Science.gov

Sample records for processed vegetables aplicacao

  1. Fruit, vegetable, and grain processing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.M.; Soderquist, M.R.

    1980-06-01

    This is a literature review of fruit, vegetable and grain processing wastes. The factors affecting water usage and methods of conservation were examined. Various processes were investigated which included the pulp recovery from caustic peeled tomato skin, the dewatering of citrus, washing leafy vegetables with recycled process water and the potato processing industry.

  2. Minimally processed vegetable salads: microbial quality evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fröder, Hans; Martins, Cecília Geraldes; De Souza, Katia Leani Oliveira; Landgraf, Mariza; Franco, Bernadette D G M; Destro, Maria Teresa

    2007-05-01

    The increasing demand for fresh fruits and vegetables and for convenience foods is causing an expansion of the market share for minimally processed vegetables. Among the more common pathogenic microorganisms that can be transmitted to humans by these products are Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial quality of a selection of minimally processed vegetables. A total of 181 samples of minimally processed leafy salads were collected from retailers in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Counts of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and Salmonella were conducted for 133 samples. L. monocytogenes was assessed in 181 samples using the BAX System and by plating the enrichment broth onto Palcam and Oxford agars. Suspected Listeria colonies were submitted to classical biochemical tests. Populations of psychrotrophic microorganisms >10(6) CFU/g were found in 51% of the 133 samples, and Enterobacteriaceae populations between 10(5) and 106 CFU/g were found in 42% of the samples. Fecal coliform concentrations higher than 10(2) CFU/g (Brazilian standard) were found in 97 (73%) of the samples, and Salmonella was detected in 4 (3%) of the samples. Two of the Salmonella-positive samples had <10(2) CFU/g concentrations of fecal coliforms. L. monocytogenes was detected in only 1 (0.6%) of the 181 samples examined. This positive sample was simultaneously detected by both methods. The other Listeria species identified by plating were L. welshimeri (one sample of curly lettuce) and L. innocua (2 samples of watercress). The results indicate that minimally processed vegetables had poor microbiological quality, and these products could be a vehicle for pathogens such as Salmonella and L. monocytogenes.

  3. Radiation processing of minimally processed vegetables and aromatic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, M. J.; Sousa, M. B.; Sapata, M. M.; Ferreira, A.; Curado, T.; Andrada, L.; Botelho, M. L.; Veloso, M. G.

    2009-07-01

    Vegetables are an essential part of people's diet all around the world. Due to cultivate techniques and handling after harvest, these products, may contain high microbial load that can cause food borne outbreaks. The irradiation of minimally processed vegetables is an efficient way to reduce the level of microorganisms and to inhibit parasites, helping a safe global trade. Evaluation of the irradiation's effects was carried out in minimal processed vegetables, as coriander ( Coriandrum sativum L .), mint ( Mentha spicata L.), parsley ( Petroselinum crispum Mill, (A.W. Hill)), lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) and watercress ( Nasturium officinale L.). The inactivation level of natural microbiota and the D 10 values of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria innocua in these products were determined. The physical-chemical and sensorial characteristics before and after irradiation at a range of 0.5 up to 2.0 kGy applied doses were also evaluated. No differences were verified in the overall of sensorial and physical properties after irradiation up to 1 kGy, a decrease of natural microbiota was noticed (⩾2 log). Based on the determined D10, the amount of radiation necessary to kill 10 5E. coli and L. innocua was between 0.70 and 1.55 kGy. Shelf life of irradiated coriander, mint and lettuce at 0.5 kGy increased 2, 3 and 4 days, respectively, when compared with non-irradiated.

  4. U.S. Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Katharine C.; And Others

    Because of shifts in consumer tastes and preferences, demographics, technology, government regulation, and the expanding interdependence of world markets, the United States fruit and vegetable processing industries must operate in a constantly changing and uncertain economic environment. U.S. per capita use of processed fruits and vegetables is…

  5. Coatings for minimally processed fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-cut fruit and vegetables are gaining increasing popularity and market share. Techniques to enhance stability of fresh cut produce are reviewed. Among these techniques, edibles coatings can provide protection against dehydration, microbial decay and decrease events related to physiological sene...

  6. Role of vegetation on erosion processes: experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Investigations on soil-system ecology are ever more oriented toward quantitative information based on the study of the linkages between physical processes and ecological response in rivers. As it is known, in presence of vegetation, the hydrodynamics characteristics of flow are principally determined by the mutual interrelation between the flow velocity field and the hydraulic behavior (completely submerged or emergent) of the vegetation elements. Much effort has been made toward identifying the theoretical law to interpret the vertical profile of flow longitudinal velocity in vegetated channels. Many theoretical and experimental studies in laboratory channels have been carried out and especially the case of submerged flexible vegetation has been examined (Termini, 2012). The effects of vegetation on flow velocity are significant and of crucial importance for stabilizing sediments and reducing erosion. Vegetation has a complex effect on walls roughness and the study of the hydrodynamic conditions of flow is difficult. Although most studies based on the "boundary layer" scheme so that the hydrodynamic conditions inside and above the vegetated layer are considered separately, some authors (Ghisalberti and Nepft, 2002; Carollo et al., 2008) claim that the "mixing layer" scheme is more appropriate to define the velocity profile both inside and outside the vegetated layer. Experimental program has been recently carried out in two laboratory flumes constructed at the laboratory of Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Aerospaziale, dei Materiali - University of Palermo (Italy) with real and flexible vegetation on the bed. In this paper, attention is paid to the influence of vegetation on the erosion processes both on the bed and on the channel banks. The structure of the detailed flow velocity field is analyzed and compared with that obtained in absence of vegetation. Attention is then devoted to the analysis of soil erosion mechanism. Carollo F.G., Ferro V

  7. The microbiology of minimally processed fresh fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-the, C; Carlin, F

    1994-01-01

    Minimally processed fresh (MPF) fruits and vegetables are good media for growth of microorganisms. They have been involved in outbreaks because of the consumption of products contaminated by pathogens. They are also sensitive to various spoilage microorganisms such as pectinolytic bacteria, saprophytic Gram-negative bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts. Contamination of MPF fruits and vegetables occurs at every stage of the food chain, from cultivation to processing. Polluted environments during cultivation or poor hygienic conditions in processing increase the risk of contamination with foodborne pathogens. Although MPF fruits and vegetables may harbor psychrotrophic microorganisms such as fluorescent pseudomonads or Listeria monocytogenes, good control of refrigeration temperature limits growth of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Modified atmospheres are often efficient to maintain or improve visual organoleptic quality of MPF fruits and vegetables, but their effects on microorganisms are inconsistent. Chemical disinfection can partially reduce the initial bacterial contamination; irradiation seems to be more efficient. The applications of legislations and quality assurance systems to control contamination, survival, and growth of foodborne pathogens in MPF fruits and vegetables are discussed.

  8. EFFECTS OF GEOMORPHIC PROCESSES AND HYDROLOGIC REGIMES ON RIPARIAN VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, the relationships among riparian vegetation and geomorphic and hydrologic processes in central Great Basin watersheds are evaluated over a range of scales. These relationships are examined through a series of case studies that have been conducted by the Great Ba...

  9. Pulsed electric field processing for fruit and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column reviews the theory and current applications of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for fruits and vegetables to improve their safety and quality. This month’s column coauthor, Stefan Toepfl, is advanced research manager at the German Institute of Food Technologies and professo...

  10. Process for producing vegetative and tuber growth regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W. (Inventor); Yorio, Neil C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process of making a vegetative and tuber growth regulator. The vegetative and tuber growth regulator is made by growing potato plants in a recirculating hydroponic system for a sufficient time to produce the growth regulator. Also, the use of the vegetative and growth regulator on solanaceous plants, tuber forming plants and ornamental seedlings by contacting the roots or shoots of the plant with a sufficient amount of the growth regulator to regulate the growth of the plant and one more of canopy size, plant height, stem length, internode number and presence of tubers in fresh mass. Finally, a method for regulating the growth of potato plants using a recirculating hydroponic system is described.

  11. Discoloration in raw and processed fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Adams, J B; Brown, H M

    2007-01-01

    Discoloration in fruits and vegetables is reviewed in relation to the chemical and biochemical causes of black, brown, red, yellow, and green discolorations. In raw materials, only a limited understanding has so far been achieved of the internal black and brown discolorations. The biochemical signaling pathways triggered by wounding or chilling-storage, the nature of the enzymes and reactive oxygen species involved, and the identity of the phenolic compounds oxidized are areas where further information is desirable. In processed materials, a greater comprehension is needed of the role of ascorbic acid reactions in the browning of fruits and "pinking" of Brassicaceous vegetables, and more information is desirable on the structure and properties of the discoloring pigments in many products. It is concluded that a greater knowledge of these areas, and of the naturally-occurring constituents that can accelerate or inhibit the causative reactions, would lead to the development of more efficient methods of controlling fruit and vegetable discolorations.

  12. NOAA/AVHRR vegetation indices and agriculture-meteorology processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    1992-07-01

    Enzymes controlled biochemical reactions in photosynthesis and respiration processes are affected by temperature making Growing Degree Days (GDDs) an important crop growth agromet parameter. NOAA/AVHRR Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) provide integrated aspect of non-linear crop-growth processes. This paper describes the inter-relationships between temporal profiles of air temperature GDDs and RVI/NDVI over Ludhiana district wherein the 94.9% of agriculture area has been under wheat. The Regression Coefficients (RC) for RVI have been lower than that for NDVI in case of mean air temperature GDDs and are significant at 99% confidence level. Similar relationship has been also observed for maximum air temperature GDDs except that regression with RVI is significant at 98% confidence level. Such relationship with minimum air temperature GDDs is significant at 99% confidence level once the regression is restricted to mid of Milking-Dough stage.

  13. Preliminary process engineering evaluation of ethanol production from vegetative crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, A. R.; Linden, J. C.; Smith, D. H.; Villet, R. H.

    1982-12-01

    Vegetative crops show good potential as feedstock for ethanol production via cellulose hydrolysis and yeast fermentation. The low levels of lignin encountered in young plant tissues show an inverse relationship with the high cellulose digestibility during hydrolysis with cellulose enzymes. Ensiled sorghum species and brown midrib mutants of sorghum exhibit high glucose yields after enzyme hydrolysis as well. Vegetative crop materials as candidate feedstocks for ethanol manufacture should continue to be studied. The species studied so far are high value cash crops and result in relatively high costs for the final ethanol product. Unconventional crops, such as pigweed, kochia, and Russian thistle, which can use water efficiently and grow on relatively arid land under conditions not ideal for food production, should be carefully evaluated with regard to their cultivation requirements, photosynthesis rates, and cellulose digestibility. Such crops should result in more favorable process economics for alcohol production.

  14. Bacterial colonization and biofilm development on minimally processed vegetables.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, I; Harper, I S; Coventry, M J; Taylor, P W; Wan, J; Hickey, M W

    1998-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been observed and reported on food and food-processing surfaces and can contribute to increased risks for product quality and food safety. The colonization of fruit and vegetables by pectynolitic bacteria like Pseudonomas fluorescens attributable to conditions such as soft rot, can also manifest as biofilms. A developed biofilm structure can provide a protective environment for pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes reducing the effectiveness of sanitisers and other inhibitory agents. Understanding the colonization of bacteria on leaf surfaces is essential to the development of a better understanding of the leaf ecology of vegetable products. Studies of microbial colonization of leaf surfaces have been conducted using SEM and more recently using confocal microsocpy techniques. In the current study, a Leica TCS NT laser scanning confocal microscope was used to investigate biofilm formation using vital fluorescence staining on intact vegetable leaves. Reflection contrast and fluorescence three-dimensional imaging successfully delineated bacterial and biofilm morphology without disturbing the bacterial or leaf surface structure. The results demonstrate the presence and development of biofilm on the surface of lettuce. The biofilms appeared to originate on the cuticle in distinct micro-environments such as in the natural depression of the stomata, or in the intercellular junction. Bacteria also adhered to and developed biofilm colonies within an hour of contact and with clean stainless steel surfaces. Our study investigates the progression of biofilm formation from leaf colonization, and will assist in characterising the critical mechanisms of plant/host interaction and facilitate the development of improved preservation, sanitising and packaging strategies for minimally processed vegetable products.

  15. Effects of industrial processing on folate content in green vegetables.

    PubMed

    Delchier, Nicolas; Ringling, Christiane; Le Grandois, Julie; Aoudé-Werner, Dalal; Galland, Rachel; Georgé, Stéphane; Rychlik, Michael; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2013-08-15

    Folates are described to be sensitive to different physical parameters such as heat, light, pH and leaching. Most studies on folates degradation during processing or cooking treatments were carried out on model solutions or vegetables only with thermal treatments. Our aim was to identify which steps were involved in folates loss in industrial processing chains, and which mechanisms were underlying these losses. For this, the folates contents were monitored along an industrial canning chain of green beans and along an industrial freezing chain of spinach. Folates contents decreased significantly by 25% during the washing step for spinach in the freezing process, and by 30% in the green beans canning process after sterilisation, with 20% of the initial amount being transferred into the covering liquid. The main mechanism involved in folate loss during both canning green beans and freezing spinach was leaching. Limiting the contact between vegetables and water or using steaming seems to be an adequate measure to limit folates losses during processing.

  16. Optimization of biodiesel production process using recycled vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, Yarely

    Petro diesel toxic emissions and its limited resources have created an interest for the development of new energy resources, such as biodiesel. Biodiesel is traditionally produced by a transesterification reaction between vegetable oil and an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. However, this process is slow and expensive due to the high cost of raw materials. Low costs feedstock oils such as recycled and animal fats are available but they cannot be transesterified with alkaline catalysts due to high content of free fatty acids, which can lead to undesirable reactions such as saponification. In this study, we reduce free fatty acids content by using an acid pre-treatment. We compare sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and ptoluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) to pre-treat recycled vegetable oil. PTSA removes water after 60 minutes of treatment at room temperature or within 15 minutes at 50°C. The pretreatment was followed by a transesterification reaction using alkaline catalyst. To minimize costs and accelerate reaction, the pretreatment and transesterification reaction of recycle vegetable oil was conducted at atmospheric pressure in a microwave oven. Biodiesel was characterized using a GC-MS method.

  17. 7 CFR 318.13-14 - Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other... fruits, vegetables, and other products. (a) Fruits, vegetables, and other products that are processed... products which are approved for interstate movement from those States can be found in the fruits...

  18. 7 CFR 318.13-14 - Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other... fruits, vegetables, and other products. (a) Fruits, vegetables, and other products that are processed... products which are approved for interstate movement from those States can be found in the fruits...

  19. 7 CFR 318.13-14 - Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other... fruits, vegetables, and other products. (a) Fruits, vegetables, and other products that are processed... products which are approved for interstate movement from those States can be found in the fruits...

  20. 7 CFR 318.13-14 - Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other... fruits, vegetables, and other products. (a) Fruits, vegetables, and other products that are processed... products which are approved for interstate movement from those States can be found in the fruits...

  1. 7 CFR 318.13-14 - Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other products that have not been processed sufficiently as to be incapable of harboring fruit flies are... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of processed fruits, vegetables, and other... fruits, vegetables, and other products. (a) Fruits, vegetables, and other products that are...

  2. Effect of Processing on Magnesium Content of Green Leafy Vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, D.; Agrawal, R.; Kumar, R.; Rai, A. Kumar; Rai, G. Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we have studied the effect of different food processing techniques like blanching, microwave processing, boiling, frying, and different drying methods on depletion of minerals especially magnesium in green leafy vegetables (leaves of Trigonella foenum, common name methi, and Spinacia oleracea, common name spinach) using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). These processing techniques are frequently used at home as well as in food processing industries. The LIBS spectra of the fresh leaves of methi and spinach and their pellets (made by drying, grinding, and pressing the leaf) were recorded in a spectral range from 200 to 500 nm. After applying the above processing techniques, different pellets of these leaves were made in the same way. The LIBS spectra of these processed leaf samples were also recorded using the same experimental parameters as used for the fresh samples. Our results show that among the above processing techniques, frying most significantly reduces the content of magnesium, whereas the least loss of Mg is observed in the case of boiling. We have verified this result by recording the LIBS spectra of the intact fresh leaves and of those processed with different techniques. The same results were also obtained from the LIBS spectra of the intact leaves and their pellets. The LIBS spectra of methi and spinach leaves were also recorded after drying them using two different techniques — drying in vacuum and in a hot air oven; the results show that vacuum drying is more suitable in terms of minimizing loss of Mg content in leaves.

  3. Fluvial processes and vegetation - Glimpses of the past, the present, and perhaps the future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Hupp, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Most research before 1960 into interactions among fluvial processes, resulting landforms, and vegetation was descriptive. Since then, however, research has become more detailed and quantitative permitting numerical modeling and applications including agricultural-erosion abatement and rehabilitation of altered bottomlands. Although progress was largely observational, the empiricism increasingly yielded to objective recognition of how vegetation interacts with and influences geomorphic process. A review of advances relating fluvial processes and vegetation during the last 50 years centers on hydrologic reconstructions from tree rings, plant indicators of flow- and flood-frequency parameters, hydrologic controls on plant species, regulation of sediment movement by vegetation, vegetative controls on mass movement, and relations between plant cover and sediment movement. Extension of present studies of vegetation as a regulator of bottomland hydrologic and geomorphic processes may become markedly more sophisticated and widespread than at present. Research emphases that are likely to continue include vegetative considerations for erosion modeling, response of riparian-zone forests to disturbance such as dams and water diversion, the effect of vegetation on channel and bottomland dynamics, and rehabilitation of stream corridors. Research topics that presently are receiving attention are the effect of woody vegetation on the roughness of stream corridors and, hence, processes of flood conveyance and flood-plain sedimentation, the development of a theoretical basis for rehabilitation projects as opposed to fully empirical approaches, the effect of invasive plant species on the dynamics of bottomland vegetation, the quantification of below-surface biomass and related soil-stability factors for use in erosion-prediction models, and the effect of impoundments on downstream narrowing of channels and accompanying encroachment of vegetation. Bottomland vegetation partially

  4. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or... properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried...

  5. 77 FR 51511 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Processed Fruits and Vegetables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Processed Fruits and Vegetables AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety, USDA. ACTION: Notice... discussed at the 26th session of the Codex Committee on Processed Fruits and Vegetables (CCPFV) of the Codex... Further Information About the 26th Session of the CCPFV Contact: Dorian LaFond, AMS, Fruits and...

  6. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or... properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried...

  7. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or... properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried...

  8. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or... properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried...

  9. 21 CFR 133.180 - Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits... with fruits, vegetables, or meats. (a) Pasteurized process cheese spread with fruits, vegetables, or... properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried fruit; any properly prepared cooked, canned, or dried...

  10. Coevolution of hydraulic, soil and vegetation processes in estuarine wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivisonno, Franco; Rodriguez, Jose F.; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia; Stenta, Hernan

    2014-05-01

    Estuarine wetlands of south eastern Australia, typically display a vegetation zonation with a sequence mudflats - mangrove forest - saltmarsh plains from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient. Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitats for fish and many terrestrial species. They also have a carbon sequestration capacity that surpasess terrestrial forest. Estuarine wetlands respond to sea-level rise by vertical accretion and horizontal landward migration, in order to maintain their position in the tidal frame. In situations in which buffer areas for landward migration are not available, saltmarsh can be lost due to mangrove encroachment. As a result of mangrove invasion associated in part with raising estuary water levels and urbanisation, coastal saltmarsh in parts of south-eastern Australia has been declared an endangered ecological community. Predicting estuarine wetlands response to sea-level rise requires modelling the coevolving dynamics of water flow, soil and vegetation. This paper presents preliminary results of our recently developed numerical model for wetland dynamics in wetlands of the Hunter estuary of NSW. The model simulates continuous tidal inflow into the wetland, and accounts for the effect of varying vegetation types on flow resistance. Coevolution effects appear as vegetation types are updated based on their preference to prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. The model also considers that accretion values vary with vegetation type. Simulations are driven using local information collected over several years, which includes estuary water levels, accretion rates, soil carbon content, flow resistance and vegetation preference to hydraulic conditions. Model results predict further saltmarsh loss under current conditions of moderate increase of estuary water levels.

  11. Connectivity processes and riparian vegetation of the upper Paraná River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevaux, José C.; Corradini, Fabrício A.; Aquino, Samia

    2013-10-01

    In fluvial systems, the relationship between a dominant variable (e.g. flood pulse) and its dependent ones (e.g. riparian vegetation) is called connectivity. This paper analyzes the connectivity elements and processes controlling riparian vegetation for a reach of the upper Paraná River (Brazil) and estimates the future changes in channel-vegetation relationship as a consequence of the managing of a large dam. The studied reach is situated 30 km downstream from the Porto Primavera Dam (construction finished in 1999). Through aerial photography (1:25,000, 1996), RGB-CBERS satellite imagery and a previous field botany survey it was possible to elaborate a map with the five major morpho-vegetation units: 1) Tree-dominated natural levee, 2) Shrubby upper floodplain, 3) Shrub-herbaceous mid floodplain, 4) Grass-herbaceous lower floodplain and 5) Shrub-herbaceous flood runoff channel units. By use of a detailed topographic survey and statistical tools each morpho-vegetation type was analyzed according to its connectivity parameters (frequency, recurrence, permanence, seasonality, potamophase, limnophase and FCQ index) in the pre- and post-dam closure periods of the historical series. Data showed that most of the morpho-vegetation units were predicted to present changes in connectivity parameters values after dam closing and the new regime could affect, in different intensity, the river ecology and particularly the riparian vegetation. The methods used in this study can be useful for dam impact studies in other South American tropical rivers.

  12. 75 FR 11147 - Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for Levees and Floodwalls

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for... of Engineers (Corps), published its proposed update to its current process for requesting a variance... stated that written comments must be submitted on or before March 11, 2010. Instructions for...

  13. Housing Seasonal Workers for the Minnesota Processed Vegetable Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziebarth, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The place where we live and work is a reflection of a complex set of economic conditions and social relationships. Very little information is available regarding housing for Minnesota's migrant workers. It is estimated that approximately 20,000 people migrate to Minnesota each summer to work in the production and processing of green peas and sweet…

  14. Computer and control applications in a vegetable processing plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many advantages to the use of computers and control in food industry. Software in the food industry takes 2 forms - general purpose commercial computer software and software for specialized applications, such as drying and thermal processing of foods. Many applied simulation models for d...

  15. Vegetation dynamics and climate variability-associated biophysical process in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Xue, Y.; Cox, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    West Africa is a bioclimatic zone of predominantly annual grasses with shrubs and trees with a steep gradient in climate, soils, vegetation, fauna, land use and human utilization. West Africa ecosystem region suffered from the most severe and longest drought in the world during the Twentieth Century since the later 1960s. This study systematically investigates how climate variability and anomalies in West Africa affect the regional terrestrial ecosystem, including plant functional types' (PFT) spatial distribution and temporal variations and vegetation characteristics, through biophysical and photosynthesis processes at different scales. We use the offline Simplified Simple Biosphere Version 4/ Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics Model (SSiB4/TRIFFID), which is a fully coupled biophysical-dynamic vegetation (DVM) model to adequately incorporate the complex non-linear coupling dynamics between ecosystem and climate variability. The biophysical parameters in SSiB4 are adjusted with TRIFFID-produced vegetation parameter values, which ensure adequate biophysical process coupling. A 59-year simulation from 1948 was conducted using the meteorological forcing, which consists of substantial seasonal, interannual, and interdecal variability and long term dry trend. The results show that the simulated PFT's and leaf area index (LAI) correspond well to climate variability and are consistent with satellite derived vegetation conditions. The simulated inter-decadal variability in vegetation conditions is consistent with the Sahel drought in the 1970s and the 1980s and partial recovery in the 1990s and the 2000s (fig1). To further understand the biophysical mechanism of interactions of water, carbon, radiation, and vegetation dynamics, analyses are conducted to find relationships between vegetation variability and environmental conditions. It is found that the vegetation characteristics simulated by SSiB4/TRIFFID responds primarily to five

  16. The influence of badland surfaces and erosion processes on vegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardenbicker, Ulrike; Matheis, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    To assess the links between badland geomorphology and vegetation cover, we used detailed mapping in the Avonlea badlands, 60 km southwest of Regina, Saskatchewan Canada. Three badlands surfaces are typical in the study area: a basal pediment surface, a mid-slope of bentonitic mudstone with typical popcorn surface, and an upper slope with mud-cemented sandstone. Badland development was triggered by rapid post Pleistocene incision of a meltwater channel in Upper Cretaceous marine and lagoonal sediments. After surveying and mapping of a test area, sediment samples were taken to analyze geophysical parameters. A detailed geomorphic map and vegetation map (1:1000) were compared and analyzed in order to determine the geomorphic environment for plant colonization. The shrink-swell capacity of the bentonitic bedrock, slaking potential and dispersivity are controlled by soil texture, clay mineralogy and chemistry, strongly influencing the timing and location of runoff and the relative significance of surface and subsurface erosional processes. The absence of shrink-swell cracking of the alluvial surfaces of the pediments indicates a low infiltration capacity and sheetflow. The compact lithology of the sandstone is responsible for its low permeability and high runoff coefficient. Slope drainage of steep sandstone slopes is routed through a deep corrasional pipe network. Silver sagebrush (Artemisia cana) is the only species growing on the popcorn surface of the mudrock, which is in large parts vegetation free. The basal pediment shows a distinct 2 m band surrounding the mudrock outcrop without vegetation as a result of high sedimentation rate due to slope wash. Otherwise the typical pioneer vegetation of this basal pediment are grasses. In the transition zone below the steep sandstone cliffs and above the gentle bentonitic mudrock surfaces patches of short-grass vegetation are found, marking slumped blocks with intact vegetation and soil cover. These patches are surrounded by

  17. Effect of processing on phenolic antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains--a review.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Balunkeswar; Liu, Rui Hai; Tang, Juming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of processing operations such as drying/dehydration, canning, extrusion, high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, and ohmic heating on the phytochemicals of fruits, vegetables, and grains is important in retaining the health benefiting properties of these antioxidative compounds in processed food products. Most of the previous investigations in the literature on the antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains have shown that food-processing operations reduced the antioxidants of the processed foods, which is also the usual consumer perception. However, in the last decade some articles in the literature reported that the evaluation of nutritional quality of processed fruits and vegetables not only depend on the quantity of vitamin C but should include analyses of other antioxidant phytochemicals and antioxidant activity. Thermal processing increased the total antioxidant activity of tomato and sweet corn. Most importantly, analysis also depends on the condition, type, and mechanism of antioxidant assays used. This review aims to provide concise information on the influence of various thermal and nonthermal food-processing operations on the stability and kinetics of health beneficial phenolic antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains.

  18. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Lightly Pickled Vegetables and Its Successful Control at Processing Plants.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Masumi; Kanki, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Inamura, Hideichi; Koganei, Yosuke; Sano, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Asakura, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Incidences of food poisoning traced to nonanimal food products have been increasingly reported. One of these was a recent large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection from the consumption of lightly pickled vegetables, indicating the necessity of imposing hygienic controls during manufacturing. However, little is known about the bacterial contamination levels in these minimally processed vegetables. Here we examined the prevalence of STEC, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes in 100 lightly pickled vegetable products manufactured at 55 processing factories. Simultaneously, we also performed quantitative measurements of representative indicator bacteria (total viable counts, coliform counts, and β-glucuronidase-producing E. coli counts). STEC and Salmonella spp. were not detected in any of the samples; L. monocytogenes was detected in 12 samples manufactured at five of the factories. Microbiological surveillance at two factories (two surveys at factory A and three surveys at factory B) between June 2014 and January 2015 determined that the areas predominantly contaminated with L. monocytogenes included the refrigerators and packaging rooms. Genotyping provided further evidence that the contaminants found in these areas were linked to those found in the final products. Taken together, we demonstrated the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in lightly pickled vegetables sold at the retail level. Microbiological surveillance at the manufacturing factories further clarified the sources of the contamination in the retail products. These data indicate the necessity of implementing adequate monitoring programs to minimize health risks attributable to the consumption of these minimally processed vegetables.

  19. Phenopix: a R package to process digital images of a vegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippa, Gianluca; Cremonese, Edoardo; Migliavacca, Mirco; Galvagno, Marta; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Richardson, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Plant phenology is a globally recognized indicator of the effects of climate change on the terrestrial biosphere. Accordingly, new tools to automatically track the seasonal development of a vegetation cover are becoming available and more and more deployed. Among them, near-continuous digital images are being collected in several networks in the US, Europe, Asia and Australia in a range of different ecosystems, including agricultural lands, deciduous and evergreen forests, and grasslands. The growing scientific interest in vegetation image analysis highlights the need of easy to use, flexible and standardized processing techniques. In this contribution we illustrate a new open source package called "phenopix" written in R language that allows to process images of a vegetation cover. The main features include: (i) define of one or more areas of interest on an image and process pixel information within them, (ii) compute vegetation indexes based on red green and blue channels, (iii) fit a curve to the seasonal trajectory of vegetation indexes and extract relevant dates (aka thresholds) on the seasonal trajectory; (iv) analyze image pixels separately to extract spatially explicit phenological information. The utilities of the package will be illustrated in detail for two subalpine sites, a grassland and a larch stand at about 2000 m in the Italian Western Alps. The phenopix package is a cost free and easy-to-use tool that allows to process digital images of a vegetation cover in a standardized, flexible and reproducible way. The software is available for download at the R forge web site (r-forge.r-project.org/projects/phenopix/).

  20. Spherical Lactic Acid-producing Bacteria of Southern-grown Raw and Processed Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, J. Orvin; Graham, Wanda F.; McCarty, I. E.

    1967-01-01

    The frequency and levels of population of the spherical lactic acid-producing bacteria were determined on raw and processed yellow summer and zucchini squash, a variety of greens, green beans, okra, southern peas, and butter and lima beans, and on fresh cucumbers and corn flowers. Six taxa occurred consistently: Leuconostoc mesenteroides, yellow-pigmented streptococci, Streptococcus faecium, Aerococcus viridans, and S. faecalis and S. faecalis var. liquefaciens. The same taxa occurred with the same order of frequency on processed, frozen vegetables, but with a marked decrease in the occurrence of S. faecalis var. liquefaciens. S. lactis, S. cremoris, S. equinus, S. bovis, and pediococci were isolated infrequently. No other member of the viridans group of the streptococci and no member of the pyogenic group was isolated. Approximately 88% of the cultures were identified. Total counts of the lactic-acid-producing bacteria rarely exceeded 105 per gram of sample, and there was a reduction by 90% during the second year of study, probably because of drought. Only one bacterial species was found on 40% of the raw and 34% of the processed vegetable samples. Two or more species or taxa were present on the remainder of 153 raw and 56 processed vegetable samples. A. viridans was present on squash, greens, okra, and southern peas, and its frequency of occurrence on vegetables suggests that plants are its natural habitat. PMID:16349739

  1. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cheese food by § 133.173, except that: (1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent. (2) It... meat. (3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by § 133.5(b) is not applicable. (b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food...

  2. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cheese food by § 133.173, except that: (1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent. (2) It... meat. (3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by § 133.5(b) is not applicable. (b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food...

  3. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cheese food by § 133.173, except that: (1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent. (2) It... meat. (3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by § 133.5(b) is not applicable. (b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food...

  4. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cheese food by § 133.173, except that: (1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent. (2) It... meat. (3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by § 133.5(b) is not applicable. (b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food...

  5. 21 CFR 133.174 - Pasteurized process cheese food with fruits, vegetables, or meats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cheese food by § 133.173, except that: (1) Its milk fat content is not less than 22 percent. (2) It... meat. (3) When the added fruits, vegetables, or meats contain fat, the method prescribed for the determination of fat by § 133.5(b) is not applicable. (b) The name of a pasteurized process cheese food...

  6. Processes of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical model processes of change associated with consumption of >=5 daily servings of fruit and vegetables in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N=549; mean (SD) age=12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic...

  7. A flexible numerical component to simulate surface runoff transport and biogeochemical processes through dense vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Carpena, R.; Perez-Ovilla, O.

    2012-12-01

    Methods to estimate surface runoff pollutant removal using dense vegetation buffers (i.e. vegetative filter strips) usually consider a limited number of factors (i.e. filter length, slope) and are in general based on empirical relationships. When an empirical approach is used, the application of the model is limited to those conditions of the data used for the regression equations. The objective of this work is to provide a flexible numerical mechanistic tool to simulate dynamics of a wide range of surface runoff pollutants through dense vegetation and their physical, chemical and biological interactions based on equations defined by the user as part of the model inputs. A flexible water quality model based on the Reaction Simulation Engine (RSE) modeling component is coupled to a transport module based on the traditional Bubnov -Galerkin finite element method to solve the advection-dispersion-reaction equation using the alternating split-operator technique. This coupled transport-reaction model is linked to the VFSMOD-W (http://abe.ufl.edu/carpena/vfsmod) program to mechanistically simulate mobile and stabile pollutants through dense vegetation based on user-defined conceptual models (differential equations written in XML language as input files). The key factors to consider in the creation of a conceptual model are the components in the buffer (i.e. vegetation, soil, sediments) and how the pollutant interacts with them. The biogeochemical reaction component was tested successfully with laboratory and field scale experiments. One of the major advantages when using this tool is that the pollutant transport and removal thought dense vegetation is related to physical and biogeochemical process occurring within the filter. This mechanistic approach increases the range of use of the model to a wide range of pollutants and conditions without modification of the core model. The strength of the model relies on the mechanistic approach used for simulating the removal of

  8. Monitoring dynamical vegetation processes with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements from space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. F.; Guanter, L.; Alonso, L.; Gomez-Chova, L.; Drusch, M.; Kraft, S.; Carnicero, B.; Bezy, J.

    2009-12-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful non-invasive tool to track the status, resilience, and recovery of photochemical processes and moreover provides important information on overall vegetation photosynthetic performance with implications for related carbon sequestration, allowing to measure planetary photosynthesis by means of a global monitoring of steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence in terrestrial vegetation. The FLuorescence EXperiment (FLEX) is designed to observe the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation layer, by using a completely novel technique measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence signal that originates from the core of the photosynthetic machinery, i.e. the ‘breathing’ of the vegetation layer of the living planet. Conceived as a technology demonstration mission, it proposes a set of instruments for the measurement of the interrelated features of fluorescence, spectral reflectance, and canopy temperature, by using a dedicated small satellite flying in tandem with GMES Sentinel-3. This will provide a completely new possibility to quantify the photosynthetic efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, to improve the predictability of dynamical vegetation models on scales comprising canopies and biomes, and to provide an improved estimate of GPP for a better understanding of the global carbon cycle. It will also improve understanding of the role of vegetation in the coupled global carbon / water cycles, the global assessment of the vegetation health conditions and vegetation stress and the support the development of future crop production strategies in a changing climate. The measurement represent a challenge: the weak fluorescence signal is masked by the reflected background radiance, and accurate compensation of all perturbing effects becomes essential. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of the measurements of canopy fluorescence from space. Recent model developments and data processing tools have made possible to

  9. Thermal Pasteurization of Vegetables: Critical Factors for Process Design and Effects on Quality.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Tang, Juming; Barrett, Diane M; Sablani, Shyam S; Anderson, Nathan; Powers, Joseph R

    2015-11-03

    Increasing consumer desire for high quality ready-to-eat foods makes thermal pasteurization important to both food producers and researchers. To be in compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), food companies seek clear regulatory and scientific guidelines to ensure that their products are safe. Clearly understanding the regulations for chilled or frozen foods is of fundamental importance to the design of thermal pasteurization processes for vegetables that meet food safety requirements. This paper provides an overview of the current regulations and guidelines for pasteurization in the U.S. and in Europe for control of bacterial pathogens. Poorly understood viral pathogens, in terms of their survival in thermal treatments, are an increasing concern for both food safety regulators and scientists. New data on heat resistance of viruses in different foods are summarized. Vegetables are sensitive to thermal degradation. A review of thermal kinetics of inactivation of quality-related enzymes in vegetables and the effects of thermal pasteurization on vegetable quality are presented. The review also discusses shelf-life of thermally pasteurized vegetables.

  10. Matching ecohydrological processes and scales of banded vegetation patterns in semiarid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Katul, Gabriel G.; Fatichi, Simone; Manoli, Gabriele; Molnar, Peter

    2016-03-01

    While the claim that water-carbon interactions result in spatially coherent vegetation patterning is rarely disputed in many arid and semiarid regions, the significance of the detailed water pathways and other high frequency variability remain an open question. How the short temporal scale meteorological fluctuations form the long-term spatial variability of available soil water in complex terrains due to the various hydrological, land surface, and vegetation dynamic feedbacks frames the scope of the work here. Knowledge of the detailed mechanistic feedbacks among soil, plants, and the atmosphere will lead to advances in our understanding of plant water availability in arid and semiarid ecosystems and will provide insights for future model development concerning vegetation pattern formation. In this study, quantitative estimates of water fluxes and vegetation productivity are provided for a semiarid ecosystem with established vegetation bands on hillslopes using numerical simulations. A state-of-the-science process based ecohydrological model is used, which resolves hydrological and plant physiological processes at the relevant space and time scales, for relatively small periods (e.g., decades) of mature ecosystems (i.e., spatially static vegetation distribution). To unfold the mechanisms that shape the spatial distribution of soil moisture, plant productivity and the relevant surface/subsurface and atmospheric water fluxes, idealized hillslope numerical experiments are constructed, where the effects of soil type, slope steepness, and overland flow accumulation area are quantified. Those mechanisms are also simulated in the presence of complex topography features on landscapes. The main results are (a) short temporal scale meteorological variability and accurate representation of the scales at which each ecohydrological process operates are crucial for the estimation of the spatial variability of soil water availability to the plant root zone; (b) water fluxes such

  11. Application of membrane separation in fruit and vegetable juice processing: a review.

    PubMed

    Ilame, Susmit A; Satyavir, V Singh

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable juices are used due to convenience. The juices are rich in various minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients. To process the juices and their clarification and/or concentration is required. The membranes are being used for these purposes. These processes are preferred over others because of high efficiency and low temperature. Membranes and their characteristics have been discussed in brief for knowing suitability of membranes for fruit and vegetable juices. Membrane separation is low temperature process in which the organoleptic quality of the juice is almost retained. In this review, different membrane separation methods including Microfiltration, Ultrafiltration, and Reverse osmosis for fruit juices reported in the literature are discussed. The major fruit and vegetable juices using membrane processes are including the Reverse osmosis studies for concentration of Orange juice, Carrot juice, and Grape juice are discusses. The Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration are used for clarification of juices of mosambi juice, apple juice, pineapple juice, and kiwifruit juice. The various optimized parameters in membranes studies are pH, TAA, TSS, and AIS. In this review, in addition to above the OD is also discussed, where the membranes are used.

  12. Repeat-pass InSAR processing for Vegetation Height Calculation: Theory and a validated example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, P.; Lei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    million hectare region. The results have been validated using the LVIS lidar system and a map of vegetation height provided by Woods Hole Research Center. This talk will describe the process that was used for creating this map, and how the data processing was automated to account for differences in temporal decorrelation over this large study area.

  13. Floristic and vegetation successional processes within landslides in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Neto, Carlos; Cardigos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Sérgio Cruz; Zêzere, José Luís

    2017-01-01

    Floristic and vegetation analysis in seven Mediterranean landslides led to the understanding of the successional processes occurring in different landslide disturbed sectors. Our study showed that in landslides that occurred between 1996 and 2010 there is a clear differentiation between the three main landslide sectors (scarp, main body and foot) concerning floristic composition, vegetation structure, floristic richness, successional processes and plant functional type. Additional differences were found between landslide areas and undisturbed agricultural areas adjacent to landslides. In this study 48 floristic relevés were made using a stratified random sampling design. The main landslide body exhibits the highest floristic richness whereas the landslide scarp has the lowest coverage rate and the highest presence of characteristic species from ruderal and strongly perturbed habitats. Finally, the landslide foot shows a late stage in the succession (maquis or pre-forest stage) with a high dominance of vines. We further discuss the importance of landslides as reservoirs of biodiversity especially for Mediterranean orchids.

  14. Effect of grassland vegetation type on the responses of hydrological processes to seasonal precipitation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salve, Rohit; Sudderth, Erika A.; St. Clair, Samuel B.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    SummaryUnder future climate scenarios, rainfall patterns and species composition in California grasslands are predicted to change, potentially impacting soil-moisture dynamics and ecosystem function. The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of altered rainfall on soil-moisture dynamics in three annual grassland vegetation types. We monitored seasonal changes in soil moisture under three different rainfall regimes in mesocosms planted with: (1) a mixed forb-grass community, (2) an Avena barbata monoculture, and (3) an Erodium botrys monoculture. We applied watering treatments in pulses, followed by dry periods that are representative of natural rainfall patterns in California annual grasslands. While rainfall was the dominant treatment, its impact on hydrological processes varied over the growing season. Surprisingly, there were only small differences in the hydrologic response among the three vegetation types. We found significant temporal variability in evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil-moisture content. Both Water Use Efficiency (WUE) and Rain Use Efficiency (RUE) decreased as annual precipitation totals increased. Results from this investigation suggest that both precipitation and vegetation have a significant interactive effect on soil-moisture dynamics. When combined, seasonal precipitation and grassland vegetation influence near-surface hydrology in ways that cannot be predicted from manipulation of a single variable.

  15. Effect of the food production chain from farm practices to vegetable processing on outbreak incidence

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yangjin; Jang, Hyein; Matthews, Karl R

    2014-01-01

    The popularity in the consumption of fresh and fresh-cut vegetables continues to increase globally. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy diet, providing vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other health-promoting compounds. The diversity of fresh vegetables and packaging formats (spring mix in clamshell container, bagged heads of lettuce) support increased consumption. Unfortunately, vegetable production and processing practices are not sufficient to ensure complete microbial safety. This review highlights a few specific areas that require greater attention and research. Selected outbreaks are presented to emphasize the need for science-based ‘best practices’. Laboratory and field studies have focused on inactivation of pathogens associated with manure in liquid, slurry or solid forms. As production practices change, other forms and types of soil amendments are being used more prevalently. Information regarding the microbial safety of fish emulsion and pellet form of manure is limited. The topic of global climate change is controversial, but the potential effect on agriculture cannot be ignored. Changes in temperature, precipitation, humidity and wind can impact crops and the microorganisms that are associated with production environments. Climate change could potentially enhance the ability of pathogens to survive and persist in soil, water and crops, increasing human health risks. Limited research has focused on the prevalence and behaviour of viruses in pre and post-harvest environments and on vegetable commodities. Globally, viruses are a major cause of foodborne illnesses, but are seldom tested for in soil, soil amendments, manure and crops. Greater attention must also be given to the improvement in the microbial quality of seeds used in sprout production. Human pathogens associated with seeds can result in contamination of sprouts intended for human consumption, even when all appropriate ‘best practices’ are used by sprout growers. PMID

  16. Effect of the food production chain from farm practices to vegetable processing on outbreak incidence.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yangjin; Jang, Hyein; Matthews, Karl R

    2014-11-01

    The popularity in the consumption of fresh and fresh-cut vegetables continues to increase globally. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy diet, providing vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other health-promoting compounds. The diversity of fresh vegetables and packaging formats (spring mix in clamshell container, bagged heads of lettuce) support increased consumption. Unfortunately, vegetable production and processing practices are not sufficient to ensure complete microbial safety. This review highlights a few specific areas that require greater attention and research. Selected outbreaks are presented to emphasize the need for science-based 'best practices'. Laboratory and field studies have focused on inactivation of pathogens associated with manure in liquid, slurry or solid forms. As production practices change, other forms and types of soil amendments are being used more prevalently. Information regarding the microbial safety of fish emulsion and pellet form of manure is limited. The topic of global climate change is controversial, but the potential effect on agriculture cannot be ignored. Changes in temperature, precipitation, humidity and wind can impact crops and the microorganisms that are associated with production environments. Climate change could potentially enhance the ability of pathogens to survive and persist in soil, water and crops, increasing human health risks. Limited research has focused on the prevalence and behaviour of viruses in pre and post-harvest environments and on vegetable commodities. Globally, viruses are a major cause of foodborne illnesses, but are seldom tested for in soil, soil amendments, manure and crops. Greater attention must also be given to the improvement in the microbial quality of seeds used in sprout production. Human pathogens associated with seeds can result in contamination of sprouts intended for human consumption, even when all appropriate 'best practices' are used by sprout growers.

  17. Contribution of understorey vegetation and soil processes to boreal forest isoprenoid exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäki, Mari; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-03-01

    Boreal forest floor emits biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from the understorey vegetation and the heterogeneous soil matrix, where the interactions of soil organisms and soil chemistry are complex. Earlier studies have focused on determining the net exchange of VOCs from the forest floor. This study goes one step further, with the aim of separately determining whether the photosynthesized carbon allocation to soil affects the isoprenoid production by different soil organisms, i.e., decomposers, mycorrhizal fungi, and roots. In each treatment, photosynthesized carbon allocation through roots for decomposers and mycorrhizal fungi was controlled by either preventing root ingrowth (50 µm mesh size) or the ingrowth of roots and fungi (1 µm mesh) into the soil volume, which is called the trenching approach. Isoprenoid fluxes were measured using dynamic (steady-state flow-through) chambers from the different treatments. This study aimed to analyze how important the understorey vegetation is as a VOC sink. Finally, a statistical model was constructed based on prevailing temperature, seasonality, trenching treatments, understory vegetation cover, above canopy photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil water content, and soil temperature to estimate isoprenoid fluxes. The final model included parameters with a statistically significant effect on the isoprenoid fluxes. The results show that the boreal forest floor emits monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and isoprene. Monoterpenes were the most common group of emitted isoprenoids, and the average flux from the non-trenched forest floor was 23 µg m-2 h-1. The results also show that different biological factors, including litterfall, carbon availability, biological activity in the soil, and physico-chemical processes, such as volatilization and absorption to the surfaces, are important at various times of the year. This study also discovered that understorey vegetation is a strong sink of monoterpenes. The

  18. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes.

  19. Vegetation as a tool in the interpretation of fluvial geomorphic processes and landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Dufour, S; Bornette, G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter exemplifies that vegetation can be used as a tool for geomorphic interpretation in several major ways. It presents a general overview: through dendrogeomorphic analysis (tree rings) to estimate the timing of important geomorphic events including floods and mass wasting and to estimate rates of erosion and sedimentation; through the documentation and interpretation of species distributional patterns that are established in response to prevailing hydrogeomorphic conditions; and through the role that it plays, depending on size, shape and growth form, in flow rates and subsequent erosion and deposition processes. Floods, from prolonged inundation characteristic of relatively large, low-gradient basins to high-gradient and short-period destructive events, are the most important extrinsic factor in bottomland systems. Vegetation organization, composition and plant community dynamics on river floodplains are controlled by disturbance type and scale, and biological characteristics of plants linked to resistance to disturbance, resilience and competitive ability.

  20. The Influence of vegetation on processes of shallow soil erosion in subalpine catchment areas in Western Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Thannen, M.; Weissteiner, C.; Rauch, H. P.; Tilch, N.; Kohl, B.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow soil erosion processes have been increasing within the last decades in the high montane and subalpine altitudinal zone of Western Austria. Explanations for the progression of eroded areas in the 2nd half of the 20th century have been subject of various research projects. The studies result in different possible explanations and process catenae regarding triggering effects, material dislocation processes and a following development of the erosive spots. Diverse results are based on different scales of the studies and the specific disciplinary driven approach of the researchers. In order to better understand the process catenae of the dynamics of shallow soil erosion processes this research project is based on an interdisciplinary, pluri-scale approach applied in different areas of the subalpine zone in Western Austria. The focus of this paper is restricted to one catchment area and highlights the influence of different plant parameters on shallow soil erosion processes. The research area "Thüringerberg" is located in the lithographic flysch unit in the subalpine zone in Vorarlberg, in Western Austria. Its vegetation is strongly characterized by agricultural activities of local people, mainly alpine pasturing. Generally the vegetation can be classified in three different types of vegetation: dry grasslands, pioneers and higher perennial herbs. The grassland, which is dominating in the area, is dominated by the vegetation community Caricetum ferrugineae. Additionally Seslerio-Semperviretum, Polygono-Trisetion, defective vegetation community with Agrostis stolonifera and defective vegetation community with Dactylis glomerata occur. Fieldwork has been conducted during summer 2011, from August, 8th up to the 18th, at highest development level of the plants. Vegetation data has been recorded around every single soil erosion process (above, sideways, below and inside). Observed vegetation parameters are: height, frequency, distribution, coverage and dominance

  1. Antimicrobial edible films and coatings for fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables: a review.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Chamorro, Silvia A; Palou, Lluís; Del Río, Miguel A; Pérez-Gago, María B

    2011-01-01

    The use of edible films and coatings is an environmentally friendly technology that offers substantial advantages for shelf-life increase of many food products including fruits and vegetables. The development of new natural edible films and coatings with the addition of antimicrobial compounds to preserve fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables is a technological challenge for the industry and a very active research field worldwide. Antimicrobial agents have been successfully added to edible composite films and coatings based on polysaccharides or proteins such as starch, cellulose derivatives, chitosan, alginate, fruit puree, whey protein isolated, soy protein, egg albumen, wheat gluten, or sodium caseinate. This paper reviews the development of edible films and coatings with antimicrobial activity, typically through the incorporation of antimicrobial food additives as ingredients, the effect of these edible films on the control of target microorganisms, the influence of antimicrobial agents on mechanical and barrier properties of stand-alone edible films, and the effect of the application of antimicrobial edible coatings on the quality of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.

  2. The role of vegetation and bed-level fluctuations in the process of channel narrowing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Lewis, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A catastrophic flood in 1965 on Plum Creek, a perennial sandbed stream in the western Great Plains, removed most of the bottomland vegetation and transformed the single-thalweg stream into a wider, braided channel. Following eight years of further widening associated with minor high flows, a process of channel narrowing began in 1973; narrowing continues today. The history of channel narrowing was reconstructed by counting the annual rings of 129 trees and shrubs along a 5-km reach of Plum Creek near Louviers, Colorado. Sixty-three of these plants were excavated in order to determine the age and elevation of the germination point. The reconstructed record of channel change was verified from historical aerial photographs, and then compared to sediment stratigraphy and records of discharge and bed elevation from a streamflow gaging station in the study reach. Channel narrowing at Plum Creek occurs in two ways. First, during periods of high flow, sand and fine gravel are delivered to the channel, temporarily raising the general bed-level. Subsequently, several years of uninterrupted low flows incise a narrower channel. Second, during years of low flow, vegetation becomes established on the subaerial part of the present channel bed. In both cases, surfaces stabilize as a result of vegetation growth and vertical accretion of sediment.

  3. Microbial Evaluation of Fresh, Minimally-processed Vegetables and Bagged Sprouts from Chain Supermarkets

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Maryam Zare; Yunesian, Masud; Gorji, Mohamad Es'haghi; Noori, Negin; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial and fungal quality of minimally-processed vegetables (MPV) and sprouts. A total of 116 samples of fresh-cut vegetables, ready-to-eat salads, and mung bean and wheat sprouts were randomly collected and analyzed. The load of aerobic mesophilic bacteria was minimum and maximum in the fresh-cut vegetables and fresh mung bean sprouts respectively, corresponding to populations of 5.3 and 8.5 log CFU/g. E. coli O157:H7 was found to be absent in all samples; however,  other E. coli strains were detected in 21 samples (18.1%), and Salmonella spp. were found in one mung bean (3.1%) and one ready-to-eat salad sample (5%). Yeasts were the predominant organisms and were found in 100% of the samples. Geotrichum, Fusarium, and Penicillium spp. were the most prevalent molds in mung sprouts while Cladosporium and Penicillium spp. were most frequently found in ready-to-eat salad samples. According to results from the present study, effective control measures should be implemented to minimize the microbiological contamination of fresh produce sold in Tehran, Iran. PMID:25395902

  4. Effects of food processing on pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables: a meta-analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Keikotlhaile, B M; Spanoghe, P; Steurbaut, W

    2010-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in food production to increase food security despite the fact that they can have negative health effects on consumers. Pesticide residues have been found in various fruits and vegetables; both raw and processed. One of the most common routes of pesticide exposure in consumers is via food consumption. Most foods are consumed after passing through various culinary and processing treatments. A few literature reviews have indicated the general trend of reduction or concentration of pesticide residues by certain methods of food processing for a particular active ingredient. However, no review has focused on combining the obtained results from different studies on different active ingredients with differences in experimental designs, analysts and analysis equipment. In this paper, we present a meta-analysis of response ratios as a possible method of combining and quantifying effects of food processing on pesticide residue levels. Reduction of residue levels was indicated by blanching, boiling, canning, frying, juicing, peeling and washing of fruits and vegetables with an average response ratio ranging from 0.10 to 0.82. Baking, boiling, canning and juicing indicated both reduction and increases for the 95% and 99.5% confidence intervals.

  5. The Role of Nurses in Coping Process of Family Caregivers of Vegetative Patients: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Imanigoghary, Zahra; Peyrovi, Hamid; Nouhi, Esmat; Kazemi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Vegetative state (VS) occurs through return of the brain stem after coma state. After hospital discharge, responsibility of caring for VS patients is transferred to their families, which causes a high burden on them. Nurses have an important role in helping the family caregivers to meet their needs and cope with difficulties. To explore the role of nurses during coping process of family caregivers of VS patients. Methods: This study is a part of a larger qualitative study which was performed in Kerman province, Iran during 2014- 2015. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used. 14 caregivers participated in the study. Data were gathered using face-to-face in-depth interviews and managed by MAXQDA 10 software. Analysis was done through constant Comparative Method. Results: Three themes of “nurse as a pursuer teacher”, “nurse as a compassionate caregiver”, and “nurse as a supporter” were derived from analysis that represent various roles of a nurse in the coping process of family caregivers of vegetative patients during the care process. Conclusion: Nurses can play an effective role in improving the caregivers’ well-being by considering the importance of training at discharge time and during home care, helping families in providing care and support them during care process. PMID:28097180

  6. A novel approach for calculating shelf life of minimally processed vegetables.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Del Nobile, Matteo Alessandro; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2006-01-15

    Shelf life of minimally processed vegetables is often calculated by using the kinetic parameters of Gompertz equation as modified by Zwietering et al. [Zwietering, M.H., Jongenburger, F.M., Roumbouts, M., van't Riet, K., 1990. Modelling of the bacterial growth curve. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 56, 1875-1881.] taking 5x10(7) CFU/g as the maximum acceptable contamination value consistent with acceptable quality of these products. As this method does not allow estimation of the standard errors of the shelf life, in this paper the modified Gompertz equation was re-parameterized to directly include the shelf life as a fitting parameter among the Gompertz parameters. Being the shelf life a fitting parameter is possible to determine its confidence interval by fitting the proposed equation to the experimental data. The goodness-of-fit of this new equation was tested by using mesophilic bacteria cell loads from different minimally processed vegetables (packaged fresh-cut lettuce, fennel and shredded carrots) that differed for some process operations or for package atmosphere. The new equation was able to describe the data well and to estimate the shelf life. The results obtained emphasize the importance of using the standard errors for the shelf life value to show significant differences among the samples.

  7. Spontaneous vegetation encroachment upon bauxite residue (red mud) as an indicator and facilitator of in situ remediation processes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Talitha C; Fey, Martin V

    2013-01-01

    The spontaneous colonization of a bauxite residue (alumina refining tailings) deposit by local vegetation in Linden, Guyana, over 30 years, indicates that natural weathering processes can ameliorate tailings to the extent that it can support vegetation. Samples were collected from vegetated and unvegetated areas to investigate the relationships between bauxite residue properties and vegetation cover. Compared to unvegetated areas, bauxite residue in vegetated areas had lower pH (mean pH 7.9 vs 10.9), lower alkalinity (mean titratable alkalinity 0.4 vs 1.4 mol H(+) kg(-1)), lower electrical conductivity (mean EC 0.3 vs 2.1 mS cm(-1)), lower total Al (mean Al2O3 19.8 vs 25.8% wt) and Na (mean Na2O 0.9 vs 3.7% wt), and less sodalite and calcite. Accumulation of N, NH4(+), and organic C occurred under vegetation, demonstrating the capacity for plants to modify residue to suit their requirements as a soil-like growth medium. Aeolian redistribution of coarse grained tailings appeared to support vegetation establishment by providing a thin zone of enhanced drainage at the surface. Natural pedogenic processes may be supplemented by irrigation, enhanced drainage, and incorporation of sand and organic matter at other tailings deposits to accelerate the remediation process and achieve similar results in a shorter time frame.

  8. Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria sp. in ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Mira; Burazin, Jelena; Pavlović, Hrvoje; Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta

    2013-04-01

    Minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables can be contaminated with Listeria species bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes due to extensive handling during processing or by cross contamination from the processing environment. The objective of this study was to examine the microbiological quality of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables from supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia. 100 samples of ready-to-eat vegetables collected from different supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia, were analyzed for presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes. The collected samples were cut iceberg lettuces (24 samples), other leafy vegetables (11 samples), delicatessen salads (23 samples), cabbage salads (19 samples), salads from mixed (17 samples) and root vegetables (6 samples). Listeria species was found in 20 samples (20 %) and Listeria monocytogenes was detected in only 1 sample (1 %) of cut red cabbage (less than 100 CFU/g). According to Croatian and EU microbiological criteria these results are satisfactory. However, the presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes indicates poor hygiene quality. The study showed that these products are often improperly labeled, since 24 % of analyzed samples lacked information about shelf life, and 60 % of samples lacked information about storage conditions. With regard to these facts, cold chain abruption with extended use after expiration date is a probable scenario. Therefore, the microbiological risk for consumers of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables is not completely eliminated.

  9. Effect of the chlorinated washing of minimally processed vegetables on the generation of haloacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2012-07-25

    Chlorine solutions are usually used to sanitize fruit and vegetables in the fresh-cut industry due to their efficacy, low cost, and simple use. However, disinfection byproducts such as haloacetic acids (HAAs) can be formed during this process, which can remain on minimally processed vegetables (MPVs). These compounds are toxic and/or carcinogenic and have been associated with human health risks; therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a maximum contaminant level for five HAAs at 60 μg/L in drinking water. This paper describes the first method to determine the nine HAAs that can be present in MPV samples, with static headspace coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry where the leaching and derivatization of the HAAs are carried out in a single step. The proposed method is sensitive, with limits of detection between 0.1 and 2.4 μg/kg and an average relative standard deviation of ∼8%. From the samples analyzed, we can conclude that about 23% of them contain at least two HAAs (<0.4-24 μg/kg), which showed that these compounds are formed during washing and then remain on the final product.

  10. Integrated microwave processing system for the extraction of organophosphorus pesticides in fresh vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-03-01

    A simple and efficient integrated microwave processing system (IMPS) was firstly assembled and validated for the extraction of organophosphorus pesticides in fresh vegetables. Two processes under microwave irradiation, dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (DMAE) and microwave-accelerated solvent elution (MASE), were integrated for simplifying the pretreatment of the sample. Extraction, separation, enrichment and elution were finished in a simple step. The organophosphorus pesticides were extracted from the fresh vegetables into hexane with DMAE, and then the extract was directly introduced into the enrichment column packed with active carbon fiber (ACF). Subsequently, the organophosphorus pesticides trapped on the ACF were eluted with ethyl acetate under microwave irradiation. No further filtration or cleanup was required before analysis of the eluate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Some experimental parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized, such as microwave output power, kind and volume of extraction solvent, extraction time, amount of sorbent, elution microwave power, kind and volume of elution solvent, elution solvent flow rate. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries were in the range of 71.5-105.2%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 11.6%. The experiment results prove that the present method is a simple and effective sample preparation method for the determination of pesticides in solid samples.

  11. Effect of fruit and vegetable processing on reduction of synthetic pyrethroid residues.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Rana, M K

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize that the advantages associated with applying pesticides to enhance agricultural productivity must be weighed against the possible health hazards arising from the appearance of toxic pesticide residues in food. First and foremost, pesticides should be handled and applied in compliance with good agricultural practices to minimize environmental or food commodity contamination.In developing countries, good agricultural practices are not fully abided by.When vegetables are produced in such countries, pesticides are applied or prospectively applied at each growth stage of the crop. Hence, contamination of vegetables and other food commodities occur. It is well known that processing of food derived from pesticide treated crop commodities can serve to reduce residues that reach consumers. Food safety can therefore partially be enhanced by employing suitable food processing techniques and appropriate storage periods, even in developing countries. Even common and simple household processing techniques for certain foods acquire significance as means to reduce the intake of harmful pesticide food residues.Pesticide residue levels in post-harvest raw agricultural commodities (RAC) are affected by the storage, handling and the processing steps they pass through, while being prepared for human consumption. The review of cogent literature presented in this article demonstrated differences among the pyrethroid insecticide residues present on or in foods, depending on how the RAC from which they came were processed for consumption. Peeling vegetables or fruit reduced pyrethroid residues the most (60-100% ), and juicing was nearly as effective in reducing residues (70-100% ). The least reduction occurred for foodstuffs that were only washed with tap water (I 0-70% ). Washing RACs with saline water and detergent was more effective(34-60%) in reducing residues than was simple washing under tap water. Freezing is also effective in reducing residue levels and

  12. Optimization of cow dung spiked pre-consumer processing vegetable waste for vermicomposting using Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Garg, V K; Gupta, Renuka

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the optimization of cow dung (CD) spiked pre-consumer processing vegetable waste (PPVW) for vermicomposting using Eisenia fetida in a laboratory scale study. Vermicomposting process decreased carbon and organic matter concentration and increased N, P and K content in the vermicompost. The C:N ratio was decreased by 45-69% in different vermireactors indicating stabilization of the waste. The heavy metal content was within permissible limits of their application in agricultural soils. It has been concluded from the results that addition of PPVW up to 40% with CD can produce a good quality vermicompost. Whereas, growth and fecundity of E. fetida was best when reared in 20% PPVW+80% CD feed mixture. However, higher percentages of PPVW in different vermireactors significantly affected the growth and fecundity of worms.

  13. Effects of river hydrology and fluvial processes on riparian vegetation establishment, growth, and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafroth, P. B.; Merritt, D. M.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Stream hydrology, sediment, and geology interact to determine the spatial and temporal availability of river bottomland substrates on which plants establish and grow. Collectively, these surfaces comprise a mosaic of landscape patches with associated plant communities that fall along key gradients of physical disturbance and water availability. Aspects of flow such as magnitude, frequency, timing, and rate of change of floods and magnitude and duration of low flows, interact with sediment flux and plant traits to determine plant distribution and fitness in different parts of the bottomland. Flow and sediment dynamics can influence different aspects of the plant life cycle such as germination, establishment, growth, and survival. Feedbacks between plants and fluvial processes, such as increased surface roughness and associated reductions in flow velocity and potential for aggradation, can determine differential survival of plant species depending on their tolerance of high velocity flow and associated shear stress, dislodgement, or burial by sediment. We present an overview of some key relationships between flow, sediment, plant traits, and riparian vegetation responses, and provide specific examples from our research on rivers in the semi-arid western U.S., including unaltered systems, dam-altered systems, and in the context of development of environmental flows to restore native riparian vegetation communities. Further, we describe the riparian response guilds framework and demonstrate how it can facilitate both an understanding of vegetation response to changing flow, sediment, and disturbance regimes and the development of priorities for flow management. Through understanding how guilds of species respond to variations in flow and sediment regimes, we are be better able to anticipate and predict biotic change in response to human-caused and climate-driven flow alteration.

  14. Review of vegetable fermentations with particular emphasis on processing modifications, microbial ecology, and spoilage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of vegetables is widespread in the world and represents a major component of the human diet. Microorganisms (mainly lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, Enterobacteriaceae, Propionibacterium and Clostridium species) play a significant role in vegetable fermentations, affecting the quality a...

  15. A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Zeng, X. D.; Levis, S.

    2012-07-01

    A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity has been developed for global simulations in the framework of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM) in an Earth System Model (ESM). Burned area in a grid cell is estimated by the product of fire counts and average burned area of a fire. The scheme comprises three parts: fire occurrence, fire spread, and fire impact. In the fire occurrence part, fire counts rather than fire occurrence probability are calculated in order to capture the observed high burned area fraction in areas of high fire frequency and realize parameter calibration based on MODIS fire counts product. In the fire spread part, post-fire region of a fire is assumed to be elliptical in shape. Mathematical properties of ellipses and some mathematical derivations are applied to improve the equation and assumptions of an existing fire spread parameterization. In the fire impact part, trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning are estimated, which offers an interface with atmospheric chemistry and aerosol models in ESMs. In addition, flexible time-step length makes the new fire parameterization easily applied to various DGVMs. Global performance of the new fire parameterization is assessed by using an improved version of the Community Land Model version 3 with the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM). Simulations are compared against the latest satellite-based Global Fire Emission Database version 3 (GFED3) for 1997-2004. Results show that simulated global totals and spatial patterns of burned area and fire carbon emissions, regional totals and spreads of burned area, global annual burned area fractions for various vegetation types, and interannual variability of burned area are reasonable, and closer to GFED3 than CLM-DGVM simulations with the commonly used Glob-FIRM fire parameterization and the old fire module of CLM-DGVM. Furthermore, average error of simulated trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning

  16. Microbiological quality of fresh, minimally-processed fruit and vegetables, and sprouts from retail establishments.

    PubMed

    Abadias, M; Usall, J; Anguera, M; Solsona, C; Viñas, I

    2008-03-31

    A survey of fresh and minimally-processed fruit and vegetables, and sprouts was conducted in several retail establishments in the Lleida area (Catalonia, Spain) during 2005-2006 to determine whether microbial contamination, and in particular potentially pathogenic bacteria, was present under these commodities. A total of 300 samples--including 21 ready-to-eat fruits, 28 whole fresh vegetables, 15 sprout samples and 237 ready-to-eat salads containing from one to six vegetables--were purchased from 4 supermarkets. They were tested for mesophilic and psychrotrophic aerobic counts, yeasts and moulds, lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, presumptive E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes counts as well as for the presence of Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica and thermotolerant Campylobacter. Results for the fresh-cut vegetables that we analyzed showed that, in general, the highest microorganism counts were associated with grated carrot, arugula and spinach (7.8, 7.5 and 7.4 log cfu g(-1) of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms; 6.1, 5.8 and 5.2 log cfu g(-1) of yeast and moulds; 5.9, 4.0 and 5.1 log cfu g(-1) lactic acid bacteria and 6.2, 5.3 and 6.0 log cfu g(-1) of Enterobacteriaceae). The lowest counts were generally associated with fresh-cut endive and lettuce (6.2 and 6.3 log cfu g(-1) of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms; 4.4 and 4.6 log cfu g(-1) of yeast and moulds; 2.7 and 3.8 log cfu g(-1) lactic acid bacteria and 4.8 and 4.4 log cfu g(-1) of Enterobacteriaceae). Counts of psychrotrophic microorganisms were as high as those of mesophilic microorganisms. Microbiological counts for fresh-cut fruit were very low. Sprouts were highly contaminated with mesophilic (7.9 log cfu g(-1)), psychrotrophic microorganisms (7.3 log cfu g(-1)) and Enterobacteriaceae (7.2 log cfu g(-1)) and showed a high incidence of E. coli (40% of samples). Of the samples analyzed, four (1.3%) were Salmonella positive and two (0.7%) harboured L. monocytogenes. None of the

  17. Intense light pulses decontamination of minimally processed vegetables and their shelf-life.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, V M; Devlieghere, F; Bonduelle, V; Debevere, J

    2005-08-15

    Intense light pulses (ILP) is a new method intended for decontamination of food surfaces by killing microorganisms using short time high frequency pulses of an intense broad spectrum, rich in UV-C light. This work studied in a first step the effect of food components on the killing efficiency of ILP. In a second step, the decontamination of eight minimally processed (MP) vegetables by ILP was evaluated, and thirdly, the effect of this treatment on the shelf-life of MP cabbage and lettuce stored at 7 degrees C in equilibrium modified atmosphere packages was assessed by monitoring headspace gas concentrations, microbial populations and sensory attributes. Proteins and oil decreased the decontamination effect of ILP, whilst carbohydrates and water showed variable results depending on the microorganism. For this reason, high protein and fat containing food products have little potential to be efficiently treated by ILP. Vegetables, on the other hand, do not contain high concentrations of both compounds and could therefore be suitable for ILP treatment. For the eight tested MP vegetables, log reductions up to 2.04 were achieved on aerobic mesophilic counts. For the shelf-life studies, respiration rates at 3% O2 and 7 degrees C were 14.63, 17.89, 9.17 and 16.83 ml O2/h kg produce for control and treated cabbage, and control and treated lettuce respectively; used packaging configurations prevented anoxic conditions during the storage times. Log reductions of 0.54 and 0.46 for aerobic psychrothrophic count (APC) were achieved after flashing MP cabbage and lettuce respectively. APC of treated cabbage became equal than that from control at day 2, and higher at day 7, when the tolerance limit (8 log) was reached and the panel detected the presence of unacceptable levels of off-odours. Control never reached 8 log in APC and were sensory acceptable until the end of the experiment (9 days). In MP lettuce, APC of controls reached rejectable levels at day 2, whilst that of treated

  18. Agricultural recycling of treatment-plant sludge: a case study for a vegetable-processing factory.

    PubMed

    Dolgen, Deniz; Alpaslan, M Necdet; Delen, Nafiz

    2007-08-01

    The present study evaluated the possibility of using the sludge produced by a vegetable-processing factory in agriculture. The sludge was amended with a soil mixture (i.e., a mixture of sand, soil, and manure) and was applied at 0, 165, 330, 495 and 660 t/ha to promote the growth of cucumbers. The effects of various sludge loadings on plant growth were assessed by counting plants and leaves, measuring stem lengths, and weighing the green parts and roots of the plants. We also compared heavy metal uptake by the plants for sludge loadings of 330, 495, and 660 t/ha with various recommended standards for vegetables. Our results showed that plant growth patterns were influenced to some extent by the sludge loadings. In general, the number of leaves, stem length, and dry weight of green parts exhibited a pronounced positive growth response compared with an unfertilized control, and root growth showed a lesser but still significant response at sludge loadings of 165 and 330 t/ha. The sludge application caused no significant increase in heavy metal concentrations in the leaves, though zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) were found at elevated concentrations. However, despite the Zn and Fe accumulation, we observed no toxicity symptoms in the plants. This may be a result of cucumber's tolerance of high metal levels.

  19. Illuminating hydrological processes at the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface with water stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Leistert, Hannes; Gimbel, Katharina; Weiler, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Water stable isotopes (18O and 2H) are widely used as ideal tracers to track water through the soil and to separate evaporation from transpiration. Due to the technical developments in the last two decades, soil water stable isotope data have become easier to collect. Thus, the application of isotope methods in soils is growing rapidly. Studies that make use of soil water stable isotopes often have a multidisciplinary character since an interplay of processes that take place in the vadose zone has to be considered. In this review, we provide an overview of the hydrological processes that alter the soil water stable isotopic composition and present studies utilizing pore water stable isotopes. The processes that are discussed include the water input as precipitation or throughfall, the output as evaporation, transpiration, or recharge, and specific flow and transport processes. Based on the review and supported by additional data and modeling results, we pose a different view on the recently proposed two water world hypothesis. As an alternative to two distinct pools of soil water, where one pool is enriched in heavy isotopes and used by the vegetation and the other pool does not undergo isotopic fractionation and becomes recharge, the water gets successively mixed with newly introduced rainwater during the percolation process. This way, water initially isotopically enriched in the topsoil loses the fractionation signal with increasing infiltration depth, leading to unfractionated isotopic signals in the groundwater.

  20. Processing Of Neem And Jatropha Methyl Esters –Alternative Fuels From Vegetable Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, S.; Manavalan, S.; Gnanavel, C.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2017-03-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engine. The methyl esters of vegetable oils, known as biodiesel are becoming increasingly popular because of their low environmental impact and potential as a green alternative fuel for diesel engine. This paper deals with the manufacturing process of Biodiesel from jatropha and neem oil. Biodiesel was prepared from neem oil and jatropha oil, the transestrified having kinematic viscosity of 3 & 2.6 centistokes, methanol ratio is 6:1 & 5.1respectively. The secondary solution is preheated at 65 C & 60 C and reaction temperature is maintained at 60C & 55 C and reaction time is 60 minutes approximately with NaOH catalyst and low viscosity oil is allowed to settle 24 hours. The average yield of neem and jatropha methyl esters was about 85%. These methyl esters shows excellent alternative under optimum condition for fossil fuels.

  1. Mapping forest vegetation with ERTS-1 MSS data and automatic data processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messmore, J.; Copeland, G. E.; Levy, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the intent of elucidating the forest mapping capabilities of ERTS-1 MSS data when analyzed with the aid of LARS' automatic data processing techniques. The site for this investigation was the Great Dismal Swamp, a 210,000 acre wilderness area located on the Middle Atlantic coastal plain. Due to inadequate ground truth information on the distribution of vegetation within the swamp, an unsupervised classification scheme was utilized. Initially pictureprints, resembling low resolution photographs, were generated in each of the four ERTS-1 channels. Data found within rectangular training fields was then clustered into 13 spectral groups and defined statistically. Using a maximum likelihood classification scheme, the unknown data points were subsequently classified into one of the designated training classes. Training field data was classified with a high degree of accuracy (greater than 95 percent), and progress is being made towards identifying the mapped spectral classes.

  2. Spectral band selection for vegetation properties retrieval using Gaussian processes regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, Juan Pablo; Gitelson, Anatoly; Delegido, Jesus; Moreno, José; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-10-01

    With current and upcoming imaging spectrometers, automated band analysis techniques are needed to enable efficient identification of most informative bands to facilitate optimized processing of spectral data into estimates of biophysical variables. This paper introduces an automated spectral band analysis tool (BAT) based on Gaussian processes regression (GPR) for the spectral analysis of vegetation properties. The GPR-BAT procedure sequentially backwards removes the least contributing band in the regression model for a given variable until only one band is kept. GPR-BAT is implemented within the framework of the free ARTMO's MLRA (machine learning regression algorithms) toolbox, which is dedicated to the transforming of optical remote sensing images into biophysical products. GPR-BAT allows (1) to identify the most informative bands in relating spectral data to a biophysical variable, and (2) to find the least number of bands that preserve optimized accurate predictions. To illustrate its utility, two hyperspectral datasets were analyzed for most informative bands: (1) a field hyperspectral dataset (400-1100 nm at 2 nm resolution: 301 bands) with leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and green leaf area index (gLAI) collected for maize and soybean (Nebraska, US); and (2) an airborne HyMap dataset (430-2490 nm: 125 bands) with LAI and canopy water content (CWC) collected for a variety of crops (Barrax, Spain). For each of these biophysical variables, optimized retrieval accuracies can be achieved with just 4 to 9 well-identified bands, and performance was largely improved over using all bands. A PROSAIL global sensitivity analysis was run to interpret the validity of these bands. Cross-validated RCV2 (NRMSECV) accuracies for optimized GPR models were 0.79 (12.9%) for LCC, 0.94 (7.2%) for gLAI, 0.95 (6.5%) for LAI and 0.95 (7.2%) for CWC. This study concludes that a wise band selection of hyperspectral data is strictly required for optimal vegetation properties mapping.

  3. Production of acetic acid by hydrothermal two-step process of vegetable wastes for use as a road deicer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, F.; Watanabe, Y.; Kishita, A.; Enomoto, H.; Kishida, H.

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to produce acetic acid from vegetable wastes by a new hydrothermal two-step process. A continuous flow reaction system with a maximum treatment capacity of 2 kg/h of dry biomass developed by us was used. Five kinds of vegetables of carrots, white radish, chinese cabbage, cabbage and potato were selected as the representation of vegetable wastes. First, batch experiments with the selected vegetables were performed under the condition of 300°C, 1 min for the first step, and 300°C, 1 min and 70% oxygen supply for the second step, which is the optimum condition for producing acetic acid in the case of using starch as test material. The highest yields of acetic acid from five vegetables were almost the same as those obtained from starch. Subsequently, similar the highest yield of acetic acid and experimental conditions from vegetables were also obtained successfully using the continuous flow reaction system. These results should be useful for developing an industrial scale process.

  4. 7 CFR 52.38c - Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes. 52.38c Section 52.38c Agriculture Regulations of the... PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 Regulations Governing Inspection and Certification Sampling § 52.38c...

  5. Effects of Freeze-Dried Vegetable Products on the Technological Process and the Quality of Dry Fermented Sausages.

    PubMed

    Eisinaite, Viktorija; Vinauskiene, Rimante; Viskelis, Pranas; Leskauskaite, Daiva

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the chemical composition of freeze-dried vegetable powders: celery, celery juice, parsnip and leek. The effect of different freeze-dried vegetables onto the ripening process and the properties of dry fermented sausages was also evaluated. Vegetable products significantly (p < 0.05) differed in their chemical composition: celery products contained higher amounts of nitrates, total phenolic compounds and lower amounts of sucrose, parsnip had higher concentration of proteins, leek was rich in fat. The analysis of pH, water activity, lactic acid bacteria, coagulase-positive staphylococci and coliforms content showed that the incorporation of freeze-dried vegetables had no negative effect on the fermentation and ripening process of dry fermented sausages. In addition, the color parameters for sausages with the added lyophilised celery products were considerable (p < 0.05) more stable during these processes. At the end of the ripening process the sausages made with lyophilised celery juice were characterised by higher lightness and lower hardness than those made with the addition of other vegetable products and control. Freeze-dried celery, celery juice, parsnip and leek have some potential for the usage as a functional ingredient or as a source for indirect addition of nitrate in the production of fermented sausages.

  6. Biogeomorphological influence of slope processes and sedimentology on vascular talus vegetation in the southern Cascades, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Francisco L.

    2012-02-01

    The vascular vegetation of alpine talus slopes between 2035 and 3095 m altitude was studied at Lassen Volcanic National Park (California) in the Cascade Range. Taluses show a diverse flora, with 79 plant species; growth forms include coniferous trees, shrubs, suffrutices, herbs, graminoids, and ferns. Spatial patterns of plant distribution were studied along 40 point-intercept transects. Plant cover was low (0-32.7%) on all slopes, spatially variable, and showed no consistent trends. Sedimentological characteristics were determined by photosieving next to 1500 plants; this census indicated preferential plant growth on blocks and cobbles, with 43.2% and 23.3% of the plants growing on these stones, respectively; fewer specimens were rooted on pebbles (13%) or on stone-free gravel areas (20.5%). Growth forms displayed different substrate preferences: 92.5% of the shrubs and 83% of the suffrutices colonized blocks or cobbles, but only 57.2% of the herbs and 59.8% of the graminoids grew on large stones. Plants are associated with large clasts because (1) coarse talus is more stable than fine sediment areas, which are more frequently disturbed by various geomorphic processes, and (2) large stones help conserve substrate water beneath them while moisture quickly evaporates from fine debris. Root patterns were studied for 30 plant species; 10 specimens for each species were excavated and inspected, and several root growth ratios calculated. All species exhibited pronounced root asymmetry, as roots for most plants grew upslope from their shoot base. For 23 species, all specimens had 100% of their roots growing upslope; for the other 7 species, 92.2-99.3% of below-ground biomass extended uphill. This uneven root distribution is ascribed to continual substrate instability and resulting talus shift; as cascading debris progressively buries roots and stems, plants are gradually pushed and/or stretched downhill. Various disturbance events affect root development. Slope erosion

  7. The effect of High Pressure and High Temperature processing on carotenoids and chlorophylls content in some vegetables.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Celia; Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2014-11-15

    The effect of High Pressure (HP) and High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) processing on carotenoid and chlorophyll content of six vegetables was evaluated. In general, carotenoid content was not significantly influenced by HP or HPHT treatments (625 MPa; 5 min; 20, 70 and 117 °C). Regarding chlorophylls, HP treatment caused no degradation or slight increases, while HPHT processes degraded both chlorophylls. Chlorophyll b was more stable than chlorophyll a at 70 °C, but both of them were highly degraded at 117 °C. HPHT treatment at 117 °C provided products with a good retention of carotenoids and colour in the case of red vegetables. Even though the carotenoids also remained in the green vegetables, their chlorophylls and therefore their colour were so affected that milder temperatures need to be applied. As an industrial scale equipment was used, results will be useful for future industrial implementation of this technology.

  8. Characterization of lactococci isolated from minimally processed fresh fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W J; Davey, G P; Ward, L J

    1998-12-08

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from minimally processed fresh fruit and vegetable products were identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on the basis of phenotypic tests, presence of lactococcal IS elements, and partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Isolated bacteria were differentiated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI digests of genomic DNA. Sprouted seeds were the best source of strains, and lactococci appear to be the dominant microflora on these products during the period they are intended to be eaten. Although these plant strains showed many similarities to strains of L. lactis used as dairy starter cultures, their carbohydrate fermentation patterns were unusual and probably reflect their environmental origin. Most strains fermented sucrose and xylose, and some also fermented raffinose and melibiose. Most of the bacteriocin-producing strains produced nisin, and nisin genes could also be detected in strains that showed no bacteriocin activity, or that produced a different bacteriocin with a narrow spectrum of activity. One strain produced nisin but was unable to ferment sucrose, properties that have been generally regarded as linked. These strains may have uses as biopreservatives for minimally processed plant products.

  9. Comprehensive metabolomics to evaluate the impact of industrial processing on the phytochemical composition of vegetable purees.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; de Vos, R C H; Jonker, H H; Mumm, R; Hall, R D; Bialek, L; Leenman, R; Strassburg, K; Vreeken, R; Hankemeier, T; Schumm, S; van Duynhoven, J

    2015-02-01

    The effects of conventional industrial processing steps on global phytochemical composition of broccoli, tomato and carrot purees were investigated by using a range of complementary targeted and untargeted metabolomics approaches including LC-PDA for vitamins, (1)H NMR for polar metabolites, accurate mass LC-QTOF MS for semi-polar metabolites, LC-MRM for oxylipins, and headspace GC-MS for volatile compounds. An initial exploratory experiment indicated that the order of blending and thermal treatments had the highest impact on the phytochemicals in the purees. This blending-heating order effect was investigated in more depth by performing alternate blending-heating sequences in triplicate on the same batches of broccoli, tomato and carrot. For each vegetable and particularly in broccoli, a large proportion of the metabolites detected in the purees was significantly influenced by the blending-heating order, amongst which were potential health-related phytochemicals and flavour compounds like vitamins C and E, carotenoids, flavonoids, glucosinolates and oxylipins. Our metabolomics data indicates that during processing the activity of a series of endogenous plant enzymes, such as lipoxygenases, peroxidases and glycosidases, including myrosinase in broccoli, is key to the final metabolite composition and related quality of the purees.

  10. Discovery of environmental rhodamine B contamination in paprika during the vegetation process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qingguo; Gao, Wei; Du, Jingjing; Zhou, Li; Lian, Yunhe

    2012-05-16

    Recently, rhodamine B (RhB) in paprika and chilli has attracted much attention. Almost all the literature has deemed that the detectable RhB was attributed to malicious intents in the fabrication process. However, the occurrence of increasing cases with ultratrace levels of RhB was difficult to understand on the basis of that statement. Here, we report on the discovery of environmental RhB contamination in paprika during its vegetation process. Samples including paprika, soils, and stems collected from seven fields in the Xinjiang Region, China, were detected by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Far from any anthropogenic addition, the ultratrace RhB concentrations in all the paprika samples provided unambiguous evidence that environmental RhB contamination in paprika had really occurred over its growth period. Further illation suggests that the soil contaminated by RhB is one of the major contamination sources and that there may be a degradation of RhB in paprika during the late maturation stage. The discovery has significant implications for re-evaluating the origin of the RhB in paprika- and chilli-containing products.

  11. Effect of combination processing on the microbial, chemical and sensory quality of ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable pulav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; George, Johnsy; Rajamanickam, R.; Nataraju, S.; Sabhapathy, S. N.; Bawa, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Effect of irradiation in combination with retort processing on the shelf life and safety aspects of an ethnic Indian food product like vegetable pulav was investigated. Gamma irradiation of RTE vegetable pulav was carried out at different dosage rates with 60Co followed by retort processing. The combination processed samples were analysed for microbiological, chemical and sensory characteristics. Microbiological analysis indicated that irradiation in combination with retort processing has significantly reduced the microbial loads whereas the chemical and sensory analysis proved that this combination processing is effective in retaining the properties even after storage for one year at ambient conditions. The results also indicated that a minimum irradiation dosage at 4.0 kGy along with retort processing at an F0 value of 2.0 is needed to achieve the desired shelf life with improved organoleptic qualities.

  12. What Works? Process Evaluation of a School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Distribution Program in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Susan C.; Schneider, Doris; Coyle, Karin K.; May, Gary; Robin, Leah; Seymour, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Background: During the 2004-2005 school year, the Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Child Nutrition, initiated a pilot program to distribute free fruit and vegetable snacks to students during the school day. This article describes the first-year implementation of the Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Program. Methods: The process…

  13. The influence of meteorological factors on growth and vegetation process of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ragazinskiene, Ona; Seinauskiene, Erika; Janulis, Valdimaras; Jankauskaite, Lina; Milasius, Arvydas

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study on the dependence of growth and vegetation process of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton upon meteorological factors are presented in the article. The investigations were conducted at Kaunas Botanical Garden of Vytautas Magnus University during vegetation periods in 2001-2005. The object of investigations was Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton, a medicinal annual herbaceous plant of Lamiaceae Lindl. family, native of Eastern Asia, which passes the whole development cycle under climatic conditions of Central Lithuania. The duration of vegetation period of Perilla frutescens on the average is 167 days. The earliest beginning of vegetation and optimal climatic conditions for growth are when hydrothermic coefficient reaches 1.60-1.80 (conditions of excessive humidity). Optimal climatic conditions for massive flowering and seed maturation are observed when hydrothermic coefficient decreases to 1.20 - then massive flowering starts 10 days earlier and lasts 25 days longer. A strong correlation was found between massive flowering and hydrothermic coefficient (r(2)=0.9408). Using mathematical-statistical methods, the consistent patterns of growth and vegetation process of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton were determined, specifying the time for raw material preparation what determines its quality and quantity.

  14. Identifying vegetation's influence on multi-scale fluvial processes based on plant trait adaptations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Merritt, D. M.; Wilcox, A. C.; Scott, M.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian vegetation-geomorphic interactions are critical to the physical and biological function of riparian ecosystems, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of these interactions and predictive ability at the reach to watershed scale. Plant functional groups, or groupings of species that have similar traits, either in terms of a plant's life history strategy (e.g., drought tolerance) or morphology (e.g., growth form), may provide an expression of vegetation-geomorphic interactions. We are developing an approach that 1) identifies where along a river corridor plant functional groups exist and 2) links the traits that define functional groups and their impact on fluvial processes. The Green and Yampa Rivers in Dinosaur National Monument have wide variations in hydrology, hydraulics, and channel morphology, as well as a large dataset of species presence. For these rivers, we build a predictive model of the probable presence of plant functional groups based on site-specific aspects of the flow regime (e.g., inundation probability and duration), hydraulic characteristics (e.g., velocity), and substrate size. Functional group traits are collected from the literature and measured in the field. We found that life-history traits more strongly predicted functional group presence than did morphological traits. However, some life-history traits, important for determining the likelihood of a plant existing along an environmental gradient, are directly related to the morphological properties of the plant, important for the plant's impact on fluvial processes. For example, stem density (i.e., dry mass divided by volume of stem) is positively correlated to drought tolerance and is also related to the modulus of elasticity. Growth form, which is related to the plant's susceptibility to biomass-removing fluvial disturbances, is also related to frontal area. Using this approach, we can identify how plant community composition and distribution shifts with a change to the flow

  15. A Robust Gold Deconvolution Approach for LiDAR Waveform Data Processing to Characterize Vegetation Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Popescu, S. C.; Krause, K.; Sheridan, R.; Ku, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing attention has been paid in the remote sensing community to the next generation Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) waveform data systems for extracting information on topography and the vertical structure of vegetation. However, processing waveform lidar data raises some challenges compared to analyzing discrete return data. The overall goal of this study was to present a robust de-convolution algorithm- Gold algorithm used to de-convolve waveforms in a lidar dataset acquired within a 60 x 60m study area located in the Harvard Forest in Massachusetts. The waveform lidar data was collected by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). Specific objectives were to: (1) explore advantages and limitations of various waveform processing techniques to derive topography and canopy height information; (2) develop and implement a novel de-convolution algorithm, the Gold algorithm, to extract elevation and canopy metrics; and (3) compare results and assess accuracy. We modeled lidar waveforms with a mixture of Gaussian functions using the Non-least squares (NLS) algorithm implemented in R and derived a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and canopy height. We compared our waveform-derived topography and canopy height measurements using the Gold de-convolution algorithm to results using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. Our findings show that the Gold algorithm performed better than the Richardson-Lucy algorithm in terms of recovering the hidden echoes and detecting false echoes for generating a DTM, which indicates that the Gold algorithm could potentially be applied to processing of waveform lidar data to derive information on terrain elevation and canopy characteristics.

  16. 7 CFR 52.38c - Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes. 52.38c Section 52.38c Agriculture Regulations of the... Regulations Governing Inspection and Certification Sampling § 52.38c Statistical sampling procedures for...

  17. 7 CFR 52.38c - Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Statistical sampling procedures for lot inspection of processed fruits and vegetables by attributes. 52.38c Section 52.38c Agriculture Regulations of the... Regulations Governing Inspection and Certification Sampling § 52.38c Statistical sampling procedures for...

  18. Demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    The success of remotely mapping wetland vegetation of the southwestern coast of Florida is examined. A computerized technique to process aircraft and LANDSAT multispectral scanner data into vegetation classification maps was used. The cost effectiveness of this mapping technique was evaluated in terms of user requirements, accuracy, and cost. Results indicate that mangrove communities are classified most cost effectively by the LANDSAT technique, with an accuracy of approximately 87 percent and with a cost of approximately 3 cent per hectare compared to $46.50 per hectare for conventional ground survey methods.

  19. Microbial-processing of fruit and vegetable wastes for production of vital enzymes and organic acids: Biotechnology and scopes.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sandeep K; Mishra, Swati S; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-04-01

    Wastes generated from fruits and vegetables are organic in nature and contribute a major share in soil and water pollution. Also, green house gas emission caused by fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) is a matter of serious environmental concern. This review addresses the developments over the last one decade on microbial processing technologies for production of enzymes and organic acids from FVWs. The advances in genetic engineering for improvement of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of the value added bio-products as well as the concept of zero-waste economy have been briefly discussed.

  20. Determination of 5-log pathogen reduction times for heat-processed, acidified vegetable brines.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Hayes, J S; Osborne, J A; McFeeters, R F

    2005-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. We determined pasteurization times and temperatures needed to assure a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella strains in acidified cucumber pickle brines. Cocktails of five strains of each pathogen were (separately) used for heat-inactivation studies between 50 and 60 degrees C in brines that had an equilibrated pH value of 4.1. Salmonella strains were found to be less heat resistant than E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes strains. The nonlinear killing curves generated during these studies were modeled using a Weibull function. We found no significant difference in the heat-killing data for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes (P = 0.9709). The predicted 5-log reduction times for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were found to fit an exponential decay function. These data were used to estimate minimum pasteurization times and temperatures needed to ensure safe processing of acidified pickle products and show that current industry pasteurization practices offer a significant margin of safety.

  1. CO₂ processing and hydration of fruit and vegetable tissues by clathrate hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Nakano, Kohei; Thammawong, Manasikan; Umeda, Hiroki; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Matsuo, Seiji

    2016-08-15

    CO2 hydrate can be used to preserve fresh fruits and vegetables, and its application could contribute to the processing of carbonated frozen food. We investigated water transformation in the frozen tissue of fresh grape samples upon CO2 treatment at 2-3 MPa and 3°C for up to 46 h. Frozen fresh bean, radish, eggplant and cucumber samples were also investigated for comparison. X-ray diffraction indicated that after undergoing CO2 treatment for several hours, structure I CO2 hydrate formed within the grape tissue. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using the diffraction-enhanced imaging technique revealed the presence of CO2 hydrate within the intercellular spaces of these tissues. The carbonated produce became effervescent because of the dissociation of CO2 hydrate through the intercellular space, especially above the melting point of ice. In addition, suppressed metabolic activity resulting from CO2 hydrate formation, which inhibits water and nutrient transport through intercellular space, can be expected.

  2. Occurrence of rhodamine B contamination in capsicum caused by agricultural materials during the vegetation process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wu, Naiying; Du, Jingjing; Zhou, Li; Lian, Yunhe; Wang, Lei; Liu, Dengshuai

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports on the environmental rhodamine B (RhB) contamination in capsicum caused by agricultural materials during the vegetation process. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was applied to detect 64 capsicum samples from China, Peru, India and Burma. Results demonstrated that RhB was found in all samples at low concentrations (0.11-0.98 μg/kg), indicating RhB contamination in capsicums is probably a ubiquitous phenomenon. In addition, studies into soils, roots, stems and leaves in Handan of Hebei province, China showed that the whole ecologic chain had been contaminated with RhB with the highest levels in leaves. The investigation into the agricultural environment in Handan of Hebei province and Korla of Xinjiang province, China demonstrated that the appearances of RhB contamination in the tested capsicums are mainly due to the agricultural materials contamination. The study verified that environmental contamination should be an important origin for the RhB contamination in capsicum fruits.

  3. Post-fire Gully Rejuvenation - Evidence of Process Thresholds Controlled by Vegetation Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, K.; Woods, S.

    2011-12-01

    High intensity rainfall may trigger gully rejuvenation on hillslopes recently disturbed by wildfire, leading to debris-laden flows which generally contribute the majority of sediment transported in post-fire erosion events. We investigated the extent to which the occurrence of gully rejuvenation can be predicted based upon burn severity, rainfall data and basin morphometric variables. Field surveys were conducted at six Northern Rockies sites to identify occurrence of gully rejuvenation in first order catchments and to map and characterize the location of gully heads. NEXRAD and rain gage data analysis coupled with field observations characterized rainfall intensity and extent. Building on previous work we quantified burn severity using the Vegetation Disturbance Index (VDI), a continuous metric based upon Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps derived from satellite imagery using the dNBR algorithm. GIS analysis combined the VDI with morphometric factors expected to influence hillslope stability. Gully heads marked abrupt transition in channel form. Above gully heads, channels were shallow and U-shaped with gentle transition to the hillslope and fine root hairs intact. Angular edges marked deep gully head incisions which down-cut channel floors from 0.2-0.3 to 1.0 meter or more. Any remaining roots were coarse and the hillslope transition was sharp. Gully heads were located at variable distances below the master rill head of the catchment hollow. Distances were obviously greater where live canopy remained upslope. Gully head morphology strongly suggests flow force transition and exceedance of an erosion process threshold. The variable distance of the gully head below the hollow suggest upslope controls influencing initiation point, possibly degree and spatial pattern of burn severity. Binary logistic regression revealed stronger correlation between gully rejuvenation and VDI than morphometric variables. The statistical strength using the continuous

  4. Efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) for reducing microbial contamination on minimally-processed vegetables.

    PubMed

    Abadias, Maribel; Usall, Josep; Oliveira, Márcia; Alegre, Isabel; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2008-03-31

    Consumption of minimally-processed, or fresh-cut, fruit and vegetables has rapidly increased in recent years, but there have also been several reported outbreaks associated with the consumption of these products. Sodium hypochlorite is currently the most widespread disinfectant used by fresh-cut industries. Neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) is a novel disinfection system that could represent an alternative to sodium hypochlorite. The aim of the study was to determine whether NEW could replace sodium hypochlorite in the fresh-cut produce industry. The effects of NEW, applied in different concentrations, at different treatment temperatures and for different times, in the reduction of the foodborne pathogens Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and against the spoilage bacterium Erwinia carotovora were tested in lettuce. Lettuce was artificially inoculated by dipping it in a suspension of the studied pathogens at 10(8), 10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1), depending on the assay. The NEW treatment was always compared with washing with deionized water and with a standard hypochlorite treatment. The effect of inoculum size was also studied. Finally, the effect of NEW on the indigenous microbiota of different packaged fresh-cut products was also determined. The bactericidal activity of diluted NEW (containing approximately 50 ppm of free chlorine, pH 8.60) against E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. innocua and E. carotovora on lettuce was similar to that of chlorinated water (120 ppm of free chlorine) with reductions of 1-2 log units. There were generally no significant differences when treating lettuce with NEW for 1 and 3 min. Neither inoculation dose (10(7) or 10(5) cfu ml(-1)) influenced the bacterial reduction achieved. Treating fresh-cut lettuce, carrot, endive, corn salad and 'Four seasons' salad with NEW 1:5 (containing about 50 ppm of free chlorine) was equally effective as applying chlorinated water at 120 ppm. Microbial reduction depended on the

  5. Coupling groundwater, vegetation and atmosphere processes: a comparison of two integrated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, M.; Williams, J. L.; Shrestha, P.; Maxwell, R. M.; Masbou, M.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    The correct modelling of the mutual response to and feedback between atmospheric, hydrological, and ecological processes is an important prerequisite for accurate climate/meteorological projection, environmental protection, and water management. As such, numerical models based on a detailed representation of both groundwater and atmospheric dynamics have gained increasing attention within the scientific community. In this study, we compare two integrated systems that dynamically simulate soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. One system is the combination of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model coupled with the three-dimensional variably saturated subsurface ParFlow model. Both sub-models are internally coupled in an explicit, operator-splitting manner via the Noah land surface scheme. The second system consists of the regional climate and weather forecast model COSMO coupled also with ParFlow but via the Community Land Model (CLM). In this second system the external OASIS coupler is used to pass relevant fluxes and state variables between these three components via the MPI parallel communications protocol. The comparison on how interactions are simulated and how different processes are integrated/coupled is carried out by selecting a set of test cases. These tests involve a flat domain with idealized initial and boundary conditions, as well as simulations over the Rur catchment in Germany based upon equilibrium initial conditions for the subsurface and realistic atmospheric conditions at the boundaries. We explore and explain the differences in model response, and we discuss the pros and cons of the two approaches by emphasizing the role played by factors such as temporal subcycling and coupling frequency between model components.

  6. Process Model for Studying Regional 13C Stable Isotope Exchange between Vegetation and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, B.; Huang, L.; Tans, P.; Worthy, D.; Ishizawa, M.; Chan, D.

    2007-12-01

    The variation of the stable isotope 13CO2 in the air in exchange with land ecosystems results from fractionation processes in both plants and soil during photosynthesis and respiration. Its diurnal and seasonal variations therefore contain information on the carbon cycle. We developed a model (BEPS-iso) to simulate its exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere. To be useful for regional carbon cycle studies, the model has the following characteristics: (i) it considers the turbulent mixing in the vertical profile from the soil surface to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL); (ii) it scales individual leaf photosynthetic discrimination to the whole canopy through the separation of sunlit and shaded leaf groups; (iii) through simulating leaf-level photosynthetic processes, it has the capacity to mechanistically examine isotope discrimination resulting from meteorological forcings, such as radiation, precipitation and humidity; and (iv) through complete modeling of radiation, energy and water fluxes, it also simulates soil moisture and temperature needed for estimating ecosystem respiration and the 13C signal from the soil. After validation using flask data acquired at 20 m level on a tower near Fraserdale, Ontario, Canada, during intensive campaigns (1998-2000), the model has been used for several purposes: (i) to investigate the diurnal and seasonal variations in the disequilibrium in 13C fractionation between ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis, which is an important step in using 13C measurements to separate these carbon cycle components; (ii) to quantify the 13C rectification in the PBL, which differs significantly from CO2 rectification because of the diurnal and seasonal disequilibriums; and (iii) to model the 13C spatial and temporal variations over the global land surface for the purpose of CO2 inversion using 13C as an additional constraint.

  7. Effect of novel ultrasound based processing on the nutrition quality of different fruit and vegetable juices.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, Paramjeet; Gogate, Parag R

    2015-11-01

    Increasing consumer awareness regarding the health benefits of different nutrients in food have led to the requirement of assessing the effect of food processing approaches on the quality attributes. The present work focuses on understanding the effects of novel approaches based on the use of ultrasound and ultraviolet irradiations on the nutritional quality of different fruit and vegetable juices (orange, sweet lime, carrot and spinach juices) and its comparison with the conventional thermal pasteurization operated at 80°C for 10 min. The ultrasound sterilization parameters were maintained at ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz and power of 100 W with treatment time as 15 min. For the case of ultraviolet irradiations, 2 UVC lamps (254 nm) of 8 W were placed in parallel on either sides of the reactor. The treated juices were analyzed for total phenol content, antioxidant activity, vitamin C, carbohydrates etc. It has been established that ultrasound processed juice retained most of the nutrient components to higher extent in comparison to all the other techniques used in the work. Combination of ultrasound and ultraviolet irradiations used to achieve an effective decontamination of juices (recommended 5 log reduction of microorganisms) also retained nutrients to a higher level in comparison to the thermal method; however some losses were observed as compared to the use of only ultrasound which could be attributed to inefficient heat exchange in the combined approach. A scale up attempt was also made for treatment of spinach juice using ultrasonic reactors and analysis for quality attributes confirmed that the juice satisfied the criteria of required nutrient contents for 18 days shelf life trial in refrigerated storage conditions. The present work has clearly established the usefulness of ultrasound based treatment in maintaining the nutritional quality of beverages while giving enhanced shelf life as compared to the conventional approaches.

  8. Geomorphic and vegetative recovery processes along modified stream channels of West Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Andrew; Hupp, C.R. Tennessee

    1992-01-01

    Hundreds of miles of streams in West Tennessee have been channelized or otherwise modt@ed since the turn of century. After all or parts of a stream are straightened, dredged, or cleared, systematic hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic processes collectively begin to reduce energy conditions towards the premodified state. One hundred and five sites along 15 streams were studied in the Obion, Forked Deer, Hatchie, and Wolf River basins. All studied streams, except the Hatchie River, have had major channel modi@cation along all or parts of their courses. Bank material shear-strength properties were determined through drained borehole-shear testing (168 tests) and used to interpret present critical bank conditions and factors of safety, and to estimate future channel-bank stability. Mean values of cohesive strength and angle of internal friction were 1.26 pounds per square inch and 30.1 degrees, respectively. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were made using botanical evidence of channel-bank failures to determine rates of channel widening; buried riparian stems were analyzed to determine rates of bank accretion. Channel bed-level changes through time and space were represented by a power equation. Plant ecological analyses were ma& to infer relative bank stability, to identify indicator species of the stage of bank recovery, and to determine patterns of vegetation development through the course of channel evolution. Quantitative data on morphologic changes were used with previously developed six-stage models of channel evolution and bank-slope development to estimate trends of geomorphic and ecologic processes and forms through time. Immediately after channel modr@cations, a 10- to 1%yearperiod of channel-bed degradation ensues at and upstream from the most recent modifications (area of maximum disturbance). Channel-bed lowering by &gradation was as much as 20 feet along some stream reaches. Downstream from the area of maximum disturbance, the bed was aggraded by the

  9. Vegetable dietary fibres made with minimal processing improve health-related faecal parameters in a valid rat model.

    PubMed

    Monro, John; Mishra, Suman; Redman, Claire; Somerfield, Sheryl; Ng, Jovyn

    2016-06-15

    Dietary fibre-induced faecal bulking and hydration are important contributors to large bowel function and health, and are affected by the dietary fibre structure. To determine faecal bulk-related parameters for vegetable dietary fibres with retained structure, cold water fragmentation of vegetables was used to make minimally processed vegetable fibres (MPVF) from swede, broccoli and asparagus. A valid adult rat model was used to subject the fibres to processes of hind gut fermentation and faecal accumulation similar to those in humans. All the MPVFs had high faecal bulking indexes (FBIs, mean ± sem: wheat bran (reference), 100 ± 6.0; asparagus 168 ± 5.7; swede 135 ± 6.1; broccoli 135 ± 5.9; broccoli rind 205 ± 10.4), and caused large increases in the theoretical colonic water load at 10 g per 100 g diet (increase over baseline (%): wheat bran, 137 ± 8.3; asparagus, 236 ± 25, swede 193 ± 8.8; broccoli 228 ± 12; broccoli rind 223 ± 8.5). Faecal bulking by MPVFs was much greater than by fermentable extracted polysaccharides such as pectin and raftilose, or by commercial fibres made from highly processed cell walls. The results show natural, non-degraded vegetable fibres with retained botanical structure have beneficial effects not provided by structure-less fermentable dietary fibres. Dietary fibre-deficient diets supplemented with prebiotics cannot, therefore, adequately substitute for varied diets containing adequate vegetables, fruits and wholegrain cereals in which fermentation is associated with enough retained structure to conserve physicochemical properties of benefit to colonic function.

  10. Control of disinfection by-products in canned vegetables caused by water used in their processing.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    Canned vegetables come into contact with sanitizers and/or treated water in industry during several steps (namely washing, sanitising, blanching and filling with sauces or brine solutions) and therefore they can contain disinfection by-products - DBPs). This study focused on the occurrence of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in a wide variety of canned vegetables (75 samples). For each vegetable, the edible solid and liquid phases of the package were separated and analysed individually. DBPs can be present in both solid (up to eight species) and liquid (up to 11 species) phases, their levels being higher in liquid ones. Volatile THMs predominate in the edible solid phase (up to four species), while HAAs do so in the liquid phase (up to five species) according to their ionic and non-volatile nature. The lowest concentrations of DBPs were found in tomatoes because they were often preserved in their own juice, without water.

  11. State of polyphenols in the drying process of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, M; Seetharaman, K

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of drying technologies and its impact on the polyphenol content of vegetables and fruits. Polyphenols contribute to many health benefits and can act as antioxidants. Specifically an increased intake of polyphenols has been shown to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular disease; furthermore, it has been shown to help reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in humans. Many researchers have reported on the effect of different drying techniques on the polyphenol content in fruits and vegetables. Polyphenol degradation mechanisms proposed in literature and pretreatments that potentially lead to higher retention of polyphenols during drying are also discussed.

  12. Health status of birds fed diets containing three differently processed discarded vegetable-bovine blood-rumen content mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ekunseitan, D A; Balogun, O O; Sogunle, O M; Yusuf, A O; Ayoola, A A; Egbeyale, L T; Adeyemi, O A; Allison, I B; Iyanda, A I

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding three differently processed mixtures on health status of broilers. A total of 1080 day-old Marshal broilers were fed; discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-fresh rumen digesta (P1), discarded vegetable-ensiled bovine blood-fresh rumen digesta (P2) and discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-ensiled rumen digesta (P3) at three levels of inclusion (0, 3 and 6%). Data on blood parameters was taken and were subjected to 3 x 3 factorial arrangements in a completely randomized design. Birds fed P1 had least values (p < 0.05) of serum glucose, total protein, globulin, uric acid and creatinine at starter phase. Birds fed diets containing 3 and 6% level of inclusion recorded the highest (p < 0.05) Packed cell volume, Haemoglobin, White blood cell and Red blood cell values. However, those fed at 0% level of inclusion recorded the highest albumin value. At finisher phase, birds fed P2 and P3 had the highest glucose, uric acid and creatinine values. 6% level of inclusion significantly (p < 0.05) increased the total protein and albumin values. Therefore, for enhanced performance and without comprising the health condition of birds; broiler chickens could be fed diets containing discarded vegetable-fresh bovine blood-ensiled rumen digesta (P3) up to 6% level of inclusion.

  13. Geomorphic process and vegetation diversity in the active riverbed and the floodplain in the Kamikochi valley, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamikochi valley is located in a mountainous area in central Japan. The R. Azusa in this valley is a braided river with floodplains. Dense riparian forests cover the floodplains and fragmented small pioneer plant patches and isolated old pioneer trees are distributed in the active riverbed. This study aims to discuss the relationships between geomorphic processes of the river and vegetation diversity. Yearly mapping of the riverbed micro-landforms revealed that channel migrations and landform changes in the active riverbed occurs once every one or several years during a bankfull flood in the rainy season. Germination ages of riparian trees using a dendrochronological technique, their established layers and landform structure were examined to reconstruct floodplain dynamics. Major channel migrations destroyed the riparian forest repeatedly and the recent event occurred about 100 years ago. This caused a longitudinal zonal structure of the riparian forest vegetation, elm-fir forest, mature pioneer forest and young pioneer forests. The young pioneer forest is located alongside the present riverbed. The mature pioneer forest lies between the older elm-fir forests. The pioneer plants germinated simultaneously on the abandoned channel after channel migration. These trees became the mature pioneer forest. Ditches and lobes including boulders are found in the floodplain. The ditches extend parallel to the direction of the present and former channels. The lobes are distributed alongside them. Younger trees under the canopy grow on the lobes in the inner part of the floodplain. These young trees and lobes show that dominant sedimentation process in the floodplain is not lateral flooding, but longitudinal flooding. Sediments from the present channel flew downward through the ditches and were overflowed on the floodplain. This process destroyed the vegetation in and alongside the ditches causing vegetation diversity in the inner part of the riparian forest. Several species

  14. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  15. 75 FR 6364 - Process for Requesting a Variance From Vegetation Standards for Levees and Floodwalls

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... requesting a variance from vegetation standards for levees and floodwalls to reflect organizational changes... docket number COE-2010-0007. All comments received will be included in the public docket without change... change based on the comments received through this public notice and should not be viewed...

  16. When Fruits and Vegetables Are Optional, Elementary School Children Choose Processed over Whole Offerings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Sarah A.; Yon, Bethany A.; Taylor, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Increasing children's fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is an important goal for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). In 2012 the NSLP began requiring students to select a FV. The objective of this study was to compare children's FV choices in two school cafeteria environments a year before these new USDA regulations…

  17. Process Evaluation of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Implementation in a New Jersey Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Yeon; Feldman, Charles; Wunderlich, Shahla M.; Aletras, Stefanie C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides funding to elementary schools for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) to encourage healthy eating. The purpose of this study was to examine factors facilitating or challenging the program's successful implementation in one New Jersey school. Methods: Researchers conducted an…

  18. Field application of glyphosate induces molecular changes affecting vegetative growth processes in leafy spurge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recommended rates of glyphosate for non-cultivated areas destroy the aboveground shoots of the perennial plant leafy spurge. However, such applications cause little or no damage to underground adventitious buds (UABs), and thus the plant readily regenerates vegetatively. High concentrations of glyph...

  19. Impacts of the 2014 Drought on Vegetation Processes in the Sierra Nevada of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loik, M. E.; Wade, C. E.; Reed, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sierra Nevada snowpack provides over 60 percent of California's freshwater supplies. The drought of 2014 has been unprecedented in the state's history, and followed below-average precipitation for the hydrologic years 2012 and 2013. Record-low precipitation has resulted in minimal Sierra Nevada snow pack and runoff, and massive reductions in reservoir storage, which has triggered widespread drought adaptation measures for one of the world's largest economies. We assessed the impacts of the 2014 drought on vegetation processes in the headwaters of the Owens River, which is one of the main watersheds for the city of Los Angeles. We monitored water relations, photosynthesis, growth and Leaf Area Index of tree, shrub, herb, and grass species. In order to better understand the effects of drought, we examined responses to watering manipulations, long-term snow fences, elevation gradient analysis, and comparisons to previous wetter years. 1 April 2014 snow pack depth was 330 mm (average for 1928 - 2012 = 1344 mm, CV = 49%). Despite widespread mortality of Pinus jeffreyi saplings (mean 1.5 m tall) at 2300 m, older trees as well as saplings of Pinus contorta showed new growth. There were no significant differences in water potential (Ψ) for the two conifer species in a wet year (2006, 1 April snow depth = 2240 mm) vs. 2014. Water potential for P. contorta in 2014 was higher at 2900 m than at 2300 m but photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs), were not different. By contrast, Ψ, A, gs, Vcmax and Jmax for the widespread shrub Artemisia tridentata increased along a gradient from 2100 m to 2900 m in 2014. Watering only significantly increased these photosynthetic parameters at the lowest, driest elevation. At the middle elevation, Leaf Area Index in 2014 was about 20% of the 2006 value for the N-fixing shrub Purshia tridentata. Results show reductions in photosynthesis and growth for some species but not others in response to the severe drought

  20. Outcome and Process Evaluation of a Norwegian School-Randomized Fruit and Vegetable Intervention: Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bere, E.; Veierod, M. B.; Bjelland, M.; Klepp, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the effect of the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks intervention, a school-based fruit and vegetable intervention consisting of a home economics classroom component and parental involvement and encouraged participation in the Norwegian School Fruit Programme, all delivered during the school year of 2001-02. Nine randomly…

  1. Initial adjustments within a new river channel: Interactions between fluvial processes, colonizing vegetation, and bank profile development.

    PubMed

    Gurnell, Angela M; Morrissey, Ian P; Boitsidis, Angela J; Bark, Tony; Clifford, Nicholas J; Petts, Geoffrey E; Thompson, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    A conceptual model of the morphological development of the riparian margins of newly cut river channels is presented, suggesting early feedbacks between vegetation growth and bank form. To test the model, observations of long and cross profiles, bank sediment and seed deposition, and bank vegetation development were collected over the first 2 years of river flows through a reach of the River Cole, West Midlands, UK. The newly created channel had a sinuous planform and varying asymmetric trapezoidal cross section in sympathy with the planform. No imposed bedforms or bank reseeding were included in the design. Over the 2 years, development of bedforms was rapid, with bed sediment sorting and bank profile adjustment occurring more steadily and progressively. Six classes of bank profile were identified by the end of the study period, illustrating close associations with sediment aggradation, vegetation colonization, and growth patterns. Vegetation colonization of the banks was seeded predominantly from local sources during the summer and from hydrochory (transport by the river) during the winter. Colonizing vegetation on the riverbanks appeared to act as a significant propagule source by the second summer and as an increasingly important roughness element, trapping both propagules and sediment, within the second year and providing early feedback into bank evolution. As a result, the time required for riparian margin development in the conceptual model was found to be considerably longer than observed in the study river. In addition, the role of surface wash/bank failure in modifying the bank profile and transporting seeds onto the upper bank face during the first year of bank development was found to be important in initiating rapid bank vegetation colonization and surface stabilization. This set of processes had not been incorporated in the initial conceptual model. In relation to channel restoration, this research illustrates that in small temperate rivers of modest

  2. Evaluation of climate-related carbon turnover processes in global vegetation models for boreal and temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Ciais, Philippe; Friend, Andrew D; Ito, Akihiko; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R; Quegan, Shaun; Rademacher, Tim T; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Tum, Markus; Wiltshire, Andy; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2017-02-13

    Turnover concepts in state-of-the-art global vegetation models (GVMs) account for various processes, but are often highly simplified and may not include an adequate representation of the dominant processes that shape vegetation carbon turnover rates in real forest ecosystems at a large spatial scale. Here we evaluate vegetation carbon turnover processes in GVMs participating in the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP; including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT) using estimates of vegetation carbon turnover rate (k) derived from a combination of remote sensing based products of biomass and net primary production (NPP). We find that current model limitations lead to considerable biases in the simulated biomass and in k (severe underestimations by all models except JeDi and VISIT compared to observation-based average k), likely contributing to underestimation of positive feedbacks of the northern forest carbon balance to climate change caused by changes in forest mortality. A need for improved turnover concepts related to frost damage, drought and insect outbreaks in order to better reproduce observation-based spatial patterns in k is identified. Since direct frost damage effects on mortality are usually not accounted for in these GVMs, simulated relationships between k and winter length in boreal forests are not consistent between different regions and strongly biased compared to the observation-based relationships. Some models show a response of k to drought in temperate forests as a result of impacts of water availability on NPP, growth efficiency or carbon balance dependent mortality as well as soil or litter moisture effects on leaf turnover or fire. However, further direct drought effects like carbon starvation (only in HYBRID4) or hydraulic failure are usually not taken into account by the investigated GVMs. While they are considered dominant large-scale mortality agents, mortality mechanisms related to insects

  3. An ecological vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP) for decentralized wastewater treatment: system development, treatment performance, and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Sun, Feiyun; Li, Pu; Zhao, Ke

    2016-05-01

    An environment-friendly decentralized wastewater treatment process that is comprised of activated sludge process (ASP) and wetland vegetation, named as vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP), was developed for decentralized wastewater treatment. The long-term experimental results evidenced that the vegetation sequencing batch reactor (V-SBR) process had consistently stable higher removal efficiencies of organic substances and nutrients from domestic wastewater compared with traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The vegetation allocated into V-SBR system could not only remove nutrients through its vegetation transpiration ratio but also provide great surface area for microorganism activity enhancement. This high vegetation transpiration ratio enhanced nutrients removal effectiveness from wastewater mainly by flux enhancement, oxygen and substrate transportation acceleration, and vegetation respiration stimulation. A mathematical model based on ASM2d was successfully established by involving the specific function of vegetation to simulate system performance. The simulation results on the influence of operational parameters on V-ASP treatment effectiveness demonstrated that V-SBR had a high resistance to seasonal temperature fluctuations and influent loading shocking.

  4. Geomorphic and vegetation processes of the Willamette River floodplain, Oregon: current understanding and unanswered science questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Hulse, David; Gregory, Stanley V.

    2013-01-01

    4. How is the succession of native floodplain vegetation shaped by present-day flow and sediment conditions? Answering these questions will produce baseline data on the current distributions of landforms and habitats (question 1), the extent of the functional floodplain (question 2), and the effects of modern flow and sediment regimes on future floodplain landforms, habitats, and vegetation succession (questions 3 and 4). Addressing questions 1 and 2 is a logical next step because they underlie questions 3 and 4. Addressing these four questions would better characterize the modern Willamette Basin and help in implementing and setting realistic targets for ongoing management strategies, demonstrating their effectiveness at the site and basin scales, and anticipating future trends and conditions.

  5. Importance of vegetation processes for model spread in the fast precipitation response to CO2 forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Qu, Xin; Hall, Alex

    2016-12-01

    In the current generation of climate models, the projected increase in global precipitation over the 21st century ranges from 2% to 10% under a high-emission scenario. Some of this uncertainty can be traced to the rapid response to carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing. We analyze an ensemble of simulations to better understand model spread in this rapid response. A substantial amount is linked to how the land surface partitions a change in latent versus sensible heat flux in response to the CO2-induced radiative perturbation; a larger increase in sensible heat results in a larger decrease in global precipitation. Model differences in the land surface response appear to be strongly related to the vegetation response to increased CO2, specifically, the closure of leaf stomata. Future research should thus focus on evaluation of the vegetation physiological response, including stomatal conductance parameterizations, for the purpose of constraining the fast response of Earth's hydrologic cycle to CO2 forcing.

  6. Single-thread channels resulting from a localization process driven by vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Tal, M.

    2009-12-01

    The unpredictable manner in which braided rivers evolve is in stark contrast to the orderly migration pattern of meandering rivers driven by erosion along outer bends and deposition along inner banks. Braided channels are the default pattern that develops when an unbounded water flow interacts with noncohesive sediment. A series of laboratory experiments demonstrated that plants alone are able to achieve the two key mechanisms to developing meandering: slowing the rate of widening and discouraging channel cutoffs. Plants initially colonized braid-bars that were emergent during low flow. By adding cohesion to the sediment and increasing roughness, vegetation deterred the flow from reoccupying areas which were colonized. By decreasing erosion rates, plants made it possible for deposition along the inner bank to match the rate of erosion along the outer bank. This enabled the channel to develop sinuosity and migrate laterally while suppressing channel splitting and the creation of new channel width. Areas with established vegetation provided stable conditions which promoted new seedling establishment and expansion of the vegetated area. A generic mechanism of width production in the braided state is the opportunistic creation of new channels. As existing flow paths become slightly less favorable, for example by bar deposition or an increase in sinuosity, new ones are readily created in areas that are not currently occupied by flow. By making it more difficult for flow to occupy vegetated areas, plants in effect decouple the transition between wet and dry areas, making it harder for areas that are dry (vegetated) to turn wet (reoccupied by flow) and less likely for areas that are wet to become dry. The net effect is localization of the flow into a single-thread channel with transitions between wet and dry occurring predominantly along the channel margin and driving lateral migration while a single-thread channel remains intact. We are using a 1D cellular automata model

  7. Outcome and process evaluation of a Norwegian school-randomized fruit and vegetable intervention: Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM).

    PubMed

    Bere, E; Veierød, M B; Bjelland, M; Klepp, K-I

    2006-04-01

    This study reports the effect of the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks intervention, a school-based fruit and vegetable intervention consisting of a home economics classroom component and parental involvement and encouraged participation in the Norwegian School Fruit Programme, all delivered during the school year of 2001-02. Nine randomly chosen schools received the intervention and 10 schools served as control schools. Participating pupils completed questionnaires at baseline (September 2001), at Follow-up 1 (May-June 2002) and at Follow-up 2 (May 2003). A total of 369 pupils (69%; mean age, 11.3 years at baseline) participated in all three surveys. No effect of the intervention was found for intake of fruit and vegetables eaten at school or all day, neither at Follow-up 1 nor at Follow-up 2. On analysing the effects on potential mediators, significant differences between intervention and control groups were found for Awareness of the five-a-day recommendations only. The intervention programme was rated as very good by the teachers, and the pupils reported that they enjoyed it. However, the intervention failed to change fruit and vegetable intake, probably because it did not succeed in changing the pupils' preferences for or the accessibility of fruit and vegetables--the two strongest correlates of children's fruit and vegetable intake.

  8. Overall Quality of Fruits and Vegetables Products Affected by the Drying Processes with the Assistance of Vacuum-Microwaves.

    PubMed

    Figiel, Adam; Michalska, Anna

    2016-12-30

    The seasonality of fruits and vegetables makes it impossible to consume and use them throughout the year, thus numerous processing efforts have been made to offer an alternative to their fresh consumption and application. To prolong their availability on the market, drying has received special attention as currently this method is considered one of the most common ways for obtaining food and pharmaceutical products from natural sources. This paper demonstrates the weakness of common drying methods applied for fruits and vegetables and the possible ways to improve the quality using different drying techniques or their combination with an emphasis on the microwave energy. Particular attention has been drawn to the combined drying with the assistance of vacuum-microwaves. The quality of the dried products was ascribed by chemical properties including the content of polyphenols, antioxidant capacity and volatiles as well as physical parameters such as color, shrinkage, porosity and texture. Both these fields of quality classification were considered taking into account sensory attributes and energy aspects in the perspective of possible industrial applications. In conclusion, the most promising way for improving the quality of dried fruit and vegetable products is hybrid drying consisting of osmotic dehydration in concentrated fruit juices followed by heat pump drying and vacuum-microwave finish drying.

  9. Overall Quality of Fruits and Vegetables Products Affected by the Drying Processes with the Assistance of Vacuum-Microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Figiel, Adam; Michalska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The seasonality of fruits and vegetables makes it impossible to consume and use them throughout the year, thus numerous processing efforts have been made to offer an alternative to their fresh consumption and application. To prolong their availability on the market, drying has received special attention as currently this method is considered one of the most common ways for obtaining food and pharmaceutical products from natural sources. This paper demonstrates the weakness of common drying methods applied for fruits and vegetables and the possible ways to improve the quality using different drying techniques or their combination with an emphasis on the microwave energy. Particular attention has been drawn to the combined drying with the assistance of vacuum-microwaves. The quality of the dried products was ascribed by chemical properties including the content of polyphenols, antioxidant capacity and volatiles as well as physical parameters such as color, shrinkage, porosity and texture. Both these fields of quality classification were considered taking into account sensory attributes and energy aspects in the perspective of possible industrial applications. In conclusion, the most promising way for improving the quality of dried fruit and vegetable products is hybrid drying consisting of osmotic dehydration in concentrated fruit juices followed by heat pump drying and vacuum-microwave finish drying. PMID:28042845

  10. Processing of vegetable-borne carotenoids in the human stomach and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Tyssandier, Viviane; Reboul, Emmanuelle; Dumas, Jean-François; Bouteloup-Demange, Corinne; Armand, Martine; Marcand, Julie; Sallas, Marcel; Borel, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    Carotenoids are thought to diminish the incidence of certain degenerative diseases, but the mechanisms involved in their intestinal absorption are poorly understood. Our aim was to obtain basic data on the fate of carotenoids in the human stomach and duodenum. Ten healthy men were intragastrically fed three liquid test meals differing only in the vegetable added 3 wk apart and in a random order. They contained 40 g sunflower oil and mashed vegetables as the sole source of carotenoids. Tomato purée provided 10 mg lycopene as the main carotenoid, chopped spinach (10 mg lutein), and carrot purée (10 mg beta-carotene). Samples of stomach and duodenal contents and blood samples were collected at regular time intervals after meal intake. all-trans and cis carotenoids were assayed in stomach and duodenal contents, in the fat and aqueous phases of those contents, and in chylomicrons. The cis-trans beta-carotene and lycopene ratios did not significantly vary in the stomach during digestion. Carotenoids were recovered in the fat phase present in the stomach during digestion. The proportion of all-trans carotenoids found in the micellar phase of the duodenum was as follows (means +/- SE): lutein (5.6 +/- 0.4%), beta-carotene (4.7 +/- 0.3%), lycopene (2.0 +/- 0.2%). The proportion of 13-cis beta-carotene in the micellar phase was significantly higher (14.8 +/- 1.6%) than that of the all-trans isomer (4.7 +/- 0.3%). There was no significant variation in chylomicron lycopene after the tomato meal, whereas there was significant increase in chylomicron beta-carotene and lutein after the carrot and the spinach meals, respectively. There is no significant cis-trans isomerization of beta-carotene and lycopene in the human stomach. The stomach initiates the transfer of carotenoids from the vegetable matrix to the fat phase of the meal. Lycopene is less efficiently transferred to micelles than beta-carotene and lutein. The very small transfer of carotenoids from their vegetable

  11. Thermal, High Pressure, and Electric Field Processing Effects on Plant Cell Membrane Integrity and Relevance to Fruit and Vegetable Quality

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced food processing methods that accomplish inactivation of microorganisms but minimize adverse thermal exposure are of great interest to the food industry. High pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing are commercially applied to produce high quality fruit and vegetable products in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Both microbial and plant cell membranes are significantly altered following exposure to heat, HP, or PEF. Our research group sought to quantify the degree of damage to plant cell membranes that occurs as a result of exposure to heat, HP, or PEF, using the same analytical methods. In order to evaluate whether new advanced processing methods are superior to traditional thermal processing methods, it is necessary to compare them. In this review, we describe the existing state of knowledge related to effects of heat, HP, and PEF on both microbial and plant cells. The importance and relevance of compartmentalization in plant cells as it relates to fruit and vegetable quality is described and various methods for quantification of plant cell membrane integrity are discussed. These include electrolyte leakage, cell viability, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). PMID:20492210

  12. Thermal, high pressure, and electric field processing effects on plant cell membrane integrity and relevance to fruit and vegetable quality.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-09-01

    Advanced food processing methods that accomplish inactivation of microorganisms but minimize adverse thermal exposure are of great interest to the food industry. High pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing are commercially applied to produce high quality fruit and vegetable products in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Both microbial and plant cell membranes are significantly altered following exposure to heat, HP, or PEF. Our research group sought to quantify the degree of damage to plant cell membranes that occurs as a result of exposure to heat, HP, or PEF, using the same analytical methods. In order to evaluate whether new advanced processing methods are superior to traditional thermal processing methods, it is necessary to compare them. In this review, we describe the existing state of knowledge related to effects of heat, HP, and PEF on both microbial and plant cells. The importance and relevance of compartmentalization in plant cells as it relates to fruit and vegetable quality is described and various methods for quantification of plant cell membrane integrity are discussed. These include electrolyte leakage, cell viability, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR).

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  14. Effect of hydrothermal processing on total polyphenolics and antioxidant potential of underutilized leafy vegetables, Boerhaavia diffusa and Portulaca oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Nagarani, Gunasekaran; Abirami, Arumugam; Nikitha, Prasad; Siddhuraju, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of different processing methods on antioxidant properties of acetone extract of aerial parts from Boerhaavia diffusa and Portulaca oleracea. Methods The total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined by Folin-Ciocalteau and aluminum chloride method, respectively. FRAP, metal chelating activity, DPPH, ABTS, nitric oxide, hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activities, carotene/linoleic acid bleaching activity were used for the determination of antioxidant capacity. Results The total phenolics in Boerhaavia diffusa (82.79-162.80 mg GAE/g extract) were found to be higher when compared to that of Portulaca oleracea (22.94-10.02 mg GAE/g extract). Hydrothermal processing enhanced the level of inhibition on synthetic radicals such as DPPH (3 439-309 549 mmol TE/g extract) and ABTS (17 808-53 818 mmol TE/g extract) as well as biologically relevant radicals such as superoxide anion (70%-90%) and nitric oxide (49%-57%). In addition, boiling of the vegetables were found to be maximum capacity of FRAP (6 404.95 mmol Fe (II)/g extract) and metal chelating activity (1.53 mg EDTA/g extract) than the respective raw samples. Conclusions The present investigation suggests that the processing enhance the functionality and improves the availability of bioactive substances of these vegetables. In addition, they also exhibited more potent antioxidant activity. Therefore these natural weeds from the crop land ecosystem could be suggested as cost effective indigenous green vegetables for human diet and potential feed resources for animals. Further extensive studies on role and importance of those weeds in sustaining the agro biodiversity are also needed. PMID:25183131

  15. Inventories of Delaware's coastal vegetation and land-use utilizing digital processing of ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Bartlett, D.; Rogers, R.; Reed, L.

    1974-01-01

    Digital analysis of ERTS-1 imagery was used in an attempt to map and inventory the significant ecological communities of Delaware's coastal zone. Eight vegetation and land use discrimination classes were selected: (1) phragmites communis (Giant Reed grass); (2) spartina alterniflora (Salt marsh cord grass); (3) spartina patens (Salt marsh hay); (4) shallow water and exposed mud; (5) deep water (2 meters); (6) forest; (7) agriculture; and (8) exposed sand and concrete. Canonical analysis showed that classification accuracy was quite good with spartina alterniflora, exposed sand-concrete, and forested land - all discriminated with between 94% and 100% accuracy. The shallow water-mud and deep water categories were classified with accuracies of 88% and 93% respectively. Phragmites communis showed a classification accuracy of 83% with all confusion occurring with spartina patens which may be due to use of mixed stands of these species as training sets. Discrimination of spartina patens was very poor (accuracy 52%).

  16. Effects of future climate change, CO2 enrichment, and vegetation structure variation on hydrological processes in China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Qiuan; Jiang, Hong; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Fang, Xiuqin; Wei, Xiaohua; Liu, Shirong; Zhou, Guomo

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the relationship between factors (climate change, atmospheric CO2 concentrations enrichment, and vegetation structure) and hydrological processes is important for understanding and predicting the interaction between the hydrosphere and biosphere. The Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) was used to evaluate the effects of climate change, rising CO2, and vegetation structure on hydrological processes in China at the end of the 21st century. Seven simulations were implemented using the assemblage of the IPCC climate and CO2 concentration scenarios, SRES A2 and SRES B1. Analysis results suggest that (1) climate change will have increasing effects on runoff, evapotranspiration (ET), transpiration (T), and transpiration ratio (transpiration/evapotranspiration, T/E) in most hydrological regions of China except in the southernmost regions; (2) elevated CO2 concentrations will have increasing effects on runoff at the national scale, but at the hydrological region scale, the physiology effects induced by elevated CO2 concentration will depend on the vegetation types, climate conditions, and geographical background information with noticeable decreasing effects shown in the arid Inland region of China; (3) leaf area index (LAI) compensation effect and stomatal closure effect are the dominant factors on runoff in the arid Inland region and southern moist hydrological regions, respectively; (4) the magnitudes of climate change (especially the changing precipitation pattern) effects on the water cycle are much larger than those of the elevated CO2 concentration effects; however, increasing CO2 concentration will be one of the most important modifiers to the water cycle; (5) the water resource condition will be improved in northern China but depressed in southernmost China under the IPCC climate change scenarios, SRES A2 and SRES B1.

  17. Gully erosion processes impacted by vegetation on gully beds based on an in situ scouring experiment in a Dry-hot Valley of Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yifan; Xiong, Donghong; Su, Zhengan

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation can protect soil from water erosion. Some previous researches on the subjects of vegetation and gully erosion were mainly focused on the topography changes cause by vegetation and the conservation effects and techniques. While the mechanics of vegetation effects on the hydraulic processes of gully bed to influence the erosion processes were still not very clear. In this study, an in situ scouring experiment was conducted 11 times assuming a consistent flow condition (7 times with a flow discharge of 83.3L/min and 4 times with a flow discharge of 166.7 L/min on five gully head plots with gully bed lengths of 20 m, which were constructed with similar initial topography (height of the headcuts were 0.5m, the slope of gully beds were from 18.2% to 19.1%) and same soil type (Dry red soil which classified as Rhodoxeralfs in USDA Soil Taxonomy ). Five vegetation condition levels were set on gully bed (the same vegetation density and different lengths of the vegetation sites as 0 m, 4m, 8m, 12m and 16m). Each scouring last 1h and the flow rate, flow depth and flow width were recorded every 10 minutes, after each scouring the topography changes were measured by RTK GPS. The total gully bed erosion volume (TEV) exhibited a significant exponentially decreasing relationship with increasing length of the vegetation sites (VL) due to the similar relationship between the VL and the runoff erosion capacity. The hydrodynamic parameters in the vegetation sites were clearly lower than those in bare sites and caused the average TEV of the vegetation sites to be approximately 3.3 times lower than that of the bare gully bed. However, the vegetation protection efficiency did not increase as the length of the vegetation sites increased. The hydrodynamics of the bare site sections showed a good relationship with TEV, while in the vegetation sites, the relationship was quite weak, indicating that hydraulics conditions were not the main factors influencing gully bed erosion in the

  18. Re-vegetation processes in cutaway peat production fields in Estonia in relation to peat quality and water regime.

    PubMed

    Orru, Mall; Ots, Katri; Orru, Hans

    2016-12-01

    Eighty-one cutaway peat production fields with a total area of about 9000 ha exist and were studied in Estonia in 2005-2015. Only a very small number of the fields (seven) have been restored-either afforested or used for growing berries. The re-vegetation of Estonian cutaway peat production fields is mainly the result of natural processes, which are generally very slow due to an unfavourable water regime or a too thin remaining peat layer. The fields are mostly covered by cotton grass and birches. Often sparse vegetation covers 15-20% of a peat field, but some fields have turned into heaths or grasslands with plant coverage up to 60%. However, due to changes in environmental (mainly hydrological) conditions and peat characteristics (mainly peat type), these areas can also be new niches for several species. A number of moss species new to or rare in Estonia, e.g. Pohlia elongata, Ephemerum serratum, Campylopus introflexus and Bryum oblongum, were recorded.

  19. Evaluation of the assimilation of As by vegetables in contaminated soils submitted to a remediation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez Sanchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Belen Martinez, Lucia; Bech, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    A greenhouse trial was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of plants (lettuce, onion and broccoli), different parts of which are destined for human and farm animals consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). The experiments were carried out to check the validity of the use of calcareous materials to recover soils contaminated with heavy metals. The aim of this work was to apply a technology for decontamination to ensure that As do not enter into the trophic chain at risky levels and analyze and to assess the risk pre and post operational of the different treatments proposed. The materials used was a soils to be remediated (mining soils) and the materials used for remediation were lime filler and Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW). The plants were cultivated in greenhouse with several types of soil. Five experiments were used, namely, Tc (contaminated soil), T1 (uncontaminated soil (blank soil)), T2 (50% T1 + 50% Tc), T3 (Tc + (25%) lime residues coming from quarries) and T4 (Tc + (25%) residues coming from demolition and construction activities). The entire project involves twenty experiments which were prepared from soils highly contaminated mixed with two types of calcareous materials. The total As content of the soils samples, rhizosphere and vegetable samples, were measured and the translocation factor (TF), which is defined as the ratio of metal concentration in the leaves or shoots to the roots, and the Bioconcentration factor (BCF), which is defined as the ratio of metal concentration in the roots to that in soil were calculated. The use of CDR is shown to be a suitable way for remediating soils contaminated by metals. The methodology permits a revalorization of CDW.

  20. The effect of vegetation type and fire on permafrost thaw: An empirical test of a process based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierry, Aaron; Estop-Aragones, Cristian; Fisher, James; Hartley, Iain; Murton, Julian; Phoenix, Gareth; Street, Lorna; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    As conditions become more favourable for plant growth in the high latitudes, most models predict that these areas will take up more carbon during the 21st century. However, vast stores of carbon are frozen in boreal and arctic permafrost, and warming may result in some of this carbon being released to the atmosphere. The recent inclusion of permafrost thaw in large-scale model simulations has suggested that the permafrost feedback could potentially substantially reduce the predicted global net uptake of carbon by terrestrial ecosystems, with major implications for the rate of climate change. However, large uncertainties remain in predicting rates of permafrost thaw and in determining the impacts of thaw in contrasting ecosystems, with many of the key processes missing from carbon-climate models. The role that different plant communities play in insulating soils and protecting permafrost is poorly quantified, with key groups such as mosses absent in many models. But it is thought that they may play a key role in determining permafrost resilience. In order to test the importance of these ecological processes we use a new specially acquired dataset from sites in the Canadian arctic to develop, parameterise and evaluate a detailed process-based model of vegetation-soil-permafrost interactions which includes an insulating moss understory. We tested the sensitivity of modelled active layer depth to a series of factors linked to fire disturbance, which is common in boreal permafrost areas. We show how simulations of active layer depth (ALD) respond to removals of (i) vascular vegetation, (ii) moss cover, and (iii) organic soil layers. We compare model responses to observed patterns from Canada. We also describe the sensitivity of our modelled ALD to changes in temperature and precipitation. We found that four parameters controlled most of the sensitivity in the modelled ALD, linked to conductivity of organic soils and mosses.

  1. Multiscale Precipitation Processes Over Mountain Terrain - Landform and Vegetation Controls of Microphysics and Convection in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Wilson, A. M.; Sun, X.; Duan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent precipitation observations in mountainous regions do not exhibit the classical orographic enhancement with elevation, especially where fog and multi-layer clouds are persistent. The role of landform in modulating moisture convergence patterns and constraining the thermodynamic environment that supports the development of complex vertical structures of clouds and precipitation is discussed first using observations and model results from the IPHEx (Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment) field campaign in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). Analysis of the complex spatial heterogeneity of precipitation microphysics in the SAM suggests that seeder-feeder interactions (SFI) among stratiform precipitation, low level clouds (LLC), and fog play a governing role on the diurnal and seasonal cycles of observed precipitation regimes. Further, in the absence of synoptic-scale forcing, results suggest that evapotranspiration makes a significant contribution to the moisture budget in the lower atmosphere, creating super-saturation conditions favorable to CCN activation, LLC formation, and light rainfall. To investigate the role of evapotranspiration on the diurnal cycle of mountain precipitation further, range-scale modeling studies were conducted in the Central Andes. Specifically, high resolution WRF simulations for realistic and quasi-idealized ET withdrawal case-studies show that evapotranspiration fluxes modulated by landform govern convective activity in the lower troposphere, including cloud formation and precipitation processes that account for daily precipitation amounts as high as 50-70% depending on synoptic conditions and season. These studies suggest multiscale vegetation controls of orographic precipitation processes via atmospheric instability on the one hand, and low level super-saturation and local microphysics on the other. A conceptual model of multiscale interactions among vegetation, landform and moist processes over complex

  2. Processes of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Di Noia, Jennifer; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical Model processes of change associated with consumption of ≥5 daily servings of FVs in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N=549; mean (SD) age=12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic). Participants completed measures of stages and processes of change, and were ranked according to intake level based on their reported stage. Spearman correlations and independent samples t tests were used in cross-sectional analyses of the relationship between processes of change and FV consumption. Consciousness raising, environmental reevaluation, helping relationships and stimulus control processes were significantly associated with FV consumption (ρ≥.12; p<.01), and were practiced more often by youths who consumed ≥5 daily servings of FVs relative to those who did not (p<.05). Findings highlight the potential of these processes for increasing FV consumption in this population.

  3. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m-2 yr-1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m-2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m-2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation results

  4. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m−2 yr−1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m−2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m−2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation

  5. Numerical modelling of snow and frozen soil processes for a multi-layer atmosphere-soil-vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katata, Genki; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Snowcover plays an important role in Earth's climate system because of its high albedo, low thermal conductivity, roughness length, and ability to store water. A sophisticated process-based snow model is useful for representing the complex snow physics. In the present study, an existing multi-layer atmosphere-SOiL-VEGetation model (SOLVEG) developed by the authors was modified to simulate snow and frozen soil processes. The schemes of a multi-layer snow structure for heat and liquid water transports in snow and freeze-thaw processes of soil moisture were incorporated into the model. In the snow scheme, the liquid water transfer in snow was modeled based on the processes of both capillary rise and gravitational drainage in order to accurately simulate water movement in unsaturated snow. The performance of the modified model was tested at the pre-alpine grassland site in TERestrial ENvironmental Observatories (TERENO) networks in Germany. The modified model overall reproduced the temporal changes in observations of surface energy fluxes, albedo, snow depth and surface temperature, and soil temperature and moisture. The measured increases of soil water content due to infiltration of melted snow to the soil were simulated by the modified model. The observed large negative sensible and positive latent heat fluxes associated with the typical south foehn, a warm and dry downslope wind of the Alps, were also reproduced in the simulation.

  6. Process of change for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study sought to identify Transtheoretical Model processes of change associated with consumption of = 5 daily servings of FVs in a sample of economically disadvantaged African American adolescents (N = 549; mean (SD) age = 12.44 (.99) years; 61% female; 15% African American Hispanic). Participan...

  7. Inactivation kinetics and photoreactivation of vegetable oxidative enzymes after combined UV-C processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inactivation kinetics of lipoxygenase (LOX), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) in phosphate buffer (pH 4.0 and 7.0) treated by combined thermal (25-65 C) and UV-C (1-10 min) processes were fitted using a traditional first-order kinetics model and the Weibull distribution function. For...

  8. [Variations of ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of artificial sand-fixing Caragana intermedia plantations in desert steppe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Tao; Chai, Yong-Qing; Xu, Kun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    To study the variation characteristics of ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of Caragana intermedia plantations in desert steppe is of scientific significance in revealing the ecological effect of the plantations on the restoration of desertified grassland ecosystem. In this paper, an investigation was conducted on the ground vegetation and soil properties in 6-, 15-, 24-, and 36-yr artificial sand-fixing C. intermedia plantations in desert steppe of Ningxia, Northwest China, with the variation characteristics of the ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of the C. intermedia plantations analyzed. With the growth and development of the plantations, the shrub crown width, height, sprout number, and basal diameter all increased significantly, the contents of soil coarse sand and fine sand had significant decrease while those of very fine sand and clay silt were in adverse, the soil organic carbon, total N, and total P contents increased linearly, and the soil pH decreased significantly. During the growth process of the plantations, the species number and individual number of ground vegetation increased significantly, and the vegetation coverage and height presented the order of 24- > 15- > 6- > 36-yr plantation. The soil texture, bulk density, nutrient contents, and pH value were the main factors affecting the species and individual number as well as the coverage of ground vegetation in C. intermedia plantations. It was suggested that in desert steppe, the growth process of artificial sand-fixing C. intermedia plantation benefited the improvement of soil conditions and the recovery of ground vegetation, and promoted the restoration of degraded grassland ecosystem in desert steppe.

  9. Application of poultry processing industry waste: a strategy for vegetation growth in degraded soil.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Carla Danielle Vasconcelos; Pontes Filho, Roberto Albuquerque; Artur, Adriana Guirado; Costa, Mirian Cristina Gomes

    2015-02-01

    The disposal of poultry processing industry waste into the environment without proper care, can cause contamination. Agricultural monitored application is an alternative for disposal, considering its high amount of organic matter and its potential as a soil fertilizer. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of poultry processing industry waste to improve the conditions of a degraded soil from a desertification hotspot, contributing to leguminous tree seedlings growth. The study was carried out under greenhouse conditions in a randomized blocks design and a 4 × 2 factorial scheme with five replicates. The treatments featured four amounts of poultry processing industry waste (D1 = control 0 kg ha(-1); D2 = 1020.41 kg ha(-1); D3 = 2040.82 kg ha(-1); D4 = 4081.63 kg ha(-1)) and two leguminous tree species (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit). The poultry processing industry waste was composed of poultry blood, grease, excrements and substances from the digestive system. Plant height, biomass production, plant nutrient accumulation and soil organic carbon were measured forty days after waste application. Leguminous tree seedlings growth was increased by waste amounts, especially M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth, with height increment of 29.5 cm for the waste amount of 1625 kg ha(-1), and L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit, with maximum height increment of 20 cm for the waste amount of 3814.3 kg ha(-1). M. caesalpiniaefolia Benth had greater initial growth, as well as greater biomass and nutrient accumulation compared with L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. However, belowground biomass was similar between the evaluated species, resulting in higher root/shoot ratio for L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Soil organic carbon did not show significant response to waste amounts, but it did to leguminous tree seedlings growth, especially L. leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Poultry processing industry waste contributes to leguminous tree seedlings growth

  10. The role of vegetation covers on soil wetting processes at rainfall event scale in scattered tree woodland of Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; Schnabel, Susanne; Ceballos-Barbancho, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Soil water is recognized as the key factor that controls the organization and functioning of dryland ecosystems. However, in spite of its great importance in ecohydrological processes as well as in modelling applications, most of the studies focus on daily or longer timescales, while its dynamics at shorter timescales are very little known. The main objective of this work was to determine the role of vegetation covers (grassland and tree canopy) in the soil hydrological response using measurements with high temporal resolution in evergreen oak woodland with Mediterranean climate. For this, soil water content was measured with capacitive sensors installed in the soil profile at different depths registering continuously with a high time resolution. Three study areas were monitored for two and half hydrological years. Results obtained revealed that rainwater amounts reaching the soil may temporarily be modified by covers according to precipitation properties and antecedent conditions (from dry to wet) before the rain episode. Rainfall amounts triggering a positive soil hydrological response decreased as initial states became drier, being more accentuated below tree canopies. The frequency of re-wetting cycles and the antecedent states seem to be as important or even more than either the duration or the precipitation amount. Therefore, the role of vegetation was more decisive under drier environmental conditions, where events lower than 6 mm and 2 mm never caused soil hydrological response either below tree canopy or grassland, respectively. This is important because initial conditions were independent of seasonality and because more than half of all rainfall events registered amounts smaller than 5 mm. If changes on precipitation patterns turn out in drier conditions, the predominance of such situations could have important ecohydrological consequences in semiarid ecosystems.

  11. Vegetation of the Elwha River estuary: Chapter 8 in Coastal habitats of the Elwha River, Washington--biological and physical patterns and processes prior to dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Fuentes, Tracy L.; Pritekel, Cynthia; Beirne, Matthew M.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The Elwha River estuary supports one of the most diverse coastal wetland complexes yet described in the Salish Sea region, in terms of vegetation types and plant species richness. Using a combination of aerial imagery and vegetation plot sampling, we identified 6 primary vegetation types and 121 plant species in a 39.7 ha area. Most of the estuary is dominated by woody vegetation types, with mixed riparian forest being the most abundant (20 ha), followed by riparian shrub (6.3 ha) and willow-alder forest (3.9 ha). The shrub-emergent marsh transition vegetation type was fourth most abundant (2.2 ha), followed by minor amounts of dunegrass (1.75 ha) and emergent marsh (0.2 ha). This chapter documents the abundance, distribution, and floristics of these six vegetation types, including plant species richness, life form, species origin (native or introduced), and species wetland indicator status. These data will serve as a baseline to which future changes can be compared, following the impending removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha Dams upstream on the Elwha River. Dam removals may alter many of the processes, materials, and biotic interactions that influence the estuary plant communities, including hydrology, salinity, sediment and wood transport, nutrients, and plant-microbe interactions.

  12. Evaluating North America Paleoclimate Simulations for 6 ka and 21 ka Using a Combination of Observed Paleovegetation Data and Process-Based Vegetation Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, S. L.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoclimate model simulations are often evaluated using observed paleovegetation data (e.g., pollen and plant macrofossils) that record vegetation responses to past climate changes. These observed vegetation data can be combined with mechanistic vegetation model simulations to develop process-based evaluations of paleoclimate model simulations. The use of mechanistic vegetation model simulations allows us to identify the particular spatial and temporal features of individual paleoclimate simulations that may be producing agreement or disagreement between the observed and simulated vegetation data. We used this approach to evaluate a set of eight PMIP3 (Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 3) paleoclimate simulations for 6 ka and 21 ka from the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5) database. Climate data were regridded onto a 10-km grid of North America using the PMIP3 vegetation simulation protocol. The regridded climate data were used as input to BIOME4, an equilibrium vegetation model, to simulate 6 ka and 21 ka biomes across the study area. The simulated biome data were compared with observed paleovegetation data from the BIOME 6000 (version 4.2) dataset. In general, agreement between simulated and observed biomes was greater for forest biomes than for non-forest biomes. We evaluated specific instances of disagreement between the simulated and observed biomes to determine whether the biome disagreement was produced by the climate model simulation (e.g., temperature bias), the vegetation model simulation (e.g., inability to simulate important disturbance regimes), the observed paleovegetation data (e.g., limits in the biomization method), or a combination of these factors. The results are summarized and we describe some of the strengths and limitations of this data-model comparison approach for evaluating paleoclimate simulations.

  13. Leaf optical system modeled as a stochastic process. [solar radiation interaction with terrestrial vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Garratt, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A stochastic leaf radiation model based upon physical and physiological properties of dicot leaves has been developed. The model accurately predicts the absorbed, reflected, and transmitted radiation of normal incidence as a function of wavelength resulting from the leaf-irradiance interaction over the spectral interval of 0.40-2.50 micron. The leaf optical system has been represented as Markov process with a unique transition matrix at each 0.01-micron increment between 0.40 micron and 2.50 micron. Probabilities are calculated at every wavelength interval from leaf thickness, structure, pigment composition, and water content. Simulation results indicate that this approach gives accurate estimations of actual measured values for dicot leaf absorption, reflection, and transmission as a function of wavelength.

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for bacterial decontamination and property improvement of fruit and vegetable processing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.; Shariff, Samir M. Al; Ouf, Salama A.; Benghanem, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet was tested for decontaminating and improving the characteristics of wastewater derived from blackberry, date palm, tomato and beetroot processing industries. The jet was generated by blowing argon gas through a cylindrical alumina tube while a high voltage was applied between two electrodes surrounding the tube. Oxygen gas was mixed with argon at the rate of 0.2% and the argon mass flow was fixed at 4.5 slm. Images show that the generated plasma jet penetrated the treated wastewater samples. Plasma emission spectra show the presence of O and OH radicals as well as excited molecular nitrogen and argon. Complete decontamination of wastewater derived from date palm and tomato processing was achieved after 120 and 150 s exposure to the plasma jet, respectively. The bacterial count of wastewater from blackberry and beetroot was reduced by 0.41 and 2.24 log10 colony-forming units (CFU) per ml, respectively, after 180 s. Escherichia coli was the most susceptible bacterial species to the cold plasma while Shigella boydii had the minimum susceptibility, recording 1.30 and 3.34 log10 CFU ml-1, respectively, as compared to the 7.00 log10 initial count. The chemical oxygen demands of wastewater were improved by 57.5-93.3% after 180 s exposure to the plasma jet being tested. The endotoxins in the wastewater were reduced by up to 90.22%. The variation in plasma effectiveness is probably related to the antioxidant concentration of the different investigated wastewaters.

  15. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-04-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forest and leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. To accurately quantify the role of fire in historical and current regional forest carbon balance using models, one needs to explicitly simulate the new forest cohort that is established after fire. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate boreal forest fire CO2 emissions and follow-up recovery after a stand-replacing fire, with representation of postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the following self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against three clusters of postfire forest chronosequence observations in Canada and Alaska. Evaluation variables for simulated postfire carbon dynamics include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index (LAI), and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). The model simulation results, when forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history on each chronosequence site, generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m-2 yr-1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m-2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m-2). We find that current postfire forest carbon sink on evaluation sites observed by chronosequence methods is mainly driven by historical atmospheric CO2 increase when forests recover from fire disturbance. Historical climate generally exerts a negative effect, probably due to increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increase without sufficient increase in precipitation. Our simulation results demonstrate that a global

  16. Combining self-affirmation with the extended parallel process model: the consequences for motivation to eat more fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Napper, Lucy E; Harris, Peter R; Klein, William M P

    2014-01-01

    There is potential for fruitful integration of research using the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) with research using Self-affirmation Theory. However, to date no studies have attempted to do this. This article reports an experiment that tests whether (a) the effects of a self-affirmation manipulation add to those of EPPM variables in predicting intentions to improve a health behavior and (b) self-affirmation moderates the relationship between EPPM variables and intentions. Participants (N = 80) were randomized to either a self-affirmation or control condition prior to receiving personally relevant health information about the risks of not eating at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day. A hierarchical regression model revealed that efficacy, threat × efficacy, self-affirmation, and self-affirmation × efficacy all uniquely contributed to the prediction of intentions to eat at least five portions per day. Self-affirmed participants and those with higher efficacy reported greater motivation to change. Threat predicted intentions at low levels of efficacy, but not at high levels. Efficacy had a stronger relationship with intentions in the nonaffirmed condition than in the self-affirmed condition. The findings indicate that self-affirmation processes can moderate the impact of variables in the EPPM and also add to the variance explained. We argue that there is potential for integration of the two traditions of research, to the benefit of both.

  17. Using UAVs and digital image processing to quantify areas of soil and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, A. A.; La Scalea, R. A.; Colturato, A. B.; Kawabata, C. L. O.; Furtado, E. L.; Castelo Branco, K. R. L. J.

    2015-09-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a very popular tool for remote sensing and crop monitoring. They are more easily deployed, cheaper and can obtain images with higher spatial-resolution than satellites. Some small, commercial UAVs can obtain images with spatial-resolution as low as 1.5cm per pixel. This opens up the range of possible remote sensing and monitoring applications. Moreover, they can cover large areas in very little time, such as 50 ha in about 20min, which makes UAVs the ideal tool for monitoring large farms and plantations. On the other hand, it is important to know precisely the area covered by farms in order to avoid invasion of other properties or preserved areas, and also to detect flaws in the plantation area. However, it is difficult to measure planted areas in some cases, such as Eucalyptus crops. Therefore, this paper aims to evaluate the use of UAV imagery for precise area measurement in Eucalyptus crops. We developed an image-processing algorithm to segment regions of soil, low biomass and high biomass and tested it on a Eucalyptus plantation in the city of Lenis Paulista -SP, Brazil. Results show that the area quantification is very accurate especially for bare soil regions and this method can be used to estimate areas in other scenarios.

  18. Basic discriminative and semantic processing in patients in the vegetative and minimally conscious state.

    PubMed

    Erlbeck, Helena; Real, Ruben G L; Kotchoubey, Boris; Mattia, Donatella; Bargak, Jakob; Kübler, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Patients who survive injuries to the brain following accidents or diseases often acquire a disorder of consciousness (DOC). Assessment of the state of consciousness in these patients is difficult since they are usually incapable of reproducible motor movements. The application of event-related potentials (ERP) recorded via EEG constitutes one promising approach to complement the assessment of cognitive functions in DOC patients. For these assessments, a hierarchical approach was suggested which means that paradigms aiming at higher order ERPs are only presented if early responses were found. In this study, 19 behaviorally unresponsive or low-responsive DOC patients were presented with three auditory paradigms using passive instructions. The paradigms aimed at eliciting the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) and N400 and were applied at two time points. One oddball paradigm (MMN) and two semantic paradigms (word-pairs: N400 Words; sentences: N400 Sentences) were included. The majority of patients (n=15) did not show any response to the stimulation. In the MMN paradigm, an MMN was identified in two patients, in the N400 Words paradigm, only an N1 was identified in one patient, and in the N400 Sentences paradigm, a late positive complex (LPC) was identified in two patients. These data contradict the hierarchical approach since the LPC was identified in patients who did not exhibit an MMN. They further support the notion that even higher information processing as addressed with the N400 paradigms is preserved in a minority of DOC patients. Thus, in this sample, around 10% of the DOC patients exhibited indicators of preserved consciousness.

  19. New Bio-Ceramization Processes Applied to Vegetable Hierarchical Structures for Bone Regeneration: An Experimental Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs. PMID:24099033

  20. Benchmarking of two terrestrial ecosystem models using a parsimonious set of tests for carbon processes and vegetation phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmonech, D.; Zaehle, S.

    2010-12-01

    A large proportion of the uncertainty in coupled carbon-cycle climate models stems from uncertainty in the climate response of the terrestrial biosphere. Evaluation of terrestrial biosphere models (TEMs) coupled to climate models is therefore an important task to gain confidence in the predictive capability of these coupled models in response to climate change. Starting from recent works of global model benchmarks initiatives (Randerson et al. 2009, Cadule et al.2010), the present work address the definition of novel tests and quantitative performance measures to discriminate the capability of models to reproduce some observed pattern of carbon cycle as response to climate changes in the last two decades. Observed atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and remote sensing data on vegetation greenness as were used valuable and precise benchmark to test and evaluate the performance of two models (JSBACH and O-CN) in terms of carbon processes and C exchange with the atmosphere at global spatial scales and on different temporal scales. A set of atmospheric carbon dioxide traits and phenological parameters to be tested and statistical evaluation of model results are defined. In particular, metrics are addressed to detect the capability of the models to reproduce the salient features of the observed processes at seasonal and decadal time scales and along biogeographical gradients. Benchmarking results of model performance are summarized in order to provide an objective and robust measure of ecosystem terrestrial model performance with the goal of facilitating a more direct comparison between models and the identification of structural modelweaknesses. The study highlights the importance to evaluate a wide spectrum of processes but with the need for the individuation of a subset of standard metrics. Ref. Randerson J.T. et al. Systematic assessment of terrestrial biogeochemistry in coupled climate-carbon models. Global Change Biology vol 15, 2009. Cadule et al

  1. An integrated modelling framework of catchment-scale ecohydrological processes: 2. The role of water subsidy by overland flow on vegetation dynamics in a semi-arid catchment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In water-limited regions, surface water and carbon fluxes are strongly controlled by soil water availability, which may be highly variable at very small spatial scales (e.g. metres) because of variations in terrain, soils, and vegetation conditions and to processes of water redistribution along hill...

  2. Effect of inoculating flower stalks and vegetable waste with ligno-cellulolytic microorganisms on the composting process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Tao; Nie, Yong-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Huang, De-Yang; Qiu, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Jin-Chun

    2004-01-01

    A lab-scale composting experiment was carried out using vegetable and flower stalks waste to study the effectiveness of ligno-cellulolytic microorganisms (LCMs) obtained from the previous isolation on composting process, especially on enhancement of biodegradation rate of these organic materials. The addition of LCMs to compost showed promised to be a valuable asset by rendering timely benefits in efficiency, maturity, and quality of the composting. This was evidenced by a significant increase of temperature, O2 consumption and CO2 emission, and population density of LCMs in compost mass compared with that of biotic (addition of culture of horse feces) and abiotic (1% molasses amendment) treatments, as well as control trial. The phytotoxicity assay showed that the substrate became mature after 60 days' composting. The LCMs inoculation enhanced the biodegradation of the composting materials as evidenced by an increasing screening ratio (1.2 cm sieve pore) of 34.5% in the treated trail, compared with that of control, which elucidated that big advantage of adding selected inoculants over other treatment, and screening ratio is a reasonable index to compare the quality of different compost. However, the inoculation seemed to have no significant effect on the moisture content, pH, and the final organic carbon of the composting materials.

  3. Responses of eastern Chinese coastal salt marshes to sea-level rise combined with vegetative and sedimentary processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Wang, Heng; Cao, Hao-Bin; Zhao, Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Peltola, Heli; Cui, Li-Fang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Li-Quan

    2016-06-23

    The impacts of sea-level rise (SLR) on coastal ecosystems have attracted worldwide attention in relation to global change. In this study, the salt marsh model for the Yangtze Estuary (SMM-YE, developed in China) and the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, developed in the U.S.) were used to simulate the effects of SLR on the coastal salt marshes in eastern China. The changes in the dominant species in the plant community were also considered. Predictions based on the SLAMM indicated a trend of habitat degradation up to 2100; total salt marsh habitat area continued to decline (4-16%) based on the low-level scenario, with greater losses (6-25%) predicted under the high-level scenario. The SMM-YE showed that the salt marshes could be resilient to threats of SLR through the processes of accretion of mudflats, vegetation expansion and sediment trapping by plants. This model predicted that salt marsh areas increased (3-6%) under the low-level scenario. The decrease in the total habitat area with the SMM-YE under the high-level scenario was much lower than the SLAMM prediction. Nevertheless, SLR might negatively affect the salt marsh species that are not adapted to prolonged inundation. An adaptive strategy for responding to changes in sediment resources is necessary in the Yangtze Estuary.

  4. Responses of eastern Chinese coastal salt marshes to sea-level rise combined with vegetative and sedimentary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Wang, Heng; Cao, Hao-Bin; Zhao, Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Peltola, Heli; Cui, Li-Fang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Li-Quan

    2016-06-01

    The impacts of sea-level rise (SLR) on coastal ecosystems have attracted worldwide attention in relation to global change. In this study, the salt marsh model for the Yangtze Estuary (SMM-YE, developed in China) and the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, developed in the U.S.) were used to simulate the effects of SLR on the coastal salt marshes in eastern China. The changes in the dominant species in the plant community were also considered. Predictions based on the SLAMM indicated a trend of habitat degradation up to 2100; total salt marsh habitat area continued to decline (4–16%) based on the low-level scenario, with greater losses (6–25%) predicted under the high-level scenario. The SMM-YE showed that the salt marshes could be resilient to threats of SLR through the processes of accretion of mudflats, vegetation expansion and sediment trapping by plants. This model predicted that salt marsh areas increased (3–6%) under the low-level scenario. The decrease in the total habitat area with the SMM-YE under the high-level scenario was much lower than the SLAMM prediction. Nevertheless, SLR might negatively affect the salt marsh species that are not adapted to prolonged inundation. An adaptive strategy for responding to changes in sediment resources is necessary in the Yangtze Estuary.

  5. Responses of eastern Chinese coastal salt marshes to sea-level rise combined with vegetative and sedimentary processes

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Wang, Heng; Cao, Hao-Bin; Zhao, Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Peltola, Heli; Cui, Li-Fang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Li-Quan

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of sea-level rise (SLR) on coastal ecosystems have attracted worldwide attention in relation to global change. In this study, the salt marsh model for the Yangtze Estuary (SMM-YE, developed in China) and the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, developed in the U.S.) were used to simulate the effects of SLR on the coastal salt marshes in eastern China. The changes in the dominant species in the plant community were also considered. Predictions based on the SLAMM indicated a trend of habitat degradation up to 2100; total salt marsh habitat area continued to decline (4–16%) based on the low-level scenario, with greater losses (6–25%) predicted under the high-level scenario. The SMM-YE showed that the salt marshes could be resilient to threats of SLR through the processes of accretion of mudflats, vegetation expansion and sediment trapping by plants. This model predicted that salt marsh areas increased (3–6%) under the low-level scenario. The decrease in the total habitat area with the SMM-YE under the high-level scenario was much lower than the SLAMM prediction. Nevertheless, SLR might negatively affect the salt marsh species that are not adapted to prolonged inundation. An adaptive strategy for responding to changes in sediment resources is necessary in the Yangtze Estuary. PMID:27334452

  6. Parent material, vegetation or slope position - which soil-forming factor controls the intensity of podzolization process in the soils of the Sudety Mountains montane zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musielok, Łukasz

    2016-04-01

    Climatic conditions, parent material and vegetation type are considered to be the main soil-forming factors controlling podzolization process advancement. Moreover, in hilly and mountainous areas properties of soils that are undergoing podzolization process are influenced significantly by its location on a slope, due to lateral translocation of soil solutions. The Sudety Mts. are a medium-high mountain range characterized by geological mosaic with many different sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks, mostly poor in alkali elements. Most of the Sudety Mts. area lies in a lower montane zone, where the dominant natural vegetation were temperate mixed and deciduous forests. However, since 18th century natural vegetation was significantly transformed by widespread introduction of spruce monocultures. These distinguishing features of the Sudety Mts. natural environment are considered to be responsible for prevalence of podzolized soil in this area, however the intensity of podzolization process is very differentiated. The aim of presented research was to determine the influence of varying parent material, different vegetation types and different slope positions the on the soil properties variability, and thus, to answer the question which of the analyzed soil-forming factors is controlling the podzolization process advancement in the Sudety Mountains montane zone? Data from A, E, Bs and C horizons of 16 soil profiles developed from different parent materials (granite, sandstone, andesites and mica schists), located under various types of vegetation (spruce and beech forests) and in different slope positions (upper, middle and lower parts of the slopes) were taken into the analysis. All analyzed soil profiles were located in lower montane zone between 550 and 950 m a. s. l. to avoid the influence of varying climatic conditions. One-way ANOVA and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were used to analyze differentiation of soil texture, pH, organic carbon and nitrogen

  7. Morphological and photosynthetic variations in the process of spermatia formation from vegetative cells in Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) and their responses to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Ling; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Song-Dong; Wang, Guang-Ce; He, Lin-Wen; Pan, Guang-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Porphyra yezoensis has a macroscopic foliage gametophyte phase with only a single cell layer, and is ideally suited for the study of the sexual differentiation process, from the vegetative cell to the spermatia. Firstly, we compared variations in the responses of the vegetative and male sectors to desiccation. Later, cell tracking experiments were carried out during the formation of spermatia from vegetative cells. The two sectors showed similar tolerance to desiccation, and the formation of spermatia from vegetative cells was independent of the degree of desiccation. Both light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of the differentiation process showed that the formation of spermatia could be divided into six phases: the one-cell, two-cell, four-cell, eight-cell, pre-release and spermatia phases. Photomicrographs of Fluorescent Brightener staining showed that the released spermatia had no cell walls. Photosynthetic data showed that there was a significant rise in Y(II) in the four-cell phase, indicating an increase in photosynthetic efficiency of PSII during this phase. We propose that this photosynthetic rise may be substantial and provide the increased energy needed for the formation and release of spermatia in P. yezoensis.

  8. ChSte7 Is Required for Vegetative Growth and Various Plant Infection Processes in Colletotrichum higginsianum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meijuan; Yan, Yaqin; Gu, Qiongnan; Huang, Junbin

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an important hemibiotrophic phytopathogen that causes crucifer anthracnose in various regions of the world. In many plant-pathogenic fungi, the Ste11-Ste7-Fus3/Kss1 kinase pathway is essential to pathogenicity and various plant infection processes. To date, the role of ChSte7 in C. higginsianum encoding a MEK orthologue of Ste7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has not been elucidated. In this report, we investigated the function of ChSte7 in the pathogen. The ChSte7 is predicted to encode a 522-amino-acid protein with a S_TKc conserved domain that shares 44% identity with Ste7 in S. cerevisiae. ChSte7 disruption mutants showed white colonies with irregularly shaped edges and extremely decreased growth rates and biomass productions. The ChSte7 disruption mutants did not form appressoria and showed defects in pathogenicity on leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. When inoculated onto wounded leaf tissues, the ChSte7 disruption mutants grew only on the surface of host tissues but failed to cause lesions beyond the wound site. In contrast, both the wild-type and complementation strains showed normal morphology, produced appressoria, and caused necrosis on leaves of Arabidopsis. Analysis with qRT-PCR suggested that ChSte7 was highly expressed during the late stages of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ChSte7 is involved in regulation of vegetative growth, appressorial formation of C. higginsianum, and postinvasive growth in host tissues. PMID:27563675

  9. The fire effect on Cerrado: Analysis of the erosive process associated with native vegetation by the use of experimental plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Yasmmin; Rodrigues, Sílvio

    2015-04-01

    In Brazil vast areas of vegetation are devastated each year by the use of fire that recorded more than 200,000 hotspots annually. In this context, the state of Minas Gerais appears first in the number of fires and burned areas due to its long stretch of reforested area in an environment where a prolonged dry season contributes to the occurrence and spread of fire in the Cerrado vegetation. This research consists of a comparative study through the controlled application of fire under different conditions of natural vegetation of the focusing on the change in rates of runoff, sediment production and vegetation density in order to evaluate the influence of burning related to soil erosion. The area of study is located in Uberlândia at an altitude of 850 meters above sea level and in the respective geographic coordinates 18°56'56"S and 48°12'21"W that composes the watershed of Glória stream. The climate is characterized by dry winters and rainy summer. On this area five experimental plots was established from the specific characteristic of its vegetation cover, slope and drainage, thus differentiated: well drained soil with the presence of a dense grass (plot A), well drained soil with the presence of shrub and grasses (plot B), poorly drained with a non-dense grass (plot C), well drained soil with grass (plot D), and well drained with grasses and tree cover(plot E). The plots have 1m2 that is connected with a trough collector that concentrate the water flow generated by runoff with a 30 liter gallon that was weekly measured. The data relating to runoff and sediment yield were obtained from the collection of water derived from water stored in gallons, in which first was homogenized, measured quantity and collected 1 liter of water to be filtrated in the laboratory. The analysis method of vegetation density was performed based on the methodology proposed by Pinese Junior, Cruz and Rodrigues (2008), using the software ENVI 4.3 to interpret and quantify the image

  10. Modelling vegetated dune landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, A. C. W.; Nield, J. M.

    2007-03-01

    This letter presents a self-organising cellular automaton model capable of simulating the evolution of vegetated dunes with multiple types of plant response in the environment. It can successfully replicate hairpin, or long-walled, parabolic dunes with trailing ridges as well as nebkha dunes with distinctive deposition tails. Quantification of simulated landscapes with eco-geomorphic state variables and subsequent cluster analysis and PCA yields a phase diagram of different types of coastal dunes developing from blow-outs as a function of vegetation vitality. This diagram indicates the potential sensitivity of dormant dune fields to reactivation under declining vegetation vitality, e.g. due to climatic changes. Nebkha simulations with different grid resolutions demonstrate that the interaction between the (abiotic) geomorphic processes and the biological vegetation component (life) introduces a characteristic length scale on the resultant landforms that breaks the typical self-similar scaling of (un-vegetated) bare-sand dunes.

  11. Site specific diel methane emission mechanisms in landfills: A field validated process based on vegetation and climate factors.

    PubMed

    Xin, Danhui; Hao, Yongxia; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Chai, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    Diel methane emission fluxes from a landfill that was covered by vegetation were investigated to reveal the methane emission mechanisms based on the interaction of vegetation characteristics and climate factors. The methane emissions showed large variation between daytime and nighttime, and the trend of methane emissions exhibited clear bimodal patterns from both Setaria viridis- and Neyraudia reynaudiana-covered areas. Plants play an important role in methane transportation as well as methane oxidation. The notable decrease in methane emissions after plants were cut suggests that methane transportation via plants is the primary way of methane emissions in the vegetated areas of landfill. Within plants, the methane emission fluxes were enhanced due to a convection mechanism. Given that the methane emission flux is highly correlated with the solar radiation during daytime, the convection mechanism could be attributed to the increase in solar radiation. Whereas the methane emission flux is affected by a combined impact of the wind speed and pedosphere characteristics during nighttime. An improved understanding of the methane emission mechanisms in vegetated landfills is expected to develop a reliable model for landfill methane emissions and to attenuate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills.

  12. Dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett’s esophagus risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Pu, Zhongshu; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Pengfei; Hao, Yiming; Wang, Qian; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qingchuan

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between dietary fruit, vegetable, fat, and red and processed meat intakes and Barrett’s esophagus (BE) risk remain inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence on these issues. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published from inception through October 2015. A total of eight studies were included in this analysis. Fruit intake was not associated with BE risk (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.37–1.13), but vegetable intake was strongly associated with BE risk (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.29–0.71). Saturated fat, red meat and processed meat intakes were not associated with BE risk with OR = 1.25 (95% CI = 0.82–1.91), OR = 0.85 (95% CI = 0.61–1.17) and OR = 1.03 (95% CI = 0.73–1.46), respectively. Dietary vegetable not fruits intake may be associated with decreased BE risk. Fat and red and processed meat intakes may not contribute to an increased BE risk. Well-designed, large prospective studies with better established dose-response relationships are needed to further validate these issues. PMID:27256629

  13. Climate Extremes, Vegetation Change, and Decoupling of Interactive Fire-Grazing Processes Exacerbate Fly Parasitism of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Scasta, John D; Talley, Justin L; Engle, David M; Debinski, Diane M

    2017-02-17

    We assessed local horn fly (Haematobia irritans L.) and face fly (Musca autumnalis De Geer) communities on cattle in 2012 and 2013 relative to vegetation and climate data to understand how parasitism of cattle is influenced by change in climate and vegetation structure. We compared heterogeneity management using spatially and temporally discrete fires (i.e., patch-burning one-third of a pasture annually) to homogeneity management (i.e., burning entire pasture in 2012 then no burning in 2013), with cattle grazing all years in both treatments. Predicted emergence of horn flies and face flies was 24 and 34 d earlier in 2012 associated with earlier spring warming, a significant deviation from the five-year mean. Intraannual horn fly dynamics were explained by concurrent high ambient air temperature the day of observations, but face flies were explained by low ambient air temperatures and dry conditions 3 wk before observations. Importance values of information for the theoretic models including fire treatments ranged from 0.89 to 1, indicating that both horn flies and face flies are sensitive to habitat alterations and fire-driven animal movements. Ordination indicates herds on unburned pastures were dissimilar to herds on pastures burned with patchy fires or pastures burned completely and species-specific fly responses to different vegetation structure metrics. For example, horn flies were correlated with vegetation visual obstruction, and face flies were correlated with woody plant cover. Vegetation structure may be as important as climate in driving the dynamics of fly parasites of cattle.

  14. Headspace components that discriminate between thermal and high pressure high temperature treated green vegetables: identification and linkage to possible process-induced chemical changes.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Tabilo-Munizaga, Gipsy; Palmers, Stijn; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    For the first time in literature, this study compares the process-induced chemical reactions in three industrially relevant green vegetables: broccoli, green pepper and spinach treated with thermal and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing. Aiming for a fair comparison, the processing conditions were selected based on the principle of equivalence. A comprehensive integration of MS-based metabolic fingerprinting techniques, advanced data preprocessing and statistical data analysis has been implemented as untargeted/unbiased multiresponse screening tool to uncover changes in the volatile fraction. For all vegetables, thermal processing, compared to HPHT, seems to enhance Maillard and Strecker degradation reaction, triggering the formation of furanic compounds and Strecker aldehydes. In most cases, high pressure seems to accelerate (an)aerobic thermal degradation of unsaturated fatty acids leading to the formation of aliphatic aldehydes and ketones. In addition, both thermal and HPHT processing accelerated the formation of sulfur-containing compounds. This work demonstrated that the approach is effective in identifying and comparing different process-induced chemical changes, adding depth to our perspective in terms of studying a highly complex chemical changes occurring during food processing.

  15. Studies of modern pollen assemblages for pollen dispersal- deposition- preservation process understanding and for pollen-based reconstructions of past vegetation, climate, and human impact: A review based on case studies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qinghai; Zhang, Shengrui; Gaillard, Marie-jose; Li, Manyue; Cao, Xianyong; Tian, Fang; Li, Furong

    2016-10-01

    Fossil pollen, as a direct proxy record of past vegetation, and indirect proxy record of past climate, plays an essential role in revealing and reconstructing past vegetation and climate. However, relationships between pollen, vegetation and climate are not linear, hence quantitative reconstructions of past vegetation and climate based on pollen records are not straightforward, and results may be highly contradictory and difficult to interpret. One of the main causes of discrepancies between results has been the lack of comprehensive and systematical studies on modern pollen dispersal and deposition processes, particularly on the quantification of these processes. Based on empirical studies performed in China over the last 30 years, this paper provides the state-of-the-art of the understanding of pollen dispersal and deposition processes in China and the remaining questions to be investigated. We show that major progress has been achieved in the study of modern pollen dispersal and deposition processes, and in the application of models of the pollen-vegetation-climate relationships for quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation and climate. However, several issues are not entirely solved or understood yet, such as how to quantify the reworking and re-deposition of pollen grains in quaternary alluvial sediments, the influence of pollen preservation on pollen assemblages, and human impact on vegetation. Even so, the progress made during the last decades makes it possible to achieve significantly more precise and informative reconstructions of past vegetation, land-use and climate in China than was possible earlier.

  16. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    PubMed

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  17. Vegetable Oil-Biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Pudel, Frank; Wiesen, Sebastian

    2017-03-07

    Conventional vegetable oil mills are complex plants, processing oil, fruits, or seeds to vegetable fats and oils of high quality and predefined properties. Nearly all by-products are used. However, most of the high valuable plant substances occurring in oil fruits or seeds besides the oil are used only in low price applications (proteins as animal feeding material) or not at all (e.g., phenolics). This chapter describes the state-of-the-art of extraction and use of oilseed/oil fruit proteins and phyto-nutrients in order to move from a conventional vegetable oil processing plant to a proper vegetable oil-biorefinery producing a wide range of different high value bio-based products.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy combined with image processing technique: Microstructure and texture analysis of legumes and vegetables for instant meal.

    PubMed

    Pieniazek, Facundo; Messina, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Development and innovation of new technologies are necessary especially in food quality; due that most instrumental technique for measuring quality properties involves a considerable amount of manual work. Image analysis is a technique that allows to provide objective evaluations from digitalized images that can estimate quality parameters for consumer's acceptance. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of freeze drying on the microstructure and texture of legume and vegetables using scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' combined with image analysis. Cooked and cooked freeze dried rehydrated legumes and vegetables were analyzed individually by scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' (250, 500, and 1000×).Texture properties were analyzed by texture analyzer and image analysis. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were obtained for image and instrumental texture parameters. A linear trend with a linear correlation was applied for instrumental and image features. Results showed that image features calculated from Grey level co-occurrence matrix at 1,000× had high correlations with instrumental features. In rice, homogeneity and contrast can be applied to evaluate texture parameters gumminess and adhesiviness; Lentils: contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and entropy for hardness, adhesiviness, gumminess, and chewiness; Potato and carrots: contrast, energy, homogeneity and entropy for adhesiviness, chewiness, hardness, cohesiviness, and resilence. Results revealed that combing scanning electron microscopy with image analysis can be a useful tool to analyze quality parameters in legumes and vegetables.

  19. Neuronal Adaptive Mechanisms Underlying Intelligent Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Simposio: "Aplicacao de venenos das serpentes em Problemas de Farmacologia e Bioquimica cellular". Ribeirao Preto S.P. Brazil. AJ PAGE 33 Allon, N. and... bined by means of a function 12 to obtain the value, i. The problems to be resolved ate: 1. How can arrays of this sort be organized to permit a

  20. Microbial consortium role in processing liquid waste of vegetables in Keputran Market Surabaya as organic liquid fertilizer ferti-plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizqi, Fauziah; Supriyanto, Agus; Lestari, Intan; Lita Indri D., L.; Elmi Irmayanti, A.; Rahmaniyah, Fadilatur

    2016-03-01

    Many activities in this market is directly proportional to increase production of vegetables waste, especially surabaya. Therefore, in this study aims to utilize liquid waste of vegetables into liquid organic fertilizer by mixing microbial consorsium. The microbial consorsium consist of Azotobacter chrococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Ttreatment of microbial concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%) and the length of the incubation period (7 days, 14 days, 21 days) used in this research. The parameters used are: C/N ratio, levels of CNP, and BOD value. This study uses a standard organic fertilizer value according SNI19-7030-2004, The results show the value of C/N ratio comply with the ISO standards. C levels showed an increase during the incubation period but not compare with standards. N levels that compare with standards are microbial treatment in all group concentration except control group with an incubation period of 21 days is > 7. P levels compare with the existing standards in the group of microbe concentration of 10% and 15% during the incubation period. The value of the initial BOD liquid waste of vegetable is 790.25 mg / L, this value indicates that the waste should not go into the water body. Accordingly, the results of this study can not be used as a liquid organic fertilizer, but potentially if it is used as a natural career or build natural soil. The Building natural soil is defined as the natural ingredients that can be used to improve soil properties.

  1. A demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major vegetative classes identified by the remote sensing technique were cypress swamp, pine, wetland grasses, salt grass, mixed mangrove, black mangrove, Brazilian pepper. Australian pine and melaleuca were not satisfactorily classified from LANDSAT. Aircraft scanners provided better resolution resulting in a classification of finer surface detail. An edge effect, created by the integration of diverse spectral responses within boundary elements of digital data, affected the wetlands classification. Accuracy classification for aircraft was 68% and for LANDSAT was 74%.

  2. Quantification of Listeria monocytogenes in minimally processed leafy vegetables using a combined method based on enrichment and 16S rRNA real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Aparecida de Oliveira, Maria; Abeid Ribeiro, Eliana Guimarães; Morato Bergamini, Alzira Maria; Pereira De Martinis, Elaine Cristina

    2010-02-01

    Modern lifestyle markedly changed eating habits worldwide, with an increasing demand for ready-to-eat foods, such as minimally processed fruits and leafy greens. Packaging and storage conditions of those products may favor the growth of psychrotrophic bacteria, including the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In this work, minimally processed leafy vegetables samples (n = 162) from retail market from Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, were tested for the presence or absence of Listeria spp. by the immunoassay Listeria Rapid Test, Oxoid. Two L. monocytogenes positive and six artificially contaminated samples of minimally processed leafy vegetables were evaluated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) with detection by classical culture method and also culture method combined with real-time PCR (RTi-PCR) for 16S rRNA genes of L. monocytogenes. Positive MPN enrichment tubes were analyzed by RTi-PCR with primers specific for L. monocytogenes using the commercial preparation ABSOLUTE QPCR SYBR Green Mix (ABgene, UK). Real-time PCR assay presented good exclusivity and inclusivity results and no statistical significant difference was found in comparison with the conventional culture method (p < 0.05). Moreover, RTi-PCR was fast and easy to perform, with MPN results obtained in ca. 48 h for RTi-PCR in comparison to 7 days for conventional method.

  3. Implementation of a ground truth process for development of a submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) mapping protocol using hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carlton R.; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Virnstein, Robert W.

    2006-09-01

    Protocol development for science based mapping of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) requires comprehensive ground truth data describing the full range of variability observed in the target. The Indian River Lagoon, Florida, extends along 250 km of the east central Florida coast adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean. The lagoon crosses the transition zone between the Caribbean and Carolinian zoogeographic provinces making it highly diverse. For large scale mapping and management of SAV four common and three uncommon species of seagrass (Tracheophyta) and three broad groups of macroalgae; red algae (Rhodophyta), green algae (Chlorophyta), and brown algae (Phaeophyta) are recognized. Based on technical and cost limitations we established twenty, 7-10 km long flight transects for collection of 1.2 m2 spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery covering the length of the lagoon. Emphasis was placed on the area near the Sebastian River and adjacent Sebastian Inlet. Twenty six 40 m long ground truth transects were established in the lagoon using 1 m2 white panels to mark each transect end. Each transect target was located in the field using high precision GPS. Transects were positioned to cover a range of depths, SAV densities, mixed and monotypic species beds, water quality conditions and general sediment types. A 3 m wide by 30 m long grid was centered on each transect to avoid spectral influences of the white targets. Water depth, species of seagrasses, estimates of vegetation cover percentage, estimates of epiphytic density, and measured canopy height were made for each 1 m2 (n=90). This target based grid arrangement allows for identification and extraction of pixel based hyperspectral signatures corresponding to individual ground truth grid cells without significant concern for rectification and registration error.

  4. Treatment of vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Bessler, T.R.

    1986-05-13

    A process is described for preparing an injectable vegetable oil selected from the group consisting of soybean oil and sunflower oil and mixtures thereof which comprise: (a) first treating the vegetable oil at a temperature of 80/sup 0/C to about 130/sup 0/C with an acid clay; (b) deodorizing the vegetable oil with steam at a temperature of 220/sup 0/C to about 280/sup 0/C and applying a vacuum to remove volatilized components; (c) treating the deodorized vegetable oil, at a temperature of from about 10/sup 0/C to about 60/sup 0/C, with an acid clay to reduce the content of a member selected from the group consisting of diglycerides, tocopherol components, and trilinolenin and mixtures thereof, wherein the acid clay is added in a weight ratio to the deoderized vegetable oil of from about 1:99 to about 1:1; and (d) thereafter conducting a particulate filtration to remove a substantial portion of the acid clay from the vegetable oil, wherein the filtration is accomplished with filters having a pore size of from about 0.1 to 0.45 microns, thereby obtaining the injectable oil.

  5. Novel simple process for tocopherols selective recovery from vegetable oils by adsorption and desorption with an anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Kousuke; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2016-03-01

    A novel and simple low-temperature process was used to recover tocopherols from a deodorizer distillate, which is a by-product of edible oil refining. The process consists of three operations: the esterification of free fatty acids with a cation-exchange resin catalyst, the adsorption of tocopherols onto an anion-exchange resin, and tocopherol desorption from the resin. No degradation of tocopherols occurred during these processes. In the tocopherol-rich fraction, no impurities such as sterols or glycerides were present. These impurities are commonly found in the product of the conventional process. This novel process improves the overall recovery ratio and the mass fraction of the product (75.9% and 51.0wt%) compared with those in the conventional process (50% and 35wt%).

  6. Bacterial communities and enzymatic activities in the vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP) and related advantages by comparison with conventional constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Sun, Feiyun; Zhao, Ke; Du, Changhang; Shao, Yunxian

    2016-11-01

    A new-developed vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP) was implemented for decentralized domestic wastewater treatment, and studied in lab-scale and full-scale. The main purpose of this work was the investigation of biomass activities and microbial communities in V-ASP by comparison with conventional constructed wetland (CW), to unveil the causations of its consistently higher pollutants removal efficiencies. Compared with CWs, V-ASP has greater vegetation nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates, higher biomass and enzymatic activities, and more bacteria community diversity. The microbial community structure was comprehensively analyzed by using high-throughput sequencing. It was observed that Proteobacteria was dominated in both CWs and V-ASPs, while their subdivisions distribution was rather different. V-ASPs contained a higher nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrospira) abundances that resulted in a consistently better nitrogen removal efficiency. Hence, a long-term experiment of full-scale V-ASP displayed stably excellent capability in resistance of influent loading shocks and seasonal temperature effect.

  7. On the potential vegetation feedbacks that enhance phosphorus availability - insights from a process-based model linking geological and ecological time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendíia, C.; Arens, S.; Hickler, T.; Higgins, S. I.; Porada, P.; Kleidon, A.

    2013-12-01

    In old and heavily weathered soils, the availability of P might be so small that the primary production of plants is limited. However, plants have evolved several mechanisms to actively take up P from the soil or mine it to overcome this limitation. These mechanisms involve the active uptake of P mediated by mycorrhiza, biotic de-occlusion through root clusters, and the biotic enhancement of weathering through root exudation. The objective of this paper is to investigate how and where these processes contribute to alleviate P limitation on primary productivity. To do so, we propose a process-based model accounting for the major processes of the carbon, water, and P cycle including chemical weathering at the global scale. We use simulation experiments to assess the relative importance of the different uptake mechanisms to alleviate P limitation on biomass production. Implementing P limitation on biomass synthesis allows the assessment of the efficiencies of biomass production across different ecosystems. We find that active P-uptake is an essential mechanism for sustaining P availability on long time scales, whereas biotic de-occlusion might serve as a buffer on time scales shorter than 10 000 yr. Although active P uptake is essential for reducing P losses by leaching, humid lowland soils reach P limitation after around 100 000 yr of soil evolution. Given the generalized modeling framework, our model results compare reasonably with observed or independently estimated patterns and ranges of P concentrations in soils and vegetation. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that P limitation might be an important driver of biomass production efficiency (the fraction of the gross primary productivity used for biomass growth), and that vegetation on older soils becomes P-limited leading to a smaller biomass production efficiency. With this study, we provide a theoretical basis for investigating the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to P availability linking geological and

  8. On the potential vegetation feedbacks that enhance phosphorus availability - insights from a process-based model linking geological and ecological timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, C.; Arens, S.; Hickler, T.; Higgins, S. I.; Porada, P.; Kleidon, A.

    2014-07-01

    In old and heavily weathered soils, the availability of P might be so small that the primary production of plants is limited. However, plants have evolved several mechanisms to actively take up P from the soil or mine it to overcome this limitation. These mechanisms involve the active uptake of P mediated by mycorrhiza, biotic de-occlusion through root clusters, and the biotic enhancement of weathering through root exudation. The objective of this paper is to investigate how and where these processes contribute to alleviate P limitation on primary productivity. To do so, we propose a process-based model accounting for the major processes of the carbon, water, and P cycles including chemical weathering at the global scale. Implementing P limitation on biomass synthesis allows the assessment of the efficiencies of biomass production across different ecosystems. We use simulation experiments to assess the relative importance of the different uptake mechanisms to alleviate P limitation on biomass production. We find that active P uptake is an essential mechanism for sustaining P availability on long timescales, whereas biotic de-occlusion might serve as a buffer on timescales shorter than 10 000 yr. Although active P uptake is essential for reducing P losses by leaching, humid lowland soils reach P limitation after around 100 000 yr of soil evolution. Given the generalized modelling framework, our model results compare reasonably with observed or independently estimated patterns and ranges of P concentrations in soils and vegetation. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that P limitation might be an important driver of biomass production efficiency (the fraction of the gross primary productivity used for biomass growth), and that vegetation on old soils has a smaller biomass production rate when P becomes limiting. With this study, we provide a theoretical basis for investigating the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to P availability linking geological and

  9. Biotic and abiotic processes of eastside ecosystems: The effects of management on plant and community ecology, and on stand and landscape vegetation dynamics. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.G.; Clausnitzer, R.R.; Mehringer, P.J.; Oilver, C.D.

    1994-02-01

    Paleo-vegetation studies have shown that vegetation has changed in composition and extent in the intermountain Pacific Northwest over the past 20,000 years. Today, both natural and human-induced disturbances have long-term influence on the structure and composition of eastside vegetation. Disturbance may enhance landscape diversity, therefore, the scale of modifying events and activities needs to shift from species and stand to the landscape level. Knowledge of plant succession is the foundation of a sound vegetation management program where the primary goal is to retard, arrest, or accelerate the natural forces of vegetation change.

  10. Applying process mapping and analysis as a quality improvement strategy to increase the adoption of fruit, vegetable, and water breaks in Australian primary schools.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Janice S; Farrell, Louise; Lawrence, Glenda; Johnson, Julie K

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decade, public health policy in Australia has prioritized the prevention and control of obesity and invested in programs that promote healthy eating-related behaviors, which includes increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children. This article reports on a study that used process mapping and analysis as a quality improvement strategy to improve the delivery of a nutrition primary prevention program delivered in primary schools in New South Wales, Australia. Crunch&Sip® has been delivered since 2008. To date, adoption is low with only 25% of schools implementing the program. We investigated the cause of low adoption and propose actions to increase school participation. We conducted semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and analyzed the process of delivering Crunch&Sip to schools. Interviews and process mapping and analysis identified a number of barriers to schools adopting the program. The analyses identified the need to simplify and streamline the process of delivering the program to schools and introduce monitoring and feedback loops to track ongoing participation. The combination of stakeholder interviews and process mapping and analysis provided important practical solutions to improving program delivery and also contributed to building an understanding of factors that help and hinder program adoption. The insight provided by this analysis helped identify usable routine measures of adoption, which were an improvement over those used in the existing program plan. This study contributed toward improving the quality and efficiency of delivering a health promoting program to work toward achieving healthy eating behaviors in children.

  11. Application of satellite data and LARS's data processing techniques to mapping vegetation of the Dismal Swamp. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messmore, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using digital satellite imagery and automatic data processing techniques as a means of mapping swamp forest vegetation was considered, using multispectral scanner data acquired by the LANDSAT-1 satellite. The site for this investigation was the Dismal Swamp, a 210,000 acre swamp forest located south of Suffolk, Va. on the Virginia-North Carolina border. Two basic classification strategies were employed. The initial classification utilized unsupervised techniques which produced a map of the swamp indicating the distribution of thirteen forest spectral classes. These classes were later combined into three informational categories: Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides), Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), and deciduous forest. The subsequent classification employed supervised techniques which mapped Atlantic white cedar, Loblolly pine, deciduous forest, water and agriculture within the study site. A classification accuracy of 82.5% was produced by unsupervised techniques compared with 89% accuracy using supervised techniques.

  12. Experimental scale and dimensionality requirements for reproducing and studying coupled land-atmosphere-vegetative processes in the intermediate scale laboratory settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, Andrew; Illangasekare, Tissa; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Helmig, Rainer; Heck, Katharina

    2016-04-01

    Past investigations of coupled land-atmosphere-vegetative processes have been constrained to two extremes, small laboratory bench-scale and field scale testing. In recognition of the limitations of studying the scale-dependency of these fundamental processes at either extreme, researchers have recently begun to promote the use of experimentation at intermediary scales between the bench and field scales. A requirement for employing intermediate scale testing to refine heat and mass transport theory regarding land-atmosphere-vegetative processes is high spatial-temporal resolution datasets generated under carefully controlled experimental conditions in which both small and field scale phenomena can be observed. Field experimentation often fails these criteria as a result of sensor network limitations as well as the natural complexities and uncertainties introduced by heterogeneity and constantly changing atmospheric conditions. Laboratory experimentation, which is used to study three-dimensional (3-D) processes, is often conducted in 2-D test systems as a result of space, instrumentation, and cost constraints. In most flow and transport problems, 2-D testing is not considered a serious limitation because the bypassing of flow and transport due to geo-biochemical heterogeneities can still be studied. Constraining the study of atmosphere-soil-vegetation interactions to 2-D systems introduces a new challenge given that the soil moisture dynamics associated with these interactions occurs in three dimensions. This is an important issue that needs to be addressed as evermore intricate and specialized experimental apparatuses like the climate-controlled wind tunnel-porous media test system at CESEP are being constructed and used for these types of studies. The purpose of this study is to therefore investigate the effects of laboratory experimental dimensionality on observed soil moisture dynamics in the context of bare-soil evaporation and evapotranspiration

  13. Effects of Holocene vegetation change on soils across the forest-grassland transition, northern Minnesota, and implications for erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Joseph; Kasmerchak, Chase; Keita, Hawa; Liang, Mengyu; Gruley, Kristine

    2016-04-01

    Boundaries between forest and grassland in the midlatitudes and their shifts in response to Holocene climatic change, provide opportunities to detect effects of life on landscapes. In northern Minnesota, USA, paleoecological research has documented that grassland and/or savanna expanded eastward in the dry early to middle Holocene. In the late Holocene, forest cover expanded westward at the expense of savanna and grassland. We studied soils at 20 sites spanning the forest-grassland transition. A dramatic change in soil morphology coincides approximately, though not exactly, with that transition as recorded in 1870s-1880s land surveys, suggesting that soils change rapidly in response to forest expansion (we are attempting to constrain the timescale of response through radiocarbon dating of deep soil organic matter in which stable C isotopes record past presence of grassland). The key changes from grassland to forest are loss of organic matter below a thin surface A horizon and greatly enhanced mobility and downward translocation of clay - particularly smectite - in forest soils. This results in upper soil horizons that have relatively low smectite content and low microaggregate stability (as detected through laser diffraction analysis of aggregate disintegration in laboratory experiments), especially below the thin A horizon. The best explanation for this change appears to involve differences in how OM is added to and accumulated in the soil under forest and grassland; soil acidity and base saturation change more gradually eastward along a gradient more likely to reflect climate than vegetation. Evidence of bioturbation (especially gopher burrowing) is much more common at former grassland sites. In addition to mixing OM downward in the soil, burrowing moves detrital carbonates upward, probably enhancing OM accumulation and aggregate stability. Research on geomorphic response to Holocene climatic change in the Midwestern US has often emphasized higher potential

  14. Determination of the energy potential of gases produced in the pyrolysis processes of the vegetal carbon manufacture industry.

    PubMed

    Gañan, J; González, J F; González-García, C M; Cuerda-Correa, E M; Macías-García, A

    2006-03-01

    In this work, a pyrolysis plant located in Valverde de Leganes, Badajoz (SW Spain) was studied. At present, only the solid phase obtained by pyrolysis finds an application as domestic fuel. In order to analyze the feasibility of a further energetic exploitation of the plant under study, the gases flowing through the chimneys were collected at different times throughout the pyrolysis process. Next, they were characterized and quantified by gas chromatography, the energy potential of each of the gases being determined. According to the results obtained in this study, a total energy potential of 5.6 x 10(7) MJ (i.e., 1.78 MW(t)) might be generated yearly. Hence, considering an overall process yield equal to 20%, up to 358 KW(e) would be produced. This power would supply enough electric energy to the industry, the remaining being added to the common electric network.

  15. Performance analysis of image processing algorithms for classification of natural vegetation in the mountains of southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yool, S. R.; Star, J. L.; Estes, J. E.; Botkin, D. B.; Eckhardt, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    The earth's forests fix carbon from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Scientists are concerned that massive forest removals may promote an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, with possible global warming and related environmental effects. Space-based remote sensing may enable the production of accurate world forest maps needed to examine this concern objectively. To test the limits of remote sensing for large-area forest mapping, we use Landsat data acquired over a site in the forested mountains of southern California to examine the relative capacities of a variety of popular image processing algorithms to discriminate different forest types. Results indicate that certain algorithms are best suited to forest classification. Differences in performance between the algorithms tested appear related to variations in their sensitivities to spectral variations caused by background reflectance, differential illumination, and spatial pattern by species. Results emphasize the complexity between the land-cover regime, remotely sensed data and the algorithms used to process these data.

  16. Natural Disaster Scenarios in the Food Security Early Warning Contingency Planning Process: The Role of Remotely Sensed Vegetation and Rainfall Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. E.; Funk, C. C.; Choularton, R.

    2006-12-01

    In this talk, we will explore how scenarios are used in early warning systems in Africa as they respond to the food security consequences of droughts and floods, and determine ways EWS could use remote sensing products more effectively. Early warning of an incipient agricultural drought triggers the contingency planning process at the national governmental level, supported by international organizations such as USAID's Famine Early Warning Network or FEWS NET. Contingency planning focuses on updating relevant national contingency plans. These scenarios are usually described as `Worst Case', `Mid-Case', and `Best Case', and focus on providing guidance for humanitarian organizations' assistance planning process. There is an increasingly apparent need to provide appropriate, nuanced, and constructive assistance. Remote sensing can support this objective by providing earlier early warning, giving aid organizations the time necessary to coordinate effective aid packages and policies. In this talk we will explore how recently developed projections of vegetation data one to four months into the future could be used to guide the scenarios both spatially and temporally, and provide probabilities for which case is most likely to occur. A case study of Ethiopia and its contingency planning process for the past few years will be presented.

  17. Genetic variability of nitrogen accumulation during vegetative development and remobilization during the forcing process in witloof chicory tuberized root (Cichorium intybus L.).

    PubMed

    Cassan, Laurent; Corbineau, Françoise; Limami, Anis M

    2008-11-01

    A better knowledge of genetic variability of traits related to nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is a potential strategy to optimize N fertilization and to reduce environmental pollution without decreasing marketable yield and quality. To this aim, in this study, 13 cultivars of witloof chicory were compared with three reference cultivars known for their adaptation to low, intermediate and high N availability in the field during the vegetative phase of development. Pertinent criteria used for this study were determined by a thorough comparison of nitrogen reserve accumulation in tuberized roots during vegetative development and mobilization during the forcing process in the three reference cultivars. Cluster analysis allowed us to sort the cultivars into four main groups we named G1, G2, G3 and G4. Cultivars of group G4, better adapted to soils with high nitrogen contents (N-demanding cultivars), showed higher total N, nitrate, total amino acids (AA), glutamine contents and lower total N and AA mobilization for chicon growth than did cultivars of group G1, adapted to soils with low nitrogen content (N-sensitive cultivars). An intermediate behavior was exhibited by cultivars of groups G2 and G3, characterized as N tolerant. It is proposed that either chicory growers or breeders may take advantage of the genetic variability revealed in the present study to gain flexibility in choosing the right cultivar for the type of soil available (N-rich soil vs N-poor soil) or to adapt the level of N fertilization to the type of cultivar (N-demanding vs N-sensitive) in order to target the highest NUE for the best chicon yield and trade quality.

  18. Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Mercury in China: New Evidence for Sources and Transformation Processes in Air and in Vegetation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ben; Fu, Xuewu; Yin, Runsheng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xun; Lin, Che-Jen; Wu, Chuansheng; Zhang, Yiping; He, Nannan; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Shang, Lihai; Sommar, Jonas; Sonke, Jeroen E; Maurice, Laurence; Guinot, Benjamin; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-09-06

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) and particle-bound mercury (PBM) and mercury (Hg) in litterfall samples have been determined at urban/industrialized and rural sites distributed over mainland China for identifying Hg sources and transformation processes. TGM and PBM near anthropogenic emission sources display negative δ(202)Hg and near-zero Δ(199)Hg in contrast to relatively positive δ(202)Hg and negative Δ(199)Hg observed in remote regions, suggesting that different sources and atmospheric processes force the mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in the air samples. Both MDF and MIF occur during the uptake of atmospheric Hg by plants, resulting in negative δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg observed in litter-bound Hg. The linear regression resulting from the scatter plot relating the δ(202)Hg to Δ(199)Hg data in the TGM samples indicates distinct anthropogenic or natural influences at the three study sites. A similar trend was also observed for Hg accumulated in broadleaved deciduous forest foliage grown in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions. The relatively negative MIF in litter-bound Hg compared to TGM is likely a result of the photochemical reactions of Hg(2+) in foliage. This study demonstrates the diagnostic stable Hg isotopic composition characteristics for separating atmospheric Hg of different source origins in China and provides the isotopic fractionation clues for the study of Hg bioaccumulation.

  19. Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D.

    1996-10-16

    This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

  20. Assessment of PAH dissipation processes in large-scale outdoor mesocosms simulating vegetated road-side swales.

    PubMed

    Leroy, M C; Legras, M; Marcotte, S; Moncond'huy, V; Machour, N; Le Derf, F; Portet-Koltalo, F

    2015-07-01

    Biofilters have been implemented in urban areas due to their ability to improve road runoff quality. However, little is known about the role of soil microorganisms and plants on pollutant remediation in planted swales. Therefore, four large-scale outdoor mesocosms were built and co-contaminated with metals and model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (phenanthrene (Phen), pyrene (Pyr) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)), to better understand the complex functioning of swale-like environments. Three macrophyte plant species were tested for enhanced remediation of PAHs: Juncus effusus, Iris pseudacorus, Phalaris arundinacea and a grass mix. Long-term dynamics of PAHs in water outflow and soil was studied. Results showed that only 0.07 to 0.22% of total PAHs were released in water outflow after one year. Two years after contamination, soil sample analyses showed a dissipation of 99.6% for Phen and 99.4% for Pyr whatever the mesocosm considered and ranging from 75.5 to 91% for BaP, depending on plant species. Furthermore, dissipation time-courses may be described by a biphasic process. Experiments showed that the grass mix facilitated BaP long-term biodegradation. Grass appeared also to be the best filter for suspended solids because of its dense rhizosphere, which prevents the transfer of BaP to groundwater.

  1. Combining livestock production information in a process-based vegetation model to reconstruct the history of grassland management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jinfeng; Ciais, Philippe; Herrero, Mario; Havlik, Petr; Campioli, Matteo; Zhang, Xianzhou; Bai, Yongfei; Viovy, Nicolas; Joiner, Joanna; Wang, Xuhui; Peng, Shushi; Yue, Chao; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Peregon, Anna; Kosykh, Natalya; Mironycheva-Tokareva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    Grassland management type (grazed or mown) and intensity (intensive or extensive) play a crucial role in the greenhouse gas balance and surface energy budget of this biome, both at field scale and at large spatial scale. However, global gridded historical information on grassland management intensity is not available. Combining modelled grass-biomass productivity with statistics of the grass-biomass demand by livestock, we reconstruct gridded maps of grassland management intensity from 1901 to 2012. These maps include the minimum area of managed vs. maximum area of unmanaged grasslands and the fraction of mown vs. grazed area at a resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°. The grass-biomass demand is derived from a livestock dataset for 2000, extended to cover the period 1901-2012. The grass-biomass supply (i.e. forage grass from mown grassland and biomass grazed) is simulated by the process-based model ORCHIDEE-GM driven by historical climate change, rising CO2 concentration, and changes in nitrogen fertilization. The global area of managed grassland obtained in this study increases from 6.1 × 106 km2 in 1901 to 12.3 × 106 km2 in 2000, although the expansion pathway varies between different regions. ORCHIDEE-GM also simulated augmentation in global mean productivity and herbage-use efficiency over managed grassland during the 20th century, indicating a general intensification of grassland management at global scale but with regional differences. The gridded grassland management intensity maps are model dependent because they depend on modelled productivity. Thus specific attention was given to the evaluation of modelled productivity against a series of observations from site-level net primary productivity (NPP) measurements to two global satellite products of gross primary productivity (GPP) (MODIS-GPP and SIF data). Generally, ORCHIDEE-GM captures the spatial pattern, seasonal cycle, and interannual variability of grassland productivity at global scale well and thus is

  2. Single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable waste: Comparison of start-up, reactor stability and process performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, Rangaraj; Torrijos, Michel; Sousbie, Philippe; Lugardon, Aurelien; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenes, Jean Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Single-phase and two-phase systems were compared for fruit and vegetable waste digestion. • Single-phase digestion produced a methane yield of 0.45 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS and 83% VS removal. • Substrate solubilization was high in acidification conditions at 7.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and pH 5.5–6.2. • Energy yield was lower by 33% for two-phase system compared to the single-phase system. • Simple and straight-forward operation favored single phase process over two-phase process. - Abstract: Single-phase and two-phase digestion of fruit and vegetable waste were studied to compare reactor start-up, reactor stability and performance (methane yield, volatile solids reduction and energy yield). The single-phase reactor (SPR) was a conventional reactor operated at a low loading rate (maximum of 3.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d), while the two-phase system consisted of an acidification reactor (TPAR) and a methanogenic reactor (TPMR). The TPAR was inoculated with methanogenic sludge similar to the SPR, but was operated with step-wise increase in the loading rate and with total recirculation of reactor solids to convert it into acidification sludge. Before each feeding, part of the sludge from TPAR was centrifuged, the centrifuge liquid (solubilized products) was fed to the TPMR and centrifuged solids were recycled back to the reactor. Single-phase digestion produced a methane yield of 0.45 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS fed and VS removal of 83%. The TPAR shifted to acidification mode at an OLR of 10.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and then achieved stable performance at 7.0 kg VS/m{sup 3} d and pH 5.5–6.2, with very high substrate solubilization rate and a methane yield of 0.30 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg COD fed. The two-phase process was capable of high VS reduction, but material and energy balance showed that the single-phase process was superior in terms of volumetric methane production and energy yield by 33%. The lower energy yield of the two-phase system was due to the loss of

  3. Linking carbon-water- and nitrogen fluxes at forest ecosystems throughout Europe with a coupled soil-vegetation process model "LandscapeDNDC"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina Herrera, Saul; Grote, Rüdiger; Haas, Edwin; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    2), accuracy (r2eff) and agreement (RMSPEn) while for reproducing daily NEE and ET as well as soil moisture was accompanied by a good statistical precision and agreement. In addition, beside C fixation also simulated C allocation into different vegetation compartments agreed well with measured data on biomass development and vegetation structure. Also soil respiration and N2O emissions agreed well with field observations. Soil respiration was driven by GPP and the rates of N2O fluxes depended on soil ecosystem properties and were influenced by litter C/N inputs and weather conditions. In conclusion by use of general tree species parameterizations LandscapeDNDC was capable to simulate and capture impacts of a multitude of environmental drivers on forest ecosystem C-, N-, water dynamics, as well as linking above - and belowground processes across various sites in Europe. Nevertheless, the quality of measured data (e.g. spatial representation, time resolution) as well as the existing description of ecosystem processes in the model should be considered when evaluating the capability of process based models to be used for evaluation of biogeochemical ecosystem functioning.

  4. Teaching children to like and eat vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Devina; Capaldi Phillips, Elizabeth D; Wilkie, Lynn M

    2015-10-01

    Higher vegetable intake has been related to lower risks of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, several cancers and obesity. Yet children consume fewer than the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables set forth by the USDA. Exposure to vegetables has successfully improved children's liking for and consumption of vegetables particularly for children younger than two years. In contrast, associative conditioning seems necessary for older children, especially with bitter vegetables. We review studies using both exposure and associative conditioning to teach children to like vegetables, including flavor-flavor learning and flavor-calorie learning. Recognizing these different processes helps reconcile discrepant literature and may provide techniques for increasing preferences for vegetables in children. Associative conditioning and exposure can be used by parents and others to enhance children's liking for and consumption of vegetables.

  5. The Influence of Climate Variation and Change on Structure and Processes in Nearshore Vegetated Communities of Puget Sound and other Northwest Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Blanton, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Williams, Gregory D.

    2001-02-14

    We have been investigating the potential for variations in ocean temperature and carbon dioxide to affect nearshore vegetated communities in the Pacific Northwest. Experimental studies as well as long-term monitoring suggest that these communities will respond to climate change and that alterations in their functions may impact fisheries resources. This paper addresses the effects of sea level rise on coastal communities; temperature variations on eelgrass; carbon dioxide-enriched seawater on photosynthetic rates of mudflats, seagrasses, and bull kelp; and of increased climate variability on primary production. Conclusions show there is a clear need to focus investigations on the potential effects of a warmer and CO2-rich environment on Puget Sound's nearshore ecosystem. Experimental data as well as filed studies strongly indicate that temperature is a major factor controlling benthic primary production, respiration and community production in Pacific Northwest estuarine ecosystems. A shift in temperature will predictably affect these processes. The actual amount of effect, the complexities of change and the ultimate impact on fisheries resources are unquantified and highly speculative at this time.

  6. Surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process: N2 sorption and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, D.; Krstić, J.; Spasov, L.; Simeonov, D.; Lončarević, D.; Stefanov, Pl.; Jovanović, D.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the type of the silica gel pore structure on the surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process has been examined applying N2 sorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The nickel catalyst precursors with identical composition (SiO2/Ni = 1.0) has been synthesized by precipitation of Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O solution with Na2CO3 solution on the three types of silica gel with different pore structures. It is shown that the usage of the silica gel supports with different texture as source of SiO2 causes different location of Ni-species into the support pores and on the external surface area. The XPS data confirm the formation of surface species with different strength of interaction and different dispersion. These surface characteristics of the precursors will predetermine the formation of the active nickel metallic phase as well as the mass transfer of the reactants and products to and from the catalytic sites.

  7. Recovery times of riparian vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Riparian vegetation is a key element in a number of processes that determine the eco-geomorphological features of the river landscape. Depending on the river water stage fluctuations, vegetation biomass randomly switches between growth and decay phases, and its biomass exhibits relevant temporal variations. A full understanding of vegetation dynamics is therefore only possible if the hydrological stochastic forcing is considered. In this vein, we focus on the recovery time of vegetation, namely the typical time taken by vegetation to recover a health state starting from a low biomass value (induced, for instance, by an intense flood). The minimalistic stochastic modeling approach is used for describing vegetation dynamics (i.e., the noise-driven alternation of growth and decay phases). The recovery time of biomass is then evaluated according to the theory of the mean first passage time in systems driven by dichotomous noise. The effect of the main hydrological and biological parameters on the vegetation recovery was studied, and the dynamics along the riparian transect was described in details. The effect of climate change and human interventions (e.g., river damming) was also investigated. We found that: (i) the oscillations of the river stage delay the recovery process (up to one order of magnitude, with respect to undisturbed conditions); (ii) hydrological/biological alterations (due to climate change, damming, exotic species invasion) modify the timescales of the recovery. The result provided can be a useful tool for the management of the river. They open the way to the estimation of: (i) the recovery time of vegetation after devastating floods, clear cutting or fires and; (ii) the timescale of the vegetation response to hydrological and biological alterations.

  8. Co-treatment of fruit and vegetable waste in sludge digesters. An analysis of the relationship among bio-methane generation, process stability and digestate phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Sordi, Alessio; Cirulli, Giuseppe; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Massaccesi, Luisa; Cucina, Mirko

    2014-09-01

    The co-digestion of a variable amount of fruit and vegetable waste in a waste mixed sludge digester was investigated using a pilot scale apparatus. The organic loading rate (OLR) was increased from 1.46 kg VS/m(3) day to 2.8 kg VS/m(3) day. The hydraulic retention time was reduced from 14 days to about 10 days. Specific bio-methane production increased from about 90 NL/kg VS to the maximum value of about 430 NL/kg VS when OLR was increased from 1.46 kg VS/m(3) day to 2.1 kg VS/m(3) day. A higher OLR caused an excessive reduction in the hydraulic retention time, enhancing microorganism wash out. Process stability evaluated by the total volatile fatty acids concentration (mg/l) to the alkalinity buffer capacity (eq. mg/l CaCO3) ratio (i.e. FOS/TAC) criterion was <0.1 indicating high stability for OLR <2.46 kg VS/m(3 )day. For higher OLR, FOS/TAC increased rapidly. Residual phytotoxicty of the digestate evaluated by the germination index (GI) (%) was quite constant for OLR<2.46 kg VS/m(3)day, which is lower than the 60% limit, indicating an acceptable toxicity level for crops. For OLR>2.46 kg VS/m(3) day, GI decreased rapidly. This corresponding trend between FOS/TAC and GI was further investigated by the definition of the GI ratio (GIR) parameter. Comparison between GIR and FOS/TAC suggests that GI could be a suitable criterion for evaluating process stability.

  9. Monitoring vegetation phenology using MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Xiayong; Friedl, Mark A.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Hodges, John C.F.; Gao, Feng; Reed, Bradley C.; Huete, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Accurate measurements of regional to global scale vegetation dynamics (phenology) are required to improve models and understanding of inter-annual variability in terrestrial ecosystem carbon exchange and climate–biosphere interactions. Since the mid-1980s, satellite data have been used to study these processes. In this paper, a new methodology to monitor global vegetation phenology from time series of satellite data is presented. The method uses series of piecewise logistic functions, which are fit to remotely sensed vegetation index (VI) data, to represent intra-annual vegetation dynamics. Using this approach, transition dates for vegetation activity within annual time series of VI data can be determined from satellite data. The method allows vegetation dynamics to be monitored at large scales in a fashion that it is ecologically meaningful and does not require pre-smoothing of data or the use of user-defined thresholds. Preliminary results based on an annual time series of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the northeastern United States demonstrate that the method is able to monitor vegetation phenology with good success.

  10. Single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable waste: comparison of start-up, reactor stability and process performance.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Rangaraj; Torrijos, Michel; Sousbie, Philippe; Lugardon, Aurelien; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenes, Jean Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Single-phase and two-phase digestion of fruit and vegetable waste were studied to compare reactor start-up, reactor stability and performance (methane yield, volatile solids reduction and energy yield). The single-phase reactor (SPR) was a conventional reactor operated at a low loading rate (maximum of 3.5 kgVS/m3 d), while the two-phase system consisted of an acidification reactor (TPAR) and a methanogenic reactor (TPMR). The TPAR was inoculated with methanogenic sludge similar to the SPR, but was operated with step-wise increase in the loading rate and with total recirculation of reactor solids to convert it into acidification sludge. Before each feeding, part of the sludge from TPAR was centrifuged, the centrifuge liquid (solubilized products) was fed to the TPMR and centrifuged solids were recycled back to the reactor. Single-phase digestion produced a methane yield of 0.45 m3 CH4/kg VS fed and VS removal of 83%. The TPAR shifted to acidification mode at an OLR of 10.0 kgVS/m3 d and then achieved stable performance at 7.0 kgVS/m3 d and pH 5.5-6.2, with very high substrate solubilization rate and a methane yield of 0.30 m3 CH4/kg COD fed. The two-phase process was capable of high VS reduction, but material and energy balance showed that the single-phase process was superior in terms of volumetric methane production and energy yield by 33%. The lower energy yield of the two-phase system was due to the loss of energy during hydrolysis in the TPAR and the deficit in methane production in the TPMR attributed to COD loss due to biomass synthesis and adsorption of hard COD onto the flocs. These results including the complicated operational procedure of the two-phase process and the economic factors suggested that the single-phase process could be the preferred system for FVW.

  11. Emergence of river dynamics through changing vegetation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oorschot, Mijke; Kleinhans, Maarten; Middelkoop, Hans; Geerling, Gertjan

    2016-04-01

    Riparian vegetation interacts with morphodynamic processes in rivers to create distinct habitat mosaics supporting a large biodiversity. The aim of our work is to quantitatively investigate the emergent patterns in vegetation and river morphology at the river reach scale by dynamically modelling the processes and their interactions. Here, we coupled an advanced morphodynamic model to a novel dynamic riparian vegetation model to study the interaction between vegetation and morphodynamics. Vegetation colonizes bare substrate within the seed dispersal window, passes several growth stages with different properties and can die through flooding, desiccation, uprooting, scour or burial. We have compared river morphology and vegetation patterns of scenarios without vegetation, with static vegetation that does not grow or die and several dynamic vegetation scenarios with a range of vegetation strategies and eco-engineering properties. Results show that dynamic vegetation has a decreased lateral migration of meander bends and maintains its active meandering behavior as opposed to the scenarios without vegetation and with static vegetation. Also the patterns in vegetation and fluvial morphology and the vegetation age distribution mostly resemble the natural situation when compared to aerial photos of the study area. We find that river dynamics, specifically sinuosity and sediment transport, are very sensitive to vegetation properties that determine vegetation density, settlement location and survival. Future work will include the effects of invasive species, addition of silt and the effect of various river management strategies.

  12. Research in remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrumpf, Barry J.; Ripple, William J.; Isaacson, Dennis L.

    1988-01-01

    The research topics undertaken were primarily selected to further the understanding of fundamental relationships between electromagnetic energy measured from Earth orbiting satellites and terrestrial features, principally vegetation. Vegetation is an essential component in the soil formation process and the major factor in protecting and holding soil in place. Vegetation plays key roles in hydrological and nutrient cycles. Awareness of improvement or deterioration in the capacity of vegetation and the trends that those changes may indicate are, therefore, critical detections to make. A study of the relationships requires consideration of the various portions of the electromagnetic spectrum; characteristics of detector system; synergism that may be achieved by merging data from two or more detector systems or multiple dates of data; and vegetational characteristics. The vegetation of Oregon is sufficiently diverse as to provide ample opportunity to investigate the relationships suggested above several vegetation types.

  13. Powdered hide model for vegetable tanning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdered hide samples for this initial study of vegetable tanning were prepared from hides that were dehaired by a typical sulfide or oxidative process, and carried through the delime/bate step of a tanning process. In this study, we report on interactions of the vegetable tannin, quebracho with th...

  14. Experimental investigation of the effect of vegetation on soil, sediment erosion, and salt transport processes in the Upper Colorado River Basin Mancos Shale formation, Price, Utah, USA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of concerns about salinity in the Colorado River, this study focused on saline and sodic soils associated with the Mancos Shale formation with the objective of investigating mechanisms driving sediment yield and salinity loads and the role of vegetation in altering soil chemistry in the Pric...

  15. Glyphosate’s impact on vegetative growth in leafy spurge identifies molecular processes and hormone cross-talk associated with increased branching

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) is a perennial weed that is considered glyphosate tolerant. Tolerance is partly attributed to escape through establishment of new vegetative shoots from an abundance of underground adventitious buds. Sub-lethal concentrations of foliar applied glyphosate resulted in ne...

  16. The Change4Life Convenience Store Programme to Increase Retail Access to Fresh Fruit and Vegetables: A Mixed Methods Process Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jean; Halligan, Joel; Burges Watson, Duika; Ryan, Vicky; Penn, Linda; Adamson, Ashley J.; White, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Consumption of fruit and vegetables is important for health, but is often lower than recommended and tends to be socio-economically patterned with lower consumption in more deprived groups. In 2008, the English Department of Health introduced the Change4Life convenience store programme. This aimed to increase retail access to fresh fruit and vegetables in deprived, urban areas by providing existing convenience stores with a range of support and branded point-of-sale materials and equipment. Methods We undertook a mixed-methods study of the Change4Life convenience store programme in the North East of England around two years after initial implementation. Store mapping (n = 87; 100% stores) and systematic in-store observations (n = 74; 85% stores) provided information on intervention fidelity; the variety, purchase price and quality of fresh fruit and vegetables on sale; and purchase price compared to a major supermarket. Ten qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of retailers and other professionals explored experiences of the intervention and provided further insight on quantitative results. Results Intervention stores were primarily located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas. Fidelity, in terms of presence of branded materials and equipment, was low and much was not being used as intended. Fresh fruit and vegetables on sale were of high quality and had a purchase price around 10% more than comparable products at a major supermarket. Interviewees were supportive of the health improvement aim of the intervention. Retailers were appreciative of part-funding for chill cabinets and free point-of-sale materials. The intervention suffered from: poor initial and on-going communication between the intervention delivery team and retailers; poor availability of replacement point-of-sale materials; and failure to cement intended links with health workers and community organisations. Conclusions Overall, intervention fidelity was low and the

  17. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics - Part 2: A C3-C4 vegetation change field labelling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-11-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilization within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30-year old labelling experiment after a wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilization by assessing differences in turnover dynamics between plant and microbial-derived sugars: while plant-derived sugars are only affected by stabilization processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilization and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤ 2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (> 2 g cm-3; mineral)) of a silty loam under long-term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of neutral sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid. While apparent MRT of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugar carbon in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, MRT of the mainly plant-derived xylose were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial-derived sugars like galactose, rhamnose, fucose, indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics in

  18. Fruits and vegetables (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, ...

  19. Handling Procedures of Vegetable Crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; French, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working towards future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit. The duration of these missions may be as long as 2.5 years and will likely include a stay on a lunar or planetary surface. The primary goal of the Advanced Food System in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. Vegetable crops can provide the crew with added nutrition and variety. These crops do not require any cooking or food processing prior to consumption. The vegetable crops, unlike prepackaged foods, will provide bright colors, textures (crispy), and fresh aromas. Ten vegetable crops have been identified for possible use in long duration missions. They are lettuce, spinach, carrot, tomato, green onion, radish, bell pepper, strawberries, fresh herbs, and cabbage. Whether these crops are grown on a transit vehicle (e.g., International Space Station) or on the lunar or planetary surface, it will be necessary to determine how to safely handle the vegetables while maintaining acceptability. Since hydrogen peroxide degrades into water and oxygen and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS), hydrogen peroxide has been recommended as the sanitizer. The objective of th is research is to determine the required effective concentration of hydrogen peroxide. In addition, it will be determined whether the use of hydrogen peroxide, although a viable sanitizer, adversely affects the quality of the vegetables. Vegetables will be dipped in 1 % hydrogen peroxide, 3% hydrogen peroxide, or 5% hydrogen peroxide. Treated produce and controls will be stored in plastic bags at 5 C for up to 14 days. Sensory, color, texture, and total plate count will be measured. The effect on several vegetables including lettuce, radish, tomato and strawberries has been completed. Although each vegetable reacts to hydrogen peroxide differently, the

  20. A Reference Unit on Home Vegetable Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCully, James S., Comp.; And Others

    Designed to provide practical, up-to-date, basic information on home gardening for vocational agriculture students with only a limited knowledge of vegetable gardening, this reference unit includes step-by-step procedures for planning, planting, cultivating, harvesting, and processing vegetables in a small plot. Topics covered include plot…

  1. Vegetable oil fuel standards

    SciTech Connect

    Pryde, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested standards for vegetable oils and ester fuels, as well as ASTM specifications for No. 2 diesel oil are given. The following physical properties were discussed: cetane number, cloud point, distillation temperatures, flash point, pour point, turbidity, viscosity, free fatty acids, iodine value, phosphorus, and wax. It was apparent that vegetable oils and their esters cannot meet ASTM specifications D975 for No. 2 diesel oil for use in the diesel engine. Vegetable oil modification or engine design modification may make it possible eventually for vegetable oils to become suitable alternative fuels. Vegetable oils must be recognized as experimental fuels until modifications have been tested thoroughly and generally accepted. 1 table. (DP)

  2. The impact of climate and environmental processes on vegetation pattern in the Czechowskie lake catchment Czechowo Region (Northern Tuchola Pinewoods) during the Younger Dryas cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka Maria; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Lutyńska, Monika; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    Czechowskie lake is located in the northern part of the Tuchola Pinewoods District (Northern Poland) in a young glacial landscape. At present, the majority of the area is forested or used for agricultural purposes, but among them a high amount of basins filled with biogenic sediments are present. This area is very suitable for the postglacial vegetation development investigation because of the LST ash and laminated sediments which we found in the Trzechowskie palaeolake and Czechowskie Lake (Wulf et. all 2013). The aim of the research was to reconstruct the past landscape and vegetation response to Younger Dryas cooling and we present the results of the palinological analysis done for 6 core of biogenic sediments. Our main objective was to determine whether local factors such as topography and soil cover have a significant impact on the vegetation, eutrophy and sedimentation rate at this time. In the lake Czechowskie lake catchment we have six cores that cover postglacial succession (Lake Czechowskie small basin - profile JC-12-s; Lake Czechowskiego terrace - profile TK; Lake Czechowskie vicinity - profile "Oko and Cz/80; Trzechowskie paleolake - profile T/trz; Valley between paleolake Trzechowskie and Lake Czechowskie - profile DTCZ-4). The paleoecological research carried out involved an analysis of pollen, macrofossils, Cladocera, diatom, loss-on-ignition and CaCO3 content. The results show, that the dominant plant communities during the Youngers Dryas in the region nearby Lake Czechowskie are heliophytes xeric herb vegetation with juniper (Juniperus communis) shrubs and birch (Betula) and pine (Pinus sylvestris). In the pollen diagrams there was the difference noted in the participation of the dominant pollen, the juniper pollen was always high but varied from 18 to 37%, birch average pollen share was between 17-27%. The thickness and type of the sediment accumulated in Younger Dryas in the presented profiles differs significantly. In the profiles which

  3. Ecological studies on the revegetation process of surface coal mined areas in North Dakota. 3. soil and vegetation development of abandoned mines. Final report Aug 75-Jun 82

    SciTech Connect

    Wali, M.K.; Pemble, R.H.

    1982-06-01

    Soil and vegetation development were studied on abandoned mine sites near Velva in Ward County, North Dakota. The sites studied were 1, 7, 17, 30 and 45 years old since abandonment; unmined sites were also studied to provide measures of comparison. Species diversity was the highest at unmined sites (114) and lowest at the 1 year old site (26). Stand-environmental complex ordinations encompassing 53 variables showed topographic variables to be the most important followed by site ages. Rates of nutrient accumulations were given in the report.

  4. Physiology of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The idea to pre-process fruits and vegetables in the fresh state started with fresh-cut salads and now has expanded to fresh-cut fruits and other vegetables. The fresh-cut portion of the fresh produce industry includes fruits, vegetables, sprouts, mushrooms and even herbs that are cut, cored, sliced...

  5. Data pre-processing: Stratospheric aerosol perturbing effect on the remote sensing of vegetation: Correction method for the composite NDVI after the Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, E.; Elsaleous, N.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Dutton, E.

    1994-01-01

    An operational stratospheric correction scheme used after the Mount Pinatubo (Phillipines) eruption (Jun. 1991) is presented. The stratospheric aerosol distribution is assumed to be only variable with latitude. Each 9 days the latitudinal distribution of the optical thickness is computed by inverting radiances observed in the NOAA AVHRR channel 1 (0.63 micrometers) and channel 2 (0.83 micrometers) over the Pacific Ocean. This radiance data set is used to check the validity of model used for inversion by checking consistency of the optical thickness deduced from each channel as well as optical thickness deduced from different scattering angles. Using the optical thickness profile previously computed and radiative transfer code assuming Lambertian boundary condition, each pixel of channel 1 and 2 are corrected prior to computation of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). Comparison between corrected, non corrected, and years prior to Pinatubo eruption (1989 to 1990) NDVI composite, shows the necessity and the accuracy of the operational correction scheme.

  6. Effects of fruit juices, processed vegetable juice, orange peel and green tea on endogenous formation of N-nitrosoproline in subjects from a high-risk area for gastric cancer in Moping County, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, G P; Song, P J; Reed, P I

    1993-07-01

    The effects of four fruit juices, processed vegetable juice, orange peel, green tea and low dose vitamin C on endogenous N-nitrosation in 86 subjects from a high-risk area for gastric cancer in Moping County, China were studied using urinary excretion of N-nitrosoproline (NPRO) as an indicator. After ingestion of 300 mg L-proline, urinary excretion of NPRO was significantly increased from a baseline of 2.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms/day to 8.7 +/- 6.2 micrograms/day. (P < 0.001). Vitamin C (75 mg) administration significantly reduced NPRO formation (62.3%, P < 0.002) although NPRO excretion remained higher than the baseline level (4.2 +/- 1.3 vs 2.2 +/- 1.2 micrograms/day, P < 0.001). Intake of fruit juices and green tea extracts (containing 75 mg vitamin C) or of orange peel powder (containing 3 mg vitamin C) together with 300 mg L-proline inhibited NPRO formation effectively to the baseline level or to levels significantly lower than the baseline level (P < 0.05-0.005). A processed juice of a number of vegetables (300 ml) significantly catalysed endogenous nitrosation (14.7 +/- 11.8 vs 9.4 +/- 4.7 micrograms/day, P < 0.05). Endogenous N-nitrosation was unaffected by the presence of intragastric lesions. The present study shows that endogenous nitrosation in this population is profoundly affected by environmental factors and that inhibitors, such as vitamin C, alpha-tocopherol and other non-nutritive compounds in the foods do inhibit endogenous nitrosation either synergistically or in an additive manner. The significance of fruits and vegetables in prevention of human cancers is discussed.

  7. Vegetation establishment in convectively accelerated streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, B.; McLelland, S. J.; Molnar, P.; Camporeale, C.; Perona, P.

    2013-12-01

    We study the conditions for vegetation establishment within river reaches with converging boundaries. Common to many such rivers worldwide is the existence of a limiting front (e.g., Figure 1a) beyond which all the riverbed vegetation is uprooted by flooding events. There are however exceptions, which leads to an interesting ecomorphodynamic problem (existence and position of the front). We use a theoretical 1-D framework based on morphodynamic equations modified in order to account for the presence of vegetation (Perona et al., submitted), and obtain the link between the position of the vegetated front and river eco-hydraulic variables under steady and unsteady conditions. We apply our framework to a number of flume experiments (unsteady flow) where Avena sativa L. (common oat) seedlings grow subject to periodic flow disturbances within a convergent flume channel (Figure 1b). We find that depending on the outcome of the competition between hydrological and biological processes there is either a limiting spatial front within the convergent section beyond which vegetation cannot survive, or vegetation colonizes the entire riverbed. The existence and the position of the front depend on the ability for vegetation to take root efficiently and withstand uprooting by the flow of the convectively accelerated stream (Crouzy et al., in press). The active role of vegetation and of unit streampower in this particular ecomorphodynamic process are then discussed in relation to the conceptual model of Gurnell and Petts (2006), and under the light of our theoretical and experimental results. REFERENCES - Crouzy, B., K. Edmaier, N. Pasquale and P. Perona (in press). Impact of floods on the statistical distribution of riverbed vegetation. Geomorphology doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2012.09.013. - Gurnell A., Petts G. (2006). Trees as riparian engineers: The Tagliamento River, Italy. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 31: 1558--1574. - Perona, P., B. Crouzy, S. Mc Lelland, P. Molnar

  8. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  9. Influence of the bank vegetation on the river bed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruei Ke, Bo; Chan, Hsun-Chuan; Chen, You-Cheng

    2014-05-01

    In the natural rivers, woody vegetation commonly grows along the riverbank. When flood flows run through the woody vegetation zones, the stream processes are markedly affected. This study experimentally discusses the characteristics of flow fields and the changes of river bedform while water flows through woody vegetation zones. The experiments were produced in a flume with 20m long, 1m wide, and a fixed slope of 0.001. The woody vegetation was set in 10 square centimeters at one side of the flume. Experimental vegetation was simulated by the steel columns due to the stem of emergent woody vegetation near bed is rigid. The experimental flow was steady and flow velocity was adopted to near the critical flow for the initiation of sediment motion. Uniform sand with a median size of 0.88 mm was used as the bed sediment. The three dimensional flow fields of time-averaged velocity distributions and turbulent characteristics were measured by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter(ADV). The bed morphology of equilibrium scour condition was measured by a Laser Distance Meter. The interactions between water flows and river bed with vegetation ware investigated by observing the scour and deposition processes around the vegetation zone. In addition, the flow fields at flat bed and equilibrium scour conditions are measured separately. Furthermore, the influence of vegetation density on the flow and bedform was investigated by using the present experiment. When the flows passed through the vegetation zones, the approaching flow was retarded by the vegetation zone along the vegetation-bank side and accelerated in the main channel. The flow velocities also reduced downstream of the vegetation zones and the water depths dropped significantly in the streamwise direction. It was observed that the levels of the sediment deposition decreased at downstream of the vegetation zones as the vegetation density increased. Near the vegetation zone, the size of the scour hole increased as the

  10. Probabilistic Evaluation of Anthropogenic Regulations In a Vegetated River Channel Using a Vegetation Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in fluvial floodplains, gravel beds, and sand bars has been a serious engineering problem for riparian management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to predict the vegetation dynamics accurately for long-term duration. In this research, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the vegetation dynamics in fluvial floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four components: (i) long-term stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with floodplain vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography, and (iv) vegetation dynamics on floodplains. In the vegetation dynamics model, the flood discharge (i) is stochastically simulated using a filtered Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The component for vegetation dynamics (iv) includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by floods, and infant tree recruitment. Vegetation condition has been observed mainly before and after floods since 2008 at a field site located between 23-24 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. The Kako River has the catchment area of 1,730 km2 and the main channel length of 96 km. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth sites in the Kako River floodplains. The predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In the field survey, the position, trunk diameter and height of each tree as well as the riverbed materials were measured after several flood events to investigate their impacts on the floodplain vegetation community. This presentation tries to examine effects of anthropogenic river regulations, i.e., thinning and cutting-down, in the vegetated channel in Kako River by using the vegetation dynamics model. Sensitivity of both the flood water level and the vegetation status in the channel is statistically evaluated in terms of the different cutting

  11. Vegetation Identification With LIDAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Quercus agrifolia ).....27 3. Eucalyptus Tree (Eucalyptus Globus).........28 E. IDENTIFYING LOCATIONS WITHOUT VEGETATION.........30 F. IDENTIFYING...Relative First Return 25 ( Quercus dumosa), and the California Live Oak ( Quercus agrifolia ). These three species of trees are very abundant in this...ELEVATION OF TERRAIN...23 D. TYPES OF VEGETATION..............................26 1. California Scrub Oak ( Quercus dumosa).......26 2. California Live Oak

  12. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  13. Changes in the bacterial community in the fermentation process of kôso, a Japanese sugar-vegetable fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Tai-Ying; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Takahashi, Tomoya

    2017-02-01

    Kôso is a Japanese fermented beverage made with over 20 kinds of vegetables, mushrooms, and sugars. The changes in the bacterial population of kôso during fermentation at 25 °C over a period of 10 days were studied using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The analysis detected 224 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) clustered from 8 DNA samples collected on days 0, 3, 7, and 10 from two fermentation batches. Proteobacteria were the dominant phylum in the starting community, but were replaced by Firmicutes within three days. Seventy-eight genera were identified from the 224 OTUs, in which Bifidobacterium, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, and Lactobacillus dominated, accounting for over 96% of the total bacterial population after three days' fermentation. UniFrac-Principal Coordinate Analysis of longitudinal fermented samples revealed dramatic changes in the bacterial community in kôso, resulting in significantly low diversity at the end of fermentation as compared with the complex starting community.

  14. Dynamics of self-organized vegetation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, R.; Ramirez, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vegetation patterns are a common and well-defined characteristic of many arid and semi-arid landscapes. In this study we explore some of the physical mechanisms responsible for the establishment of self-organized, non-random vegetation patterns that arise at the hillslope scale in many areas of the world, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. In doing so we use a water and energy balance model and provide a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the dynamics of vegetation pattern formation and development. Within the modeling, reciprocal effects of vegetation on the hillslope energy balance, runoff production and run-on infiltration, root density, surface albedo and soil moisture content are analyzed. In particular, we: 1) present a physically based mechanistic description of the processes leading to vegetation pattern formation; 2) Compare simulated vegetation coverage at the hillslope scale with observations; 3) quantify the relative impact of pattern-inducing dynamics on pattern formation; and 4) describe the relationships between vegetation patterns and the climatic, hydraulic and topographic characteristic of the system. The model is validated by comparing hillslope-scale simulations with available observations for the areas of Niger near Niamey and Somalia near Garoowe, where respectively tiger bushes and banded vegetation patterns are present. The model validation includes comparison of simulated and observed vegetation coverage as well as simulated and measured water fluxes, showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement between simulations and observations. The analysis of the system suggests that the main driver of pattern establishment is climate, in terms of average annual precipitation and incoming solar radiation. In particular, decreasing precipitation or, conversely, increasing incoming radiation are responsible for the system departure from fully vegetated with indistinguishable vegetation structures to sparsely vegetated with (self

  15. Boundary Shear Stress Along Vegetated Streambanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, L. A.; Wynn, T.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment, a leading cause of water quality impairment, damages aquatic ecosystems and interferes with recreational uses and water treatment processes. Streambank retreat can contribute as much as 85% of watershed sediment yield. Vegetation is an important component of stream restoration designs used to control streambank retreat, but vegetation effects on streambank boundary shear stress (SBSS) need to be quantified. The overall goal of this experiment is to predict boundary shear stress along vegetated streambanks. This goal will be met by determining a method for measuring boundary shear stress in the field along hydraulically rough streambanks, evaluating the effects of streambank vegetation on boundary shear stress in the field, and developing predictive methods based on measurable vegetative properties. First, three streambank vegetation types (herbaceous, shrubbery, and woody) will be modeled in a flume study to examine both boundary shear stress measurement theory and instruments for field use. An appropriate method (law of the wall, Reynold's stresses, TKE, or average wall shear stress) and field instrument (ADV, propeller, or Pitot tube) will be selected, resulting in a field technique to measure SBSS. Predictive methods for estimating SBSS, based on common vegetation measurements, will be developed in the flume study and validated with field data. This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The results will also aide in quantifying sediment inputs from streambanks, providing quantitative information for stream restoration projects and watershed management planning.

  16. The Role of Historical Barriers in the Diversification Processes in Open Vegetation Formations during the Miocene/Pliocene Using an Ancient Rodent Lineage as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fabrícia F.; Lazar, Ana; Menezes, Albert N.; Durans, Andressa da Matta; Moreira, Jânio C.; Salazar-Bravo, Jorge; D′Andrea, Paulo S.; Bonvicino, Cibele R.

    2013-01-01

    The Neotropics harbors a high diversity of species and several hypotheses have been proposed to account for this pattern. However, while species of forested domains are frequently studied, less is known of species from open vegetation formations occupying, altogether, a larger area than the Amazon Forest. Here we evaluate the role of historical barriers and the riverine hypothesis in the speciation patterns of small mammals by analyzing an ancient rodent lineage (Thrichomys, Hystricomorpha). Phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses were carried out with mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers to analyze the evolutionary relationships between Thrichomys lineages occurring in dry domains along both banks of the Rio São Francisco. This river is one of the longest of South America whose course and water flow have been modified by inland tectonic activities and climate changes. Molecular data showed a higher number of lineages than previously described. The T. inermis species complex with 2n = 26, FN = 48 was observed in both banks of the river showing a paraphyletic arrangement, suggesting that river crossing had occurred, from east to west. A similar pattern was also observed for the T. apereoides complex. Thrichomys speciation occurred in Late Miocene when the river followed a different course. The current geographic distribution of Thrichomys species and their phylogenetic relationships suggested the existence of frequent past connections between both banks in the middle section of the Rio São Francisco. The extensive palaeodune region found in this area has been identified as a centre of endemism of several vertebrate species and is likely to be a center of Thrichomys diversification. PMID:24349576

  17. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... cruciferous vegetables? Cruciferous vegetables are part of the Brassica genus of plants. They include the following vegetables, ... others: Arugula Bok choy Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Collard greens Horseradish Kale Radishes Rutabaga Turnips Watercress ...

  18. Practical aspects of analyzing vegetable oils in fire debris.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Lisa M; Reardon, Michelle R

    2009-07-01

    Vegetable oils undergo burning, self-heating, and spontaneous ignition, resulting in their presence in fire debris. As these processes can affect the fatty acid content of vegetable oils, it is important that debris be properly handled in order to obtain reliable and informative data. This research investigated changes in vegetable oil content as a result of storage conditions and different types of burning. Material spiked with vegetable oils and burned was stored under various long-term conditions, and debris was tested by heating overnight using passive headspace concentration. Results indicated that refrigeration is ideal for fire debris samples suspected of containing vegetable oils and that including passive headspace concentration in the analytical scheme would not affect oils. Spontaneous ignition experiments were conducted to compare the effects of various burning processes on vegetable oil content. Vegetable oils that experienced nonpiloted ignition, self-heating, and spontaneous ignition produced noticeably different chromatograms from those that underwent piloted ignition.

  19. Phenolic compounds in Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cartea, María Elena; Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo

    2010-12-30

    Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  20. Vegetable oils: a new alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper relates: (1) the use and production of methyl ester of vegetable oil, M.E.V.O., as fuel in diesel engines and the effect of the catalyst proportion, alcohol and vegetable oil V.O. on the transesterification process; (2) simple control methods during industrial preparation and the behavior of V.O. and M.E.V.O. on accelerated oxidation test to determine the maximum contration of V.O. in M.E.V.O. that do not cause problems on the injectors; and (3) the behavior of M.E.V.O. and V.O. on parafinic and naphtenic lubricants, with high T.B.N. and without organo-metallic compounds, using antioxidants as B.H.T. to reduce the oxidation effect. 9 figures, 7 tables.

  1. Vegetable Production System (Veggie)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.

    2016-01-01

    The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) was developed by Orbital Technologies Corp. to be a simple, easily stowed, and high growth volume yet low resource facility capable of producing fresh vegetables on the International Space Station (ISS). In addition to growing vegetables in space, Veggie can support a variety of experiments designed to determine how plants respond to microgravity, provide real-time psychological benefits for the crew, and conduct outreach activities. Currently, Veggie provides the largest volume available for plant growth on the ISS.

  2. Vegetation against dune mobility.

    PubMed

    Durán, Orencio; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-11-03

    Vegetation is the most common and most reliable stabilizer of loose soil or sand. This ancient technique is for the first time cast into a set of equations of motion describing the competition between aeolian sand transport and vegetation growth. Our set of equations is then applied to study quantitatively the transition between barchans and parabolic dunes driven by the dimensionless fixation index theta which is the ratio between the dune characteristic erosion rate and vegetation growth velocity. We find a fixation index theta(c) below which the dunes are stabilized, characterized by scaling laws.

  3. Vegetation extraction from high-resolution satellite imagery using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShamsi, Meera R.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past years, there has been various urban development all over the UAE. Dubai is one of the cities that experienced rapid growth in both development and population. That growth can have a negative effect on the surrounding environment. Hence, there has been a necessity to protect the environment from these fast pace changes. One of the major impacts this growth can have is on vegetation. As technology is evolving day by day, there is a possibility to monitor changes that are happening on different areas in the world using satellite imagery. The data from these imageries can be utilized to identify vegetation in different areas of an image through a process called vegetation detection. Being able to detect and monitor vegetation is very beneficial for municipal planning and management, and environment authorities. Through this, analysts can monitor vegetation growth in various areas and analyze these changes. By utilizing satellite imagery with the necessary data, different types of vegetation can be studied and analyzed, such as parks, farms, and artificial grass in sports fields. In this paper, vegetation features are detected and extracted through SAFIY system (i.e. the Smart Application for Feature extraction and 3D modeling using high resolution satellite ImagerY) by using high-resolution satellite imagery from DubaiSat-2 and DEIMOS-2 satellites, which provide panchromatic images of 1m resolution and spectral bands (red, green, blue and near infrared) of 4m resolution. SAFIY system is a joint collaboration between MBRSC and DEIMOS Space UK. It uses image-processing algorithms to extract different features (roads, water, vegetation, and buildings) to generate vector maps data. The process to extract green areas (vegetation) utilize spectral information (such as, the red and near infrared bands) from the satellite images. These detected vegetation features will be extracted as vector data in SAFIY system and can be updated and edited by end-users, such as

  4. Coma / Vegetative State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vegetative State Legal Issues Sleeping Problems Anxiety & Stress Concussion / Mild TBI Living with Traumatic Brain Injury Speech & ... Conscious States After Severe Brain Injury Brain Trauma, Concussion, and Coma What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale? ...

  5. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  6. Vegetative pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Randie H; Lewin, Jesse; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Stein, Jennifer; Ramachandran, Sarika

    2014-12-16

    Vegetative pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare, superficial variant of pyoderma gangrenosum that is more commonly found on the trunk as single or multiple, non-painful lesions. There is typically no associated underlying systemic disease. Compared to classic pyoderma gangrenosum, vegetative lesions are more likely to heal without the use of systemic glucocorticoids, although up to 39% of patients required a short course of prednisone in a review of 46 cases. Treatments for vegetative pyoderma gangrenosum include topical and intralesional glucocorticoids, minocycline or doxycycline, dapsone, colchicine, and, rarely, alternative steroid-sparing immunosuppressants. We present a case of multiple vegetative pyoderma gangrenosum lesions arising in prior surgical sites in a patient found to have IgA monoclonal gammopathy and abnormal urinary protein electrophoresis.

  7. Scaling Vegetation on Experimental Channel Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breemen, D. M.; van de Lageweg, W. I.; van Dijk, W. M.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    There are strong feedbacks between river channels, floodplains and riparian and floodplain vegetation. We study the effect of experimental vegetation on channel pattern. Through linear bar theory it is known that channel width-depth ratio affects bar pattern and relatively narrow channels with strong banks are required for meandering. Riparian vegetation is able to alter the channel width-depth ratio and therefore the channel pattern through strengthening of the banks. Floodplain vegetation adds hydraulic resistance so the flow is more focused into the channels. However, determination of the underlying mechanisms and processes has remained scarce and qualitative and hence these effects are not yet fully understood. The objectives of this study are 1) to develop a controllable and scalable method to reproduce vegetation effect in experimental self-formed channels, and 2) to experimentally determine the effects of riparian vegetation on bank strength, channel pattern and meandering dynamics. Sprouts of three plant species were systematically subjected to different seeding densities and to various growing conditions, including light intensity, submergence and nutrient starvation. Denser seeding reduced sprout growth after about a week. Stronger light increased plant growth and plant strength. Nutrient starvation caused different branching intensity of the root system. Tens of small-scale bank erosion experiments and bank failure experiments (see Kleinhans et al., this conference) were performed to quantify the strength of banks reinforced by plant roots at the experimental scale, demonstrating that bank strength is strongly determined by seeding density, rooting density and depth relative to channel depth. To study pattern evolution and morphodynamics we used a 1.25x7.5 m flume with a constant discharge and sediment feed. The introduction of vegetation in experiments results in narrower and deeper channels. Higher vegetation density leads to static channels with

  8. Monitoring global vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.; Houston, A. G.; Heydorn, R. P.; Botkin, D. B.; Estes, J. E.; Strahler, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the need for, and the current capability of, a technology which could aid in monitoring the Earth's vegetation resource on a global scale. Vegetation is one of our most critical natural resources, and accurate timely information on its current status and temporal dynamics is essential to understand many basic and applied environmental interrelationships which exist on the small but complex planet Earth.

  9. Vegetation and soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, M.K.; King, S.L.; Eisenbies, M.H.; Gartner, D.

    2000-01-01

    Intro paragraph: Characterization of bottomland hardwood vegetation in relatively undisturbed forests can provide critical information for developing effective wetland creation and restoration techniques and for assessing the impacts of management and development. Classification is a useful technique in characterizing vegetation because it summarizes complex data sets, assists in hypothesis generation about factors influencing community variation, and helps refine models of community structure. Hierarchical classification of communities is particularly useful for showing relationships among samples (Gauche 1982).

  10. Vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Fifty contributions (presentations) involving more than one hundred people worldwide were given at the International Conference on Plant and Vegetable Oils as Fuels. The proceedings were in Fargo, North Dakota, from August 2-4, 1982. The conference helped to promote renewable fuels, bio-oils, from plant and vegetable oils. Separate abstracts were prepared for 44 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  11. [Fruits and vegetables].

    PubMed

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    Fruits and vegetables are particularly interesting for health for their content in minerals, antioxidant vitamins, phytochemicals and dietary fiber. All these substances are related to lower risk for the development of health probems, such as certain types of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity, constipation or diverticolsys. The sound basis of scientific evidence led European and American scientific organizations and societies to recommend an intake up to 150-200 g of vegetables every day; ie. 2 or more portions daily and 3 or more portions of fruit; five portions of fruit and vegetables all together. According to the consumer panel from the Spanish Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, between the late 80s and the end of the 90s. consumption of fruit and vegetables decreased. However, in late years this trend has slow down and even reversed. Results from food consumption studies based on individual level assessment in Spain estimate an average consumption of fruit and vegetables of 154 g/per person/day in adults aged 25-60 yr. Prevalence of inadequate intake of fruit and vegetables is high among children and young people. In this age group above 70% of the population consume less than 3 portions of fruit every day on average. Reorientation of prevailing food patterns nowadays require investment in measures aimed at increasing the consumption of plant foods and estimulate healthy food habits in families.

  12. Use of response surface methodology to study the combined effects of UV-C and thermal process on vegetable oxidative enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ultraviolet processing (UV-C) (temperature, exposure time, and wavelength) and an environmental parameter (pH) were studied on three oxidative enzymes, namely, lipoxygenase (LOX), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) by using a central composite design. An initial screening de...

  13. Backscattering power spectrum for randomly moving vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiankang, J.; Zhongzhi, Z.; Zhong, S.

    1986-08-01

    The vegetation backscattering power spectrum in the presence of winds is derived. The physical process of the action of stems and leaves of the vegetation is analyzed. A statistical distribution of the random velocity of stems and leaves is obtained, and the vegetation backscattering power spectral density which is dependent on the wind speed and direction as well as the incident wave parameters is given. In the case of uniform notion of vegetation in the direction of winds, the results provide a good interpretation of Fishbein's empirical model. The determination of the values of the equivalent parameters in the spectrum is discussed, and comparisons are made between the derived spectrum and measured published spectra with satisfactory consistence.

  14. Post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based on spot/vegetation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2010-04-01

    A procedure is presented that allows identifying large burned scars and the monitoring of vegetation recovery in the years following major fire episodes. The procedure relies on 10-day fields of Maximum Value Composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MVC-NDVI), with a 1 km×1 km spatial resolution obtained from the VEGETATION instrument. The identification of fire scars during the extremely severe 2003 fire season is performed based on cluster analysis of NDVI anomalies that persist during the vegetative cycle of the year following the fire event. Two regions containing very large burned scars were selected, located in Central and Southwestern Portugal, respectively, and time series of MVC-NDVI analysed before the fire events took place and throughout the post-fire period. It is shown that post-fire vegetation dynamics in the two selected regions may be characterised based on maps of recovery rates as estimated by fitting a monoparametric model of vegetation recovery to MVC-NDVI data over each burned scar. Results indicated that the recovery process in the region located in Central Portugal is mostly related to fire damage rather than to vegetation density before 2003, whereas the latter seems to have a more prominent role than vegetation conditions after the fire episode, e.g. in the case of the region in Southwestern Portugal. These differences are consistent with the respective predominant types of vegetation. The burned area located in Central Portugal is dominated by Pinus Pinaster whose natural regeneration crucially depends on the destruction of seeds present on the soil surface during the fire, whereas the burned scar in Southwestern Portugal was populated by Eucalyptus that may quickly re-sprout from buds after fire. Besides its simplicity, the monoparametric model of vegetation recovery has the advantage of being easily adapted to other low-resolution satellite data, as well as to other types of vegetation indices.

  15. Biomechanics of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Peleg, K

    1985-01-01

    The scope of fruit and vegetable biomechanics is reviewed. Sources of mechanical injury to produce in harvesting, processing, storage, packaging and transportation are briefly described. A survey of produce handling and transportation environments was conducted, whereby an envelope model encompassing composite spectra of trucks, railroad, marine and cargo aircraft is presented. The protective quality, i.e. strength of shipping containers is quantified in static and dynamic loading such as encountered in storage, handling and transportation. Mechanical response of fruits and vegetables in quasistatic and dynamic loading are formulated by a nonlinear rheological model, whereby a time and deformation dependent relaxation modulus is defined. A realistic link is established between the model and real fruits and vegetables by test procedures for determination of the parameters in the governing nonlinear equations. Based on the nonlinear relaxation modulus, mechanical damage of fruits and vegetables is quantified for static compression, transients and vibration loading as well as for combined static and dynamic loading, by equations of contact circle diameter, bruise depth and contact pressure. Distribution of loads over a maximal number of contact points per fruit is linked to geometrical patterns of produce packs. The application of Shock Damage Boundary techniques for produce-package testing is described along with a case study comparing the protective qualities of two types of apple packs. Produce damage quantification by direct fruit inspection in terms of a 'Bruise Index' is described, including a practical example, comparing the protective qualities of three types of apple packs in shipping tests. Indirect methods of mechanical injury evaluation, based on weight loss and CO2 emission differences between bruised and wholesome fruits are also briefly discussed.

  16. Linking Weathering, Rock Moisture Dynamics, Geochemistry, Runoff, Vegetation and Atmospheric Processes through the Critical Zone: Graduate Student led Research at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory lies Rivendell, a heavily-instrumented steep forested hillslope underlain by nearly vertically dipping argillite interbedded with sandstone. Under this convex hillslope lies "Zb", the transition to fresh bedrock, which varies from less than 6 m below the surface near the channel to 20 m at the divide. Rempe and Dietrich (2014, PNAS) show that the Zb profile can be predicted from the assumption that weathering occurs when drainage is induced in the uplifting fresh bedrock under hillslopes by lateral head gradients driven by channel incision at the hillslope boundary. Infiltrating winter precipitation is impeded at the lower conductivity boundary at Zb, generating perched groundwater that dynamically pulses water laterally to the channel, controlling stream runoff. Below the soil and above the water table lies an unsaturated zone through which all recharge to the perched groundwater (and thus all runoff to channels) occurs. It is this zone and the waters in them that profoundly affect critical zone processes. In our seasonally dry environment, the first rains penetrate past the soil and moisten the underlying weathered bedrock (Salve et al., 2012, WRR). It takes about 200 to 400 mm of cumulative rain, however, before the underlying groundwater rises significantly. Oshun et al (in review) show that by this cumulative rainfall the average of the wide-ranging isotopic signature of rain reaches a nearly constant average annual value. Consequently, the recharging perched groundwater shows only minor temporal isotopic variation. Kim et al, (2014, GCA) find that the winter high-flow groundwater chemistry is controlled by relatively fast-reacting cation exchange processes, likely occurring in transit in the unsaturated zone. Oshun also demonstrates that the Douglas fir rely on this rock moisture as a water source, while the broadleaf trees (oaks and madrone) use mostly soil moisture. Link et al (2014 WRR) show that Doug fir declines

  17. Effects of climate and lifeform on dry matter yield (epsilon) from simulations using BIOME BGC. [ecosystem process model for vegetation biomass production using daily absorbed photosynthetically active radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Running, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An ecosystem process simulation model, BIOME-BGC, is used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the factors that may cause the dry matter yield (epsilon) and annual net primary production to vary for different ecosystems. At continental scales, epsilon is strongly correlated with annual precipitation. At a single location, year-to-year variation in net primary production (NPP) and epsilon is correlated with either annual precipitation or minimum air temperatures. Simulations indicate that forests have lower epsilon than grasslands. The most sensitive parameter affecting forest epsilon is the total amount of living woody biomass, which affects NPP by increasing carbon loss by maintenance respiration. A global map of woody biomass should significantly improve estimates of global NPP using remote sensing.

  18. Mineral-vegetal co-milling: An effective process to improve lignocellulosic biomass fine milling and to increase interweaving between mixed particles.

    PubMed

    Motte, J-C; Delenne, J-Y; Rouau, X; Mayer-Laigle, C

    2015-09-01

    Fine-milling is a crucial objective for lignocellulosic biomass valorization. Co-milling appears to be a promising technique to improve its efficiency. However, the mechanisms occurring while co-milling remain poorly understood. In this study, an experimental work was performed to produce co-milled powders from both lignocellulosic (wheat, straw or pine sawdust) and mineral materials (limestone, quartzite or tile) with very contrasted physicochemical properties. The main consequences of co-milling were studied for both materials. A two-component mixing law for the prediction of the blend properties was proposed (particle sizes and true densities) to highlight the gain of this single processing step compared to separate milling and mixing. The predicted values were compared with experimental data for co-milled powders at 7 biomass contents from 0% to 100%. In all cases, co-milling leads to a reduction in particle size of lignocellulosic materials and create strong interweaving with mineral particles.

  19. On the evaluation of vegetation resilience in Southern Italy by using satellite VEGETATION, MODIS, TM time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluzzi, C.; Didonna, I.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite technologies can be profitably used for investigating the dynamics of vegetation re-growth after disturbance at different temporal and spatial scales. Nevertheless, disturbance -induced dynamical processes are very difficult to study since they affect the complex soil-surface-atmosphere system, due to the existence of feedback mechanisms involving human activity, ecological patterns and different subsystems of climate. The remote sensing of vegetation has been traditionally carried out by using vegetation indices, which are quantitative measures, based on vegetation spectral properties, that attempt to measure biomass or vegetative vigor. The vegetation indices operate by contrasting intense chlorophyll pigment absorption in the red against the high reflectance of leaf mesophyll in the near infrared. The simplest form of vegetation index is simply a ratio between two digital values from these two spectral bands. The most widely used index is the well-known normalized difference vegetation index NDVI = [NIR-R]/ [NIR+R]. The normalization of the NDVI reduces the effects of variations caused by atmospheric contaminations. High values of the vegetation index identify pixels covered by substantial proportions of healthy vegetation. NDVI is indicative of plant photosynthetic activity and has been found to be related to the green leaf area index and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation. Therefore variations in NDVI values become indicative of variations in vegetation composition and dynamics. In this study, we analyze the mutiscale satellite temporal series ( 1998 to 2008) of NDVI and other vegetation indices from SPOT VEGETATION and Landsat TM data acquired for some significant test areas affetced and unaffected (Southern Italy) by different type of environmenta diturbances (drought, salinity, pollution, etc). Our objective is to characterize quantitatively the resilient effect of vegetation cover at different temporal and

  20. On the evaluation of vegetation resilience in Southern Italy by using VEGETATION, MODIS, TM satellite time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didonna, I.; Coluzzi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite technologies can be profitably used for investigating the dynamics of vegetation re-growth after disturbance at different temporal and spatial scales. Nevertheless, disturbance -induced dynamical processes are very difficult to study since they affect the complex soil-surface-atmosphere system, due to the existence of feedback mechanisms involving human activity, ecological patterns and different subsystems of climate. The remote sensing of vegetation has been traditionally carried out by using vegetation indices, which are quantitative measures, based on vegetation spectral properties, that attempt to measure biomass or vegetative vigor. The vegetation indices operate by contrasting intense chlorophyll pigment absorption in the red against the high reflectance of leaf mesophyll in the near infrared. The simplest form of vegetation index is simply a ratio between two digital values from these two spectral bands. The most widely used index is the well-known normalized difference vegetation index NDVI = [NIR-R]/ [NIR+R]. The normalization of the NDVI reduces the effects of variations caused by atmospheric contaminations. High values of the vegetation index identify pixels covered by substantial proportions of healthy vegetation. NDVI is indicative of plant photosynthetic activity and has been found to be related to the green leaf area index and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation. Variations in NDVI values become indicative of variations in vegetation composition and dynamics. In this study, we analyze the mutiscale satellite temporal series ( 2000 to 2008) of NDVI and other vegetation indices from SPOT VEGETATION, MODIS and Landsat TM data acquired for some significant test areas affetced and unaffected (Southern Italy) by different types of environmental diturbances (drought, salinity, pollution, etc). Our objective was to characterize quantitatively the resilient effect of vegetation cover at differen temporal and

  1. Products from vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Vegetable oils serve various industrial applications such as plasticizers, emulsifiers, surfactants, plastics and resins. Research and development approaches may take advantage of natural properties of the oils. More often it is advantageous to modify those properties for specific applications. One example is the preparation of ink vehicles using vegetable oils in the absence of petroleum. They are cost competitive with petroleum-based inks with similar quality factors. Vegetable oils have potential as renewable sources of fuels for the diesel engine. However, several characteristics can restrict their use. These include poor cold-engine startup, misfire and for selected fuels, high pour point and cloud point temperatures. Other characteristics include incomplete combustion causing carbon buildup, lube oil dilution and degradation, and elevated NO{sub x} emissions. Precombustion and fuel quality data are presented as a tool for understanding and solving these operational and durability problems.

  2. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  3. Climate Change Implications to Vegetation Production in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigh, Christopher S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of long-term meteorological satellite data revealed statistically significant vegetation response to climate drivers of temperature, precipitation and solar radiation with exclusion of fire disturbance in Alaska. Abiotic trends were correlated to satellite remote sensing observations of normalized difference vegetation index to understand biophysical processes that could impact ecosystem carbon storage. Warming resulted in disparate trajectories for vegetation growth due to precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation variation. Interior spruce forest low lands in late summer through winter had precipitation deficit which resulted in extensive fire disturbance and browning of undisturbed vegetation with reduced post-fire recovery while Northern slope moist alpine tundra had increased production due to warmer-wetter conditions during the late 1990s and early 2000s. Coupled investigation of Alaska s vegetation response to warming climate found spatially dynamic abiotic processes with vegetation browning not a result from increased fire disturbance.

  4. Evaluating models of climate and forest vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, James S.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding how the biosphere may respond to increasing trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere requires models that contain vegetation responses to regional climate. Most of the processes ecologists study in forests, including trophic interactions, nutrient cycling, and disturbance regimes, and vital components of the world economy, such as forest products and agriculture, will be influenced in potentially unexpected ways by changing climate. These vegetation changes affect climate in the following ways: changing C, N, and S pools; trace gases; albedo; and water balance. The complexity of the indirect interactions among variables that depend on climate, together with the range of different space/time scales that best describe these processes, make the problems of modeling and prediction enormously difficult. These problems of predicting vegetation response to climate warming and potential ways of testing model predictions are the subjects of this chapter.

  5. Vegetable oil as fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A review is presented of various experiments undertaken over the past few years in the U.S. to test the performance of vegetable oils in diesel engines, mainly with a view to on-farm energy self-sufficiency. The USDA Northern Regional Research Center in Peoria, Illinois, is screening native U.S. plant species as potential fuel oil sources.

  6. Fermented and Acidified Vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetables may be preserved by fermentation, direct acidification, or a combination of these along with pasteurization or refrigeration and selected additives to yield products with an extended shelf life and enhanced safety. Organic acids such as lactic, acetic, sorbic and benzoic acids along with ...

  7. Impact of natural climate change and historical land use on vegetation cover and geomorphological process dynamics in the Serra dos Órgãos mountain range in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehren, U.; Sattler, D.; Heinrich, J.

    2010-03-01

    The Serra dos Órgãos mountain range in the hinterland of Rio de Janeiro contains extensive remnants of the Atlantic Forest (Mata Atlântica) biome, which once covered about 1.5 million km² from Northeast to South Brazil and further inland to Paraguay and Argentina. As a result of historical deforestation and recent land use intensification processes today only 5 to 8% of the original Atlantic Forest remains. Despite the dramatic habitat loss and a high degree of forest fragmentation, the remnants are among the Earth’s most diverse habitats in terms of species richness. Furthermore, they are characterized by a high level of endemism. Therefore, the biome is considered a "hotspot of biodiversity". In the last years many efforts have been taken to investigate the Mata Atlântica biome in different spatial and time scales and from different scientific perspectives. We are working in the Atlantic Forest of Rio de Janeiro since 2004 and focus in our research particularly on Quaternary landscape evolution and landscape history. By means of landscape and soil archives we reconstruct changes in the landscape system, which are mainly the result of Quaternary climate variability, young tectonic uplift and human impact. The findings throw light on paleoecological conditions in the Late Quaternary and the impact of pre-colonial and colonial land use practices on these landscapes. In this context, a main focus is set on climate and human-driven changes of the vegetation cover and its consequences for the geomorphological process dynamics, in particular erosion and sedimentation processes. Research methods include geomorphological field studies, interpretation of satellite images, physical and chemical sediment and soil analyses as well as relative and absolute dating (Feo/Fed ratio and 14C dating). For the Late Quaternary landscape evolution, the findings are compared with results from paleoclimatic and paloecological investigations in Southeast and South Brazil using other

  8. Estimating the vegetation water content using a radar vegetation index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter. Here, the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) based on polarimetric backscatter observations was evaluated for estimating vegetation water content. Analysis utilized a data set obtained by a ground-based multi-frequency polarimetric scatterome...

  9. FLUVIAL DISTURBANCE AND WETLAND VEGETATION DEVELOPMENT, UPPER MAIN STEM, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeomorphic processes drive vegetation establishment, and promote development of diverse wetland and riparian types associated with lotic ecosystems. The main objective of this study was to estimate the rate and pattern of vegetation development on bars tracked since 1936, a...

  10. Toward a comprehensive landscape vegetation monitoring framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Robert; Hughes, Joseph; Neeti, Neeti; Larrue, Tara; Gregory, Matthew; Roberts, Heather; Ohmann, Janet; Kane, Van; Kane, Jonathan; Hooper, Sam; Nelson, Peder; Cohen, Warren; Yang, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Blossoming Earth observation resources provide great opportunity to better understand land vegetation dynamics, but also require new techniques and frameworks to exploit their potential. Here, I describe several parallel projects that leverage time-series Landsat imagery to describe vegetation dynamics at regional and continental scales. At the core of these projects are the LandTrendr algorithms, which distill time-series earth observation data into periods of consistent long or short-duration dynamics. In one approach, we built an integrated, empirical framework to blend these algorithmically-processed time-series data with field data and lidar data to ascribe yearly change in forest biomass across the US states of Washington, Oregon, and California. In a separate project, we expanded from forest-only monitoring to full landscape land cover monitoring over the same regional scale, including both categorical class labels and continuous-field estimates. In these and other projects, we apply machine-learning approaches to ascribe all changes in vegetation to driving processes such as harvest, fire, urbanization, etc., allowing full description of both disturbance and recovery processes and drivers. Finally, we are moving toward extension of these same techniques to continental and eventually global scales using Google Earth Engine. Taken together, these approaches provide one framework for describing and understanding processes of change in vegetation communities at broad scales.

  11. A Coupled Vegetation-Crust Model for Patchy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinast, Shai; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Meron, Ehud

    2016-03-01

    A new model for patchy landscapes in drylands is introduced. The model captures the dynamics of biogenic soil crusts and their mutual interactions with vegetation growth. The model is used to identify spatially uniform and spatially periodic solutions that represent different vegetation-crust states, and map them along the rainfall gradient. The results are consistent extensions of the vegetation states found in earlier models. A significant difference between the current and earlier models of patchy landscapes is found in the bistability range of vegetated and unvegetated states; the incorporation of crust dynamics shifts the onset of vegetation patterns to a higher precipitation value and increases the biomass amplitude. These results can shed new light on the involvement of biogenic crusts in desertification processes that involve vegetation loss.

  12. Evapotranspiration estimation in heterogeneous urban vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Nouri, H.; Beecham, S.; Anderson, S.; Sutton, P.; Chavoshi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Finding a valid approach to measure the water requirements of mixed urban vegetation is a challenge. Evapotranspiration (ET) is the main component of a plant's water requirement. A better understanding of the ET of urban vegetation is essential for sustainable urbanisation. Increased implementation of green infrastructure will be informed by this work. Despite promising technologies and sophisticated facilities, ET estimation of urban vegetation remains insufficiently characterized. We reviewed the common field, laboratory and modelling techniques for ET estimation, mostly agriculture and forestry applications. We opted for 3 approaches of ET estimation: 1) an observational-based method using adjustment factors applied to reference ET, 2) a field-based method of Soil Water Balance (SWB) and 3) a Remote Sensing (RS)-based method. These approaches were applied to an experimental site to evaluate the most suitable ET estimation approach for an urban parkland. To determine in-situ ET, 2 lysimeters and 4 Neutron Moisture Meter probes were installed. Based on SWB principles, all input water (irrigation, precipitation and upward groundwater movements) and output water (ET, drainage, soil moisture and runoff) were measured monthly for 14 months. The observation based approach and the ground-based approach (SWB) were compared. Our predictions were compared to the actual irrigation rates (data provided by the City Council). Results suggest the observational-based method is the most appropriate urban ET estimation. We examined the capability of RS to estimate ET for urban vegetation. Image processing of 5 WorldView2 satellite images enabled modelling of the relationship between urban vegetation and vegetation indices derived from high resolution images. Our results indicate that an ETobservational-based -NDVI modelling approach is a reliable method of ET estimation for mixed urban vegetation. It also has the advantage of not depending on extensive field data collection.

  13. Decontamination efficiency of high power ultrasound in the fruit and vegetable industry, a review.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Seda Ersus; Turantaş, Fulya

    2013-08-16

    Decontamination of fresh fruits and vegetables is an important unsolved technological problem. The main focus of this review is to summarize and synthesize the results of studies and articles about ultrasonic processing which can be adapted to the wash water decontamination process for fruits and vegetables. This review will also provide an overview about the importance of an effective wash water decontamination process in fruits and vegetables, the increase of foodborne outbreaks caused by fresh fruits and vegetables, microbial inactivation using ultrasound, and an interpretation of the high power ultrasound results in the fruits and vegetable industry. In addition, the limitations of ultrasonic processing in commercial applications have also been introduced.

  14. Vegetable oil fuels: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1999-04-01

    Using vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has economic, environmental, and energy benefits for Turkey. The present work provides insight to the status of vegetable oil fuels in Turkey. A brief historical background of the issue, as well as an up to date review of the research carried out on vegetable oil fuels, is given and the future of their production and application is discussed.

  15. Stochastic Evaluation of Riparian Vegetation Dynamics in River Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Kimura, R.; Toshimori, N.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in sand bars and floodplains has been a serious problem for river management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to accurately predict the vegetation dynamics for a long period of time. In this study, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the dynamics of trees in floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four processes in coupling ecohydrology with biogeomorphology: (i) stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography and (iv) vegetation dynamics on the floodplain. In the model, the flood discharge is stochastically simulated using a Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The model for vegetation dynamics includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by flood impacts, and infant tree invasion. To determine the model parameters, vegetation conditions have been observed mainly before and after flood impacts since 2008 at a field site located between 23.2-24.0 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth locations in Kako River floodplains, where the predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In this presentation, sensitivity of the vegetation overgrowth tendency is investigated in Kako River channels. Through the Monte Carlo simulation for several cross sections in Kako River, responses of the vegetated channels are stochastically evaluated in terms of the changes of discharge magnitude and channel geomorphology. The expectation and standard deviation of vegetation areal ratio are compared in the different channel cross sections for different river discharges and relative floodplain heights. The result shows that the vegetation status changes sensitively in the channels with larger discharge and insensitive in the lower floodplain

  16. Nonlinearities in vegetation functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos-Núñez, Verónika; Müller, Markus; Metzler, Holger; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Given the current drastic changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the role of vegetation in the global carbon cycle, there is increasing attention to the carbon allocation component in biosphere terrestrial models. Improving the representation of C allocation in models could be the key to having better predictions of the fate of C once it enters the vegetation and is partitioned to C pools of different residence times. C allocation has often been modeled using systems of ordinary differential equations, and it has been hypothesized that most models can be generalized with a specific form of a linear dynamical system. However, several studies have highlighted discrepancies between empirical observations and model predictions, attributing these differences to problems with model structure. Although efforts have been made to compare different models, the outcome of these qualitative assessments has been a conceptual categorization of them. In this contribution, we introduce a new effort to identify the main properties of groups of models by studying their mathematical structure. For this purpose, we performed a literature research of the relevant models of carbon allocation in vegetation and developed a database with their representation in symbolic mathematics. We used the Python package SymPy for symbolic mathematics as a common language and manipulated the models to calculate their Jacobian matrix at fixed points and their eigenvalues, among other mathematical analyses. Our preliminary results show a tendency of inverse proportionality between model complexity and size of time/space scale; complex interactions between the variables controlling carbon allocation in vegetation tend to operate at shorter time/space scales, and vice-versa. Most importantly, we found that although the linear structure is common, other structures with non-linearities have been also proposed. We, therefore, propose a new General Model that can accommodate these

  17. Wave Dissipation by Vegetation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    relative to conditions without vegetation. During Hurricanes Charley and Wilma, water levels recorded in two Florida mangrove ecosystems were...reduced by as much as 9.4 cm per km inland. Although water levels were reduced as the surge moved through the coastal mangroves , the relative contribution...of mangroves was still unclear (Krauss et al. 2009). Numerical simulations by Loder et al. (2009) and ERDC/CHL CHETN-I-82 September 2011 2

  18. Characterization of global vegetation using AVHRR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Richard K.

    1998-03-01

    Increase in the levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases over the next half-century may result in an increase in global mean temperature. The recent discoveries of possible advance of arctic tree line into the tundra and earlier greening of northern vegetation provide additional warnings that global warming may indeed be occurring. On the Earth surface, land cover and its changes affect the coupling between the biosphere and the atmosphere, and control many important Earth system processes. Satellite remote sensing provides long-term, repeated coverage over extended area and is the essential data source for monitoring climate changes. An Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder dataset from 1987, in 1 degree latitude-longitude resolution, is used in this study. Two reflective channels, two thermal channels, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index are the input parameters. In conjunction with a global vegetation ground truth, a multi-layer neural network is trained and used for global vegetation characterization. As the same type of vegetation may appear very differently over different parts of the Earth at any given time, global classification is more difficult than local classification. It is shown that a multitemporal approach, in which data from multiple dates are used, may improve the accuracy.

  19. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.B.; Faber-Langendoen, D.; Jennings, M.; Keeler-Wolf, T.; Loucks, O.; Peet, R.; Roberts, D.; McKerrow, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Vegetation Subcommittee, the Ecological Society of America Panel on Vegetation Classification, and NatureServe have worked together to develop the United States National Vegetation Classification (USNVC). The current standard was accepted in 2008 and fosters consistency across Federal agencies and non-federal partners for the description of each vegetation concept and its hierarchical classification. The USNVC is structured as a dynamic standard, where changes to types at any level may be proposed at any time as new information comes in. But, because much information already exists from previous work, the NVC partners first established methods for screening existing types to determine their acceptability with respect to the 2008 standard. Current efforts include a screening process to assign confidence to Association and Group level descriptions, and a review of the upper three levels of the classification. For the upper levels especially, the expectation is that the review process includes international scientists. Immediate future efforts include the review of remaining levels and the development of a proposal review process.

  20. Accumulation and bioavailability of dietary carotenoids in vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Kopsell, Dean A; Kopsell, David E

    2006-10-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments found in many vegetable crops that are reported to have the health benefits of cancer and eye disease reduction when consumed in the diet. Research shows that environmental and genetic factors can significantly influence carotenoid concentrations in vegetable crops, and that changing cultural management strategies could be advantageous, resulting in increased vegetable carotenoid concentrations. Improvements in vegetable carotenoid levels have been achieved using traditional breeding methods and molecular transformations to stimulate biosynthetic pathways. Postharvest and processing activities can alter carotenoid chemistry, and ultimately affect bioavailability. Bioavailability data emphasize the importance of carotenoid enhancement in vegetable crops and the need to characterize potential changes in carotenoid composition during cultivation, storage and processing before consumer purchase.

  1. Dynamic floodplain vegetation model development for the Kootenai River, USA.

    PubMed

    Benjankar, Rohan; Egger, Gregory; Jorde, Klaus; Goodwin, Peter; Glenn, Nancy F

    2011-12-01

    The Kootenai River floodplain in Idaho, USA, is nearly disconnected from its main channel due to levee construction and the operation of Libby Dam since 1972. The decreases in flood frequency and magnitude combined with the river modification have changed the physical processes and the dynamics of floodplain vegetation. This research describes the concept, methodologies and simulated results of the rule-based dynamic floodplain vegetation model "CASiMiR-vegetation" that is used to simulate the effect of hydrological alteration on vegetation dynamics. The vegetation dynamics are simulated based on existing theory but adapted to observed field data on the Kootenai River. The model simulates the changing vegetation patterns on an annual basis from an initial condition based on spatially distributed physical parameters such as shear stress, flood duration and height-over-base flow level. The model was calibrated and the robustness of the model was analyzed. The hydrodynamic (HD) models were used to simulate relevant physical processes representing historic, pre-dam, and post-dam conditions from different representative hydrographs. The general concept of the vegetation model is that a vegetation community will be recycled if the magnitude of a relevant physical parameter is greater than the threshold value for specific vegetation; otherwise, succession will take place toward maturation stage. The overall accuracy and agreement Kappa between simulated and field observed maps were low considering individual vegetation types in both calibration and validation areas. Overall accuracy (42% and 58%) and agreement between maps (0.18 and 0.27) increased notably when individual vegetation types were merged into vegetation phases in both calibration and validation areas, respectively. The area balance approach was used to analyze the proportion of area occupied by different vegetation phases in the simulated and observed map. The result showed the impact of the river

  2. Incineration of Low Level Radioactive Vegetation for Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, N.P.S.; Rucker, G.G.; Looper, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The DOE changing mission at Savannah River Site (SRS) are to increase activities for Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. There are a number of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) locations that are contaminated with radioactivity and support dense vegetation, and are targeted for remediation. Two such locations have been studied for non-time critical removal actions under the National Contingency Plan (NCP). Both of these sites support about 23 plant species. Surveys of the vegetation show that radiation emanates mainly from vines, shrubs, and trees and range from 20,000 to 200,000 d/m beta gamma. Planning for removal and disposal of low-level radioactive vegetation was done with two principal goals: to process contaminated vegetation for optimum volume reduction and waste minimization, and for the protection of human health and environment. Four alternatives were identified as candidates for vegetation removal and disposal: chipping the vegetation and packing in carbon steel boxes (lined with synthetic commercial liners) and disposal at the Solid Waste Disposal Facility at SRS; composting the vegetation; burning the vegetation in the field; and incinerating the vegetation. One alternative `incineration` was considered viable choice for waste minimization, safe handling, and the protection of the environment and human health. Advantages and disadvantages of all four alternatives considered have been evaluated. For waste minimization and ultimate disposal of radioactive vegetation incineration is the preferred option. Advantages of incineration are that volume reduction is achieved and low-level radioactive waste are stabilized. For incineration and final disposal vegetation will be chipped and packed in card board boxes and discharged to the rotary kiln of the incinerator. The slow rotation and longer resident time in the kiln will ensure complete combustion of the vegetative material.

  3. INTERCOMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE VEGETATION DATABASES FOR REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation cover data are used to characterize several regional air quality modeling processes, including the calculation of heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes with the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5) and the estimate of biogenic volatile organic compound and nitric oxide...

  4. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    SciTech Connect

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002

  5. Experimental Study of Flows Induced Scour around compound Vegetation Patch in Different Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hsun-Chuan; Huang, Tai-Ran

    2015-04-01

    In the natural rivers, woody vegetation commonly grows along the riverbank. When flows run through the woody vegetation zones, the stream processes are markedly affected. Previous studies were to explore Single-density vegetation group. This study used a combination of dual-density vegetation group. We experimentally investigated the flows induced scour around vegetation patch in different density. Since vegetation grows along the nature bank, so the vegetation model is arranged along one side of the flume wall. The experiments were expected to simulate the near bank scour in the jointed effects of vegetation and levee. The woody vegetation was set in 10 square centimeters. Modelled vegetation was simulated by the steel columns in the emergent flow conditions. Uniform sand with a median size of 0.88 mm was used as the bed sediment. The experimental flow was steady and flow velocity was adopted to close to the initiation of sediment motion. It was observed sediment erosion phenomenon around the vegetation zone. The bed morphology of equilibrium scour condition was measured by a Laser Distance Meter in the cases of vegetation density equal to 0.03, 0.04, 0.05, 0.07, 0.09, 0.12, 0.15,0.2, and 0.3. Test result of the vegetation group compound arrangement made by a combination of density 0.03, 0.05, 0.09, and 0.12. The difference between double density and single density of the vegetation was compared. Vegetation densities were used to research the effects of vegetation on the maximum scour depth of the scour hole. Near the vegetation zone, the size of the scour hole increased as the vegetation density increased. However, the height of depositing dune is in a low correlation with vegetation density. Location of Maximum scour depth and the maximum accumulation will move upstream with the density increase.

  6. White vegetables: glycemia and satiety.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G Harvey; Soeandy, Chesarahmia Dojo; Smith, Christopher E

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss the effect of white vegetable consumption on glycemia, satiety, and food intake. White vegetables is a term used to refer to vegetables that are white or near white in color and include potatoes, cauliflowers, turnips, onions, parsnips, white corn, kohlrabi, and mushrooms (technically fungi but generally considered a vegetable). They vary greatly in their contribution to the energy and nutrient content of the diet and glycemia and satiety. As with other foods, the glycemic effect of many white vegetables has been measured. The results illustrate that interpretation of the semiquantitative comparative ratings of white vegetables as derived by the glycemic index must be context dependent. As illustrated by using the potato as an example, the glycemic index of white vegetables can be misleading if not interpreted in the context of the overall contribution that the white vegetable makes to the carbohydrate and nutrient composition of the diet and their functionality in satiety and metabolic control within usual meals. It is concluded that application of the glycemic index in isolation to judge the role of white vegetables in the diet and, specifically in the case of potato as consumed in ad libitum meals, has led to premature and possibly counterproductive dietary guidance.

  7. Salt marsh vegetation promotes efficient tidal channel networks.

    PubMed

    Kearney, William S; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-07-19

    Tidal channel networks mediate the exchange of water, nutrients and sediment between an estuary and marshes. Biology feeds back into channel morphodynamics through the influence of vegetation on both flow and the cohesive strength of channel banks. Determining how vegetation affects channel networks is essential in understanding the biological functioning of intertidal ecosystems and their ecosystem services. However, the processes that control the formation of an efficient tidal channel network remain unclear. Here we compare the channel networks of vegetated salt marshes in Massachusetts and the Venice Lagoon to unvegetated systems in the arid environments of the Gulf of California and Yemen. We find that the unvegetated systems are dissected by less efficient channel networks than the vegetated salt marshes. These differences in network geometry reflect differences in the branching and meandering of the channels in the network, characteristics that are related to the density of vegetation on the marsh.

  8. Salt marsh vegetation promotes efficient tidal channel networks

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, William S.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Tidal channel networks mediate the exchange of water, nutrients and sediment between an estuary and marshes. Biology feeds back into channel morphodynamics through the influence of vegetation on both flow and the cohesive strength of channel banks. Determining how vegetation affects channel networks is essential in understanding the biological functioning of intertidal ecosystems and their ecosystem services. However, the processes that control the formation of an efficient tidal channel network remain unclear. Here we compare the channel networks of vegetated salt marshes in Massachusetts and the Venice Lagoon to unvegetated systems in the arid environments of the Gulf of California and Yemen. We find that the unvegetated systems are dissected by less efficient channel networks than the vegetated salt marshes. These differences in network geometry reflect differences in the branching and meandering of the channels in the network, characteristics that are related to the density of vegetation on the marsh. PMID:27430165

  9. Remote sensing of aquatic vegetation: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago S F; Costa, Maycira P F; Melack, John M; Novo, Evlyn M L M

    2008-05-01

    Aquatic vegetation is an important component of wetland and coastal ecosystems, playing a key role in the ecological functions of these environments. Surveys of macrophyte communities are commonly hindered by logistic problems, and remote sensing represents a powerful alternative, allowing comprehensive assessment and monitoring. Also, many vegetation characteristics can be estimated from reflectance measurements, such as species composition, vegetation structure, biomass, and plant physiological parameters. However, proper use of these methods requires an understanding of the physical processes behind the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and vegetation, and remote sensing of aquatic plants have some particular difficulties that have to be properly addressed in order to obtain successful results. The present paper reviews the theoretical background and possible applications of remote sensing techniques to the study of aquatic vegetation.

  10. Use of spectral channels and vegetation indices from satellite VEGETATION time series for the Post-Fire vegetation recovery estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluzzi, Rosa; Lasaponara, Rosa; Montesano, Tiziana; Lanorte, Antonio; de Santis, Fortunato

    2010-05-01

    Satellite data can help monitoring the dynamics of vegetation in burned and unburned areas. Several methods can be used to perform such kind of analysis. This paper is focused on the use of different satellite-based parameters for fire recovery monitoring. In particular, time series of single spectral channels and vegetation indices from SPOT-VEGETATION have investigated. The test areas is the Mediterranean ecosystems of Southern Italy. For this study we considered: 1) the most widely used index to follow the process of recovery after fire: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained from the visible (Red) and near infrared (NIR) by using the following formula NDVI = (NIR_Red)/(NIR + Red), 2) moisture index MSI obtained from the near infrared and Mir for characterization of leaf and canopy water content. 3) NDWI obtained from the near infrared and Mir as in the case of MSI, but with the normalization (as the NDVI) to reduce the atmospheric effects. All analysis for this work was performed on ten-daily normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (S10) from the SPOT- VEGETATION (VGT) sensor. The final data set consisted of 279 ten-daily, 1 km resolution NDVI S1O composites for the period 1 April 1998 to 31 December 2005 with additional surface reflectance values in the blue (B; 0.43-0.47,um), red (R; 0.61-0.68,um), near-infrared (NIR; 0.78-0.89,um) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR; 1.58-1.75,um) spectral bands, and information on the viewing geometry and pixel status. Preprocessing of the data was performed by the Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO) in the framework of the Global Vegetation Monitoring (GLOVEG) preprocessing chain. It consisted of the Simplified Method for Atmospheric Correction (SMAC) and compositing at ten-day intervals based on the Maximum Value Compositing (MVC) criterion. All the satellite time series were analysed using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to estimate post fire vegetation recovery

  11. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ita, A.; Flores, G.; Franco, F.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different.

  12. Assessment of Stage of Change, Decisional Balance, Self-Efficacy, and Use of Processes of Change of Low-Income Parents for Increasing Servings of Fruits and Vegetables to Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Deana A.; Betts, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Use the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM) to determine the proportionate stage of change of low-income parents and primary caregivers (PPC) for increasing accessibility, measured as servings served, of fruits and vegetables (FV) to their preschool-aged children and evaluate response differences for theoretical constructs.…

  13. Monitoring tropical vegetation succession with LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, V. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    The shadowing problem, which is endemic to the use of LANDSAT in tropical areas, and the ability to model changes over space and through time are problems to be addressed when monitoring tropical vegetation succession. Application of a trend surface analysis model to major land cover classes in a mountainous region of the Phillipines shows that the spatial modeling of radiance values can provide a useful approach to tropical rain forest succession monitoring. Results indicate shadowing effects may be due primarily to local variations in the spectral responses. These variations can be compensated for through the decomposition of the spatial variation in both elevation and MSS data. Using the model to estimate both elevation and spectral terrain surface as a posteriori inputs in the classification process leads to improved classification accuracy for vegetation of cover of this type. Spatial patterns depicted by the MSS data reflect the measurement of responses to spatial processes acting at several scales.

  14. Scour patterns around isolated vegetation elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagci, Oral; Celik, Mehmet Furkan; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Ozgur Kirca, V. S.; Hodoglu, Can; Valyrakis, Manousos; Duran, Zaide; Kaya, Sinasi

    2016-11-01

    The complex multi-directional interactions between hydrological, biological and fluvial processes govern the formation and evolution of river landscapes. In this context, as key geomorphological agents, riparian trees are particularly important in trapping sediment and constructing distinct landforms, which subsequently evolve to larger ones. The primary objective of this paper is to experimentally investigate the scour/deposition patterns around different forms of individual vegetation elements. Flume experiments were conducted in which the scour patterns around different representative forms of individual in-stream obstructions (solid cylinder, hexagonal array of circular cylinders, several forms of emergent and submerged vegetation) were monitored by means of a high-resolution laser scanner. The three dimensional scour geometry around the simulated vegetation elements was quantified and discussed based on the introduced dimensionless morphometric characteristics. The findings reveal that the intact vegetation forms generated two elongated scour holes at the downstream with a pronounced ridge. For the impermeable form of the plant, the scour got localized, more deposition was detected within the monitoring zone, and the distance between the obstruction and deposition zone became shorter. It is also shown that with the effect of bending and the subsequent decrease of the projected area of the plant and the increase of bulk volume, the characteristic scour values decrease compared to the intact version, and the scour zone obtains a more elongated form and expands in the downstream direction.

  15. Removal of Atmospheric Particulates by Urban Vegetation: Implications for Human and Vegetative Health

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William H.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals considerable evidence to support the suggestion that vegetative surfaces remove particulate matter from the atmosphere. Preliminary observations of the leaf surfaces of an important urban tree indicate the presence of numerous particulate contaminants. In view of the medical importance of fine particles in urban atmospheres, it is important to assess the efficiency of tree surfaces in particle retention. Can particulate loads be reduced below biologically significant thresholds by vegetation? Are trees acutely injured or subtly influenced in the process of this removal? A brief assessment of research needs is provided. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:331695

  16. Behavior of glucosinolates in pickling cruciferous vegetables.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chise; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Murata, Takashi; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2006-12-13

    Crucifer species, which include widely consumed vegetables, contain glucosinolates as secondary metabolites. Cruciferous vegetables are consumed in Japan in salt-preserved or pickled form as well as cooked and raw fresh vegetables. In this study, changes in contents of glucosinolates during the pickling process were investigated. 4-Methylthio-3-butenyl glucosinolate, a major glucosinolate in the root of Japanese radish, daikon (Raphanus sativus L.), was detected in pickled products with a short maturation period but not in those with a long maturation period. As a model pickling experiment, fresh watercress (Nasturtium officinale) and blanched watercress were soaked in 3% NaCl solution for 7 days. The results showed that the ratio of indole glucosinolates to total glucosinolates increased during the pickling process, whereas total glucosinolates decreased. Myrosinase digestion of glucosinolates in nozawana (Brassica rapa L.) indicated that indole glucosinolates, especially 4-methoxyglucobrassicin, were relatively resistant to the enzyme. The effect of pickling on glucosinolate content and the possible mechanism are discussed in view of degradation by myrosinase and synthetic reaction in response to salt stress or compression during the pickling process.

  17. Evolution of vegetated waterways design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1990, the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) was recognized as a National Historic Landmark by ASABE for its groundbreaking work and development of vegetated waterways design procedures. In 2000, ASABE acknowledged the vegetated waterway design criteria as an Outstanding Achieve...

  18. Grafting effects on vegetable quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, vegetable grafting is rare and few experiments have been done to determine optimal grafting procedures and production practices for different geographical and climatic regions in America. Grafting vegetables to control soilborne disease is a common practice in Asia, parts of E...

  19. Importance of vegetation distribution for future carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlström, A.; Xia, J.; Arneth, A.; Luo, Y.; Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    Projections of future terrestrial carbon uptake vary greatly between simulations. Net primary production (NPP), wild fires, vegetation dynamics (including biome shifts) and soil decomposition constitute the main processes governing the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle in a changing climate. While primary production and soil respiration are relatively well studied and implemented in all global ecosystem models used to project the future land sink of CO2, vegetation dynamics are less studied and not always represented in global models. Here we used a detailed second generation dynamic global vegetation model with advanced representation of vegetation growth and mortality and the associated turnover and proven skill in predicting vegetation distribution and succession. We apply an emulator that describes the carbon flows and pools exactly as in simulations with the full model. The emulator simulates ecosystem dynamics in response to 13 different climate or Earth system model simulations from the CMIP5 ensemble under RCP8.5 radiative forcing at year 2085. We exchanged carbon cycle processes between these 13 simulations and investigate the changes predicted by the emulator. This method allowed us to partition the entire ensemble carbon uptake uncertainty into individual processes. We found that NPP, vegetation dynamics (including biome shifts, wild fires and mortality) and soil decomposition rates explained 49%, 17% and 33% respectively of uncertainties in modeled global C-uptake. Uncertainty due to vegetation dynamics was further partitioned into stand-clearing disturbances (16%), wild fires (0%), stand dynamics (7%), reproduction (10%) and biome shifts (67%) globally. We conclude that while NPP and soil decomposition rates jointly account for 83% of future climate induced C-uptake uncertainties, vegetation turnover and structure, dominated by shifts in vegetation distribution, represent a significant fraction globally and regionally (tropical forests: 40

  20. Vegetation spatial variability and its effect on vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.; Choudhury, B. J.; Owe, M.

    1987-01-01

    Landsat MSS data were used to simulate low resolution satellite data, such as NOAA AVHRR, to quantify the fractional vegetation cover within a pixel and relate the fractional cover to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR). The MSS data were converted to radiances from which the NDVI and SR values for the simulated pixels were determined. Each simulated pixel was divided into clusters using an unsupervised classification program. Spatial and spectral analysis provided a means of combining clusters representing similar surface characteristics into vegetated and non-vegetated areas. Analysis showed an average error of 12.7 per cent in determining these areas. NDVI values less than 0.3 represented fractional vegetated areas of 5 per cent or less, while a value of 0.7 or higher represented fractional vegetated areas greater than 80 per cent. Regression analysis showed a strong linear relation between fractional vegetation area and the NDVI and SR values; correlation values were 0.89 and 0.95 respectively. The range of NDVI values calculated from the MSS data agrees well with field studies.

  1. Classification of wetlands vegetation using small scale color infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. S. L.

    1975-01-01

    A classification system for Chesapeake Bay wetlands was derived from the correlation of film density classes and actual vegetation classes. The data processing programs used were developed by the Laboratory for the Applications of Remote Sensing. These programs were tested for their value in classifying natural vegetation, using digitized data from small scale aerial photography. Existing imagery and the vegetation map of Farm Creek Marsh were used to determine the optimal number of classes, and to aid in determining if the computer maps were a believable product.

  2. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  3. Vegetation recovery on closed paths in temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Roovers, Pieter; Bossuyt, Beatrijs; Gulinck, Hubert; Hermy, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate vegetation recovery on footpaths in woodland that have been closed for access for 6 years. A vegetation survey was conducted in four mesophile forests, in transects perpendicular to the trail. Analyses concentrated on the direction and rate of the recovery process. Vegetation on trail sides in these ecosystems recovered substantially. Non-metric multidimensional scaling based upon species composition separated the four sample locations and each cluster contained representatives of the three major trail zones: path centre, transition and undisturbed zones. Analysis of distribution of life forms, plant strategies and seedbank longevity indices showed no differences between trail zones. This indicates that vegetation on the path centre is likely to recover towards the plant composition of the undisturbed zone. Ellenberg values indicate that environmental variation is not related to former path structures, as significant variability was only observed between the forest sites. Furthermore, the analysis concentrated on characteristics of species relevant to the recovery process.

  4. Calcium biofortification and bioaccessibility in soilless "baby leaf" vegetable production.

    PubMed

    D'Imperio, Massimiliano; Renna, Massimiliano; Cardinali, Angela; Buttaro, Donato; Serio, Francesco; Santamaria, Pietro

    2016-12-15

    Calcium is an essential nutrient for human health, because it is a structural component and takes part in a variety of biological processes. The aim of this study was to increase Ca content of baby leaf vegetables (BLV: basil, mizuna, tatsoi and endive), as fresh-cut products. For the production of biofortified BLV, a floating system with two level of Ca (100 and 200mgL(-1)) in the nutrient solution was used. In addition, the assessment of bioaccessibility of Ca, by in vitro digestion process, was performed. In all vegetables, the Ca biofortification (200mgL(-1)) caused a significant Ca enrichment (9.5% on average) without affecting vegetables growth, oxalate contents and marketable quality. Calcium bioaccessibility ranged from 25% (basil) to 40% (endive) but the biofortified vegetables showed more bioaccessible Ca. These results underline the possibility to obtain Ca biofortified BLV by using agronomic approaches.

  5. Vegetative bioremediation of phenanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Malathi, A.; Banks, M.K.; Schwab, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    The role of vegetation to stimulate the degradation and detoxification of toxic and recalcitrant organic chemicals at low soil concentrations is brought about by several mechanisms of plant-soil interactions, including improvement of physical and chemical properties of contaminated soils, increase in soil microbial activity and increase in contact between microbes associated with the roots and toxic compounds in a contaminated soil. This represents a potential cost effective and low maintenance alternative for waste management. However, there is not enough information concerning specific application of plants, chemicals and soils either in the form of laboratory or field results. In the research to be presented, different and diverse perennial plant species [grasses (monocot), legumes, and dicots] were collected from the native prairie grasslands and tested for their efficiency in mineralization of phenanthrene. The mineralization of phenanthrene was evaluated by the measurement of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from the radiolabeled target compound incubated in a rhizosphere soil microcosm. Results from this study will indicate the potential of using different types of plants to enhance degradation of PAHs in contaminated soils.

  6. Carboniferous coal swamp vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Peppers, R.A.; DiMichele, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Carboniferous Period was one of considerable change on the Earth. The volume explores these changes by using plant morphology and paleoecology to develop the relationship between plant evolution and the derived coal sources. Both are interrelated by the regional and stratigraphic trends in paleoecology and paleoclimatology. The book is divided into three sections dealing with geology, plant morphology including palynology, and paleoecology. In Section I, the paleogeography, geologic settings of major coal basins, coal resources, coal-ball origins and occurrences, and the sources of paleobotanical information are presented with biostratigraphic correlations of Europe and the United States. Section II emphasizes plant morphology as form and structure provide the means of identifying plants and, in turn, establishing development, size, habit, reproductive biology, environmental parameters, and evolutionary change. Quantitative abundances and stratigraphic ranges of plants and spores are compared and summarized. Lastly, Section III integrates coal-ball peats and coal-spore floras as complementary sources for the quantitative analyses of coal-swamp vegetation in relation to climate and coal. The local and regional swamp studies are interfaced and basinal geology and depositional interpretations in a stratigraphic succession.

  7. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or alternative vegetation management approaches. (b) Vegetation may be cleared to create and maintain... specifically approved in the Vegetative Management Plan. (m) Restricted use herbicides and pesticides shall not... pesticides shall be applied in accordance with label requirements....

  8. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or alternative vegetation management approaches. (b) Vegetation may be cleared to create and maintain... specifically approved in the Vegetative Management Plan. (m) Restricted use herbicides and pesticides shall not... pesticides shall be applied in accordance with label requirements....

  9. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or alternative vegetation management approaches. (b) Vegetation may be cleared to create and maintain... specifically approved in the Vegetative Management Plan. (m) Restricted use herbicides and pesticides shall not... pesticides shall be applied in accordance with label requirements....

  10. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or alternative vegetation management approaches. (b) Vegetation may be cleared to create and maintain... specifically approved in the Vegetative Management Plan. (m) Restricted use herbicides and pesticides shall not... pesticides shall be applied in accordance with label requirements....

  11. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or alternative vegetation management approaches. (b) Vegetation may be cleared to create and maintain... specifically approved in the Vegetative Management Plan. (m) Restricted use herbicides and pesticides shall not... pesticides shall be applied in accordance with label requirements....

  12. Indicators: Lakeshore Habitat/Riparian Vegetative Cover

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Riparian and lakeshore vegetative cover consist of the vegetation corridor alongside streams, rivers, and lakes. Vegetative cover refers to overhanging or submerged tree limbs, shrubs, and other plants growing along the shore of the waterbody.

  13. Dielectric properties of marsh vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana D.; Suslyaev, Valentin I.; Shcheglova, Anna S.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is devoted to the measurement of the dielectric properties of mosses and lichens in the frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz. Subjects of this research were three species of march vegetation - moss (Dicranum polysetum Michx), groundcedar (Diphasiastrum complanatum (L.) Holub) and lichen (Cladonia stellaris). Samples of vegetation were collected in Tomsk region, Western Siberia, Russia. Complex dielectric permittivity was measured in coaxial section by Agilent Technologies vector network analyzer E8363B. Green samples was measured for some moisture contents from 100% to 3-5 % during a natural drying. The measurements were performed at room temperature, which remained within 21 ÷ 23 ° C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant for the three species of marsh vegetation differ markedly. Different parts of the complex permittivity dependency on moisture were fitted by line for all frequency points. Two break point were observed corresponding to the transition of water in the vegetation in various phase states. The complex permittivity spectra of water in the vegetation allow determining the most likely corresponding dielectric model of water in the vegetation by the method of hypothesis testing. It is the Debye's model. Parameters of Debye's model were obtained by numerical methods for all of three states of water. This enables to calculate the dielectric constant of water at any frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz and to find the parameters of the dielectric model of the vegetation.

  14. Green vegetation, nonphotosynthetic vegetation, and soils in AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of distinguishing between green vegetation, nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV, such as dry grass, leaf litter, and woody material), and soils in imaging-spectrometer data is addressed by analyzing an image taken by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (California) on September 20, 1989, using spectral mixture analysis. Over 98 percent of the spectral variation could be explained by linear mixtures of three endmembers, green vegetation, shade, and soil. NPV, which could not be distinguished from soil when included as an endmember, was discriminated by residual spectra that contained cellulose and lignin absorptions. Distinct communities of green vegetation were distinguished by (1) nonlinear mixing effect caused by transmission and scattering by green leaves, (2) variations in a derived canopy-shade spectrum, and (3) the fraction of NPV.

  15. Interactive visualization of vegetation dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, B.C.; Swets, D.; Bard, L.; Brown, J.; Rowland, J.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite imagery provides a mechanism for observing seasonal dynamics of the landscape that have implications for near real-time monitoring of agriculture, forest, and range resources. This study illustrates a technique for visualizing timely information on key events during the growing season (e.g., onset, peak, duration, and end of growing season), as well as the status of the current growing season with respect to the recent historical average. Using time-series analysis of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor, seasonal dynamics can be derived. We have developed a set of Java-based visualization and analysis tools to make comparisons between the seasonal dynamics of the current year with those from the past twelve years. In addition, the visualization tools allow the user to query underlying databases such as land cover or administrative boundaries to analyze the seasonal dynamics of areas of their own interest. The Java-based tools (data exploration and visualization analysis or DEVA) use a Web-based client-server model for processing the data. The resulting visualization and analysis, available via the Internet, is of value to those responsible for land management decisions, resource allocation, and at-risk population targeting.

  16. Effect of blanching and drying methods on the nutritional and sensory quality of leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Onayemi, O; Badifu, G I

    1987-01-01

    The nutrient retention and sensory quality factors of vegetables blanched by two methods and solar-dried or dried in the cabinet dryer were evaluated. The type and conditions of the blanching treatment prior to drying affect the retention of ascorbic acid, carotene, and ash in the dried vegetables. The sun-dried vegetables had inferior colour, texture and acceptibility compared to the vegetables dried in the cabinet dryer. There were significant differences in the rehydration and drying ratio of the dried vegetables. The implications of the blanching and drying processes for an effective preservation technique are discussed.

  17. Analyzing nonlinear variations in terrestrial vegetation in China during 1982-2012.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanxu; Liu, Xianfeng; Hu, Yi'na; Li, Shuangshuang; Peng, Jian; Wang, Yanglin

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying the long-term trends of changes in terrestrial vegetation on a large scale is an effective method for detecting the effects of global environmental change. In view of the trend towards overall restoration and local degradation of terrestrial vegetation in China, it is necessary to pay attention to the spatial processes of vegetative restoration or degradation, as well as to clarify the temporal and spatial characteristics of vegetative growth in greater geographical detail. However, traditional linear regression analysis has some drawbacks when describing ecological processes. Combining nonparametric linear regression analysis with high-order nonlinear fitting, the temporal and spatial characteristics of terrestrial vegetative growth in China during 1982-2012 were detected using the third generation of Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS3g) dataset. The results showed that high-order curves could be effective. The region joining Ordos City and Shaanxi Gansu Ningxia on the Loess Plateau may have experienced restoration-degradation-restoration processes of vegetative growth. In the Daloushan Mountains, degradation-restoration processes of vegetative growth may have occurred, and the occurrence of several hidden vegetative growth processes was located in different regions of eastern China. Changes in cultivated vegetation were inconsistent with changes in other vegetation types. In southern China and some high-altitude areas, temperature was the primary driver of vegetative growth on an interannual scale, while in the north, the effect of rainfall was more significant. Nevertheless, the influence of climate on vegetation activity in large urban areas was weak. The trend types of degradation-restoration processes in several regions were inconsistent with the implements of regional land development and protection strategy. Thus, the role of human activity cannot be ignored. In future studies, it will be still necessary to quantify the

  18. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  19. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  20. Monitoring vegetation growth and morphodynamic effects after stream restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Luna, Andrés; Crosato, Alessandra; Anders, Niels; Hoitink, Ton; Keesstra, Saskia; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation processes are widely recognized as a key component on the ecological and morphological development of river channels. Moreover, plants reduce flow velocities and bed-shear stresses by increasing the local hydraulic roughness and thus increasing water levels. Therefore, monitoring the vegetation development is an important activity in river management not only for protecting ecological services, but also in flood risk reduction; especially in times of a changing climate. This paper presents the analysis the effects of riparian vegetation growth on the morphology of a lowland restored stream located in The Netherlands, the Lunterse beek. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was used to obtain aerial imagery at different time steps which was the basis for generating land cover maps with semi-automated image classification. In addition hydrological series and multi-temporal high-resolution bathymetric data allowed analysing river bed morphology and the relevance of seasonality. The UAV campaigns were found a crucial step to ease the vegetation mapping and monitoring. The morphological change observed in this stream, represented by the channel-width adjustment and the cross sectional evolution, is slowed down once vegetation is stablished on the stream. Results of this work show that the vegetation root system assert a strong control on soil stabilization, even during the winter season when the plants biomass is highly reduced. Seasonal variations in plant development appear important only during the first stages of establishment, when vegetation has a low density and, more importantly, a root system that is not fully developed yet.

  1. Influence of cooking methods on antioxidant activity of vegetables.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Monreal, A M; García-Diz, L; Martínez-Tomé, M; Mariscal, M; Murcia, M A

    2009-04-01

    The influence of home cooking methods (boiling, microwaving, pressure-cooking, griddling, frying, and baking) on the antioxidant activity of vegetables has been evaluated in 20 vegetables, using different antioxidant activity assays (lipoperoxyl and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and TEAC). Artichoke was the only vegetable that kept its very high scavenging-lipoperoxyl radical capacity in all the cooking methods. The highest losses of LOO. scavenging capacity were observed in cauliflower after boiling and microwaving, pea after boiling, and zucchini after boiling and frying. Beetroot, green bean, and garlic kept their antioxidant activity after most cooking treatments. Swiss chard and pepper lost OH. scavenging capacity in all the processes. Celery increased its antioxidant capacity in all the cooking methods, except boiling when it lost 14%. Analysis of the ABTS radical scavenging capacity of the different vegetables showed that the highest losses occurred in garlic with all the methods, except microwaving. Among the vegetables that increased their TEAC values were green bean, celery, and carrot after all cooking methods (except green bean after boiling). These 3 types of vegetables showed a low ABTS radical scavenging capacity. According to the method of analysis chosen, griddling, microwave cooking, and baking alternately produce the lowest losses, while pressure-cooking and boiling lead to the greatest losses; frying occupies an intermediate position. In short, water is not the cook's best friend when it comes to preparing vegetables.

  2. Late-quaternary vegetational dynamics and community stability reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.

    1983-03-01

    Defining the spatial and temporal limits of vegetational processes such as migration and invasion of established communities is a prerequisite to evaluating the degree of stability in plant communities through the late Quaternary. The interpretation of changes in boundaries of major vegetation types over the past 20,000 yr offers a complementary view to that provided by migration maps for particular plant taxa. North of approximately 43°N in eastern North America, continual vegetational disequilibrium has resulted from climatic change, soil development, and species migrations during postglacial times. Between 33° and 39°N, stable full-glacial vegetation was replaced by a relatively unstable vegetation during late-glacial climatic amelioration; stable interglacial vegetation developed there after about 9000 yr B.P. Late-Quaternary vegetation has been in dynamic equilibrium, with a relatively constant flora, south of 33°N on upland interfluves along the northern Gulf Coastal Plain, peninsular Florida, and west-central Mexico.

  3. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  4. Vegetation ecogeomorphology, dynamic equilibrium, and disturbance: chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    Early ecologists understood the need to document geomorphic form and process to explain plant species distributions. Although this relationship has been acknowledged for over a century, with the exception of a few landmark papers, only the past few decades have experienced intensive research on this interdisciplinary topic. Here the authors provide a summary of the intimate relations between vegetation and geomorphic/process on hillslopes and fluvial systems. These relations are separated into systems (primarily fluvial) in dynamic equilibrium and those that are in nonequilibrium conditions including the impacts of various human disturbances affecting landforms, geomorphic processes, and interrelated, attendant vegetation patterns and processes. The authors conclude with a conceptual model of stream regime focusing on sediment deposition, erosion, and equilibrium that can be expanded to organize and predict vegetation patterns and life history strategies.

  5. The Circumpolar Arctic vegetation map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Donald A.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Daniels, F.J.A.; Einarsson, E.; Elvebakk, A.; Gould, W.A.; Katenin, A.E.; Kholod, S.S.; Markon, C.J.; Melnikov, E.S.; Moskalenko, N.G.; Talbot, S. S.; Yurtsev, B.A.; Bliss, L.C.; Edlund, S.A.; Zoltai, S.C.; Wilhelm, M.; Bay, C.; Gudjonsson, G.; Ananjeva, G.V.; Drozdov, D.S.; Konchenko, L.A.; Korostelev, Y.V.; Ponomareva, O.E.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Safranova, I.N.; Shelkunova, R.; Polezhaev, A.N.; Johansen, B.E.; Maier, H.A.; Murray, D.F.; Fleming, Michael D.; Trahan, N.G.; Charron, T.M.; Lauritzen, S.M.; Vairin, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Question: What are the major vegetation units in the Arctic, what is their composition, and how are they distributed among major bioclimate subzones and countries? Location: The Arctic tundra region, north of the tree line. Methods: A photo-interpretive approach was used to delineate the vegetation onto an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) base image. Mapping experts within nine Arctic regions prepared draft maps using geographic information technology (ArcInfo) of their portion of the Arctic, and these were later synthesized to make the final map. Area analysis of the map was done according to bioclimate subzones, and country. The integrated mapping procedures resulted in other maps of vegetation, topography, soils, landscapes, lake cover, substrate pH, and above-ground biomass. Results: The final map was published at 1:7 500 000 scale map. Within the Arctic (total area = 7.11 x 106 km 2), about 5.05 ?? 106 km2 is vegetated. The remainder is ice covered. The map legend generally portrays the zonal vegetation within each map polygon. About 26% of the vegetated area is erect shrublands, 18% peaty graminoid tundras, 13% mountain complexes, 12% barrens, 11% mineral graminoid tundras, 11% prostrate-shrub tundras, and 7% wetlands. Canada has by far the most terrain in the High Arctic mostly associated with abundant barren types and prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, whereas Russia has the largest area in the Low Arctic, predominantly low-shrub tundra. Conclusions: The CAVM is the first vegetation map of an entire global biome at a comparable resolution. The consistent treatment of the vegetation across the circumpolar Arctic, abundant ancillary material, and digital database should promote the application to numerous land-use, and climate-change applications and will make updating the map relatively easy. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  6. Literature Review - Vegetation on Levees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    significant dam safety issue in the United States . The purpose of this Technical Manual on the Effects of Tree and Woody Vegetation Root Penetrations on...nationwide inspection of levee systems in 2007, many deficiencies were attributed to woody vegetation located within 15-ft of the levee toe as required...maintenance, operation, or flood-fight activities. International guidance documents and manuals Several countries other than the United States have guidance

  7. Post-fire vegetation dynamics in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    analysed for some selected areas and a regression model of post-fire recovery was fitted to the recorded values of NDVI. The model allowed characterising the dynamics of the regeneration process. It was found that recovery rates depend on geographical location, fire intensity/severity and type of vegetation cover. Díaz-Delgado, R., Salvador, R. and Pons, X., 1998: Monitoring of plant community regeneration after fire by remote sensing. In L. Traboud (Ed.), Fire management and landscape ecology (pp. 315-324). International Association of Wildland Fire, Fairfield, WA. Pausas, G.J. and Vallejo, V.R., 1999: The role of fire in European Mediterranean Ecosystems. In: E. Chuvieco (Ed.), Remote sensing of large wildfires in the European Mediterranean basin (pp. 3-16). Springer-Verlag. Trigo R.M., Pereira J.M.C., Pereira M.G., Mota B., Calado M.T., DaCamara C.C., Santo F.E., 2006: Atmospheric conditions associated with the exceptional fire season of 2003 in Portugal. International Journal of Climatology 26 (13): 1741-1757 NOV 15 2006.

  8. Carotenoids and their isomers: color pigments in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hock-Eng; Prasad, K Nagendra; Kong, Kin-Weng; Jiang, Yueming; Ismail, Amin

    2011-02-18

    Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as 'functional food ingredients'. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  9. Spatial organisation of vegetation in water controlled landscapes: the role of vegetation dispersion strategies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Katul, G.

    2007-12-01

    When investigating the spatial organization of biomass resulting from plant-water feedbacks in arid ecosystems, spatial movement of plants is generally represented as a diffusive processes. Diffusive representations of plant movement have two consequences: they fix the length scale of dispersion to the immediate vicinity of the parent plant, and thus cannot explicitly represent long distance dispersal; and they treat the local gradient of biomass as the determinant of the rate and direction of dispersal. An adaptation of an existing model (Rietkerk et al. 2002) is used to investigate the significance of these assumptions on predicted spatial distributions of vegetation. Model runs were conducted separately with a diffusive and a long-distance dispersive kernel for spatial movement and the resulting spatial organization of vegetation was contrasted. The results indicate that dispersion behavior strongly influences the spatial organization of vegetation in arid landscapes, destabilizing the regular spatial patterns often predicted by models utilizing diffusive representations of biomass movement. The model results provide insight into ecological hypotheses regarding the preponderance of short-range dispersion behavior observed in arid ecosystems, and suggest that this is a consequence of the highly organized nature of the soil water resource. Rietkerk, M., M. C. Boerlijst, F. van Langevelde, R. HilleRisLambers, J. van de Koppel, L. Kumar, H. H. T. Prins, and A. M. de Roos. 2002. Self-organization of vegetation in arid ecosystems. American Naturalist 160:524-530.

  10. Groundwater controls on vegetation composition and patterning in mountain meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Christopher S.; Loheide, Steven P., II; Moore, Courtney E.; Lundquist, Jessica D.

    2011-10-01

    Mountain meadows are groundwater-dependent ecosystems that are hot spots of biodiversity and productivity. In the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, these ecosystems rely on shallow groundwater to support their vegetation communities during the dry summer growing season in the region's Mediterranean montane climate. Vegetation composition in this environment is influenced by both (1) oxygen stress that occurs when portions of the root zone are saturated and anaerobic conditions limit root respiration and (2) water stress that occurs when the water table drops and the root zone becomes water limited. A spatially distributed watershed model that explicitly accounts for snowmelt processes was linked to a fine-resolution groundwater flow model of Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite National Park, California, to simulate water table dynamics. This linked hydrologic model was calibrated to observations from a well observation network for 2006-2009. A vegetation survey was also conducted at the site in which the three dominant species were identified at more than 200 plots distributed across the meadow. Nonparametric multiplicative regression was performed to create and select the best models for predicting vegetation dominance on the basis of the simulated hydrologic regime. The hydrologic niches of three vegetation types representing wet, moist, and dry meadow vegetation communities were found to be best described using both (1) a sum exceedance value calculated as the integral of water table position above a depth threshold of oxygen stress and (2) a sum exceedance value calculated as the integral of water table position below a depth threshold of water stress. This linked hydrologic and vegetative modeling framework advances our ability to predict the propagation of human-induced climatic and land use or land cover changes through the hydrologic system to the ecosystem. The hydroecologic functioning of meadows provides an example of the extent to which cascading

  11. Deciphering the Costs of Reproduction in Mango - Vegetative Growth Matters.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Mathilde; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Normand, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Irregular fruit production across successive years is a major issue that limits the profitability of most temperate and tropical fruit crops. It is particularly affected by the reciprocal relationships between vegetative and reproductive growth. The concept of the costs of reproduction is defined in terms of losses in the potential future reproductive success caused by current investment in reproduction. This concept, developed in ecology and evolutionary biology, could provide a methodological framework to analyze irregular bearing in fruit crops, especially in relation to the spatial scale at which studies are done. The objective of this study was to investigate the direct effects of reproduction during a growing cycle on reproduction during the following growing cycle and the indirect effects through vegetative growth between these two reproductive events, for four mango cultivars and during two growing cycles. Two spatial scales were considered: the growth unit (GU) and the scaffold branch. Costs of reproduction were detected between two successive reproductive events and between reproduction and vegetative growth. These costs were scale-dependent, generally detected at the GU scale and infrequently at the scaffold branch scale, suggesting partial branch autonomy with respect to processes underlying the effects of reproduction on vegetative growth. In contrast, the relationships between vegetative growth and reproduction were positive at the GU scale and at the scaffold branch scale in most cases, suggesting branch autonomy for the processes, mainly local, underlying flowering and fruiting. The negative effect of reproduction on vegetative growth prevailed over the positive effect of vegetative growth on the subsequent reproduction. The costs of reproduction were also cultivar-dependent. Those revealed at the GU scale were related to the bearing behavior of each cultivar. Our results put forward the crucial role of vegetative growth occurring between two

  12. BIOMONITORING USING AQUATIC VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of the state-of-the-science as related to the phytoassessment techniques used in environmental biomonitoring and the hazard assessment process for chemicals. The emphasis is on freshwater angiosperms and bryophytes. Algal species, which are prese...

  13. Sand Bed Morphodynamics under Standing Waves and Vegetated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, B. J.; Garcia, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    Littoral processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, and boundary layer development are governed by the presence of bathymetric features, which include large-scale sand bars upon which smaller-scale sand ripples are superimposed, as well as the presence of submarine vegetation. Numerous studies on sand ripples and bars have aided to elucidate the dynamics in oscillatory flows; however, the effect of vegetation on the system is less understood. Recent laboratory studies have focused on quantifying wave attenuation by emergent vegetation as a natural method to mitigate storm surges. The emergent vegetation, while promising for coastal protection, alters sediment transport rates directly by the physical presence of the plants near the bed and indirectly from reduction in near-bed shear stresses due to attenuated wave energy. The experimental work herein focuses on the area near the deeply submerged vegetated canopy limit (current work has a ratio of mean still water depth to plant height, H/h, = 7.9) to minimize the effect on the surface waves and discern the direct impact vegetation has on sand bed morphodynamics. Experiments were conducted in the large wave tank (49-m long by 1.83-m wide by 1.22-m deep) in the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory at the University of Illinois in which a high reflection wave forcing was used over a uniform sand bed with a 0.25-mm median sediment diameter in which staggered and uniform arrangements of idealized vegetation (i.e., 6.35-mm diameter rigid wooden cylinders) were positioned along the bed (e.g., at predetermined sand bar troughs and over an entire sand bar). The resulting bathymetric evolution from the vegetated case experiments were compared to the base case of no vegetation using two optical methods: a high-resolution laser displacement sensor for three-dimensional surveys and digitized profiles via high-definition panoramic images of the entire test section. The experimental findings illustrate the profound

  14. Application of stochastic radiative transfer to remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, Nikolay V.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of high quality remote sensing data during the past decade provides an impetus for the development of methods that facilitate accurate retrieval of structural and optical properties of vegetation required for the study of global vegetation dynamics. Empirical and statistical methods have proven to be quite useful in many applications, but they often do not shed light on the underlying physical processes. Approaches based on radiative transfer and the physics of matter-energy interaction are therefore required to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for signal generation. The goal of this dissertation is the development of advanced methods based on radiative transfer for the retrieval of biophysical information from satellite data. Classical radiative transfer theory is applicable to homogeneous vegetation and is generally inaccurate in characterizing the radiation regime in natural vegetation communities, such as forests or woodlands. A stochastic approach to radiative transfer was introduced in this dissertation to describe the radiation regime in discontinuous vegetation canopies. The resulting stochastic model was implemented and tested with field data and Monte Carlo simulations. The effect of gaps on radiation fluxes in vegetation canopies was quantified analytically and compared to classical representations. Next, the stochastic theory was applied to vegetation remote sensing in two case studies. First, the radiative transfer principles underlying an algorithm for leaf area index (LAI) retrieval were studied with data from Harvard Forest. The classical expression for uncollided radiation was modified according to stochastic principles to explain radiometric measurements and vegetation structure. In the second case study, vegetation dynamics in the northern latitudes inferred from the Pathfinder Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer Land data were investigated. The signatures of interannual and seasonal variation recorded in the

  15. Mapping and characterizing the vegetation types of the Democratic Republic of Congo using SPOT VEGETATION time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancutsem, C.; Pekel, J.-F.; Evrard, C.; Malaisse, F.; Defourny, P.

    2009-02-01

    The need for quantitative and accurate information to characterize the state and evolution of vegetation types at a national scale is widely recognized. This type of information is crucial for the Democratic Republic of Congo, which contains the majority of the tropical forest cover of Central Africa and a large diversity of habitats. In spite of recent progress in earth observation capabilities, vegetation mapping and seasonality analysis in equatorial areas still represent an outstanding challenge owing to high cloud coverage and the extent and limited accessibility of the territory. On one hand, the use of coarse-resolution optical data is constrained by performance in the presence of cloud screening and by noise arising from the compositing process, which limits the spatial consistency of the composite and the temporal resolution. On the other hand, the use of high-resolution data suffers from heterogeneity of acquisition dates, images and interpretation from one scene to another. The objective of the present study was to propose and demonstrate a semi-automatic processing method for vegetation mapping and seasonality characterization based on temporal and spectral information from SPOT VEGETATION time series. A land cover map with 18 vegetation classes was produced using the proposed method that was fed by ecological knowledge gathered from botanists and reference documents. The floristic composition and physiognomy of each vegetation type are described using the Land Cover Classification System developed by the FAO. Moreover, the seasonality of each class is characterized on a monthly basis and the variation in different vegetation indicators is discussed from a phenological point of view. This mapping exercise delivers the first area estimates of seven different forest types, five different savannas characterized by specific seasonality behavior and two aquatic vegetation types. Finally, the result is compared to two recent land cover maps derived from

  16. Incorporating geometrically complex vegetation in a computational fluid dynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Rosser, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is known to have a significant influence on the hydraulic, geomorphological, and ecological functioning of river systems. Vegetation acts as a blockage to flow, thereby causing additional flow resistance and influencing flow dynamics, in particular flow conveyance. These processes need to be incorporated into flood models to improve predictions used in river management. However, the current practice in representing vegetation in hydraulic models is either through roughness parameterisation or process understanding derived experimentally from flow through highly simplified configurations of fixed, rigid cylinders. It is suggested that such simplifications inadequately describe the geometric complexity that characterises vegetation, and therefore the modelled flow dynamics may be oversimplified. This paper addresses this issue by using an approach combining field and numerical modelling techniques. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) with waveform processing has been applied to collect a sub-mm, 3-dimensional representation of Prunus laurocerasus, an invasive species to the UK that has been increasingly recorded in riparian zones. Multiple scan perspectives produce a highly detailed point cloud (>5,000,000 individual data points) which is reduced in post processing using an octree-based voxelisation technique. The method retains the geometric complexity of the vegetation by subdividing the point cloud into 0.01 m3 cubic voxels. The voxelised representation is subsequently read into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model using a Mass Flux Scaling Algorithm, allowing the vegetation to be directly represented in the modelling framework. Results demonstrate the development of a complex flow field around the vegetation. The downstream velocity profile is characterised by two distinct inflection points. A high velocity zone in the near-bed (plant-stem) region is apparent due to the lack of significant near-bed foliage. Above this, a zone of reduced velocity is

  17. Projected Future Vegetation Changes for the Northwest United States and Southwest Canada at a Fine Spatial Resolution Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Sarah L; Bartlein, Patrick J; Gray, Elizabeth M; Pelltier, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0-58.0°N latitude by 136.6-103.0°W longitude). LPJ is a process-based vegetation model that mechanistically simulates the effect of changing climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations on vegetation. It was developed and has been mostly applied at spatial resolutions of 10-minutes or coarser. In this study, we used LPJ at a 30-second (~1-km) spatial resolution to simulate potential vegetation changes for 2070-2099. LPJ was run using downscaled future climate simulations from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CCSM3, CGCM3.1(T47), GISS-ER, MIROC3.2(medres), UKMO-HadCM3) produced using the A2 greenhouse gases emissions scenario. Under projected future climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated vegetation changes result in the contraction of alpine, shrub-steppe, and xeric shrub vegetation across the study area and the expansion of woodland and forest vegetation. Large areas of maritime cool forest and cold forest are simulated to persist under projected future conditions. The fine spatial-scale vegetation simulations resolve patterns of vegetation change that are not visible at coarser resolutions and these fine-scale patterns are particularly important for understanding potential future vegetation changes in topographically complex areas.

  18. Projected Future Vegetation Changes for the Northwest United States and Southwest Canada at a Fine Spatial Resolution Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Sarah L.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Gray, Elizabeth M.; Pelltier, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0–58.0°N latitude by 136.6–103.0°W longitude). LPJ is a process-based vegetation model that mechanistically simulates the effect of changing climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations on vegetation. It was developed and has been mostly applied at spatial resolutions of 10-minutes or coarser. In this study, we used LPJ at a 30-second (~1-km) spatial resolution to simulate potential vegetation changes for 2070–2099. LPJ was run using downscaled future climate simulations from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CCSM3, CGCM3.1(T47), GISS-ER, MIROC3.2(medres), UKMO-HadCM3) produced using the A2 greenhouse gases emissions scenario. Under projected future climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated vegetation changes result in the contraction of alpine, shrub-steppe, and xeric shrub vegetation across the study area and the expansion of woodland and forest vegetation. Large areas of maritime cool forest and cold forest are simulated to persist under projected future conditions. The fine spatial-scale vegetation simulations resolve patterns of vegetation change that are not visible at coarser resolutions and these fine-scale patterns are particularly important for understanding potential future vegetation changes in topographically complex areas. PMID:26488750

  19. Projected future vegetation changes for the northwest United States and southwest Canada at a fine spatial resolution using a dynamic global vegetation model.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafer, Sarah; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Gray, Elizabeth M.; Pelltier, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0–58.0°N latitude by 136.6–103.0°W longitude). LPJ is a process-based vegetation model that mechanistically simulates the effect of changing climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations on vegetation. It was developed and has been mostly applied at spatial resolutions of 10-minutes or coarser. In this study, we used LPJ at a 30-second (~1-km) spatial resolution to simulate potential vegetation changes for 2070–2099. LPJ was run using downscaled future climate simulations from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CCSM3, CGCM3.1(T47), GISS-ER, MIROC3.2(medres), UKMO-HadCM3) produced using the A2 greenhouse gases emissions scenario. Under projected future climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated vegetation changes result in the contraction of alpine, shrub-steppe, and xeric shrub vegetation across the study area and the expansion of woodland and forest vegetation. Large areas of maritime cool forest and cold forest are simulated to persist under projected future conditions. The fine spatial-scale vegetation simulations resolve patterns of vegetation change that are not visible at coarser resolutions and these fine-scale patterns are particularly important for understanding potential future vegetation changes in topographically complex areas.

  20. Experimental Study on the Characteristics of Scour Hole around Emergent Vegetation with Single-Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the natural rivers, woody vegetation commonly grows along the riverbank. When flows run through the woody vegetation zones, the stream processes and bed form are markedly affected. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of scour hole around vegetation patch with different densities by flume experiments. For corresponding to the natural plant growing condition, the vegetation models were arranged along one side of the flume wall. The vegetation models were made of the steel columns with staggered arrangement. The vegetation densities were set equal to 0.03, 0.04, 0.05, 0.07, 0.09, 0.12, 0.15, 0.22 and 0.3. The experimental flow condition was steady and the vegetation models were emergent. The flow velocity was controlled close to the initiation of sediment motion. The scour patterns around the vegetation zone were measured by the Laser Distance Meter in equilibrium scour conditions. The results show that the scour patterns have similarity in vegetation density ranging from 0.03 to 0.12. The dimensionless scour length (D) is ranging 1.30-1.50. The dimensionless scour width (B) is ranging 1.11-1.48. The dimensionless accumulation width (E) is ranging 1.18-1.67. The dimensionless accumulation length (F) is ranging 0.49-1.81.The results also show that B and E are proportional to the vegetation densities, and the D and F are inversely proportional to the vegetation densities.

  1. Effects of temperature seasonality on tundra vegetation productivity using a daily vegetation dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Erler, A.; Frazier, J.; Bhatt, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in the seasonality of air temperature will elicit interacting effects on the dynamics of snow cover, nutrient availability, vegetation growth, and other ecosystem properties and processes in arctic tundra. Simulation models often do not have the fine temporal resolution necessary to develop theory and propose hypotheses for the effects of daily and weekly timescale changes on ecosystem dynamics. We therefore developed a daily version of an arctic tundra vegetation dynamics model (ArcVeg) to simulate how changes in the seasonality of air temperatures influences the dynamics of vegetation growth and carbon sequestration across regions of arctic tundra. High temporal-resolution air and soil temperature data collected from field sites across the five arctic tundra bioclimate subzones were used to develop a daily weather generator operable for sites throughout the arctic tundra. Empirical relationships between temperature and soil nitrogen were used to generate daily dynamics of soil nitrogen availability, which drive the daily uptake of nitrogen and growth among twelve tundra plant functional types. Seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and remotely sensed land surface temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) GIMMS 3g dataset were used to investigate constraints on the start of the growing season, although there was no indication of any spatially consistent temperature or day-length controls on greening onset. Because of the exponential nature of the relationship between soil temperature and nitrogen mineralization, temperature changes during the peak of the growing season had greater effects on vegetation productivity than changes earlier in the growing season. However, early season changes in temperature had a greater effect on the relative productivities of different plant functional types, with potential influences on species composition.

  2. Soil temperature depressions beneath vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Starkweather, S.

    1996-10-01

    The results from a summer-long monitoring project were used to determine the effects of vegetative cover on soil temperatures and ground heat fluxes. The measurements were taken over three months in a residential neighborhood adjacent to the University of Colorado campus and correlated with data from a weather station located a mile away. By contrasting the soil temperatures beneath a moderately shaded, vegetated site to those beneath an open site covered with turf grass, the authors were able to quantify an added energy saving benefit of alternative landscapes and tree planting; reduced summer-time ground heat flux. The results from the monitoring project were used to develop a general model for relating local weather data and site-specific vegetative morphologies to site-specific ground heat fluxes. The authors found that the reduced ground heat flux can be largely attributed to the reduced net radiation flux arriving at the soil surface.

  3. Assessing global vegetation activity using spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Vera L.; van Eck, Christel M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Regnier, Pierre A. G.

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of modelling vegetation activity using a hierarchical Bayesian spatio-temporal model. This approach allows modelling changes in vegetation and climate simultaneous in space and time. Changes of vegetation activity such as phenology are modelled as a dynamic process depending on climate variability in both space and time. Additionally, differences in observed vegetation status can be contributed to other abiotic ecosystem properties, e.g. soil and terrain properties. Although these properties do not change in time, they do change in space and may provide valuable information in addition to the climate dynamics. The spatio-temporal Bayesian models were calibrated at a regional scale because the local trends in space and time can be better captured by the model. The regional subsets were defined according to the SREX segmentation, as defined by the IPCC. Each region is considered being relatively homogeneous in terms of large-scale climate and biomes, still capturing small-scale (grid-cell level) variability. Modelling within these regions is hence expected to be less uncertain due to the absence of these large-scale patterns, compared to a global approach. This overall modelling approach allows the comparison of model behavior for the different regions and may provide insights on the main dynamic processes driving the interaction between vegetation and climate within different regions. The data employed in this study encompasses the global datasets for soil properties (SoilGrids), terrain properties (Global Relief Model based on SRTM DEM and ETOPO), monthly time series of satellite-derived vegetation indices (GIMMS NDVI3g) and climate variables (Princeton Meteorological Forcing Dataset). The findings proved the potential of a spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling approach for assessing vegetation dynamics, at a regional scale. The observed interrelationships of the employed data and the different spatial and temporal trends support

  4. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  5. Cellular Automaton Simulation of Vegetated Dune Field Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; Baas, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetated aeolian dune fields develop through non-linear interactions between physical geomorphic processes and ecological vegetation growth and response into complex ecogeomorphic systems that are sensitive to both climatic and environmental variations. We present a Discrete Ecogeomorphic Aeolian Landscape (DECAL) cellular automaton model that replicates the self-organisation of vegetated dune systems and enables the investigation of conditions necessary for long-walled (hairpin) parabolic dune and nebkha formation in coastal and semi-arid environments over various temporal and spatial scales. The algorithm utilises simple transport rules and mutual feedback between geomorphic and ecological components to investigate vegetation pattern formation and how and why this influences dune dynamics. We examine ecogeomorphic interactions both by exploring system mechanics via dune mobility and by more descriptive numerical state variables, facilitating the investigation of trajectories and potential attractors as a function of environmental parameters and system perturbations and leading to the identification of possible system sensitivities and thresholds. The model simulations elucidate possible dune field responses to anthropogenic impacts and palaeo and future climate variations and highlight the ability of vegetation to impart a characteristic length-scale on a landscape. This simple vegetated dune model illustrates the power and versatility of a cellular automaton approach for exploring ecological and geomorphic interactions in complex earth surface systems.

  6. Textural signatures for wetland vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, R. I.; Marcellus, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation indicates that unique textural signatures do exist for specific wetland communities at certain times in the growing season. When photographs with the proper resolution are obtained, the textural features can identify the spectral features of the vegetation community seen with lower resolution mapping data. The development of a matrix of optimum textural signatures is the goal of this research. Seasonal variations of spectral and textural features are particularly important when performing a vegetations analysis of fresh water marshes. This matrix will aid in flight planning, since expected seasonal variations and resolution requirements can be established prior to a given flight mission.

  7. Interactions among hydrogeomorphology, vegetation, and nutrient biogeochemistry in floodplain ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogeomorphic, vegetative, and biogeochemical processes interact in floodplains resulting in great complexity that provides opportunities to better understand linkages among physical and biological processes in ecosystems. Floodplains and their associated river systems are structured by four dimensional gradients of hydrogeomorphology: longitudinal, lateral, vertical, and temporal components. These four dimensions create dynamic hydrologic and geomorphologic mosaics that have a large imprint on the vegetation and nutrient biogeochemistry of floodplains. Plant physiology, population dynamics, community structure, and productivity are all very responsive to floodplain hydrogeomorphology. The strength of this relationship between vegetation and hydrogeomorphology is evident in the use of vegetation as an indicator of hydrogeomorphic processes. However, vegetation also influences hydrogeomorphology by modifying hydraulics and sediment entrainment and deposition that typically stabilize geomorphic patterns. Nitrogen and phosphorus biogeochemistry commonly influence plant productivity and community composition, although productivity is not limited by nutrient availability in all floodplains. Conversely, vegetation influences nutrient biogeochemistry through direct uptake and storage as well as production of organic matter that regulates microbial biogeochemical processes. The biogeochemistries of nitrogen and phosphorus cycling are very sensitive to spatial and temporal variation in hydrogeomorphology, in particular floodplain wetness and sedimentation. The least studied interaction is the direct effect of biogeochemistry on hydrogeomorphology, but the control of nutrient availability over organic matter decomposition and thus soil permeability and elevation is likely important. Biogeochemistry also has the more documented but indirect control of hydrogeomorphology through regulation of plant biomass. In summary, the defining characteristics of floodplain ecosystems

  8. Interactions among hydrogeomorphology, vegetation, and nutrient biogeochemistry in floodplain ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Shroder, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogeomorphic, vegetative, and biogeochemical processes interact in floodplains resulting in great complexity that provides opportunities to better understand linkages among physical and biological processes in ecosystems. Floodplains and their associated river systems are structured by four-dimensional gradients of hydrogeomorphology: longitudinal, lateral, vertical, and temporal components. These four dimensions create dynamic hydrologic and geomorphologic mosaics that have a large imprint on the vegetation and nutrient biogeochemistry of floodplains. Plant physiology, population dynamics, community structure, and productivity are all very responsive to floodplain hydrogeomorphology. The strength of this relationship between vegetation and hydrogeomorphology is evident in the use of vegetation as an indicator of hydrogeomorphic processes. However, vegetation also influences hydrogeomorphology by modifying hydraulics and sediment entrainment and deposition that typically stabilize geomorphic patterns. Nitrogen and phosphorus biogeochemistry commonly influence plant productivity and community composition, although productivity is not limited by nutrient availability in all floodplains. Conversely, vegetation influences nutrient biogeochemistry through direct uptake and storage as well as production of organic matter that regulates microbial biogeochemical processes. The biogeochemistries of nitrogen and phosphorus cycling are very sensitive to spatial and temporal variation in hydrogeomorphology, in particular floodplain wetness and sedimentation. The least-studied interaction is the direct effect of biogeochemistry on hydrogeomorphology, but the control of nutrient availability over organic matter decomposition and thus soil permeability and elevation is likely important. Biogeochemistry also has the more documented but indirect control of hydrogeomorphology through regulation of plant biomass. In summary, the defining characteristics of floodplain ecosystems

  9. [Impact of moss soil crust on vegetation indexes interpretation].

    PubMed

    Fang, Shi-bo; Zhang, Xin-shi

    2011-03-01

    Vegetation indexes were the most common and the most important parameters to characterizing large-scale terrestrial ecosystems. It is vital to get precise vegetation indexes for running land surface process models and computation of NPP change, moisture and heat fluxes over surface. Biological soil crusts (BSC) are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid, polar and sub-polar regions. The spectral characteristics of dry and wet BSCs were quite different, which could produce much higher vegetation indexes value for the wet BSC than for the dry BSC as reported. But no research was reported about whether the BSC would impact on regional vegetation indexes and how much dry and wet BSC had impact on regional vegetation indexes. In the present paper, the most common vegetation index NDVI were used to analyze how the moss soil crusts (MSC) dry and wet changes affect regional NDVI values. It was showed that 100% coverage of the wet MSC have a much higher NDVI value (0.657) than the dry MSC NDVI value (0.320), with increased 0.337. Dry and wet MSC NDVI value reached significant difference between the levels of 0.000. In the study area, MSC, which had the average coverage of 12.25%, would have a great contribution to the composition of vegetation index. Linear mixed model was employed to analyze how the NDVI would change in regional scale as wet MSC become dry MSC inversion. The impact of wet moss crust than the dry moss crust in the study area can make the regional NDVI increasing by 0.04 (14.3%). Due to the MSC existence and rainfall variation in arid and semi-arid zones, it was bound to result in NDVI change instability in a short time in the region. For the wet MSC's spectral reflectance curve is similar to those of the higher plants, misinterpretation of the vegetation dynamics could be more severe due to the "maximum value composite" (MVC) technique used to compose the global vegetation maps in the study of vegetation dynamics. The researches would be useful for

  10. Analysis of the dynamics of African vegetation using the normalized difference vegetation index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.; Justice, C. O.

    1986-01-01

    Images at a resolution of 8 km are currently being generated for the whole of Africa, displaying the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). These images have undergone a process of temporal compositing to reduce the effects of cloud cover and atmospheric variation. When the NDVI is plotted against time, different cover types are shown to have characteristic profiles corresponding closely with their phenology. The resultant pattern of NDVI values displayed on the images is analyzed in terms of the cover types present and local variations in rainfall. Comparison between images for 1983 and 1984 overall showed considerable similarities, but significant differences were observed in the northward extent of the greening wave in the Sahel, the greening up of the Kalahari Desert and East African communities. It is concluded that vegetation monitoring using NDVI images needs to be associated with scene stratification according to cover type.

  11. Evaluation of mercury methylation and methylmercury demethylation rates in vegetated and non-vegetated saltmarsh sediments from two Portuguese estuaries.

    PubMed

    Cesário, Rute; Hintelmann, Holger; Mendes, Ricardo; Eckey, Kevin; Dimock, Brian; Araújo, Beatriz; Mota, Ana Maria; Canário, João

    2017-04-05

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MMHg) is formed from inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(2+)). However, it is poorly understood to what extent different mercury (Hg) pools contribute to existent MMHg levels. In this study, ambient concentrations of total Hg (THg) and MMHg as well as rates of methylation and demethylation were measured simultaneously in sediments with and without salt-marsh plant vegetation, which were collected in Guadiana and Tagus estuaries, Portugal. Concurrent processes of Hg methylation and MMHg demethylation were directly monitored and compared by spiking sediments cores with stable isotope tracers of (199)Hg(2+) and CH3(201)Hg(+) followed by gas chromatographic separation and isotope-specific detection using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared to the Guadiana estuary, where concentrations were comparatively low, THg and MMHg levels varied between vegetated and non-vegetated sediments collected at the Rosário site (ROS) of the Tagus estuary. Methylation (KM) and demethylation rates (KD) were also different between estuaries being dependent on the presence of vegetation. In addition, the type of macrophyte species influenced KM and KD values. In fact, the highest KM value was found in Sarcocornia fruticosa vegetated sediments at the Castro Marim site in Guadiana (CM, 0.160 day(-1)) and the lowest KM was observed in non-vegetated sediments at the Alcochete site in Tagus (ALC, 0.009 day(-1)). KD varied by a factor of three among sites with highest rates of demethylation observed in non-vegetated sediments in Guadiana (12 ± 1.3 day(-1), corresponding to a half-life of 1.4 ± 0.2 h). This study clearly shows that the presence of vegetation in sediments favors the formation of MMHg. Moreover, this effect might be site specific and further studies are needed to confirm the findings reported here.

  12. Classification of vegetation types in military region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Miguel; Silva, Jose Silvestre; Bioucas-Dias, Jose

    2015-10-01

    In decision-making process regarding planning and execution of military operations, the terrain is a determining factor. Aerial photographs are a source of vital information for the success of an operation in hostile region, namely when the cartographic information behind enemy lines is scarce or non-existent. The objective of present work is the development of a tool capable of processing aerial photos. The methodology implemented starts with feature extraction, followed by the application of an automatic selector of features. The next step, using the k-fold cross validation technique, estimates the input parameters for the following classifiers: Sparse Multinomial Logist Regression (SMLR), K Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Linear Classifier using Principal Component Expansion on the Joint Data (PCLDC) and Multi-Class Support Vector Machine (MSVM). These classifiers were used in two different studies with distinct objectives: discrimination of vegetation's density and identification of vegetation's main components. It was found that the best classifier on the first approach is the Sparse Logistic Multinomial Regression (SMLR). On the second approach, the implemented methodology applied to high resolution images showed that the better performance was achieved by KNN classifier and PCLDC. Comparing the two approaches there is a multiscale issue, in which for different resolutions, the best solution to the problem requires different classifiers and the extraction of different features.

  13. Literature Review - Vegetation on Levees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    lateritic site, absorption of 32P from a lateral distance of 75- and 30-cm depth was much greater than from 150- and 225-cm lateral distance and 60- and...the root activity percentage. Vegetation: Wild jack tree (Artocarpus hirsutus Lamk.) Soil Properties: Lateritic oxisol with a pH of 6.7

  14. GLOBAL ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter discusses several aspects of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation. It begins with a section on emission measurements that includes a brief history of enclosure and above-canopy flux measurements as well as a discussion of existing d...

  15. Thermal modification of vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article reviews some literature, both old and recent, involving the hypothesis that the Diels-Alder reaction is operative in the thermal polymerization of vegetable oil. Both triacylglycerol oils and methyl esters are used to show that this mechanism is unlikely to be a significant contributor ...

  16. 'Vegetable' substitutes for diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-22

    Research programs in the US, Brazil, South Africa and the Philippines on efforts to find a vegetable oil substitute for diesel fuel are reported. A narrowing price gap with diesel fuel and a favourable energy balance improve the prospects for such fuels. Much of the current work is centered on blends, rather than the use of the pure oil.

  17. Vegetable production after heavy rains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not clear if extraordinary precipitation stored in the soil was able to support vegetable crops planted after rains events returned to normal levels. Cucumber and sweet corn were established from seed and non-pungent jalapeno peppers were established from 8-week old transplants on beds. Half...

  18. Vegetable Crop Pests. MEP 311.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantzes, James G.; And Others

    As part of a cooperative extension service series by the University of Maryland, this publication introduces the identification and control of common agricultural pests of vegetable crops. The first of the five sections defines "pest" and "weed" and generally introduces different kinds of pests in the categories of insects,…

  19. Grafting effects on vegetable quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable grafting began in the 1920s to control soil-borne disease. It is now a common practice in Asia, parts of Europe, and the Middle East. In Japan and Korea most of the cucurbits and tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown are grafted. This practice is rare in the U.S. and there have...

  20. Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéfanon, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Nathalie de Noblet(2) (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) IPSL/LSCE, France The land surface model (LSM) in regional climate models (RCMs) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere. The vegetation can affect these exchanges through physical, biophysical and bio-geophysical mechanisms. It participates to evapo-transpiration process which determines the partitioning of net radiation between sensible and latent heat flux, through water evaporation from soil throughout the entire root system. For seasonal timescale leaf cover change induced leaf-area index (LAI) and albedo changes, impacting the Earth's radiative balance. In addition, atmospheric chemistry and carbon concentration has a direct effect on plant stomatal structure, the main exchange interface with the atmosphere. Therefore the surface energy balance is intimately linked to the carbon cycle and vegetation conditions and an accurate representation of the Earth's surface is required to improve the performance of RCMs. It is even more crucial for extreme events as heat waves and droughts which display highly nonlinear behaviour. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, local coupled processes over land can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. One set of two simulation has been conducted with WRF, using different LSMs. They aim to study drought and vegetation effect on the dynamical and hydrological processes controlling the occurrence and life cycle of heat waves In the MORCE plateform, the dynamical global vegetation model (DGVM) ORCHIDEE is implemented in the atmospheric module WRF. ORCHIDEE is based on three different modules. The first module, called SECHIBA, describes the fast processes such as exchanges of energy and water between the atmosphere and the biosphere, and the soil water budget. The phenology and carbon

  1. Serving vegetables first: A strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary school cafeterias.

    PubMed

    Elsbernd, S L; Reicks, M M; Mann, T L; Redden, J P; Mykerezi, E; Vickers, Z M

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable consumption in the United States is low despite the wealth of evidence that vegetables play an important role in reducing risk of various chronic diseases. Because eating patterns developed in childhood continue through adulthood, we need to form healthy eating habits in children. The objective of this study was to determine if offering vegetables before other meal components would increase the overall consumption of vegetables at school lunch. We served kindergarten through fifth-grade students a small portion (26-33 g) of a raw vegetable (red and yellow bell peppers) while they waited in line to receive the rest of their lunch meal. They then had the options to take more of the bell peppers, a different vegetable, or no vegetable from the lunch line. We measured the amount of each vegetable consumed by each child. Serving vegetables first greatly increased the number of students eating vegetables. On intervention days most of the vegetables consumed came from the vegetables-first portions. Total vegetable intake per student eating lunch was low because most students chose to not eat vegetables, but the intervention significantly increased this value. Serving vegetables first is a viable strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary schools. Long-term implementation of this strategy may have an important impact on healthy eating habits, vegetable consumption, and the health consequences of vegetable intake.

  2. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Questions: How long may it take for desert perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance and how do different plant community variables (i.e. diversity, density and cover) change during the recovery process? Location: Sonoran Desert, Arizona, USA. Methods: Since protection from grazing from 1907 onwards, plant diversity, density and cover of perennial species were monitored intermittently on ten 10 m x 10 m permanent plots on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Results: The study shows an exceptionally slow recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover had been stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. Conclusions: It took more than 50 yr for the perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of a clear relationship between environment (e.g. precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery processes after disturbance.

  3. Vegetative phase change and shoot maturation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Poethig, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    As a plant shoot develops, it produces different types of leaves, buds, and internodes, and eventually acquires the capacity to produce structures involved in sexual reproduction. Morphological and anatomical traits that change in coordinated fashion at a predictable time in vegetative development allow this process to be divided into several more-or-less discrete phases; the transition between these phases is termed vegetative phase change. Vegetative phase change is regulated by a decrease in the expression of the related microRNAs, miR156 and miR157, which act by repressing the expression of SBP/SPL transcription factors. SBP/SPL proteins regulate a wide variety of processes in shoot development, including flowering time and inflorescence development. Answers to long-standing questions about the relationship between vegetative and reproductive maturation have come from genetic analyses of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks in which these proteins are involved. Studies conducted over several decades indicate that carbohydrates have a significant effect on phase-specific leaf traits, and recent research suggests that sugar may be the leaf signal that promotes vegetative phase change. PMID:23962841

  4. Vegetative phase change and shoot maturation in plants.

    PubMed

    Poethig, R Scott

    2013-01-01

    As a plant shoot develops, it produces different types of leaves, buds, and internodes, and eventually acquires the capacity to produce structures involved in sexual reproduction. Morphological and anatomical traits that change in coordinated fashion at a predictable time in vegetative development allow this process to be divided into several more-or-less discrete phases; the transition between these phases is termed "vegetative phase change." Vegetative phase change is regulated by a decrease in the expression of the related microRNAs, miR156, and miR157, which act by repressing the expression of squamosa promoter binding protein/SBP-like (SBP/SPL) transcription factors. SBP/SPL proteins regulate a wide variety of processes in shoot development, including flowering time and inflorescence development. Answers to long-standing questions about the relationship between vegetative and reproductive maturation have come from genetic analyses of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks in which these proteins are involved. Studies conducted over several decades indicate that carbohydrates have a significant effect on phase-specific leaf traits, and recent research suggests that sugar may be the leaf signal that promotes vegetative phase change.

  5. Development of the IAP Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Li, Fang; Song, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    The IAP Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (IAP-DGVM) has been developed to simulate the distribution and structure of global vegetation within the framework of Earth System Models. It incorporates our group's recent developments of major model components such as the shrub sub-model, establishment and competition parameterization schemes, and a process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity. The model has 12 plant functional types, including seven tree, two shrub, and three grass types, plus bare soil. Different PFTs are allowed to coexist within a grid cell, and their state variables are updated by various governing equations describing vegetation processes from fine-scale biogeophysics and biogeochemistry, to individual and population dynamics, to large-scale biogeography. Environmental disturbance due to fire not only affects regional vegetation competition, but also influences atmospheric chemistry and aerosol emissions. Simulations under observed atmospheric conditions showed that the model can correctly reproduce the global distribution of trees, shrubs, grasses, and bare soil. The simulated global dominant vegetation types reproduce the transition from forest to grassland (savanna) in the tropical region, and from forest to shrubland in the boreal region, but overestimate the region of temperate forest.

  6. 7 CFR 983.23 - Processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.23 Processing. Processing means hulling and drying pistachios...

  7. 7 CFR 983.23 - Processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.23 Processing. Processing means hulling and drying pistachios...

  8. 7 CFR 983.23 - Processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.23 Processing. Processing means hulling and drying pistachios...

  9. Near ground level sensing for spatial analysis of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Tom; Rasure, John; Gage, Charlie

    1991-01-01

    Measured changes in vegetation indicate the dynamics of ecological processes and can identify the impacts from disturbances. Traditional methods of vegetation analysis tend to be slow because they are labor intensive; as a result, these methods are often confined to small local area measurements. Scientists need new algorithms and instruments that will allow them to efficiently study environmental dynamics across a range of different spatial scales. A new methodology that addresses this problem is presented. This methodology includes the acquisition, processing, and presentation of near ground level image data and its corresponding spatial characteristics. The systematic approach taken encompasses a feature extraction process, a supervised and unsupervised classification process, and a region labeling process yielding spatial information.

  10. An overview of research on the beneficial effects of vegetation in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Erickson, L E

    1997-11-21

    Vegetation can enhance in situ bioremediation processes in many applications. Microbial transformations occur in soil and water external to plant roots. Organic contaminants also enter vegetation and are transformed within plants. Research progress is reviewed with emphasis on recent experimental results and mathematical models of contaminant fate in systems where vegetation is present. Plant evapotranspiration provides a solar driven pump-and-treat system which moves contaminants to the rhizosphere and helps to contain them on site. Significant savings have been reported at several field sites where vegetation has been utilized.

  11. 30 CFR 779.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., contain a map that delineates existing vegetative types and a description of the plant communities within... information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation. (b) When a map or...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN OFF-CHANNEL HABITATS AND RELATIONSHIPS WITH ANNUAL FLOODING PATTERNS, UPPER MAIN STEM, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeomorphic processes drive riparian vegetation establishment, growth, and longevity. The stage of vegetation development (e.g. age, composition, height, density) affects its degree of functionality with respect to hydrology, nutrient cycling, and terrestrial and aquatic hab...

  13. Modified atmosphere packaging for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The latest development in and different aspects of modified atmosphere packaging for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables are reviewed in the book. This book provides all readers, including fresh-cut academic researchers, fresh-cut R&D personnel, and fresh-cut processing engineers, with unique, essential...

  14. A model for seed dispersion and vegetation growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Jaqueline Maria; Vieira Kritz, Maurício

    2016-08-01

    The study of processes associated with vegetation grow is very important to understand the dynamics of flooded ecosystems and their sustainable management. We present a cell-centered individual-based probabilistic model for the dynamics of tree-populations, that is further tailored towards the environmental conditions present in the Amazon floodplains.

  15. Climate change effects on vegetation characteristics and groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Flip) Witte, J. P. M.; (Ruud) Bartholomeus, R. P.; (Gijsbert) Cirkel, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    fraction of vascular plants may drop from 70 to 20 percent in the future (2050) climate due to increased moisture deficits. ET of bare soil and non-rooting species is much lower than that of vascular plants and thus the vegetation composition feeds back on the soil moisture conditions. Knowledge on such feedback mechanisms is indispensable in the analysis of climate change effects on the future groundwater recharge. Important questions are how, in the course of time, climate change will affect both groundwater table depth and dynamics, and how water management could adapt to these changes. We pursue a dynamic modeling approach that takes account of the interacting processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, including feedback mechanisms of the vegetation. This allows us to analyze climate change effects on groundwater recharge and thus future freshwater availability.

  16. Climate change effects on vegetation characteristics and groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, R.; Voortman, B.; Witte, J.

    2010-12-01

    , the fraction of vascular plants may drop from 70 to 20 percent in the future (2050) climate due to increased moisture deficits. ET of bare soil and non-rooting species is much lower than that of vascular plants and thus the vegetation composition feeds back on the soil moisture conditions. Knowledge on such feedback mechanisms is indispensable in the analysis of climate change effects on the future groundwater recharge. Important questions are how, in the course of time, climate change will affect both groundwater table depth and dynamics, and how water management could adapt to these changes. We pursue a dynamic modeling approach that takes account of the interacting processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, including feedback mechanisms of the vegetation. This allows us to analyze climate change effects on groundwater recharge and thus future freshwater availability.

  17. Towards more accurate vegetation mortality predictions

    DOE PAGES

    Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Xu, Chonggang

    2016-09-26

    Predicting the fate of vegetation under changing climate is one of the major challenges of the climate modeling community. Here, terrestrial vegetation dominates the carbon and water cycles over land areas, and dramatic changes in vegetation cover resulting from stressful environmental conditions such as drought feed directly back to local and regional climate, potentially leading to a vicious cycle where vegetation recovery after a disturbance is delayed or impossible.

  18. Abnormal Functional MRI BOLD Contrast in the Vegetative State after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelmann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal…

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation on furan formation in fresh-cut fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan, a possible carcinogen, is commonly induced by thermal processing in a wide variety of foods. The possible formation of furan from fresh-cut fruits and vegetables due to irradiation was studied. Nineteen fresh-cut fruits and vegetables were irradiated to 5 kGy gamma rays at 4C. Furan was an...

  20. Groundwater Controls on Vegetation Composition and Patterning in Mountain Meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loheide, S. P.; Lowry, C.; Moore, C. E.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Mountain meadows are groundwater dependent ecosystems that are hotspots of biodiversity and productivity in the Sierra Nevada of California. Meadow vegetation relies on shallow groundwater during the region’s dry summer growing season. Vegetation composition in this environment is influenced both by 1) oxygen stress that occurs when portions of the root zone are saturated and anaerobic conditions are created that limit root respiration and 2) water stress that occurs when the water table drops and water-limited conditions are created in the root zone. A watershed model that explicitly accounts for snowmelt processes was linked to a fine resolution groundwater flow model of Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite National Park, CA to simulated spatially distributed water table dynamics. This linked hydrologic model was calibrated to observations from a well observation network for 2006-2008, and validated using data from 2009. A vegetation survey was also conducted at the site in which the three dominant species were identified at more than 200 plots distributed across the meadow. Nonparametric multiplicative regression was performed to create and select the best models for predicting vegetation dominance based on simulated hydrologic regime. The hydrologic niche of three vegetation types representing wet, moist, and dry meadow vegetation communities was best described using both 1) a sum exceedance value calculated as the integral of water table position above a threshold of oxygen stress and 2) a sum deceedance value calculated as the integral of water table position below a threshold of water stress. This linked hydrologic and vegetative modeling framework advances our ability to predict the propagation of human-induced climatic and land-use/-cover changes through the hydrologic system to the ecosystem.

  1. Importance of vegetation for manganese cycling in temperate forested watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Jin, Lixin; Andrews, Danielle M.; Eissenstat, David M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-02-01

    Many surface soils are enriched in metals due to anthropogenic atmospheric inputs. To predict the persistence of these contaminants in soils, factors that impact rates of metal removal from soils into streams must be understood. Experiments at containerized seedling (mesocosm), pedon, and catchment scales were used to investigate the influence of vegetation on manganese (Mn) transport at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO) in Pennsylvania, USA, where past atmospheric inputs from industrial sources have enriched Mn in surface soils. Large quantities of Mn that were leached from soil components into solution were taken up by vegetation; as a result, only relatively small quantities of Mn were removed from soil into effluent and streams. Manganese uptake into vegetation exceeded Mn losses in soil leachate by 20-200X at all scales, and net Mn loss from soils decreased in the presence of vegetation due to uptake into plant tissues. The majority of Mn taken up by forest vegetation at SSHCZO each year was returned to the soil in leaf litter and consequently immobilized as Mn oxides that formed during litter decomposition. Thus, plant uptake of Mn combined with rapid oxidation of Mn during litter decomposition contribute to long-term retention. Current release rates of soluble Mn from SSHCZO soils were similar to release rates from the larger Susquehanna River Basin, indicating that the processes observed at SSHCZO may be widespread across the region. Indeed, although atmospheric deposition of Mn has declined, surface soils at SSHCZO and throughout the eastern United States remain enriched in Mn. If recycling through vegetation can attenuate the removal of Mn from soils, as observed in this study, then Mn concentrations in soils and river waters will likely decrease slowly over time following watershed contamination. Understanding the role of vegetation in regulating metal transport is important for evaluating the long-term effects of historical

  2. Measurement of soil hydraulic conductivity in relation with vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qinbo

    2010-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a key parameter which influences hydrological processes of infiltration, surface and subsurface runoff. Vegetation alters surface characteristics (e.g., surface roughness, litter absorption) or subsurface characteristics (e.g. hydraulic conductivity). Field infiltration experiment of a single ring permeameter is widely used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. Measurement equipment is a simple single-ring falling head permeameter which consists of a hollow cylinder that is simply inserted into the top soil. An optimization method on the basis of objective of minimum error between the measured and simulated water depths in the single-ring is developed for determination of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the single ring permeameter, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the red loam soil with and without vegetation covers on five hillslopes at Taoyuan Agro-Ecology Experimental Station, Hunan Province of China. For the measurement plots without vegetation roots, Ks value of the soil at 25cm depth is much smaller than that of surface soil (1.52×10-4 vs. 1.10×10-5 m/s). For the measurement plots with vegetation cover, plant roots significantly increase Ks of the lower layer soil but this increase is not significant for the shallow soil. Moreover, influences of vegetation root on Ks depend on vegetation species and ages. Ks value of the Camellia is about three times larger than that of seeding of Camphor (2.62×10-4 vs. 9.82×10-5 m/s). Ks value of the matured Camellia is 2.72×10-4 m/s while Ks value of the young Camellia is only 2.17×10-4 m/s. Key words: single ring permeameter; soil hydraulic conductivity; vegetation

  3. Riparian vegetation controls on channels formed in non-cohesive sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, K.; Tal, M.; Paola, C.

    2002-05-01

    , vegetation is reseeded following repeat high flow events, simulating the natural process of vegetation encroachment on the floodplain and channel.

  4. Building a delta: Interactions between water, sediment, and vegetation in an experimental system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliouras, A.; Kim, W.; Carlson, B.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation is an important part of morphodynamics in river deltas, but it has not been thoroughly investigated in physical delta models. We conducted a set of experiments in the Sediment Transport and Earth-surface Processes (STEP) Basin at the University of Texas at Austin to examine the effects of vegetation on delta growth and dynamics. One experiment was conducted without vegetation (Run 1), and four (Runs 2-5) were conducted using alfalfa (Medicago sativa) as a proxy for riparian vegetation, one of which included cycles between flood and normal flow discharges (Run 5). Results indicate that vegetation increased sediment trapping on the delta topset, increasing delta slope and decreasing progradation rate as compared to the unvegetated experiment. Vegetation also caused a lack of channelization when the topset reached 20% plant cover, after which progradational delta lobes were no longer evident. Discharge fluctuations in Run 5, however, led to more topset reworking, resulting in lower vegetation density (< 20%) and the persistence of highly incisional channels. Experiments run only at flood stage resulted in consistently net depositional deltas with very little channel incision, regardless of the amount of vegetation. The addition of water and sediment discharge fluctuations in Run 5, however, created a cyclic pattern between periods of topset aggradation and periods of channel incision that were net erosional. We conclude that there is a two-way interaction between the vegetation and the channels through discharge fluctuations that aid in delta growth. (1) During floods, vegetation acts an efficient sediment trapper on the floodplain to aid in topset aggradation and maintain channel relief. During normal flow, vegetation also stabilizes channel banks, allowing channels to focus their flow and erode sediment from the bed. (2) During floods, channels transport sediment to the shoreline to create new deposits that can be colonized by vegetation and deliver

  5. Importance of vegetation dynamics for future terrestrial carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlström, Anders; Xia, Jianyang; Arneth, Almut; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently sequester about one third of anthropogenic CO2 emissions each year, an important ecosystem service that dampens climate change. The future fate of this net uptake of CO2 by land based ecosystems is highly uncertain. Most ecosystem models used to predict the future terrestrial carbon cycle share a common architecture, whereby carbon that enters the system as net primary production (NPP) is distributed to plant compartments, transferred to litter and soil through vegetation turnover and then re-emitted to the atmosphere in conjunction with soil decomposition. However, while all models represent the processes of NPP and soil decomposition, they vary greatly in their representations of vegetation turnover and the associated processes governing mortality, disturbance and biome shifts. Here we used a detailed second generation dynamic global vegetation model with advanced representation of vegetation growth and mortality, and the associated turnover. We apply an emulator that describes the carbon flows and pools exactly as in simulations with the full model. The emulator simulates ecosystem dynamics in response to 13 different climate or Earth system model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 ensemble under RCP8.5 radiative forcing. By exchanging carbon cycle processes between these 13 simulations we quantified the relative roles of three main driving processes of the carbon cycle; (I) NPP, (II) vegetation dynamics and turnover and (III) soil decomposition, in terms of their contribution to future carbon (C) uptake uncertainties among the ensemble of climate change scenarios. We found that NPP, vegetation turnover (including structural shifts, wild fires and mortality) and soil decomposition rates explained 49%, 17% and 33%, respectively, of uncertainties in modelled global C-uptake. Uncertainty due to vegetation turnover was further partitioned into stand-clearing disturbances (16%), wild fires (0%), stand

  6. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  7. 49 CFR 213.37 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.37 Section 213.37 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Roadbed § 213.37 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on...

  8. 49 CFR 213.321 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.321 Section 213.321 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.321 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed shall be controlled so that...

  9. 30 CFR 783.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vegetation information. 783.19 Section 783.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... description shall include information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation....

  10. 49 CFR 213.37 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.37 Section 213.37 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Roadbed § 213.37 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on...

  11. 49 CFR 213.321 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.321 Section 213.321 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.321 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed shall be controlled so that...

  12. 30 CFR 779.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vegetation information. 779.19 Section 779.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation. (b) When a map or...

  13. 30 CFR 779.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vegetation information. 779.19 Section 779.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation. (b) When a map or...

  14. 30 CFR 779.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vegetation information. 779.19 Section 779.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation. (b) When a map or...

  15. 49 CFR 213.37 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.37 Section 213.37 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Roadbed § 213.37 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on...

  16. 49 CFR 213.321 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.321 Section 213.321 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.321 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed shall be controlled so that...

  17. 30 CFR 783.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vegetation information. 783.19 Section 783.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... description shall include information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation....

  18. 30 CFR 783.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vegetation information. 783.19 Section 783.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... description shall include information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation....

  19. 49 CFR 213.37 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.37 Section 213.37 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Roadbed § 213.37 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on...

  20. 30 CFR 783.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vegetation information. 783.19 Section 783.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... description shall include information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation....

  1. 49 CFR 213.321 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vegetation. 213.321 Section 213.321 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.321 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed shall be controlled so that...

  2. 30 CFR 779.19 - Vegetation information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vegetation information. 779.19 Section 779.19....19 Vegetation information. (a) The permit application shall, if required by the regulatory authority... information adequate to predict the potential for reestablishing vegetation. (b) When a map or...

  3. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.260 Vegetable juice. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The definition of vegetable juice in this paragraph is for the purpose of identity as a color additive only,...

  4. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.260 Vegetable juice. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The definition of vegetable juice in this paragraph is for the purpose of identity as a color additive only,...

  5. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  6. Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Lyon, John G.; Huete, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Hyperspectral narrow-band (or imaging spectroscopy) spectral data are fast emerging as practical solutions in modeling and mapping vegetation. Recent research has demonstrated the advances in and merit of hyperspectral data in a range of applications including quantifying agricultural crops, modeling forest canopy biochemical properties, detecting crop stress and disease, mapping leaf chlorophyll content as it influences crop production, identifying plants affected by contaminants such as arsenic, demonstrating sensitivity to plant nitrogen content, classifying vegetation species and type, characterizing wetlands, and mapping invasive species. The need for significant improvements in quantifying, modeling, and mapping plant chemical, physical, and water properties is more critical than ever before to reduce uncertainties in our understanding of the Earth and to better sustain it. There is also a need for a synthesis of the vast knowledge spread throughout the literature from more than 40 years of research.

  7. Shortwave infrared detection of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, S. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The potential of short wave infrared (SWIR) measurements in vegetation discrimination is further substantiated through a discussion of field studies and an examination of the physical bases which cause SWIR measurements to vary with the vegetation type observed. The research reported herein supported the AGRISTARS program objective to incorporate TM measurements in the analysis of agricultural activity. Field measurements on corn and soybeans in Iowa were conducted, and the mean and variance of canopy reflectance were computed for each observation date. The Suits canopy reflectance model was used to evaluate possible explanations of the observed corn/soybeans reflectance patterns /39/. The SWIR measurements were shown to effectively discriminate corn and soybeans on the basis of leaf absorption properties.

  8. Vegetation dynamics amplifies precessional forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Martin; Fohlmeister, Jens; Ganopolski, Andrey; Brovkin, Victor

    2006-05-01

    The astronomical theory of climate variations predicts that the climatic precession which changes the seasonal distance between Earth and Sun does not affect the annual mean irradiation at any given latitude. However, previous modeling studies suggest that during interglacials, the interaction between atmosphere, vegetation and ocean can transform the seasonal forcing by precession into an annual mean global signal. Here, we show that this result can be generalized. A distinct precessional signal emerges in a climate system model over many precessional cycles. While neither the atmosphere-ocean nor the atmosphere-vegetation model are able to produce a large amplitude of global temperature in the precessional band, only the mutual amplification of biogeophysical feedback and sea ice- albedo feedback allows a strong amplification of the precessional signal.

  9. Role of dynamic vegetation in regional climate predictions over western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alo, Clement Aga; Wang, Guiling

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the role of vegetation dynamics in regional predictions of future climate change in western Africa using a dynamic vegetation model asynchronously coupled to a regional climate model. Two experiments, one for present day and one for future, are conducted with the linked regional climate-vegetation model, and the third with the regional climate model standing alone that predicts future climate based on present-day vegetation. These simulations are so designed in order to tease out the impact of structural vegetation feedback on simulated climate and hydrological processes. According to future predictions by the regional climate-vegetation model, increase in LAI is widespread, with significant shift in vegetation type. Over the Guinean Coast in 2084-2093, evergreen tree coverage decreases by 49% compared to 1984-1993, while drought deciduous tree coverage increases by 56%. Over the Sahel region in the same period, grass cover increases by 31%. Such vegetation changes are accompanied by a decrease of JJA rainfall by 2% over the Guinean Coast and an increase by 23% over the Sahel. This rather small decrease or large increase of precipitation is largely attributable to the role of vegetation feedback. Without the feedback effect from vegetation, the regional climate model would have predicted a 5% decrease of JJA rainfall in both the Guinean Coast and the Sahel as a result of the radiative and physiological effects of higher atmospheric CO2 concentration. These results demonstrate that climate- and CO2-induced changes in vegetation structure modify hydrological processes and climate at magnitudes comparable to or even higher than the radiative and physiological effects, thus evincing the importance of including vegetation feedback in future climate predictions.

  10. Responses of Hyalella azteca to a Pesticide-Nutrient Mixture in Vegetated and Non-vegetated Wetland Mesocosms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic vegetation has been shown to improve water quality by trapping and processing contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients and sediments. Currently there is little information regarding effects of pesticide and nutrient mixtures on aquatic biota in these systems and the influence aquatic vege...

  11. Diesel fuels from vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.W.; Bagby, M.O.; Freedman, B.

    1986-03-01

    Vegetable oils have heat contents approximately 90% that of diesel fuel and are potential alternate fuel candidates. A major obstacle deterring their use in the direct-injection diesel engine is their inherent high viscosities which are nearly 10 times that of diesel fuel. Solution to the viscosity problem has been approached in three ways: 1) microemulsification, 2) pyrolysis, and 3) transesterification. Microemulsification with short chain alcohols such as methanol and ethanol yields fuels that are clear, thermodynamically stable liquid systems with viscosities near the ASTM specified range for number2 diesel fuel. These micellar systems may be formulated ionically or nonionically. The alcohols are attractive from an economic as well as a renewable resource viewpoint. Methanol has an economic advantage over ethanol, and it can be derived from a large variety of base stocks. These include biomass, municipal waste, natural gas being flared at refineries and from coal. Pyrolysis of vegetable oils is another approach to lowering their viscosity. Soybean and safflower oils were thermally decomposed in both air and nitrogen to obtain fuels for the diesel engine. Using standard ASTM distillation conditions, yields of pyrolysis products were about 75%. GS-MS analysis of the distillates showed the presence of alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids with carbon numbers ranging from 4 to more than 20. Fuel properties of the thermal decomposition products were substantially improved as evaluated by lower viscosities and higher cetane numbers compared to the unpyrrolyzed vegetable oils. Simple esters from transesterification of vegetable oils perform well in engine tests, and thus show good promise as an alternative or emergency fuel for diesel engines.

  12. Carbon Dioxide and Vegetation Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.T.; Peterson, A.G.; Hoylman, A.M.; Luo, Y.; Sims, D.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Coleman, J.S.; Ross, P.D.; Cheng, W.

    1996-12-01

    Evapo-transpiration from vegetation, as well as patterns of precipitation are expected to change as the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere continues to rise (f). Water modulates the rates of many biogeochemical processes, and it has been estimated that water directly limits plant productivity over two-thirds of the earth's land surface (2). Water quality and availability are increasingly important practical issues as demands by both agricultural and urban users continue to increase. In a recent Perspective article (3) Farquhar stated that transpiration (water loss) from terrestrial vegetation will decline by 40 to 50% as the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere approaches twice present levels. He suggested that ''the impending saving of water would be a welcome result of the rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.'' We can confirm that large reductions in transpiration are expected by terrestrial physiological ecologists. Examining 35 recent articles that discussed the issue of water use while synthesizing research on ecosystem impacts of doubling atmospheric CO{sub 2} (including reviews and crop/natural ecosystem models), we found that 31 articles suggest that reductions in water use of between 25 and 50% are to be expected.

  13. Exploring the Relationship Between Water Flux and Vegetation Water Status Using Time Series Data of Evapotranspiration and Modis Vegetation Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Riaño, D.; Ustin, S.

    2012-12-01

    In agricultural practices, evapotranspiration (ET) data obtained from weather stations or flux towers are used to monitor crop water use and schedule irrigation over the growing season. Recent advances in remote sensing have shown that satellite data (e.g., MODIS) can be used to quantify the amount of water held in vegetation canopies. However, the relationship between how much water has been used through the ET process and how much water is maintained in vegetation canopies remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate how vegetation canopy water content is related to ET for almond orchards in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. MODIS Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance 8-day 500 m data for the growing season of 2011 (March ~ November of 2011) were used to derive a number of vegetation indices as spectral indicators of canopy water content, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), the Normalized Difference Infrared Index using MODIS Band 6 (NDII) and the Normalized Difference Infrared Index using MODIS Band 7 (NDII7). These times series of MODIS indices were then compared to flux tower-based ET measurements temporally integrated from half-hourly to 8 days for the same time period. Our results showed all vegetation indices could account for more than 70% of variation in the ET data and the two infrared indices (NDII and NDII7) explained more than the other three indices. The relationships between vegetation indices and ET were generally positive and rate of ET change increased while the water content in almond canopies increased. The seasonal trajectory of ET could be fitted by a Gaussian function, with the ET peaking at day of year (DOY) 179. All vegetation indices exhibited broader peaking periods than ET due to insensitivity of spectral signals to fully developed canopies. The Gaussian function fitted to the NDII trajectory had the peaking day closest

  14. Multispectral vegetative canopy parameter retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Bunker, David J.

    2011-11-01

    Precision agriculture, forestry and environmental remote sensing are applications uniquely suited to the 8 bands that DigitalGlobe's WorldView-2 provides. At the fine spatial resolution of 0.5 m (panchromatic) and 2 m (multispectral) individual trees can be readily resolved. Recent research [1] has shown that it is possible for hyper-spectral data to invert plant reflectance spectra and estimate nitrogen content, leaf water content, leaf structure, canopy leaf area index and, for sparse canopies, also soil reflectance. The retrieval is based on inverting the SAIL (Scattering by Arbitrary Inclined Leaves) vegetation radiative transfer model for the canopy structure and the reflectance model PROSPECT4/5 for the leaf reflectance. Working on the paper [1] confirmed that a limited number of adjacent bands covering just the visible and near infrared can retrieve the parameters as well, opening up the possibility that this method can be used to analyze multi-spectral WV-2 data. Thus it seems possible to create WV-2 specific inversions using 8 bands and apply them to imagery of various vegetation covered surfaces of agricultural and environmental interest. The capability of retrieving leaf water content and nitrogen content has important applications in determining the health of vegetation, e.g. plant growth status, disease mapping, quantitative drought assessment, nitrogen deficiency, plant vigor, yield, etc.

  15. Ecology of bison, elk, and vegetation in an arid ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenecker, Kathryn A.; Advised by Hobbs, N. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Herbivory has profound effects on vegetation production and structure in many different plant communities. The influence of herbivory on plants and ultimately ecosystem processes is shaped by the types of plants consumed, the intensity of herbivory, the evolutionary history of grazing, and the availability of water and nutrients to plants. The effect of ungulate herbivores on vegetation is of great interest to ecologists, land managers and agriculturalists. In addition, the Department of Interior recently established a Bison Conservation Initiative to provide for the conservation and restoration of North American plains- and wood bison, which includes establishing new populations and expanding existing populations. The San Luis Valley, Colorado, is being considered as a potential location for a bison conservation herd. Resource managers need to know the vegetation impacts of adding a second large ungulate to a system that already has elk.

  16. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    The study shows an exceptionally long-term recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection in 1906, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of clear relationship between environment (e.g., precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery process after disturbances.

  17. Effects of vegetation canopy on the radar backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne L- and C-band scatterometer data, taken over both vegetation-covered and bare fields, were systematically analyzed and theoretically reproduced, using a recently developed model for calculating radar backscattering coefficients of rough soil surfaces. The results show that the model can reproduce the observed angular variations of radar backscattering coefficient quite well via a least-squares fit method. Best fits to the data provide estimates of the statistical properties of the surface roughness, which is characterized by two parameters: the standard deviation of surface height, and the surface correlation length. In addition, the processes of vegetation attenuation and volume scattering require two canopy parameters, the canopy optical thickness and a volume scattering factor. Canopy parameter values for individual vegetation types, including alfalfa, milo and corn, were also determined from the best-fit results. The uncertainties in the scatterometer data were also explored.

  18. Salt marsh vegetation promotes efficient tidal channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, W. S.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal channel networks mediate the exchange of water, nutrients and sediment between an estuary and marshes and mudflats. Biology feeds back into channel morphodynamics through vegetation's influence on the cohesive strength of channel banks. Understanding the morphology of a tidal channel network is thus essential to understanding both the biological functioning of intertidal ecosystems and the topographic signature of life. A critical measure of the morphology of a channel network is the unchanneled path length, which is characteristic of the efficiency with which a network dissects the marsh platform. However, the processes which control the formation and maintenance of an efficient tidal channel network remain unclear. Here we show that an unvegetated marsh platform (Estero La Ramada, Baja California, Mexico) is dissected by a less efficient channel network than a vegetated one (Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States). The difference in geometric efficiency reflects a difference in the branching and meandering characteristics of the network, characteristics controlled by the density of vegetation on the channel banks. Our results suggest a feedback between network geometry and vegetation, mediated by fluxes of nutrients and salinity through the channel network, maintains the observed network geometries. An efficient network can support a denser vegetation community which stabilizes channel banks, leading to an efficient meandering geometry.

  19. Modeling the interaction between flow and highly flexible aquatic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, J. T.; Uittenbogaard, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has an important role in estuaries and rivers by acting as bed stabilizer, filter, food source, and nursing area. However, macrophyte populations worldwide are under high anthropogenic pressure. Protection and restoration efforts will benefit from more insight into the interaction between vegetation, currents, waves, and sediment transport. Most aquatic plants are very flexible, implying that their shape and hence their drag and turbulence production depend on the flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulation model that describes this dynamic interaction between very flexible vegetation and a time-varying flow, using the sea grass Zostera marina as an example. The model consists of two parts: an existing 1DV k-ɛ turbulence model simulating the flow combined with a new model simulating the bending of the plants, based on a force balance that takes account of both vegetation position and buoyancy. We validated this model using observations of positions of flexible plastic strips and of the forces they are subjected to, as well as hydrodynamic measurements. The model predicts important properties like the forces on plants, flow velocity profiles, and turbulence characteristics well. Although the validation data are limited, the results are sufficiently encouraging to consider our model to be of generic value in studying flow processes in fields of flexible vegetation.

  20. Vegetation plays an important role in mediating future water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukkola, A. M.; Keenan, T. F.; Kelley, D. I.; Prentice, I. C.

    2016-09-01

    Future environmental change is expected to modify the global hydrological cycle, with consequences for the regional distribution of freshwater supplies. Regional precipitation projections, however, differ largely between models, making future water resource projections highly uncertain. Using two representative concentration pathways and nine climate models, we estimate 21st century water resources across Australia, employing both a process-based dynamic vegetation model and a simple hydrological framework commonly used in water resource studies to separate the effects of climate and vegetation on water resources. We show surprisingly robust, pathway-independent regional patterns of change in water resources despite large uncertainties in precipitation projections. Increasing plant water use efficiency (due to the changing atmospheric CO2) and reduced green vegetation cover (due to the changing climate) relieve pressure on water resources for the highly populated, humid coastal regions of eastern Australia. By contrast, in semi-arid regions across Australia, runoff declines are amplified by CO2-induced greening, which leads to increased vegetation water use. These findings highlight the importance of including vegetation dynamics in future water resource projections.

  1. Maintaining antioxidant potential of fresh fruits and vegetables after harvest.

    PubMed

    Villa-Rodriguez, Jose A; Palafox-Carlos, H; Yahia, Elhadi M; Ayala-Zavala, J Fernando; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables has increased in the past few years, not only because of their attractive sensorial properties, but also for their nutritional and health benefits. Antioxidants are compounds found in fresh fruits and vegetables, and evidence of their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases is continuously emerging. However, the antioxidants in some fruits and vegetables can be lost during handling after harvest, even during minimal processing and storage. In this sense, postharvest treatments are needed to preserve the quality and antioxidant potential of fresh produce. Postharvest treatments and technologic strategies (including ultraviolet light, controlled and modified atmospheres, heat treatments, and application of natural compounds, such as edible coatings, active packaging, microencapsulation, and nanoemulsion) have shown positive and promising results to maintain fruit and vegetable antioxidant potential. The purpose of this review is to analyze and propose the application of postharvest strategies to maintain, or even improve, the antioxidant status of fruits and vegetables, thus offering options to maximize health benefits to consumers.

  2. The importance of catchment vegetation for lake sediment mercury records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydberg, Johan; Rösch, Manfred; Heinz, Emanuel; Biester, Harald

    2014-05-01

    elements, because coniferous forest intercepts more mercury from the atmosphere than deciduous forest. Secondly, changes in the vegetation will also affect the re-emission of mercury, because of differences in the shading. Thirdly, the vegetation will influence soil stability, production of litter, litter quality, degradation of soil organic matter. This will, in turn, affect the cycling of organic material, which is an important vector for many trace elements, and the soil erosion. Thus, before using lake sediment records to study the historical changes in mercury loading to the environment there is a need to constrain if there have been any changes in the vegetation. However, this study also shows that long lake-sediment records have a large potential as natural laboratories to study the effect of slow processes, like vegetation development, on the transport and accumulation of mercury and other trace elements through the landscape.

  3. Feedbacks between vegetation and soil moisture in mountain grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, M.; Bertoldi, G.; Notarnicola, C.; Brenner, J.; Greifeneder, F.; Niedrist, G.; Tappeiner, U.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content (SMC) is a key variable for water budget and controls both physical processes, as runoff generation, and biological processes, as vegetation development. On the other hand, vegetation and land management influence soil evolution and therefore SMC dynamic. Moreover, in mountain areas complex topography adds an additional control on water fluxes and climate. For those reasons, understanding the controls on the spatio-temporal variability of SMC is essential to predict how perturbations in vegetation and climate affects mountain hydrology. In this contribution we want to analyze the impact of different land management (meadows versus pastures) on the spatial and temporal dynamic of surface and root-zone SMC, and its relationships with climate and topography. We focus on water-limited alpine grasslands in the LTER area Mazia Valley in the European Alps. The infrastructure includes a dense network of more than 20 stations measuring soil moisture, biomass production observations and two eddy-covariance stations over meadow and pasture. Moreover, more than ten high-resolution SAR (Sentinel1 and RADARSAT2) images were acquired, in combination with ground surveys to monitor SMC spatial distribution. In order to understand the different physical controls, SMC has been also modelled using the GEOtop hydrological model, coupled with a dynamic vegetation model. Results show that meadows and pastures have different behaviors. Meadows are in general wetter and in flatter locations. This leads to higher vegetation productivity, development of soils with higher water holding capacity and to a positive feedback on SMC. In contrast, pastures are drier, in steeper locations with lower vegetation density and more compact soils due animal trampling, with a negative feedback on SMC. This co-evolution of land cover and SMC leads to persistent spatial patterns controlled by both topography and management.

  4. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  5. New views on changing Arctic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Robert E.

    2012-03-01

    trend data could be extracted. While other studies have used TM data to map change across two to three points in time to evaluate change in boreal or arctic vegetation under climate change (Masek 2001, Ranson et al 2004), the time-series analysis of Fraser et al (2011) allows the detection of subtle trends not typically discernible with two-date comparisons. Second, the findings of Fraser et al confirm that vegetation in the Arctic appears to be responding to warming, particularly winter warming. Their maps represent a basic empirical dataset whose spatial patterns should be replicated by model-based approaches. Third, the comparatively fine resolution of this study relative to previous satellite studies allows Fraser et al to more precisely locate where greening occurs. They note increases in shrub cover, confirming findings from studies that used other approaches to reach similar conclusions (Stow et al 2004, Tape et al 2006). They also find evidence that both shrub and herbaceous growth occurs more in landscape positions already favorable to productive vegetation, such as lower hillslopes and valleys, and less so on uplands. Such findings will certainly factor into discussions of the mechanism by which warming could facilitate vegetative growth in Arctic communities (Forbes et al 2010, Sturm et al 2005). The work of Fraser et al (2011) also adds to a growing body of work leveraging free Landsat data from the US Geological Survey's (USGS) archive. As the longest-running continuous satellite image dataset for land processes, Landsat data provide unparalleled witness to the enormous changes occurring on Earth since 1972 (Wulder et al 2008). By opening the US holdings of the Landsat archive to all humans on the planet (Woodcock et al 2008), the USGS in 2008 catalyzed a blossoming of approaches to capture and characterize that change (Goodwin et al 2010, Hais et al 2009, Hansen et al 2010, Huang et al 2010, Kennedy et al 2010, Potapov et al 2011, Vogelmann et al 2009

  6. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    PubMed

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions.

  7. Health benefits of fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Joanne L; Lloyd, Beate

    2012-07-01

    Fruits and vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend you make one-half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Myplate.gov also supports that one-half the plate should be fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables include a diverse group of plant foods that vary greatly in content of energy and nutrients. Additionally, fruits and vegetables supply dietary fiber, and fiber intake is linked to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. Fruits and vegetables also supply vitamins and minerals to the diet and are sources of phytochemicals that function as antioxidants, phytoestrogens, and antiinflammatory agents and through other protective mechanisms. In this review, we describe the existing dietary guidance on intake of fruits and vegetables. We also review attempts to characterize fruits and vegetables into groups based on similar chemical structures and functions. Differences among fruits and vegetables in nutrient composition are detailed. We summarize the epidemiological and clinical studies on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. Finally, we discuss the role of fiber in fruits and vegetables in disease prevention.

  8. Combined use of vegetation and water indices from remotely-sensed AVIRIS and MODIS data to monitor riparian and semiarid vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jin

    2006-04-01

    The objectives of dissertation were to examine vegetation and water indices from AVIRIS and MODIS data for monitoring semiarid and upland vegetation communities related with moisture condition and their spatial and temporal dependencies in estimating evapotranspiration (ET). The performance of various water indices, including the normalized difference water index (NDWI) and land surface water index (LSWI), with the chlorophyll-based vegetation indices (VIs), the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) was evaluated in (1) investigating sensitivity of vegetation and land surface moisture condition, (2) finding optimal indices in detecting seasonal variations in vegetation water status at the landscape level, and (3) their spatial and temporal scale dependency on estimating ET. The analyses were accomplished through field radiometric measurement, airborne-based and satellite data processing accompanied with water flux data. The results of these studies showed vegetation and landscape moisture condition could be identified in VI--WI scatter-plot. LSWI (2100) showed the biggest sensitivity to variation of vegetation and background soil moisture condition as well. Multi-temporal MODIS data analysis was able to show water use characteristic of riparian vegetation and upland vegetation. Results showed water use characteristics of riparian vegetation are relatively insensitive to summer monsoon pulse, while upland vegetation is highly tied to summer monsoon rain. The relationship between water flux measurement from eddy covariance tower and satellite data has shown that MODIS derived EVI and LSWI (2100) have similar merit to estimate ET rate, but better correlation was observed from the relationship between MODIS EVI and ET. Pixel aggregation results using fine resolution AVIRIS data showed moderate resolution spatial scale 250m or 500m, best predicted ET rates over all study areas. Surface fluxes temporally aggregated to weekly or

  9. Relationships between vegetation indices and different burn and vegetation ratios: a multi-scale approach applied in a fire affected area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleniou, M.; Koutsias, N.

    2013-08-01

    Vegetation indices have been widely used in remote sensing literature for burned land mapping and monitoring. In the present study we used satellite data (IKONOS, LANDSAT, ASTER, MODIS) of multiple spectral (visible, near, shortwave infrared) and spatial (1-500 meters) resolutions, acquired shortly after a very destructive fire occurred in the mountain of Parnitha in Attica, Greece the summer of 2007. The aim of our study is to examine and evaluate the performance of some vegetation indices for burned land mapping and also to characterize the relationships between vegetation indices and the percent of fire-scorched (burned) and non fire-scorched (vegetated) areas. The available satellite images were processed geometrically, radiometrically and atmospherically. The very high resolution IKONOS imagery was served as a base to estimate the percent of cover of burned areas, bare soil and vegetation by applying the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. The percent of cover for each type was then correlated to vegetation indices for all the satellite images, and regression models were fit to characterize those relationships. In total 57 versions of some classical vegetation indices were computed using LANDSAT, ASTER and MODIS data. Most of them were modified by replacing Red with SWIR channel, as the latter has been proved sensitive to burned area discrimination. IPVI and NDVI showed a better performance among the indices tested to estimate the percent of vegetation, while most of the modified versions of the indices showed highest performance to estimate the percent of burned areas.

  10. Arctic Browning: vegetation damage and implications for carbon balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treharne, Rachael; Bjerke, Jarle; Emberson, Lisa; Tømmervik, Hans; Phoenix, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    'Arctic browning' is the loss of biomass and canopy in Arctic ecosystems. This process is often driven by climatic and biological extreme events - notably extreme winter warm periods, winter frost-drought and severe outbreaks of defoliating insects. Evidence suggests that browning is becoming increasingly frequent and severe at the pan-arctic scale, a view supported by observations from more intensely observed regions, with major and unprecedented vegetation damage reported at landscape (>1000km2) and regional (Nordic Arctic Region) scales in recent years. Critically, the damage caused by these extreme events is in direct opposition to 'Arctic greening', the well-established increase in productivity and shrub abundance observed at high latitudes in response to long-term warming. This opposition creates uncertainty as to future anticipated vegetation change in the Arctic, with implications for Arctic carbon balance. As high latitude ecosystems store around twice as much carbon as the atmosphere, and vegetation impacts are key to determining rates of loss or gain of ecosystem carbon stocks, Arctic browning has the potential to influence the role of these ecosystems in global climate. There is therefore a clear need for a quantitative understanding of the impacts of browning events on key ecosystem carbon fluxes. To address this, field sites were chosen in central and northern Norway and in Svalbard, in areas known to have been affected by either climatic extremes or insect outbreak and subsequent browning in the past four years. Sites were chosen along a latitudinal gradient to capture both conditions already causing vegetation browning throughout the Norwegian Arctic, and conditions currently common at lower latitudes which are likely to become more damaging further North as climate change progresses. At each site the response of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange to light was measured using a LiCor LI6400 Portable Photosynthesis system and a custom vegetation chamber with

  11. Modelling post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, A.; Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    Wildfires in Mediterranean Europe have been increasing in number and extension over the last decades and constitute one of the major disturbances of these ecosystems. Portugal is the country with more burnt area in the last decade and the years of 2003 and 2005 were particularly devastating, the total burned areas of 425 000 and 338 000 ha being several times higher than the corresponding average. The year of 2005 further coincided with one of the most severe droughts since early 20th century. Due to different responses of vegetation to diverse fire regimes and to the complexity of landscape structures, fires have complex effects on vegetation recovery. Remote sensing has revealed to be a powerful tool in studying vegetation dynamics and in monitoring post-fire vegetation recovery, which is crucial to land-management and to prevent erosion. The main goals of the present work are (i) to assess the accuracy of a vegetation recovery model previously developed by the authors; (ii) to assess the model's performance, namely its sensitivity to initial conditions, to the temporal length of the input dataset and to missing data; (iii) to study vegetation recovery over two selected areas that were affected by two large wildfire events in the fire seasons of 2003 and 2005, respectively. The study relies on monthly values of NDVI over 11 yr (1998-2009), at 1 × 1 km spatial resolution, as obtained by the VEGETATION instrument. According to results from sensitivity analysis, the model is robust and able to provide good estimations of recovery times of vegetation when the regeneration process is regular, even when missing data is present. In what respect to the two selected burnt scars, results indicate that fire damage is a determinant factor of regeneration, as less damaged vegetation recovers more rapidly, which is mainly justified by the high coverage of Pinus Pinaster over the area, and by the fact that coniferous forests tend to recover slower than transitional woodland

  12. Modelling post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, A.; Gouveia, C. M.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Wildfires in Mediterranean Europe have been increasing in number and extension over the last decades and constitute one of the major disturbances of these ecosystems. Portugal is the country with more burnt area in the last decade and the years of 2003 and 2005 were particularly devastating, the total burned areas of 425 000 and 338 000 ha being several times higher than the corresponding average. The year of 2005 further coincided with one of the most severe droughts since early 20th century. Due to different responses of vegetation to diverse fire regimes and to the complexity of landscape structures, fires have complex effects on vegetation recovery. Remote sensing has revealed to be a powerful tool in studying vegetation dynamics and in monitoring post-fire vegetation recovery, which is crucial to land-management and to prevent erosion. The main goals of the present work are (i) to assess the accuracy of a vegetation recovery model previously developed by the authors; (ii) to assess the model's performance, namely its sensitivity to initial conditions, to the temporal length of the input dataset and to missing data; (iii) to study vegetation recovery over two selected areas that were affected by two large wildfire events in the fire seasons of 2003 and 2005, respectively. The study relies on monthly values of NDVI over 11 years (1998-2009), at 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution, as obtained by the VEGETATION instrument. According to results from sensitivity analysis, the model is robust and able to provide good estimations of recovery times of vegetation when the regeneration process is regular, even when missing data is present. In respect to the two selected burnt scars, results indicate that fire damage is a determinant factor of regeneration, as less damaged vegetation recovers more rapidly, which is mainly justified by the high coverage of Pinus pinaster over the area, and by the fact that coniferous forests tend to recover slower than transitional woodland

  13. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  14. Asynchronous vegetation phenology enhances winter body condition of a large mobile herbivore.

    PubMed

    Searle, Kate R; Rice, Mindy B; Anderson, Charles R; Bishop, Chad; Hobbs, N T

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how spatial and temporal heterogeneity influence ecological processes forms a central challenge in ecology. Individual responses to heterogeneity shape population dynamics, therefore understanding these responses is central to sustainable population management. Emerging evidence has shown that herbivores track heterogeneity in nutritional quality of vegetation by responding to phenological differences in plants. We quantified the benefits mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) accrue from accessing habitats with asynchronous plant phenology in northwest Colorado over 3 years. Our analysis examined both the direct physiological and indirect environmental effects of weather and vegetation phenology on mule deer winter body condition. We identified several important effects of annual weather patterns and topographical variables on vegetation phenology in the home ranges of mule deer. Crucially, temporal patterns of vegetation phenology were linked with differences in body condition, with deer tending to show poorer body condition in areas with less asynchronous vegetation green-up and later vegetation onset. The direct physiological effect of previous winter precipitation on mule deer body condition was much less important than the indirect effect mediated by vegetation phenology. Additionally, the influence of vegetation phenology on body fat was much stronger than that of overall vegetation productivity. In summary, changing annual weather patterns, particularly in relation to seasonal precipitation, have the potential to alter body condition of this important ungulate species during the critical winter period. This finding highlights the importance of maintaining large contiguous areas of spatially and temporally variable resources to allow animals to compensate behaviourally for changing climate-driven resource patterns.

  15. Evaluating the impact of a wide range of vegetation densities on river channel pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Roucou, Ron

    2016-04-01

    Braided rivers are very dynamic systems which have complex controls over their planform and flow dynamics. Vegetation is one variable which influences channel geometry and pattern, through its effect on local flow hydraulics and the process continuum of sediment erosion-transport-deposition. Furthermore, where in the braided floodplain stable vegetation develops depends on the temporal sequencing of the river discharge i.e. floods. Understanding the effect of vegetation in these highly dynamic systems has multiple consequences for human activity and floodplain management. This paper focusses on the specific role of vegetation density in controlling braided river form and processes. Previous research in this field has been contradictory; with Gran and Paola (2001) finding that increasing vegetation density decreased the number of active channels. In contrast, Coulthard (2005] observed that as vegetation become denser there was an increase in the number of channels. This was hypothesized to be caused by flow separation around vegetation and the development of bars immediately downstream of the plant. This paper reports the results from a set of experiments in a 4m by 1m flume, where discharge, slope and sediment size were kept constant. Artificial grass was used to represent vegetation with a density ranging from 50 plants/m2 to 400 plants/m2. Digital photographs, using a GoPro camera with a fish eye lens, were taken from ~1m above the flume at an interval of 30 seconds during the 3 hour experiment. The experiments showed that as the vegetation density increased from 50 to 150 plants/m2, the number of channel bars developing doubled from 12 to 24. At vegetation densities greater than 150 plants/m2 there was a decline in the number of bars created to a minimum of 8 bars for a density of 400 plants/m2. We attribute these patterns to the effect that the vegetation has on flow hydraulics, sediment transport processes and the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. We

  16. Vegetation fire proneness in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Aranha, José; Amraoui, Malik

    2015-04-01

    Fire selectivity has been studied for vegetation classes in terms of fire frequency and fire size in a few European regions. This analysis is often performed along with other landscape variables such as topography, distance to roads and towns. These studies aims to assess the landscape sensitivity to forest fires in peri-urban areas and land cover changes, to define landscape management guidelines and policies based on the relationships between landscape and fires in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, the objectives of this study includes the: (i) analysis of the spatial and temporal variability statistics within Europe; and, (ii) the identification and characterization of the vegetated land cover classes affected by fires; and, (iii) to propose a fire proneness index. The datasets used in the present study comprises: Corine Land Cover (CLC) maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006) and burned area (BA) perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe, provided by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS). The CLC is a part of the European Commission programme to COoRdinate INformation on the Environment (Corine) and it provides consistent, reliable and comparable information on land cover across Europe. Both the CLC and EFFIS datasets were combined using geostatistics and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of shrubs and forest affected by fires. Obtained results confirms the usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index which allows to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire. As expected, differences between northern and southern Europe are notorious in what concern to land cover distribution, fire incidence and fire proneness of vegetation cover classes. This work was supported by national funds by FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project PEst-OE/AGR/UI4033/2014 and by

  17. Vegetables, fruit and phytoestrogens as preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Potter, J D; Steinmetz, K

    1996-01-01

    The practice of medicine-both past and present-often involves the prescription of specific foods (almost always plants) or their potent derivatives, to treat a wide spectrum of illnesses. Foods that have been ascribed healing properties include the Cruciferae, the allium family, celery, cucumber, endive, parsley, radish and legumes. Review of the epidemiological data, including both cohort and case-control studies, of all cancer sites strongly suggests that plant foods also have preventive potential and that consumption of the following groups and types of vegetables and fruits is lower in those who subsequently develop cancer: raw and fresh vegetables, leafy green vegetables, Cruciferae, carrots, broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, and raw and fresh fruit (including tomatoes and citrus fruit). Other data suggest that foods high in phytoestrogens, particularly soy (which contains isoflavones), or high in precursor compounds that can be metabolized by gut bacteria into active agents, particularly some grains and vegetables with woody stems (which contain precursors to lignans), are plausibly associated with a lower risk of sex-hormone-related cancers. The human evidence for these latter associations is not strong. There are many biologically plausible reasons why consumption of plant foods might slow or prevent the appearance of cancer. These include the presence in plant foods of such potentially anticarcinogenic substances as carotenoids, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, dietary fibre (and its components), dithiolthiones, isothiocyanates, indoles, phenols, protease inhibitors, allium compounds, plant sterols, and limonene. Phytoestrogens are also derived from some vegetables and berries as well as grains and seeds. Most of the data for the observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of all of these compounds have come from animal and in vitro studies. At almost every one of the stages of the cancer process, identified phytochemicals are known to be able to alter the

  18. Rapid screening of biologically modified vegetable oils for fuel performance

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, D.P.; Goodrum, J.W.; Campbell, C.C.

    1999-08-01

    A process for the rapid screening of alternative diesel fuel performance was applied to analogues of genetically modified vegetable oils and a mixture with no. 2 diesel fuel. The oils examined contained 60 to 70% of low molecular weight, short-chain, saturated triglycerides compared to the 1 to 2% found in traditional vegetable oils. These oils have relatively low viscosity that is predicted to enhance their performance as alternative diesel fuels. The screening process utilizes an engine torque test sequence that accelerates the tendency of diesel fuels to coke fuel injectors, a key indicator of fuel performance. The results of the tests were evaluated using a computer vision system for the rapid quantification of injector coking. The results of the screen were compared to those using no. 2 diesel fuel as a baseline. Coke deposition from the modified vegetable oil analogues was not found to be significantly different than deposition from diesel fuel. Suggestions are made to guide further modification of vegetable oil biosynthesis for the production of alternative diesel fuel.

  19. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  20. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, E.; Beirle, S.; Marbach, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME of SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common Vegetation Indices use the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth's surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the Red and Near Infrared spectrum. We look at these using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for changes in the atmosphere. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types. We investigate how well we will be able to distinguish vegetation types from space. This will also be valuable for monitoring global vegetation-cycles over long time spans. Preliminary results will be presented here.

  1. Contents of fluorides in vegetables from areas contaminated by industrial emissions: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Machoy, Z.; Samujlo, D.

    1981-01-01

    In vegetables grown in 1978 and 1979 near a chemical plant where phosphorites and apatites are processed, according to preliminary data, fluoride was significantly elevated in roots of carrots and parsley and in the leaves of parsley.

  2. A mechanistic description of the formation and evolution of vegetation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, R.; Ramírez, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation patterns are a common and well-defined characteristic of many landscapes. In this paper we explore some of the physical mechanisms responsible for the establishment of self-organized, non-random vegetation patterns that arise at the hillslope scale in many areas of the world, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. In doing so, we provide a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the dynamics of vegetation pattern formation and development. Reciprocal effects of vegetation on the hillslope thermodynamics, runoff production and run-on infiltration, root density, surface albedo and soil moisture content are analyzed. In particular, we: (1) present a physically based mechanistic description of processes leading to vegetation pattern formation; (2) quantify the relative impact of each process on pattern formation; and (3) describe the relationships between vegetation patterns and the climatic, hydraulic and topographic characteristics of the system. We validate the model by comparing simulations with observed natural patterns in the areas of Niger near Niamey and Somalia near Garoowe. Our analyses suggest that the phenomenon of pattern formation is primarily driven by run-on infiltration and mechanisms of facilitation/inhibition among adjacent vegetation groups, mediated by vegetation effects on soil properties and controls on soil moisture and albedo. Nonetheless, even in presence of those mechanisms, patterns arise only when the climatic conditions, particularly annual precipitation and net radiation, are favorable.

  3. Examination of the semi-automatic calculation technique of vegetation cover rate by digital camera images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemine, S.; Rikimaru, A.; Takahashi, K.

    The rice is one of the staple foods in the world High quality rice production requires periodically collecting rice growth data to control the growth of rice The height of plant the number of stem the color of leaf is well known parameters to indicate rice growth Rice growth diagnosis method based on these parameters is used operationally in Japan although collecting these parameters by field survey needs a lot of labor and time Recently a laborsaving method for rice growth diagnosis is proposed which is based on vegetation cover rate of rice Vegetation cover rate of rice is calculated based on discriminating rice plant areas in a digital camera image which is photographed in nadir direction Discrimination of rice plant areas in the image was done by the automatic binarization processing However in the case of vegetation cover rate calculation method depending on the automatic binarization process there is a possibility to decrease vegetation cover rate against growth of rice In this paper a calculation method of vegetation cover rate was proposed which based on the automatic binarization process and referred to the growth hysteresis information For several images obtained by field survey during rice growing season vegetation cover rate was calculated by the conventional automatic binarization processing and the proposed method respectively And vegetation cover rate of both methods was compared with reference value obtained by visual interpretation As a result of comparison the accuracy of discriminating rice plant areas was increased by the proposed

  4. Sensitivity of blanket peat vegetation and hydrochemistry to local disturbances.

    PubMed

    Robroek, Bjorn J M; Smart, Richard P; Holden, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    At the ecosystem scale, peatlands can be extremely resilient to perturbations. Yet, they are very sensitive to local disturbances, especially mechanical perturbations (e.g. trampling). The effects of these disturbances on vegetation, and potential effects on hydrochemical conditions along the peat surface, however, are largely unknown. We used three research tracks (paths researchers use to access their study sites) differing in time of abandonment to investigate the impact of local disturbance (trampling) on the vegetation and its short-term (< or = 2 year) recovery in a flagship research blanket peatland. Additionally, we examined the effects of local disturbance on fluvial runoff events and the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) in runoff water. Local disturbance heavily impacted peat vegetation, resulting in large areas of scarred and churned peat. Recovery of vascular plants along abandoned tracks was slow, but a functional Sphagnum layer re-established after just one year. The absence of vegetation elicited an increase in the number of runoff events along the tracks, by which POC runoff from the tracks increased. POC concentrations were highest in the surface water from the recently abandoned track, while they were low in the runoff water from the track abandoned longest and the undisturbed control track. We attribute this to the relatively fast recovery of the Sphagnum vegetation. DOC concentrations did not differ significantly either spatially or temporally in surface runoff or soil solution waters. While at an ecosystem scale local disturbances may be negligible in terms of carbon loss, our data points to the need for further research on the potential long-term effects of local disturbance on the vegetation, and significant effects on local scale carbon fluxes. Moreover, the effects of disturbances could be long-lasting and their role on ecosystem processes should not be underestimated.

  5. A review of the analysis of vegetable oil residues from fire debris samples: spontaneous ignition, vegetable oils, and the forensic approach.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Eric

    2005-09-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the analysis of vegetable (and animal) oil residues from fire debris samples. The process of self-heating and spontaneous ignition is well-known by fire investigators and causes many fires. Vegetable oils are often the chemicals that originate such phenomenon. Vegetable oils are composed of lipids, which contain fatty acids. The autooxidation of the double bonds present in unsaturated fatty acids is the exothermic reaction at the origin of the self-heating process. The degree of unsaturation of fatty acids directly influences the propensity of an oil to undergo self-heating and, eventually, spontaneous ignition. When fire debris samples are collected, it is possible to examine them at the laboratory to extract and identify vegetable oil residues. This is typically performed by solvent extraction, followed by gas chromatographic(-mass spectrometric) analysis of the extract. Such analyses differ from ignitable liquid residue analyses, so a different forensic approach is necessary.

  6. Effective vegetation optical depth retrieval using microwave vegetation indices from WindSat data for short vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunqing; Shi, Jiancheng; Zhao, Tianjie

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation optical depth (VOD) and effective vegetation optical depth (EVOD) are key factors for estimating soil moisture and vegetation parameters. Microwave vegetation indices (MVIs, including A and B parameters) have been recently developed for short-vegetation covered surfaces. The MVIs parameter B (MVIs_B) is mainly related to vegetation conditions, which makes it provide a potential way of EVOD retrieval. A theoretical expression deriving EVOD was deduced using MVIs_B from WindSat data. Global patterns of EVOD were analyzed subsequently. It has been shown that EVOD retrieved from MVIs performed a consistent global pattern and seasonal variation with normalized difference vegetation index. Time-series data from the Central Tibetan Plateau Soil Moisture/Temperature Monitoring Network, which is grassland dominated, was selected for temporal analysis. It was found that the temporal EVOD from WindSat MVIs can capture the growth trend of vegetation. Comparisons between EVOD estimations from MVIs and a radiative transfer model were also performed over this network. It was found that EVOD from the two methods exhibited comparable values and similar trends. MVIs_B-derived EVOD can be obtained without any other auxiliary data and has great potential in land-surface parameter retrieval over short-vegetation covered areas.

  7. Teleconnection between ENSO and Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, F.

    Since 1980s strong ENSO disturbed weather environment economy and human lives worldwide Total impact of these events on society is estimated in billions of dollars and consequences include famine human health problems loss of life property damage and destruction of the environment Areas sensitive to ENSO have been identified in some world areas from climatic records and recently from 15-year satellite data This presentation examines teleconnection between ENSO and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide using 24-year satellite and in situ data records ENSO events were characterized by monthly sea surface temperature SST anomalies in the tropical Pacific They were collected from the improved SST analysis data set Reynolds and Smith 1994 Average anomalies were calculated for the region 5 r N - 5 r S and 170 r - 120 r E 3 4 area Terrestrial ecosystems were presented by the vegetation health condition indices VHI Kogan 1997 The VHIs derived from AVHRR-based NDVI and 10-11 Phi m thermal radiances were designed to monitor moisture and thermal impacts on vegetation health greenness and vigor Two types of responses were identified In boreal winter ecosystems of northern South America southern Africa and Southeast Asia experienced severe moisture and thermal stress during El Ni n o and favorable conditions during La Ni n a years In central South America and the Horn of Africa regions the response was opposite World ecosystems are less sensitive to SSTs during boreal summer except for the areas in northern Brazil

  8. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, E.; Beirle, S.; Marbach, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME or SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common vegetation indices are based on the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth’s surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the red and near infrared spectrum. We look at these features using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for atmospheric effects. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types using our own instrumentation. We analyze the effect of different Pigments on high-frequency-structures of the DOAS Retrieval. Applying these results we investigate how well we can distinguish vegetation types from space.

  9. Monitoring vegetation using DOAS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigemeier, Ellen; Beirle, Steffen; Marbach, Thierry; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation-cycles are of general interest for many applications. Be it for harvest-predictions, global monitoring of climate-change or as input to atmospheric models. From novel spectrally resolving UV/vis satellite instruments (like GOME or SCIAMACHY) the spectral signatures of different types of vegetation can be identified and analysed. Although the spatial resolution of GOME and SCIAMACHY observations is much coarser than those of conventional satellite instruments for vegetation monitoring, our data sets on different vegetation types add new and useful information, not obtainable from other sources. Common vegetation indices are based on the fact that the difference between Red and Near Infrared reflection is higher than in any other material on Earth's surface. This gives a very high degree of confidence for vegetation-detection. The spectrally resolving data from GOME and SCIAMACHY provide the chance to concentrate on finer spectral features throughout the red and near infrared spectrum. We look at these features using a technique known as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Although originally developed to retrieve information on trace gases, it can also be used to gain information on vegetation. Another advantage is that this method automatically corrects for atmospheric effects. This renders the vegetation-information easily comparable over long time-spans. In addition, high-frequency-structures from vegetation also effect the retrieval of tropospheric trace-gases and aerosols. To optimize vegetation monitoring with DOAS we produce spectrally resolved reference spectra from different vegetation types using our own instrumentation. We analyze the effect of different Pigments on high-frequency-structures of the DOAS Retrieval. Applying these results we investigate how well we can distinguish vegetation types from space.

  10. Fourth international circumpolar arctic vegetation mapping workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raynolds, Martha K.; Markon, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    During the week of April 10, 2001, the Fourth International Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Mapping Workshop was held in Moscow, Russia. The purpose of this meeting was to bring together the vegetation scientists working on the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) to (1) review the progress of current mapping activities, (2) discuss and agree upon a standard set of arctic tundra subzones, (3) plan for the production and dissemination of a draft map, and (4) begin work on a legend for the final map.

  11. Wet scrubbing of biomass producer gas tars using vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoi, Prakashbhai Ramabhai

    experimental data from the wet scrubbing system would be useful in the design and operation of a pilot scale vegetable oil based system. The process model, validated using experimental data, would be a key design tool for the design and optimization of a pilot scale vegetable oil based system.

  12. Airphoto assessment of changes in aquatic vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Philipson, W. R.; Russel, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Large scale, multiyear, color and color infrared aerial photographs were used to evaluate changes in aquatic vegetation that have accompanied a reduction in phosphorus inputs to a phosphorus-limited, eutrophic lake in New York State. The study showed that the distribution of emergent, floating and submersed vegetation could be determined with little or no concurrent ground data; that various emergent and floating types could be separated and, with limited field checks, identified; and that different submersed types are generally not separable. Major vegetative types are characterized by spectral and nonspectral features, and a classification is developed for compiling time-sequential vegetation maps.

  13. White Vegetables: Glycemia and Satiety12

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Harvey; Soeandy, Chesarahmia Dojo; Smith, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss the effect of white vegetable consumption on glycemia, satiety, and food intake. White vegetables is a term used to refer to vegetables that are white or near white in color and include potatoes, cauliflowers, turnips, onions, parsnips, white corn, kohlrabi, and mushrooms (technically fungi but generally considered a vegetable). They vary greatly in their contribution to the energy and nutrient content of the diet and glycemia and satiety. As with other foods, the glycemic effect of many white vegetables has been measured. The results illustrate that interpretation of the semiquantitative comparative ratings of white vegetables as derived by the glycemic index must be context dependent. As illustrated by using the potato as an example, the glycemic index of white vegetables can be misleading if not interpreted in the context of the overall contribution that the white vegetable makes to the carbohydrate and nutrient composition of the diet and their functionality in satiety and metabolic control within usual meals. It is concluded that application of the glycemic index in isolation to judge the role of white vegetables in the diet and, specifically in the case of potato as consumed in ad libitum meals, has led to premature and possibly counterproductive dietary guidance. PMID:23674805

  14. Prevalent vegetation growth enhancement in urban environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Decheng

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization, a dominant global demographic trend, leads to various changes in environments (e.g., atmospheric CO2 increase, urban heat island). Cities experience global change decades ahead of other systems so that they are natural laboratories for studying responses of other nonurban biological ecosystems to future global change. However, the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth are not well understood. Here, we developed a general conceptual framework for quantifying the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth and applied it in 32 Chinese cities. Results indicated that vegetation growth, as surrogated by satellite-observed vegetation index, decreased along urban intensity across all cities. At the same time, vegetation growth was enhanced at 85% of the places along the intensity gradient, and the relative enhancement increased with urban intensity. This growth enhancement offset about 40% of direct loss of vegetation productivity caused by replacing productive vegetated surfaces with nonproductive impervious surfaces. In light of current and previous field studies, we conclude that vegetation growth enhancement is prevalent in urban settings. Urban environments do provide ideal natural laboratories to observe biological responses to environmental changes that are difficult to mimic in manipulative experiments. However, one should be careful in extrapolating the finding to nonurban environments because urban vegetation is usually intensively managed, and attribution of the responses to diverse driving forces will be challenging but must be pursued. PMID:27185955

  15. The vegetative index number and crop identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashburn, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A vegetative index number of numerical value was calculated from the digital values of the LANDSAT system to provide some measure of green growing vegetation. The usefulness of the green numbers for schemes in crop identification and acreage estimation is investigated and the Ashburn vegetation index (AVI) is compared with the Kauth-Thomas vegetation index (KVI) for crop identification schemes. Results of wheat acreage estimation using LACIE Procedure 1 and the AVI for eight sample segments are given. Tables show comparisons between the AVI and the KVI as well as visual results of the AVI.

  16. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  17. Wetland vegetation establishment in L-Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, S.R.

    1990-07-01

    Wetland vegetation was transplanted from PAR Pond to L-Lake between January and August, 1987. Approximately 100,000 individual plants representing over 40 species were transplanted along the southern shoreline. Three zones of vegetation were created: (1) submersed/floating-leaved, (2) emergent, (3) upper emergent/shrub. During the summers of 1987, 1988, 1989, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory sampled the vegetation in 54 permanent transects located in planted (N=32) and unplanted areas (N=22). The 1989 vegetation data from L-Lake were compared to 1985 data from PAR Pond.

  18. Riparian vegetation controls on braided stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Karen; Paola, Chris

    2001-12-01

    Riparian vegetation can significantly influence the morphology of a river, affecting channel geometry and flow dynamics. To examine the effects of riparian vegetation on gravel bed braided streams, we conducted a series of physical experiments at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory with varying densities of bar and bank vegetation. Water discharge, sediment discharge, and grain size were held constant between runs. For each run, we allowed a braided system to develop, then seeded the flume with alfalfa (Medicago sativa), allowed the seeds to grow, and then continued the run. We collected data on water depth, surface velocity, and bed elevation throughout each run using image-based techniques designed to collect data over a large spatial area with minimal disturbance to the flow. Our results show that the influence of vegetation on overall river patterns varied systematically with the spatial density of plant stems. Vegetation reduced the number of active channels and increased bank stability, leading to lower lateral migration rates, narrower and deeper channels, and increased channel relief. These effects increased with vegetation density. Vegetation influenced flow dynamics, increasing the variance of flow direction in vegetated runs and increasing scour depths through strong downwelling where the flow collided with relatively resistant banks. This oblique bank collision also provides a new mechanism for producing secondary flows. We found it to be more important than the classical curvature-driven mechanism in vegetated runs.

  19. Prevalent vegetation growth enhancement in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Decheng

    2016-05-31

    Urbanization, a dominant global demographic trend, leads to various changes in environments (e.g., atmospheric CO2 increase, urban heat island). Cities experience global change decades ahead of other systems so that they are natural laboratories for studying responses of other nonurban biological ecosystems to future global change. However, the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth are not well understood. Here, we developed a general conceptual framework for quantifying the impacts of urbanization on vegetation growth and applied it in 32 Chinese cities. Results indicated that vegetation growth, as surrogated by satellite-observed vegetation index, decreased along urban intensity across all cities. At the same time, vegetation growth was enhanced at 85% of the places along the intensity gradient, and the relative enhancement increased with urban intensity. This growth enhancement offset about 40% of direct loss of vegetation productivity caused by replacing productive vegetated surfaces with nonproductive impervious surfaces. In light of current and previous field studies, we conclude that vegetation growth enhancement is prevalent in urban settings. Urban environments do provide ideal natural laboratories to observe biological responses to environmental changes that are difficult to mimic in manipulative experiments. However, one should be careful in extrapolating the finding to nonurban environments because urban vegetation is usually intensively managed, and attribution of the responses to diverse driving forces will be challenging but must be pursued.

  20. Remote sensing/vegetation classification. [California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    The CALVEG classification system for identification of vegetation is described. This hierarchical system responds to classification requirements and to interpretation of vegetation at various description levels, from site description to broad identification levels. The system's major strength is its flexibility in application of remote sensing technology to assess, describe and communicate data relative to vegetative resources on a state-wide basis. It is concluded that multilevel remote sensing is a cost effective tool for assessment of the natural resource base. The CLAVEG system is found to be an economically efficient tool for both existing and potential vegetation.

  1. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, J.; Rabine, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne laser altimeter designed to quickly and extensively map surface topography as well as the relative heights of other reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint. Since 1997, this instrument has primarily been used as the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, a spaceborne mission designed to measure tree height, vertical structure and ground topography (including sub-canopy topography). LVIS is capable of operating from 500 m to 10 km above ground level with footprint sizes from 1 to 60 m. Laser footprints can be randomly spaced within the 7 degree telescope field-of-view, constrained only by the operating frequency of the ND:YAG Q-switched laser (500 Hz). A significant innovation of the LVIS altimeter is that all ranging, waveform recording, and range gating are performed using a single digitizer, clock base, and detector. A portion of the outgoing laser pulse is fiber-optically fed into the detector used to collect the return signal and this entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized at 500 Msamp/sec. The ground return is then located using software digital signal processing, even in the presence of visibly opaque clouds. The surface height distribution of all reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint can be determined, for example, tree height and ground elevation. To date, the LVIS system has been used to monitor topographic change at Long Valley caldera, CA, as part of NASA's Topography and Surface Change program, and to map tree structure and sub-canopy topography at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, as part of the pre-launch calibration activities for the VCL mission. We present results that show the laser altimeter consistently and accurately maps surface topography, including sub-canopy topography, and vegetation height and structure. These results confirm the measurement concept of VCL and highlight the benefits of

  2. Mapping coastal vegetation, land use and environmental impact from ERTS-1. [Delaware Bay area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Vegetation map overlays at a scale of 1:24,000 compiled by multispectral analysis from NASA aircraft imagery for all of Delaware's wetlands are being used as ground truth for ERTS-1 mapping and by state agencies for wetlands management. Six major vegetation species were discriminated and mapped, including percentages of minor species. Analogue enhancements of wetlands vegetation and dredge-fill operations have been produced using General Electric's GEMS data processing and ERTS-1 false color composites. Digital, thematic land use, and vegetation mapping of entire Delaware Bay area is in progress using Bendix Corporation's Earth Resources Data System and ERTS-1 digital tapes. Statistical evaluation of target-group selection reliability has been completed. Three papers have been published on ERTS-1 coastal vegetation and land use. Local and state officials are participating in the ERTS-1 program as co-investigators.

  3. Quantifying influences of physiographic factors on temperate dryland vegetation, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ziqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhitao; Pang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Variability in satellite measurements of terrestrial greenness in drylands is widely observed in land surface processes and global change studies. Yet the underlying causes differ and are not fully understood. Here, we used the GeogDetector model, a new spatial statistical approach, to examine the individual and combined influences of physiographic factors on dryland vegetation greenness changes, and to identify the most suitable characteristics of each principal factor for stimulating vegetation growth. Our results indicated that dryland greenness was predominantly affected by precipitation, soil type, vegetation type, and temperature, either separately or in concert. The interaction between pairs of physiographic factors enhanced the influence of any single factor and displayed significantly non-linear influences on vegetation greenness. Our results also implied that vegetation greenness could be promoted by adopting favorable ranges or types of major physiographical factors, thus beneficial for ecological conservation and restoration that aimed at mitigating environmental degradation.

  4. Study on biomethane production and biodegradability of different leafy vegetables in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hu; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Jiafu; Zhang, Ruihong; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Chen, Chang

    2017-12-01

    Enormous amounts of vegetable residues are wasted annually, causing many environmental problems due to their high moisture and organic contents. In this study, the methane production potential of 20 kinds of typical leafy vegetable residues in China were explored using a unified method. A connection between the biochemical components and the methane yields of these vegetables was well established which could be used to predict biogas performance in practice. A high volatile solid/total solid (VS/TS) ratio and hemicellulose content exhibited a positive impact on the biogas yield while lignin had a negative impact. In addition, three kinetic models were used to describe the methane production process of these agro-wastes. The systematic comparison of the methane production potentials of these leafy vegetables shown in this study will not only serve as a reference for basic research on anaerobic digestion but also provide useful data and information for agro-industrial applications of vegetable residues in future work.

  5. Analysis of the Relationship Between Intra-Urban Vegetation Change and Socio-Economic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, L. M. G.; Boggione, G. A.; Monteiro, A. M. V.; Santos, R.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the vegetation dynamics in urban areas in both quantitative and qualitative aspects is essential to population welfare and also to economic, social and environmental development. However, it is necessary appropriate tools for monitoring and analysis of the landscape dynamic in a systematic way. Therefore, this study proposes a methodology to analyze the relationship between intra-urban vegetation and the social-economic data using the integrated techniques of remote sensing and GIS as well as data mining. This research intends to answer questions such as: Is it possible to extract the intra-urban vegetation as well as identify the intra-urban vegetation changes from medium spatial resolution images and digital image processing techniques? Is it possible to establish a relationship between the intra-urban vegetation changes and social-economic information using data mining techniques?

  6. Employing lidar to detail vegetation canopy architecture for prediction of aeolian transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Law, Darin J.; Breshears, David D.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse and fundamental effects that aeolian processes have on the biosphere and geosphere are commonly generated by horizontal sediment transport at the land surface. However, predicting horizontal sediment transport depends on vegetation architecture, which is difficult to quantify in a rapid but accurate manner. We demonstrate an approach to measure vegetation canopy architecture at high resolution using lidar along a gradient of dryland sites ranging from 2% to 73% woody plant canopy cover. Lidar-derived canopy height, distance (gaps) between vegetation elements (e.g., trunks, limbs, leaves), and the distribution of gaps scaled by vegetation height were correlated with canopy cover and highlight potentially improved horizontal dust flux estimation than with cover alone. Employing lidar to estimate detailed vegetation canopy architecture offers promise for improved predictions of horizontal sediment transport across heterogeneous plant assemblages.

  7. Quantifying influences of physiographic factors on temperate dryland vegetation, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ziqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhitao; Pang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Variability in satellite measurements of terrestrial greenness in drylands is widely observed in land surface processes and global change studies. Yet the underlying causes differ and are not fully understood. Here, we used the GeogDetector model, a new spatial statistical approach, to examine the individual and combined influences of physiographic factors on dryland vegetation greenness changes, and to identify the most suitable characteristics of each principal factor for stimulating vegetation growth. Our results indicated that dryland greenness was predominantly affected by precipitation, soil type, vegetation type, and temperature, either separately or in concert. The interaction between pairs of physiographic factors enhanced the influence of any single factor and displayed significantly non-linear influences on vegetation greenness. Our results also implied that vegetation greenness could be promoted by adopting favorable ranges or types of major physiographical factors, thus beneficial for ecological conservation and restoration that aimed at mitigating environmental degradation. PMID:28067259

  8. Effect of submerged vegetation on solute transport in an open channel using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Dai, HC

    2016-11-01

    Existence of vegetation plays a significant effect on the flow velocity distributions, turbulence structures and solute mixing in an open channel. This paper has implemented a 3D large eddy simulation model for the flow and scalar transport in the open channel with vegetation. The model can produce a typical turbulence characteristics and concentration distribution with vegetation. The scalar transport mechanism is quantitatively explained by the turbulent Schmidt number, Reynolds flux, coherent structures and quadrant conditional analysis. A dominance of ejection-sweeping events occurs in the process of the momentum and scalar flux transport. The spectral analysis is used to identify the Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency. The turbulence characteristics of the length scale of vortexes, Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency and Reynolds stress etc. are analyzed with the vegetation density. The model quantitatively predicts the trend of decreasing in the concentration distribution along the flow direction with the increasing of vegetation density.

  9. Health-promoting components of fruits and vegetables in the diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui Hai

    2013-05-01

    Regular consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods has been negatively correlated with the risk of the development of chronic diseases. There is a huge gap between the average consumption of fruits and vegetables in Americans and the amount recommended by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The key is to encourage consumers to increase the total amount to 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables in all forms available. Fresh, processed fruits and vegetables including frozen and canned, cooked, 100% fruit juices and 100% vegetable juices, as well as dry fruits are all considered as servings of fruits and vegetables per day. A wide variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods provide a range of nutrients and different bioactive compounds including phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, and fibers. Potatoes serve as one of the low-fat foods with unique nutrients and phytochemical profiles, particularly rich in vitamin C, vitamin B-6, potassium, manganese, and dietary fibers. Potatoes provide 25% of vegetable phenolics in the American diet, the largest contributors among the 27 vegetables commonly consumed in the United States, including flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol), phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid), and carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). More and more evidence suggests that the health benefits of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods are attributed to the synergy or interactions of bioactive compounds and other nutrients in whole foods. Therefore, consumers should obtain their nutrients, antioxidants, bioactive compounds, and phytochemicals from a balanced diet with a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods for optimal nutrition, health, and well-being, not from dietary supplements.

  10. Cumulative drought and land-use impacts on perennial vegetation across a North American dryland region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Long, A. Lexine; Wallace, Cynthia; Webb, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Question The decline and loss of perennial vegetation in dryland ecosystems due to global change pressures can alter ecosystem properties and initiate land degradation processes. We tracked changes of perennial vegetation using remote sensing to address the question of how prolonged drought and land-use intensification have affected perennial vegetation cover across a desert region in the early 21st century? Location Mojave Desert, southeastern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona, USA. Methods We coupled the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Enhanced Vegetation Index (MODIS-EVI) with ground-based measurements of perennial vegetation cover taken in about 2000 and about 2010. Using the difference between these years, we determined perennial vegetation changes in the early 21st century and related these shifts to climate, soil and landscape properties, and patterns of land use. Results We found a good fit between MODIS-EVI and perennial vegetation cover (2000: R2 = 0.83 and 2010: R2 = 0.74). The southwestern, far southeastern and central Mojave Desert had large declines in perennial vegetation cover in the early 21st century, while the northeastern and southeastern portions of the desert had increases. These changes were explained by 10-yr precipitation anomalies, particularly in the cool season and during extreme dry or wet years. Areas heavily impacted by visitor use or wildfire lost perennial vegetation cover, and vegetation in protected areas increased to a greater degree than in unprotected areas. Conclusions We find that we can extrapolate previously documented declines of perennial plant cover to an entire desert, and demonstrate that prolonged water shortages coupled with land-use intensification create identifiable patterns of vegetation change in dryland regions.

  11. Health-Promoting Components of Fruits and Vegetables in the Diet12

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui Hai

    2013-01-01

    Regular consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods has been negatively correlated with the risk of the development of chronic diseases. There is a huge gap between the average consumption of fruits and vegetables in Americans and the amount recommended by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The key is to encourage consumers to increase the total amount to 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables in all forms available. Fresh, processed fruits and vegetables including frozen and canned, cooked, 100% fruit juices and 100% vegetable juices, as well as dry fruits are all considered as servings of fruits and vegetables per day. A wide variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods provide a range of nutrients and different bioactive compounds including phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, and fibers. Potatoes serve as one of the low-fat foods with unique nutrients and phytochemical profiles, particularly rich in vitamin C, vitamin B-6, potassium, manganese, and dietary fibers. Potatoes provide 25% of vegetable phenolics in the American diet, the largest contributors among the 27 vegetables commonly consumed in the United States, including flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol), phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid), and carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). More and more evidence suggests that the health benefits of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods are attributed to the synergy or interactions of bioactive compounds and other nutrients in whole foods. Therefore, consumers should obtain their nutrients, antioxidants, bioactive compounds, and phytochemicals from a balanced diet with a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant foods for optimal nutrition, health, and well-being, not from dietary supplements. PMID:23674808

  12. Soil erosion-vegetation interactions in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed mining slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Merino-Martín, Luis; Espigares, Tíscar; Nicolau, José M.

    2014-05-01

    Mining reclamation in Mediterranean-dry environments represents a complex task. Reclaimed mining slopes are particularly vulnerable to the effects of accelerated soil erosion processes, especially when these processes lead to the formation of rill networks. On the other hand, encouraging early vegetation establishment is perceived as indispensable to reduce the risk of degradation in these man-made ecosystems. This study shows a synthesis of soil erosion-vegetation research conducted in reclaimed mining slopes at El Moral field site (Teruel coalfield, central-east Spain). Our results highlight the role of rill erosion processes in the development of reclaimed ecosystems. Runoff routing is conditioned by the development of rill networks, maximizing the loss of water resources at the slope scale by surface runoff and altering the spatial distribution of soil moisture. As a result, the availability of water resources for plant growth is drastically reduced, affecting vegetation development. Conversely, vegetation exerts a strong effect on soil erosion: erosion rates rapidly decrease with vegetation cover and no significant rill erosion is usually observed after a particular cover threshold is reached. These interactive two-way vegetation-soil erosion relationships are further studied using a novel modeling approach that focuses on stability analysis of water-limited reclaimed slopes. Our framework reproduces two main groups of trends along the temporal evolution of reclaimed slopes: successful trends, characterized by widespread vegetation development and the effective control of rill erosion processes; and gullying trends, characterized by the progressive loss of vegetation and a sharp logistic increase in erosion rates. This stability-analysis also facilitates the determination of threshold values for both vegetation cover and rill erosion that drive the long-term reclamation results, assisting the identification of critical situations that require specific human

  13. Volatilization of iodine from vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Johnston, F. L.

    Gaseous emissions of iodine were measured from bean plant foliage. A gamma-emitting iodine tracer, Na 125I, was taken up by the plants from a hydroponic growth medium and released to a cuvette atmosphere. The dynamics of the flux were studied using a flow-through gamma detector. The relationship between leaf radioactive tracer activity and growth-medium activity was linear, as was the relationship between the iodine flux and both leaf and growth-medium activity. Iodine flux and leaf conductance to water responded similarly to changes in light levels, suggesting that the stomata may partially control the flux. The flux was inhibited by aeration of the hydroponic growth medium, and we postulate that methylation causes the iodine flux. Iodine emissions from living vegetation probably contribute <0.1 % to the stable iodine concentration in the atmosphere above terrestrial areas. However, this pathway may be a direct route for radioactive iodine transport from contaminated soils to the atmosphere.

  14. Theory, methods and tools for determining environmental flows for riparian vegetation: Riparian vegetation-flow response guilds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, D.M.; Scott, M.L.; Leroy, Poff N.; Auble, G.T.; Lytle, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian vegetation composition, structure and abundance are governed to a large degree by river flow regime and flow-mediated fluvial processes. Streamflow regime exerts selective pressures on riparian vegetation, resulting in adaptations (trait syndromes) to specific flow attributes. Widespread modification of flow regimes by humans has resulted in extensive alteration of riparian vegetation communities. Some of the negative effects of altered flow regimes on vegetation may be reversed by restoring components of the natural flow regime. 2. Models have been developed that quantitatively relate components of the flow regime to attributes of riparian vegetation at the individual, population and community levels. Predictive models range from simple statistical relationships, to more complex stochastic matrix population models and dynamic simulation models. Of the dozens of predictive models reviewed here, most treat one or a few species, have many simplifying assumptions such as stable channel form, and do not specify the time-scale of response. In many cases, these models are very effective in developing alternative streamflow management plans for specific river reaches or segments but are not directly transferable to other rivers or other regions. 3. A primary goal in riparian ecology is to develop general frameworks for prediction of vegetation response to changing environmental conditions. The development of riparian vegetation-flow response guilds offers a framework for transferring information from rivers where flow standards have been developed to maintain desirable vegetation attributes, to rivers with little or no existing information. 4. We propose to organise riparian plants into non-phylogenetic groupings of species with shared traits that are related to components of hydrologic regime: life history, reproductive strategy, morphology, adaptations to fluvial disturbance and adaptations to water availability. Plants from any river or region may be grouped

  15. Analysis of vegetable oil production in central Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Claar, P.W. II.; Colvin, T.S.; Marley, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Vegetable oil can be used as an emergency substitute for diesel fuel for farming applications. This paper is an economic and energy analysis for vegetable oil production on a 180-ha (450-acre) central Iowa farm. The following data are presented as the basis for the economic analysis: (1) the yields of four varieties of sunflowers at three planting dates; (2) the measured sunflower harvesting losses-preharvest, header, threshing, and separating and cleaning for each variety and date of planting; and (3) the quantities of sunflower oil yielded from the pressing operation. Based on the data presented, it was concluded that even though a farmer could satisfatorily produce sunflowers, the on-farm processed sunflower oil does not compete with current diesel fuel prices. On-farm processed soybean oil has more potential as a substitute fuel from an economic standpoint in central Iowa. 8 tables.

  16. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  17. General classification handbook for floodplain vegetation in large river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieck, Jennifer J.; Ruhser, Janis; Hoy, Erin E.; Robinson, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    This handbook describes the General Wetland Vegetation Classification System developed as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program, Long Term Resource Monitoring (LTRM) element. The UMRR is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the states of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin. The classification system consists of 31 general map classes and has been used to create systemic vegetation data layers throughout the diverse Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), which includes the commercially navigable reaches of the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the north to Cairo, Illinois, in the south, the Illinois River, and navigable portions of the Kaskaskia, Black, St. Croix, and Minnesota Rivers. In addition, this handbook describes the evolution of the General Wetland Vegetation Classification System, discusses the process of creating a vegetation data layer, and describes each of the 31 map classes in detail. The handbook also acts as a pictorial guide to each of the map classes as they may appear in the field, as well as on color-infrared imagery. This version is an update to the original handbook published in 2004.

  18. Application of Machine Learning to the Prediction of Vegetation Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Emily; Nay, John J.; Gilligan, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This project applies machine learning techniques to remotely sensed imagery to train and validate predictive models of vegetation health in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. For both locations, we downloaded and processed eleven years of imagery from multiple MODIS datasets which were combined and transformed into two-dimensional matrices. We applied a gradient boosted machines model to the lagged dataset values to forecast future values of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). The predictive power of raw spectral data MODIS products were compared across time periods and land use categories. Our models have significantly more predictive power on held-out datasets than a baseline. Though the tool was built to increase capacity to monitor vegetation health in data scarce regions like South Asia, users may include ancillary spatiotemporal datasets relevant to their region of interest to increase predictive power and to facilitate interpretation of model results. The tool can automatically update predictions as new MODIS data is made available by NASA. The tool is particularly well-suited for decision makers interested in understanding and predicting vegetation health dynamics in countries in which environmental data is scarce and cloud cover is a significant concern.

  19. Self-Replication of Localized Vegetation Patches in Scarce Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G.; Couteron, Piere; Lefever, René; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2016-09-01

    Desertification due to climate change and increasing drought periods is a worldwide problem for both ecology and economy. Our ability to understand how vegetation manages to survive and propagate through arid and semiarid ecosystems may be useful in the development of future strategies to prevent desertification, preserve flora—and fauna within—or even make use of scarce resources soils. In this paper, we study a robust phenomena observed in semi-arid ecosystems, by which localized vegetation patches split in a process called self-replication. Localized patches of vegetation are visible in nature at various spatial scales. Even though they have been described in literature, their growth mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Here, we develop an innovative statistical analysis based on real field observations to show that patches may exhibit deformation and splitting. This growth mechanism is opposite to the desertification since it allows to repopulate territories devoid of vegetation. We investigate these aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple mathematical model, a new class of instabilities that lead to the self-replication phenomenon observed.

  20. Climate-vegetation interaction and amplification of Australian dust variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Stuart; Ginoux, Paul; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena

    2016-11-01

    Observations show that Australian dust activity varies by a factor of 4 on decadal timescales. General circulation models, however, typically fail to simulate this variability. Here we introduce a new dust parameterization into the NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model CM3 that represents land surface processes controlling dust sources including soil water and ice, snow cover, vegetation characteristics, and land type. In an additional novel step, we couple this new dust parameterization to the dynamic vegetation model LM3. In Australia, the new parameterization amplifies the magnitude and timescale of dust variability and better simulates the El Niño-Southern Oscillation-dust relationship by more than doubling its strength. We attribute these improvements primarily to the slow response time of vegetation to precipitation anomalies and show that vegetation changes account for approximately 50% of enhanced dust emission during El Niño events. The amplified dust leads to radiative forcing over Australia greater than -1 and -20 W/m2 at top of atmosphere and surface, respectively.

  1. Self-Replication of Localized Vegetation Patches in Scarce Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G.; Couteron, Piere; Lefever, René; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Desertification due to climate change and increasing drought periods is a worldwide problem for both ecology and economy. Our ability to understand how vegetation manages to survive and propagate through arid and semiarid ecosystems may be useful in the development of future strategies to prevent desertification, preserve flora—and fauna within—or even make use of scarce resources soils. In this paper, we study a robust phenomena observed in semi-arid ecosystems, by which localized vegetation patches split in a process called self-replication. Localized patches of vegetation are visible in nature at various spatial scales. Even though they have been described in literature, their growth mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Here, we develop an innovative statistical analysis based on real field observations to show that patches may exhibit deformation and splitting. This growth mechanism is opposite to the desertification since it allows to repopulate territories devoid of vegetation. We investigate these aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple mathematical model, a new class of instabilities that lead to the self-replication phenomenon observed. PMID:27650430

  2. Self-Replication of Localized Vegetation Patches in Scarce Environments.

    PubMed

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G; Couteron, Piere; Lefever, René; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2016-09-21

    Desertification due to climate change and increasing drought periods is a worldwide problem for both ecology and economy. Our ability to understand how vegetation manages to survive and propagate through arid and semiarid ecosystems may be useful in the development of future strategies to prevent desertification, preserve flora-and fauna within-or even make use of scarce resources soils. In this paper, we study a robust phenomena observed in semi-arid ecosystems, by which localized vegetation patches split in a process called self-replication. Localized patches of vegetation are visible in nature at various spatial scales. Even though they have been described in literature, their growth mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Here, we develop an innovative statistical analysis based on real field observations to show that patches may exhibit deformation and splitting. This growth mechanism is opposite to the desertification since it allows to repopulate territories devoid of vegetation. We investigate these aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple mathematical model, a new class of instabilities that lead to the self-replication phenomenon observed.

  3. To what extent did changes in July temperature influence Lateglacial vegetation patterns in NW Europe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birks, Hilary H.; Birks, H. John B.

    2014-12-01

    What was the impact of July temperature changes on vegetation patterns during the Lateglacial period in north-west Europe? Chironomid-inferred mean July air temperature estimates (C-Tjul) are proxy temperature records independent of terrestrial vegetation. The relationships between Lateglacial vegetation inferred from pollen percentages and these temperature estimates are explored using data synthesised geographically from 15 sites where both pollen percentages and C-Tjul are published to assess the influence of temperature and of temperature changes on regional vegetation. Direct impacts of temperature on a species involve passing the range limits or realised niche of that species. The Bølling warming allowed vegetation to develop. The Younger Dryas cooling had direct impacts on species and vegetation types that were at a critical ecotone and thus sensitive to change. Precipitation is extremely important and its interaction with temperature controlled most of the vegetation patterns inferred from these NW European pollen data. High precipitation was important in W Norway, whereas aridity in the YD was a controlling factor in N Norway, the Netherlands, and NE Germany. Under constant climate, ecological processes occurred such as immigration, succession, and soil development that resulted in vegetation changes. Biotic interactions were also important, such as the impact of grazing by mega-herbivores during Allerød time in Ireland that may have restricted the development of birch woodland. At the coarse scale of this synthesis, July temperature alone is seen not to be a good predictor of the patterns of pollen percentages and hence of vegetation through the Lateglacial. Rather, it is the interactions of temperature and precipitation, combined with ecological processes that appear to be the major factors influencing Lateglacial palynological and vegetation patterns in NW Europe.

  4. Role of climate and vegetation density in modulating denudation rates in the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olen, Stephanie M.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-07-01

    Vegetation has long been hypothesized to influence the nature and rates of surface processes. We test the possible impact of vegetation and climate on denudation rates at orogen scale by taking advantage of a pronounced along-strike gradient in rainfall and vegetation density in the Himalaya. We combine 12 new 10Be denudation rates from the Sutlej Valley and 123 published denudation rates from fluvially-dominated catchments in the Himalaya with remotely-sensed measures of vegetation density and rainfall metrics, and with tectonic and lithologic constraints. In addition, we perform topographic analyses to assess the contribution of vegetation and climate in modulating denudation rates along strike. We observe variations in denudation rates and the relationship between denudation and topography along strike that are most strongly controlled by local rainfall amount and vegetation density, and cannot be explained by along-strike differences in tectonics or lithology. A W-E along-strike decrease in denudation rate variability positively correlates with the seasonality of vegetation density (R = 0.95, p < 0.05), and negatively correlates with mean vegetation density (R = - 0.84, p < 0.05). Vegetation density modulates the topographic response to changing denudation rates, such that the functional relationship between denudation rate and topographic steepness becomes increasingly linear as vegetation density increases. We suggest that while tectonic processes locally control the pattern of denudation rates across strike of the Himalaya (i.e., S-N), along strike of the orogen (i.e., E-W) climate exerts a measurable influence on how denudation rates scatter around long-term, tectonically-controlled erosion, and on the functional relationship between topography and denudation.

  5. Factors influencing fruit and vegetable intake among urban Fijians: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, E H; Vatucawaqa, P; Snowdon, W; Worsley, A; Dangour, A D; Lock, K

    2016-06-01

    Low fruit and vegetable intake is an important risk factor for micronutrient deficiencies and non-communicable diseases, but many people worldwide, including most Fijians, eat less than the World Health Organization recommended amount. The present qualitative study explores factors that influence fruit and vegetable intake among 57 urban Fijians (50 women, 7 men) of indigenous Fijian (iTaukei) and South Asian (Indian) descent. Eight focus group discussions were held in and around Suva, Fiji's capital and largest urban area, which explored motivation for eating fruit and vegetables, understandings of links to health and disease, availability and sources, determinants of product choice, and preferred ways of preparing and eating fruit and vegetables. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Regardless of ethnicity, participants indicated that they enjoyed and valued eating fruit and vegetables, were aware of the health benefits, and had confidence in their cooking skills. In both cultures, fruit and vegetables were essential components of traditional diets. However, increasing preferences for processed and imported foods, and inconsistent availability and affordability of high-quality, low-priced, fresh produce, were identified as important barriers. The findings indicate that efforts to improve fruit and vegetable intake in urban Fijians should target the stability of the domestic fruit and vegetable supply and access.

  6. New metrics of affordable nutrition: which vegetables provide most nutrients for least cost?

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam

    2013-09-01

    Measuring food prices per gram, rather than per calorie, is one way to make healthful vegetables appear less expensive. However, a better measure of affordability would take the nutrient content of vegetables into account. This study, based on analyses of US Department of Agriculture datasets, aimed to identify which vegetables, including juices and soups, provided the most nutrients per unit cost. Nutrient density was measured using the Nutrient Rich Foods (NRF) index, based on nine nutrients to encourage: protein; fiber; vitamins A, C, and E; calcium; iron; magnesium; and potassium; and on three nutrients to limit: saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium. Food cost in dollars was calculated per 100 g, per 100 kcal, per serving, and per nutrient content. One-way analyses of variance with post hoc tests were used to determine statistical significance. Results showed that tomato juices and tomato soups, dark green leafy and nonleafy vegetables, and deep yellow vegetables, including sweet potatoes, had the highest NRF scores overall. Highest NRF scores per dollar were obtained for sweet potatoes, white potatoes, tomato juices and tomato soups, carrots, and broccoli. Tomato sauces, raw tomatoes, and potato chips were eaten more frequently than were many other vegetables that were both more affordable and more nutrient-rich. These new measures of affordable nutrition can help foodservice and health professionals identify those vegetables that provide the highest nutrient density per unit cost. Processed vegetables, including soups and juices, can contribute to the quality and the affordability of the diet.

  7. Modeling the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooijen, A. A.; McCall, R. T.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; van Dongeren, A. R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic vegetation in the coastal zone attenuates wave energy and reduces the risk of coastal hazards, e.g., flooding. Besides the attenuation of sea-swell waves, vegetation may also affect infragravity-band (IG) waves and wave setup. To date, knowledge on the effect of vegetation on IG waves and wave setup is lacking, while they are potentially important parameters for coastal risk assessment. In this study, the storm impact model XBeach is extended with formulations for attenuation of sea-swell and IG waves, and wave setup effects in two modes: the sea-swell wave phase-resolving (nonhydrostatic) and the phase-averaged (surfbeat) mode. In surfbeat mode, a wave shape model is implemented to capture the effect of nonlinear wave-vegetation interaction processes on wave setup. Both modeling modes are verified using data from two flume experiments with mimic vegetation and show good skill in computing the sea-swell and IG wave transformation, and wave setup. In surfbeat mode, the wave setup prediction greatly improves when using the wave shape model, while in nonhydrostatic mode (nonlinear) intrawave effects are directly accounted for. Subsequently, the model is used for a range of coastal geomorphological configurations by varying bed slope and vegetation extent. The results indicate that the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup may be relevant for a range of typical coastal geomorphological configurations (e.g., relatively steep to gentle slope coasts fronted by vegetation).

  8. 9 CFR 319.311 - Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.311 Chow mein vegetables with meat, and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat. 319.311 Section 319.311 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...

  9. Assessing environmental drivers of vegetation greenness by integrating multiple earth observation data in the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Matthias; Carvalhais, Nuno; Schaphoff, Sibyll; von Bloh, Werner; Thurner, Martin; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    vegetation distribution by still keeping major processes of vegetation dynamics like mortality and competition among plant functional types. We prescribed observed burnt areas from the GFED dataset as well as from the Alaskan and Canadian national fire databases in LPJmL to better reproduce observed fire dynamics. We evaluated LPJmL with optimized parameters against independent data streams. LPJmL with a new phenology scheme and optimized parameters better represents spatial patterns of gross primary production, biomass, soil organic carbon, evapotranspiration and tree cover than the original model. LPJmL-DIS is able to reproduce spatial patterns and observed temporal dynamics of FAPAR from seasonal to decadal scales in all major biomes. We performed several model experiments to disentangle the spatial and temporal importance of temperature, radiation, water availability, CO2 fertilization, fire activity and permafrost changes on the seasonal to decadal variability of vegetation greenness. Our results indicate that water availability is a major driver for the seasonal to decadal variability of vegetation greenness in tropical, temperate and boreal biomes. The developed LPJmL data integration system enables to reanalyse recent trends in vegetation greenness and their environmental drivers by combining earth observation data of multiple environmental variables in a consistent process-based global vegetation model framework.

  10. Optimization of Refining Craft for Vegetable Insulating Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhu-Jun; Hu, Ting; Cheng, Lin; Tian, Kai; Wang, Xuan; Yang, Jun; Kong, Hai-Yang; Fang, Fu-Xin; Qian, Hang; Fu, Guang-Pan

    2016-05-01

    Vegetable insulating oil because of its environmental friendliness are considered as ideal material instead of mineral oil used for the insulation and the cooling of the transformer. The main steps of traditional refining process included alkali refining, bleaching and distillation. This kind of refining process used in small doses of insulating oil refining can get satisfactory effect, but can't be applied to the large capacity reaction kettle. This paper using rapeseed oil as crude oil, and the refining process has been optimized for large capacity reaction kettle. The optimized refining process increases the acid degumming process. The alkali compound adds the sodium silicate composition in the alkali refining process, and the ratio of each component is optimized. Add the amount of activated clay and activated carbon according to 10:1 proportion in the de-colorization process, which can effectively reduce the oil acid value and dielectric loss. Using vacuum pumping gas instead of distillation process can further reduce the acid value. Compared some part of the performance parameters of refined oil products with mineral insulating oil, the dielectric loss of vegetable insulating oil is still high and some measures are needed to take to further optimize in the future.

  11. Discoloration of Indigo Carmine Using Aqueous Extracts from Vegetables and Vegetable Residues as Enzyme Sources

    PubMed Central

    Solís, A.; Perea, F.; Solís, M.; Manjarrez, N.; Pérez, H. I.; Cassani, J.

    2013-01-01

    Several vegetables and vegetable residues were used as sources of enzymes capable to discolor indigo carmine (IC), completely or partially. Complete discoloration was achieved with aqueous extracts of green pea seeds and peels of green pea, cucumber, and kohlrabi, as well as spring onion leaves. The source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), pH, time, and aeration is fundamental for the discoloration process catalyzed by PPO. The PPO present in the aqueous extract of green pea seeds was able to degrade 3,000 ppm of IC at a pH of 7.6 and magnetic stirring at 1,800 rpm in about 36 h. In addition, at 1,800 rpm and a pH of 7.6, this extract discolored 300 ppm of IC in 1:40 h; in the presence of 10% NaCl, the discoloration was complete in 5:50 h, whereas it was completed in 4:30 h with 5% NaCl and 2% laundry soap. PMID:24151588

  12. 49 CFR 213.37 - Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Roadbed § 213.37 Vegetation. Vegetation on railroad property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed shall be controlled so that it does not— (a) Become a fire hazard to track-carrying structures; (b) Obstruct visibility of railroad signs and signals: (1) Along the right-of-way,...

  13. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The... shall not be construed as a standard of identity under section 401 of the act. However, where a standard of identity for a particular vegetable juice has been promulgated under section 401 of the act,...

  14. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The... shall not be construed as a standard of identity under section 401 of the act. However, where a standard of identity for a particular vegetable juice has been promulgated under section 401 of the act,...

  15. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The... shall not be construed as a standard of identity under section 401 of the act. However, where a standard of identity for a particular vegetable juice has been promulgated under section 401 of the act,...

  16. Weed Identification and Control in Vegetable Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Peter A., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines weed control and identification in vegetable crops. Contents include: (1) Types of weeds; (2) Reducing losses caused by weeds, general control methods and home garden weed control; (3) How herbicides are used; (4) Specific weeds in vegetable plantings; and…

  17. Cover crops in vegetable production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current vegetable production systems require an intensive amount Current vegetable production systems require an intensive amount of work and inputs, and if not properly managed could have detrimental effects on soil and the environment. Practices such as intensive tillage, increased herbicide use, ...

  18. Estimating wheat growth with radar vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we computed the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) using observations made with a ground based multi-frequency polarimetric scatterometer system over an entire wheat growth period. The temporal variations of the backscattering coefficients for L-, C-, and X-band, RVI, vegetation water conte...

  19. The role of vegetation patch spatial configuration in landscape-scale flow-vegetation-sediment feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, L.; Ma, J.; Kaplan, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that processes affecting the planform configuration of marshes may be just as important as, if not more important than, vertical accretion and degradation processes. Sea-level rise may erode marshes laterally through wave action or expansion of the tidal channel network just as it may cause vertical inundation. Understanding the feedbacks contingent on the spatial configuration of vegetation patches and microtopography and their interactions with flow is critical to understanding the processes driving marsh persistence and predicting how marshes will respond to changes in environmental drivers. Based on case studies in the Florida Everglades and on generic modeled landscapes, we demonstrate approaches for quantifying spatial configuration and show how they may be used to distinguish between landscapes subject to different driving factors. These approaches include quantifying the connectivity of waterways using the directional connectivity index, quantifying characteristic patch length scales using autocorrelation functions, and state-space reconstruction based on cumulative width of vegetation patches in subsequent downstream cross-sections. Directional connectivity is particularly useful as an indicator of driving mechanisms governing the evolution of marsh landscapes, because connectivity engages directly in feedbacks with landscape-scale flow. We quantified the sensitivity of discharge through a modeled landscape subject to constant-head boundary conditions to different aspects of patch configuration, finding that directional connectivity and landscape fractal dimension were secondary only to patch area. Hence, changes in waterway connectivity caused by inundation (e.g., tidal marshes) or infilling (inland marshes) promote a positive feedback that amplifies the initial change and may contribute substantially to marsh degradation.

  20. Sensitivity of vegetation indices to different burn and vegetation ratios using LANDSAT-5 satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleniou, M.; Koutsias, N.

    2013-08-01

    The application of vegetation indices is a very common approach in remote sensing of burned areas to either map the fire scar or estimate burn severity since they minimize the effect of exogenous factors and enhance the correlation with the internal parameters of vegetation. In a recent study we found that the original spectral channels, based on which these indices are estimated, are sensitive to external parameters of the vegetation as for example the spectral reflectance of the background soil. In such cases, the influence of the soil in the reflectance values is different in the various spectral regions depending on its type. These problems are further enhanced by the non-homogeneous pixels, as created from fractions of different types of land cover. Parnitha (Greece), where a wildfire occurred on July 2007, was established as test site. The purpose of this work is to explore the sensitivity of vegetation indices when used to estimate and map different fractions of fire-scorched (burned) and non fire-scorched (vegetated) areas. IKONOS, a very high resolution satellite imagery, was used to create a three-class thematic map to extract the percentages of vegetation, burned surfaces, and bare soil. Using an overlaid fishnet we extracted samples of completely "burned", completely "vegetated" pixels and proportions with different burn/vegetation ratios (45%-55% burned - 45%-55% vegetation, 20%-30% burned - 70%- 80% vegetation, 70%-80% burned - 20%-30% vegetation). Vegetation indices were calculated (NDVI, IPVI, SAVI) and their values were extracted to characterize the mentioned classes. The main findings of our recent research were that vegetation indices are less sensitive to external parameters of the vegetation by minimizing external effects. Thus, the semi-burned classes were spectrally more consistent to their different fractions of scorched and non-scorched vegetation, than the original spectral channels based on which these indices are estimated.