, and environmental considerations. An inhouse linear programming model served as the basis for determining economic processing paths for the existing refineries and new refineries syncrude upgrading. This involved development of extensive input data comprised of fuel properties, yields, component blending characteristics, incremental capital and operating costs, feed and product costs. Economics are based on March 1980 price levels.

  3. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 3: Fuel upgrading studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Bruggink, P.; Sinnett, C.

    1981-01-01

    The methods used to calculate the refinery selling prices for the turbine fuels of low quality are described. Detailed descriptions and economics of the upgrading schemes are included. These descriptions include flow diagrams showing the interconnection between processes and the stream flows involved. Each scheme is in a complete, integrated, stand alone facility. Except for the purchase of electricity and water, each scheme provides its own fuel and manufactures, when appropriate, its own hydrogen.

  4. Control of the aeration volume in an activated sludge process for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, P; Carlsson, B

    2002-01-01

    Biological nitrogen removal in an activated sludge process is obtained by two biological processes; nitrification and denitrification. Nitrifying bacteria need dissolved oxygen and a sufficiently large aeration volume for converting ammonium to nitrate in the wastewater. The objective of this paper is to develop an automatic control strategy for adjusting the aerated volume so that the effluent ammonium level can be kept close to a desired value despite major changes in the influent load. The strategy is based on applying exact linearization of the IAWO Activated Sludge Process Model No 1. Simulation results show that the suggested controller effectively attenuates process disturbances.

  5. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1993-08-01

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  6. The Graphical Representation of Algorithmic Processes. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    systems and their classifications. Static Dynamic PegaSys [18] BALSA [6] Booch Diagrams [4] PV [5] Process Data Flow Diagrams Structure Charts...techniques that attempt to show data or control flow in a static graphical representation of an algorithm. The PegaSys system strad- dles the fields of...Through PegaSys ," Computer, 18(8):72-85 (August 1985). 19. Myers, Brad A. "Incense: A system For Displaying Data Structures," Computer Graphics, 17(3):115

  7. Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). Volume 1: Design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Meemong; Groom, Steven L.; Mazer, Alan S.; Williams, Winifred I.

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of a Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE), which is intended to become the support system software for a prototype high performance science analysis workstation are described. The target machine for this software is a JPL/Caltech Mark 3fp Hypercube hosted by either a MASSCOMP 5600 or a Sun-3, Sun-4 workstation; however, the design will accommodate other concurrent machines of similar architecture, i.e., local memory, multiple-instruction-multiple-data (MIMD) machines. The CIPE system provides both a multimode user interface and an applications programmer interface, and has been designed around four loosely coupled modules: user interface, host-resident executive, hypercube-resident executive, and application functions. The loose coupling between modules allows modification of a particular module without significantly affecting the other modules in the system. In order to enhance hypercube memory utilization and to allow expansion of image processing capabilities, a specialized program management method, incremental loading, was devised. To minimize data transfer between host and hypercube, a data management method which distributes, redistributes, and tracks data set information was implemented. The data management also allows data sharing among application programs. The CIPE software architecture provides a flexible environment for scientific analysis of complex remote sensing image data, such as planetary data and imaging spectrometry, utilizing state-of-the-art concurrent computation capabilities.

  8. Dynamic Volume Holography and Optical Information Processing by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin,I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-09-05

    A method of producing holograms of three-dimensional optical pulses is proposed. It is shown that both the amplitude and the phase profile of three-dimensional optical pulse can be stored in dynamic perturbations of a Raman medium, such as plasma. By employing Raman scattering in a nonlinear medium, information carried by a laser pulse can be captured in the form of a slowly propagating low-frequency wave that persists for a time large compared with the pulse duration. If such a hologram is then probed with a short laser pulse, the information stored in the medium can be retrieved in a second scattered electromagnetic wave. The recording and retrieving processes can conserve robustly the pulse shape, thus enabling the recording and retrieving with fidelity of information stored in optical signals. While storing or reading the pulse structure, the optical information can be processed as an analogue or digital signal, which allows simultaneous transformation of three-dimensional continuous images or computing discrete arrays of binary data. By adjusting the phase fronts of the reference pulses, one can also perform focusing, redirecting, and other types of transformation of the output pulses.

  9. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  10. SOLTECH 1992 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17-20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil, (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, and (6) Photovoltaic (PV) Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35 mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  11. Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

  12. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  13. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 3: Operational availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description and explanation of the operational availability parameter is presented. The fundamental mathematical basis for operational availability is developed, and its relationship to a system's overall performance effectiveness is illustrated within the context of identifying specific availability requirements. Thus, in attempting to provide a general methodology for treating both hypothetical and existing availability requirements, the concept of an availability state, in conjunction with the more conventional probability-time capability, is investigated. In this respect, emphasis is focused upon a balanced analytical and pragmatic treatment of operational availability within the system design process. For example, several applications of operational availability to typical aerospace systems are presented, encompassing the techniques of Monte Carlo simulation, system performance availability trade-off studies, analytical modeling of specific scenarios, as well as the determination of launch-on-time probabilities. Finally, an extensive bibliography is provided to indicate further levels of depth and detail of the operational availability parameter.

  14. Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). Volume 3: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Meemong; Cooper, Gregory T.; Groom, Steven L.; Mazer, Alan S.; Williams, Winifred I.; Kong, Mih-Seh

    1990-01-01

    CIPE (the Concurrent Image Processing Executive) is both an executive which organizes the parameter inputs for hypercube applications and an environment which provides temporary data workspace and simple real-time function definition facilities for image analysis. CIPE provides two types of user interface. The Command Line Interface (CLI) provides a simple command-driven environment allowing interactive function definition and evaluation of algebraic expressions. The menu interface employs a hierarchical screen-oriented menu system where the user is led through a menu tree to any specific application and then given a formatted panel screen for parameter entry. How to initialize the system through the setup function, how to read data into CIPE symbols, how to manipulate and display data through the use of executive functions, and how to run an application in either user interface mode, are described.

  15. Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). Volume 2: Programmer's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Winifred I.

    1990-01-01

    This manual is intended as a guide for application programmers using the Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). CIPE is intended to become the support system software for a prototype high performance science analysis workstation. In its current configuration CIPE utilizes a JPL/Caltech Mark 3fp Hypercube with a Sun-4 host. CIPE's design is capable of incorporating other concurrent architectures as well. CIPE provides a programming environment to applications' programmers to shield them from various user interfaces, file transactions, and architectural complexities. A programmer may choose to write applications to use only the Sun-4 or to use the Sun-4 with the hypercube. A hypercube program will use the hypercube's data processors and optionally the Weitek floating point accelerators. The CIPE programming environment provides a simple set of subroutines to activate user interface functions, specify data distributions, activate hypercube resident applications, and to communicate parameters to and from the hypercube.

  16. Cleanroom Engineering Handbook. Volume 1. Cleanroom Engineering Process Introduction and Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM Cleanroom Engineering Handbook Volume 1 Cleanroom Engineering Process Introduction and Overview Contract No...F19628-88-D-0032 Task ID52 - STARS Technology Transfer Demonstration Project for the U.S. Army Prepared for: Electronic Systems Center Air Force Materiel...CDRL Sequence 05504-001 31 July 1993 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM Cleanroom Engineering Handbook Volume 1

  17. Energy from biological processes. Volume III. Appendixes, Part B: Agriculture, unconventional crops, and select biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This volume contains the following working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, Energy from Biological Processes: The Potential of Producing Energy From Agriculture; Cropland Availability for Biomass Production; Energy From Agriculture: Unconventional Crops; Energy From Aquaculture Biomass Systems: Fresh and Brackish Water Aquatic Plants; Energy From Agriculture: Animal Wastes; and Energy From Agriculture: Agricultural Processing Wastes.

  18. Advanced Information Processing. Volume I. Student's Materials. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Linda

    This course curriculum is intended for use in an advanced information processing course. It builds on the skills developed in the previous information processing course but goes one step further by requiring students to perform in a simulated office environment and improve their decision-making skills. This volume contains two parts of the…

  19. Image Data Processing System (IDAPS) user manual, S-056 experiment. Volume 1: System description. Volume 2: Batch IDAPS. Volume 3: Interactive IDAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Image data processing system (IDAPS) developed to satisfy the image processing requirements of the Skylab S-056 experiment is described. The S-056 experiment was designed to obtain high-resolution photographs of the sun in the far ultraviolet, or soft X-ray, portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thirty-five thousand photographs were obtained by the three flights of the program; and, faced with such a massive volume of imagery, the designers of the experiment decided to develop a computer-based system which would reduce the image processing workload. The purpose of the IDAPS User Manual is to give the IDAPS user the necessary information and instructions to effectively utilize the system.

  20. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  1. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 17B, Processing of Ceramics Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Richard J.

    1996-12-01

    Progress in the processing of ceramics has made these materials very important for current and future technologies. Internationally renowned experts have contributed to this second of two volumes which provide a wealth of information indispensable for materials scientists and engineers. Contents of Volume B: Riedel: Advanced Ceramics from Inorganic Polymers. Calvert: Biomimetic Processing. Eisele: Sintering and Hot Pressing. Kwon: Liquid-Phase Sintering. Leriche/Cambier: Vitrification. Larker/Larker: Hot Isostatic Pressing. Harmer/Chan: Fired Microstructures and Their Charactzerization. Subramanian: Finishing. Nicholas: Joining of Ceramics. Hirai: Functional Gradient Materials.

  2. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a synthesis of the research carried out under the subject headings of the respective chapters. Certain of the chapters, e.g., those on geology, subtidal and intertidal environments and ecology, and those on reef processes and trophic relationships, summarize a great diversity of research carried out by many scientists for many years. In contrast, the chapters on meteorology and oceanography summarize research carried out under one integrated program involving fewer scientists working over a shorter period. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume I. Identification of the processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, R.L.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Blair, H.T.; Carter, J.G.; Gorton, P.S.; Partain, W.L.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document contains preconceptual design data on 11 processes for the solidification and isolation of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HLLW). The processes are: in-can glass melting (ICGM) process, joule-heated glass melting (JHGM) process, glass-ceramic (GC) process, marbles-in-lead (MIL) matrix process, supercalcine pellets-in-metal (SCPIM) matrix process, pyrolytic-carbon coated pellets-in-metal (PCCPIM) matrix process, supercalcine hot-isostatic-pressing (SCHIP) process, SYNROC hot-isostatic-pressing (SYNROC HIP) process, titanate process, concrete process, and cermet process. For the purposes of this study, it was assumed that each of the solidification processes is capable of handling similar amounts of HLLW generated in a production-sized fuel reprocessing plant. It was also assumed that each of the processes would be enclosed in a shielded canyon or cells within a waste facility located at the fuel reprocessing plant. Finally, it was assumed that all of the processes would be subject to the same set of regulations, codes and standards. Each of the solidification processes converts waste into forms that may be acceptable for geological disposal. Each process begins with the receipt of HLLW from the fuel reprocessing plant. In this study, it was assumed that the original composition of the HLLW would be the same for each process. The process ends when the different waste forms are enclosed in canisters or containers that are acceptable for interim storage. Overviews of each of the 11 processes and the bases used for their identification are presented in the first part of this report. Each process, including its equipment and its requirements, is covered in more detail in Appendices A through K. Pertinent information on the current state of the art and the research and development required for the implementation of each process are also noted in the appendices.

  4. The Relationship between Processing Speed and Regional White Matter Volume in Healthy Young People

    PubMed Central

    Magistro, Daniele; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nejad, Keyvan Kashkouli; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Processing speed is considered a key cognitive resource and it has a crucial role in all types of cognitive performance. Some researchers have hypothesised the importance of white matter integrity in the brain for processing speed; however, the relationship at the whole-brain level between white matter volume (WMV) and processing speed relevant to the modality or problem used in the task has never been clearly evaluated in healthy people. In this study, we used various tests of processing speed and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses, it is involves a voxel-wise comparison of the local volume of gray and white, to assess the relationship between processing speed and regional WMV (rWMV). We examined the association between processing speed and WMV in 887 healthy young adults (504 men and 383 women; mean age, 20.7 years, SD, 1.85). We performed three different multiple regression analyses: we evaluated rWMV associated with individual differences in the simple processing speed task, word–colour and colour–word tasks (processing speed tasks with words) and the simple arithmetic task, after adjusting for age and sex. The results showed a positive relationship at the whole-brain level between rWMV and processing speed performance. In contrast, the processing speed performance did not correlate with rWMV in any of the regions examined. Our results support the idea that WMV is associated globally with processing speed performance regardless of the type of processing speed task. PMID:26397946

  5. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 2. Commercial plant study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Arthur L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit (PDU). This process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of the salt. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  6. Students' Cognitive Processes While Learning from Teaching. Final Report: Appendices. (Volume Two).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winne, Philip H.; Marx, Ronald W.

    These appendices present the protocols used in research (reported in Volume 1) on the cognitive processes of students while learning from teaching. Curriculum outlines are given for the videotaped lessons used in the second and third studies: lessons in sleep and elementary psychology. Included in the appendices are: (1) the illustrative script…

  7. Electrophysiological Correlates of Emotional Content and Volume Level in Spoken Word Processing

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Annika; Bayer, Mareike; Schacht, Annekathrin

    2016-01-01

    For visual stimuli of emotional content as pictures and written words, stimulus size has been shown to increase emotion effects in the early posterior negativity (EPN), a component of event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing attention allocation during visual sensory encoding. In the present study, we addressed the question whether this enhanced relevance of larger (visual) stimuli might generalize to the auditory domain and whether auditory emotion effects are modulated by volume. Therefore, subjects were listening to spoken words with emotional or neutral content, played at two different volume levels, while ERPs were recorded. Negative emotional content led to an increased frontal positivity and parieto-occipital negativity—a scalp distribution similar to the EPN—between ~370 and 530 ms. Importantly, this emotion-related ERP component was not modulated by differences in volume level, which impacted early auditory processing, as reflected in increased amplitudes of the N1 (80–130 ms) and P2 (130–265 ms) components as hypothesized. However, contrary to effects of stimulus size in the visual domain, volume level did not influence later ERP components. These findings indicate modality-specific and functionally independent processing triggered by emotional content of spoken words and volume level. PMID:27458359

  8. Conceptual designs and assessments of a coal gasification demonstration plant. Volume III. Texaco process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains detailed information on the conceptual design and assessment of the facility required to process approximately 20,000 tons per day of coal to produce medium Btu gas using the Texaco gasification process. The report includes process descriptions, flow diagrams and equipment lists for the various subsystems associated with the gasifiers along with descriptions of the overall facility. The facility is analyzed from both an economic and environmental standpoint. Problems of construction are addressed together with an overall design and construction schedule for the total facility. Resource requirements are summarized along with suggested development areas, both process and environmental.

  9. Conceptual designs and assessments of a coal gasification demonstration plant. Volume II. Koppers-Totzek process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This volume of the report contains detailed information on the conceptual design and assessment of the facility required to process approximately 20,000 tons per day of coal to produce medium Btu gas using the Koppers-Totzek gasification process. The report includes process descriptions, flow diagrams and equipment lists for the various subsystems associated with the gasifiers along with descriptions of the overall facility. The facility is analyzed from both an economic and environmental standpoint. Problems of construction are addressed together with an overall design and construction schedule for the total facility. Resource requirements are summarized along with suggested development areas, both process and environmental.

  10. Conceptual designs and assessments of a coal gasification demonstration plant. Volume IV. Babcock and Wilcox process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This volume of the report contains detailed information on the conceptual design and assessment of the facility required to process approximately 20,000 tons per day of coal to produce medium Btu gas using the Babcock and Wilcox gasification process. The report includes process descriptions, flow diagrams and equipment lists for the various subsystems associated with the gasifiers along with descriptions of the overall facility. The facility is analyzed from both an economic and environmental standpoint. Problems of construction are addressed together with an overall design and construction schedule for the total facility. Resource requirements are summarized along with suggested development areas, both process and environmental.

  11. New Applications for ARPANET Developed Information Processing Technology. Volume 1. On the Automation of the Procurement Process: Present Status, Feasibility for Improvements, Proposed Next Steps, and Payoffs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-03

    AD/A-006 900 NEW APPLICATIONS FOR ARPANET DEVELOPED INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY , VOLUME I. ON THE AUTOMATION OF THE PROCUREMENT PROCESS...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AD///- CLü± C/6ö 4 TITLE (end Subiin») NEW APPLICATIONS FOR ARPANET DEVEL- OPED INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY -- VOLUME

  12. Extrusion Process by Finite Volume Method Using OpenFoam Software

    SciTech Connect

    Matos Martins, Marcelo; Tonini Button, Sergio; Divo Bressan, Jose; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2011-01-17

    The computational codes are very important tools to solve engineering problems. In the analysis of metal forming process, such as extrusion, this is not different because the computational codes allow analyzing the process with reduced cost. Traditionally, the Finite Element Method is used to solve solid mechanic problems, however, the Finite Volume Method (FVM) have been gaining force in this field of applications. This paper presents the velocity field and friction coefficient variation results, obtained by numerical simulation using the OpenFoam Software and the FVM to solve an aluminum direct cold extrusion process.

  13. Machine vision for high-precision volume measurement applied to levitated containerless material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, R.C.; Schmidt, D.P.; Rogers, J.R.; Kelton, K.F.; Hyers, R.W.

    2005-12-15

    By combining the best practices in optical dilatometry with numerical methods, a high-speed and high-precision technique has been developed to measure the volume of levitated, containerlessly processed samples with subpixel resolution. Containerless processing provides the ability to study highly reactive materials without the possibility of contamination affecting thermophysical properties. Levitation is a common technique used to isolate a sample as it is being processed. Noncontact optical measurement of thermophysical properties is very important as traditional measuring methods cannot be used. Modern, digitally recorded images require advanced numerical routines to recover the subpixel locations of sample edges and, in turn, produce high-precision measurements.

  14. Technical options for processing additional light tight oil volumes within the United States

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This report examines technical options for processing additional LTO volumes within the United States. Domestic processing of additional LTO would enable an increase in petroleum product exports from the United States, already the world’s largest net exporter of petroleum products. Unlike crude oil, products are not subject to export limitations or licensing requirements. While this is one possible approach to absorbing higher domestic LTO production in the absence of a relaxation of current limitations on crude exports, domestic LTO would have to be priced at a level required to encourage additional LTO runs at existing refinery units, debottlenecking, or possible additions of processing capacity.

  15. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume I. Waste form and process evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This study provides an assesses seven waste forms and eight processes for immobilizing transuranic (TRU) wastes. The waste forms considered are cast cement, cold-pressed cement, FUETAP (formed under elevated temperature and pressure) cement, borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass, basalt glass-ceramic, and cold-pressed and sintered silicate ceramic. The waste-immobilization processes considered are in-can glass melting, joule-heated glass melting, glass marble forming, cement casting, cement cold-pressing, FUETAP cement processing, ceramic cold-pressing and sintering, basalt glass-ceramic processing. Properties considered included gas generation, chemical durability, mechanical strength, thermal stability, and radiation stability. The ceramic products demonstrated the best properties, except for plutonium release during leaching. The glass and ceramic products had similar properties. The cement products generally had poorer properties than the other forms, except for plutonium release during leaching. Calculations of the Pu release indicated that the waste forms met the proposed NRC release rate limit of 1 part in 10/sup 5/ per year in most test conditions. The cast-cement process had the lowest processing cost, followed closely by the cold-pressed and FUETAP cement processes. Joule-heated glass melting had the lower cost of the glass processes. In-can melting in a high-quality canister had the highest cost, and cold-pressed and sintered ceramic the second highest. Labor and canister costs for in-can melting were identified. The major contributor to costs of disposing of TRU wastes in a defense waste repository is waste processing costs. Repository costs could become the dominant cost for disposing of TRU wastes in a commercial repository. It is recommended that cast and FUETAP cement and borosilicate glass waste-form systems be considered. 13 figures, 16 tables.

  16. Application of Hollow Fiber Forward Osmosis Membranes for Produced and Process Water Volume Reduction: An Osmotic Concentration Process.

    PubMed

    Minier-Matar, Joel; Santos, Ana; Hussain, Altaf; Janson, Arnold; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G; Adham, Samer

    2016-06-07

    Produced and process water (PPW) from oil and gas operations, specifically in Qatar, are disposed of by deep well injection in onshore facilities. Disposing large volumes of PPW may affect deep well formation sustainability highlighting the need for effective PPW management. Forward osmosis (FO) was applied as an "osmotic concentration" process to reduce PPW injection volumes by 50% using brines and seawater as draw solutions (DS). The energy intensive step of restoring the salinity of the DS was eliminated; the diluted DS would be simply discharged to the ocean. Both hollow fiber and flat sheet FO membranes were tested and the former exhibited better flux and rejection; they are the focus of this study. Optimization experiments, conducted using Box-Behnken statistical design, confirmed that temperature and DS concentration had a substantial effect on performance. To validate the concept, a long-term experiment, under optimized conditions, was conducted with PPW as feed and brine from thermal desalination plant as DS which yielded an average flux of 24 L/m(2)h. The results confirmed that low-energy osmotic concentration FO has the potential for full-scale implementation to reduce PPW injection volumes. Pilot testing opportunities are being evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology under field conditions.

  17. Application of three-dimensional digital image processing for reconstruction of microstructural volume from serial sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, A.; Gokhale, A.M.

    2000-03-01

    Three-dimensional digital image processing is useful for reconstruction of microstructural volume from a stack of serial sections. Application of this technique is demonstrated via reconstruction of a volume segment of the liquid-phase sintered microstructure of a tungsten heavy alloy processed in the microgravity environment of NASA's space shuttle, Columbia. Ninety serial sections (approximately one micrometer apart) were used for reconstruction of the three-dimensional microstructure. The three-dimensional microstructural reconstruction clearly revealed that the tungsten grains are almost completely connected in three-dimensional space. Both the matrix and the grains are topologically co-continuous, although the alloy was liquid-phase sintered in microgravity. Therefore, absence of gravity did not produced a microstructure consisting of discrete isolated W grains uniformly dispersed in the liquid Ni-Fe alloy matrix at the sintering temperature.

  18. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  19. The NJOY nuclear data processing system: Volume 2, The NJOY, RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR modules

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Boicourt, R.M.

    1982-05-01

    The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing cross sections and related nuclear parameters from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This volume provides detailed descriptions of the NJOY module, which contains the executive program and utility subroutines used by the other modules, and it discusses the theory and computational methods of four of the modules used for producing pointwise cross sections: RECONR, BROADR, HEATR, and THERMR.

  20. Practical machinery management for process plants. Volume 3: Machinery component maintenance and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.; Geitner, F.K.

    1985-01-01

    This work is a reference for machinery engineers concerned with machinery and component installation, maintenance, and repair. This third volume covers maintenance organization, machinery turnaround management, turbomachinery overhauls, machinery foundations and grouting, process machinery piping, alignment and balancing of machinery components, ball bearing maintenance and replacement, mechanical seals, welded repairs to pump shafts and other rotating equipment components, centrifugal compressor rotor repair, selection and application of O-rings, and more.

  1. New Applications for ARPANET Developed Information Processing Technology. Volume 2. Security in the Automated Procurement Process; Secrecy vs. Efficiency: A Legal Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-03

    ÜP* AD/A-006 901 NEW APPLICATIONS FOR ARPANET DEVELOPED INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY , VOLUME XI. SECURITY IN THE AUTOMATED PROCUREMENT...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER R-171 AV/A-COA 9ot «. TiTLCraKMMM*) j^ APPLICATIONS POR ARPANET DEVEL- OPED INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY — VOLUME II

  2. A scale down process for the development of large volume cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Peter; Morris, G. John; Milne, Stuart; Fuller, Barry; Skepper, Jeremy; Selden, Clare

    2014-01-01

    The process of ice formation and propagation during cryopreservation impacts on the post-thaw outcome for a sample. Two processes, either network solidification or progressive solidification, can dominate the water–ice phase transition with network solidification typically present in small sample cryo-straws or cryo-vials. Progressive solidification is more often observed in larger volumes or environmental freezing. These different ice phase progressions could have a significant impact on cryopreservation in scale-up and larger volume cryo-banking protocols necessitating their study when considering cell therapy applications. This study determines the impact of these different processes on alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) as a model system during cryopreservation, and develops a method to replicate these differences in an economical manner. It was found in the current studies that progressive solidification resulted in fewer, but proportionally more viable cells 24 h post-thaw compared with network solidification. The differences between the groups diminished at later time points post-thaw as cells recovered the ability to undertake cell division, with no statistically significant differences seen by either 48 h or 72 h in recovery cultures. Thus progressive solidification itself should not prove a significant hurdle in the search for successful cryopreservation in large volumes. However, some small but significant differences were noted in total viable cell recoveries and functional assessments between samples cooled with either progressive or network solidification, and these require further investigation. PMID:25219980

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF PROCESSING ALGORITHMS FOR OUTLIERS AND MISSING VALUES IN CONSTANT OBSERVATION DATA OF TRAFFIC VOLUMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Tomohiko; Momma, Toshiyuki; Uesaka, Katsumi

    Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan is going to make maximum use of vehicle detectors installed at national roads around the country and efficiently gather traffic volume data from wide areas by estimating traffic volumes within adjacent road sections based on the constant observation data obtained from the vehicle detectors. Efficient processing of outliers and missing values in constant observation data are needed in this process. Focusing on the processing of singular and missing values, the authors have developed a series of algorithms to calculate hourly traffic volumes in which a required accuracy is secured based on measurement data obtained from vehicle detectors. The algorithms have been put to practical uses. The main characteristic of these algorithms is that they use data accumulated in the past as well as data from constant observation devices in adjacent road sections. This paper describes the contents of the developed algorithms and clarifies their accuracy using actual observation data and by making comparis on with other methods.

  4. A new process for volume reduction of radwaste, drying and calcination of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Krapukhin, V.B.; Kareta, V.I.; Zurin, V.D.; Lavricov, V.A.; Grushevsky, S.E.

    1993-12-31

    The facility COMPLEX-1 designed for carrying out the processes of mass crystallization from solutions, separation of the resulting solid phase from mother liquor, drying of crystals, their calcination and loading the product obtained into containers, is described. The facility is entirely hermetic. It works in vacuum and has an autonomous system of gas purification, excluding the carryover of dust during the thermal treatment of the product obtained. All the technological processes are continuous and carried out in a minimum volume without pumping the products from apparatus to apparatus. The facility is compact and ecologically safer than the familiar analogous facilities. Each unit of the facility may be of special interest for users.

  5. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  6. USAF Logistics Process Optimization Study for the Aircraft Asset Sustainment Process. Volume 3. Future to be Asset Sustainment Process Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Models), contains the To-Be Retail Asset Sustainment Process Model displaying the activities and functions related to the improved processes for receipt...of a logistics process model for a more distant future asset sustainment scenario unconstrained by today’s logistics information systems limitations...It also contains a process model reflecting the Reengineering Team’s vision of the future asset sustainment process.

  7. Study of Aerospace Materials, Coatings, Adhesions and Processes. Aircraft Icing Processes. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-14

    AP A160 413 STUDY OF AEROSPACE MATERIALS CATIS AD|SIOS A - PROCESSES AIRCRAFT IC.. (UI INSTITUbO NACIONAL DE TECNICA AEROESPACIAL MORID ISPAIN) E I...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Prepared for INSTITTTTO NACIONAL DE TECNICA AEROESPACIAL "Esteban Terradas". Torrejdn de Ardoz...ADDRESS il0. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASKC Thstituto Naciorial Tecnica Aeroespacial Dto. Aerodindmica y Navegabilidad 2301 / D1 Torrejcn de Ardoz

  8. Ultrasmall volume molecular isothermal amplification in microfluidic chip with advanced surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoliang; Ma, Li; Yang, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a metal micro-fluidic chip with advanced surface processing for ultra-small volume molecular isothermal amplification. This method takes advantages of the nucleic acid amplification with good stability and consistency, high sensitivity about 31 genomic DNA copies and bacteria specific gene identification. Based on the advanced surface processing, the bioreaction assays of nucleic acid amplification was dropped about 392nl in volume. A high numerical aperture confocal optical detection system was advanced to sensitively monitor the DNA amplification with low noise and high power collecting fluorescence near to the optical diffraction limit. A speedy nucleic acid isothermal amplification was performed in the ultra-small volume microfluidic chip, where the time at the inflexions of second derivative to DNA exponential amplified curves was brought forward and the sensitivity was improved about 65 folds to that of in current 25μl Ep-tube amplified reaction, which indicates a promising clinic molecular diagnostics in the droplet amplification.

  9. Determining the Volume of Additive Solution and Residual Plasma in Whole Blood Filtered and Buffy Coat Processed Red Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Residual plasma in transfused red cell concentrates (RCCs) has been associated with adverse transfusion outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the standard procedure for measuring residual plasma volume. Methods The volumes of residual plasma and additive solution were measured in RCCs processed using two separation methods: whole blood filtration (WBF) and buffy coat (BC)/RCC filtration. The concentration of mannitol and albumin in RCC components was measured using colorimetric assays. Mannitol concentration was used to calculate additive solution volume. Residual plasma volume was calculated using two methods. Results Calculated RCC supernatant volumes were much lower in BC-processed components compared to WBF-processed components (BC = 97 ± 6 ml, WBF = 109 ± 4 ml; p < 0.05). Calculated additive solution volumes were greater in WBF- than in BC-processed components (BC = 81 ± 4 ml, WBF = 105 ± 2 ml; p < 0.05). Absolute residual plasma volume varied significantly based on the calculation method used. Conclusion Disparity between plasma volume calculation methods was observed. Efforts should be made to standardize residual plasma volume measurement methods in order to accurately assess the impact of residual plasma on transfusion outcomes. PMID:27330533

  10. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 4: On site processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. E., Jr.; Cutrone, M.; Doering, H.; Hickey, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel treated at the turbine and the turbine exhaust gas processed at the turbine site are studied. Fuel treatments protect the turbine from contaminants or impurities either in the upgrading fuel as produced or picked up by the fuel during normal transportation. Exhaust gas treatments provide for the reduction of NOx and SOx to environmentally acceptable levels. The impact of fuel quality upon turbine maintenance and deterioration is considered. On site costs include not only the fuel treatment costs as such, but also incremental costs incurred by the turbine operator if a turbine fuel of low quality is not acceptably upgraded.

  11. Application of Control Volume Method Using the Voronoi Tessellation in Numerical Modelling of Solidification Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, Zbigniew; Ciesielski, Mariusz; Mochnacki, Bohdan

    2010-03-01

    The paper presents the method to analyse the thermal processes occurring in the cast composite solidification. The cast is formed by a bundle of parallel fibres randomly immersed in a host metal matrix. The heat is transferred from the metal matrix and absorbed by the fibres. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the volumetric fraction of the fibres for which the solidification of the metal matrix occurs only due to the presence of fibres playing a role of internal chills. Our method is to compute Voronoi diagrams with Voronoi regions representing the geometric location of the fibres in the metal matrix and to use these regions as control volumes within a variant of the Control Volume Method.

  12. Framework Programmable Platform for the Advanced Software Development Workstation (FPP/ASDW). Demonstration framework document. Volume 2: Framework process description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Dewitte, Paula S.; Crump, John W.; Ackley, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    In the second volume of the Demonstration Framework Document, the graphical representation of the demonstration framework is given. This second document was created to facilitate the reading and comprehension of the demonstration framework. It is designed to be viewed in parallel with Section 4.2 of the first volume to help give a picture of the relationships between the UOB's (Unit of Behavior) of the model. The model is quite large and the design team felt that this form of presentation would make it easier for the reader to get a feel for the processes described in this document. The IDEF3 (Process Description Capture Method) diagrams of the processes of an Information System Development are presented. Volume 1 describes the processes and the agents involved with each process, while this volume graphically shows the precedence relationships among the processes.

  13. Vivaldi: A Domain-Specific Language for Volume Processing and Visualization on Distributed Heterogeneous Systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungsuk; Choi, Woohyuk; Quan, Tran Minh; Hildebrand, David G C; Pfister, Hanspeter; Jeong, Won-Ki

    2014-12-01

    As the size of image data from microscopes and telescopes increases, the need for high-throughput processing and visualization of large volumetric data has become more pressing. At the same time, many-core processors and GPU accelerators are commonplace, making high-performance distributed heterogeneous computing systems affordable. However, effectively utilizing GPU clusters is difficult for novice programmers, and even experienced programmers often fail to fully leverage the computing power of new parallel architectures due to their steep learning curve and programming complexity. In this paper, we propose Vivaldi, a new domain-specific language for volume processing and visualization on distributed heterogeneous computing systems. Vivaldi's Python-like grammar and parallel processing abstractions provide flexible programming tools for non-experts to easily write high-performance parallel computing code. Vivaldi provides commonly used functions and numerical operators for customized visualization and high-throughput image processing applications. We demonstrate the performance and usability of Vivaldi on several examples ranging from volume rendering to image segmentation.

  14. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant`s or licensee`s HSI design.

  15. [Analysis on changes of sclerotin volume during the self-repairing process of bone defect].

    PubMed

    Mamatjan, Mamut; Mamtimin, Geni; Nijat, Yusup; Zhang, Rui; Arxidin, Ablat; Muhtar, Yusup; Akrem, Mahmut; Jurat, Matruzi; Mamattursun, Turdi

    2012-08-01

    Bone maintenance theory considers that the external load is the direct stimulating source of the bone remodeling. In this article, the method of experimental observation of self-repairing process of the bone defect and related results are introduced. Firstly, a hole was drilled in the rabbit thighbone so that the continuity of the bone was changed. Then bone defect model was established, and the thighbone data were obtained by using CT scanning, and the self-repairing process of bone defects caused by growth factor were observed and analyzed by MIMICS software. Finally, the relationship between volume changes of sclerotin was established, and scientific bases were provided for introducing the bionic topology optimization method to the remodeling process. The experimental results showed that the self-repairing of the each layer sclerotin of the young rabbits was faster than that of the adult ones under the same condition. In addition, the volume always changes contrarily between the spongy bone and enamel bone during the self-repairing process of bone defect.

  16. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

  17. Effect of variables in inert gas condensation processing on nanoparticle trajectory simulated by finite volume method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Min; Juhng, Woo-Nam; Choi, Bo-Young

    2006-11-01

    The finite volume method was applied to the determination of the three-dimensional convection current during inert gas condensation (IGC) processing by using the commercially available software, "Fluent". The lower velocity of the convection current at higher evaporation temperature resulted from the lower value of the coefficient of thermal expansion. The velocity of the convection current increased with increasing chamber pressure, because the driving force of the buoyancy was directly proportional to the gas density. 13% and 17.3% of the particles were trapped during the first period of circulation in the case of the single and double heaters, respectively.

  18. Mechanisms controlling warm water volume interannual variations in the equatorial Pacific: diabatic versus adiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengaigne, M.; Hausmann, U.; Madec, G.; Menkes, C.; Vialard, J.; Molines, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    Variations of the volume of warm water above the thermocline in the equatorial Pacific are a good predictor of ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation) and are thought to be critical for its preconditioning and development. In this study, the Warm Water Volume (WWV) interannual variability is analysed using forced general circulation model experiments and an original method for diagnosing processes responsible for WWV variations. The meridional recharge/discharge to higher latitudes drives 60% of the ENSO-related equatorial WWV variations, while diabatic processes in the eastern equatorial Pacific account for the remaining 40%. Interior meridional transport is partially compensated by western boundary transports, especially in the southern hemisphere. Diabatic equatorial WWV formation (depletions) during La Niña (El Niño) are explained by enhanced (reduced) diathermal transport through enhanced (reduced) vertical mixing and penetrating solar forcing at the 20°C isotherm depth. The respective contribution of diabatic and adiabatic processes during build-ups/depletions strongly varies from event-to-event. The WWV build-up during neutral ENSO phases (e.g. 1980-1982) is almost entirely controlled by meridional recharge, providing a text-book example for the recharge/discharge oscillator's theory. On the other hand, diabatic processes are particularly active during the strongest La Niña events (1984, 1988, 1999), contributing to more than 70% of the WWV build-up, with heating by penetrative solar fluxes explaining as much as 30% of the total build-up due to a very shallow thermocline in the eastern Pacific. This study does not invalidate the recharge/discharge oscillator theory but rather emphasizes the importance of equatorial diabatic processes and western boundary transports in controlling WWV changes.

  19. GMP Cryopreservation of Large Volumes of Cells for Regenerative Medicine: Active Control of the Freezing Process

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G. John

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to −60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze—viabilities at 93.4%±7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3±1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5±1.7

  20. Simulation and Analysis of Finite Volume of Hot Forging Process of Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Hosseyni, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this study the forging operations of nut has been modeled. This nut is a part which is manufactured with the help of hot forging. The aim of this research is utilizing computers in designing forming process, and in particular, modeling of hot forging in the nut and to inquire the stresses appeared on the mold. For this purpose Pro/Engineer software for modeling, and SuperForge2004 software for analyzing the process have been used. This part is formed in two stages. To enrich the results coming out of the use of the software, the findings achieved from the modeling of the first stage are compared with its analytic dissolving. In the second stage modeling of metal forming the effect of rake on increasing the stresses imposed to the die mold is studied. The aim of this research is to correct the molds and the volume of the raw materials so that we can produce high qualified parts in spite of raw material low volume and low pressure on the molds.

  1. SMV⊥: Simplex of maximal volume based upon the Gram-Schmidt process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Vazquez, Jairo; Mendez-Vazquez, Andres

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, different algorithms for Hyperspectral Image (HI) analysis have been introduced. The high spectral resolution of these images allows to develop different algorithms for target detection, material mapping, and material identification for applications in Agriculture, Security and Defense, Industry, etc. Therefore, from the computer science's point of view, there is fertile field of research for improving and developing algorithms in HI analysis. In some applications, the spectral pixels of a HI can be classified using laboratory spectral signatures. Nevertheless, for many others, there is no enough available prior information or spectral signatures, making any analysis a difficult task. One of the most popular algorithms for the HI analysis is the N-FINDR because it is easy to understand and provides a way to unmix the original HI in the respective material compositions. The N-FINDR is computationally expensive and its performance depends on a random initialization process. This paper proposes a novel idea to reduce the complexity of the N-FINDR by implementing a bottom-up approach based in an observation from linear algebra and the use of the Gram-Schmidt process. Therefore, the Simplex of Maximal Volume Perpendicular (SMV⊥) algorithm is proposed for fast endmember extraction in hyperspectral imagery. This novel algorithm has complexity O(n) with respect to the number of pixels. In addition, the evidence shows that SMV⊥ calculates a bigger volume, and has lower computational time complexity than other poular algorithms on synthetic and real scenarios.

  2. Effects of Mass and Volume Fraction Skewness in Variable Density Mixing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Among the parameters characterizing mixing by variable density turbulence of fluids involving density variations of a factor of 5 to 10 are the Atwood, Froude, Schmidt, and Reynolds numbers. There is evidence that the amount of each fluid present when the two pure fluids mix, as described by the probability density function of the mass or molar (volume) fraction, also strongly affects the mixing process. To investigate this phenomena, implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) are performed for binary fluid mixtures in statistically homogenous environments under constant acceleration. These coarse grained simulations are used as data for theory validation and mix model development. ILES has been demonstrated to accurately capture the mixing behavior of a passive scalar field through stirring and advection by a turbulent velocity field. The present work advances that research and studies the extent to which an under-resolved active scalar drives the subsequent fluid motion and determines the nature of the mixing process. Effects of initial distributions of the mass and molar (volume) fraction probability density function on the resulting variable density turbulence and mixing are investigated and compared to direct numerical simulations from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database. Funded by the LANL LDRD-ER on ``Inserting Nonlinear N-Material Coupling PDF Information into Turbulent Mixing Models'' through exploratory research project number 20150498ER.

  3. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  4. Process window limiting hot spot monitoring for high-volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochemsen, Marinus; Anunciado, Roy; Timoshkov, Vadim; Hunsche, Stefan; Zhou, Xinjian; Jones, Chris; Callan, Neal

    2016-03-01

    As process window margins for cutting edge DUV lithography continue to shrink, the impact of systematic patterning defects on final yield increases. Finding process window limiting hot spot patterns and monitoring them in high volume manufacturing (HVM) is increasingly challenging with conventional methods, as the size of critical defects can be below the resolution of traditional HVM inspection tools. We utilize a previously presented computational method of finding hot spot patterns by full chip simulation and use this to guide high resolution review tools by predicting the state of the hot spots on all fields of production wafers. In experiments with a 10nm node Metal LELELE vehicle we show a 60% capture rate of after-etch defects down to 3nm in size, at specific hot spot locations. By using the lithographic focus and dose correction knobs we can reduce the number of patterning defects for this test case by ~60%.

  5. Low-loss polysilicon waveguides fabricated in an emulated high-volume electronics process.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Jason S; Tang, Sanh D; Kramer, Steve; Mehta, Karan; Li, Hanqing; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J

    2012-03-26

    We measure end-of-line polysilicon waveguide propagation losses of ~6-15 dB/cm across the telecommunication O-, E-, S-, C- and L-bands in a process representative of high-volume product integration. The lowest loss of 6.2 dB/cm is measured at 1550 nm in a polysilicon waveguide with a 120 nm x 350 nm core geometry. The reported waveguide characteristics are measured after the thermal cycling of the full CMOS electronics process that results in a 32% increase in the extracted material loss relative to the as-crystallized waveguide samples. The measured loss spectra are fit to an absorption model using defect state parameters to identify the dominant loss mechanism in the end-of-line and as-crystallized polysilicon waveguides.

  6. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.E.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

  7. NAVSPASUR sensor system digital signal processing receiver. Volume 1: Hardware and software overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Carl J.; Bryant, Carolyn F.; Earl, Marilyn P.; Myers, Tamara A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a system description of the Naval Space Surveillance (NAVSPASUR) Sensor System Digital Signal Processing Receiver (DSPR). The NAVSPASUR system began as an advanced research project in June 1958, was commissioned as an operational Naval command in February 1961, and is operated by the Naval Space Surveillance Center (NSSC) in Dahlgren, Virginia. The DSPR is a real-time radar data acquisition and analysis system. Its function is to detect, with no prior information, all space objects whose orbits cross the continental United States and to compute their subsequent orbits. It provides vital satellite information in support of national defense mission objectives of space intelligence, satellite attack warning, satellite intercept support, and space mission support. This system description was prepared as part of a modernization program that has replaced DSPR hardware for which parts are no longer available. Volume 1 (NRL/FR/8154--93-9577) describes the DSPR system in terms of current operation and hardware and software environment. Functions of the major subsystems and the relationship between them are discussed. Volume 2 (NRL/FR/8154--93-9578) discusses the function and capabilities of software and hardware components of the subsystems that provide the digital functions of the DSPR. For each subsystem, individual software modules and hardware components used primarily by that subsystem are described.

  8. A high resolution finite volume method for efficient parallel simulation of casting processes on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.B.; Turner, J.A.; Mosso, S.J.; Ferrell, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    We discuss selected aspects of a new parallel three-dimensional (3-D) computational tool for the unstructured mesh simulation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) casting processes. This tool, known as {bold Telluride}, draws upon on robust, high resolution finite volume solutions of metal alloy mass, momentum, and enthalpy conservation equations to model the filling, cooling, and solidification of LANL castings. We briefly describe the current {bold Telluride} physical models and solution methods, then detail our parallelization strategy as implemented with Fortran 90 (F90). This strategy has yielded straightforward and efficient parallelization on distributed and shared memory architectures, aided in large part by new parallel libraries {bold JTpack9O} for Krylov-subspace iterative solution methods and {bold PGSLib} for efficient gather/scatter operations. We illustrate our methodology and current capabilities with source code examples and parallel efficiency results for a LANL casting simulation.

  9. The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System: Volume 3, The GROUPR, GAMINR, and MODER modules

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R E; Muir, D W

    1987-10-01

    The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup cross sections and related quantities from ENDF/B-IV, V, or VI evaluated nuclear data. A concise description of the code system and references to the ancestors of NJOY are given in Vol. 1 of this report. This volume describes the GROUPR module, which produces multigroup neutron interaction cross sections and group-to-group production cross sections for neutrons and photons; the GAMINR module, which produces multigroup photon-interaction cross sections and group-to-group matrices; and the MODER module, which converts ENDF/B and NJOY interface files back and forth between formatted (i.e., BCD, ASCII) and binary modes and performs several associated editing functions. 34 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Volume Averaging Study of the Capacitive Deionization Process in Homogeneous Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-05

    Ion storage in porous electrodes is important in applications such as energy storage by supercapacitors, water purification by capacitive deionization, extraction of energy from a salinity difference and heavy ion purification. In this paper, a model is presented to simulate the charge process in homogeneous porous media comprising big pores. It is based on a theory for capacitive charging by ideally polarizable porous electrodes without faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions. A volume averaging technique is used to derive the averaged transport equations in the limit of thin electrical double layers. Transport between the electrolyte solution and the chargedmore » wall is described using the Gouy–Chapman–Stern model. The effective transport parameters for isotropic porous media are calculated solving the corresponding closure problems. Finally, the source terms that appear in the average equations are calculated using numerical computations. An alternative way to deal with the source terms is proposed.« less

  11. Volume Averaging Study of the Capacitive Deionization Process in Homogeneous Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-05

    Ion storage in porous electrodes is important in applications such as energy storage by supercapacitors, water purification by capacitive deionization, extraction of energy from a salinity difference and heavy ion purification. In this paper, a model is presented to simulate the charge process in homogeneous porous media comprising big pores. It is based on a theory for capacitive charging by ideally polarizable porous electrodes without faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions. A volume averaging technique is used to derive the averaged transport equations in the limit of thin electrical double layers. Transport between the electrolyte solution and the charged wall is described using the Gouy–Chapman–Stern model. The effective transport parameters for isotropic porous media are calculated solving the corresponding closure problems. Finally, the source terms that appear in the average equations are calculated using numerical computations. An alternative way to deal with the source terms is proposed.

  12. High-volume manufacturing equipment and processing for directed self-assembly applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somervell, Mark; Yamauchi, Takashi; Okada, Soichiro; Tomita, Tadatoshi; Nishi, Takanori; Iijima, Etsuo; Nakano, Takeo; Ishiguro, Takumi; Nagahara, Seiji; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Dojun, Makiko; Ozawa, Mariko; Yatsuda, Koichi; Tobana, Toshikatsu; Romo Negreira, Ainhoa; Parnell, Doni; Kawakami, Shinchiro; Muramatsu, Makoto; Rathsack, Benjamen; Nafus, Kathleen; Peyre, Jean-Luc; Kitano, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is one of the most promising technologies for scaling feature sizes to 16 nm and below. Both line/space and hole patterns can be created with various block copolymer morphologies, and these materials allow for molecular-level control of the feature shapes—exactly the characteristics that are required for creating high fidelity lithographic patterns. Over the past five years, the industry has been addressing the technical challenges of maturing this technology by addressing concerns such as pattern defectivity, materials specifications, design layout, and tool requirements. Though the learning curve has been steep, DSA has made significant progress toward implementation in high-volume manufacturing. Tokyo Electron has been focused on the best methods of achieving high-fidelity patterns using DSA processing. Unlike other technologies where optics and photons drive the formation of patterns, DSA relies on surface interactions and polymer thermodynamics to determine the final pattern shapes. These phenomena, in turn, are controlled by the processing that occurs on clean-tracks, etchers, and cleaning systems, and so a host of new technology has been developed to facilitate DSA. In this paper we will discuss the processes and hardware that are emerging as critical enablers for DSA implementation, and we will also demonstrate the kinds of high fidelity patterns typical of mainstream DSA integrations.

  13. New municipal solid waste processing technology reduces volume and provides beneficial reuse applications for soil improvement and dust control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A garbage-processing technology has been developed that shreds, sterilizes, and separates inorganic and organic components of municipal solid waste. The technology not only greatly reduces waste volume, but the non-composted byproduct of this process, Fluff®, has the potential to be utilized as a s...

  14. Processes Influencing the Timing and Volume of Eruptions From the Youngest Supervolcano on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J. N.; Barker, S. J.; Morgan, D. J.; Rowland, J. V.; Schipper, I.

    2015-12-01

    In their stratigraphic records, silicic caldera volcanoes display wide ranges of eruptive styles and volumes. However, relationships between frequency and magnitude are often complex, and the forecasting of future activity is inherently problematic. Taupo volcano, New Zealand, provides a unique opportunity to investigate eruptive histories from a hyperactive, large silicic magmatic system with eruptive volumes that span 3-4 orders of magnitude, and show no clear relationships with the repose period. Taupo hosted the world's most recent supereruption at 25.4 ka, which discharged 530 km3 of magma in the episodic 10-phase Oruanui event. Only 5 kyr later, Taupo revived, with 3 dacitic eruptions from 21.5-17 ka and 25 rhyolite eruptions from 12-1.7 ka. Here we use trends in whole rock, glass and mineral chemistry to show how the magma system reestablished following the Oruanui event, and to consider what processes influence the state of the modern volcano. The post-Oruanui dacites reflect the first products of the rebuilding silicic magma system, as most of the Oruanui mush was reconfigured or significantly modified in composition following thermal fluxing accompanying post-caldera collapse readjustment. Compositional variations within the younger rhyolites at <12 ka reflect fine-scale temporal changes in mineral phase stability, closely linked to the development, stabilization and maturation of a new silicic mush system. For the most recent eruptions, the system underwent destabilization, resulting in increased volumes of melt extraction from the silicic mush. Orthopyroxene Fe-Mg diffusion timescales indicate that the onset of rapid heating and priming of the silicic mush occurred <100 years prior to the <2.15 ka eruptions, with subsequent melt accumulation occurring in only decades. The largest post-Oruanui eruption at 232 AD culminated from elevated mafic magma supply to the silicic mush pile, rapid melt accumulation and high differential tectonic stress build up

  15. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1984-02-01

    All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

  16. Critical Infrastructure Protection II, The International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    The information infrastructure -- comprising computers, embedded devices, networks and software systems -- is vital to day-to-day operations in every sector: information and telecommunications, banking and finance, energy, chemicals and hazardous materials, agriculture, food, water, public health, emergency services, transportation, postal and shipping, government and defense. Global business and industry, governments, indeed society itself, cannot function effectively if major components of the critical information infrastructure are degraded, disabled or destroyed. Critical Infrastructure Protection II describes original research results and innovative applications in the interdisciplinary field of critical infrastructure protection. Also, it highlights the importance of weaving science, technology and policy in crafting sophisticated, yet practical, solutions that will help secure information, computer and network assets in the various critical infrastructure sectors. Areas of coverage include: - Themes and Issues - Infrastructure Security - Control Systems Security - Security Strategies - Infrastructure Interdependencies - Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation This book is the second volume in the annual series produced by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 11.10 on Critical Infrastructure Protection, an international community of scientists, engineers, practitioners and policy makers dedicated to advancing research, development and implementation efforts focused on infrastructure protection. The book contains a selection of twenty edited papers from the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.10 International Conference on Critical Infrastructure Protection held at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, USA in the spring of 2008.

  17. Policy-Making for Education Reform in Developing Countries: Contexts and Processes. Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James H.; Cummings, William K.

    2005-01-01

    Here is the first book in a two-volume series designed to help those working, or preparing to work, as education change agents in developing countries. Each volume describes an approach to education reform that is: (1) Political and empirical; (2) A series of choices rather than a single best approach; (3) Implementation-centered; and (4)…

  18. CryoSat-2 Processing and Model Interpretation of Greenland Ice Sheet Volume Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.; Gardner, A. S.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.

    2015-12-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched in late 2010 tasked with monitoring the changes of the Earth's land and sea ice. It carries a novel radar altimeter allowing the satellite to monitor changes in highly complex terrain, such as smaller ice caps, glaciers and the marginal areas of the ice sheets. Here we present on the development and validation of an independent elevation retrieval processing chain and respective elevation changes based on ESA's L1B data. Overall we find large improvement in both accuracy and precision over Greenland relative to ESA's L2 product when comparing against both airborne data and crossover analysis. The seasonal component and spatial sampling of the surface elevation changes where also compared against ICESat derived changes from 2003-2009. The comparison showed good agreement between the to product on a local scale. However, a global sampling bias was detected in the seasonal signal due to the clustering of CryoSat-2 data in higher elevation areas. The retrieval processing chain presented here does not correct for changes in surface scattering conditions and appears to be insensitive to the 2012 melt event (Nilsson et al., 2015). This in contrast to the elevation changes derived from ESA's L2 elevation product, which where found to be sensitive to the effects of the melt event. The positive elevation bias created by the event introduced a discrepancy between the two products with a magnitude of roughly 90 km3/year. This difference can directly be attributed to the differences in retracking procedure pointing to the importance of the retracking of the radar waveforms for altimetric volume change studies. Greenland 2012 melt event effects on CryoSat-2 radar altimetry./ Nilsson, Johan; Vallelonga, Paul Travis; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hvidberg, Christine S.; Kjær, Helle A.; Satow, Kazuhide.

  19. 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant gas systems. Design baseline package, Volume 8. [DEA process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    Volume 8 contains the design of the fuel gas desulfurization process (DEA) and of the liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) section of the plant. The removal of acid gases is accomplished by intimately contacting the feed stream with the descending DEA solution. A partially regenerated semi-lean DEA solution is fed to an intermediate tray of the column for the bulk removal of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ while a fully regenerated lean DEA solution is fed at the top tray for the removal of the remaining acid gases in the top section of the absorber. The lean solution stream temperature is maintained at 10 to 15/sup 0/F above the absorber feed gas temperature to prevent hydrocarbon condensation in the column with consequent foaming and flooding of the column. The overhead gas (Stream 6305) leaving the H.P. DEA absorber is cooled and passed through the Sweet Gas K.O. Drum (bottom section of V-15305) to separate any condensate. The gas leaving the drum is further contacted with a 3 weight percent caustic solution in the bottom section of the Treated Gas Wash Column (T-15303) for removal of residual acid gases in order to comply with the sweet gas specifications of 1 ppMv H/sub 2/S and 10 ppMv CO/sub 2/. The LPG Recovery Unit is designed to process 15.95 MMSCFD of low pressure fuel reject gas from the HPU to recover approximately 60 percent of the propane and most of the heavier hydrocarbons. The recovered hydrocarbons are produced as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product. Specifications for the LPG product are: (1) Ethane/Propane (Vol/Vol) 0.02; and (2) LPG product should meet GPA Publication 2140-77 Commercial B-P mixture specifications.

  20. Business Education and Training: A Value-Laden Process. Volume II: The Developing Professional: Maintaining Values in "Practical" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Samuel M., Ed.; Fenton, Mark B., Ed.

    This volume contains 19 papers that explore value conflicts in all professions: "Changing Student Teacher Values with Respect to Business and Industry" (Ralph P. Williams, Elizabeth J. Foster); "Admissions Processes into Canadian Master of Social Work Programs in the 1990s" (John R. Graham, Beatrice Traub-Werner); "Organizational Paradigms and…

  1. TV Trouble-Shooting Manual. Volumes 5-6. Part 2: Video Signal Processing Circuit. Student and Instructor's Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukai, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryozo

    These volumes are, respectively, the self-instructional student manual and the teacher manual that cover the second set of training topics in this course for television repair technicians. Both contain identical explanations of the structure and function of the elements of the video signal processing circuit (the tuner, video intermediate…

  2. Repeated head trauma is associated with smaller thalamic volumes and slower processing speed: the Professional Fighters’ Brain Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Charles; Banks, Sarah J; Shin, Wanyong; Obuchowski, Nancy; Butler, Sam; Noback, Michael; Phillips, Michael; Lowe, Mark; Jones, Stephen; Modic, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cumulative head trauma may alter brain structure and function. We explored the relationship between exposure variables, cognition and MRI brain structural measures in a cohort of professional combatants. Methods 224 fighters (131 mixed martial arts fighters and 93 boxers) participating in the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study, a longitudinal cohort study of licensed professional combatants, were recruited, as were 22 controls. Each participant underwent computerised cognitive testing and volumetric brain MRI. Fighting history including years of fighting and fights per year was obtained from self-report and published records. Statistical analyses of the baseline evaluations were applied cross-sectionally to determine the relationship between fight exposure variables and volumes of the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, caudate, putamen. Moreover, the relationship between exposure and brain volumes with cognitive function was assessed. Results Increasing exposure to repetitive head trauma measured by number of professional fights, years of fighting, or a Fight Exposure Score (FES) was associated with lower brain volumes, particularly the thalamus and caudate. In addition, speed of processing decreased with decreased thalamic volumes and with increasing fight exposure. Higher scores on a FES used to reflect exposure to repetitive head trauma were associated with greater likelihood of having cognitive impairment. Conclusions Greater exposure to repetitive head trauma is associated with lower brain volumes and lower processing speed in active professional fighters. PMID:25633832

  3. Integer, fractional, and anomalous quantum Hall effects explained with Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2017-02-22

    The Hall effects, especially the integer, fractional and anomalous quantum Hall effects, have been addressed using Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept. The basic assumptions are that the conduction process is a common rate controlled "reaction" process that can be described with Eyring's absolute rate process theory; the mobility of electrons should be dependent on the free volume available for conduction electrons. The obtained Hall conductivity is clearly quantized as with prefactors related to both the magnetic flux quantum number and the magnetic quantum number via the azimuthal quantum number, with and without an externally applied magnetic field. This article focuses on two dimensional (2D) systems, but the approaches developed in this article can be extended to 3D systems.

  4. Agricultural Handling and Processing Industries; Data Pertinent to an Evaluation of Overtime Exemptions Available under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Volume II, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wage and Labor Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Definitions of terms used in the Fair Labor Standards Act and statistical tables compiled from a survey of agricultural processing firms comprise this appendix, which is the second volume of a two volume report. Volume I is available as VT 012 247. (BH)

  5. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This volume consists of the following sections: WRAP 2A value engineering assessment, resolution of value engineering assessment actions (white paper), HAZOP studies for identifying major safety and operability problems, and time and motion simulation.

  6. Estimation of single cell volume from 3D confocal images using automatic data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, A.; Cagalinec, M.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac cells are highly structured with a non-uniform morphology. Although precise estimation of their volume is essential for correct evaluation of hypertrophic changes of the heart, simple and unified techniques that allow determination of the single cardiomyocyte volume with sufficient precision are still limited. Here, we describe a novel approach to assess the cell volume from confocal microscopy 3D images of living cardiac myocytes. We propose a fast procedure based on segementation using active deformable contours. This technique is independent on laser gain and/or pinhole settings and it is also applicable on images of cells stained with low fluorescence markers. Presented approach is a promising new tool to investigate changes in the cell volume during normal, as well as pathological growth, as we demonstrate in the case of cell enlargement during hypertension in rats.

  7. Role of FKBP5 in emotion processing: results on amygdala activity, connectivity and volume.

    PubMed

    Holz, Nathalie E; Buchmann, Arlette F; Boecker, Regina; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Baumeister, Sarah; Wolf, Isabella; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H; Plichta, Michael M; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of FKBP5, a co-chaperone regulating the glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, in the etiology of depression and anxiety disorders. Based on recent findings of altered amygdala activity following childhood adversity, the present study aimed at clarifying the impact of genetic variation in FKBP5 on threat-related neural activity and coupling as well as morphometric alterations in stress-sensitive brain systems. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during an emotional face-matching task was performed in 153 healthy young adults (66 males) from a high-risk community sample followed since birth. Voxel-based morphometry was applied to study structural alterations and DNA was genotyped for FKBP5 rs1360780. Childhood adversity was measured using retrospective self-report (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and by a standardized parent interview assessing childhood family adversity. Depression was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. There was a main effect of FKBP5 on the left amygdala, with T homozygotes showing the highest activity, largest volume and increased coupling with the left hippocampus and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Moreover, amygdala-OFC coupling proved to be associated with depression in this genotype. In addition, our results support previous evidence of a gene-environment interaction on right amygdala activity with respect to retrospective assessment of childhood adversity, but clarify that this does not generalize to the prospective assessment. These findings indicated that activity in T homozygotes increased with the level of adversity, whereas the opposite pattern emerged in C homozygotes, with CT individuals being intermediate. The present results point to a functional involvement of FKBP5 in intermediate phenotypes associated with emotional processing, suggesting a possible mechanism for this gene in conferring susceptibility to stress-related disorders.

  8. The Influence of Hole Processing and Joint Variables on the Fatigue Life of Shear Joints. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    AFML-TR-77-167 Volume I Lo Q L THE INFLUENCE OF HOLE PROCESSING AND JOINT VARIABLES ON THE t FRACTURE LIFE OF SHEAR JOINTS Metals Behavior Branch... Metals and Ceramics Division February 1978 TECHNICAL REPORT AFML-TR-77-167, Volume I Final Report for Period May 1975 to May 1977 0 0 Approved for public...EICHELZAN, CHIEF Metals Behavior Branch Metals and Ceramics Division Copies of this report should not be returned unless return is required by security

  9. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  10. Business Education and Training: A Value-Laden Process. Volume III: Instilling Values in the Educational Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Samuel M., Ed.; Fenton, Mark B., Ed.

    This volume contains 21 papers that explore value conflicts in all professions: "Ethics and the Development of Work: The Central Maintenance Computer Case" (Harry Hummels); "Too Many Cooks Spoil the Stew--Ethical Preparation of Interdisciplinary Professionals" (Vincent F. Maher); "Value Conflict in 'Competence-Based' Training Incentives" (John…

  11. A method for simulating the entire leaking process and calculating the liquid leakage volume of a damaged pressurized pipeline.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxi; Liang, Yongtu; Li, Yansong; Wu, Mengyu; Sun, Liying; Xie, Cheng; Li, Feng

    2017-06-15

    The accidental leakage of long-distance pressurized oil pipelines is a major area of risk, capable of causing extensive damage to human health and environment. However, the complexity of the leaking process, with its complex boundary conditions, leads to difficulty in calculating the leakage volume. In this study, the leaking process is divided into 4 stages based on the strength of transient pressure. 3 models are established to calculate the leaking flowrate and volume. First, a negative pressure wave propagation attenuation model is applied to calculate the sizes of orifices. Second, a transient oil leaking model, consisting of continuity, momentum conservation, energy conservation and orifice flow equations, is built to calculate the leakage volume. Third, a steady-state oil leaking model is employed to calculate the leakage after valves and pumps shut down. Moreover, sensitive factors that affect the leak coefficient of orifices and volume are analyzed respectively to determine the most influential one. To validate the numerical simulation, two types of leakage test with different sizes of leakage holes were conducted from Sinopec product pipelines. More validations were carried out by applying commercial software to supplement the experimental insufficiency. Thus, the leaking process under different leaking conditions are described and analyzed.

  12. Retrospective processing of DTI tractography to compensate for partial volume effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Darryl; Shetty, Aarti; Rajagopalan, Amrita; Singh, Manbir

    2007-03-01

    Partial volume effects are one of the most common sources of error in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography. For example, in data from older subjects or Alzheimer's disease probable subjects, the situation is especially exacerbated around the dilated ventricle, which causes erroneous merging of tracts. Rescanning the subject at higher resolution is the best solution, but often times unattainable. We offer a retrospective filtering algorithm, which is purely subtractive, based on a region of interest (ROI) filtering methodology that filters tracts by their shape and seed points. The ROIs are defined using both anatomic images and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps in normalized space allowing for consistency across all subjects. Our algorithm helps correct the partial volume effects by reducing the overestimation of tract length, giving a more accurate regional tract count. The objective of our retrospective algorithm is reclamation of data sets from partial volume effects.

  13. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  14. Business Education and Training: A Value-Laden Process. Volume I: Education and Value Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Samuel M., Ed.; Fenton, Mark B., Ed.

    The 19 papers in this volume explore value conflicts in all professions. "Worlds in Collision: Value Conflicts in the Training of Professionals" (Samuel M. Natale, William G. O'Neill, Tara M. Madden) introduces the papers and explores what is meant by values, ethics, and conflict. The papers are as follows: "Values and Conflicts in School-Based…

  15. Federal Student Aid Handbook, 2006-2007. Volume 4: Processing Aid & Managing FSA Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide participating schools with guidance on how to request, disburse, manage, and report on the use of Federal Student Aid funds. A summary of the changes and clarifications is presented in greater detail in the chapters that are contained in this volume: Chapter 1, The MPN (Master Promissory Note) and the…

  16. New Applications for ARPANET Developed Information Processing Technology. Volume 3. Briareus - Computer Netting for Design, Fabrication and Repair of Electronic Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-03

    INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY , VOLUME HI. BRIAREUS - COMPUTER NETTING FOR DESIGN, FABRICATION AND REPAIR OF ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT CABLEDATA ASSOCIATES...E& ED INFORMATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY — VOLUME III; . Final Report "BRIAREUS — COMPUTER NETTING FOR DESIGN, FABRICA- ■ February 1974 - January

  17. Image data processing system requirements study. Volume 1: Analysis. [for Earth Resources Survey Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honikman, T.; Mcmahon, E.; Miller, E.; Pietrzak, L.; Yorsz, W.

    1973-01-01

    Digital image processing, image recorders, high-density digital data recorders, and data system element processing for use in an Earth Resources Survey image data processing system are studied. Loading to various ERS systems is also estimated by simulation.

  18. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Objective of this document is to provide descriptions of all WRAP 2A feed streams, including physical and chemical attributes, and describe the pathway that was used to select data for volume estimates. WRAP 2A is being designed for nonthermal treatment of contact-handled mixed low-level waste Category 1 and 3. It is based on immobilization and encapsulation treatment using grout or polymer.

  19. Parts, materials, and processes experience summary, volume 2. [design, engineering, and quality control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This summary provides the general engineering community with the accumulated experience from ALERT reports issued by NASA and the Government-Industry. Data Exchange Program, and related experience gained by Government and industry. It provides expanded information on selected topics by relating the problem area (failure) to the cause, the investigation and findings, the suggestions for avoidance (inspections, screening tests, proper part applications, requirements for manufacturer's plant facilities, etc.), and failure analysis procedures. Diodes, integrated circuits, and transistors are covered in this volume.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Polarimetric Weather Radar Data With Multiple Processes in a Resolution Volume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    single radar resolution volume. An example of clear air observed using an S- band dual polarization radar is presented. Heretofore, migrating birds...WEATHER CONDITIONS Time-series data were collected with the NOAA/NSSL research S- band radar (KOUN) on September 7, 2004 at 11 pm local time (04...densities ( ZDR , hv, and ) along the 180 radial are shown in Fig. 1a, b, c , d. Only spectral coefficients with Sh > 5dB above the noise are displayed. One

  1. Inhibition of clot formation in deterministic lateral displacement arrays for processing large volumes of blood for rare cell capture.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Joseph; Austin, Robert H; Sturm, James C

    2015-05-21

    Microfluidic deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays have been applied for fractionation and analysis of cells in quantities of ~100 μL of blood, with processing of larger quantities limited by clogging in the chip. In this paper, we (i) demonstrate that this clogging phenomenon is due to conventional platelet-driven clot formation, (ii) identify and inhibit the two dominant biological mechanisms driving this process, and (iii) characterize how further reductions in clot formation can be achieved through higher flow rates and blood dilution. Following from these three advances, we demonstrate processing of 14 mL equivalent volume of undiluted whole blood through a single DLD array in 38 minutes to harvest PC3 cancer cells with ~86% yield. It is possible to fit more than 10 such DLD arrays on a single chip, which would then provide the capability to process well over 100 mL of undiluted whole blood on a single chip in less than one hour.

  2. Column flotation: Processes, designs and practices. Process engineering for the chemical, metals and minerals industry, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, J.B. . Flotation Equipment and Process Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    Practically all mined ores of non-ferrous and rare metals and an increasing share of industrial minerals and coal are processed through flotation. This book presents the analysis of a wide range of problems in the process theory of flotation columns, including the first published analysis of models of flotation froths. The experience of pilot tests and commercial applications of column flotation for mineral processing and in waste water treatment circuits are also considered. This is the first book to consider column flotation design and operation experience and to present data on column parameters. Topics include: design of flotation columns; aerators in flotation columns; experimental methods of column aerohydrodynamics investigation; aerohydrodynamic characteristics of flotation columns; experimental investigation of the flotation process in columns; kinetics aspects of column flotation; scaling-up methods for flotation columns; structure and mass transfer in flotation froths; column flotation practice; and column flotation control.

  3. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace vehicle Design (IPAD). Volume 2: The design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillette, W. B.; Turner, M. J.; Southall, J. W.; Whitener, P. C.; Kowalik, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The extent to which IPAD is to support the design process is identified. Case studies of representative aerospace products were developed as models to characterize the design process and to provide design requirements for the IPAD computing system.

  4. Computer Simulation of the Continuous TNT Process. Volume 1: The Nitration Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    atents for that vessel such as volume and notch setting; it provides the ini. it and output phase compositions for the vessel from the previous time step...AeO 4+ Re RIOM +Do +Me -As"A dAl (A-62) AtO + RI O i Dv + MI AV a tdA , (A-03) A dot As 0 +$RIO + Do + Me As t " dA (A-64) A 0t A0 + 4P$0.-P$ " Ds "P

  5. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 1: Integrated payload and mission planning process evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapp, T. P.; Davin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The integrated payload and mission planning process for STS payloads was defined, and discrete tasks which evaluate performance and support initial implementation of this process were conducted. The scope of activity was limited to NASA and NASA-related payload missions only. The integrated payload and mission planning process was defined in detail, including all related interfaces and scheduling requirements. Related to the payload mission planning process, a methodology for assessing early Spacelab mission manager assignment schedules was defined.

  6. Tap density equations of granular powders based on the rate process theory and the free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-02-28

    The tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via the Carr index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in the literature: the inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept under the assumption that particles will obey similar thermodynamic laws during the tapping process if the "granular temperature" is defined in a different way, we obtain the tap density equations, and they are reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environmental temperature are grouped into this parameter that weighs the pace of the packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both "dry" (granular) and "wet" (colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process).

  7. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  8. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2A: Experiment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. G.; Anderson, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the space processing applications payload equipment was conducted. The primary objective was to perform a review and an update of the space processing activity research equipment requirements and specifications that were derived in the first study. The analysis is based on the six major experimental classes of: (1) biological applications, (2) chemical processes in fluids, (3) crystal growth, (4) glass technology, (5) metallurgical processes, and (6) physical processes in fluids. Tables of data are prepared to show the functional requirements for the areas of investigation.

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  11. End-point process development for low-volume, high reliability tungsten CMP

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, P.B.; Myers, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    A temperature end point method was developed for tungsten CMP (WCMP) processing in the Sandia Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a facility which develops and prototypes a variety of silicon based devices including ASIC, memory, radiation hardened CMOS and microelectromechanical systems. A large product variety and small production lot size prevents process recipe optimization or standardization for each mask level and product. Rigorous product reliability requirements and prohibitively expensive hardware qualifications essentially require that a single process and consumable set be established for all products, with minimal opportunity for adjustment. A timed process was not suitable without significant potential for manual inspections and rework. Over several weeks of processing on an IPEC 472, the temperature end point method gave a 7.7% 1-sigma end point time distribution. This enabled a 50% reduction in daily process qualification wafers, and allowed minimization of yield loss, rework, and oxide erosion.

  12. HTGR high temperature process heat design and cost status report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    Information is presented concerning the 850/sup 0/C IDC reactor vessel; primary cooling system; secondary helium system; steam generator; heat cycle evaluations for the 850/sup 0/C IDC plant; 950/sup 0/C DC reactor vessel; 950/sup 0/C DC steam generator; direct and indirect cycle reformers; methanation plant; thermochemical pipeline; methodology for screening candidate synfuel processes; ECCG process; project technical requirements; process gas explosion assessment; HTGR program economic guidelines; and vendor respones.

  13. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Appendices; Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g. missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  14. Software Support for Fully Distributed/Loosely Coupled Processing Systems. Volume 2. Appendix-Selected Papers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    8217mailboxempty’ .o.:*.. event when this event is announced by a process executing the mailbox process script shown in Figure 6. whnh mailboxlempty anounce ...methods of recovery from design flaws in software is at least as pressing as "° that for hardware. Also in [Rand75], Randell states: "If all design...Processing Integrity," from Computing System Reliability, Cambridge University Press , 1978, pp. 288-354. I l)ijk681 Dijkstra, E.W., "Cooperating Sequential

  15. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Volume 1; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g., missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  16. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems. Volume 3: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Facilities and equipment are defined for refining processes to commercial grade of lunar material that is delivered to a 'space manufacturing facility' in beneficiated, primary processed quality. The manufacturing facilities and the equipment for producing elements of large space systems from these materials and providing programmatic assessments of the concepts are also defined. In-space production processes of solar cells (by vapor deposition) and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, converters, and others are described.

  17. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

  18. An implicit finite volume scheme for a scalar hyperbolic problem with measure data related to piecewise deterministic Markov processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymard, Robert; Mercier, Sophie; Prignet, Alain

    2008-12-01

    We are interested here in the numerical approximation of a family of probability measures, solution of the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation associated to some non-diffusion Markov process with uncountable state space. Such an equation contains a transport term and another term, which implies redistribution of the probability mass on the whole space. An implicit finite volume scheme is proposed, which is intermediate between an upstream weighting scheme and a modified Lax-Friedrichs one. Due to the seemingly unusual probability framework, a new weak bounded variation inequality had to be developed, in order to prove the convergence of the discretised transport term. Such an inequality may be used in other contexts, such as for the study of finite volume approximations of scalar linear or nonlinear hyperbolic equations with initial data in L1. Also, due to the redistribution term, the tightness of the family of approximate probability measures had to be proven. Numerical examples are provided, showing the efficiency of the implicit finite volume scheme and its potentiality to be helpful in an industrial reliability context.

  19. Texas-louisiana shelf circulation and transport processes study: Year 1, annual report. Volume 2. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jochens, A.E.; Nowlin, W.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Louisiana-Texas Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX) is supported by the MMS of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior. The first field year of LATEX A was conducted from April 1992-March 1993. Data were collected from an array of current meter moorings, meteorological buoys, drifting buoys, and hydrographic and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) surveys deployed on the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Historical and concurrent data from other programs in this region also were collected. This Technical Report volume provides detail of the field operations, data processing, and preliminary data analysis for the first field year of the LATEX A program.

  20. Modular space station, phase B extension. Information management advanced development. Volume 4: Data processing assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The computation and logical functions which are performed by the data processing assembly of the modular space station are defined. The subjects discussed are: (1) requirements analysis, (2) baseline data processing assembly configuration, (3) information flow study, (4) throughput simulation, (5) redundancy study, (6) memory studies, and (7) design requirements specification.

  1. Space vehicle electrical power processing distribution and control study. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krausz, A.

    1972-01-01

    A concept for the processing, distribution, and control of electric power for manned space vehicles and future aircraft is presented. Emphasis is placed on the requirements of the space station and space shuttle configurations. The systems involved are referred to as the processing distribution and control system (PDCS), electrical power system (EPS), and electric power generation system (EPGS).

  2. Process system evaluation: Consolidated letter reports. Volume 3: Formulation of final products

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, G.B.; Chapman, C.C.; Albertsen, K.H.

    1996-04-01

    Glass discharged from the low-level waste (LLW) melter may be processed into a variety of different forms for storage and disposal. The purpose of the study reported here is to identify and evaluate processing options for forming the glass.

  3. Advanced Information Processing. Volume II. Instructor's Materials. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Linda

    This course curriculum is intended for use by community college insructors and administrators in implementing an advanced information processing course. It builds on the skills developed in the previous information processing course but goes one step further by requiring students to perform in a simulated office environment and improve their…

  4. Spacelab Level 4 Programmatic Implementation Assessment Study. Volume 2: Ground Processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Alternate ground processing options are summarized, including installation and test requirements for payloads, space processing, combined astronomy, and life sciences. The level 4 integration resource requirements are also reviewed for: personnel, temporary relocation, transportation, ground support equipment, and Spacelab flight hardware.

  5. Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

  6. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  7. Coal conversion systems design and process modeling. Volume 1: Application of MPPR and Aspen computer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a coal gasification system design and mass and energy balance simulation program for the TVA and other similar facilities is described. The materials-process-product model (MPPM) and the advanced system for process engineering (ASPEN) computer program were selected from available steady state and dynamic models. The MPPM was selected to serve as the basis for development of system level design model structure because it provided the capability for process block material and energy balance and high-level systems sizing and costing. The ASPEN simulation serves as the basis for assessing detailed component models for the system design modeling program. The ASPEN components were analyzed to identify particular process blocks and data packages (physical properties) which could be extracted and used in the system design modeling program. While ASPEN physical properties calculation routines are capable of generating physical properties required for process simulation, not all required physical property data are available, and must be user-entered.

  8. PETRO-SAFE '92 conference papers: Volume 7 (Processing and Refining 2), Volume 8 (Transportation and storage), Volume 9 (Spill control, disposal and remedial treatment 1) and Volume 10 (Spill control, disposal and remedial treatment 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This conference presents papers on a wide range of petroleum and petrochemical industry issues which pertain to waste disposal, waste processing, and safety issues. It presents specific papers on waste reduction and processing;fire prevention and suppression of oil and gas fires in storage and processing facilities; safety engineering and monitoring and plants and facilities;transportation and storage issues as they relate to safety and leak detection; and oil spill remediation and disposal. Spill topics include sorption techniques, bioremediation, dispersions, and air stripping. The remediation papers include both on and offshore sites and approach the topic from both safety and environmental aspects.

  9. Process-based selection of copula types for flood peak-volume relationships in Northwest Austria: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnová, Silvia; Gaál, Ladislav; Bacigál, Tomáš; Szolgay, Ján; Hlavčová, Kamila; Valent, Peter; Parajka, Juraj; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-12-01

    The case study aims at selecting optimal bivariate copula models of the relationships between flood peaks and flood volumes from a regional perspective with a particular focus on flood generation processes. Besides the traditional approach that deals with the annual maxima of flood events, the current analysis also includes all independent flood events. The target region is located in the northwest of Austria; it consists of 69 small and mid-sized catchments. On the basis of the hourly runoff data from the period 1976- 2007, independent flood events were identified and assigned to one of the following three types of flood categories: synoptic floods, flash floods and snowmelt floods. Flood events in the given catchment are considered independent when they originate from different synoptic situations. Nine commonly-used copula types were fitted to the flood peak - flood volume pairs at each site. In this step, two databases were used: i) a process-based selection of all the independent flood events (three data samples at each catchment) and ii) the annual maxima of the flood peaks and the respective flood volumes regardless of the flood processes (one data sample per catchment). The goodness-of-fit of the nine copula types was examined on a regional basis throughout all the catchments. It was concluded that (1) the copula models for the flood processes are discernible locally; (2) the Clayton copula provides an unacceptable performance for all three processes as well as in the case of the annual maxima; (3) the rejection of the other copula types depends on the flood type and the sample size; (4) there are differences in the copulas with the best fits: for synoptic and flash floods, the best performance is associated with the extreme value copulas; for snowmelt floods, the Frank copula fits the best; while in the case of the annual maxima, no firm conclusion could be made due to the number of copulas with similarly acceptable overall performances. The general

  10. Phase I: the pipeline gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant process design. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Conoco's process for manufacturing high-Btu gas from high-sulfur, bituminous, caking coals combines the British Gas/Lurgi slagging gasification technology and Conoco's own shift/methanation expertise. The 1245-acre site in Ohio selected for the demonstration plant is large enough to allow scale-up to a commercial venture. The plant will consist of 12 processing units and 8 offsite units. Conoco will use the plant data to evaluate the economic, environmental, and safety aspects of the process. The preliminary budget places the erected plant cost at $187 million (not including a contingency).

  11. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  12. A regional look at the selection of a process-oriented model for flood peak/volume relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolgay, Ján; Gaál, Ladislav; Bacigál, Tomáš; Kohnová, Silvia; Hlavčová, Kamila; Výleta, Roman; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on the bivariate flood peak/volume frequency analysis has mainly focused on the statistical aspects of the use of various copula models. The interplay of climatic and catchment processes in discriminating among these models has attracted less interest. In the paper we analyse the influence of climatic and hydrological controls on flood peak and volume relationships and their models, which are based on the concept of comparative hydrology in the catchments of a selected region in Austria. Independent flood events have been isolated and assigned to one of the three types of flood processes: synoptic floods, flash floods and snowmelt floods. First, empirical copulas are regionally compared in order to verify whether any flood processes are discernible in terms of the corresponding bivariate flood-peak relationships. Next the types of copulas, which are frequently used in hydrology are fitted, and their goodness-of-fit is examined in a regional scope. The spatial similarity of copulas and their rejection rate, depending on the flood type, region, and sample size are examined, too. In particular, the most remarkable difference is observed between flash floods and the other two types of flood. It is concluded that treating flood processes separately in such an analysis is beneficial, both hydrologically and statistically, since flood processes and the relationships associated with them are discernible both locally and regionally in the pilot region. However, uncertainties inherent in the copula-based bivariate frequency analysis itself (caused, among others, also by the relatively small sample sizes for consistent copula model selection, upper tail dependence characterization and reliable predictions) may not be overcome in the scope of such a regional comparative analysis.

  13. Data processing and display of laser Doppler experimental results, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashmore, B. R.; Kimura, A.; Skeith, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Contract activities performed in developing a laser Doppler system for detecting, tracking, and measuring aircraft wake vortices are summarized. The computer program for processing and displaying the Dust Devil experimental data is presented. Program listings are included in the appendix.

  14. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-04

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  15. Data analysis software for the autoradiographic enhancement process. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, and appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The computer software developed to set up a method for Wiener spectrum analysis of photographic films is presented. This method is used for the quantitative analysis of the autoradiographic enhancement process. The software requirements and design for the autoradiographic enhancement process are given along with the program listings and the users manual. A software description and program listings modification of the data analysis software are included.

  16. Distributed Processing Tools Definition. Volume 1. Hardware and Software Technologies for Tightly-Coupled Distributed Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    LOSARDO Project Engineer APPROVED: .MARMCINIhI, Colonel. USAF Chief, Coaud and Control Division FOR THE CCOaIDKR: Acting Chief, Plea Off ice * **711...WORK UNIT NUMBERS General Dynamics Corporation 62702F Data Systems Division P 0 Box 748, Fort Worth TX 76101 55811829 I1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND...Processing System for 29 the Operation/Direction Center(s) 4-3 Distribution of Processing Control 30 for the Operation/Direction Center(s) 4-4 Generalized

  17. Evaluation of natural gas processing technology. Task 3, Volume 2. Topical report, September-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, M.K.; McKee, R.L.; Neshan, H.; Pathak, V.K.; Quinlan, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    The report establishes the costs of producing pipeline quality gas on a small scale from subquality natural gas. The processing technologies evaluated include: carbon dioxide (CO2) and acid gas removal employing conventional diethanolamine (DEA) absorption; modified Claus sulfur recovery; triethylene glycol (TEG) dehydration; natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery employing the expander, lean oil and Joule-Thomson processes; and cryogenic nitrogen (N2) rejection. The results show that the size and investment cost of a DEA unit for CO2/acid gas removal increase with increasing CO2/acid gas concentration of the feed gas due to the increasing DEA circulation rate requirement. Due to economies of scale, processing costs for DEA units decrease at higher feed flow rates. The Claus process is not economical for very low inlet sulfur rates, but becomes economical at about 20 LT/D sulfur capacity (at a $100/LT sulfur product price). The size and investment cost of a TEG dehydration unit increase as the water content of the feed gas increases due to the increasing TEG circulation rate requirement. Processing costs associated with TEG dehydration units decrease at higher feed flow rates. At the same feed flow rate, the plant investment cost of a cryogenic N2 rejection unit increases with increasing N2 content of the feed gas primarily due to the increasing sales gas compression requirements. Processing costs for cryogenic N2 rejection units also increase with increasing N2 content of the feed gas.

  18. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Tasks 2, 3, and 4. 1 to 4. 6), Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. ); Duthie, R.G. ); Wootten, J.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Volume 2 contains information on the following topics: (1) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (2) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (3) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. (VC)

  19. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  20. The Effect of Thermo-mechanical Processing on the Mechanical Properties of Molybdenum-2 Volume%Lanthana

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Mueller; R.W. Buckman,Jr.; A.J. Shields,Jr

    2001-03-14

    Variations in oxide species and consolidation method have been shown to have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum material. The mechanical behavior of molybdenum - 2 Volume % La[sub]2O[sub]3 mill product forms, produced by a wet doping process, were characterized over the temperature range of -150 degrees C to 1800 degrees C. The various mill product forms evaluated ranged from thin sheet stock to bar stock. Tensile properties of the material in the various product forms were not significantly affected by the vast difference in total cold work. Creep properties, however, were sensitive to the total amount of cold work as well as the starting microstructure. Stress-relieved material had superior creep rupture properties to recrystallized material at 1200 degrees C, while at 1500 degrees C and above the opposite was observed. Thus it is necessary to match the appropriate thermo-mechanical processing and microstructure of molybdenum - 2 volume % LA[sub]2O[sub]3 to the demands of the application being considered.

  1. Seismoacoustic Emission and Lunar-Solar Tidal Deformation Processes in the Geo-Environment Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, E.; Troyanov, A.; Astrakhantsev, Yu.; Nachapkin, N.; Vdovin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation processes in the Earth's crust are various, but the lunar-solar tidal deformation process, which is the most notable and controlled (relative deformations are 10-6 to 10-8), attracts great attention. The investigation of the correlation between the tidal deformation processes and Seismoacoustic response of the geo-environment is a timely problem due to many reasons. Firstly, it is related to the discovery of the modulation effect of the high-frequency noise by the long-period deformation processes including tidal processes [L. N. Rykunov, O. B. Khavroshkin, and V. V. Tsyplakov, 1980]. The possibility appeared to distinguish similar periods in the variations of the amplitude level of the seismic acoustic emission (SAE) based on the known periodicities of the deformation processes. Secondly, the level of the Seismoacoustic response of the geo-environment to the influence of the tidal deformation processes allows us to estimate the physic-mechanical properties of the rocks composing the massif and their variation in time. Thirdly, the dependence of some geodynamic processes on the lunar-solar tides can be used to estimate the dynamic activity of different geo-structures. The investigation of the deformation processes is a complicated problem because the majority of currently applied methods give us information about deformations in the surface layer. In the conditions of the hierarchical block structure of the Earth's crust; such observations do not sufficiently reveal the distribution of deformations related to the accumulation and relaxation of stresses in the internal points of the medium. Therefore, the spatiotemporal distribution of the SAE in the boreholes carries significant information about the deformation processes in the Earth's crust directly reflecting the actual stresses and the structure of the investigated rock massif [B. P. Dyakonov, A. K. Troyanov, A. N. Nazarov, 1989]. The borehole version of the observations as the most noise

  2. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  3. Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes. Volume 1, 1978-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Farmer, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 10,676 works on atomic and molecular processes reported in publications dated 1978-1981. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the county of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Power Processing Systems (MAPPS). Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Rahman, S.; Carter, R. A.; Wu, C. H.; Yu, Y.; Chang, R.

    1980-01-01

    Computer aided design and analysis techniques were applied to power processing equipment. Topics covered include: (1) discrete time domain analysis of switching regulators for performance analysis; (2) design optimization of power converters using augmented Lagrangian penalty function technique; (3) investigation of current-injected multiloop controlled switching regulators; and (4) application of optimization for Navy VSTOL energy power system. The generation of the mathematical models and the development and application of computer aided design techniques to solve the different mathematical models are discussed. Recommendations are made for future work that would enhance the application of the computer aided design techniques for power processing systems.

  5. WFF TOPEX Software Documentation Altimeter Instrument File (AIF) Processing, October 1998. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    This document is a compendium of the WFF TOPEX Software Development Team's knowledge regarding Sensor Data Record (SDR) Processing. It includes many elements of a requirements document, a software specification document, a software design document, and a user's manual. In the more technical sections, this document assumes the reader is familiar with TOPEX and instrument files.

  6. Follow-Up Study of Former Students of the Data Processing Program. Volume XVI, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rilki, Ernest; Lucas, John A.

    In spring 1987, a follow-up survey was conducted of former William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) students who had taken five or more data processing courses at the college between 1980 and 1986. The survey focused on the students' employment status and educational intent while attending WRHC, their present employment situation, and their evaluation…

  7. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 1: Data processing and transfer panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The data processing and transfer technology areas that need to be developed and that could benefit from space flight experiments are identified. Factors considered include: user requirements, concepts in 'Outlook for Space', and cost reduction. Major program thrusts formulated are an increase in end-to-end information handling and a reduction in life cycle costs.

  8. THE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. VOLUME II, BETWEEN CITIZENS AND SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, RICHARD F.; CHAFFEE, STEVEN H.

    FROM A 1964 NATIONAL QUOTA-PROBABILITY SAMPLE OF INTERVIEWS WITH 1,500 CITIZENS 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, MAJOR VARIABLES WERE DEFINED RELATING TO COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THEIR COMMUNITIES. PRIMARY CONTENT OF THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS STUDIED WAS FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR SCHOOLS. FOR PURPOSES OF CORRELATIONAL ANALYSIS, RESPONDENTS…

  9. A DDC Bibliography on Optical or Graphic Information Processing (Information Sciences Series). Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    This unclassified-unlimited bibliography contains 183 references, with abstracts, dealing specifically with optical or graphic information processing. Citations are grouped under three headings: display devices and theory, character recognition, and pattern recognition. Within each group, they are arranged in accession number (AD-number) sequence.…

  10. Fuel quality/processing study. Volume 2: Appendix. Task 1 literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, J. B.; Bela, A.; Jentz, N. E.; Klumpe, H. W.; Kessler, H. E.; Kotzot, H. T.; Loran, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a literature survey of fuel processing and fuel quality are given. Liquid synfuels produced from coal and oil shale are discussed. Gas turbine fuel property specifications are discussed. On-site fuel pretreatment and emissions from stationary gas turbines are discussed. Numerous data tables and abstracts are given.

  11. TOPEX Software Document Series. Volume 5; Rev. 1; TOPEX GDR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Dennis; Hancock, David W., III

    2003-01-01

    This document is a compendium of the WFF TOPEX Software Development Team's knowledge regarding Geophysical Data Record (GDR) Processing. It includes many elements of a requirements document, a software specification document, a software design document, and a user's manual. In the more technical sections, this document assumes the reader is familiar with TOPEX and instrument files.

  12. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  13. TiO2 film properties as a function of processing temperature, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgibbons, E. T.; Sladek, K. J.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Thin film TiO2 was produced at 150 C by chemical vapor deposition using hydrolysis of tetraisopropyl titanate. Films were amorphous as grown, but annealing in air caused crystallization, with anatase formed beginning at 350 C and rutile at 700 C. Density and index of refraction increased substantially with increasing anneal temperature, while etch susceptibility in HF and H2SO4 decreased. Comparison with literature data showed two groups of processes. One group yields films having properties that gradually approach those of rutile with increasing process temperature. The other group gives rutile directly at moderate temperatures. Deposition of amorphous film followed by etching and annealing is suggested as a means for pattern definition.

  14. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Software Support for Fully Distributed/Loosely Coupled Processing Systems. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    apply may be better than nothing , but not much, since simulators rarely exhibit operational uniformity. In fact, they often execute entirely different...Design of . Distributed Databases and Communication Networks" and Toby J. Teorey is work- ing with James P. Fry on "A Generalized Facility for...construct for distributed processing. I= Trans. Softw. uz. SE-7, 5 (Sep. 1981) 502-509. -- [KRAM81] Kramer, J., Magee, J., and Sloman , M. Intertask

  16. Restoration of stressed sites, and processes. Volume 4. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, R.L.

    1994-04-01

    The report includes the first steps in restoring forest and aquatic ecosystems which are the immediate reduction in hazard for catastrophic loss of biodiversity, site quality, resource commodities, and improved conditions for public health. To prevent loss of future options the authors need to simultaneously reestablish ecosystem processes and disturbance effects that create and maintain desired sustainable ecosystems, while conserving genetic, species, community, and landscape diversity and long-term site productivity.

  17. Technology Insertion-Engineering Services Process Characterization, Task Order Number 1. Volume 5. Revision A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-22

    titled, "To Reduce End Item Assembly lime," recommends that visual inspection, nick , and deburring of hardware items which are presently done in MATPSS...improvements in process quality at the Harley - Davidson Corp. plant (which undertook a similar, though more extensive, restructuring in 1986) were so...during FY 88. Of these, 20-30% (estimated) received only a visual inspection, nick and burr removal, and corrosion treatment (no dimensional inspection

  18. Investigation of the free flow electrophoretic process. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. A.; Lanham, J. W.; Richman, D. W.; Walker, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the free flow electrophoretic process was investigated. The demonstrated effects were then compared with predictions made by mathematical models. Results show that the carrier buffer flow was affected by gravity induced thermal convection and that the movement of the separating particle streams was affected by gravity induced buoyant forces. It was determined that if gravity induced buoyant forces were included in the mathematical models, then effective predictions of electrophoresis chamber separation performance were possible.

  19. Handbook of Perception and Human Performance. Volume 2. Cognitive Processes and Performance,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    was vari( Casali (1983b). In this modification references to aircraft han - changing the presentation rate of aircraft call signs an( dling...performance. Representative examples of use of this task can be time can be found in Fisk, Derrick, and Schneider (1982); Isreal, found in Eysenck and Eysenck ...Engineering Laboratory, 1972. Eysenck , M. W., & Eysenck , M. C. Processing depth, elaboration of Hallsten, L., & Borg, G. Six rating scales for

  20. Satellite radar altimetry over ice. Volume 1: Processing and corrections of Seasat data over Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Major, Judith A.; Martin, Thomas V.; Bindschadler, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The data-processing methods and ice data products derived from Seasat radar altimeter measurements over the Greenland ice sheet and surrounding sea ice are documented. The corrections derived and applied to the Seasat radar altimeter data over ice are described in detail, including the editing and retracking algorithm to correct for height errors caused by lags in the automatic range tracking circuit. The methods for radial adjustment of the orbits and estimation of the slope-induced errors are given.

  1. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-02

    our computed properties of hot pressed aluminum nitride. Ceram. Int. 8 value is a few orders of magnitude lower than the 1 (1982) pp 34-40 observed one...prospect of alloying SiC with other covalencly bonded refractory materials, such as AlN, to achieve microstructural control or alter properties has...specialty applica- tions. In this review the processing, properties . and uses of the end-member compounds. silicon dioxide (SiO.) and aluminum oxide

  2. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 2; Science Data Management Plan; 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jester, Peggy L.; Hancock, David W., III

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Data Management Plan for the GLAS Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument of the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. The SDS encompasses the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) Software and the Instrument Support Facility (ISF) Software. This Plan addresses the identification, authority, and description of the interface nodes associated with the GLAS Standard Data Products and the GLAS Ancillary Data.

  3. Development of Cost-Effective Manufacturing Process for Producing Ceramic Turbocharger Rotors. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-14

    41.. 5.3.1. Phase One (Metal Blade Tooling )............41 5.3.2. Phase Two (Modified Metal Blade Tooling )........440 5.3.3. Phase Three (Ceramic...Rotor Tooling ).........46 5.3.4. Phase Four (Alternate Process).............46 5.3.5. Analysis/Conclusion.................49 5.4. Ceramic Rotor...development (Phase Two) was scheduled to begin initially using the existing TV8117 production metal rotor tooling . This was . to provide the experience

  4. Extraterrestrial processing and manufacturing of large space systems, volume 1, chapters 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Space program scenarios for production of large space structures from lunar materials are defined. The concept of the space manufacturing facility (SMF) is presented. The manufacturing processes and equipment for the SMF are defined and the conceptual layouts are described for the production of solar cells and arrays, structures and joints, conduits, waveguides, RF equipment radiators, wire cables, and converters. A 'reference' SMF was designed and its operation requirements are described.

  5. The monitoring and control of TRUEX processes. Volume 1, The use of sensitivity analysis to determine key process variables and their control bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Regalbuto, M.C.; Misra, B.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1992-04-01

    The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to design a flowsheet for the TRUEX solvent extraction process that would be used to determine its instrumentation and control requirements. Sensitivity analyses of the key process variables, namely, the aqueous and organic flow rates, feed compositions, and the number of contactor stages, were carried out to assess their impact on the operation of the TRUEX process. Results of these analyses provide a basis for the selection of an instrument and control system and the eventual implementation of a control algorithm. Volume Two of this report is an evaluation of the instruments available for measuring many of the physical parameters. Equations that model the dynamic behavior of the TRUEX process have been generated. These equations can be used to describe the transient or dynamic behavior of the process for a given flowsheet in accordance with the TRUEX model. Further work will be done with the dynamic model to determine how and how quickly the system responds to various perturbations. The use of perturbation analysis early in the design stage will lead to a robust flowsheet, namely, one that will meet all process goals and allow for wide control bounds. The process time delay, that is, the speed with which the system reaches a new steady state, is an important parameter in monitoring and controlling a process. In the future, instrument selection and point-of-variable measurement, now done using the steady-state results reported here, will be reviewed and modified as necessary based on this dynamic method of analysis.

  6. [Effect of different volume loading of aerobic/anaerobic zone on nitrogen and phosphorus removal by biofilm and granular sludge coupling process].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Liu, Chang; Gao, Hui; Gao, Da-Wen

    2014-05-01

    The effect of different aerobic/anaerobic zone volume loading on nitrogen and phosphorus removal by biological film and granular coupling process was investigated using a self-designed Biofilm/Granular sludge coupling reactor. Three operating modes were conducted in the experiment. In operating mode I ,the volume of aerobic zone was 9. 66 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 15. 34 L. In operating mode II , the volume of aerobic zone was 12. 56 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 12. 44 L. In operating mode III , the volume of aerobic zone was 15.42 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 9.58 L. Three operating modes expressed different volume loading of the reactor because of different aerobic/anaerobic zone. The results showed that the performance of ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus removal was a bit poor in operating mode I , the effluent nitrate nitrogen was higher in operating mode III compared with other modes, which brought the total nitrogen removal efficiency lower. The operating mode II was optimal for nitrogen and phosphorus removal. In operating mode II , the ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency was about 80. 63% , the volume loading rate of nitrogen removal was about 150. 27 g(m3 d)-1, and the COD removal efficiency was higher than 83.24%; the amounts of phosphorus release and uptake under anaerobic conditions were 7. 23 mg L-1 and 11. 93 mg L-1.

  7. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume I - a self-instructional manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers.

  8. Responsible science: Ensuring the integrity of the research process, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This report thoughtfully examines the challenges posed in ensuring that the search for truth reflects adherence to ethical standards. In recent years, we have learned, sometimes painfully, that not all scientists adhere to this obligation. Reports of falsified research results and plagiarism involving both junior and senior scientists have stimulated doubts and criticism about the ways in which misconduct in science is addressed by the research community. Misconduct in science is now being publicly examined in all of its aspects; how misconduct is defined, the process by which misconduct is discovered, and procedures for judging innocence or guilt and assessing penalties. Also being explored are the appropriate roles of individuals, research institutions, journals, government research agencies, and the legal system. Issues of misconduct and integrity in science present complex questions. These issues require the sustained attention of all members of the research community as well as of leaders in the public and private sector who are concerned with safeguarding the health of science. In this regard ensuring the integrity of the research process is similar to assuring safety in the workplace: it is a process that requires continued participation from all levels of the entire research enterprise--the practitioners, the host institutions, the sponsors in government, and the legislators who provide the funds.

  9. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 1, Industrial solid waste processing municipal waste reduction/recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.E.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarizes the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. A three-dimensional hybrid finite element-volume tracking model for mould filling in casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D. M.

    1999-04-01

    Metal casting is a complicated process in which flow momentum plays a crucial role in the mould filling process due to the high velocity of the liquid metal. Inertia and gravity effects may cause splashing, jetting or undesirable filling of the metal flow into the mould cavity. When considering complex parts, the accurate prediction of mould filling behaviour using empirical knowledge and intuition is nearly impossible. Therefore, numerical modelling and simulation are essential to predict such a complex physical problem and assist in part with mould design. A mould filling analysis can help the mould designer to determine the size and location of the gate as well as a proper runner system design for ensuring a complete and balanced filling of the part. Such an analysis can also be used to predict potential product defects, such as air entrapment, porosities, and help in correct positioning of overflows and venting systems. A three-dimensional finite element model combined with a volume tracking method has been developed in this work to simulate the cavity filling for casting processes. A mixed formulation based on a four node tetrahedral element with a bubble function at the centroid (P1+/P1) is employed to solve the flow equations. Such a finite element provides a small dimension of the element matrices and satisfies the Brezzi-Babuska condition to ensure a stable solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. A slip boundary condition combined with a friction model is implemented to better simulate the metal flow near the mould walls. An algebraic model is used to account for the turbulence effects during the mould filling. The flow fronts are tracked by a volume tracking method developed for the tetrahedral elements. This method can handle complicated flow front shapes and complex situations like merging and separation of flow fronts. The combination of a volume tracking technique with a FEM flow solver in three-dimensional unstructured meshes constitutes the major

  11. Economic evaluation of FGD systems. Volume 1. Throwaway FGD processes, high- and low-sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Miranda, J.E.; Reisdorf, J.B.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    This volume presents the estimated cost for 10 throwaway FGD systems and a coal cleaning process based on December 1982 cost and technology. These systems were evaluated for operability, technical merit and commercial availability. The FGD systems were evaluated for both high and low sulfur coal applications at a hypothetical 1000 MW (two 500 MW units) power plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. This arbitrary reference plant was selected to ensure consistent comparisons, and to increase the relative accuracy of the costs presented. A flow sheet, material balance, equipment list, system description and utility consumption list form the basis of each FGD evaluation. Cost information was obtained from process vendors, Stearns-Roger information, and published reports. Capital costs were estimated by factoring costs of process equipment (i.e., an EPRI Class II estimate.) Operating costs were estimated from reagent and utility consumption. The levelized capital and operating costs were developed using EPRI's standard economic premises. Costs have an absolute accuracy of +-30 percent. However, since methodology, scope and unit costs are consistent, the relative accuracy between process estimates probably is +-15 percent.

  12. Assessment of citrus-processing energy-efficiency improvement. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The cirtus industry was surveyed in order to assess the impact of two programs toward the goal of implementing energy conserving options and the development of new technologies. Six technologies were identified that have recently been implemented in the citrus industry, and a case history is summarized for each. Advanced technologies have been identified that could be applied in citrus processing plants and that would result in significant energy and operating cost savings. The industry sources indicated a need to prove these concepts in a research and development project such as a pilot plant before they will be implemented. (LEW)

  13. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Robotic Processing System Program Automation Systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobbs, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    Topics related to robot operated materials processing in space (RoMPS) are presented in view graph form. Some of the areas covered include: (1) mission requirements; (2) automation management system; (3) Space Transportation System (STS) Hitchhicker Payload; (4) Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) scripts; (5) SCL software components; (6) RoMPS EasyLab Command & Variable summary for rack stations and annealer module; (7) support electronics assembly; (8) SCL uplink packet definition; (9) SC-4 EasyLab System Memory Map; (10) Servo Axis Control Logic Suppliers; and (11) annealing oven control subsystem.

  14. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 1; Science Software Management Plan; 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, David W., III

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Software Management Plan for the GLAS Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument of the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. The SDS encompasses the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) Software and the Instrument Support Terminal (IST) Software. For the I-SIPS Software, the SDS will produce Level 0, Level 1, and Level 2 data products as well as the associated product quality assessments and descriptive information. For the IST Software, the SDS will accommodate the GLAS instrument support areas of engineering status, command, performance assessment, and instrument health status.

  15. Process Definition and Modeling Guidebook. Volume 2. Advanced Applications of MPDM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Transition Abstraction ....................... 5-20 x Contenus 5.4.6.1 Structure of Formal Generic Process Model ....................... 5-20 5.4.6.2...detalsprogessmeasremntsconinuus-ity mproements measuremenitis, n nomto o prje t pl nninglad bs Activity anag.eTsient oal m emnt hd s Propat I...that metric-a will go up by x units and metric-b will be reduced by about y 7 ercent, etc. One value to such predictions is that they more precisely

  16. NAVSPASUR sensor system digital signal processing receiver. Volume 2: Function and capabilities of hardware and software components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Carl J.; Bryant, Carolyn F.; Earl, Marilyn P.; Myers, Tamara A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a system description of the Naval Space Surveillance (NAVSPASUR) Sensor System Digital Signal Processing Receiver (DSPR). The NAVSPASUR system began as an advanced research project in June 1958, was commissioned as an operational Naval command in February 1961, and is operated by the Naval Space Surveillance Center (NSSC) in Dahlgren, Virginia. The DSPR is a real-time radar data acquisition and analysis system. Its function is to detect, with no prior information, all space objects whose orbits cross the continental United States and to compute their subsequent orbits. It provides vital satellite information in support of national defense mission objectives of space intelligence, satellite attack warning, satellite intercept support, and space mission support. This system description was prepared as part of a modernization program that has replaced DSPR hardware for which parts are no longer available. Volume 1 (NRL/FR/8154--93-9577) describes the DSPR system in terms of current operation and hardware and software environment. Functions of the major subsystems and the relationship between them are discussed. Volume 2 (NRL/FR/8154--93-9578) discusses the function and capabilities of software and hardware components of the subsystems that provide the digital functions of the DSPR. For each subsystem, individual software modules and hardware components used primarily by that subsystem are described.

  17. Real-time tracking data drive process improvements, even while ED volumes continue to climb.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Christiana Hospital in Newark, DE, has been able to dramatically reduce length-of-stay in the ED by making use of data derived from a real-time location system (RTLS) that tracks the movements of patients, providers, and staff. Administrators say that while some efficiencies are gained from the system alone, most of the positive impact is derived from using the RTLS data to focus on specific processes and make refinements. Within one year of implementing the RTLS technology, LOS in the ED was reduced by 40 minutes for admitted patients and 18 to 20 minutes for the treated-and-released population. A work group focused on process improvements in the ED's fast track section reduced the average LOS from 2.5 hours to 60 minutes or less. Similarly, a work group focused on the ESI 3 population reduced the average treatment time for this population from 5 or 6 hours to 3.4 hours. Administrators say key steps toward a successful RTLS implementation are careful planning for how you want to use the technology, and alleviating staff concerns about why their movements are being tracked.

  18. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J., Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents an exploration of the relationships between biomass feedstocks and the conversion processes that utilize them. Specifically, it discusses the effect of the physical and chemical structure of biomass on conversion yields, rates, and efficiencies in a wide variety of available or experimental conversion processes. A greater understanding of the complex relationships between these conversion systems and the production of biomass for energy uses is required to help optimize the complex network of biomass production, collection, transportation, and conversion to useful energy products. The review of the literature confirmed the scarcity of research aimed specifically at identifying the effect of feedstock properties on conversion. In most cases, any mention of feedstock-related effects was limited to a few brief remarks (usually in qualitative terms) in the conclusions, or as a topic for further research. Attempts to determine the importance of feedstock parameters from published data were further hampered by the lack of consistent feedstock characterization and the difficulty of comparing results between different experimental systems. Further research will be required to establish quantitative relationships between feedstocks and performance criteria in conversion. 127 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Pinch technology/process optimization. Volume 1, Case studies---multiple plants: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Improved process efficiency is of great importance to electric utilities and their industrial customers. It enhances company profitability, thereby fostering load retention and strategic load growth. Moreover, the technical means of achieving improved efficiency can significantly impact utility load shapes. By understanding the energy use patterns and options in an industrial facility, the utility and industrial user can work together to define mutually beneficial investment and operating decisions and to clarify how the decisions might be impacted by existing or alternative energy prices. Efforts to achieve such understanding are facilitated by using pinch technology, an innovative and highly effective methodology for systematically analyzing total industrial sites. This report documents a series of twelve industrial process optimization case studies. The studies were carried out using ``pinch technology. `` Each study was cosponsored by the industrial site`s local electric utility. The twelve studies are follows: (1) pulp and paper, (2) refinery, (3) refinery, (4) yeast, (5) soups/sauces, (6) cellulose- acetate, (7) refinery, (8) chemicals, (9) gelatin-capsules, (10) refinery, (11) brewery, (12) cereal grains.

  20. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2E: Commercial equipment utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Examination of commercial equipment technologies revealed that the functional performance requirements of space processing equipment could generally be met by state-of-the-art design practices. Thus, an apparatus could be evolved from a standard item or derived by custom design using present technologies. About 15 percent of the equipment needed has no analogous commercial base of derivation and requires special development. This equipment is involved primarily with contactless heating and position control. The derivation of payloads using commercial equipment sources provides a broad and potentially cost-effective base upon which to draw. The derivation of payload equipment from commercial technologies poses other issues beyond that of the identifiable functional performance, but preliminary results on testing of selected equipment testing appear quite favorable. During this phase of the SPA study, several aspects of commercial equipment utility were assessed and considered. These included safety, packaging and structural, power conditioning (electrical/electronic), thermal and materials of construction.

  1. Clean coal demonstration program: Advanced flue gas desulfurization process. Volume 1 - public design report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-03-01

    The single 100 percent absorber is a co-current grid packed tower with an integrated reaction tank at the bottom. It is designed to accomplish several process steps (quenching, absorption of SO{sub 2}, reaction with limestone, oxidation to gypsum) in a single vessel, resulting in a simple configuration of the plant. The co-current absorber is designed for higher flue gas velocities than conventional countercurrent towers, which results in a compact absorber size. The flue gas enters the top of the absorber where it contacts recirculating slurry. Quenching and absorption of SO{sub 2} occur simultaneously. This {open_quotes}wet/dry{close_quotes} interface is washed intermittently with fresh water to prevent the formation and growth of any deposits.

  2. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C.; Williams, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  3. Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

  4. Automated space processing payloads study. Volume 2, book 1: Technical report. [instrument packages and space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The extent was investigated to which experiment hardware and operational requirements can be met by automatic control and material handling devices; payload and system concepts that make extensive use of automation technology are defined. Hardware requirements for each experiment were established and tabulated, and investigations of applicable existing hardware were documented. The capabilities and characteristics of industrial automation equipment, controls, and techniques are presented in the form of a summary of applicable equipment characteristics in three basic mutually-supporting formats. Facilities for performing groups of experiments are defined along with four levitation groups and three furnace groups; major hardware elements required to implement them were identified. A conceptual design definition of ten different automated processing facilities is presented along with the specific equipment to implement each facility and the design layouts of the different units. Constraints and packaging, weight, and power requirements for six payloads postulated for shuttle missions in the 1979 to 1982 time period were examined.

  5. Investigation of the free flow electrophoretic process. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. A.; Lanham, J. W.; Richman, D. W.; Walker, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the free flow electrophoretic process was investigated. The demonstrated effects were then compared with predictions made by mathematical models. Results show that the carrier buffer flow was affected by gravity induced thermal convection and that the movement of the separating particle streams was affected by gravity induced buoyant forces. It was determined that if gravity induced buoyant forces were included in the mathematical models, then effective predictions of electrophoresis chamber separation performance were possible. The results of tests performed using various methods of electrophoresis using supportive media show that the mobility and the ability to separate were essentially independent of concentration, providing promise of being able to perform electrophoresis with higher inlet concentrations in space.

  6. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  7. Formation and Assembly-Disassembly Processes of ZnO Hexagonal Pyramids Driven by Dipolar and Excluded Volume Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-20

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  8. Formation and assembly-disassembly processes of ZnO hexagonal pyramids driven by dipolar and excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-02-17

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  9. Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 2, Production of IFG (industrial fuel gas)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnstecher, L.W.

    1984-12-01

    A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of industrial fuel gas (IFG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based upon a plant producing 73.3 billion Btu (HHV) per day of IFG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant feed, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 73.3 billion Btu (HHV) per day of industrial fuel gas. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, seven Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, acid gas removal, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots facility located in the area of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 39 refs., 33 figs., 50 tabs.

  10. Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K

    2003-08-20

    A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

  11. Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnstecher, L.W.

    1984-09-01

    A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

  12. Processing and thermodynamics research, Volume II. Monthly progress report, November 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-14

    Data assembly is in progress on the Venezuelan Cerro Negro, California, Wilmington and Mexican Mayan crudes. A draft of a proposal is in preparation that might join this correlational work with complementary correlational work at the University of Oklahoma (Project BPT1). Cerro Negro 200 to 425/sup 0/C and 425 to 550/sup 0/C saturate fractions were analyzed with the CEC 21-103 mass spectrometer using ASTM method D2786, and experiments were devised to establish reproducibility of analyses with the KRATOS MS-50 (Project BPT2). Thermodynamic property measurements on organic nitrogen compounds included a liquid phase heat capacity study of 2,5-dimethylpyridine, and the oxygen sensitivity of phenanthridine was checked prior to bomb calorimetry (Project BPT3A). Heat capacity measurements on chroman are progressing well, and vapor pressure measurements of tetrahydrophenanthrene are in progress (Project BPT3B). Work was begun on the design and procurement of equipment necessary for construction of a bench scale catalytic cracking unit. The supercritical extraction unit is being assembled (Project OPT1). Thiopene separations were begun on Cerro Negro 425 to 550/sup 0/C neutrals, and separation of sulfides from Cerro Negro 550 to 700/sup 0/C and 700+/sup 0/C neutrals was completed (Project OPT2). Preparations for PVT studies of methanol are nearing completion, and a list of critically needed PVT measurements was reviewed to help select the next compound for study. A possible candidate is hydrogen sulfide. (Project OPT3). Good progress continues in the treatment of the RP feed (Project OPT4) to recover Milspec F-76. It is anticipated that 85% recovery is possible by the chemical treatment/distillation process.

  13. A Five-Year Plan for Meeting the Automatic Data Processing and Telecommunications Needs of the Federal Government. Volume l: Planning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    The first of two volumes, this document describes the planning process of a 5-year plan for meeting the telecommunications and automatic data processing (ADP) needs of the federal government, examines the planning efforts of several typical agencies, and explores issues involved in managing new technology as it evolves. For each agency,…

  14. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 3; GLAS Science Software Requirements Document; Ver 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jester, Peggy L.; Lee, Jeffrey; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document addresses the software requirements of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument on the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. This Software Requirements Document represents the initial collection of the technical engineering information for the GLAS SDS. This information is detailed within the second of four main volumes of the Standard documentation, the Product Specification volume. This document is a "roll-out" from the governing volume outline containing the Concept and Requirements sections.

  15. The 5th World Congress of chemical engineering: Technologies critical to a changing World. Volume II: Agriculture, food biotechnology biomedical electric power process safety

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Volume 2 of the proceedings from the 5th World Congress of Chemical Engineering covers four major topic areas from which papers were selected for the database: Agriculture, Food; Biotechnology; Electric Power, and Process Safety. Pertinent subtopics include: Renewable Resource Engineering; Special Processes in the Food Industry; Advances in Metabolite Production; Advances in Fermentation and Cell Culture Engineering; Coal and Nuclear Central Station Power Plants; Large Natural Gas Fired Power Stations; Distributed Generation; Potential Impact of Biomass Energy; and Chemical Hazards in Plant Design. 29 papers were selected from Volume 1 for the database.

  16. A Collection of Papers on Self-Study and Institutional Improvement, 2003. Volume 4: The Self-Study Process for Commission Evaluation. 2003 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kollenburg, Susan E., Ed.

    Papers in this collection were prepared for the annual meeting of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. This volume contains papers related to the self-study process for Commission evaluation. Papers in chapters 1, "Self-Study and Commission Evaluation: Coordinating the Self-Study," are: (1) "Initiating the…

  17. Large wood recruitment processes and transported volumes in Swiss mountain streams during the extreme flood of August 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, Nicolas; Rickenmann, Dieter; Badoux, Alexandre; Rickli, Christian; Waldner, Peter

    2017-02-01

    The extreme flood event that occurred in August 2005 was the most costly (documented) natural hazard event in the history of Switzerland. The flood was accompanied by the mobilization of > 69,000 m3 of large wood (LW) throughout the affected area. As recognized afterward, wood played an important role in exacerbating the damages, mainly because of log jams at bridges and weirs. The present study aimed at assessing the risk posed by wood in various catchments by investigating the amount and spatial variability of recruited and transported LW. Data regarding LW quantities were obtained by field surveys, remote sensing techniques (LiDAR), and GIS analysis and was subsequently translated into a conceptual model of wood transport mass balance. Detailed wood budgets and transport diagrams were established for four study catchments of Swiss mountain streams, showing the spatial variability of LW recruitment and deposition. Despite some uncertainties with regard to parameter assumptions, the sum of reconstructed wood input and observed deposition volumes agree reasonably well. Mass wasting such as landslides and debris flows were the dominant recruitment processes in headwater streams. In contrast, LW recruitment from lateral bank erosion became significant in the lower part of mountain streams where the catchment reached a size of about 100 km2. According to our analysis, 88% of the reconstructed total wood input was fresh, i.e., coming from living trees that were recruited from adjacent areas during the event. This implies an average deadwood contribution of 12%, most of which was estimated to have been in-channel deadwood entrained during the flood event.

  18. COMT Val158Met × SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR interaction impacts on gray matter volume of regions supporting emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Wissam; Monté, Gemma C.; Gohier, Benedicte; Tropeano, Maria; Phillips, Mary L.; Surguladze, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been several reports on the association between the Val158Met genetic polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, as well as the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), and frontolimbic region volumes, which have been suggested to underlie individual differences in emotion processing or susceptibility to emotional disorders. However, findings have been somewhat inconsistent. This study used diffeomorphic anatomic registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) whole-brain voxel-based morphometry to study the genetic effects of COMT Val158Met and SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR, as well as their interaction, on the regional gray matter volumes of a sample of 91 healthy volunteers. An interaction of COMT Val158Met × SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR genotypes with gray matter volume was found in bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, amygdala, hippocampus, vermis of cerebellum and right putamen/insula. In particular, the gray matter volume in these regions was smaller in individuals who were both COMT-Met and 5-HTTLPR-S carriers, or both COMT-Val and 5-HTTLPR-L homozygotes, as compared with individuals with intermediate combinations of alleles. The interaction of COMT Val158Met and SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR adds to the understanding of individual differences in emotion processing. PMID:23748501

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Standards and State Practices: Pre-Adjudication and Adjudication Processes. Volume VII of IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The reports included in this publication (volume seven in a series of nine) reflect a variety of views on and approaches to major questions in the juvenile justice field. It contains chapters on court rules, pre-trial detention, conditions of release, plea bargaining, rules of evidence, etc. In addition, there is a section concerning special…

  20. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  1. Critical review, comparative evaluation, cost update, and baseline data development services in oil shale mining, in-situ liquefaction, and above ground retorting processes from the environmental, permitting, and licensing viewpoints. Volume I. Oil-shale retorting process engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-15

    The present volume is the first of a series of three constituting the title study. It provides a brief but thorough description of six Oil Shale Retorting Processes, namely: Paraho, Tosco II, Oxidental Modified In-Situ, Rio Blanco, Union Oil, and Superior Oil. The processes are treated at Unit Operations level, including operations such as Mining, Crushing, Screening, Conveying, Hydrogenation (or Upgrading), Hydrogen Manufacturing Plant, Amine Treating, Low-Btu Gas Treating, Tail Gas Treating, Sulfur Recovery, Wastewater Treatment, Sour Waste Stripping, Refining, Spent Shale Disposal, etc. The present first volume of the study provides most process engineering information required in order for Control Requirements, at specific points of a given unit operations flowsheet, to be fully assessed. Flow sheets for unit operations presented in the present Volume I are only conceptual and qualitative. Some quantitative data on volumeric flow rates of specific flow streams are occasionally given. However, no systematic effort has been presently made to develop a numerical data base on process flow streams. This has been done in a much more systematic and thorough manner in another FMR study performed on behalf of DOE under title Source Terms for the Health and Environmental Effects Document (HEED) for Oil Shale - 1982. Additional original quantitative analysis has been performed by FMR towards developing material balances for specific oil shale feeds into specific retorting processes.

  2. Reducing uncertainty in the selection of bi-variate distributions of flood peaks and volumes using copulas and hydrological process-based model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolgay, Jan; Gaál, Ladislav; Bacigál, Tomáš; Kohnová, Silvia; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Bi-variate distributions of flood peaks and flood event volumes are needed for a range of practical purposes including e.g. retention basin design and identifying extent and duration of flooding in flood hazard zones. However, the selection of the types of bi-variate distributions and estimating their parameters from observed peak-volume pairs are associated with far larger uncertainties compared to uni-variate distributions, since observed flood records of required length are rarely available. This poses a serious problem to reliable flood risk estimation in bi-variate design cases. The aim of this contribution was to shed light on the possibility of reducing uncertainties in the estimation of the dependence models/parameters from a regional perspective. The peak-volume relationships were modeled in terms of copulas. Flood events were classified according to their origin. In order to reduce the uncertainty in estimating flood risk, pooling and analyzing catchments of similar behavior according to flood process types was attempted. Most of the work reported in the literature so far did not direct the multivariate analysis toward discriminating certain types of models regionally according to specific runoff generation processes. Specifically, the contribution addresses these problems: - Are the peak-volume relationships of different flood types for a given catchment similar? - Are the peak-volume dependence structures between catchments in a larger region for given flood types similar? - Are some copula types more suitable for given flood process types and does this have consequences for reliable risk estimation? The target region is located in the northern parts of Austria, and consists of 72 small and mid-sized catchments. Instead of the traditional approach that deals with annual maximum floods, the current analysis includes all independent flood events in the region. 24 872 flood events from the period 1976-2007 were identified, and classified as synoptic, flash

  3. Fused slurry silicide coatings for columbium alloy reentry heat shields. Volume 2: Experimental and coating process details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental and coating process details are presented. The process specifications which were developed for the formulation and application of the R-512E fused slurry silicide coating using either an acrylic or nitrocellulose base slurry system is also discussed.

  4. Tailoring Fiber Volume Fraction of Vacuum-assisted Resin Transfer Molding Processed Composite Laminates by Bladder-bag Resin Reservoir

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    applications serve as justification for the high cost of autoclave processes. The Vacuum- Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) process is an...alternative, out-of-autoclave, method which is attractive due to its low cost, simplicity, and portability. However, a limitation to current VARTM ...autoclave, composite processing, composite fabrication, VARTM 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES

  5. Technology Insertion-Engineering Services Process Characterization. Task Order No. 1 Volume 3. OC-ALC Book 2 of 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    Douglas Missile Systems Company 6.14-14 TASK ORDER NO. 1 PROCESS CHARACTERIZATION *i ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL FLOW TIME AVERAGES USING TAGUCHI METHOD (L4...Systems Company 6.15-12 TASK ORDER NO. 1 PROCESS CHARACTERIZATION 0ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL FLOW TIME AVERAGES USING TAGUCHI METHOD (L4) TABLE 6.15.2-2...1 PROCESS CHARACTERIZATION ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL FLOW TIME AVERAGES USING TAGUCHI METHOD (L4) TABLE 6.16.2-2 EXPERIMENTAL FLOW TIME AVERAGES EXP

  6. Laser Peening for Reliable Fatigue Life. Delivery Order 0025: Volume 1 - Simulation and Optimization of a Laser Peening Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Processes, Vol. 5(4), 1990, pp. 501–528. [44] Brar, N. S., Hopkins, A., and Laber, M. W., “ Laser Shock Peening of Titanium 6-4 Alloy,” Shock Cmpression...burnishing process . . . . . . . . 7 3 Schematic of Laser Peening process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4 Shock wave in a material...methodology is developed for structures subjected to the shock -type loadings that occur in shot peen - ing, laser peening , explosions, and bullet impacts. The

  7. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  8. Texas-louisiana shelf circulation and transport processes study: Year 1, annual report. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jochens, A.E.; Nowlin, W.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Louisiana-Texas Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX) is supported by the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior. The first field year of LATEX A was conducted from April 1992-March 1993. Data were collected from an array of current meter moorings, meteorology buoys, drifting buoys, and hydrographic and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) surveys deployed on the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Historical and concurrent data from other programs in this region also were collected. This Executive Summary volume provides an overview of the LATEX A Program from contract award to the end of the first year of field operations.

  9. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing. Phase I. The Role of Simulators in the Mariner Training and Licensing Process. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    between giving a rudder :ommand and the perception of the ship beginning to respond) ( van Manen and Hooft , 1.󈨊). The basic research literature...Name and Address Office of Research and Development 13. Type of Report & Period Office of Commercital Development U. S. Coast Guard (G-D M4 T -1/54) - I...MARINER TRAINING AND LICENSING PROCESS VOLUME I Prepared by T . J. Hammell, K. E. Williams J. A. Grasso, & W. Evans CAORF Research Staff July 1980 C* 6

  10. Development of a process flowsheet for the elution of radiocesium from the TMI-2 makeup and purification demineralizers. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W D; Knauer, J B; King, L J

    1986-09-01

    A process was developed for removing radiocesium from the two makeup and purification demineralizers at TMI-2 which had been highly contaminated as a result of the accident in 1979. Process conditions were established in hot-cell experiments using relatively small samples of the contaminated and degraded resins from the TMI-2 demineralizers.

  11. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, volume 2. [application and processing of remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Application and processing of remotely sensed data are discussed. Areas of application include: pollution monitoring, water quality, land use, marine resources, ocean surface properties, and agriculture. Image processing and scene analysis are described along with automated photointerpretation and classification techniques. Data from infrared and multispectral band scanners onboard LANDSAT satellites are emphasized.

  12. A microfluidic platform for precision small-volume sample processing and its use to size separate biological particles with an acoustic microdevice [Precision size separation of biological particles in small-volume samples by an acoustic microfluidic system

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Erika J.; Huang, Chao; Hamilton, Julie; Benett, William J.; Bora, Mihail; Burklund, Alison; Metz, Thomas R.; Shusteff, Maxim

    2015-11-23

    Here, a major advantage of microfluidic devices is the ability to manipulate small sample volumes, thus reducing reagent waste and preserving precious sample. However, to achieve robust sample manipulation it is necessary to address device integration with the macroscale environment. To realize repeatable, sensitive particle separation with microfluidic devices, this protocol presents a complete automated and integrated microfluidic platform that enables precise processing of 0.15–1.5 ml samples using microfluidic devices. Important aspects of this system include modular device layout and robust fixtures resulting in reliable and flexible world to chip connections, and fully-automated fluid handling which accomplishes closed-loop sample collection, system cleaning and priming steps to ensure repeatable operation. Different microfluidic devices can be used interchangeably with this architecture. Here we incorporate an acoustofluidic device, detail its characterization, performance optimization, and demonstrate its use for size-separation of biological samples. By using real-time feedback during separation experiments, sample collection is optimized to conserve and concentrate sample. Although requiring the integration of multiple pieces of equipment, advantages of this architecture include the ability to process unknown samples with no additional system optimization, ease of device replacement, and precise, robust sample processing.

  13. A microfluidic platform for precision small-volume sample processing and its use to size separate biological particles with an acoustic microdevice [Precision size separation of biological particles in small-volume samples by an acoustic microfluidic system

    DOE PAGES

    Fong, Erika J.; Huang, Chao; Hamilton, Julie; ...

    2015-11-23

    Here, a major advantage of microfluidic devices is the ability to manipulate small sample volumes, thus reducing reagent waste and preserving precious sample. However, to achieve robust sample manipulation it is necessary to address device integration with the macroscale environment. To realize repeatable, sensitive particle separation with microfluidic devices, this protocol presents a complete automated and integrated microfluidic platform that enables precise processing of 0.15–1.5 ml samples using microfluidic devices. Important aspects of this system include modular device layout and robust fixtures resulting in reliable and flexible world to chip connections, and fully-automated fluid handling which accomplishes closed-loop sample collection,more » system cleaning and priming steps to ensure repeatable operation. Different microfluidic devices can be used interchangeably with this architecture. Here we incorporate an acoustofluidic device, detail its characterization, performance optimization, and demonstrate its use for size-separation of biological samples. By using real-time feedback during separation experiments, sample collection is optimized to conserve and concentrate sample. Although requiring the integration of multiple pieces of equipment, advantages of this architecture include the ability to process unknown samples with no additional system optimization, ease of device replacement, and precise, robust sample processing.« less

  14. Osmostress-Induced Cell Volume Loss Delays Yeast Hog1 Signaling by Limiting Diffusion Processes and by Hog1-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Roja; Adiels, Caroline Beck; Smedh, Maria; Petelenz-Kurdziel, Elzbieta; Goksör, Mattias; Hohmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Signal transmission progresses via a series of transient protein-protein interactions and protein movements, which require diffusion within a cell packed with different molecules. Yeast Hog1, the effector protein kinase of the High Osmolarity Glycerol pathway, translocates transiently from the cytosol to the nucleus during adaptation to high external osmolarity. We followed the dynamics of osmostress-induced cell volume loss and Hog1 nuclear accumulation upon exposure of cells to different NaCl concentrations. While Hog1 nuclear accumulation peaked within five minutes following mild osmotic shock it was delayed up to six-fold under severe stress. The timing of Hog1 nuclear accumulation correlated with the degree of cell volume loss and the cells capacity to recover. Also the nuclear translocation of Msn2, the transcription factor of the general stress response pathway, is delayed upon severe osmotic stress suggesting a general phenomenon. We show by direct measurements that the general diffusion rate of Hog1 in the cytoplasm as well as its rate of nuclear transport are dramatically reduced following severe volume reduction. However, neither Hog1 phosphorylation nor Msn2 nuclear translocation were as much delayed as Hog1 nuclear translocation. Our data provide direct evidence that signaling slows down during cell volume compression, probably as a consequence of molecular crowding. Hence one purpose of osmotic adaptation is to restore optimal diffusion rates for biochemical and cell biological processes. In addition, there may be mechanisms slowing down especially Hog1 nuclear translocation under severe stress in order to prioritize Hog1 cytosolic targets. PMID:24278344

  15. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. ); Duthie, R.G. ); Wootten, J.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

  16. High‐Volume Processed, ITO‐Free Superstrates and Substrates for Roll‐to‐Roll Development of Organic Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Hösel, Markus; Angmo, Dechan; Søndergaard, Roar R.; dos Reis Benatto, Gisele A.; Carlé, Jon E.; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of substrates and superstrates prepared by scalable roll‐to‐roll methods is reviewed. The substrates and superstrates that act as the flexible carrier for the processing of functional organic electronic devices are an essential component, and proposals are made about how the general availability of various forms of these materials is needed to accelerate the development of the field of organic electronics. The initial development of the replacement of indium‐tin‐oxide (ITO) for the flexible carrier materials is described and a description of how roll‐to‐roll processing development led to simplification from an initially complex make‐up to higher performing materials through a more simple process is also presented. This process intensification through process simplification is viewed as a central strategy for upscaling, increasing throughput, performance, and cost reduction. PMID:27980893

  17. Research and Development in the Computer and Information Sciences. Volume 2, Processing, Storage, and Output Requirements in Information Processing Systems: A Selective Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mary Elizabeth

    Areas of concern with respect to processing, storage, and output requirements of a generalized information processing system are considered. Special emphasis is placed on multiple-access systems. Problems of system management and control are discussed, including hierarchies of storage levels. Facsimile, digital, and mass random access storage…

  18. Direct interval volume visualization.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Weiskopf, Daniel; Carr, Hamish

    2010-01-01

    We extend direct volume rendering with a unified model for generalized isosurfaces, also called interval volumes, allowing a wider spectrum of visual classification. We generalize the concept of scale-invariant opacity—typical for isosurface rendering—to semi-transparent interval volumes. Scale-invariant rendering is independent of physical space dimensions and therefore directly facilitates the analysis of data characteristics. Our model represents sharp isosurfaces as limits of interval volumes and combines them with features of direct volume rendering. Our objective is accurate rendering, guaranteeing that all isosurfaces and interval volumes are visualized in a crack-free way with correct spatial ordering. We achieve simultaneous direct and interval volume rendering by extending preintegration and explicit peak finding with data-driven splitting of ray integration and hybrid computation in physical and data domains. Our algorithm is suitable for efficient parallel processing for interactive applications as demonstrated by our CUDA implementation.

  19. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 2: Residual-fired nocogeneration process boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Computer generated data on the performance of the cogeneration energy conversion system are presented. Performance parameters included fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics, and emissions of residual fired process boilers.

  20. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Tasks 2, 3, and 4.1 to 4.6), Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H.; Duthie, R.G.; Wootten, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    Volume 2 contains information on the following topics: (1) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (2) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (3) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. (VC)

  1. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

  2. Fluidized-bed copper oxide process. Phase IV. Conceptual design and economic evaluation, Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-30

    Universal Oil Products, Inc. (UOP) of Des Plaines, Illinois has contracted A.E. Roberts & Associates, Inc. (AERA) of Atlanta, Georgia to prepare a sensitivity analysis for the development of the Fluidized-bed Copper Oxide (FBCO) process. As proposed by AERA in September 1991, development of the FBCO process design for a 500 mega-watt (MW) unit was divided into three tasks: (1) Establishment of a Conceptual Design, (2) Conceptual Design, (3) Cost Analysis Task 1 determined the basis for a conceptual design for the 500 megawatt (MW) FBCO process. It was completed by AERA in September of 1992, and a report was submitted at that time {open_quotes}Establishment of the Design Basis for Application to a 500 MW Coal-fired Facility.{close_quotes} Task 2 gathered all pertinent data available to date and reviewed its applicability to the 500 MW FBCO process. Work on this task was carried out on a joint basis by the AERA team members: Roberts & Schaefers worked on the dense phase transport aspect of the design; Cornell and Carnegie Mellon Universities worked on the design kinetics and modeling; and AERA contributed commercial power and combustion experience. Task 3 provides budgetary cost estimates for the FBCO process and competing alternative technologies for sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide removal.

  3. Scale-Up of SLIP Process: Producing Nanoengineered Coatings at High Volumes to Meet Multi-Directorate Needs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K C; Sanders, D M; Moffitt, K C; Marquez, R; Spadaccini, C

    2005-10-27

    There are a variety of applications that require the use of nanoengineered surfaces for separation applications. Surfaces are commonly functionalized in order to facilitate the purification of gases and liquids. Functionalization often requires the application of a polymer to the surface. The most common means is to dissolve the polymer in a solvent and then either cast or spray it onto the surface. This traditional approach causes two severe limitations: (1) the polymer must be soluble; (2) the solvent must be removed from the final coating. The first limitation often eliminates many potential candidate polymers. The second limitation is influential on the transport and separation properties of the coating. Low levels of residual solvents can significantly degrade the ability of the coating to perform the separation process. These two issues can be overcome through the use of ''Solvent-Less vapor deposition followed by In-situ Polymerization'' (SLIP). The SLIP process was originally developed for the fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. This application required the deposition of films of 100 to 200 microns in thickness onto a spherical substrate. The process consists of two evaporation chambers each containing a quantity of monomer. The precursors, monomers, are vaporized and flow though a mixing nozzle and eventually are deposited on a substrate surface. They react at the surface and form a nanoengineered polymer film. The SLIP process has been utilized to develop composite membranes for gas and liquid separation applications. Polyimide films that range in thickness from 50 to 400 nm were deposited onto a range of substrates. The SLIP process has been shown to be robust and current plans are in place to scale-up the process. This scale-up would enable the coating of flat sheets and fibers. This paper will outline the roadmap to constructing a pilot scale SLIP system in order to meet multiple programmatic needs.

  4. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L.

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  5. Technology and Public Policy. The Process of Technology Assessment in the Federal Government. Volume 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Vary T.

    A descriptive and analytical study was made of the process of planning, programming, and evaluation of technological projects and programs as carried out by 86 offices within federal executive agencies. The focus is on the extent to which techniques of technology assessment are used, based on interviews with 115 officials. Ninety-seven…

  6. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE STYRENE EMISIONS FROM OPEN CONTACT MOLDING PROCESSES - VOLUME 1. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to evaluate several pollution prevention techniques that could be used to reduce styrene emissions from open molding processes in the fiberglass-reinforced
    plastics/composites (FRP/C) and fiberglass boat building industries. Styrene emission...

  7. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM OPEN CONTACT MOLDING PROCESSES - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to evaluate several pollution prevention techniques that could be used to reduce styrene emissions from open molding processes in the fiberglass-reinforced plastics/composites (FRP/C) and fiberglass boat building industries. Styrene emissions u...

  8. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 21, Materials and processes selection. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.R.

    1995-08-15

    This document identifies the candidate materials and manufacturing processes selected for development of the TPX Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet. Supporting rationale and selection criteria are provided for justification and the materials properties database report is included for completeness. Specific properties for each material selection are included in this document.

  9. Thermomechanical Processing and Ambient Temperature Properties of a 6061 Aluminum 10 Volume Percent Alumina Metal Matrix Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of’ MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL March... Mechanical Properties................. 15 3. Effects of Processing on Particle Size...........................16 C. AGE HARDENING STUDY...modulus * density - elevated temperature strength - thermal and electrical conductivities - corrosion and abrasion resistance. Furthermore, mechanical

  10. Space technology in Berlin. Volume 1: Ideas for the establishment of an institute for space processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The past, present, and future status of space technology in Berlin is discussed, including raw material processing, transportation, energy, and information generation and distribution. How Berlin can contribute toward further advancement in this field, individually or in collaboration with international partners is indicated.

  11. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  12. VARIATIONS IN INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA, PROCESSES, CONTENT AND APTITUDE VARIABLES IN RELATION TO EFFICIENCY OF COGNITIVE GOAL ATTAINMENT, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FATTU, N. A.

    A SERIES OF STUDIES WAS UNDERTAKEN, DIRECTED TOWARD EXPLORATIONS OF INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG MEDIA, PROCESSES (INSTRUCTIONAL PREREQUISITES), CONTENT AND APTITUDE VARIABLES, AND ACHIEVEMENTS. EMPHASIS THROUGHOUT WAS ON (1) THE COGNITIVE DOMAIN AND (2) PROBLEMS INVOLVED IN APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE TO A PRACTICAL TEACHING SITUATION. "THE…

  13. Process Definition and Modeling Guidebook. Volume 1. Concepts and Principles of MPDM. Version 02.00.02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Process Definition and Modeling Guidebook 6. AUTHOR (S) R. Bechtold, J. Brackett, S. Redwine Produced by Software...1-5 1.3 Guidebook Organization ................................................. 1-5 1.4 Author Interaction and Feedback...of this guidebook was authored by Richard Bechtold and John Brackett. Volur is authored by Richard Bechtold, John Brackett, and Sam Redwine. The

  14. The Process and Product of T & I High School Level Vocational Education in the United States. Volume II-The Process Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eninger, M.U.

    The primary objective of this study was to provide a description of the process variables of trade and industrial education, such as curriculum, facilities, guidance and placement services, teachers and instructional methods, advisory committees and community relations, and administration. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of 100…

  15. From pattern to process: The strategy of the Earth Observing System: Volume 2: EOS Science Steering Committee report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) represents a new approach to the study of the Earth. It consists of remotely sensed and correlative in situ observations designed to address important, interrelated global-scale processes. There is an urgent need to study the Earth as a complete, integrated system in order to understand and predict changes caused by human activities and natural processes. The EOS approach is based on an information system concept and designed to provide a long-term study of the Earth using a variety of measurement methods from both operational and research satellite payloads and continuing ground-based Earth science studies. The EOS concept builds on the foundation of the earlier, single-discipline space missions designed for relatively short observation periods. Continued progress in our understanding of the Earth as a system will come from EOS observations spanning several decades using a variety of contemporaneous measurements.

  16. Study of water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarneri, C. A.; Reed, A.; Renman, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    This study of water reclamation and waste disposal is directed toward a more efficient utilization of natural resources. From an ecological standpoint improved methods of land use, water processing equipment, and ideal population profiles are investigated. Methods are described whereby significant reduction in water usage can be achieved by the adoption of presently available and practically applied technological concepts. Allowances are made for social, natural, and economic contingencies which are likely to occur up to the year 2000.

  17. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 4. 7), Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. ); Duthie, R.G. ); Wootten, J.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The focus of this task is the preparation of (1) preliminary piping and instrument diagrams (P IDs) and single line electrical diagrams for a site-specific conceptual design and (2) a factored cost estimate for a 24 ton/day (tpd) capacity mild gasification process development unit (PDU) and an associated form coke preparation PDU. The intended site for this facility is the Illinois Coal Development Park at Carterville, Illinois, which is operated by Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. (VC)

  18. Integrated Information Support System (IISS). Volume 6. Network Transaction Manager Subsystem. Part 6. NTM Message Processing Unit Product Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    contributing activities were as follows: TASK 4.2 Subcontractors Role Boeing Military Aircraft Reviewer. Company (BMAC) D. Appleton Company Responsible for IDEF ...8217 " X . . - ->-- --’. - - - - " " "t’J " % % . PS 620142200 1 November 1985 Subcontractors Role Illinois Institute of Responsible for factory view...MESSAGE HANDLER. IATCHK AGE I’M ALIVE TABLE ENTRIES. IMALIV PROCESS I’M ALIVE MESSAGE. 3-42 % X %%X6 PS 620142200 1 November 1965 NTH/MPU Where-include

  19. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing Parameters on the Ambient Behavior of 10% Volume 6061 AL-Alumina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    of particulate metal-matrix composites", Materials Science Technology, pp. 1160, Vol. 6, November 1990. 20. Askeland , D. R., The Science of Envineering...processing of particulate metal-matrix composites", Materials Science Technology, Vol. 6, pp. 1157-1166, November 1990. 37. Askeland , Donald R., The...pp. 1160, November 1990. 40. Askeland , Donald R., The Science of Engineering Materials, 2nd Edition, p. 571, PWS Kent Publishers, 1989. 41

  20. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 12. Aircraft Flight Test Data Processing. A Review of the State of the Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    can be at very high frequen- cies. Test systems need to cover ranges up to tens of thousands of Hz and, in the case of radaz and similar equipment...the tracking is in progress, a camera records the telescope view at regular intervals nf one, five, ten , or twenty frames per second. Each fram contains...submission can prevent costly reruns. 3.2.3 Sophistication The flowv of data processing should be as straightforward and simple as i.. con- sistent

  1. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems (ECS) are compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented for coal fired process boilers. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented.

  2. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  3. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 2: Residual-fired nocogeneration process boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  4. Coal hydrogasification process development. Volume II. Peat studies. Second annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, K.M.; Rosemary, J.K.

    1980-10-20

    This report describes work performed on a program directed towards investigating the effects of peat hydrogasification in an entrained flow reactor. The program was conducted in three phases: peat dense-phase feed system flow studies, hydrogasification entrained flow reactor testing, and preliminary peat process economic evaluations. The peat dense-phase feeding studies included low-pressure (below 150 psig) testing at nominal solid peat flow rates of 1 ton/hr and analytical modeling efforts. The hydrogasification reactor testing was performed at peat flow rates of over 1000 lb/hr and reactor temperatures to 1900/sup 0/F in hydrogen atmospheres from 500 to 1000 psig. A simple analytical kinetic model was developed to predict total carbon conversion as a function of reactor operating variables and its agreement with experimental data was found to be excellent. Finally, preliminary process economics were established for three variations of the Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Flash Hydropyrolysis Process with the cost of high-Btu gas ranging from $3.43 to $4.06 per million Btu.

  5. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-05-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems (ECS) are compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented for coal fired process boilers. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented.

  6. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuels consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  7. Facile spray-coating process for the fabrication of tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces with heterogeneous chemical compositions used for selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Jing, Zhijiao; Zha, Fei; Yang, Yaoxia; Wang, Qingtao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-06-11

    In this paper, tunable adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces have been fabricated successfully by spraying ZnO nanoparticle (NP) suspensions onto desired substrates. We regulate the spray-coating process by changing the mass percentage of hydrophobic ZnO NPs (which were achieved by modifying hydrophilic ZnO NPs with stearic acid) in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ZnO NP mixtures to control heterogeneous chemical composition of the ZnO surfaces. Thus, the water adhesion on the same superhydrophobic ZnO surface could be effectively tuned by controlling the surface chemical composition without altering the surface morphology. Compared with the conventional tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces, on which there were only three different water sliding angle values: lower than 10°, 90° (the water droplet is firmly pinned on the surface at any tilted angles), and the value between the two ones, the water adhesion on the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces has been tuned effectively, on which the sliding angle is controlled from 2 ± 1° to 9 ± 1°, 21 ± 2°, 39 ± 3°, and 90°. Accordingly, the adhesive force can be adjusted from extremely low (∼2.5 μN) to very high (∼111.6 μN). On the basis of the different adhesive forces of the tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces, the selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes was achieved, which has never been reported before. In addition, we demonstrated a proof of selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes for application in the droplet-based microreactors via our tunable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces for the quantitative detection of AgNO3 and NaOH. The results reported herein realize the selective transportation of microdroplets with different volumes and we believe that this method would potentially be used in many important applications, such as selective water droplet transportation, biomolecular quantitative detection and droplet-based biodetection.

  8. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 29, August-November, 1978. Volume VI. Process development unit studies. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This report presents the results of seven SRC-II runs on Process Development Unit P99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam coal. Four of these runs (Runs 41-44) were made feeding coal from the Robinson Run Mine and three (Runs 45-47) were made feeding a second shipment of coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. This work showed that both these coals are satisfactory feedstocks for the SRC-II process. Increasing dissolver outlet hydrogen partial pressure from approximately 1300 to about 1400 psia did not have a significant effect on yields from Robinson Run coal, but simultaneously increasing coal concentration in the feed slurry from 25 to 30 wt% and decreasing the percent recycle solids from 21% to 17% lowered distillate yields. With the Powhatan coal, a modest increase in the boiling temperature (approximately 35/sup 0/F) at the 10% point) of the process solvent had essentially no effect on product yields, while lowering the average dissolver temperature from 851/sup 0/F to 842/sup 0/F reduced gas yield.

  9. A process for containment removal and waste volume reduction to remediate groundwater containing certain radionuclides, toxic metals and organics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, L.P.; Killey, D.R.W.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, P.C.F.

    1992-09-01

    A project to remove groundwater contaminants by an improved treatment process was performed during 1990 October--1992 March by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the United States Department of Energy, managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The goal was to generate high-quality effluent while minimizing secondary waste volume. Two effluent target levels, within an order of magnitude, or less than the US Drinking Water Limit, were set to judge the process effectiveness. The program employed mixed waste feeds containing cadmium, uranium, lead, iron, calcium, strontium-85-90, cesium-137, benzene and trichlorethylene in simulated and actual groundwater and soil leachate solutions. A combination of process steps consisting of sequential chemical conditioning, cross-flow microfiltration and dewatering by low temperature-evaporation, or filter pressing were effective for the treatment of mixed waste having diverse physico-chemical properties. A simplified single-stage version of the process was implemented to treat ground and surface waters contaminated with strontium-90 at the Chalk River Laboratories site. Effluent targets and project goals were met successfully.

  10. Data requirements for EOR surfactant-polymer process simulation and analysis of El Dorado pilot-project simulation, Butler County, Kansas. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, E.L.; Lohse, A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of computer simulation of the El Dorado surfactant-polymer EOR pilot project, Butler County, Kansas indicated that conventional data from the project and other data in the public domain were not adequate for geologic, reservoir and process characterizations in a complex numerical simulation. As used by GURC in geologic characterization, and by INTERCOMP in process characterization and input into the CFTE simulator, the collective body of field and chemical data and related assumptions necessary for simulator input was not sufficient to predict how the chemical flood would behave in the Admire 650-foot sandstone reservoir. Based upon this study, a comprehensive body of data requirements for EOR simulation is defined in detail. Geologic characterization includes descriptors for rock, interwell and intrasystem correlations; reservoir characterization includes descriptors for fluid/rock, production, and flow rate properties; process characterization includes descriptors for chemical properties, interactions and functions. Reservoir heterogeneity is a principal problem in EOR simulation. It can be overcome within reasonable economic limits by successive orders of descriptors from: microscale (rock), achieved through borehole and core analyses; to macroscale (interwell), achieved through multiple borehole correlations; to megascale (intrasystem), achieved through extrapolation of rock and correlative well data into a generic depositional model that contains a description of internal mass properties within a given external morphology. Volume II contains appendices for: flow chart for surfactant-polymer process simulation; INTERCOMP reports to GURC describing the CFTE simulator program used in this study.

  11. Data requirements for EOR surfactant-polymer process simulation and analysis of El Dorado pilot-project simulation, Butler County, Kansas. Volume I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, E.L.; Lohse, A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of computer simulation of the El Dorado surfactant-polymer EOR pilot project, Butler County, Kansas indicated that conventional data from the project and other data in the public domain were not adequate for geologic, reservoir and process characterizations in a complex numerical simulation. As used by GURC in geologic characterization, and by INTERCOMP in process characterization and input into the CFTE simulator, the collective body of field and chemical data and related assumptions necessary for simulator input was not sufficient to predict how the chemical flood would behave in the Admire 650-foot sandstone reservoir. Based upon this study, a comprehensive body of data requirements for EOR simulation is defined in detail. Geologic characterization includes descriptors for rock, interwell and intrasystem correlations; reservoir characterization includes descriptors for fluid/rock, production, and flow rate properties; process characterization includes descriptors for chemical properties, interactions and functions. Reservoir heterogeneity is a principal problem in EOR simulation. It can be overcome within reasonable economic limits by successive orders of descriptors from: microscale (rock), achieved through borehole and core analyses; to macroscale (interwell), achieved through multiple borehole correlations; to megascale (intrasystem), achieved through extrapolation of rock and correlative well data into a generic depositional model that contains a description of internal mass properties within a given external morphology. Volume II contains appendices for: flow chart for surfactant-polymer process simulation; INTERCOMP reports to GURC describing the CFTE simulator program used in this study.

  12. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  13. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and U S Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  14. Altered relationship between electrophysiological response to errors and gray matter volumes in an extended network for error-processing in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanni; Hanna, Gregory L; Carrasco, Melisa; Gehring, William J; Fitzgerald, Kate D

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) show an increased electrophysiological response to errors that is thought to be localized to the posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMFC). However, the relation of this response, the error-related negativity (ERN), to underlying brain structures remains unknown. In an examination of 20 pediatric OCD patients and 20 healthy youth, we found that more negative ERN amplitude was correlated with lower gray matter (GM) density in pMFC and orbital frontal cortex. The association of the ERN with pMFC gray matter volume was driven by the patient group. In addition, a group difference in the association of ERN with gray matter in right insula was observed, showing an association of these measures in healthy youth (more negative ERN amplitude was associated with lower GM density in insula), but not in patients. These findings provide preliminary evidence linking gray matter volumes in an extended network for error processing to the ERN, and suggest that structural alterations in this network may underlie exaggeration of the ERN in pediatric OCD.

  15. Conical scan impact study. Volume 1: General central data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, D. H.; Eppes, T. A.; Thomas, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument was studied in terms of: (1) design modifications required in framing and continuous image recording devices; and (2) changes in configurations of an all-digital precision image processor. A baseline system was defined to provide the framework for comparison, and included pertinent spacecraft parameters, a conical MSS, a linear MSS, an image recording system, and an all-digital precision processor. Lateral offset pointing of the sensors over a range of plus or minus 20 deg was considered. The study addressed the conical scan impact on geometric, radiometric, and aperture correction of MSS data in terms of hardware and software considerations, system complexity, quality of corrections, throughput, and cost of implementation. It was concluded that: (1) if the MSS data are to be only film recorded, then there is only a nomial concial scan impact on the ground data processing system; and (2) if digital data are to be provided to users on computer compatible tapes in rectilinear format, then there is a significant conical scan impact on the ground data processing system.

  16. Architecture and data processing alternatives for Tse computer. Volume 1: Tse logic design concepts and the development of image processing machine architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickard, D. A.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Digital computer components which perform two dimensional array logic operations (Tse logic) on binary data arrays are described. The properties of Golay transforms which make them useful in image processing are reviewed, and several architectures for Golay transform processors are presented with emphasis on the skeletonizing algorithm. Conventional logic control units developed for the Golay transform processors are described. One is a unique microprogrammable control unit that uses a microprocessor to control the Tse computer. The remaining control units are based on programmable logic arrays. Performance criteria are established and utilized to compare the various Golay transform machines developed. A critique of Tse logic is presented, and recommendations for additional research are included.

  17. Analyses of requirements for computer control and data processing experiment subsystems: Image data processing system (IDAPS) software description (7094 version), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A description of each of the software modules of the Image Data Processing System (IDAPS) is presented. The changes in the software modules are the result of additions to the application software of the system and an upgrade of the IBM 7094 Mod(1) computer to a 1301 disk storage configuration. Necessary information about IDAPS sofware is supplied to the computer programmer who desires to make changes in the software system or who desires to use portions of the software outside of the IDAPS system. Each software module is documented with: module name, purpose, usage, common block(s) description, method (algorithm of subroutine) flow diagram (if needed), subroutines called, and storage requirements.

  18. Study of water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 2: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarneri, C. A.; Reed, A.; Renman, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The manner in which current and advanced technology can be applied to develop practical solutions to existing and emerging water supply and waste disposal problems is evaluated. An overview of water resource factors as they affect new community planning, and requirements imposed on residential waste treatment systems are presented. The results of equipment surveys contain information describing: commercially available devices and appliances designed to conserve water; devices and techniques for monitoring water quality and controlling back contamination; and advanced water and waste processing equipment. System concepts are developed and compared on the basis of current and projected costs. Economic evaluations are based on community populations of from 2,000 to 250,000. The most promising system concept is defined in sufficient depth to initiate detailed design.

  19. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process. Volume 2, Parts 4--8: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D.

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE`s Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. MODFLOW–USG version 1: An unstructured grid version of MODFLOW for simulating groundwater flow and tightly coupled processes using a control volume finite-difference formulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Ibaraki, Motomu; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    A new version of MODFLOW, called MODFLOW–USG (for UnStructured Grid), was developed to support a wide variety of structured and unstructured grid types, including nested grids and grids based on prismatic triangles, rectangles, hexagons, and other cell shapes. Flexibility in grid design can be used to focus resolution along rivers and around wells, for example, or to subdiscretize individual layers to better represent hydrostratigraphic units. MODFLOW–USG is based on an underlying control volume finite difference (CVFD) formulation in which a cell can be connected to an arbitrary number of adjacent cells. To improve accuracy of the CVFD formulation for irregular grid-cell geometries or nested grids, a generalized Ghost Node Correction (GNC) Package was developed, which uses interpolated heads in the flow calculation between adjacent connected cells. MODFLOW–USG includes a Groundwater Flow (GWF) Process, based on the GWF Process in MODFLOW–2005, as well as a new Connected Linear Network (CLN) Process to simulate the effects of multi-node wells, karst conduits, and tile drains, for example. The CLN Process is tightly coupled with the GWF Process in that the equations from both processes are formulated into one matrix equation and solved simultaneously. This robustness results from using an unstructured grid with unstructured matrix storage and solution schemes. MODFLOW–USG also contains an optional Newton-Raphson formulation, based on the formulation in MODFLOW–NWT, for improving solution convergence and avoiding problems with the drying and rewetting of cells. Because the existing MODFLOW solvers were developed for structured and symmetric matrices, they were replaced with a new Sparse Matrix Solver (SMS) Package developed specifically for MODFLOW–USG. The SMS Package provides several methods for resolving nonlinearities and multiple symmetric and asymmetric linear solution schemes to solve the matrix arising from the flow equations and the Newton

  1. Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

  2. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

  3. SMALL-VOLUME BASALTIC VOLCANOES: ERUPTIVE PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES, AND POST-ERUPTIVE GEOMORPHIC EVOLUTION IN CRATER FLAT (PLEISTOCENE), SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Valentine; F.V. Perry; D. Krier; G.N. Keating; R.E. Kelley; A.H. Cogbill

    2006-04-04

    Five Pleistocene basaltic volcanoes in Crater Flat (southern Nevada) demonstrate the complexity of eruption processes associated with small-volume basalts and the effects of initial emplacement characteristics on post-eruptive geomorphic evolution of the volcanic surfaces. The volcanoes record eruptive processes in their pyroclastic facies ranging from ''classical'' Strombolian mechanisms to, potentially, violent Strombolian mechanisms. Cone growth was accompanied, and sometimes disrupted, by effusion of lavas from the bases of cones. Pyroclastic cones were built upon a gently southward-sloping surface and were prone to failure of their down-slope (southern) flanks. Early lavas flowed primarily southward and, at Red and Black Cone volcanoes, carried abundant rafts of cone material on the tops of the flows. These resulting early lava fields eventually built platforms such that later flows erupted from the eastern (at Red Cone) and northern (at Black Cone) bases of the cones. Three major surface features--scoria cones, lava fields with abundant rafts of pyroclastic material, and lava fields with little or no pyroclastic material--experienced different post-eruptive surficial processes. Contrary to previous interpretations, we argue that the Pleistocene Crater Flat volcanoes are monogenetic, each having formed in a single eruptive episode lasting months to a few years, and with all eruptive products having emanated from the area of the volcanoes main cones rather than from scattered vents. Geochemical variations within the volcanoes must be interpreted within a monogenetic framework, which implies preservation of magma source heterogeneities through ascent and eruption of the magmas.

  4. A Microfluidic Platform for Precision Small-volume Sample Processing and Its Use to Size Separate Biological Particles with an Acoustic Microdevice

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Erika J.; Huang, Chao; Hamilton, Julie; Benett, William J.; Bora, Mihail; Burklund, Alison; Metz, Thomas R.; Shusteff, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    A major advantage of microfluidic devices is the ability to manipulate small sample volumes, thus reducing reagent waste and preserving precious sample. However, to achieve robust sample manipulation it is necessary to address device integration with the macroscale environment. To realize repeatable, sensitive particle separation with microfluidic devices, this protocol presents a complete automated and integrated microfluidic platform that enables precise processing of 0.15–1.5 ml samples using microfluidic devices. Important aspects of this system include modular device layout and robust fixtures resulting in reliable and flexible world to chip connections, and fully-automated fluid handling which accomplishes closed-loop sample collection, system cleaning and priming steps to ensure repeatable operation. Different microfluidic devices can be used interchangeably with this architecture. Here we incorporate an acoustofluidic device, detail its characterization, performance optimization, and demonstrate its use for size-separation of biological samples. By using real-time feedback during separation experiments, sample collection is optimized to conserve and concentrate sample. Although requiring the integration of multiple pieces of equipment, advantages of this architecture include the ability to process unknown samples with no additional system optimization, ease of device replacement, and precise, robust sample processing. PMID:26651055

  5. Maintaining high-volume, low-pressure surface-coating regulatory compliance using the U.s. Environmental Protection Agency's data quality objectives process.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Peters, Scott; Olivas, Arthur C; Nelson, Tim M

    2005-03-01

    To effectively reduce the environmental compliance costs associated with meeting specific requirements under the Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facility's National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants rule, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objective (DQO) process has been proposed as a suitable framework for developing a scientifically defensible surface compliance monitoring program. By estimating the variability associated with the air cap pressure of high- volume, low-pressure (HVLP) surface-coating spray equipment, the number of monitoring samples necessary for an affected facility to claim compliance with a desired statistical confidence level was established. Using data taken from the pilot test facility, the DQO process indicated that the mean of at least 21 HVLP air cap pressure samples taken over the compliance period must be < or = 10 pounds per square inch (psig) gauge for the facility to claim regulatory compliance with 99.99% statistical confidence. Fewer compliance samples could be taken, but that decision would lead to a commensurate reduction in the compliance confidence level. Implementation of the DQO-based compliance sampling plan eliminates the need for an affected facility to sample all regulated HVLP surface-coating processes while still maintaining a high level of compliance assurance.

  6. Observation of Hydrological Processes Using Remote Sensing. Chapter 2.14; Volume 2: The Science of Hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, Peter (Editor); Su, Z.; Robeling, R. A.; Schulz, J.; Holleman, I.; Levizzani, V.; Timmermans, W. J.; Rott, H.; Mognard-Campbell, N.; de Jeu, R.; Wagner, W.; Rodell, M.; Salama, M. S.; Parodi, G. N.; Wang, L.

    2011-01-01

    requested by the European Union s Water Framework Directive (WFD), as well as national policies). Geo-information science and EO are vital in achieving a better understanding of the water cycle and better monitoring, analysis, prediction, and management of the world s water resources. The major components of the water cycle of the Earth system and their possible observations are presented. Such observations are essential to understand the global water cycle and its variability, both spatially and temporally, and can only be achieved consistently by means of EOs. Additionally, such observations are essential to advance our understanding of coupling between the terrestrial, atmospheric, and oceanic branches of the water cycle, and how this coupling may influence climate variability and predictability. Water resources management directly interferes with the natural water cycle in the forms of building dams, reservoirs, water transfer systems, and irrigation systems that divert and redistribute part of the water storages and fluxes on land. The water cycle is mainly driven and coupled to the energy cycle in terms of phase changes of water (changes among liquid, water vapor, and solid phases) and transport of water by winds in addition to gravity and diffusion processes. The water-cycle components can be observed with in situ sensors as well as airborne and satellite sensors in terms of radiative quantities. Processing and conversion of these radiative signals are necessary to retrieve the water-cycle components.

  7. Duct injection for SO{sub 2} control, Design Handbook, Volume 1, Process design and engineering guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    PETC developed a comprehensive program of coal-related, acid-rain research and development with a major activity area centering on flue gas cleanup and control of SO{sub 2} emissions. Particular emphasis was placed on the retrofit measures for older coal-fired power plants which predate the 1971 New Source Performance Standards. Candidate emission control technologies fall into three categories, depending upon their point of application along the fuel path (i.e., pre, during, or post combustion). The post-combustion, in-duct injection of a calcium-based chemical reagent seemed promising. Preliminary studies showed that reagent injection between the existing air heater and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) could remove between 50-60% of the SO{sub 2} and produce an environmentally safe, dry, solid waste that is easily disposed. Although SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies were less, the estimated capital costs for duct injection technology were low making the economics of duct injection systems seem favorable when compared to conventional wet slurry scrubbers under certain circumstances. With the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 came more incentive for the development of low capital cost flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. A number of technical problems had to be resolved, however, before duct injection technology could be brought to a state of commercial readiness. The Duct Injection Technology Development Program was launched as a comprehensive, four-year research effort undertaken by PETC to develop this new technology. Completed in 1992, this Duct Injection Design Handbook and the three-dimensional predictive mathematical model constitute two primary end products from this development program. The aim of this design handbook and the accompanying math model is to provide utility personnel with sufficient information to evaluate duct injection technology against competing SO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies for an existing plant.

  8. Mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells: guidelines for blood volume to process, based on CD34-positive blood cell count in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Anguita-Compagnon, A T; Dibarrart, M T; Palma, J; Paredes, L; Mosso, C; Montalva, R; Salas, L; Araos, D; Delgado, I; Majlis, A

    2010-01-01

    We report 189 mobilizations and 489 collections of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) performed in 139 autologous transplantation patients and in 28 donors for allogeneic transplantations whose ages ranged from 2-68 years. We observed a correlation (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.64) between CD34-positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units examined to estimate PBSC. In a subset of 287 collections (97 adults and 49 children) we obtained peripheral blood (PB) CD34-positive cell counts at 2 to 4 hours before leukapheresis. We noted a correlation between PB CD34-positive cell counts before leukapheresis and the number of CD34-positive cells per kilogram of body weight collected in the whole apheresis of the day (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.82). An even better correlation was obtained between PB CD34-positive cells preapheresis and the yield of each individual blood volume (BV) processed (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.87). Healthy donors and patients in each age group behaved similarly. In addition, the collection yield was greater among children than adults. These findings allowed us to develop a simple predictive model to estimate the BV to process for a target dose of CD34-positive cells per kilogram, based on the level of PBSC before apheresis in children and adults.

  9. Processing techniques development, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator); Anuta, P. E.; Hixson, M. M.; Swain, P. H.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of the geometric characteristics of the aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) relative to LANDSAT indicated that relatively low order polynominals would model the distortions to subpixel accuracy to bring SAR into registration for good quality imagery. Also the area analyzed was small, about 10 miles square, so this is an additional constraint. For the Air Force/ERIM data, none of the tested methods could achieve subpixel accuracy. Reasons for this is unknown; however, the noisy (high scintillation) nature of the data and attendent unrecognizability of features contribute to this error. It is concluded that the quadratic model would adequately provide distortion modeling for small areas, i.e., 10 to 20 miles square.

  10. Influence of manganese on sintering processes in the Ti-Fe system. 1. Volume changes in sintering of Ti-Fe-Mn compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Kivalo, L.I.; Skorokhod, V.V.

    1986-05-01

    An investigation was made of the influence of manganese on the sintering processes in the titanium-iron system in the area of temperatures of existence of the first ternary eutectic point. Powders of titanium obtained by hydride-calcium reduction, ferromanganese, and types PZh4M2 and V3 iron were used. A figure presents data on the character of the volume changes in sintering of compacts of mixtures of titanium and iron powders with and without manganese. The x-ray analysis was made on a DRON-0.5 instrument. The profiles of intensities of the x-ray lines of Ti(Fe, Mn) phase present in specimens of mixture II are shown. With an increase in sintering temperature the line, which is diffuse at 1050 degrees C, gradually narrows, and at 1250 degrees C a doublet appears. At the time, the lattice parameter changes from 0.2976 for unalloyed TiFe to 0.2991 nm for Ti(Fe, Mn) obtained at 1250 degrees C. To obtain Ti(Fe, Mn) compounds of the required composition, it is necessary to take into account the amount of evaporated manganese.

  11. Quantification of organophosphorus nerve agent metabolites using a reduced-volume, high-throughput sample processing format and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swaim, Leigh L; Johnson, Rudolph C; Zhou, Yingtao; Sandlin, Chris; Barr, John R

    2008-01-01

    A reduced-volume, high-throughput analytical method has been developed for the quantification of organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent metabolites in human urine. Metabolites of soman, sarin, cyclohexyl-sarin, VX, and Russian-VX were quantified down to a lowest reportable limit of 1 ng/mL in human urine. One hundred microliter urine samples were preconcentrated using normal-phase 96-well solid-phase extraction silica sorbent beds. Dual-column hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was applied in a 2.5-min isocratic separation followed by negative electrospray isotope-dilution multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry. Method validation included the characterization of two synthetic urine pools, relative recovery experiments, and calculation of the method limit of detection. All liquid handling steps were processed in a high-density 96-well format, including sample aliquoting, extraction, dry-down, and reconstitution. This allows up to 3840 unknown samples, plus calibrators and quality control materials, to be prepared on a single liquid handler in a 24-h period. In a public health emergency involving OP-nerve agents, this method provides the sample preparation and analytical capacity to respond rapidly to a large number of patient samples.

  12. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2015-06-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 High Altitude LOng Range (HALO) research aircraft during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra that are spectrally sampled every 0.625 cm-1. A total of 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line of sight. Simultaneous in situ observations by the Basic Halo Measurement and Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), an ozone detector named Fairo, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large extent be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  13. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb-imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 research aircraft HALO during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra. 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line-of-sight. Simultaneous in-situ observations by the BAsic HALO Measurement And Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-Situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), FAIRO, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in-situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large fraction be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  14. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    In collaboration with The City of Calgary 2011 Sustainability Direction and as part of the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) project, the focus of this research is to develop a semi/automated 'protocol' to post-process large volumes of high-resolution (H-res) airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to enable accurate urban waste heat mapping. HEAT is a free GeoWeb service, designed to help Calgary residents improve their home energy efficiency by visualizing the amount and location of waste heat leaving their homes and communities, as easily as clicking on their house in Google Maps. HEAT metrics are derived from 43 flight lines of TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) data acquired on May 13--14, 2012 at night (11:00 pm--5:00 am) over The City of Calgary, Alberta (˜825 km 2) at a 50 cm spatial resolution and 0.05°C thermal resolution. At present, the only way to generate a large area, high-spatial resolution TIR scene is to acquire separate airborne flight lines and mosaic them together. However, the ambient sensed temperature within, and between flight lines naturally changes during acquisition (due to varying atmospheric and local micro-climate conditions), resulting in mosaicked images with different temperatures for the same scene components (e.g. roads, buildings), and mosaic join-lines arbitrarily bisect many thousands of homes. In combination these effects result in reduced utility and classification accuracy including, poorly defined HEAT Metrics, inaccurate hotspot detection and raw imagery that are difficult to interpret. In an effort to minimize these effects, three new semi/automated post-processing algorithms (the protocol) are described, which are then used to generate a 43 flight line mosaic of TABI-1800 data from which accurate Calgary waste heat maps and HEAT metrics can be generated. These algorithms (presented as four peer-reviewed papers)---are: (a) Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN)---used to mitigate the microclimatic

  15. A Review and Analysis of Performance Appraisal Processes, Volume III. Performance Appraisal for Professional Service Employees: Non-Technical Report. Professionalism in Schools Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondrack, D. A.; Oliver, C.

    The third of three volumes, this report summarizes the findings of, first, a review and analysis of published literature on performance appraisal in general and particularly on the use of appraisals in public education systems, and, second, a series of field-site investigations of performance appraisal systems in action. The field site studies of…

  16. Ada (Trade Name) Foundation Technology. Volume 4. Software Requirements for WIS (WWMCCS (World Wide Military Command and Control System) Information System) Text Processing Prototypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    type lonts and gsei-oriented "help" messages tailored to the operations being performed and user expertise In general, critical design issues...other volumes include command language, software design , description and analysis tools, database management system operating systems; planning and...summary information. d. Detailed planning capabilities must provide improved methods for designating specific units and associated sustainment

  17. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  18. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Nonlinear processes in the formation of dynamic volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, V. G.; Danileĭko, Yu K.; Lebedeva, T. P.; Nesterov, D. A.

    1987-10-01

    The solutions of wave equations are used to develop new ideas on the dynamics of the diffraction efficiency of a volume light-induced grating in a medium with a nonlinear refractive index and/or absorption coefficient. It is shown that the earlier solutions have failed to describe satisfactorily the diffraction of radiation by volume phase and amplitude gratings because of distortion of the amplitude-phase profile of the radiation forming the grating. An analysis is made of the influence of the radial distribution of the intensity of the grating-forming beams on the observed changes in the diffraction efficiency. Predictions are made and experimental evidence is provided of the role of nonlinear refraction of a beam as a whole, which is an important factor in the space-time dynamics of the diffracted radiation in the far-field zone.

  19. Tidal volume (TV) post-process obtained with electrical impedance tomography on a group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Use of adjust equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balleza, Marco; Anton, Daniel; Casan, Pere; Riu, Pere

    2010-04-01

    Equations used to estimate ventilation out of EIT images, validated on healthy volunteers show a significant bias and a larger variance when were applied on a COPD patients group. The differences in estimation values were found to be highly correlated with anthropometric parameters. Two groups of 13 and 4 COPD male patients (FEV1/FVC<70% and FVC >= 80%) were used in this study. We have measured different anthropometric parameters like age, weight, height and skinfolds. The EIT system (TIE4sys) and a pneumotach were simultaneously connected to monitor tidal volume. The main anthropometric parameters values of 13 COPD patients were: age: 67±9 years, height: 1.65±0.05 m, weight: 72±11 kg, BMI: 26.4±3.3 and the subscapular skinfold thickness was 23±9mm. The mean tidal volume estimated with TIE4sys and the pneumotach were: 0.580±0.212 L and 0.774±0.173 L r = 0.861 (p<0.01). The mean difference was 0.196±0.096 L (p0.01). On this group we have found out an adjust equation and we have validated it on an independent group of 4 COPD patients. The equation was Diff=-1478+15.6(weight). The mean tidal volume values obtained with pneumotach and TIE4sys on the second group of COPD patients (M:4) were: 0.798±0.395 L and 0.732±0.327 L. The mean of the differences was 0.066±0.114L. The differences of determinations estimated with pneumotach and TIE4sys can be attributed to changes of anthropometric characteristics like subscapular skinfold.

  20. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

  1. Integrated Information Support System (IISS). Volume 6. Network Transaction Manager Subsystem. Part 6. Network Transaction Manager (NTM) Message Processing Unit Product Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-30

    CATEGORY TABLE. CDMFIL REQUEST NEW TABLE FROM CDM. CHDPRC CHILD TABLE PROCESSING. CHDSTM PROCESS CHILD STATUS MESSAGE. CLDCHK CHECK CHILD TABLE FOR RESERVED...ENTRIES. CLDINI INITIALIZE CHILD TABLE. CLDTBL TABLE MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS FOR THE CHILD TABLE. CLNHSD PURPOSE NOT KNOWN - STUBBED OUT. CLNUP CLEAN UP...THE AP STATUS ENTRY AND CHILD TABLE. CMPHDR COMPLETE MESSAGE HEADER. CNCLSD PROCESS CANCEL SHUT DOWN MESSAGE ON UI APC. CRTPRC CREATE PROCESSES

  2. Biochemical kinetics in changing volumes.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, Piotr H; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The need of taking into account the change of compartment volume when developing chemical kinetics analysis inside the living cell is discussed. Literature models of a single enzymatic Michaelis-Menten process, glycolytic oscillations, and mitotic cyclin oscillations were tested with appropriate theoretical extension in the direction of volume modification allowance. Linear and exponential type of volume increase regimes were compared. Due to the above, in a growing cell damping of the amplitude, phase shift, and time pattern deformation of the metabolic rhythms considered were detected, depending on the volume change character. The performed computer simulations allow us to conclude that evolution of the cell volume can be an essential factor of the chemical kinetics in a growing cell. The phenomenon of additional metabolite oscillations caused by the periodic cell growth and division was theoretically predicted and mathematically described. Also, the hypothesis of the periodized state in the growing cell as the generalization of the steady-state was formulated.

  3. New large volume hydrothermal reaction cell for studying chemical processes under supercritical hydrothermal conditions using time-resolved in situ neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Kang Min; O'Hare, Dermot; Smith, Ronald I.; Chowdhury, Mohammed; Fikremariam, Hanna

    2010-12-01

    The design and testing of a new large volume Inconel pressure cell for the in situ study of supercritical hydrothermal syntheses using time-resolved neutron diffraction is introduced for the first time. The commissioning of this new cell is demonstrated by the measurement of the time-of-flight neutron diffraction pattern for TiO2 (Anatase) in supercritical D2O on the POLARIS diffractometer at the United Kingdom's pulsed spallation neutron source, ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The sample can be studied over a wide range of temperatures (25-450 °C) and pressures (1-355 bar). This novel apparatus will now enable us to study the kinetics and mechanisms of chemical syntheses under extreme environments such as supercritical water, and in particular to study the crystallization of a variety of technologically important inorganic materials.

  4. New large volume hydrothermal reaction cell for studying chemical processes under supercritical hydrothermal conditions using time-resolved in situ neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ok, Kang Min; O'Hare, Dermot; Smith, Ronald I; Chowdhury, Mohammed; Fikremariam, Hanna

    2010-12-01

    The design and testing of a new large volume Inconel pressure cell for the in situ study of supercritical hydrothermal syntheses using time-resolved neutron diffraction is introduced for the first time. The commissioning of this new cell is demonstrated by the measurement of the time-of-flight neutron diffraction pattern for TiO(2) (Anatase) in supercritical D(2)O on the POLARIS diffractometer at the United Kingdom's pulsed spallation neutron source, ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The sample can be studied over a wide range of temperatures (25-450 °C) and pressures (1-355 bar). This novel apparatus will now enable us to study the kinetics and mechanisms of chemical syntheses under extreme environments such as supercritical water, and in particular to study the crystallization of a variety of technologically important inorganic materials.

  5. Turbine Fuels from Tar Sands Bitumen and Heavy Oil. Volume 2. Phase 3. Process Design Specifications for a Turbine Fuel Refinery Charging San Ardo Heavy Crude Oil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    basis: a high-activity hydrocracking catalyst (Nickel-Moly on zeolite ). Single reactor with 2477 cu.ft. volume operated at a 2.5 liquid hourly space...1 192,000 192,000 4.10 S.00 4.33 Sta3,400 2 - 18’ X 401’ BAYS 410 SS SOURCE: HAPPY El STRIPPER COW . 650 F 200 PSIG 1 51,600 3 1 53,100 53,100 4.10 S...MOLE WTWOD20 2.0 .1 a890 SUCT. 125 F a 2൒ PSIA DISCH. 131 F a 2620 PSIA SPARES: ROTOR SOURCE: EST. K2 ATMOS TN OFF-GAS Cow . 50 MP 2 280,000 3 2 2,800

  6. An Original Processing Method of Satellite Altimetry for Estimating Water Levels and Volume Fluctuations in a Series of Small Lakes of the Pantanal Wetland Complex in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Costa, Paulo; Oliveira Pereira, Eric; Maillard, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry is becoming a major tool for measuring water levels in rivers and lakes offering accuracies compatible with many hydrological applications, especially in uninhabited regions of difficult access. The Pantanal is considered the largest tropical wetland in the world and the sparsity of in situ gauging station make remote methods of water level measurements an attractive alternative. This article describes how satellites altimetry data from Envisat and Saral was used to determine water level in two small lakes in the Pantanal. By combining the water level with the water surface area extracted from satellite imagery, water volume fluctuations were also estimated for a few periods. The available algorithms (retrackers) that compute a range solution from the raw waveforms do not always produce reliable measurements in small lakes. This is because the return signal gets often "contaminated" by the surrounding land. To try to solve this, we created a "lake" retracker that rejects waveforms that cannot be attributed to "calm water" and convert them to altitude. Elevation data are stored in a database along with the water surface area to compute the volume fluctuations. Satellite water level time series were also produced and compared with the only nearby in situ gauging station. Although the "lake" retracker worked well with calm water, the presence of waves and other factors was such that the standard "ice1" retracker performed better on the overall. We estimate our water level accuracy to be around 75 cm. Although the return time of both satellites is only 35 days, the next few years promise to bring new altimetry satellite missions that will significantly increase this frequency.

  7. Fifty Years of College Choice: Social, Political and Institutional Influences on the Decision-Making Process. New Agenda Series. Volume 5, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzie, Jillian; Palmer, Megan; Hayek, John; Hossler, Don; Jacob, Stacy A.; Cummings, Heather

    2004-01-01

    The college-choice process is complex and affects many high school students, family members and public policy-makers, as well as institutions of higher education. This report provides an overview of the college-choice process for traditional-age students and examines how it has evolved during the last half of the 20th century. Material from the…

  8. Agricultural Handling and Processing Industries; Data Pertinent to an Evaluation of Overtime Exemptions Available under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wage and Labor Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This report covers the major agricultural handling and processing industries qualifying for partial overtime exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act and evaluates the need for such exemptions. Questionnaires which were sent to firms in various processing industries provide data on nearly 4,000 processors. The results show that existing…

  9. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H.; Duthie, R.G.; Wootten, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

  10. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 6: Specification for EOS Central Data Processing Facility (CDPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications and functions of the Central Data Processing (CDPF) Facility which supports the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are discussed. The CDPF will receive the EOS sensor data and spacecraft data through the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) and the Operations Control Center (OCC). The CDPF will process the data and produce high density digital tapes, computer compatible tapes, film and paper print images, and other data products. The specific aspects of data inputs and data processing are identified. A block diagram of the CDPF to show the data flow and interfaces of the subsystems is provided.

  11. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD) system. Volume 3: Engineering creative/evaluation processes, phase 1, task 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrocq, C. A.; Hosek, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A series of functional flow charts are considered that were developed to properly identify and record the degree of participation of the disciplines considered in this feasibility study and the type of data required in the design process.

  12. Development of a finite volume model for the high-density infrared processing of gamma-titanium aluminide thin-gage sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, John D. K.

    2005-07-01

    A new method for the rapid processing of thin-gage sheet of traditionally difficult-to-process materials has been developed. The method uses high-density infrared (HDI) rapid heating of a plasma-arc lamp to liquid-phase sinter powder metal compact precursors to a dense structure. Using this method, intermetallic sheet can be produced in a fraction of the time at a significant cost savings over traditional processing methods. In this work, gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) sheet was produced using HDI from powder precursors. A mathematical model was developed in order to determine lamp processing parameters. The model was developed using nickel materials and uses a comprehensive set of thermophysical data to predict temperature fields and phase changes during processing. The model was extended to the gamma-TiAl material system. With the aid of the model, processing parameters were determined that allowed for a temperature gradient across the sheet that would produce a liquid-phase cast structure on the surface, residual powder on the backside, and a middle layer solid + liquid zone. The later region produced an optimal fine-grain, lamellar microstructure that yields the best mechanical properties. The model also reduced costs by removing the need for front-end experiments. Postprocessing investigations showed that HDI was an effective tool for producing sheet. Measurements of density and mechanical properties revealed that HDI-produced gamma-TiAl was >99% dense and had a tensile strength of 428 MPa and ductility of 0.55%. Light microscope investigation showed the predicted fine-grain, lamellar microstructure was achieved. Results of HDI processing were compared to material processed by traditional methods.

  13. Parts, Materials, and Processes Experience Summary. Volume 1; [Catalog of ALERT and Other Information on Basic Design, Reliability, Quality and Applications Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The ALERT program, a system for communicating common problems with parts, materials, and processes, is condensed and catalogued. Expanded information on selected topics is provided by relating the problem area (failure) to the cause, the investigations and findings, the suggestions for avoidance (inspections, screening tests, proper part applications), and failure analysis procedures. The basic objective of ALERT is the avoidance of the recurrence of parts, materials, and processed problems, thus improving the reliability of equipment produced for and used by the government.

  14. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  15. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Hilbig, Andreas; Rogalla, Patrik

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences.

  16. Study for Identification of Beneficial Uses of Space (BUS). Volume 2: Technical report. Book 4: Development and business analysis of space processed surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary development plans, analysis of required R and D and production resources, the costs of such resources, and, finally, the potential profitability of a commercial space processing opportunity for the production of very high frequency surface acoustic wave devices are presented.

  17. Bibliography of the space processing program. Volume 1: A compilation through June 1974, Parts 1 and 2. [space manufacturing/spacecraft construction materials - aerospace environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoultz, M. B.; Mcclurken, E. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A compilation of NASA research efforts in the area of space environmental effects on materials and processes is presented. Topics considered are: (1) fluid mechanics and heat transfer; (2) crystal growth and containerless melts; (3) acoustics; (4) glass and ceramics; (5) electrophoresis; (6) welding; and (7) exobiology.

  18. Development of a prototype fluid volume measurement system. [for urine volume measurement on space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.; Meckel, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    The research is reported in applying the axial fluid temperature differential flowmeter to a urine volume measurement system for space missions. The fluid volume measurement system is described along with the prototype equipment package. Flowmeter calibration, electronic signal processing, and typical void volume measurements are also described.

  19. FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, O.J.

    1996-02-22

    Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

  20. Extraction and processing of circulating DNA from large sample volumes using methylation on beads for the detection of rare epigenetic events.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Brian; Stark, Alejandro; Pisanic, Thomas R; Kwak, Ruby; Zhang, Yi; Wrangle, John; Baylin, Stephen; Herman, James; Ahuja, Nita; Brock, Malcolm V; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2013-10-21

    The use of methylated tumor-specific circulating DNA has shown great promise as a potential cancer biomarker. Nonetheless, the relative scarcity of tumor-specific circulating DNA presents a challenge for traditional DNA extraction and processing techniques. Here we demonstrate a single tube extraction and processing technique dubbed "methylation on beads" that allows for DNA extraction and bisulfite conversion for up to 2 ml of plasma or serum. In comparison to traditional techniques including phenol chloroform and alcohol extraction, methylation on beads yields a 1.5- to 5-fold improvement in extraction efficiency. The technique results in far less carryover of PCR inhibitors yielding analytical sensitivity improvements of over 25-fold. The combination of improved recovery and sensitivity make possible the detection of rare epigenetic events and the development of high sensitivity epigenetic diagnostic assays.

  1. Study for identification of beneficial Uses of Space (BUS). Volume 2: Technical report. Book 3: Development and business analysis of space processed tungsten fox X-ray targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development plans, analysis of required R and D and production resources, the costs of such resources, and finally, the potential profitability of a commercial space processing opportunity for containerless melting and resolidification of tungsten are discussed. The aim is to obtain a form of tungsten which, when fabricated into targets for X-ray tubes, provides at least, a 50 percent increase in service life.

  2. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 4.7), Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H.; Duthie, R.G.; Wootten, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    The focus of this task is the preparation of (1) preliminary piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and single line electrical diagrams for a site-specific conceptual design and (2) a factored cost estimate for a 24 ton/day (tpd) capacity mild gasification process development unit (PDU) and an associated form coke preparation PDU. The intended site for this facility is the Illinois Coal Development Park at Carterville, Illinois, which is operated by Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. (VC)

  3. Study for identification of beneficial uses of Space (BUS). Volume 2: Technical report. Book 1: Development and business analysis of space processed isoenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A separation method to provide reasonable yields of high specificity isoenzymes for the purpose of large scale, early clinical diagnosis of diseases and organic damage such as, myocardial infarction, hepatoma, muscular dystrophy, and infectous disorders is presented. Preliminary development plans are summarized. An analysis of required research and development and production resources is included. The costs of such resources and the potential profitability of a commercial space processing opportunity for electrophoretic separation of high specificity isoenzymes are reviewed.

  4. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight. Volume 1. Published manuscripts. Progress report, June 1982-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhofer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1984-12-14

    Effects of the Gulf Stream on the outer southeastern US continental shelf were determined. The relationships of phytoplankton productivity and related processes to the oceanography of the inner shelf were investigated. Upwelling studies on the northeastern Florida shelf are described, and feeding and excretory rates of juvenile and adult zooplankton characteristic of advanced and matured upwellings on the southeastern continental shelf are reported. 6 figures. (ACR)

  5. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 3: Gasification, process fuels, and balance of plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, W. A.; Corman, J. C.; Johnson, G. G.; Cassel, T. A. V.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation of gasification and clean fuels from coal. Factors discussed include: coal and coal transportation costs; clean liquid and gas fuel process efficiencies and costs; and cost, performance, and environmental intrusion elements of the integrated low-Btu coal gasification system. Cost estimates for the balance-of-plant requirements associated with advanced energy conversion systems utilizing coal or coal-derived fuels are included.

  6. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year four of the grant, we continued to capitalize on and benefit from historical events which drove our early emphasis on group process studies. Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders' Forum (both of which provide input to the Five-Year Waste Plan), we continue to observe these groups and collect data. We also began a configuration study involving the complex modeling of DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Related to group process studies is the issue of the information requirements for individuals making decisions in consensus groups. Our information studies examined the requirements for decision-related information, frameworks for such information, and the effectiveness of information portrayed for decision making. However, we were able not only to continue studying consensus groups in action and related information issues, but also to focus considerable attention on the fundamental side of our research. The fundamental or basic research conducted in year four included: (1) expanding our literature database; (2) beginning the writing of the literature review summary document and the consensus guide; (3) developing frameworks and models such as the Environmental Trilogy model and a structural equations model of the consensus process; and (4) conducting laboratory studies concerning the effects of the presence of an expert, met expectations, opportunity to express views, incentive structure and conflict type (competitive versus collaborative) on consensus outcomes.

  7. The Heterogeneity in Retrieved Relations between the Personality Trait ‘Harm Avoidance’ and Gray Matter Volumes Due to Variations in the VBM and ROI Labeling Processing Settings

    PubMed Central

    Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; De Mey, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Concerns are raising about the large variability in reported correlations between gray matter morphology and affective personality traits as ‘Harm Avoidance’ (HA). A recent review study (Mincic 2015) stipulated that this variability could come from methodological differences between studies. In order to achieve more robust results by standardizing the data processing procedure, as a first step, we repeatedly analyzed data from healthy females while changing the processing settings (voxel-based morphology (VBM) or region-of-interest (ROI) labeling, smoothing filter width, nuisance parameters included in the regression model, brain atlas and multiple comparisons correction method). The heterogeneity in the obtained results clearly illustrate the dependency of the study outcome to the opted analysis settings. Based on our results and the existing literature, we recommended the use of VBM over ROI labeling for whole brain analyses with a small or intermediate smoothing filter (5-8mm) and a model variable selection step included in the processing procedure. Additionally, it is recommended that ROI labeling should only be used in combination with a clear hypothesis and that authors are encouraged to report their results uncorrected for multiple comparisons as supplementary material to aid review studies. PMID:27096608

  8. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  9. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  10. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume II - support materials. Final progress report, May 15, 1991--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers. This document consists of Support Materials for the manual: exercise answer keys; templates; guidelines for reviewing templates; a complete profiling packet; guidelines for the trainer.

  11. Proceedings: International Conference on Fixed-Film Biological Processes (1st) Held at Kings Island, Ohio on 20-23 April 1982. Volume II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    total counts, Azide - for enterococci and fecal streptococcus, Wort - for fungi, filamentous and non-filamentous, Weman - for slime forming mesophilic...Contactors). PO00 770 Inhibition of Nitrification by Chromium in a Biodisc System. PO00 771 Scale-Up and Process Analysis Techniques for Plastic...No. 17050 Dam, Nov. 1971. 5. Lawton, G.W. and Eggert, C.V., "Effect of High Sodium Filter Shines." Sew. and Ind. Wastes, 29, 1226 (1956). 6. u.b. tPA

  12. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 6, appendix A: Partially processed thematic mapper High Density Tape (HDT-AT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jai, A.

    1982-01-01

    One of the outputs of the data management system being developed to provide a variety of standard image products from the thematic mapper and the multispectral band scanners on LANDSAT 4, is the partially processed TM data (radiometric corrections applied and geometric correction matrices for two projections appended) which is recorded on a 28-track high density tape. Specifications are presented for the format of the recorded data as well as for the time code and the major and minor frames of the tape. Major frame types, formats, and field definitions are included.

  13. Low cost silicon solar array project. Task 1: Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low cost, high volume production of silane, SiH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, W. C.; Mui, J. Y. P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the redistribution of dichlorosilane and trichlorosilane vapor over a tertiary amine ion exchange resin catalyst were investigated. The hydrogenation of SiCl4 to form HSiCl3 and the direct synthesis of H2SiCl2 from HCl gas and metallurgical silicon metal were also studied. The purification of SiH4 using activated carbon adsorbent was studied along with a process for storing SiH4 absorbed on carbon. The latter makes possible a higher volumetric efficiency than compressed gas storage. A mini-plant designed to produce ten pounds per day of SiH4 is described.

  14. Concepts for on-board satellite image registration. Volume 3: Impact of VLSI/VHSIC on satellite on-board signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; Snyder, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Anticipated major advances in integrated circuit technology in the near future are described as well as their impact on satellite onboard signal processing systems. Dramatic improvements in chip density, speed, power consumption, and system reliability are expected from very large scale integration. Improvements are expected from very large scale integration enable more intelligence to be placed on remote sensing platforms in space, meeting the goals of NASA's information adaptive system concept, a major component of the NASA End-to-End Data System program. A forecast of VLSI technological advances is presented, including a description of the Defense Department's very high speed integrated circuit program, a seven-year research and development effort.

  15. Thermal analysis of the growth process of synthetic diamond in the large volume cubic press apparatus with large deformation of high pressure cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingchao; Li, Rui; Gu, Xue; Qin, Jieming; Jia, Xiaopeng; Ma, Hongan

    2015-06-01

    The temperature-field in diamond synthesis cell was simulated by a finite element method. A three-dimensional model of the China-type cubic press with large deformation of the synthesis cell was established successfully, which has been verified by situ measurements of synthesis cell. In addition, the distributions of temperature and its gradient in the synthesis sample were described. We found there is a large temperature drop in the synthesis sample, which brings some uncertainties in a synthesis process, such as the phenomenon of "wasteland, on which there is no nucleation and growth of diamond". Furthermore, the formation mechanism of wasteland was studied in detail. It indicates that the wasteland is inevitably exists in the synthesis sample, the distribution of growth region of the diamond with hex-octahedral is move to the center of the synthesis sample from near the heater as the power increasing, and the growth conditions of high quality diamond is locate at the center of the synthesis sample. This work can offer suggestion and advice to the development and optimization of a diamond production process.

  16. Conical scan impact study. Volume 2: Small local user data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, D. H.; Chase, P. E.; Dye, J.; Fahline, W. C.; Johnson, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument on a small local-user data processing facility was studied. User data requirements were examined to determine the unique system rquirements for a low cost ground system (LCGS) compatible with the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system. Candidate concepts were defined for the LCGS and preliminary designs were developed for selected concepts. The impact of a conical scan MSS versus a linear scan MSS was evaluated for the selected concepts. It was concluded that there are valid user requirements for the LCGS and, as a result of these requirements, the impact of the conical scanner is minimal, although some new hardware development for the LCGS is necessary to handle conical scan data.

  17. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  18. 30 CFR 250.1163 - How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid hydrocarbon burning volumes, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... volumes and liquid hydrocarbon burning volumes, and what records must I maintain? 250.1163 Section 250..., and Burning Hydrocarbons § 250.1163 How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid hydrocarbon burning volumes, and what records must I maintain? (a) If your facility processes more than...

  19. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 30. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. The fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [111 references

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, S. R.

    1980-02-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study the distribution and fate of up to 36 elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process Pilot Plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington. The elements Ti, V, Mg, Ca, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Br, Na, K, Sm, La, Ga, Cu, Sb, Se, Hg, Ni, Co, Cr, Fe, Rb, Cs, Sc, Tb, Eu, Ce, Sr, Ba, Th, U, Hf, Ta, Zr and Zn were measured in feed coal, insoluble residues, process solvent, process and effluent waters, by-product sulfur, SRC-I solid product, liquid-liquid separator oils and SRC-II liquid products. The material balance was calculated for each element from the concentration data and yields of each process fraction for both the SRC-I and SRC-II processes. Except for Ti, Cl and Br in the SRC-I mode and Hg in the SRC-II mode, each element was substantially lower in the SRC products than in the original feed coal. Residues from the process contained more than 80% of the trace element content found in the coal, except for Hg. More than 98.5% of the total contents of K and Fe in coal were retained in the insoluble residues. Elements such as Hg, Se, As and Sb can form volatile compounds (such as Hg/sup 0/, H/sub 2/Se, AsH/sub 3/ and SbH/sub 3/) stable under the process conditions. The high enhancement factors of Se (957), As (202) and Sb (27.4) in the aqueous phase of the separator water compared to that of the oil are evidence for the formation of volatile species which are more soluble in water than in the oil phase.

  20. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Volume 1, Dry sorbent injection: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1992-01-29

    This report presents the results of fundamental mass transfer testing for in-duct removal of SO{sub 2}. Following this initial part of an experimental program, it became clear that the amount of initial moisture on the sorbent strongly affected the extent of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion. Novel techniques aimed at increasing sorbent utilization were investigated and are described. Major novel technique investigated and reported on here was the reaction with SO{sub 2} of sorbents with initial free moisture (damp sorbents). The duct injection process using damp solids has the following steps: preparation of sorbent as a slurry, blending of the slurry with dry recycle materials to create damp solids, injection of the solids into the duct, reaction and drying of the solids with flue gas in the duct, collection in particulate control equipment, and finally recycle of dry solids with some bleed to disposal. The moisture content of the solids at each step affects system performance. Various factors favor high moisture whereas others favor low moisture. (VC)

  1. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of the series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: the nature of reversible processes, equilibrium constants, variable reaction tendencies, practical…

  2. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  3. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  4. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  5. Time-Critical Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Arie

    1998-01-01

    For the past twelve months, we have conducted and completed a joint research entitled "Time- Critical Volume Rendering" with NASA Ames. As expected, High performance volume rendering algorithms have been developed by exploring some new faster rendering techniques, including object presence acceleration, parallel processing, and hierarchical level-of-detail representation. Using our new techniques, initial experiments have achieved real-time rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second of various 3D data sets with highest resolution. A couple of joint papers and technique reports as well as an interactive real-time demo have been compiled as the result of this project.

  6. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  7. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  8. New Generation Knowledge Processing. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    project was to design a high-levl proirammin , ,;vsten .i’h wi- ’ named SG’rEF, an acronym for "Syracuse T’niv,,rsity Parnilll i’xpre,,sin RtRducer... design issues. These systems have turned out to be of considerable interest and utility in their own-right, and they have taken on separate and... designed as a useful guide to someone who wishes to use the system for experimental computations. .C. Sii I K 1A- * UNCLASSIFIED - i,:"W

  9. MEDEX Processing System. Volume 2. Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-21

    A-44 AMPC ............ .......................... .... A-47 FIX ................... .......................... A-48 FIXPT...SCAL 8 A-40 AXIS 9 A-44 AMPC 10 A-47 FIX 11 A-48 P FIXPT 12 A-50 STRPH 13 A-54 A-1 AUTOMATIC CALIBRATION~ P/SAZL Y -sLIEcT ARRAY TYPE ACCIEPT ACCEPT lmc...uetOu’r i4E AXIS A-46 1-SFUr1NE. AMPC (A y .ISHD0) KIA ARRAY (K~): MW Y(KI) I A-47 SUB¶ROUTttN FIX, FKC-T fipar.~ WOI LI FM~’~. rI Li A,4 qLL~t= (FCT

  10. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    at-law 10 Center Street, Suite 209 Chicopee, MA 01013 (413) 594-5958 or 536-4181 E-12 Mr. Maurice Archambault Ms. Cecile Archambault 26 Nutmeg Circle...South Amherst, MA 01002 Mrs. Annie L. Smith 83 Bourbeau Street Chicopee, MA 01020 Lester W. Smith 6 Nutmeg Circle Chicopee, MA 01020

  11. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    of airfield operation to 24 hr/day. On June 13, 1986, the Westover Metropolitan Development Corporation (WMDC) submitted a request to increase the...hours of airfield opera- tion from the current 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. to 24 hr/day. This increase is considered by WMDC to be necessary for the development of...impacts on current land uses (primarily residential development ) and could impose constraints on future development (also primarily residential uses

  12. New Generation Knowledge Processing. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    arguments are evaluated as required. 2.2.5. Pair and List Oriented Functors, -melk Lists are data structures familia to all functional programmers. Since...haviinz mran , dcciar-t ions twf esol ilwt eua I L~EEC’cxphra\\in~ganl c’ie dClarraticn. Consider the \\\\iLERI.R1EC-_eXp: exp \\VIIRERLC be -- ebe ...whIeIre ebe I., an LNF-exp) containinrg sonic Free occurrences of the variables in be. Tlhc% -,mxvi i ibin ation is equiv alent tc, ebe : %/ (X (be) ebe ) be

  13. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  14. Higher Education in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Volume I: Overview of the System and the Needs of the Reconstruction Process [and] Volume II: Recommendations and Project Proposals for Strengthening Higher Education in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip over the 1994-1998 Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This publication comprised of two volumes describes the findings of a review of Palestinian universities emphasizing science and technology, and the resulting recommendations for higher education improvement and support to be carried out between 1994 and 1998. In volume I the review, or mission, found that there are 28 tertiary-level institutions…

  15. Rapid Decimation for Direct Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Jonathan; VanGelder, Allen; Verma, Vivek; Wilhelms, Jane

    1997-01-01

    An approach for eliminating unnecessary portions of a volume when producing a direct volume rendering is described. This reduction in volume size sacrifices some image quality in the interest of rendering speed. Since volume visualization is often used as an exploratory visualization technique, it is important to reduce rendering times, so the user can effectively explore the volume. The methods presented can speed up rendering by factors of 2 to 3 with minor image degradation. A family of decimation algorithms to reduce the number of primitives in the volume without altering the volume's grid in any way is introduced. This allows the decimation to be computed rapidly, making it easier to change decimation levels on the fly. Further, because very little extra space is required, this method is suitable for the very large volumes that are becoming common. The method is also grid-independent, so it is suitable for multiple overlapping curvilinear and unstructured, as well as regular, grids. The decimation process can proceed automatically, or can be guided by the user so that important regions of the volume are decimated less than unimportant regions. A formal error measure is described based on a three-dimensional analog of the Radon transform. Decimation methods are evaluated based on this metric and on direct comparison with reference images.

  16. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2010-06-29

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  17. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2011-01-18

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  18. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-06-21

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  19. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-05-31

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  20. Anterior Insula Volume and Guilt

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Andy C.; Barch, Deanna M.; Oakberg, Timothy J.; April, Laura M.; Harms, Michael P.; Botteron, Kelly N.; Luby, Joan L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE This is the first study to date to examine volumetric alterations in the anterior insula (AI) as a potential biomarker for the course of childhood major depressive disorder (MDD). OBJECTIVES To examine whether children with a history of preschool-onset (PO) MDD show reduced AI volume, whether a specific symptom of PO MDD (pathological guilt) is related to AI volume reduction (given the known relationship between AI and guilt processing), and whether AI volumes predict subsequent likelihood of having an episode of MDD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a prospective longitudinal study, 306 children (age range, 3.00–5.11 years) and caregivers completed DSM diagnostic assessments at 6 annual time points during 10 years as part of the Preschool Depression Study. Magnetic resonance imaging was completed on a subset of 145 school-age children (age range, 6.11–12.11 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Whole-brain–adjusted AI volume measured using magnetic resonance imaging at school age and children’s diagnosis of MDD any time after their imaging. RESULTS Compared with children without a history of PO MDD, school-age children previously diagnosed as having PO MDD had smaller left and right AI volumes (Wilks Λ = 0.94, F2,124 = 3.37, P = .04, Cohen d = 0.23). However, the effect of PO MDD on reduced AI volumes was better explained by children’s experience of pathological guilt during preschool (Λ = 0.91, F2,120 = 6.17, P = .003, d = .30). When covarying for children’s lifetime history of MDD episodes, their experience of pathological guilt during preschool, as well as their sex and age at the time of imaging, schoolchildren’s right-side AI volume was a significant predictor of being diagnosed as having an MDD episode after imaging (odds ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.01–0.75; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These results provide evidence that structural abnormalities in AI volume are related to the neurobiology of depressive disorders starting in

  1. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  2. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  3. Variable volume combustor

    DOEpatents

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  4. Heliophysics 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2010-11-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Prologue Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Introduction to heliophysics Thomas J. Bogdan; 3. Creation and destruction of magnetic field Matthias Rempel; 4. Magnetic field topology Dana W. Longcope; 5. Magnetic reconnection Terry G. Forbes; 6. Structures of the magnetic field Mark B. Moldwin, George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 7. Turbulence in space plasmas Charles W. Smith; 8. The solar atmosphere Viggo H. Hansteen; 9. Stellar winds and magnetic fields Viggo H. Hansteen; 10. Fundamentals of planetary magnetospheres Vytenis M. Vasyliūnas; 11. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling: an MHD perspective Frank R. Toffoletto and George L. Siscoe; 12. On the ionosphere and chromosphere Tim Fuller-Rowell and Carolus J. Schrijver; 13. Comparative planetary environments Frances Bagenal; Bibliography; Index. Volume 2: Preface; 1. Perspective on heliophysics George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 2. Introduction to space storms and radiation Sten Odenwald; 3. In-situ detection of energetic particles George Gloeckler; 4. Radiative signatures of energetic particles Tim Bastian; 5. Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets Hugh Hudson; 6. Models of coronal mass ejections and flares Terry Forbes; 7. Shocks in heliophysics Merav Opher; 8. Particle acceleration in shocks Dietmar Krauss-Varban; 9. Energetic particle transport Joe Giacalone; 10. Energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres Vytenis Vasyliūnas; 11. Energization of trapped particles Janet Green; 12. Flares, CMEs, and atmospheric responses Tim Fuller-Rowell and Stanley C. Solomon; 13. Energetic particles and manned spaceflight 358 Stephen Guetersloh and Neal Zapp; 14. Energetic particles and technology Alan Tribble; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index. Volume 3: Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun

  5. Unsteady flow volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

  6. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  7. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  8. Cumulative Heat Diffusion Using Volume Gradient Operator for Volume Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gurijala, K C; Wang, Lei; Kaufman, A

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a simple, yet powerful method called the Cumulative Heat Diffusion for shape-based volume analysis, while drastically reducing the computational cost compared to conventional heat diffusion. Unlike the conventional heat diffusion process, where the diffusion is carried out by considering each node separately as the source, we simultaneously consider all the voxels as sources and carry out the diffusion, hence the term cumulative heat diffusion. In addition, we introduce a new operator that is used in the evaluation of cumulative heat diffusion called the Volume Gradient Operator (VGO). VGO is a combination of the LBO and a data-driven operator which is a function of the half gradient. The half gradient is the absolute value of the difference between the voxel intensities. The VGO by its definition captures the local shape information and is used to assign the initial heat values. Furthermore, VGO is also used as the weighting parameter for the heat diffusion process. We demonstrate that our approach can robustly extract shape-based features and thus forms the basis for an improved classification and exploration of features based on shape.

  9. Computer-Aided Structural Engineering (CASE) Project: Decision Logic Table Formulation of ACI (American Concrete Institute) 318-77 Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete for Automated Constraint Processing. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    aggregate concrete, psi X fct Ratio of volume of sand replacement to total volume of aggregate X rV Weight of concrete, pcf X Wc Cracking moment X M cr ...It was assumed that the only lateral tie reinforcement possible is spiral or tie. A225 Datum 10.3(f) Source Label Number Design axial load strength...0.67v’b d + V + Vi Mcr , (1.7fTb d ci cw d M cwmax M (I/Y )(6v’f + f -f) cr t c pe d A3 Section 11.5 X X X Comments: 1) DLT 11.4(b) covers Section

  10. Large volume manufacture of dymalloy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-22

    The purpose of this research was to test the commercial viability and feasibility of Dymalloy, a composite material to measure thermal conductivity. Dymalloy was developed as part of a CRADA with Sun Microsystems. Sun Microsystems was a potential end user of Dymalloy as a substrate for MCMS. Sun had no desire to be involved in the manufacture of this material. The goal of this small business CRADA with Spectra Mat was to establish the high volume commercial manufacturing industry source for Dymalloy required by an end-user such as Sun Microsystems. The difference between the fabrication technique developed during the CRADA and this proposed work related to the mechanical technique of coating the diamond powder. Mechanical parts for the high-volume diamond powder coating process existed; however, they needed to be installed in an existing coating system for evaluation. Sputtering systems similar to the one required for this project were available at LLNL. Once the diamond powder was coated, both LLNL and Spectra Mat could make and test the Dymalloy composites. Spectra Mat manufactured Dymalloy composites in order to evaluate and establish a reasonable cost estimate on their existing processing capabilities. This information was used by Spectra Mat to define the market and cost-competitive products that could be commercialized from this new substrate material.

  11. Critical review, comparative evaluation, cost update, and baseline data development services in oil-shale mining, in-situ liquefaction, and above-ground retorting processes from the environmental, permitting, and licensing viewpoints. Volume III. Emission-source identification and source-specific pollution-control applications. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-18

    This volume is the third major deliverable of the title study. The document accomplishes two objectives: (1) It identifies all major emission sources within an integrated flow-sheet of oil shale operations encompassing mining, preparation, retorting, and upgrading; and (2) It delineates the logic process for selecting and instigating source-specific pollution controls, selected among all currently commercially available options. Volume III is divided into two separate parts. Part II covers mercury; trace metals; carbon monoxide; NO/sub x/; and hydrocarbons. Mercury waste water control technologies discussed include ion exchange, starch complexing, ferrite coprecipitation, evaporation ponds, sulfide precipitation, activated carbon, and specific control processes. Trace metal control processes in waste water discussed include reverse osmosis, starch complexing, sodium borohydride, hydroxide precipitation, ferrite coprecipitation, ion exchange, activated carbon, sulfide precipitation, evaporation ponds, and combined physical-chemical metal removal. Offgas system removal of beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium are also covered. Carbon monoxide control technologies in utility and industrial boilers and in petroleum refineries are covered. Flue gas denitrification processes discussed included noncatalytic and catalytic reduction, adsorption, oxidation, alkalized alumina, electron beam radiation, activated carbon process for NO/sub x/ removal. Hydrocarbon control technologies in waste water and gases are described. (DMC)

  12. Stratified volume diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Diana Marie

    2000-11-01

    Gratings with high diffraction efficiency into a single order find use in applications ranging from optical interconnects to beam steering. Such gratings have been realized with volume holographic, blazed, and diffractive optical techniques. However, each of these methods has limitations that restrict the range of applications in which they can be used. In this work an alternate, novel approach and method for creating high efficiency gratings has been developed. These new gratings are named stratified volume diffractive optical elements (SVDOE's). In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. An SVDOE consists of binary gratings interleaved with homogeneous layers in a multi-layer, stratified grating structure. The ridges of the binary gratings form fringe planes analogous to those of a volume hologram. The modulation and diffraction of an incident beam, which occur concurrently in a volume grating, are achieved sequentially by the grating layers and the homogeneous layers, respectively. The layers in this type of structure must be fabricated individually, which introduces the capability to laterally shift the binary grating layers relative to one another to create a grating with slanted fringe planes. This allows an element to be designed with high diffraction efficiency into the first order for any arbitrary angle of incidence. A systematic design process has been developed for SVDOE's. Optimum modulation depth of the SVDOE is determined analytically and the number of grating layers along with the thickness of homogeneous layers is determined by numerical simulation. A rigorous electromagnetic simulation of the diffraction properties of multi-layer grating structures, based on the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) algorithm, was developed and applied to SVDOE performance prediction. Fabrication of an SVDOE structure presents unique challenges. Microfabrication combined with

  13. Control volume based hydrocephalus research; analysis of human data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Wei, Timothy; Voorhees, Abram; Madsen, Joseph; Anor, Tomer

    2010-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a neuropathophysiological disorder primarily diagnosed by increased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure within the brain. To date, utilization of clinical measurements have been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs enforce volume conservation principles in terms of pressure. Control volume analysis, through the integral mass and momentum conservation equations, ensures that pressure and volume are accounted for using first principles fluid physics. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians into a simple, direct and robust mechanics based framework. Clinical data obtained for analysis are discussed along with data processing techniques used to extract terms in the conservation equation. Control volume analysis provides a non-invasive, physics-based approach to extracting pressure information from magnetic resonance velocity data that cannot be measured directly by pressure instrumentation.

  14. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  15. Kansas Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Melissa, Ed.; Choi, Dong-Ik, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Papers in this volume include the following: "Evidence for Foot Structure in Hausa" (Ousseina Alidou); "Korean 'Tense' Consonants as Geminates" (Dong-Ik Choi); "Gemination Processes: Motivation, Form, and Constraints" (Mamadou Niang); "Syllable 'Sonority' Hierarchy and Pulaar Stress: A Metrical Approach"…

  16. Handbook of Early Literacy Research. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B., Ed.; Dickinson, David K., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Building crucial bridges between theory, research, and practice, this volume brings together leading authorities on the literacy development of young children. The "Handbook" examines the full range of factors that shape learning in and out of the classroom, from basic developmental processes to family and sociocultural contexts,…

  17. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  18. First CLIPS Conference Proceedings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The topics of volume 2 of First CLIPS Conference are associated with following applications: quality control; intelligent data bases and networks; Space Station Freedom; Space Shuttle and satellite; user interface; artificial neural systems and fuzzy logic; parallel and distributed processing; enchancements to CLIPS; aerospace; simulation and defense; advisory systems and tutors; and intelligent control.

  19. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  20. Deafness Annual, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Arthur G., Ed.

    Presented is the second of two volumes on deafness which contains 12 papers and a review of programs or grants sponsored by the federal government and other groups. Larry Stewart identifies the deaf in "A Truly Silent Minority". In the "Seven-Faces of Deafness", G. Loyd tells what deafness means to seven people. E. Mindel maintains that parents…

  1. RESEARCH ABSTRACTS, VOLUME VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLETTE, SISTER M.

    THIS SIXTH VOLUME OF RESEARCH ABSTRACTS PRESENTS REPORTS OF 35 RESEARCH STUDIES COMPLETED BY CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE AT THE CARDINAL STRITCH COLLEGE IN 1964. TWENTY-NINE STUDIES ARE CONCERNED WITH READING, AND SIX ARE CONCERNED WITH THE EDUCATION OF THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED. OF THE READING STUDIES, FIVE PERTAIN TO THE JUNIOR HIGH LEVEL…

  2. FLES News, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLES News, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Volume 8 of the newslettter for teachers of foreign language in elementary schools (FLES) features these articles: "The Teacher's Voice: Action Research in Your Classroom" (Anna Uhl Chamot); "Teacher Preparation: Using Videotapes in a Teaching Practicum" (Gisela Ernst, Kerri J. Richard); and "Hawaiian Language Immersion:…

  3. Children's Literature. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Francelia, Ed.; Brockman, Bennett A., Ed.

    This volume applies critical literary standards to the field of children's literature in a long-range effort to improve its quality and teaching. Contributors and editors represent international scholarship in all of the humanities, as well as in the specific area of children's literature. Articles span topics from European children's literature…

  4. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  5. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  6. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Wound Volume Measurement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    III and IV decubitus ulcers ). Wounds can also be classified by etiology as (a) surgical, (b) traumatic (such as mechanical or thermal injuries), and...had either decubitus ulcers or venous stasis ulcers . Each patient’s wound was measured with each of the three methods. First, the wound was...standardized and clinically available method to estimate wound volume is needed to determine rate of pressure ulcer healing. This quasi-experimental

  8. Apodized Volume Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Sergiy

    2015-03-01

    Reflective and transmissive volume Bragg grating (VBGs) are widely used in high power laser applications because of their large operational aperture and robustness. They are fabricated in photosensitive material through holographic recording of uniform interference pattern of two overlapping coherent waves obtained by splitting a flat-top shaped laser beam. The following thermal treatment produces permanent refractive index modulation (RIM). Reflective VBGs have fringes parallel to operational anti-reflective coated surfaces and they demonstrate narrow reflection bandwidth. Transmissive VBGs are cut with fringes perpendicular to surfaces and they are characterized by narrow angular selectivity. Uniform RIM causes secondary lobes in corresponding reflection and transmission spectra due to sharp boundary conditions for volume Bragg diffraction. We propose to create apodization of RIM by recording two interference patterns with slightly different parameters in the same volume which would create slow varying moire envelope of amplitude of RIM. Cutting the specimen at zeros of moire envelope with one sine semi-period thickness will produce VBGs apodized at sides which will reduce parasitic secondary lobes in spectra. In reflection geometry, two patterns of the same orientation with slightly different periods are required for apodization along Bragg wave vector. In transmission case, recording of the same interference patterns with small mutual rotation angle provides apodization in direction perpendicular to Bragg wave vector. Modeling results show significant improvement in selective properties of VBGs with such moire apodization.

  9. OMAE 1994. Volume 3: Materials Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.; Toyoda, Masao; Lui, S.; Dos Santos, J.F.; Kocak, M.; Patterson, E.A.; Berge, S.

    1994-12-31

    The International Symposium on Offshore and Arctic Materials Technology of the OMAE Conference continues to serve as a major forum for researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and fabricators to share recent advances, discuss problems, and identify challenges associated with materials application in the offshore industry. This volume discusses recent advances in several areas that are important for offshore and arctic development and operations with emphasis on fatigue and fracture control, weld metal and HAZ properties, underwater welding, elastomers and composites, and recent advances in high strength steel and welding technology. Additional materials papers are presented in the proceedings on Reliability (Volume 2) and the proceedings on Pipeline (Volume 5). Forty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Military Testing Association (Proceedings of the Annual Conference (27th, San Diego, California, October 21-25, 1985). Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, San Diego, CA.

    The 169 paper and symposium presentations given during 57 sessions of the conference are provided in these two volumes. The first volume contains the keynote speech, which addressed military entrance processing command and its acquired immune deficiency snydrome testing program. Symposia topics in this volume include: (1) computerized diagnostic…

  11. Sensors, Volume 1, Fundamentals and General Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandke, Thomas; Ko, Wen H.

    1996-12-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This volume deals with the fundamentals and common principles of sensors and covers the wide areas of principles, technologies, signal processing, and applications. Contents include: Sensor Fundamentals, e.g. Sensor Parameters, Modeling, Design and Packaging; Basic Sensor Technologies, e.g. Thin and Thick Films, Integrated Magnetic Sensors, Optical Fibres and Intergrated Optics, Ceramics and Oxides; Sensor Interfaces, e.g. Signal Processing, Multisensor Signal Processing, Smart Sensors, Interface Systems; Sensor Applications, e.g. Automotive: On-board Sensors, Traffic Surveillance and Control, Home Appliances, Environmental Monitoring, etc. This volume is an indispensable reference work and text book for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  12. Coastal Benthic Boundary Layer Special Research Program: A Review of the First Year. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-06

    cracterzion and modeling of benthic boundary layer processes and the impact of the processe on seafloor structure, properties, and behavior. In volume I of...52 I 3.5 Processes of Macro Scale Volume Inhomogeneity in the Benthic Boundary Layer (Principal...Rapid Predictor of Physical and * Acoustic Properties of Unconsolidated Marine Sediments and Processes Affecting Their Relationships (Principal

  13. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  14. Completing HST's Local Volume Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne

    2007-07-01

    Nearby galaxies offer one of the few laboratories within which stellar populations can be tied to multi-wavelength observations. They are thus essential for calibrating and interpreting key astrophysical observables, such as broad-band luminosities, durations and energy input from starbursts, and timescales of UV, H-alpha, and FIR emission. The study of stellar populations in nearby galaxies requires high-resolution observations with HST, but HST's legacy for this limited set of galaxies remains incomplete.As a first attempt to establish this legacy, The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury {ANGST} began observations in late 2006. ANGST was designed to carry out a uniform multi-color survey of a volume-limited sample of 70 nearby galaxies that could be used for systematic studies of resolved stellar populations. The resulting data provide nuanced constraints on the processes which govern star formation and galaxy evolution, for a well-defined population of galaxies. All photometry for the survey has been publicly released.However, the failure of ACS 4.5 months after ANGST began taking data led to a drastic reduction in the planned survey. The loss is two-fold. First, the goals of completeness and uniformity were greatly compromised, impacting global comparison studies. Second, the variety of observed star formation histories was reduced. Given that we have never found two galaxies with identical star formation histories, and fully sampling the population allows us to catch those few systems whose star formation rates and metallicities place the strongest constraints on key astrophysical processes.Here we propose WFPC2 observations of all remaining galaxies within the Local Volume {D<3.5Mpc} for which current HST observations are insufficient for meaningful stellar population studies. We will use these observations for research on the star formation histories of individual galaxies and the Local Volume, detailed calibrations of star formation rate indicators, and the

  15. Web based brain volume calculation for magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Karsch, Kevin; Grinstead, Brian; He, Qing; Duan, Ye

    2008-01-01

    Brain volume calculations are crucial in modern medical research, especially in the study of neurodevelopmental disorders. In this paper, we present an algorithm for calculating two classifications of brain volume, total brain volume (TBV) and intracranial volume (ICV). Our algorithm takes MRI data as input, performs several preprocessing and intermediate steps, and then returns each of the two calculated volumes. To simplify this process and make our algorithm publicly accessible to anyone, we have created a web-based interface that allows users to upload their own MRI data and calculate the TBV and ICV for the given data. This interface provides a simple and efficient method for calculating these two classifications of brain volume, and it also removes the need for the user to download or install any applications.

  16. Technologies for imaging neural activity in large volumes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Na; Freeman, Jeremy; Smith, Spencer L.

    2017-01-01

    Neural circuitry has evolved to form distributed networks that act dynamically across large volumes. Collecting data from individual planes, conventional microscopy cannot sample circuitry across large volumes at the temporal resolution relevant to neural circuit function and behaviors. Here, we review emerging technologies for rapid volume imaging of neural circuitry. We focus on two critical challenges: the inertia of optical systems, which limits image speed, and aberrations, which restrict the image volume. Optical sampling time must be long enough to ensure high-fidelity measurements, but optimized sampling strategies and point spread function engineering can facilitate rapid volume imaging of neural activity within this constraint. We also discuss new computational strategies for the processing and analysis of volume imaging data of increasing size and complexity. Together, optical and computational advances are providing a broader view of neural circuit dynamics, and help elucidate how brain regions work in concert to support behavior. PMID:27571194

  17. EOS Data Products Handbook. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L. (Editor); Greenstone, Reynold (Editor); Closs, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The EOS Data Products Handbook provides brief descriptions of the data products that will be produced from a range of missions of the Earth Observing System (EOS) and associated projects. Volume 1, originally published in 1997, covers the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Terra mission (formerly named EOS AM-1), and the Data Assimilation System, while this volume, Volume 2, covers the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite (ACRIMSAT), Aqua, Jason-1, Landsat 7, Meteor 3M/Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). the Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat), the Quick Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (Quik-TOMS), and the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) missions. Volume 2 follows closely the format of Volume 1, providing a list of products and an introduction and overview descriptions of the instruments and data processing, all introductory to the core of the book, which presents the individual data product descriptions, organized into 11 topical chapters. The product descriptions are followed by five appendices, which provide contact information for the EOS data centers that will be archiving and distributing the data sets, contact information for the science points of contact for the data products, references, acronyms and abbreviations, and a data products index.

  18. Calculus Students' Understanding of Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have documented difficulties that elementary school students have in understanding volume. Despite its importance in higher mathematics, we know little about college students' understanding of volume. This study investigated calculus students' understanding of volume. Clinical interview transcripts and written responses to volume…

  19. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  20. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Large-volume leukaphereses may be more efficient than standard-volume leukaphereses for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Passos-Coelho, J L; Machado, M A; Lúcio, P; Leal-Da-Costa, F; Silva, M R; Parreira, A

    1997-10-01

    To overcome the need for multiple leukaphereses to collect enough PBPC for autologous transplantation, large-volume leukaphereses (LVL) are used to process multiple blood volumes per session. We compared the efficiency of CD34+ cell collection by LVL (n = 63; median blood volumes processed 11.1) with that of standard-volume leukaphereses (SVL) (n = 38; median blood volumes processed 1.9). To achieve this in patients with different peripheral blood concentrations of CD34+ cells, we analyzed the ratio of CD34+ cells collected per unit of blood volume processed, divided by the number of CD34+ cells in total blood volume at the beginning of apheresis. For LVL, 30% (9%-323%) of circulating CD34+ cells were collected per blood volume compared with 42% (7%-144%) for SVL (p = 0.02). However, in LVL patients, peripheral blood CD34+ cells/L decreased a median of 54% during LVL (similar data for SVL not available). The number of CD34+ cells collected per blood volume processed after 4 and 8 blood volumes and at the end of LVL were 0.32 (0.01-2.05), 0.24 (0.01-1.68), and 0.22 (0.01-2.40) x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, respectively (p = 0.0007), despite the 54% decrease in peripheral blood CD34+ cells/L throughout LVL. A median 66% decrease in the platelet count was also observed during LVL. Thus, LVL may be more efficient than SVL for PBPC collection, allowing, in most patients, the collection in one LVL of sufficient PBPC to support autologous transplantation.

  3. Technology Insertion (TI)/Industrial Process Improvement (IP) Task Order Number 14. Contract Summary Report/Quick Fix Plan for SA-ALC/MAEPNC (Cleaning). Volume 5. SA-ALC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-16

    DISASSEMBLE ITEM SORT PER PICTURE BOOK If[PLACE IN BASKET OR O PALLET I TAG FOR PROCESS iA AUTOMATED CLEANING j.YES - CLEANUREQUIED NO HAND CLEANING...requiring cleaning are sorted by cleaning process and placed in stainless steel wire baskets or onto plastic pallets . A stainless steel tag is attached to...engine parts can be stored/hung while they await assembly. With this arrangement (rather than the current system of storing these parts in the stacker

  4. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  5. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  6. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James; Hays, David; Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  7. External bulb variable volume maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Cervenka, P. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A maser functioning as a frequency standard stable to one part in 10 to the 14th power includes a variable volume, constant surface area storage bulb having a fixed volume portion located in a resonant cavity from which the frequency standard is derived. A variable volume portion of the bulb, exterior to the resonant cavity, has a maximum volume on the same order of magnitude as the fixed volume bulb portion. The cavity has a length to radius ratio of at least 3:1 so that the operation is attained without the need for a feedback loop. A baffle plate, between the fixed and variable volume bulb portions, includes apertures for enabling hydrogen atoms to pass between the two bulb portions and is an electromagnetic shield that prevents coupling of the electromagnetic field of the cavity into the variable volume bulb portion.

  8. Advanced Avionics Architecture and Technology Review. Executive Summary and Volume 1, Avionics Technology. Volume 2. Avionics Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-06

    VOLUME 1 - AVIONICS TECHNOLOGYI VOLUME 2-AVIONICS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 6 August 1993 Under the Direction of Avionics Systems Engineering Division...of the signal and power MESFET process work begun during Phase 1; b.) a 0.25 jim Pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor (PHEMT) processes...Field-Effect Transistors (FETs), High Electron Mobility Transistors (HIEMTs) and Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs). From these foundries four

  9. Volume Bragg lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divliansky, Ivan; Jain, Apurva; Drachenberg, Derrek; Podvyaznyy, Alexey; Smirnov, Vadim; Venus, George; Glebov, Leonid

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a survey of recent achievements at the College of Optics and Photonics/CREOL at the University of Central Florida in the use of newly developed diffractive optical elements which are volume Bragg gratings recorded in a photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass. Three levels of semiconductor laser design are proposed to achieve high-power low-divergence output. The first level is coherent coupling of emitters by means of PTR Bragg gratings which provide excitation of only one common mode in a multichannel resonator. This type of phase locking automatically leads to a narrow spectral width of emission usually not exceeding a few tens of picometers. The second level is a change of the mechanism of transverse mode selection from spatial selection by apertures to angular selection by PTR Bragg gratings. This approach allows increasing of the aperture size without increasing the length and selecting of arbitrary mode but not necessarily a fundamental one. The third level is spectral beam combining by PTR Bragg gratings which re-direct radiation from several high-power fiber lasers to co-propagate in the same direction with diffraction limited divergence. This approach allows simplification of the thermal management because only passive devices with low absorption (a PTR volume Bragg gratings) are placed in the path of high power laser beam.

  10. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 31, August 1976-July 1977. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. [Fate of 36 trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    Results are presented on a study of the distribution and fate of 34 trace elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process at the pilot plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington, and operated by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. under contract with the US Department of Energy. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine Ti, V, Ca, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Br, Co, Ni, Cr, Fe, Na, Rb, Cs, K, Sc, Tb, Eu, Sm, Ce, La, Sr, Ba, Th, Hf, Ta, Ga, Zr, and Cu in feed coals, process solvent, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), mineral residues, wet filter cake, by-product solvents, process and effluent waters and by-product sulfur. The sample points were chosen such that the major process streams were adequately described and that the major input and output materials were included. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure the toxic elements Pb, Cd, Be in plant-derived solvents, effluent water and Hamer Marsh water. Specific methods were developed for analysis of a wide range of material compositions. The neutron activation analysis procedures were divided into short and long irradiation procedures for elements with short half lives (less than 3 hours) and intermediate to long half lives ( 8 hours to 5.2 years). Data are presented for a third equilibrium set of samples from the SRC-I process and compared to two similar sets analyzed previously. A material balance (or budget) was calculated for each element from the concentration data and the yields of each process fraction. Data are also presented on a study of carbon monoxide addition to the hydrogen stream and its effect on trace elements, and trace element data on a study of thirty-six plant effluent water samples taken during an SRC-I production run.

  11. The Local Volume Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D. A.; Gordon, K. D.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Skillman, E.; Begum, A.; Funes, J. G.; Gil de Paz, A.; Johnson, B.; Sakai, S.; van Zee, L.; Walter, F.; Weisz, D.; Williams, B.; Wu, Y.; Block, M.

    2008-10-01

    We introduce the Local Volume Legacy (LVL), a Spitzer Cycle 4 IRAC and MIPS Legacy survey of a complete sample of 258 galaxies within 11 Mpc. The broad goal of LVL is to provide critical insight into two of the primary processes that shape the growth of galaxies: star formation and its interaction with the interstellar medium. This goal will be achieved by investigating the spatially-resolved star formation, dust, and red stellar populations of galaxies that have been drawn from a statistically robust local sample, in which the full diversity of galaxy properties (e.g., luminosities, surface brightnesses, metallicities) are represented. Our tiered sample includes: (1) all known galaxies inside a sub-volume bounded by 3.5 Mpc, and (2) an unbiased sample of S-Irr galaxies within the larger, and more representative, 11 Mpc sphere. LVL will produce a multi-wavelength census of the Galactic neighborhood, extending to the faintest limits of the galactic luminosity function and exploiting the highest spatial resolution and absolute depth achievable with Spitzer. Our rich suite of ancillary data includes Hα and UV imaging from the GALEX 11HUGS and NGS surveys, stellar population mapping from the HST ANGST Treasury survey, H I mapping with the VLA and GMRT, optical broad-band imaging and spectroscopy. LVL will homogeneously fill in critical gaps in the current Spitzer coverage of the LV, provide SED coverage from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared, and thus supply the community with a core archival dataset on the Galactic neighborhood.

  12. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  13. Waste disposal options report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

    1998-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

  14. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  15. Civil-Military Roles of Indigenous Armed Forces (CRIAF). Volume 1. Executive Summary. Volume 2. Main Report. Volume 3. Appendixes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-01

    AD-A009 190 CIVIL-MILITARY ROLES OF INDIGENOUS ARMED FORCES (CRIAF). VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . VOLUME II MAIN REPORT . VOLUME III...H FINAL REPORT VOLUME I - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY VOLUME II - MAIN REPORT VOLUME III - APPENDIXES o o DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY...Sussex: Conference of Political Development, 1968. 23. Einaudi, Luigi R. The Peruvian Military: A Summary Political Analysis . Santa

  16. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD)

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yasunobu; Maeno, Emi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Dezaki, Katsuya; Wang, Jun; Morishima, Shigeru

    2001-01-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl− channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl− channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl− conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNFα receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma × rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be

  17. Volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurbjörnsson, Ómar F.; Signorell, Ruth

    2008-05-01

    The present study puts an end to the ongoing controversy regarding volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols: Our study on nanosized aerosol particles demonstrates that current state of the art measurements of droplet ensembles cannot distinguish between the two mechanisms. The reasons are inherent experimental uncertainties as well as approximations used to analyze the kinetics. The combination of both can lead to uncertainties in the rate constants of two orders of magnitude, with important consequences for the modeling of atmospheric processes.

  18. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task: Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low-cost, high volume production of silane (step 1) and the pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon (step 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, W. C.; Farrier, E. G.; Rexer, J.

    1977-01-01

    Extended operation of a small process-development unit routinely produced high quality silane in 97+% yield from dichlorosilane. The production rate was consistent with design loadings for the fractionating column and for the redistribution reactor. A glass fluid-bed reactor was constructed for room temperature operation. The behavior of a bed of silcon particles was observed as a function of various feedstocks, component configurations, and operating conditions. For operating modes other than spouting, the bed behaved in an erratic and unstable manner. A method was developed for casting molten silicon powder into crack-free solid pellets for process evaluation. The silicon powder was melted and cast into thin walled quartz tubes that sacrificially broke on cooling.

  19. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned, Volume 2 of 3: Appendixes A - C

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    This document is the 2nd volume of the three volume set from the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise held at Hanford in 1994. Volume 2 contains Appendices A-C, with Appendices A and B containing a discussion of the design of the PUREX process and Appendix C containing a discussion of the safeguards measures for the PUREX facility.

  20. Ceramic Transactions. Volume 21. Proceedings of the Symposium on Microwave Theory and Application in Materials Processing Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society (23rd) Held in Cincinnati, Ohio on April 29-May 3 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-27

    conventional sintering at this temperature . No significant difference in densities of Si3N4 samples was observed. Determination of Grain Size using...pellet of microwave processing at 1200*C for 10 min (I- 1) was different from that convrcntionally sintered at the same temperature for 2 h (Fig. 3...Soo -- 300 - lann 0 200 400 600 N00 1000 Time (sec) Fig. 7. Indicated temperature -time profiles of thimble specimens sintered under different nitrogen

  1. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies. Progress report, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1994, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year five, we devoted much of our activities to completing fundamental research projects delayed because of the considerably stepped-up effort in consensus processes efforts during development of DOE`s Five Year Waste Plan (FYWP). Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five Year Waste Plan), we compiled a literature overview of small-group consensus gaining and a handbook for consensus decision making. We also tested the effectiveness Of group decision support software, and designed a structured observation process and its related hard- and software. We completed studies on experts and the role of personality characteristics in consensus group influence. Results of these studies are included in this final report. In consensus processes research, we were unable to continue studying consensus groups in action. However, we did study ways to improve ways to improve DOE`s technological information exchange effectiveness. We also studied how a new administration identifies what its strategic mission is and how it gets support from existing EM managers. We identified selection criteria for locating the EM exhibit, and tested our audience selection model. We also further calibrated our consensus measure. Additional conference papers and papers for journal submission were completed during year five.

  2. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-23

    The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

  3. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies: Volume 1. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year four of the grant, we continued to capitalize on and benefit from historical events which drove our early emphasis on group process studies. Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five-Year Waste Plan), we continue to observe these groups and collect data. We also began a configuration study involving the complex modeling of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Related to group process studies is the issue of the information requirements for individuals making decisions in consensus groups. Our information studies examined the requirements for decision-related information, frameworks for such information, and the effectiveness of information portrayed for decision making. However, we were able not only to continue studying consensus groups in action and related information issues, but also to focus considerable attention on the fundamental side of our research. The fundamental or basic research conducted in year four included: (1) expanding our literature database; (2) beginning the writing of the literature review summary document and the consensus guide; (3) developing frameworks and models such as the Environmental Trilogy model and a structural equations model of the consensus process; and (4) conducting laboratory studies concerning the effects of the presence of an expert, met expectations, opportunity to express views, incentive structure and conflict type (competitive versus collaborative) on consensus outcomes.

  4. Cognitive Theory. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellan, N. John, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    The conference papers in this collection emphasize the theoretical significance of their authors' work in the areas of mathematical and cognitive psychology. Major topics considered include facilitation of problem solving; psychological differences among problem isomorphs; the process of understanding in problem solving; processing information for…

  5. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  6. BODY VOLUME OF ADULT MEN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ideal weight given on the USAF standard weight table was found to have a correlation coefficient of only .672 with calculated percent body fat....volume from height and weight revealed the chart to be biased for adult men. Body volume was found to correlate well with body weight ( correlation ... coefficient of .996). Body volume of men in liters, V, may be estimated from body weight in kilograms, W, by using the formula: V = -4.7573 + 1.0153 W

  7. [Methods and importance of volume measurement in reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Kunos, Csaba; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Pesthy, Pál; Kovács, Eszter; Mátrai, Zoltán

    2014-03-16

    Volume measurement of the breast allows for better surgical planning and implant selection in breast reconstructive and symmetrization procedures. The safety and accuracy of tumor removal, in accordance with oncoplastic principles, may be improved by knowing the true breast- and breast tumor volume. The authors discuss the methods of volume measurement of the breast and describe the method based on magnetic resonance imaging digital volume measurement in details. The volume of the breast parenchyma and the tumor was determined by processing the diagnostic magnetic resonance scans, and the difference in the volume of the two breasts was measured. Surgery was planned and implant selection was made based on the measured volume details. The authors conclude that digital volume measurement proved to be a valuable tool in preoperative planning of volume reducing mammaplasty, replacement of unknown size implants and in cases when breast asymmetry is treated.

  8. Finite Volume Methods: Foundation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Ohlberger, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Finite volume methods are a class of discretization schemes that have proven highly successful in approximating the solution of a wide variety of conservation law systems. They are extensively used in fluid mechanics, porous media flow, meteorology, electromagnetics, models of biological processes, semi-conductor device simulation and many other engineering areas governed by conservative systems that can be written in integral control volume form. This article reviews elements of the foundation and analysis of modern finite volume methods. The primary advantages of these methods are numerical robustness through the obtention of discrete maximum (minimum) principles, applicability on very general unstructured meshes, and the intrinsic local conservation properties of the resulting schemes. Throughout this article, specific attention is given to scalar nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws and the development of high order accurate schemes for discretizing them. A key tool in the design and analysis of finite volume schemes suitable for non-oscillatory discontinuity capturing is discrete maximum principle analysis. A number of building blocks used in the development of numerical schemes possessing local discrete maximum principles are reviewed in one and several space dimensions, e.g. monotone fluxes, E-fluxes, TVD discretization, non-oscillatory reconstruction, slope limiters, positive coefficient schemes, etc. When available, theoretical results concerning a priori and a posteriori error estimates are given. Further advanced topics are then considered such as high order time integration, discretization of diffusion terms and the extension to systems of nonlinear conservation laws.

  9. Volumic visual perception: principally novel concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valery

    1996-01-01

    The general concept of volumic view (VV) as a universal property of space is introduced. VV exists in every point of the universe where electromagnetic (EM) waves can reach and a point or a quasi-point receiver (detector) of EM waves can be placed. Classification of receivers is given for the first time. They are classified into three main categories: biological, man-made non-biological, and mathematically specified hypothetical receivers. The principally novel concept of volumic perception is introduced. It differs chiefly from the traditional concept which traces back to Euclid and pre-Euclidean times and much later to Leonardo da Vinci and Giovanni Battista della Porta's discoveries and practical stereoscopy as introduced by C. Wheatstone. The basic idea of novel concept is that humans and animals acquire volumic visual data flows in series rather than in parallel. In this case the brain is free from extremely sophisticated real time parallel processing of two volumic visual data flows in order to combine them. Such procedure seems hardly probable even for humans who are unable to combine two primitive static stereoscopic images in one quicker than in a few seconds. Some people are unable to perform this procedure at all.

  10. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest

  11. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale, Phase 2. Construction, operation, testing, and environmental impact. Final report, August 1981-December 1982. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.L.; Zahradnik, R.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Occidential Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) recently completed the demonstration of mining, rubblization, ignition, and simulataneous processing of two commericalized modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the Logas Wash facility near DeBeque, Colorado. Upon completion of Retort 6 in 1978, Occidential began incorporating all of the knowledge previously acquired in an effort to design two more commercial-sized MIS retorts. Any commercial venture of the future would require the ability to operate simultaneously more than one retort. Thus, Retorts 7 and 8 were developed during 1980 and 1981 through joint funding of the DOE and OOSI in Phase II. Rubblization of the retorts produced an average rubble void of 18.5% in the low grade shale (17 gallons per ton) at the Logan Wash site. After rubblization, bulkheads were constructed, inlet and offgas pipes were installed and connected to surface processing facilities and liquid product handling systems were connected to the retorts. Extensive instrumentation was installed in cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories for monitoring the complete operation of the retorts. After pre-ignition testing, Retort 8 was ignited in December of 1981 and Retort 7 was ignited in January of 1982. The retorts were operated without interruption from ignition until mid- November of 1982 at which time inlet gas injection was terminated and water quenching was begun. Total product yield from the two retorts was approximately 200,000 barrels of oil, or 70% of the Fischer Assay oil-in-place in the rubblized rock in the two retrots. Water quenching studies were conducted over a period of several months, with the objective of determining the rate of heat extraction from the retorts as well as determining the quantity and quality of offgas and water coming out from the quenching process. Data from these studies are also included in this Summary Report. 62 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Performing Arts Management and Law. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taubman, Joseph

    Performing arts management and law are reviewed in detail in these volumes. Special attention is paid to the issue of copyright, both the current law and proposed changes, in the light of technological changes in the media used by the arts. Volume I describes the scope covered by this work, and discusses the market place, copyright, and contract.…

  13. The Occupational Thesaurus: Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Everett A.

    Presented in two volumes, the job guide handbook can be used by high school and college counselors, students, recruiters for business and industry, and parents in determining areas of employment which are compatible with a student's or potential employee's interests, abilities, and preparation. Volume 1 lists job areas for students majoring in…

  14. Healthy People 2010: Conference Edition, Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the two volumes of the Conference Edition of Healthy People 2010, a comprehensive, nationwide health promotion and disease prevention agenda. The first section of Volume I, "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health," includes "Introduction,""Leading Health Indicators," and…

  15. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -22 deg through -30 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 s and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  16. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -40 deg through -49 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 sec and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  17. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  18. PDLE: Sustaining Professionalism. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Patricia, Ed.; Nelson, Gayle, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This third volume looks at ways that seasoned professionals continue to develop throughout their careers. The text includes descriptive accounts of professionals seeking to enhance their careers while remaining inspired to continue to develop professionally. This volume reveals how personal and professional lives are entwined. It proves that TESOL…

  19. Hypertools in image and volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.

    1996-06-17

    This paper describes our experience in image and volume visualization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After an introduction on visualization issues, we present a new software approach to the analysis and visualization of images and volumes. The efficiency of the visualization process is improved by letting the user combine small and reusable applications by the means of a machine-independent interpreted language such as Tcl/Tk. These hypertools can communicate with each other over a network, which has a direct impact on the design of graphical interfaces. We first describe the implementation of a flexible gray-scale image widget that can handle large data sets, provides complete control of the color palette and allows for manual and semi-interactive segmentation. This visualization tool can be embedded in a data-flow image processing environment to assess the quality of acquisition, preprocessing and filtering of raw data. This approach combines the simplicity of visual programming with the power of a high-level interpreted language. We show how hypertools can be used in surface and volume rendering and how they increase the interaction efficiency by performing complex or tedious tasks automatically. One biomedical application is presented.

  20. Volume-Preserving Mapping and Registration for Collective Data Visualization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaxi; Zou, Guangyu Jeff; Hua, Jing

    2014-12-01

    In order to visualize and analyze complex collective data, complicated geometric structure of each data is desired to be mapped onto a canonical domain to enable map-based visual exploration. This paper proposes a novel volume-preserving mapping and registration method which facilitates effective collective data visualization. Given two 3-manifolds with the same topology, there exists a mapping between them to preserve each local volume element. Starting from an initial mapping, a volume restoring diffeomorphic flow is constructed as a compressible flow based on the volume forms at the manifold. Such a flow yields equality of each local volume element between the original manifold and the target at its final state. Furthermore, the salient features can be used to register the manifold to a reference template by an incompressible flow guided by a divergence-free vector field within the manifold. The process can retain the equality of local volume elements while registering the manifold to a template at the same time. An efficient and practical algorithm is also presented to generate a volume-preserving mapping and a salient feature registration on discrete 3D volumes which are represented with tetrahedral meshes embedded in 3D space. This method can be applied to comparative analysis and visualization of volumetric medical imaging data across subjects. We demonstrate an example application in multimodal neuroimaging data analysis and collective data visualization.

  1. Advanced HVDC control, Volume 1: Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bridenbaugh, C.J.; Clark, K.; Cutler, J.M.; D`Aquila, R.; Larsen, E.V.; Lorden, D.J.; Nozari, F.; Piwko, R.J.; Walling, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Enhancing HVDC system response to power transmission system disturbances will increase the overall security of power system operations. This five-volume report discusses the numerous performance aspects involved in the design process when applying digital control methods to HVDC systems. This study identified basic issues important in understanding the performance limits of HVDC systems regardless of control system implementation. Special attention has been given to enhancing performance for single-pole dc faults and, the most common ac network faults, namely, single-phase ac faults. In each case, investigators studied the underlying system behavior for a wide variety of network parameters, determining the type of information needed to select and apply a control philosophy. Also addressed is control of overvoltages at the connection point of the dc converter in weak ac systems by means of nonlinear filters. Based on the understanding developed during this project, this five-volume report recommends control functions that will achieve the greatest possible benefit from the system. Volume 1 contains the Summary Report, which provides brief synopses for each of the following four volumes. Volume 2 addresses the Characterization and Mitigation of AC Overvoltages and Distortion at HVDC Terminals. Volume 3 presents Concepts of Stability and Performance Enhancement with Digital Controls for HVDC Systems. Volume 4 describes the Characterization and Enhancement of HVDC System Performance During Unbalanced AC Faults. Volume 5 details the Characterization and Enhancement of HVDC System Performance During Single-Pole DC Faults.

  2. [A hybrid volume rendering method using general hardware].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve the effect and efficiency of the reconstructed image after hybrid volume rendering of different kinds of volume data from medical sequential slices or polygonal models, we propose a hybrid volume rendering method based on Shear-Warp with economical hardware. First, the hybrid volume data are pre-processed by Z-Buffer method and RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data structure. Then, during the process of compositing intermediate image, a resampling method based on the dual-interpolation and the intermediate slice interpolation methods is used to improve the efficiency and the effect. Finally, the reconstructed image is rendered by the texture-mapping technology of OpenGL. Experiments demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method.

  3. Stereoscopic volume imaging on personal computers under Microsoft Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Michael A.

    1995-03-01

    `Volume imaging' is the process of visualizing image data that exists on a grid in three- dimensions: at every point in the volume, a gray-level or color value is known. These image volumes usually result from building a `stack' from a sequence of cross-sectional views, such as those from CT, MRI, and confocal imaging. Stereoscopic viewing is a very effective way of viewing and analyzing these volumes. The stereo pair is constructed using ray projections. My objectives for this paper are three-fold: (1) To present a new way to view stereo images on a PC computer. (2) To demonstrate the ease-of-use and high image quality of the system using sample images from confocal microscopy. (3) To present preliminary results for projection image processing on a PC from CT and MRI image stacks.

  4. Brain tumor locating in 3D MR volume using symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Bartusek, Karel

    2014-03-01

    This work deals with the automatic determination of a brain tumor location in 3D magnetic resonance volumes. The aim of this work is not the precise segmentation of the tumor and its parts but only the detection of its location. This work is the first step in the tumor segmentation process, an important topic in neuro-image processing. The algorithm expects 3D magnetic resonance volumes of brain containing a tumor. The detection is based on locating the area that breaks the left-right symmetry of the brain. This is done by multi-resolution comparing of corresponding regions in left and right hemisphere. The output of the computation is the probabilistic map of the tumor location. The created algorithm was tested on 80 volumes from publicly available BRATS databases containing 3D brain volumes afflicted by a brain tumor. These pathological structures had various sizes and shapes and were located in various parts of the brain. The locating performance of the algorithm was 85% for T1-weighted volumes, 91% for T1-weighted contrast enhanced volumes, 96% for FLAIR and T2-wieghted volumes and 95% for their combinations.

  5. Plasma volume in isosmotic hypervolaemia.

    PubMed

    Kishegyi, J; Horváth, G; Kövér, G

    1978-01-01

    The Evans-blue distribution volume, haematocrit, and plasma protein concentration were investigated in non-hydrated (control), hydrated, and acutely nephrectomized hydrated, anaesthetized dogs. In control anaesthetized dogs a decrease of the plasma protein level was observed as part of the plasma proteins was lost into the extravascular space and did not return into the circulating plasma during the experimental period. Under the effect of hydration, the Evans-blue distribution volume increased significantly, while the haematocrit and plasma volume did not change. The phenomenon was ascribed to an increase in capillary permeability. During hydration following acute nephrectomy, the Evans-blue distribution volume increased but the haematocrit disecreased and the circulating plasma volume increased. It is concluded that a material (or materials) orginating from the kidney may influence capillary permeability.

  6. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  7. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  8. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  9. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  10. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 5, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the appendices of the five volume series.

  11. Liquid Rocket Booster Integration Study. Volume 2: Study synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the study summary of the five volume series.

  12. Runtime volume visualization for parallel CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of design of a data distributed, massively parallel volume rendering library for runtime visualization of parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations in a message-passing environment. Unlike the traditional scheme in which visualization is a postprocessing step, the rendering is done in place on each node processor. Computational scientists who run large-scale simulations on a massively parallel computer can thus perform interactive monitoring of their simulations. The current library provides an interface to handle volume data on rectilinear grids. The same design principles can be generalized to handle other types of grids. For demonstration, we run a parallel Navier-Stokes solver making use of this rendering library on the Intel Paragon XP/S. The interactive visual response achieved is found to be very useful. Performance studies show that the parallel rendering process is scalable with the size of the simulation as well as with the parallel computer.

  13. System and Method for Wirelessly Determining Fluid Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and method are provided for determining the volume of a fluid in container. Sensors are positioned at distinct locations in a container of a fluid. Each sensor is sensitive to an interface defined by the top surface of the fluid. Interfaces associated with at least three of the sensors are determined and used to find the volume of the fluid in the container in a geometric process.

  14. IGES Interface for Medical 3-D Volume Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many medical image processing and virtual surgery systems that provide rather consummate 3D-visualization and data manipulation techniques, few of them can export the volume data for engineering analyze. The thesis presents an interface implementing IGES (initial graphics exchange specification). Volume data such as bones, skins and other tissues can be exported as IGES files to be directly used for engineering analysis.

  15. Heliophysics 3 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2013-03-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Prologue Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Introduction to heliophysics Thomas J. Bogdan; 3. Creation and destruction of magnetic field Matthias Rempel; 4. Magnetic field topology Dana W. Longcope; 5. Magnetic reconnection Terry G. Forbes; 6. Structures of the magnetic field Mark B. Moldwin, George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 7. Turbulence in space plasmas Charles W. Smith; 8. The solar atmosphere Viggo H. Hansteen; 9. Stellar winds and magnetic fields Viggo H. Hansteen; 10. Fundamentals of planetary magnetospheres Vytenis M. Vasyliunas; 11. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling: an MHD perspective Frank R. Toffoletto and George L. Siscoe; 12. On the ionosphere and chromosphere Tim Fuller-Rowell and Carolus J. Schrijver; 13. Comparative planetary environments Frances Bagenal; Bibliography; Index. Volume 2: Preface; 1. Perspective on heliophysics George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 2. Introduction to space storms and radiation Sten Odenwald; 3. In-situ detection of energetic particles George Gloeckler; 4. Radiative signatures of energetic particles Tim Bastian; 5. Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets Hugh Hudson; 6. Models of coronal mass ejections and flares Terry Forbes; 7. Shocks in heliophysics Merav Opher; 8. Particle acceleration in shocks Dietmar Krauss-Varban; 9. Energetic particle transport Joe Giacalone; 10. Energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres Vytenis Vasyliunas; 11. Energization of trapped particles Janet Green; 12. Flares, CMEs, and atmospheric responses Tim Fuller-Rowell and Stanley C. Solomon; 13. Energetic particles and manned spaceflight Stephen Guetersloh and Neal Zapp; 14. Energetic particles and technology Alan Tribble; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index. Volume 3: Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun

  16. Improving Organizational Productivity in NASA. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Recognizing that NASA has traditionally been in the forefront of technological change, the NASA Administrator challenged the Agency in 1982 to also become a leader in developing and applying advanced technology and management practices to increase productivity. One of the activities undertaken by the Agency to support this ambitious productivity goal was participation in a 2-year experimental action research project devoted to learning more about improving and assessing the performance of professional organizations. Participating with a dozen private sector organizations, NASA explored the usefulness of a productivity improvement process that addressed all aspects of organizational performance. This experience has given NASA valuable insight into the enhancement of professional productivity. More importantly, it has provided the Agency with a specific management approach that managers and supervisors can effectively use to emphasize and implement continuous improvement. This report documents the experiences of the five different NASA installations participating in the project, describes the improvement process that was applied and refined, and offers recommendations for expanded application of that process. Of particular interest is the conclusion that measuring white collar productivity may be possible, and at a minimum, the measurement process itself is beneficial to management. Volume I of the report provides a project overview, significant findings, and recommendations. Volume II presents individual case studies of the NASA pilot projects that were part of the action research effort.

  17. Determinants of pulmonary blood volume

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Milena L.; Gnoj, Julian; Fisher, Vincent J.; Christianson, Lynn C.

    1970-01-01

    Pulmonary blood volume was determined by the radiocardiographic technique in 49 patients coming to cardiac catheterization. Since this method has not been directly compared with the more commonly used double injection of dye. 25 comparisons were carried out in 13 patients of the series. Agreement was good over a range of 4.5-21.1 heart cycles since there was no statistically significant difference between transit time values measured by the two methods. The relation of pulmonary blood volume to other hemodynamic factors in these 49 patients, with and without cardiac or pulmonary disease, was evaluated by means of multiple regression analysis. The analysis carried out for mean transit time indicates that this parameter varies predominately with flow. Pulmonary blood volume, in this series of resting recumbent individuals, varies to a significant degree only with total blood volume and with pulmonary venous pressure. No parameters of vascular distensibility, such as pulmonary vascular resistance, were found to affect the volume of blood in the lungs. The fact that variations in pulmonary blood volume among the subjects could be described by a multiple regression equation linear with respect to total blood volume and pulmonary venous pressure indicates that these variations are the result of passive distention of components of the vascular bed. PMID:4902826

  18. Polymer Blends. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    polyimides, thereby potentially leading to a viable, new class of high temperature, thermoformable resins for 371 0C (7000F) applica- tions. The Polymer...PBI/PI systems exhibit miscibility which: - exhibit improved processibility over neat PBI - are thermoformable - have improved mechanical performance...new class of high temperature, thermoformable resins for 3710C (700*F) applications. The Polymer Alloy and Composite Program also established a

  19. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  20. Volume inside old black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Marios; De Lorenzo, Tommaso

    2016-11-01

    Black holes that have nearly evaporated are often thought of as small objects, due to their tiny exterior area. However, the horizon bounds large spacelike hypersurfaces. A compelling geometric perspective on the evolution of the interior geometry was recently shown to be provided by a generally covariant definition of the volume inside a black hole using maximal surfaces. In this article, we expand on previous results and show that finding the maximal surfaces in an arbitrary spherically symmetric spacetime is equivalent to a 1 +1 geodesic problem. We then study the effect of Hawking radiation on the volume by computing the volume of maximal surfaces inside the apparent horizon of an evaporating black hole as a function of time at infinity: while the area is shrinking, the volume of these surfaces grows monotonically with advanced time, up to when the horizon has reached Planckian dimensions. The physical relevance of these results for the information paradox and the remnant scenarios are discussed.

  1. Closing volume during normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Garrard, G S; Littler, W A; Redman, C W

    1978-01-01

    Serial lung function studies were performed in ten healthy, primiparous women aged 21--28. Measurements were made at two-monthly intervals during pregnancy and included functional residual capacity (FRC), total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC), specific conductance (SGaw) and closing volume (CV) on each occasion. Closing volume expressed as formular: (see text), showed a progressive rise during pregnancy in all subjects with a linear relationship to time (P less than 0.001, P greater than 0.01, respectively). No consistent changes in lung volume could be shown during pregnancy over the study period. It is suggested that the increase in closing volume during pregnancy might result in abnormalities of distribution of ventilation sufficient to explain the maternal blood gas disturbances of pregnancy. PMID:694802

  2. Lake volume monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, Jean-Francois; Abarca Del Rio, Rodrigo; Berge-Nguyen, Muriel; Arsen, Adalbert; Drolon, Vanessa; Maisongrande, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Lakes are integrator of environmental changes occurring at regional to global scale and present a high variety of behaviors on a variety of time scales (cyclic and secular) depending on the climate conditions and their morphology. In addition their crucial importance as water stocks and retaining, given the significant environment changes occurring worldwide at many anthropocentric levels, has increased the necessity of monitoring all its morphodynamics characteristics, say water level, surface (water contour) and volume. The satellite altimetry and satellite imagery together are now widely used for the calculation of lakes and reservoirs water storage changes worldwide. However strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward and need development of specific approaches. We intend to present a review of some of these methodologies by using the lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked with the survey of climate changes impacts on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variations using the short period of remote sensing measurements available, although time series are probably too short to lead to definitive conclusions to link these results directly with the framework of climate changes. Indeed, many processes beyond the observations are still uncertain, for example the influence of morphology of the lakes. The time response for a lake to reach new state of equilibrium is one of the key aspects often neglected in the current literature. Observations over long period of time, therein maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with a continuity of services over decades, especially when ground gauges network is too limited is therefore a necessity. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g. SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) is

  3. Lake Volume Monitoring from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, J.-F.; Abarca-del-Río, R.; Bergé-Nguyen, M.; Arsen, A.; Drolon, V.; Clos, G.; Maisongrande, P.

    2016-03-01

    Lakes are integrators of environmental change occurring at both the regional and global scale. They present a wide range of behavior on a variety of timescales (cyclic and secular) depending on their morphology and climate conditions. Lakes play a crucial role in retaining and stocking water, and because of the significant global environmental changes occurring at several anthropocentric levels, the necessity to monitor all morphodynamic characteristics [e.g., water level, surface (water contour) and volume] has increased substantially. Satellite altimetry and imagery are now widely used together to calculate lake and reservoir water storage changes worldwide. However, strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward, and specific approaches need to be developed. We present a review of some of these methodologies by using lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked to the observation of climate change impact on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variation using the limited remote sensing measurements available over short time periods, even though the time series are probably too short to directly link these results with climate change. Indeed, there are many processes and factors, like the influence of lake morphology, that are beyond observation and are still uncertain. The time response for lakes to reach a new state of equilibrium is a key aspect that is often neglected in current literature. Observations over a long period of time, including maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with service continuity over decades, are therefore necessary especially when the ground gauge network is too limited. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g., SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) will also be suitable for complete

  4. Technology 2000, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of the conference was to increase awareness of existing NASA developed technologies that are available for immediate use in the development of new products and processes, and to lay the groundwork for the effective utilization of emerging technologies. There were sessions on the following: Computer technology and software engineering; Human factors engineering and life sciences; Information and data management; Material sciences; Manufacturing and fabrication technology; Power, energy, and control systems; Robotics; Sensors and measurement technology; Artificial intelligence; Environmental technology; Optics and communications; and Superconductivity.

  5. Technology 2000, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the conference was to increase awareness of existing NASA developed technologies that are available for immediate use in the development of new products and processes, and to lay the groundwork for the effective utilization of emerging technologies. There were sessions on the following: Computer technology and software engineering; Human factors engineering and life sciences; Information and data management; Material sciences; Manufacturing and fabrication technology; Power, energy, and control systems; Robotics; Sensors and measurement technology; Artificial intelligence; Environmental technology; Optics and communications; and Superconductivity.

  6. Technology 2000, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Technology 2000 was the first major industrial conference and exposition spotlighting NASA technology and technology transfer. It's purpose was, and continues to be, to increase awareness of existing NASA-developed technologies that are available for immediate use in the development of new products and processes, and to lay the groundwork for the effective utilization of emerging technologies. Included are sessions on: computer technology and software engineering; human factors engineering and life sciences; materials science; sensors and measurement technology; artificial intelligence; environmental technology; optics and communications; and superconductivity.

  7. Fatigue 󈨛. Volume 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Figure 5 appears to be composed of fibrils or crazes which have been torn in the fracture process. There is little of this rough fibrous material on the...their work on the role of crazes in the fatigue of polycarbonate. They suggested that the smooth area evident at the edge of an untreated sample is a...remnant of a single craze which first formed during cyclic loading at a point of high local surface stress. Under cyclic loading, this craze grew, as

  8. A urine volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Sabin, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An improved urine volume measurement system for use in the unusual environment of manned space flight is reported. The system utilizes a low time-constant thermal flowmeter. The time integral of the transient response of the flowmeter gives the urine volume during a void as it occurs. In addition, the two phase flows through the flowmeter present no problem. Developments of the thermal flowmeter and a verification of the predicted performance characteristics are summarized.

  9. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy in reduced detection volumes.

    PubMed

    Blom, H; Kastrup, L; Eggeling, C

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is a versatile technique applied to in vitro and in vivo investigations of biochemical processes such as interactions, mobilities or densities with high specifity and sensitivity. The prerequisite of this dynamical fluorescence technique is to have, at a time, only few fluorescent molecules in the detection volume in order to generate significant fluorescence fluctuations. For usual confocal fluorescence microscopy this amounts to a useful concentration in the nanomolar range. The concentration of many biomolecules in living cell or on cell membranes is, however, often quite high, usually in the micro- to the millimolar range. To allow fluctuation spectroscopy and track intracellular interaction or localization of single fluorescently labeled biomolecules in such crowded environments, development of detection volumes with nanoscale resolution is necessary. As diffraction prevents this in the case of light microscopy, new (non-invasive) optical concepts have been developed. In this mini-review article we present recent advancements, implemented to decrease the detection volume below that of normal fluorescence microscopy. Especially, their combination with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is emphasized.

  10. Biogasification of papaya processing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.Y.; Weitzenhoff, M.H.; Moy, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Biogasification of papaya processing wastes for pollution control and energy utilization is feasible. The biogasification process with sludge recycling permits smaller reactor volume without any deterioration of CH4 production rate and CH4 content. Appropriate design and operational criteria for biogasification processing of papaya wastes were developed.

  11. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  12. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  13. Infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) catalogs and atlases. Volume 7: The small scale structure catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George (Editor); Walker, D. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) was launched January 26, 1983. During its 300-day mission, it surveyed over 96 pct of the celestial sphere at four infrared wavelengths, centered approximately at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns. Volume 1 describes the instrument, the mission, and the data reduction process. Volumes 2 through 6 present the observations of the approximately 245,000 individual point sources detected by IRAS; each volume gives sources within a specified range of declination. Volume 7 gives the observations of the approximately 16,000 sources spatially resolved by IRAS and smaller than 8'. This is Volume 7, The Small Scale Structure Catalog.

  14. Production and delivery of a fluid mixture to an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E [Los Alamos, NM; Bland, Ronald Gene [Houston, TX; Foley, Ron Lee [Magnolia, TX; Bloys, James B [Katy, TX; Gonzalez, Manuel E [Kingwood, NM; Daniel, John M [Germantown, TN; Robinson, Ian M [Guisborough, GB; Carpenter, Robert B [Tomball, TX

    2012-01-24

    The methods described herein generally relate to preparing and delivering a fluid mixture to a confined volume, specifically an annular volume located between two concentrically oriented casing strings within a hydrocarbon fluid producing well. The fluid mixtures disclosed herein are useful in controlling pressure in localized volumes. The fluid mixtures comprise at least one polymerizable monomer and at least one inhibitor. The processes and methods disclosed herein allow the fluid mixture to be stored, shipped and/or injected into localized volumes, for example, an annular volume defined by concentric well casing strings.

  15. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume I, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Faletra, P.; Beavis, W.; Franz, K.; Musick, C.; Walbridge, S.E.; Myron, H.

    2001-01-01

    This is our first volume of the Undergraduate Journal. It is an approbation of the impressive research performed by summer interns under the guidance of their dedicated mentors. The full-length publications were chosen from a pool of submissions that were reviewed by many of the excellent scientists at our National Laboratories. Most of these students will pursue careers in science, engineering and technology and, hopefully, some of this talent will remain with our labs. We have also included about 125 abstracts that survived the review process. These were submitted from all of our participating National Laboratories.

  16. Intracellular signalling involved in volume regulatory decrease.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K

    2000-01-01

    The following volume-sensitive channels are characterized in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC), (i) a tamoxifen- and AA acid sensitive, outwardly rectifying small anion channel (I(Cl,vol)) with low field anion selectivity (I(-)>Cl(-)) and moderate depolarisation-induced inactivation, (ii) a separate DIDS- and niflumic acid-sensitive organic osmolyte/anion channel (OOC) transporting predominantly taurine, and (iii) a clofilium- and Ba(2+)-sensitive, voltage- and Ca(2+)-insensitive 5 pS K(+) channel (I(K,vol)), resistant to a range of K(+) channel inhibitors including ChTX, clotrimazole, apamin, kaliotoxin, margatoxin, and TEA, and with a pH(o) dependence reminiscent of the two-pore domain background K(+) channels TASK. Cell swelling leads to an immediate and transient 3.3 fold increase in the rate of AA release resulting from activation of cPLA(2)alpha, which is found to be translocated to the nucleus upon cell swelling (probably to the inner nuclear membrane), where it is phosphorylated and activated by a G-protein coupled process. AA is a precursor for LTC(4), which is transported out of the cell, where it is converted to LTD(4), which activates I(K,vol), and OOC, whereas I(Cl,vol) is activated via a different pathway. In the absence of an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), the unitary conductance, kinetics, and pharmacological profile are similar for I(K,vol) and the K(+)-channels activated by LTD(4). Tyrosine phosphorylations are involved in the volume regulatory pathways and in defining the volume set-point. Tyrosin kinases appear to be involved in the signalling sequence leading to opening of the channels, and tyrosin phosphatases seem to be involved in closing of the channels. Finally a significant de-polymerization of F-actin is observed after cell swelling, the potential role of which in the volume regulatory mechanisms is under investigation.

  17. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  18. Exploring the connectome: petascale volume visualization of microscopy data streams.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Johanna; Hadwiger, Markus; Al-Awami, Ali; Jeong, Won-Ki; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Lichtman, Jeff W; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution microscopy let neuroscientists acquire neural-tissue volume data of extremely large sizes. However, the tremendous resolution and the high complexity of neural structures present big challenges to storage, processing, and visualization at interactive rates. A proposed system provides interactive exploration of petascale (petavoxel) volumes resulting from high-throughput electron microscopy data streams. The system can concurrently handle multiple volumes and can support the simultaneous visualization of high-resolution voxel segmentation data. Its visualization-driven design restricts most computations to a small subset of the data. It employs a multiresolution virtual-memory architecture for better scalability than previous approaches and for handling incomplete data. Researchers have employed it for a 1-teravoxel mouse cortex volume, of which several hundred axons and dendrites as well as synapses have been segmented and labeled.

  19. Study on spectrometer based upon volume holographic transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhen; Liu, Guodong; Ren, Zhong; Zeng, Lvming

    2010-10-01

    In this present paper, a spectrometer based upon axial transmissive optical structure with the volume-phase holographic (VPH) transmission grating technology is introduced. We give a physical insight for the structure and mechanism of photorefractive volume holographic gratings and theoretically analyze some important performance parameters of the spectrometer device using the coupled wave theory, which should be considered in the process of the following design for the device with volume phase holographic transmission gratings. The experimental results show, owing to its axial transmissive optical geometry and the perfect performance of the VPH transmission grating, the spectrometer based on the volume-phase holographic transmission grating has satisfactory high resolution and wavelength accuracy. It has great promise to be widely used in the future.

  20. Pathophysiology of mitochondrial volume homeostasis: potassium transport and permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Nowikovsky, Karin; Schweyen, Rudolf J; Bernardi, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial volume is a key issue in cellular pathophysiology. Mitochondrial volume and shape changes can occur following regulated fission-fusion events, which are modulated by a complex network of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins; and through regulation of ion transport across the inner membrane. In this review we will cover mitochondrial volume homeostasis that depends on (i) monovalent cation transport across the inner membrane, a regulated process that couples electrophoretic K(+) influx on K(+) channels to K(+) extrusion through the K(+)-H(+) exchanger; (ii) the permeability transition, a loss of inner membrane permeability that may be instrumental in triggering cell death. Specific emphasis will be placed on molecular advances on the nature of the transport protein(s) involved, and/or on diseases that depend on mitochondrial volume dysregulation.