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Sample records for processes euclidean quantum

  1. Simplicial Euclidean and Lorentzian Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.

    2002-09-01

    One can try to define the theory of quantum gravity as the sum over geometries. In two dimensions the sum over Euclidean geometries can be performed constructively by the method of dynamical triangulations. One can define a proper-time propagator. This propagator can be used to calculate generalized Hartle-Hawking amplitudes and it can be used to understand the the fractal structure of quantum geometry. In higher dimensions the philosophy of defining the quantum theory, starting from a sum over Euclidean geometries, regularized by a reparametrization invariant cut off which is taken to zero, seems not to lead to an interesting continuum theory. The reason for this is the dominance of singular Euclidean geometries. Lorentzian geometries with a global causal structure are less singular. Using the framework of dynamical triangulations it is possible to give a constructive definition of the sum over such geometries, In two dimensions the theory can be solved analytically. It differs from two-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity, and the relation between the two theories can be understood. In three dimensions the theory avoids the pathologies of three-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity. General properties of the four-dimensional discretized theory have been established, but a detailed study of the continuum limit in the spirit of the renormalization group and asymptotic safety is till awaiting.

  2. The Fourier Transform on Quantum Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulembier, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    We study Fourier theory on quantum Euclidean space. A modified version of the general definition of the Fourier transform on a quantum space is used and its inverse is constructed. The Fourier transforms can be defined by their Bochner's relations and a new type of q-Hankel transforms using the first and second q-Bessel functions. The behavior of the Fourier transforms with respect to partial derivatives and multiplication with variables is studied. The Fourier transform acts between the two representation spaces for the harmonic oscillator on quantum Euclidean space. By using this property it is possible to define a Fourier transform on the entire Hilbert space of the harmonic oscillator, which is its own inverse and satisfies the Parseval theorem.

  3. Euclidean quantum field theory: Curved spacetimes and gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, William Gordon

    This thesis presents a new formulation of quantum field theory (QFT) on curved spacetimes, with definite advantages over previous formulations, and an introduction to the millennium prize problem on four-dimensional gauge theory. Our constructions are completely rigorous, making QFT on curved spacetimes into a subfield of mathematics, and we achieve the first analytic control over nonperturbative aspects of interacting theories on curved spacetimes. The success of Euclidean path integrals to capture nonperturbative aspects of QFT has been striking. The Euclidean path integral is the most accurate method of calculating strong-coupling effects in gauge theory (such as glueball masses). Euclidean methods are also useful in the study of black holes, as evidenced by the Hartle-Hawking calculation of black-hole radiance. From a mathematical point of view, on flat spacetimes the Euclidean functional integral provides the most elegant method of constructing examples of interacting relativistic field theories. Yet until now, the incredibly-useful Euclidean path integral had never been given a definitive mathematical treatment on curved backgrounds. It is our aim to rectify this situation. Along the way, we discover that the Dirac operator on an arbitrary Clifford bundle has a resolvent kernel which is the Laplace transform of a positive measure. In studying spacetime symmetries, we discover a new way of constructing unitary representations of noncompact Lie groups. We also define and explore an interesting notion of convergence for Laplacians. The same mathematical framework applies to scalar fields, fermions, and gauge fields. The later chapters are devoted to gauge theory. We present a rigorous, self-contained introduction to the subject, aimed at mathematicians and using the language of modern mathematics, with a view towards nonperturbative renormalization in four dimensions. The latter ideas are unfinished. A completion of the final chapter would imply the construction

  4. Spectral asymptotics of Euclidean quantum gravity with diff-invariant boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Fucci, Guglielmo; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu; Kirsten, Klaus

    2005-03-01

    A general method is known to exist for studying Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories, as well as Euclidean quantum gravity, at 1-loop level on manifolds with boundary. In the latter case, boundary conditions on metric perturbations h can be chosen to be completely invariant under infinitesimal diffeomorphisms, to preserve the invariance group of the theory and BRST symmetry. In the de Donder gauge, however, the resulting boundary-value problem for the Laplace-type operator acting on h is known to be self-adjoint but not strongly elliptic. The latter is a technical condition ensuring that a unique smooth solution of the boundary-value problem exists, which implies, in turn, that the global heat-kernel asymptotics yielding 1-loop divergences and 1-loop effective action actually exists. The present paper shows that, on the Euclidean 4-ball, only the scalar part of perturbative modes for quantum gravity is affected by the lack of strong ellipticity. Further evidence for lack of strong ellipticity, from an analytic point of view, is therefore obtained. Interestingly, three sectors of the scalar-perturbation problem remain elliptic, while lack of strong ellipticity is 'confined' to the remaining fourth sector. The integral representation of the resulting ζ-function asymptotics on the Euclidean 4-ball is also obtained; this remains regular at the origin by virtue of a spectral identity here obtained for the first time.

  5. The q-DEFORMED SCHRÖDINGER Equation of the Harmonic Oscillator on the Quantum Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Watamura, Satoshi

    We consider the q-deformed Schrödinger equation of the harmonic oscillator on the N-dimensional quantum Euclidean space. The creation and annihilation operators are found, which systematically produce all energy levels and eigenfunctions of the Schrödinger equation. In order to get the q series representation of the eigenfunction, we also give an alternative way to solve the Schrödinger equation which is based on the q analysis. We represent the Schrödinger equation by the q difference equation and solve it by using q polynomials and q exponential functions.

  6. Perceptual or Analytical Processing? Evidence from Children's and Adult's Performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Iris; Schactman, Alissa; Kadlec, Helena; Stege, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    The Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problem (E-TSP) is a useful task to study how humans optimize when faced with computational intractability. It has been found that humans are capable of finding high-quality solutions for E-TSP in a relatively short time and with seemingly little cognitive effort. This observation has led to two general…

  7. Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    preparation, indicating, to our surprise, that standard quantum teleportation is *not* optimal for the transmission of states from Alice to Bob if...1 August 1998-1 August. 2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Information Processing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DAAG55-98-C-0041 6. AUTHOR(S) David P... quantum entanglement in which the transmitted quantum state is known to Alice. Very recently, with A. Winter, a new, more efficient protocol for RSP has

  8. Hybrid quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-04

    I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of hybrid quantum information processing, which is hybridization of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the hybrid technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.

  9. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2017-03-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics interference experiments as analog signal processing converting quantum signals into experimentally observable quantities such as current averages and correlations. This point of view also gives us a procedure to obtain quantum information quantities from electron quantum optics coherences. We illustrate these ideas by discussing two mode entanglement in electron quantum optics. We also sketch how signal processing ideas may open new perspectives for representing electronic coherences in quantum conductors and understand the properties of the underlying many-body electronic state.

  10. Quantum image processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastriani, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a number of problems concerning the practical (real) implementation of the techniques known as quantum image processing. The most serious problem is the recovery of the outcomes after the quantum measurement, which will be demonstrated in this work that is equivalent to a noise measurement, and it is not considered in the literature on the subject. It is noteworthy that this is due to several factors: (1) a classical algorithm that uses Dirac's notation and then it is coded in MATLAB does not constitute a quantum algorithm, (2) the literature emphasizes the internal representation of the image but says nothing about the classical-to-quantum and quantum-to-classical interfaces and how these are affected by decoherence, (3) the literature does not mention how to implement in a practical way (at the laboratory) these proposals internal representations, (4) given that quantum image processing works with generic qubits, this requires measurements in all axes of the Bloch sphere, logically, and (5) among others. In return, the technique known as quantum Boolean image processing is mentioned, which works with computational basis states (CBS), exclusively. This methodology allows us to avoid the problem of quantum measurement, which alters the results of the measured except in the case of CBS. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too.

  11. Euclidean Epstein-Glaser renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kai J.

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory recently developed by Brunetti, Duetsch, and Fredenhagen (http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2038) I give a general construction of so-called Euclidean time-ordered products, i.e., algebraic versions of the Schwinger functions, for scalar quantum field theories on spaces of Euclidean signature. This is done by generalizing the recursive construction of time-ordered products by Epstein and Glaser, originally formulated for quantum field theories on Minkowski space [Epstein and Glaser, Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare 19, 211 (1973)]. An essential input of Epstein-Glaser renormalization is the causal structure of Minkowski space. The absence of this causal structure in the Euclidean framework makes it necessary to modify the original construction of Epstein and Glaser at two points. First, the whole construction has to be performed with an only partially defined product on (interaction) functionals. This is due to the fact that the fundamental solutions of the Helmholtz operator (-{delta}+m{sup 2}) of Euclidean quantum field theory have a unique singularity structure, i.e., they are unique up to a smooth part. Second, one needs to (re)introduce a (rather natural) 'Euclidean causality' condition for the recursion of Epstein and Glaser to be applicable.

  12. Euclidean Epstein-Glaser renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kai J.

    2009-10-01

    In the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory recently developed by Brunetti, Dütsch, and Fredenhagen (http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2038) I give a general construction of so-called Euclidean time-ordered products, i.e., algebraic versions of the Schwinger functions, for scalar quantum field theories on spaces of Euclidean signature. This is done by generalizing the recursive construction of time-ordered products by Epstein and Glaser, originally formulated for quantum field theories on Minkowski space [Epstein and Glaser, Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare 19, 211 (1973)]. An essential input of Epstein-Glaser renormalization is the causal structure of Minkowski space. The absence of this causal structure in the Euclidean framework makes it necessary to modify the original construction of Epstein and Glaser at two points. First, the whole construction has to be performed with an only partially defined product on (interaction) functionals. This is due to the fact that the fundamental solutions of the Helmholtz operator (-Δ+m2) of Euclidean quantum field theory have a unique singularity structure, i.e., they are unique up to a smooth part. Second, one needs to (re)introduce a (rather natural) "Euclidean causality" condition for the recursion of Epstein and Glaser to be applicable.

  13. PREFACE: Quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Andrew; Ferry, David; Stoneham, Marshall

    2006-05-01

    Microelectronics and the classical information technologies transformed the physics of semiconductors. Photonics has given optical materials a new direction. Quantum information technologies, we believe, will have immense impact on condensed matter physics. The novel systems of quantum information processing need to be designed and made. Their behaviours must be manipulated in ways that are intrinsically quantal and generally nanoscale. Both in this special issue and in previous issues (see e.g., Spiller T P and Munro W J 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 V1-10) we see the emergence of new ideas that link the fundamentals of science to the pragmatism of market-led industry. We hope these papers will be followed by many others on quantum information processing in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter.

  14. Imbedding Locally Euclidean and Conformally Euclidean Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. A.

    1992-02-01

    The possibility of imbedding n-dimensional locally Euclidean metrics in the large in Rn is studied by means of the global inverse function theorem in the forms suggested by Hadamard, John, Levy and Plastock. The imbeddability of conformally Euclidean metrics is studied by means of a theorem of Zorich on the removability of an isolated singularity of a locally quasiconformal mapping.

  15. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  16. Simplified quantum process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, M. P. A.; Nunn, J.; Walmsley, I. A.; Kosut, R. L.

    2009-11-01

    We propose and evaluate experimentally an approach to quantum process tomography that completely removes the scaling problem plaguing the standard approach. The key to this simplification is the incorporation of prior knowledge of the class of physical interactions involved in generating the dynamics, which reduces the problem to one of parameter estimation. This allows part of the problem to be tackled using efficient convex methods, which, when coupled with a constraint on some parameters, allows globally optimal estimates for the Krauss operators to be determined from experimental data. Parameterizing the maps provides further advantages: it allows the incorporation of mixed states of the environment as well as some initial correlation between the system and environment, both of which are common physical situations following excitation of the system away from thermal equilibrium. Although the approach is not universal, in cases where it is valid it returns a complete set of positive maps for the dynamical evolution of a quantum system at all times.

  17. Free q-Schrödinger equation from homogeneous spaces of the 2-dim Euclidean quantum group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonechi, F.; Ciccoli, N.; Giachetti, R.; Sorace, E.; Tarlini, M.

    1996-01-01

    After a preliminary review of the definition and the general properties of the homogeneous spaces of quantum groups, the quantum hyperboloid qH and the quantum plane qP are determined as homogeneous spaces of F q ( E(2)). The canonical action of E q (2) is used to define a natural q-analog of the free Schrödinger equation, that is studied in the momentum and angular momentum bases. In the first case the eigenfunctions are factorized in terms of products of two q-exponentials. In the second case we determine the eigenstates of the unitary representation, which, in the qP case, are given in terms of Hahn-Exton functions. Introducing the universal T-matrix for E q (2) we prove that the Hahn-Exton as well as Jackson q-Bessel functions are also obtained as matrix elements of T, thus giving the correct extension to quantum groups of well known methods in harmonic analysis.

  18. The Development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Cosmologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses early Euclidean cosmologies, inadequacies in classical Euclidean cosmology, and the development of non-Euclidean cosmologies. Explains the present state of the theory of cosmology including the work of Dirac, Sandage, and Gott. (CP)

  19. Optical Hybrid Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Furusawa, Akira

    Historically, two complementary approaches to optical quantum information processing have been pursued: qubits and continuous-variables, each exploiting either particle or wave nature of light. However, both approaches have pros and cons. In recent years, there has been a significant progress in combining both approaches with a view to realizing hybrid protocols that overcome the current limitations. In this chapter, we first review the development of the two approaches with a special focus on quantum teleportation and its applications. We then introduce our recent research progress in realizing quantum teleportation by a hybrid scheme, and mention its future applications to universal and fault-tolerant quantum information processing.

  20. Quantum communication and information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beals, Travis Roland

    Quantum computers enable dramatically more efficient algorithms for solving certain classes of computational problems, but, in doing so, they create new problems. In particular, Shor's Algorithm allows for efficient cryptanalysis of many public-key cryptosystems. As public key cryptography is a critical component of present-day electronic commerce, it is crucial that a working, secure replacement be found. Quantum key distribution (QKD), first developed by C.H. Bennett and G. Brassard, offers a partial solution, but many challenges remain, both in terms of hardware limitations and in designing cryptographic protocols for a viable large-scale quantum communication infrastructure. In Part I, I investigate optical lattice-based approaches to quantum information processing. I look at details of a proposal for an optical lattice-based quantum computer, which could potentially be used for both quantum communications and for more sophisticated quantum information processing. In Part III, I propose a method for converting and storing photonic quantum bits in the internal state of periodically-spaced neutral atoms by generating and manipulating a photonic band gap and associated defect states. In Part II, I present a cryptographic protocol which allows for the extension of present-day QKD networks over much longer distances without the development of new hardware. I also present a second, related protocol which effectively solves the authentication problem faced by a large QKD network, thus making QKD a viable, information-theoretic secure replacement for public key cryptosystems.

  1. Quantum information processing : science & technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Rebecca; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Tarman, Thomas David

    2010-09-01

    Qubits demonstrated using GaAs double quantum dots (DQD). The qubit basis states are the (1) singlet and (2) triplet stationary states. Long spin decoherence times in silicon spurs translation of GaAs qubit in to silicon. In the near term the goals are: (1) Develop surface gate enhancement mode double quantum dots (MOS & strained-Si/SiGe) to demonstrate few electrons and spin read-out and to examine impurity doped quantum-dots as an alternative architecture; (2) Use mobility, C-V, ESR, quantum dot performance & modeling to feedback and improve upon processing, this includes development of atomic precision fabrication at SNL; (3) Examine integrated electronics approaches to RF-SET; (4) Use combinations of numerical packages for multi-scale simulation of quantum dot systems (NEMO3D, EMT, TCAD, SPICE); and (5) Continue micro-architecture evaluation for different device and transport architectures.

  2. Efficient Quantum Information Processing via Quantum Compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Luo, M. X.; Ma, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to improve the quantum transmission efficiency and reduce the resource cost by quantum compressions. The lossless quantum compression is accomplished using invertible quantum transformations and applied to the quantum teleportation and the simultaneous transmission over quantum butterfly networks. New schemes can greatly reduce the entanglement cost, and partially solve transmission conflictions over common links. Moreover, the local compression scheme is useful for approximate entanglement creations from pre-shared entanglements. This special task has not been addressed because of the quantum no-cloning theorem. Our scheme depends on the local quantum compression and the bipartite entanglement transfer. Simulations show the success probability is greatly dependent of the minimal entanglement coefficient. These results may be useful in general quantum network communication.

  3. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  4. Physics as quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo

    2011-10-01

    The experience from Quantum Information has lead us to look at Quantum Theory (QT) and the whole Physics from a different angle. The information-theoretical paradigm—It from Bit— prophesied by John Archibald Wheeler is relentlessly advancing. Recently it has been shown that QT is derivable from pure informational principles. The possibility that there is only QT at the foundations of Physics has been then considered, with space-time, Relativity, quantization rules and Quantum Field Theory (QFT) emerging from a quantum-information processing. The resulting theory is a discrete version of QFT with automatic relativistic invariance, and without fields, Hamiltonian, and quantization rules. In this paper I review some recent advances on these lines. In particular: i) How space-time and relativistic covariance emerge from the quantum computation; ii) The derivation of the Dirac equation as free information flow, without imposing Lorentz covariance; iii) the information-theoretical meaning of inertial mass and Planck constant; iv) An observable consequence of the theory: a mass-dependent refraction index of vacuum. I will then conclude with two possible routes to Quantum Gravity.

  5. The complementarity relations of quantum coherence in quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei; Qiu, Liang; Liu, Zhi

    2017-03-08

    We establish two complementarity relations for the relative entropy of coherence in quantum information processing, i.e., quantum dense coding and teleportation. We first give an uncertainty-like expression relating local quantum coherence to the capacity of optimal dense coding for bipartite system. The relation can also be applied to the case of dense coding by using unital memoryless noisy quantum channels. Further, the relation between local quantum coherence and teleportation fidelity for two-qubit system is given.

  6. The complementarity relations of quantum coherence in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fei; Qiu, Liang; Liu, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    We establish two complementarity relations for the relative entropy of coherence in quantum information processing, i.e., quantum dense coding and teleportation. We first give an uncertainty-like expression relating local quantum coherence to the capacity of optimal dense coding for bipartite system. The relation can also be applied to the case of dense coding by using unital memoryless noisy quantum channels. Further, the relation between local quantum coherence and teleportation fidelity for two-qubit system is given.

  7. The complementarity relations of quantum coherence in quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Qiu, Liang; Liu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    We establish two complementarity relations for the relative entropy of coherence in quantum information processing, i.e., quantum dense coding and teleportation. We first give an uncertainty-like expression relating local quantum coherence to the capacity of optimal dense coding for bipartite system. The relation can also be applied to the case of dense coding by using unital memoryless noisy quantum channels. Further, the relation between local quantum coherence and teleportation fidelity for two-qubit system is given. PMID:28272481

  8. Practicality of quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan

    Quantum Information Processing (QIP) is expected to bring revolutionary enhancement to various technological areas. However, today's QIP applications are far from being practical. The problem involves both hardware issues, i.e., quantum devices are imperfect, and software issues, i.e., the functionality of some QIP applications is not fully understood. Aiming to improve the practicality of QIP, in my PhD research I have studied various topics in quantum cryptography and ion trap quantum computation. In quantum cryptography, I first studied the security of position-based quantum cryptography (PBQC). I discovered a wrong assumption in the previous literature that the cheaters are not allowed to share entangled resources. I proposed entanglement attacks that could cheat all known PBQC protocols. I also studied the practicality of continuous-variable (CV) quantum secret sharing (QSS). While the security of CV QSS was considered by the literature only in the limit of infinite squeezing, I found that finitely squeezed CV resources could also provide finite secret sharing rate. Our work relaxes the stringent resources requirement of implementing QSS. In ion trap quantum computation, I studied the phase error of quantum information induced by dc Stark effect during ion transportation. I found an optimized ion trajectory for which the phase error is the minimum. I also defined a threshold speed, above which ion transportation would induce significant error. In addition, I proposed a new application for ion trap systems as universal bosonic simulators (UBS). I introduced two architectures, and discussed their respective strength and weakness. I illustrated the implementations of bosonic state initialization, transformation, and measurement by applying radiation fields or by varying the trap potential. When comparing with conducting optical experiments, the ion trap UBS is advantageous in higher state initialization efficiency and higher measurement accuracy. Finally, I

  9. Enjoyment of Euclidean Planar Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ?ABC is a right angle…

  10. Scalable Quantum Information Processing and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-19

    Read-out Channel Depletion Gate (-V) Read-out Channel Depletion Gate (-V) Source Drain Qubit Control Gates for Quantum Teleportation Spin Coherent...REPORT Scalable Quantum Information Processing and Applications: Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of this...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum repeater, quantum computing, quantum information processing

  11. Non-Euclidean spring embedders.

    PubMed

    Kobourov, Stephen G; Wampler, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptually simple approach to generalizing force-directed methods for graph layout from Euclidean geometry to Riemannian geometries. Unlike previous work on non-Euclidean force-directed methods, ours is not limited to special classes of graphs, but can be applied to arbitrary graphs. The method relies on extending the Euclidean notions of distance, angle, and force-interactions to smooth non-Euclidean geometries via projections to and from appropriately chosen tangent spaces. In particular, we formally describe the calculations needed to extend such algorithms to hyperbolic and spherical geometries. We also study the theoretical and practical considerations that arise when working with non-Euclidean geometries.

  12. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  13. Experimental Quantum Randomness Processing Using Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Ma, Yuwei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Zhaopeng; Vijay, R.; Sun, Luyan; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Coherently manipulating multipartite quantum correlations leads to remarkable advantages in quantum information processing. A fundamental question is whether such quantum advantages persist only by exploiting multipartite correlations, such as entanglement. Recently, Dale, Jennings, and Rudolph negated the question by showing that a randomness processing, quantum Bernoulli factory, using quantum coherence, is strictly more powerful than the one with classical mechanics. In this Letter, focusing on the same scenario, we propose a theoretical protocol that is classically impossible but can be implemented solely using quantum coherence without entanglement. We demonstrate the protocol by exploiting the high-fidelity quantum state preparation and measurement with a superconducting qubit in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and a nearly quantum-limited parametric amplifier. Our experiment shows the advantage of using quantum coherence of a single qubit for information processing even when multipartite correlation is not present.

  14. Information Processing Using Quantum Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Laxmidhar

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents an information processing paradigm that introduces collective response of multiple agents (computational units) while the level of intelligence associated with the information processing has been increased manifold. It is shown that if the potential field of the Schroedinger wave equation is modulated using a self-organized learning scheme, then the probability density function associated with the stochastic data is transferred to the probability amplitude function which is the response of the Schroedinger wave equation. This approach illustrates that information processing of data with stochastic behavior can be efficiently done using quantum probability instead of classical probability. The proposed scheme has been demonstrated through two applications: denoising and adaptive control.

  15. Action with Acceleration i: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Path Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2013-10-01

    An action having an acceleration term in addition to the usual velocity term is analyzed. The quantum mechanical system is directly defined for Euclidean time using the path integral. The Euclidean Hamiltonian is shown to yield the acceleration Lagrangian and the path integral with the correct boundary conditions. Due to the acceleration term, the state space depends on both position and velocity — and hence the Euclidean Hamiltonian depends on two degrees of freedom. The Hamiltonian for the acceleration system is non-Hermitian and can be mapped to a Hermitian Hamiltonian using a similarity transformation; the matrix elements of the similarity transformation are explicitly evaluated.

  16. Adaptive schemes for incomplete quantum process tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, Yong Siah; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Rehacek, Jaroslav; Hradil, Zdenek

    2011-12-15

    We propose an iterative algorithm for incomplete quantum process tomography with the help of quantum state estimation. The algorithm, which is based on the combined principles of maximum likelihood and maximum entropy, yields a unique estimator for an unknown quantum process when one has less than a complete set of linearly independent measurement data to specify the quantum process uniquely. We apply this iterative algorithm adaptively in various situations and so optimize the amount of resources required to estimate a quantum process with incomplete data.

  17. Quantum Simulations of Classical Annealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, R. D.; Boixo, S.; Barnum, H.; Knill, E.

    2008-09-01

    We describe a quantum algorithm that solves combinatorial optimization problems by quantum simulation of a classical simulated annealing process. Our algorithm exploits quantum walks and the quantum Zeno effect induced by evolution randomization. It requires order 1/δ steps to find an optimal solution with bounded error probability, where δ is the minimum spectral gap of the stochastic matrices used in the classical annealing process. This is a quadratic improvement over the order 1/δ steps required by the latter.

  18. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Janet; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2013-03-01

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  19. Fractional Fourier processing of quantum light.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-13

    We have extended Fourier transform of quantum light to a fractional Fourier processing, and demonstrated that a classical optical fractional Fourier processor can be used for the shaping of quantum correlations between two or more photons. Comparing the present method with that of Fourier processing, we find that fractional Fourier processing for quantum light possesses many advantages. Based on such a method, not only quantum correlations can be shaped more rich, but also the initial states can be easily identified. Moreover, the twisted phase information can be recovered and quantum states are easily controlled in performing quantum information experiments. Our findings open up new avenues for the manipulation of correlations between photons in optical quantum information processing.

  20. Whiteheadian process and quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.

    1998-08-01

    There are deep similarities between Whitehead's idea of the process by which nature unfolds and the ideas of quantum theory. Whitehead says that the world is made of ''actual occasions'', each of which arises from potentialities created by prior actual occasions. These actual occasions are happenings modeled on experiential events, each of which comes into being and then perishes, only to be replaced by a successor. It is these experience-like happenings that are the basic realities of nature, according to Whitehead, not the persisting physical particles that Newtonian physics took be the basic entities. Similarly, Heisenberg says that what is really happening in a quantum process is the emergence of an actual from potentialities created by prior actualities. In the orthodox Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory the actual things to which the theory refer are increments in ''our knowledge''. These increments are experiential events. The particles of classical physics lose their fundamental status: they dissolve into diffuse clouds of possibilities. At each stage of the unfolding of nature the complete cloud of possibilities acts like the potentiality for the occurrence of a next increment in knowledge, whose occurrence can radically change the cloud of possibilities/potentialities for the still-later increments in knowledge. The fundamental difference between these ideas about nature and the classical ideas that reigned from the time of Newton until this century concerns the status of the experiential aspects of nature. These are things such as thoughts, ideas, feelings, and sensations. They are distinguished from the physical aspects of nature, which are described in terms of quantities explicitly located in tiny regions of space and time. According to the ideas of classical physics the physical world is made up exclusively of things of this latter type, and the unfolding of the physical world is determined by causal connections involving only these things

  1. Generalized Hofmann quantum process fidelity bounds for quantum filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Fiurášek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    We propose and investigate bounds on the quantum process fidelity of quantum filters, i.e., probabilistic quantum operations represented by a single Kraus operator K . These bounds generalize the Hofmann bounds on the quantum process fidelity of unitary operations [H. F. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160504 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.160504] and are based on probing the quantum filter with pure states forming two mutually unbiased bases. Determination of these bounds therefore requires far fewer measurements than full quantum process tomography. We find that it is particularly suitable to construct one of the probe bases from the right eigenstates of K , because in this case the bounds are tight in the sense that if the actual filter coincides with the ideal one, then both the lower and the upper bounds are equal to 1. We theoretically investigate the application of these bounds to a two-qubit optical quantum filter formed by the interference of two photons on a partially polarizing beam splitter. For an experimentally convenient choice of factorized input states and measurements we study the tightness of the bounds. We show that more stringent bounds can be obtained by more sophisticated processing of the data using convex optimization and we compare our methods for different choices of the input probe states.

  2. Silicon Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Systems relaxes through SOC [40, 41, 42]. With the combination of SOC and the Zeeman effect , the typical dependency of a spin lifetime can be expressed as...diagram showing the effect of the 3-level pulse sequence on the electro-chemical potential of the dot. Energy levels in the QD are Zeeman split according...dependent on the valley splitting energy, with a dramatic rate enhancement (or hot-spot) when the Zeeman and valley splittings coincided, a process

  3. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Levy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum…

  4. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  5. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  6. On Heat in a Quantum Mechanical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deesuwan, Tanapat; Anders, Janet

    2013-05-01

    Heat is the portion of energy exchange between systems in thermodynamic process which, unlike work, is always associated with the change of the entropies of the systems. In the context of quantum thermodynamics, heat process is described by an incoherent generalised quantum evolution, which is a map between two quantum states that does not preserve the entropy. Based on an information-theoretic reasoning, we propose that heat involving in a general quantum thermodynamic process can be separated into two types: one that is due to the unital subclass of the evolutions and another one that is due to the others. According to these categories, we show how the former type of heat can be incorporated into Jarzynski equality, resulting in a generalised version of the equality. We also derive a Jarzynski inequality which incorporates all heat into the picture and show that this situation is just equivalent to the presence of Maxwell's demon.

  7. Quantum processes: A Whiteheadian interpretation of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Jonathan

    Quantum processes: A Whiteheadian interpretation of quantum field theory is an ambitious and thought-provoking exercise in physics and metaphysics, combining an erudite study of the very complex metaphysics of A.N. Whitehead with a well-informed discussion of contemporary issues in the philosophy of algebraic quantum field theory. Hättich's overall goal is to construct an interpretation of quantum field theory. He does this by translating key concepts in Whitehead's metaphysics into the language of algebraic quantum field theory. In brief, this Hättich-Whitehead (H-W, hereafter) interpretation takes "actual occasions" as the fundamental ontological entities of quantum field theory. An actual occasion is the result of two types of processes: a "transition process" in which a set of initial possibly-possessed properties for the occasion (in the form of "eternal objects") is localized to a space-time region; and a "concrescence process" in which a subset of these initial possibly-possessed properties is selected and actualized to produce the occasion. Essential to these processes is the "underlying activity", which conditions the way in which properties are initially selected and subsequently actualized. In short, under the H-W interpretation of quantum field theory, an initial set of possibly-possessed eternal objects is represented by a Boolean sublattice of the lattice of projection operators determined by a von Neumann algebra R (O) associated with a region O of Minkowski space-time, and the underlying activity is represented by a state on R (O) obtained by conditionalizing off of the vacuum state. The details associated with the H-W interpretation involve imposing constraints on these representations motivated by principles found in Whitehead's metaphysics. These details are spelled out in the three sections of the book. The first section is a summary and critique of Whitehead's metaphysics, the second section introduces the formalism of algebraic quantum field

  8. Quantum metrology with unitary parametrization processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Jing, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-02-24

    Quantum Fisher information is a central quantity in quantum metrology. We discuss an alternative representation of quantum Fisher information for unitary parametrization processes. In this representation, all information of parametrization transformation, i.e., the entire dynamical information, is totally involved in a Hermitian operator H. Utilizing this representation, quantum Fisher information is only determined by H and the initial state. Furthermore, H can be expressed in an expanded form. The highlights of this form is that it can bring great convenience during the calculation for the Hamiltonians owning recursive commutations with their partial derivative. We apply this representation in a collective spin system and show the specific expression of H. For a simple case, a spin-half system, the quantum Fisher information is given and the optimal states to access maximum quantum Fisher information are found. Moreover, for an exponential form initial state, an analytical expression of quantum Fisher information by H operator is provided. The multiparameter quantum metrology is also considered and discussed utilizing this representation.

  9. Engineering Photonic Switches for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Neal N.

    In this dissertation, we describe, characterize, and demonstrate the operation of a dual-in, dual-out, all-optical, fiber-based quantum switch. This "cross-bar" switch is particularly useful for applications in quantum information processing because of its low-loss, high-speed, low-noise, and quantum-state-retention properties. Building upon on our lab's prior development of an ultrafast demultiplexer [1-3] , the new cross-bar switch can be used as a tunable multiplexer and demultiplexer. In addition to this more functional geometry, we present results demonstrating faster performance with a switching window of ≈45 ps, corresponding to >20-GHz switching rates. We show a switching fidelity of >98%, i. e., switched polarization-encoded photonic qubits are virtually identical to unswitched photonic qubits. We also demonstrate the ability to select one channel from a two-channel quantum data stream with the state of the measured (recovered) quantum channel having >96% relative fidelity with the state of that channel transmitted alone. We separate the two channels of the quantum data stream by 155 ps, corresponding to a 6.5-GHz datastream. Finally, we describe, develop, and demonstrate an application that utilizes the switch's higher-speed, lower-loss, and spatio-temporal-encoding features to perform quantum state tomographies on entangled states in higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces. Since many previous demonstrations show bipartite entanglement of two-level systems, we define "higher" as d > 2 where d represents the dimensionality of a photon. We show that we can generate and measure time-bin-entangled, two-photon, qutrit (d = 3) and ququat (d = 4) states with >85% and >64% fidelity to an ideal maximally entangled state, respectively. Such higher-dimensional states have applications in dense coding [4] , loophole-free tests of nonlocality [5] , simplifying quantum logic gates [6] , and increasing tolerance to noise and loss for quantum information processing [7] .

  10. Quantum Control, Quantum Information Processing, and Quantum-Limited Metrology with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Barrett, M. D.; Ben-Kish, A.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Demarco, B.; Hume, D.; Itano, W. M.; Jensen, M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Koelemeij, J.; Langer, C.; Oskay, W.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.

    2005-12-01

    We briefly discuss recent experiments on quantum information processing using trapped ions at NIST. A central theme of this work has been to increase our capabilities in terms of quantum computing protocols, but we have also applied the same concepts to improved metrology, particularly in the area of frequency standards and atomic clocks. Such work may eventually shed light on more fundamental issues, such as the quantum measurement problem.

  11. Quantum information processing by weaving quantum Talbot carpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; de Melo, Fernando; Milman, Pérola; Walborn, Stephen P.

    2015-06-01

    Single-photon interference due to passage through a periodic grating is considered in a novel proposal for processing D -dimensional quantum systems (quDits) encoded in the spatial degrees of freedom of light. We show that free-space propagation naturally implements basic single-quDit gates by means of the Talbot effect: an intricate time-space carpet of light in the near-field diffraction regime. By adding a diagonal phase gate, we show that a complete set of single-quDit gates can be implemented. We then introduce a spatially dependent beam splitter that allows for projective measurements in the computational basis and can be used for the implementation of controlled operations between two quDits. Universal quantum information processing can then be implemented with linear optics and ancilla photons via postselection and feed-forward following the original proposal of Knill-Laflamme and Milburn. Although we consider photons, our scheme should be directly applicable to a number of other physical systems. Interpretation of the Talbot effect as a quantum logic operation provides a beautiful and interesting way to visualize quantum computation through wave propagation and interference.

  12. Euclidean, Spherical, and Hyperbolic Shadows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Many classical problems in elementary calculus use Euclidean geometry. This article takes such a problem and solves it in hyperbolic and in spherical geometry instead. The solution requires only the ability to compute distances and intersections of points in these geometries. The dramatically different results we obtain illustrate the effect…

  13. Enjoyment of Euclidean planar triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-09-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar ?, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar ? are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ? is a right angle with the two remaining angles as acute angles. It is said to be obtuse angled at the vertex B if ? is an obtuse angle, with the two remaining angles as acute angles. In spite of the availability of numerous text books that contain our human knowledge of Euclidean plane geometry, softwares can offer newer insights about the characterizations of planar geometrical objects. The author's characterizations of triangles involve points like the centroid G, the orthocentre H of the ?, the circumcentre S of the ?, the centre N of the nine-point circle of the ?. Also the radical centre rc of three involved diameter circles of the sides BC, AC and AB of the ? provides a reformulation of the orthocentre, resulting in an interesting theorem, dubbed by the author as 'Three Circles Theorem'. This provides a special result for a right-angled ?, again dubbed by the author as 'The Four Circles Theorem'. Apart from providing various inter connections between the geometrical points, the relationships between shapes of the triangle and the behaviour of the points are reasonably explored in this article. Most of these results will be useful to students that take courses in Euclidean Geometry at the college level and the high school level. This article will be useful to teachers in mathematics at the high school level and the college level.

  14. Euclidean lattice simulation for dynamical supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sugino, Fumihiko

    2008-05-01

    The global supersymmetry is spontaneously broken if and only if the ground-state energy is strictly positive. We propose to use this fact to observe the spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in Euclidean lattice simulations. For lattice formulations that possess a manifest fermionic symmetry, there exists a natural choice of a Hamiltonian operator that is consistent with a topological property of the Witten index. We confirm validity of our idea in models of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics. We then examine a possibility of a dynamical supersymmetry breaking in the two-dimensional N=(2,2) super Yang-Mills theory with the gauge group SU(2), for which the Witten index is unknown. Differently from a recent conjectural claim, our numerical result tempts us to conclude that supersymmetry is not spontaneously broken in this system.

  15. Euclidean Circles and Their Modular Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Joe Dan

    1990-01-01

    Shows a series of Euclidean equations using the Euclidean algorithm to get the greatest common divisor of two integers. Describes the use of the equations to generate a series of circles. Discusses computer generation of Euclidean circles and provides a BASIC program. (YP)

  16. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability…

  17. Reversibility in Quantum Models of Stochastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, David; Crutchfield, James; Mahoney, John; James, Ryan

    Natural phenomena such as time series of neural firing, orientation of layers in crystal stacking and successive measurements in spin-systems are inherently probabilistic. The provably minimal classical models of such stochastic processes are ɛ-machines, which consist of internal states, transition probabilities between states and output values. The topological properties of the ɛ-machine for a given process characterize the structure, memory and patterns of that process. However ɛ-machines are often not ideal because their statistical complexity (Cμ) is demonstrably greater than the excess entropy (E) of the processes they represent. Quantum models (q-machines) of the same processes can do better in that their statistical complexity (Cq) obeys the relation Cμ >= Cq >= E. q-machines can be constructed to consider longer lengths of strings, resulting in greater compression. With code-words of sufficiently long length, the statistical complexity becomes time-symmetric - a feature apparently novel to this quantum representation. This result has ramifications for compression of classical information in quantum computing and quantum communication technology.

  18. Exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1981-06-01

    Large momentum transfer exclusive processes and the short distance structure of hadronic wave functions can be systematically analyzed within the context of perturbative QCD. Predictions for meson form factors, two-photon processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. M anti M, hadronic decays of heavy quark systems, and a number of other related QCD phenomena are reviewed.

  19. Non-Local Euclidean Medians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Singer, Amit

    2012-11-01

    In this letter, we note that the denoising performance of Non-Local Means (NLM) can be improved at large noise levels by replacing the mean by the Euclidean median. We call this new denoising algorithm the Non-Local Euclidean Medians (NLEM). At the heart of NLEM is the observation that the median is more robust to outliers than the mean. In particular, we provide a simple geometric insight that explains why NLEM performs better than NLM in the vicinity of edges, particularly at large noise levels. NLEM can be efficiently implemented using iteratively reweighted least squares, and its computational complexity is comparable to that of NLM. We provide some preliminary results to study the proposed algorithm and to compare it with NLM.

  20. Exclusive Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Peter Lepage, G.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * NONRELATIVISTIC FORM FACTORS FOR HEAVY-QUARK MESONS * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTIONS * DEFINITIONS * LIGHT-CONE BOUND-STATE EQUATIONS * GENERAL PROPERTIES OF LIGHT-CONE WAVEFUNCTIONS * RENORMALIZATION * CALCULATING * A PERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS * FACTORIZATION—LEADING ORDER ANALYSIS * THE QUARK DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDE * DETERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTION AMPLITUDES * HIGHER ORDER ANALYSIS * COMPLICATIONS * How LARGE IS ASYMPTOTIC Q? * APPLICATIONS OF QCD TO THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * GENERAL FEATURES OF EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES IN QCD * ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS * COMPARISON OF QCD SCALING WITH EXPERIMENT * EXCLUSIVE ANTI-PROTON PROTON ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * ADDITIONAL TESTS OF GLUON SPIN IN EXCLUSIVE PROCESSES * HADRONIC WAVEFUNCTION PHENOMENOLOGY * CALCULATING TH * THE PRE-QCD DEVELOPMENT OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS * EXCLUSIVE e+ e- ANNIHILATION PROCESSES * J/ψ DECAY TO HADRON PAIRS * THE π-ρ PUZZLE * FORM FACTOR ZEROS IN QCD * EXCLUSIVE γγ REACTIONS * QCD PROCESSES IN NUCLEI * EXCLUSIVE NUCLEAR REACTIONS - REDUCED AMPLITUDES * COLOR TRANSPARENCY * SPIN CORRELATIONS IN PROTON-PROTON SCATTERING * CONCLUSIONS * APPENDIX I BARYON FORM FACTORS AND EVOLUTION EQUATIONS * APPENDIX II LIGHT CONE QUANTIZATION AND PERTURBATION THEORY * APPENDIX III A NONPERTURBATIVE ANALYSIS OF EXCLUSIVE REACTIONS-DISCRETIZED LIGHT-CONE QUANTIZATION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  1. Quantum cooperative process in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, Robert

    2006-03-01

    A model of a quantum cooperative process has accurately accounted for various quantitative observations.^1 That investigation considered chemical oscillations to be generated by generic quantum oscillators producing discrete quanta with well-defined energy and wavelength. The current work extends the theory by postulating that these oscillations arise from repetitive electron transfers in membranes. We find this produces a limit cycle completely consistent with the hypothetical generic oscillators, accurately reproduces the results of microwave irradiation experiments on yeast, and addresses limits for the smallest possible cell sizes. Questions of coherence in cells and implications for molecular information transfers are briefly considered. ^1R.W. Finkel, J. Theor. Biol. in press.

  2. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped 43Ca+ Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-18

    state 11 Fig.3: Deterministic quantum teleportation protocol 12 Fig.4: Density matrix of an entangled eight-ion state 13 Fig.5: Quantum process...4.3.4 Deterministic quantum teleportation Teleportation of a quantum state encompasses the complete transfer of information from one particle to...allow quantum -state teleportation to be performed. We succeeded in demonstrating deterministic quantum -state teleportation between a pair of trapped

  3. Optimal Hamiltonian Simulation by Quantum Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Guang Hao; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    The physics of quantum mechanics is the inspiration for, and underlies, quantum computation. As such, one expects physical intuition to be highly influential in the understanding and design of many quantum algorithms, particularly simulation of physical systems. Surprisingly, this has been challenging, with current Hamiltonian simulation algorithms remaining abstract and often the result of sophisticated but unintuitive constructions. We contend that physical intuition can lead to optimal simulation methods by showing that a focus on simple single-qubit rotations elegantly furnishes an optimal algorithm for Hamiltonian simulation, a universal problem that encapsulates all the power of quantum computation. Specifically, we show that the query complexity of implementing time evolution by a d -sparse Hamiltonian H ^ for time-interval t with error ɛ is O [t d ∥H ^ ∥max+log (1 /ɛ ) /log log (1 /ɛ ) ] , which matches lower bounds in all parameters. This connection is made through general three-step "quantum signal processing" methodology, comprised of (i) transducing eigenvalues of H ^ into a single ancilla qubit, (ii) transforming these eigenvalues through an optimal-length sequence of single-qubit rotations, and (iii) projecting this ancilla with near unity success probability.

  4. The role of quantum memory in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Kae; Stephens, Ashley M.; Devitt, Simon J.; Harrison, Keith A.; Munro, William J.

    2013-09-01

    Until recently, it was believed that long-lived quantum memories were necessary for long-distance quantum communication. However, by using error-correction codes in an efficient way—specifically, by correcting for photon loss—it is possible to transmit quantum information over long distances without quantum memories. For quantum computation, recent architectures for topological quantum computation indicate that the simplest large-scale structure could be memory-less. While a quantum memory may no longer be an essential resource for quantum networks, it could nonetheless be a key device in the development of quantum information technology. However, it is still not clear what benefits a functioning device could bring to quantum information systems, largely due to a lack of detailed models. Recently we have developed a detailed model for a quantum network based on a simple device designed to act as a building block for a full system architecture. The device is based on an optical cavity containing a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. This model naturally integrates quantum communication with computation, and using this model we can assess quantitatively the costs and benefits of quantum memories. With or without quantum memories, it is necessary for us to preserve quantum information for a long period of time in either communication or computation.

  5. Basing quantum theory on information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard

    2008-03-01

    I consider information-based derivations of the quantum formalism, in a framework encompassing quantum and classical theory and a broad spectrum of theories serving as foils to them. The most ambitious hope for such a derivation is a role analogous to Einstein's development of the dynamics and kinetics of macroscopic bodies, and later of their gravitational interactions, on the basis of simple principles with clear operational meanings and experimental consequences. Short of this, it could still provide a principled understanding of the features of quantum mechanics that account for its greater-than-classical information-processing power, helping guide the search for new quantum algorithms and protocols. I summarize the convex operational framework for theories, and discuss information-processing in theories therein. Results include the fact that information that can be obtained without disturbance is inherently classical, generalized no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, exponentially secure bit commitment in all non-classical theories without entanglement, properties of theories that allow teleportation, and properties of theories that allow ``remote steering'' of ensembles using entanglement. Joint work with collaborators including Jonathan Barrett, Matthew Leifer, Alexander Wilce, Oscar Dahlsten, and Ben Toner.

  6. Phylogenetic trees and Euclidean embeddings.

    PubMed

    Layer, Mark; Rhodes, John A

    2017-01-01

    It was recently observed by de Vienne et al. (Syst Biol 60(6):826-832, 2011) that a simple square root transformation of distances between taxa on a phylogenetic tree allowed for an embedding of the taxa into Euclidean space. While the justification for this was based on a diffusion model of continuous character evolution along the tree, here we give a direct and elementary explanation for it that provides substantial additional insight. We use this embedding to reinterpret the differences between the NJ and BIONJ tree building algorithms, providing one illustration of how this embedding reflects tree structures in data.

  7. Conformal Janus on Euclidean sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gustavsson, Andreas; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2016-12-01

    We interpret Janus as an interface in a conformal field theory and study its properties. The Janus is created by an exactly marginal operator and we study its effect on the interface conformal field theory on the Janus. We do this by utilizing the AdS/CFT correspondence. We compute the interface free energy both from leading correction to the Euclidean action in the dual gravity description and from conformal perturbation theory in the conformal field theory. We find that the two results agree each other and that the interface free energy scales precisely as expected from the conformal invariance of the Janus interface.

  8. Precisely Timing Dissipative Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastoryano, M. J.; Wolf, M. M.; Eisert, J.

    2013-03-01

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource and, consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that the protocols are typically independent of the initial state of the system. However, the time independent nature of this scheme makes it difficult to imagine precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements, or error correction. In this work, we provide a path around these challenges, by introducing basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger, and time dissipative operations while keeping the system Liouvillian time independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how measurement-based computation can be simulated in the dissipative setting.

  9. Precisely timing dissipative quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Kastoryano, M J; Wolf, M M; Eisert, J

    2013-03-15

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource and, consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that the protocols are typically independent of the initial state of the system. However, the time independent nature of this scheme makes it difficult to imagine precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements, or error correction. In this work, we provide a path around these challenges, by introducing basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger, and time dissipative operations while keeping the system Liouvillian time independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how measurement-based computation can be simulated in the dissipative setting.

  10. Nondegenerate superintegrable systems in n-dimensional Euclidean spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, E. G.; Kress, J. M. Miller, W.; Pogosyan, G. S.

    2007-03-15

    We analyze the concept of a nondegenerate superintegrable system in n-dimensional Euclidean space. Attached to this idea is the notion that every such system affords a separation of variables in one of the various types of generic elliptical coordinates that are possible in complex Euclidean space. An analysis of how these coordinates are arrived at in terms of their expression in terms of Cartesian coordinates is presented in detail. The use of well-defined limiting processes illustrates just how all these systems can be obtained from the most general nondegenerate superintegrable system in n-dimensional Euclidean space. Two examples help with the understanding of how the general results are obtained.

  11. Realization of quantum information processing in quantum star network constituted by superconducting hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of superconducting hybrid systems, we construct a star quantum network in which a superconducting transmission line resonator as a quantum bus and multiple units constituted by transmission line resonator and superconducting qubits as the carriers of quantum information. We further propose and analyze a theoretical scheme to realize quantum information processing in the quantum network. The coupling between the bus and any two superconducting qubits can be selectively implemented based on the dark state resonances of the highly dissipative transmission line resonators, and it can be found that quantum information processing between any two units can be completed in one step. As examples, the transmission of unknown quantum states and the preparation of quantum entanglement in this quantum network are investigated. At last, we exhibit our simulation results and complete the relevant discussions in order to show the advantages of this kind of quantum network.

  12. A Case Example of Insect Gymnastics: How Is Non-Euclidean Geometry Learned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junius, Premalatha

    2008-01-01

    The focus of the article is on the complex cognitive process involved in learning the concept of "straightness" in Non-Euclidean geometry. Learning new material is viewed through a conflict resolution framework, as a student questions familiar assumptions understood in Euclidean geometry. A case study reveals how mathematization of the straight…

  13. From geometry to algebra: the Euclidean way with technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarello, Daniela; Flavia Mammana, Maria; Pennisi, Mario

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an experimental classroom activity, history-based with a phylogenetic approach, to achieve algebra properties through geometry. In particular, we used Euclidean propositions, processed them by a dynamic geometry system and translate them into algebraic special products.

  14. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perez, A.; Saavedra, C.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  15. Quantum process discrimination with information from environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Mei; Li, Jun-Gang; Zou, Jian; Xu, Bao-Ming

    2016-12-01

    In quantum metrology we usually extract information from the reduced probe system but ignore the information lost inevitably into the environment. However, K. Mølmer [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 040401 (2015)] showed that the information lost into the environment has an important effect on improving the successful probability of quantum process discrimination. Here we reconsider the model of a driven atom coupled to an environment and distinguish which of two candidate Hamiltonians governs the dynamics of the whole system. We mainly discuss two measurement methods, one of which obtains only the information from the reduced atom state and the other obtains the information from both the atom and its environment. Interestingly, for the two methods the optimal initial states of the atom, used to improve the successful probability of the process discrimination, are different. By comparing the two methods we find that the partial information from the environment is very useful for the discriminations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274043, 11375025, and 11005008).

  16. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  17. Compact component for integrated quantum optic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2015-11-01

    Quantum interference is indispensable to derive integrated quantum optic technologies (1-2). For further progress in large scale integration of quantum optic circuit, we have introduced first time two mode interference (TMI) coupler as an ultra compact component. The quantum interference varying with coupling length corresponding to the coupling ratio is studied and the larger HOM dip with peak visibility ~0.963 ± 0.009 is found at half coupling length of TMI coupler. Our results also demonstrate complex quantum interference with high fabrication tolerance and quantum visibility in TMI coupler.

  18. Quantum processes in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1975-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes that occur in a piece of matter embedded in a magnetic field with a strength of the order of 10 to the 13th power G are described which either are entirely due to the presence of the field or become modified because of it. The conversion of rotational energy into electromagnetic energy in pulsars is analyzed as a mechanism for producing such a field, and it is shown that a strong magnetic field is not sufficient for quantum effects to play a significant role; in addition, the density must be adjusted to be as low as possible. The pressure and energy density of a free electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are evaluated, neutron beta-decay in the presence of a strong field is examined, and the effect of such a field on neutrino reactions is discussed. The thermal history of a neutron star is studied, and it is concluded that a strong magnetic field helps to increase the cooling rate of the star by producing new channels through which neutrinos can carry away energy.

  19. Characterization of conditional state-engineering quantum processes by coherent state quantum process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Merlin; Slade, Eirion; Karpiński, Michał; Smith, Brian J.

    2015-03-01

    Conditional quantum optical processes enable a wide range of technologies from generation of highly non-classical states to implementation of quantum logic operations. The process fidelity that can be achieved in a realistic implementation depends on a number of system parameters. Here we experimentally examine Fock state filtration, a canonical example of a broad class of conditional quantum operations acting on a single optical field mode. This operation is based upon interference of the mode to be manipulated with an auxiliary single-photon state at a beam splitter, resulting in the entanglement of the two output modes. A conditional projective measurement onto a single photon state at one output mode heralds the success of the process. This operation, which implements a measurement-induced nonlinearity, is capable of suppressing particular photon-number probability amplitudes of an arbitrary quantum state. We employ coherent-state process tomography to determine the precise operation realized in our experiment, which is mathematically represented by a process tensor. To identify the key sources of experimental imperfection, we develop a realistic model of the process and identify three main contributions that significantly hamper its efficacy. The experimentally reconstructed process tensor is compared with the model, yielding a fidelity better than 0.95. This enables us to identify three key challenges to overcome in realizing a filter with optimal performance—namely the single-photon nature of the auxiliary state, high mode overlap of the optical fields involved, and the need for photon-number-resolving detection when heralding. The results show that the filter does indeed exhibit a non-linear response as a function of input photon number and preserves the phase relation between Fock layers of the output state, providing promise for future applications.

  20. Euclidean supersymmetry, twisting and topological sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, C. M.; Lindström, U.; Melo dos Santos, L.; von Unge, R.; Zabzine, M.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss two dimensional N-extended supersymmetry in Euclidean signature and its R-symmetry. For N = 2, the R-symmetry is SO(2) × SO(1, 1), so that only an A-twist is possible. To formulate a B-twist, or to construct Euclidean N = 2 models with H-flux so that the target geometry is generalised Kahler, it is necessary to work with a complexification of the sigma models. These issues are related to the obstructions to the existence of non-trivial twisted chiral superfields in Euclidean superspace.

  1. Entropy Transfer of Quantum Gravity Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2015-05-01

    We introduce the term smooth entanglement entropy transfer, a phenomenon that is a consequence of the causality-cancellation property of the quantum gravity environment. The causality-cancellation of the quantum gravity space removes the causal dependencies of the local systems. We study the physical effects of the causality-cancellation and show that it stimulates entropy transfer between the quantum gravity environment and the independent local systems of the quantum gravity space. The entropy transfer reduces the entropies of the contributing local systems and increases the entropy of the quantum gravity environment. We discuss the space-time geometry structure of the quantum gravity environment and the local quantum systems. We propose the space-time geometry model of the smooth entropy transfer. We reveal on a smooth Cauchy slice that the space-time geometry of the quantum gravity environment dynamically adapts to the vanishing causality. We prove that the Cauchy area expansion, along with the dilation of the Rindler horizon area of the quantum gravity environment, is a corollary of the causality-cancellation of the quantum gravity environment. This work was partially supported by the GOP-1.1.1-11-2012-0092 (Secure quantum key distribution between two units on optical fiber network) project sponsored by the EU and European Structural Fund, and by the COST Action MP1006.

  2. Non-Euclidean Geometry and Unreal Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thwaites, G. N.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses two of the reasons for the decline of formal Euclidean geometry in recent syllabi: (1) Traditional approach; and (2) Inherent difficulties. Suggested are some reasons and examples as to why the decline should be reversed. (YP)

  3. Zero energy scattering calculation in Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, J.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the scattering amplitude in the limit of zero incident energy can be transformed into a purely Euclidean form, as it is the case for the bound states. The decoupling between Euclidean and Minkowski amplitudes is only possible for zero energy scattering observables and allows determining the scattering length from the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude. Such a possibility strongly simplifies the numerical solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and suggests an alternative way to compute the scattering length in Lattice Euclidean calculations without using the Luscher formalism. The derivations contained in this work were performed for scalar particles and one-boson exchange kernel. They can be generalized to the fermion case and more involved interactions.

  4. Toward Scalable Ion Traps for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits Nature 429 737 [15] Jost J D, Home J P, Amini J M, Hanneke D, Ozeri R, Langer C, Bollinger J J, Leibfried...Toward scalable ion traps for quantum information processing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full...AND SUBTITLE Toward Scalable ion Traps For Quantum Information Processing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  5. Quantum Chemical Strain Analysis For Mechanochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2017-03-24

    The use of mechanical force to initiate a chemical reaction is an efficient alternative to the conventional sources of activation energy, i.e., heat, light, and electricity. Applications of mechanochemistry in academic and industrial laboratories are diverse, ranging from chemical syntheses in ball mills and ultrasound baths to direct activation of covalent bonds using an atomic force microscope. The vectorial nature of force is advantageous because specific covalent bonds can be preconditioned for rupture by selective stretching. However, the influence of mechanical force on single molecules is still not understood at a fundamental level, which limits the applicability of mechanochemistry. As a result, many chemists still resort to rules of thumb when it comes to conducting mechanochemical syntheses. In this Account, we show that comprehension of mechanochemistry at the molecular level can be tremendously advanced by quantum chemistry, in particular by using quantum chemical force analysis tools. One such tool is the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which provides a convenient approach to analyze the distribution of strain energy in a mechanically deformed molecule. Based on the harmonic approximation, the strain energy contribution is calculated for each bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle, thus providing a comprehensive picture of how force affects molecules. This Account examines the theoretical foundations of quantum chemical force analysis and provides a critical overview of the performance of the JEDI analysis in various mechanochemical applications. We explain in detail how this analysis tool is to be used to identify the "force-bearing scaffold" of a distorted molecule, which allows both the rationalization and the optimization of diverse mechanochemical processes. More precisely, we show that the inclusion of every bond, bending and torsion of a molecule allows a particularly insightful discussion of the distribution of mechanical

  6. Barbero-Immirzi parameter, manifold invariants and Euclidean path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Tomáš

    2012-05-01

    The Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ appears in the real connection formulation of gravity in terms of the Ashtekar variables, and gives rise to a one-parameter quantization ambiguity in loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we investigate the conditions under which γ will have physical effects in Euclidean quantum gravity. This is done by constructing a well-defined Euclidean path integral for the Holst action with a non-zero cosmological constant on a manifold with a boundary. We find that two general conditions must be satisfied by the spacetime manifold in order for the Holst action and its surface integral to be non-zero: (i) the metric has to be non-diagonalizable; (ii) the Pontryagin number of the manifold has to be non-zero. The latter is a strong topological condition and rules out many of the known solutions to the Einstein field equations. This result leads us to evaluate the on-shell first-order Holst action and corresponding Euclidean partition function on the Taub-NUT-ADS solution. We find that γ shows up as a finite rotation of the on-shell partition function which corresponds to shifts in the energy and entropy of the NUT charge. In an appendix, we also evaluate the Holst action on the Taub-NUT and Taub-bolt solutions in flat spacetime and find that in that case as well γ shows up in the energy and entropy of the NUT and bolt charges. We also present an example whereby the Euler characteristic of the manifold has a non-trivial effect on black hole mergers. Communicated by PRLV Moniz

  7. Limitations on post-processing assisted quantum programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki; Tukiainen, Mikko

    2017-03-01

    A quantum multimeter is a programmable device that can implement measurements of different observables depending on the programming quantum state inserted into it. The advantage of this arrangement over a single-purpose device is in its versatility: one can realize various measurements simply by changing the programming state. The classical manipulation of measurement output data is known as post-processing. In this work we study the post-processing assisted quantum programming, which is a protocol where quantum programming and classical post-processing are combined. We provide examples showing that these two processes combined can be more efficient than either of them used separately. Furthermore, we derive an inequality relating the programming resources to their corresponding programmed observables, thereby enabling us to study the limitations on post-processing assisted quantum programming.

  8. Quantum Transport in Solids: Two-Electron Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    The central objective of this research program has been to study theoretically the underlying principles of quantum transport in solids. The area of...research investigated has emphasized the understanding of two electron processes in quantum transport . The problems have been treated analytically to...the extent possible through the use of dynamical localized Wannier functions. These results have been and are being incorporated in a full quantum

  9. Quantum Transport in Solids: Two-Electron Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    The central objective of this research program has been to study theoretically the underlying principles of quantum transport in solids. The area of...research investigated has emphasized the understanding of two electron processes in quantum transport . The problems have been treated analytically to...the extent possible through the use of dynamical localized Wannier functions. These results have been and are being incorporated in a full quantum

  10. Modular quantum-information processing by dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation can be used as a resource to control and simulate quantum systems. We discuss a modular model based on fast dissipation capable of performing universal quantum computation, and simulating arbitrary Lindbladian dynamics. The model consists of a network of elementary dissipation-generated modules and it is in principle scalable. In particular, we demonstrate the ability to dissipatively prepare all single-qubit gates, and the controlled-not gate; prerequisites for universal quantum computing. We also show a way to implement a type of quantum memory in a dissipative environment, whereby we can arbitrarily control the loss in both coherence, and concurrence, over the evolution. Moreover, our dissipation-assisted modular construction exhibits a degree of inbuilt robustness to Hamiltonian and, indeed, Lindbladian errors, and as such is of potential practical relevance.

  11. Minimized state complexity of quantum-encoded cryptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-05-01

    The predictive information required for proper trajectory sampling of a stochastic process can be more efficiently transmitted via a quantum channel than a classical one. This recent discovery allows quantum information processing to drastically reduce the memory necessary to simulate complex classical stochastic processes. It also points to a new perspective on the intrinsic complexity that nature must employ in generating the processes we observe. The quantum advantage increases with codeword length: the length of process sequences used in constructing the quantum communication scheme. In analogy with the classical complexity measure, statistical complexity, we use this reduced communication cost as an entropic measure of state complexity in the quantum representation. Previously difficult to compute, the quantum advantage is expressed here in closed form using spectral decomposition. This allows for efficient numerical computation of the quantum-reduced state complexity at all encoding lengths, including infinite. Additionally, it makes clear how finite-codeword reduction in state complexity is controlled by the classical process's cryptic order, and it allows asymptotic analysis of infinite-cryptic-order processes.

  12. Using quantum filters to process images of diffuse axonal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Osorio, Mateo

    2014-06-01

    Some images corresponding to a diffuse axonal injury (DAI) are processed using several quantum filters such as Hermite Weibull and Morse. Diffuse axonal injury is a particular, common and severe case of traumatic brain injury (TBI). DAI involves global damage on microscopic scale of brain tissue and causes serious neurologic abnormalities. New imaging techniques provide excellent images showing cellular damages related to DAI. Said images can be processed with quantum filters, which accomplish high resolutions of dendritic and axonal structures both in normal and pathological state. Using the Laplacian operators from the new quantum filters, excellent edge detectors for neurofiber resolution are obtained. Image quantum processing of DAI images is made using computer algebra, specifically Maple. Quantum filter plugins construction is proposed as a future research line, which can incorporated to the ImageJ software package, making its use simpler for medical personnel.

  13. Quantum Information Processing with Modular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Clayton; Inlek, Ismail V.; Hucul, David; Sosnova, Ksenia; Vittorini, Grahame; Monroe, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are qubit standards for the production of entangled states in quantum information science and metrology applications. Trapped ions can exhibit very long coherence times, external fields can drive strong local interactions via phonons, and remote qubits can be entangled via photons. Transferring quantum information across spatially separated ion trap modules for a scalable quantum network architecture relies on the juxtaposition of both phononic and photonic buses. We report the successful combination of these protocols within and between two ion trap modules on a unit structure of this architecture where the remote entanglement generation rate exceeds the experimentally measured decoherence rate. Additionally, we report an experimental implementation of a technique to maintain phase coherence between spatially and temporally distributed quantum gate operations, a crucial prerequisite for scalability. Finally, we discuss our progress towards addressing the issue of uncontrolled cross-talk between photonic qubits and memory qubits by implementing a second ion species, Barium, to generate the photonic link. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness Program, the ARO MURI on Hybrid Quantum Circuits, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Transduction, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  14. Controlled Hawking process by quantum energy teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, a new quantum mechanical method to extract energy from black holes with contracting horizons is proposed. The method is based on a gedanken experiment on quantum energy teleportation, which has been recently proposed in quantum information theory. We consider this quantum energy teleportation protocol for N massless fields in near-horizon regions of large-mass black holes with near-horizon geometry described by the Minkowski metric. For each field, a two-level spin is strongly coupled with the local quantum fluctuation outside the horizon during a short time period. After the measurement of N fields, N-bit information is obtained. During the measurement, positive-energy wave packets of the fields form and then fall into the black hole. The amount of excitation energy is independent of the measurement result. After absorption of the wave packets and increase of the black-hole mass, a measurement-result-dependent local operation of the N fields is performed outside the horizon. Then, accompanying the extraction of positive energy from the quantum fluctuation by the operation, negative-energy wave packets of the fields form and then fall into the black hole, decreasing the black-hole mass. This implies that a part of the absorbed positive energy emitted from the measurement devices is effectively retrieved from the black hole via the measurement results.

  15. Understanding Entanglement as a Resource for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2008-05-01

    Ever since Erwin Schrodinger shocked the physics world by killing (and not killing) his cat, entanglement has played a critical role in attempts to understand quantum mechanics. More recently, entanglement has been shown to be a valuable resource, of central importance for quantum computation and the processing of quantum information. In this talk, I will describe a new diagrammatic approach to understanding why entanglement is so valuable, the key idea being that entanglement between two systems ``creates'' multiple images of the state of a third. By way of example, I will show how to ``visualize'' teleportation of unknown quantum states, and how to use entanglement to implement an interaction between spatially separated (and therefore non-interacting!) systems. These ideas have also proven useful in quantum state discrimination, where the state of a quantum system is unknown and is to be determined.

  16. Occam's Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic Processes via a Quantum Channel.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John R; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P

    2016-02-15

    A stochastic process' statistical complexity stands out as a fundamental property: the minimum information required to synchronize one process generator to another. How much information is required, though, when synchronizing over a quantum channel? Recent work demonstrated that representing causal similarity as quantum state-indistinguishability provides a quantum advantage. We generalize this to synchronization and offer a sequence of constructions that exploit extended causal structures, finding substantial increase of the quantum advantage. We demonstrate that maximum compression is determined by the process' cryptic order--a classical, topological property closely allied to Markov order, itself a measure of historical dependence. We introduce an efficient algorithm that computes the quantum advantage and close noting that the advantage comes at a cost-one trades off prediction for generation complexity.

  17. Quantum Processes Which Do Not Use Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadin, Benjamin; Ma, Jiajun; Girolami, Davide; Gu, Mile; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-10-01

    A major signature of quantum mechanics beyond classical physics is coherence, the existence of superposition states. The recently developed resource theory of quantum coherence allows the formalization of incoherent operations—those operations which cannot create coherence. We identify the set of operations which additionally do not use coherence. These are such that coherence cannot be exploited by a classical observer, who measures incoherent properties of the system, to go beyond classical dynamics. We give a physical interpretation in terms of interferometry and prove a dilation theorem, showing how these operations can always be constructed by the system interacting, in an incoherent way, with an ancilla. Such a physical justification is not known for the incoherent operations; thus, our results lead to a physically well-motivated resource theory of coherence. Next, we investigate the implications for coherence in multipartite systems. We show that quantum correlations can be defined naturally with respect to a fixed basis, providing a link between coherence and quantum discord. We demonstrate the interplay between these two quantities in the operations that we study and suggest implications for the theory of quantum discord by relating these operations to those which cannot create discord.

  18. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  19. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  20. Efficient classical simulation of continuous variable quantum information processes.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Sanders, Barry C; Braunstein, Samuel L; Nemoto, Kae

    2002-03-04

    We obtain sufficient conditions for the efficient simulation of a continuous variable quantum algorithm or process on a classical computer. The resulting theorem is an extension of the Gottesman-Knill theorem to continuous variable quantum information. For a collection of harmonic oscillators, any quantum process that begins with unentangled Gaussian states, performs only transformations generated by Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the canonical operators, and involves only measurements of canonical operators (including finite losses) and suitable operations conditioned on these measurements can be simulated efficiently on a classical computer.

  1. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  2. Heralded processes on continuous-variable spaces as quantum maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreyrol, Franck; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Blandino, Rémi; Barbieri, Marco; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa

    2014-12-04

    Heralding processes, which only work when a measurement on a part of the system give the good result, are particularly interesting for continuous-variables. They permit non-Gaussian transformations that are necessary for several continuous-variable quantum information tasks. However if maps and quantum process tomography are commonly used to describe quantum transformations in discrete-variable space, they are much rarer in the continuous-variable domain. Also, no convenient tool for representing maps in a way more adapted to the particularities of continuous variables have yet been explored. In this paper we try to fill this gap by presenting such a tool.

  3. Non-Hermitian Euclidean random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Goetschy, A; Skipetrov, S E

    2011-07-01

    We develop a theory for the eigenvalue density of arbitrary non-Hermitian Euclidean matrices. Closed equations for the resolvent and the eigenvector correlator are derived. The theory is applied to the random Green's matrix relevant to wave propagation in an ensemble of pointlike scattering centers. This opens a new perspective in the study of wave diffusion, Anderson localization, and random lasing.

  4. Making Euclidean Geometry Compulsory: Are We Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Putten, Sonja; Howie, Sarah; Stols, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the attitude towards, as well as the level of understanding of Euclidean geometry in pre-service mathematics education (PME) students. In order to do so, a case study was undertaken within which a one group pre-post-test procedure was conducted around a geometry module, and a representative group of students was interviewed…

  5. Measuring the heat exchange of a quantum process.

    PubMed

    Goold, John; Poschinger, Ulrich; Modi, Kavan

    2014-08-01

    Very recently, interferometric methods have been proposed to measure the full statistics of work performed on a driven quantum system [Dorner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230601 (2013) and Mazzola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230602 (2013)]. The advantage of such schemes is that they replace the necessity to make projective measurements by performing phase estimation on an appropriately coupled ancilla qubit. These proposals are one possible route to the tangible experimental exploration of quantum thermodynamics, a subject which is the center of much current attention due to the current control of mesoscopic quantum systems. In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate that a modification of the phase estimation protocols can be used in order to measure the heat distribution of a quantum process. In addition, we demonstrate how our scheme maybe implemented using ion trap technology. Our scheme should pave the way for experimental explorations of the Landauer principle and hence the intricate energy to information conversion in mesoscopic quantum systems.

  6. Ultrafast Quantum Control and Quantum Processing in the Vibronic States of Molecules and Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Benjamin; Bustard, Philip; England, Duncan; Lausten, Rune

    2014-05-01

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics, including applications in secure communications, quantum processing, and enhanced measurement. Efforts to build these devices utilize nonclassical states in numerous quantum systems, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, trap ions, nuclear spins, etc. as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate vibronic states in both molecules and bulk solids as distinct alternatives. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules and the optical phonons of diamond. Both classical and nonclassical photon states are used. These THz-bandwidth memories can be used to store femtosecond pulses for many operational time bins before the states decohere, making them viable for local photonic processing. We investigate decoherence and major sources of competing noise. While sustaining quantum coherence is critical for most quantum processing, rapid dephasing can also be used as a resource in these systems for rapid quantum random number generation, suitable for high-performance cryptography. NSERC

  7. Occam’s Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic Processes via a Quantum Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-02-01

    A stochastic process’ statistical complexity stands out as a fundamental property: the minimum information required to synchronize one process generator to another. How much information is required, though, when synchronizing over a quantum channel? Recent work demonstrated that representing causal similarity as quantum state-indistinguishability provides a quantum advantage. We generalize this to synchronization and offer a sequence of constructions that exploit extended causal structures, finding substantial increase of the quantum advantage. We demonstrate that maximum compression is determined by the process’ cryptic order–a classical, topological property closely allied to Markov order, itself a measure of historical dependence. We introduce an efficient algorithm that computes the quantum advantage and close noting that the advantage comes at a cost–one trades off prediction for generation complexity.

  8. Quantum statistics of optical parametric processes with squeezed reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan; Křepelka, Jaromír

    2013-11-01

    Quantum statistics including joint photon-number and integrated-intensity probability distributions are derived in time evolution of general optical parametric process involving processes of frequency conversion, parametric amplification and subharmonic generation taking into account losses and noise described by squeezed reservoirs. Using these tools quantum entanglement of modes is considered and the other nonclassical properties of the process under discussion are demonstrated by means of conditional probability distributions and their Fano factors, difference-number probability distributions, quantum oscillations, squeezing of vacuum fluctuations and negative values of the joint and difference wave probability quasidistributions. Nonclassical properties are illustrated for spontaneous process as well as stimulated process by means of chaotic light and squeezed vacuum field. Multimode processes are investigated in the spirit of the Mandel-Rice photocount formula.

  9. Survey of control performance in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Zheng, Yicong; Kosut, Robert; Brun, Todd; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-11-01

    There is a rich variety of physics underlying the fundamental gating operations for quantum information processing (QIP). A key aspect of a QIP system is how noise may enter during quantum operations and how suppressing or correcting its effects can best be addressed. Quantum control techniques have been developed to specifically address this effort, although a detailed classification of the compatibility of controls schemes with noise sources found in common quantum systems has not yet been performed. This work numerically examines the performance of modern control methods for suppressing decoherence in the presence of noise forms found in viable quantum systems. The noise-averaged process matrix for controlled one-qubit and two-qubit operations are calculated across noise found in systems driven by Markovian open quantum dynamics. Rather than aiming to describe the absolute best control scheme for a given physical circumstance, this work serves instead to classify quantum control behavior across a large class of noise forms so that opportunities for improving QIP performance may be identified.

  10. Quantum correlation dynamics in photosynthetic processes assisted by molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, G.L.; Roncaglia, M.; Raffa, F.A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-10-15

    During the long course of evolution, nature has learnt how to exploit quantum effects. In fact, recent experiments reveal the existence of quantum processes whose coherence extends over unexpectedly long time and space ranges. In particular, photosynthetic processes in light-harvesting complexes display a typical oscillatory dynamics ascribed to quantum coherence. Here, we consider the simple model where a dimer made of two chromophores is strongly coupled with a quasi-resonant vibrational mode. We observe the occurrence of wide oscillations of genuine quantum correlations, between electronic excitations and the environment, represented by vibrational bosonic modes. Such a quantum dynamics has been unveiled through the calculation of the negativity of entanglement and the discord, indicators widely used in quantum information for quantifying the resources needed to realize quantum technologies. We also discuss the possibility of approximating additional weakly-coupled off-resonant vibrational modes, simulating the disturbances induced by the rest of the environment, by a single vibrational mode. Within this approximation, one can show that the off-resonant bath behaves like a classical source of noise.

  11. Employing Noisy Environments to Support Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Quantum Information Processing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS DAAD19-02-1-0161 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin B Plenio and Susana F Huelga...designated by other documentation. 12 a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 12 b ...entanglement dynamics can be achieved in such a system. The results of this work have been published in E. Jané, M.B. Plenio and D. Jonathan, ”Quantum

  12. Quantum stochastic processes for maps on Hilbert C*-modules

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Jaeseong; Ji, Un Cig

    2011-05-15

    We discuss pairs ({phi}, {Phi}) of maps, where {phi} is a map between C*-algebras and {Phi} is a {phi}-module map between Hilbert C*-modules, which are generalization of representations of Hilbert C*-modules. A covariant version of Stinespring's theorem for such a pair ({phi}, {Phi}) is established, and quantum stochastic processes constructed from pairs ({l_brace}{phi}{sub t{r_brace}}, {l_brace}{Phi}{sub t{r_brace}}) of families of such maps are studied. We prove that the quantum stochastic process J={l_brace}J{sub t{r_brace}} constructed from a {phi}-quantum dynamical semigroup {Phi}={l_brace}{Phi}{sub t{r_brace}} is a j-map for the quantum stochastic process j={l_brace}j{sub t{r_brace}} constructed from the given quantum dynamical semigroup {phi}={l_brace}{phi}{sub t{r_brace}}, and that J is covariant if the {phi}-quantum dynamical semigroup {Phi} is covariant.

  13. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on

  14. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    PubMed

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models.

  15. On the sensitivity of a Euclidean projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, A. F.; Kurennoy, A. S.

    2014-03-01

    The structure and behavior of Euclidean projections of a point onto a set defined by parametric constraints is studied. Under the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, it is shown that the projection is locally unique and continuous and, if the feasible set is constant, locally Lipschitz continuous as well. Quantitative results are obtained characterizing the asymptotic behavior of projections under perturbations in a given direction.

  16. Quantum-Classical Hybrid for Information Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Based upon quantum-inspired entanglement in quantum-classical hybrids, a simple algorithm for instantaneous transmissions of non-intentional messages (chosen at random) to remote distances is proposed. The idea is to implement instantaneous transmission of conditional information on remote distances via a quantum-classical hybrid that preserves superposition of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such a hybrid system reinforces the advantages, and minimizes the limitations, of both quantum and classical characteristics. Consider n observers, and assume that each of them gets a copy of the system and runs it separately. Although they run identical systems, the outcomes of even synchronized runs may be different because the solutions of these systems are random. However, the global constrain must be satisfied. Therefore, if the observer #1 (the sender) made a measurement of the acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, then the receiver, by measuring the corresponding acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, may get a wrong value because the accelerations are random, and only their ratios are deterministic. Obviously, the transmission of this knowledge is instantaneous as soon as the measurements have been performed. In addition to that, the distance between the observers is irrelevant because the x-coordinate does not enter the governing equations. However, the Shannon information transmitted is zero. None of the senders can control the outcomes of their measurements because they are random. The senders cannot transmit intentional messages. Nevertheless, based on the transmitted knowledge, they can coordinate their actions based on conditional information. If the observer #1 knows his own measurements, the measurements of the others can be fully determined. It is important to emphasize that the origin of entanglement of all the observers is the joint probability density that couples their actions. There is no centralized source

  17. On the general constraints in single qubit quantum process tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Ramesh; Peters, Nicholas A.

    2016-05-18

    In this study, we briefly review single-qubit quantum process tomography for trace-preserving and nontrace-preserving processes, and derive explicit forms of the general constraints for fitting experimental data. These forms provide additional insight into the structure of the process matrix. We illustrate this with several examples, including a discussion of qubit leakage error models and the intuition which can be gained from their process matrices.

  18. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mingjian; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  19. The Master Equations in the Euclidean Schwarzschild-Tangherlini Metric of a Small Static Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Morales, José L.

    The master equations in the Euclidean Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time of a small static perturbation are studied. For each harmonic mode on the sphere there are two solutions that behave differently at infinity. One solution goes like the power 2-l-n of the radial variable, the other solution goes like the power l. These solutions occur in power series. The second main statement of the paper is that any eigentensor of the Lichnerowicz operator in a Euclidean Schwarzschild space-time with an eigenvalue different from zero is essentially singular at infinity. Possible applications of the stability of instantons are discussed. We present the analysis of a small static perturbation of the Euclidean Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metric tensor. The higher order perturbations will appear later. We determine independently the static perturbations of the Schwarzschild quantum black hole in dimension 1+n≥4, where the system of equations is reduced to master equations — ordinary differential equations. The solutions are hypergeometric functions which in some cases can be reduced to polynomials. In the same Schwarzschild background, we analyze static perturbations of the scalar mode and show that there does not exist any static perturbation that is regular everywhere outside the event horizon and is well-behaved at the spatial infinity. This confirms the uniqueness of the spherically symmetric static empty quantum black hole, within the perturbation framework. Our strategy for treating the stability problem is also applicable to other symmetric quantum black holes with a nonzero cosmological constant.

  20. The FEYNMAN tools for quantum information processing: Design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, S.

    2014-06-01

    The FEYNMAN tools have been re-designed with the goal to establish and implement a high-level (computer) language that is capable to deal with the physics of finite, n-qubit systems, from frequently required computations to mathematically advanced tasks in quantum information processing. In particular, emphasis has been placed to introduce a small but powerful set of keystring-driven commands in order to support both, symbolic and numerical computations. Though the current design is implemented again within the framework of MAPLE, it is general and flexible enough to be utilized and combined with other languages and computational environments. The present implementation facilitates a large number of computational tasks, including the definition, manipulation and parametrization of quantum states, the evaluation of quantum measures and quantum operations, the evolution of quantum noise in discrete models, quantum measurements and state estimation, and several others. The design is based on a few high-level commands, with a syntax close to the mathematical notation and its use in the literature, and which can be generalized quite readily in order to solve computational tasks at even higher degree of complexity. In this work, I present and discuss the (re-design of the) FEYNMAN tools and make major parts of the code available for public use. Moreover, a few selected examples are shown and demonstrate possible application of this toolbox. The FEYNMAN tools are provided as MAPLE library and can hence be used on all platforms on which this computer-algebra system is accessible.

  1. Synchronization of optical photons for quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kenzo; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Toyama, Takeshi; van Loock, Peter; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental element of quantum information processing with photonic qubits is the nonclassical quantum interference between two photons when they bunch together via the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect. Ultimately, many such photons must be processed in complex interferometric networks. For this purpose, it is essential to synchronize the arrival times of the flying photons and to keep their purities high. On the basis of the recent experimental success of single-photon storage with high purity, we demonstrate for the first time the HOM interference of two heralded, nearly pure optical photons synchronized through two independent quantum memories. Controlled storage times of up to 1.8 μs for about 90 events per second were achieved with purities that were sufficiently high for a negative Wigner function confirmed with homodyne measurements. PMID:27386536

  2. The series product for gaussian quantum input processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John E.; James, Matthew R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theory for connecting quantum Markov components into a network with quantum input processes in a Gaussian state (including thermal and squeezed). One would expect on physical grounds that the connection rules should be independent of the state of the input to the network. To compute statistical properties, we use a version of Wicks' theorem involving fictitious vacuum fields (Fock space based representation of the fields) and while this aids computation, and gives a rigorous formulation, the various representations need not be unitarily equivalent. In particular, a naive application of the connection rules would lead to the wrong answer. We establish the correct interconnection rules, and show that while the quantum stochastic differential equations of motion display explicitly the covariances (thermal and squeezing parameters) of the Gaussian input fields we introduce the Wick-Stratonovich form which leads to a way of writing these equations that does not depend on these covariances and so corresponds to the universal equations written in terms of formal quantum input processes. We show that a wholly consistent theory of quantum open systems in series can be developed in this way, and as required physically, is universal and in particular representation-free.

  3. Quantum Process Tomography Quantifies Coherence Transfer Dynamics in Vibrational Exciton

    PubMed Central

    Chuntonov, Lev; Ma, Jianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Quantum coherence has been a subject of great interest in many scientific disciplines. However, detailed characterization of the quantum coherence in molecular systems, especially its transfer and relaxation mechanisms, still remains a major challenge. The difficulties arise in part because the spectroscopic signatures of the coherence transfer are typically overwhelmed by other excitation relaxation processes. We use quantum process tomography (QPT) via two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to quantify the rate of the elusive coherence transfer between two vibrational exciton states. QPT retrieves the dynamics of the dissipative quantum system directly from the experimental observables. It thus serves as an experimental alternative to theoretical models of the system-bath interaction, and can be used to validate these theories. Our results for coupled carbonyl groups of a diketone molecule in chloroform, used as a benchmark system, reveal the non-secular nature of the interaction between the exciton and the Markovian bath and open the door for the systematic studies of the dissipative quantum systems dynamics in detail. PMID:24079417

  4. Fast Quantum Algorithms for Numerical Integrals and Stochastic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss quantum algorithms that calculate numerical integrals and descriptive statistics of stochastic processes. With either of two distinct approaches, one obtains an exponential speed increase in comparison to the fastest known classical deterministic algotithms and a quadratic speed increase incomparison to classical Monte Carlo methods.

  5. Topological Quantum Information Processing Mediated Via Hybrid Topogical Insulator Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-28

    formation, manipulation, entanglement and detection of Majorana fermions in diamond-topological insulator- superconductor heterojunctions. Furthermore...between Superconductors and Topological Insulators Recent advances have revealed a new type of information processing, topological quantum...vortex lines6 and lattices7 in TI – superconductor heterostructures. Some of our most impactful work in this area has come through collaborations with

  6. Post-processing procedure for industrial quantum key distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiktenko, Evgeny; Trushechkin, Anton; Kurochkin, Yury; Fedorov, Aleksey

    2016-08-01

    We present algorithmic solutions aimed on post-processing procedure for industrial quantum key distribution systems with hardware sifting. The main steps of the procedure are error correction, parameter estimation, and privacy amplification. Authentication of classical public communication channel is also considered.

  7. Broadband invisibility by non-Euclidean cloaking.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomás

    2009-01-02

    Invisibility and negative refraction are both applications of transformation optics where the material of a device performs a coordinate transformation for electromagnetic fields. The device creates the illusion that light propagates through empty flat space, whereas in physical space, light is bent around a hidden interior or seems to run backward in space or time. All of the previous proposals for invisibility require materials with extreme properties. Here we show that transformation optics of a curved, non-Euclidean space (such as the surface of a virtual sphere) relax these requirements and can lead to invisibility in a broad band of the spectrum.

  8. Harmonic and Monogenic Potentials in Euclidean Halfspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, F.; De Bie, H.; De Schepper, H.

    2011-09-01

    In the framework of Clifford analysis a chain of harmonic and monogenic potentials is constructed in the upper half of Euclidean space Rm+1. Their distributional limits at the boundary are computed, obtaining in this way well-known distributions in Rm such as the Dirac distribution, the Hilbert kernel, the square root of the negative Laplace operator, and the like. It is shown how each of those potentials may be recovered from an adjacent kernel in the chain by an appropriate convolution with such a distributional limit.

  9. Fast Quantum Algorithm for Predicting Descriptive Statistics of Stochastic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams Colin P.

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic processes are used as a modeling tool in several sub-fields of physics, biology, and finance. Analytic understanding of the long term behavior of such processes is only tractable for very simple types of stochastic processes such as Markovian processes. However, in real world applications more complex stochastic processes often arise. In physics, the complicating factor might be nonlinearities; in biology it might be memory effects; and in finance is might be the non-random intentional behavior of participants in a market. In the absence of analytic insight, one is forced to understand these more complex stochastic processes via numerical simulation techniques. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm for performing such simulations. In particular, we show how a quantum algorithm can predict arbitrary descriptive statistics (moments) of N-step stochastic processes in just O(square root of N) time. That is, the quantum complexity is the square root of the classical complexity for performing such simulations. This is a significant speedup in comparison to the current state of the art.

  10. A model of the measurement process in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diel, H. H.

    2015-07-01

    The so-called measurement problem of quantum theory (QT) is still lacking a satisfactory, or at least widely agreed upon, solution. A number of theories, known as interpretations of quantum theory, have been proposed and found differing acceptance among physicists. Most of the proposed theories try to explain what happens during a QT measurement using a modification of the declarative equations that define the possible results of a measurement of QT observables or by making assumptions outside the scope of falsifiable physics. This paper proposes a solution to the QT measurement problem in terms of a model of the process for the evolution of two QT systems that interact in a way that represents a measurement. The model assumes that the interactions between the measured QT object and the measurement apparatus are ’’normal” interactions which adhere to the laws of quantum field theory.

  11. Understanding Entanglement as a Resource for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2009-03-01

    Ever since Erwin Schrodinger shocked the physics world by killing (and not killing) his cat, entanglement has played a critical role in attempts to understand quantum mechanics. More recently, entanglement has been shown to be a valuable resource, of central importance for quantum computation and the processing of quantum information. In this talk, I will describe a new diagrammatic approach to understanding why entanglement is so valuable, the key idea being that entanglement between two systems ``creates'' multiple images of the state of a third. By way of example, I will show how to ``visualize'' teleportation of unknown quantum states, and how to use entanglement to determine the (unknown) state of a spatially distributed, multipartite quantum system. Illustrative examples of this entanglement-assisted local state discrimination are sets of orthogonal product states exhibiting what is known as ``non-locality without entanglement'', including unextendible product bases. These ideas have also proven useful in using entanglement to implement a unitary interaction between spatially separated (and therefore non-interacting!) systems.

  12. Evolution of quantum-like modeling in decision making processes

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikova, Polina

    2012-12-18

    The application of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to model behavioral patterns in social science and economics is a novel and constantly emerging field. The aim of the so called 'quantum like' models is to model the decision making processes in a macroscopic setting, capturing the particular 'context' in which the decisions are taken. Several subsequent empirical findings proved that when making a decision people tend to violate the axioms of expected utility theory and Savage's Sure Thing principle, thus violating the law of total probability. A quantum probability formula was devised to describe more accurately the decision making processes. A next step in the development of QL-modeling in decision making was the application of Schroedinger equation to describe the evolution of people's mental states. A shortcoming of Schroedinger equation is its inability to capture dynamics of an open system; the brain of the decision maker can be regarded as such, actively interacting with the external environment. Recently the master equation, by which quantum physics describes the process of decoherence as the result of interaction of the mental state with the environmental 'bath', was introduced for modeling the human decision making. The external environment and memory can be referred to as a complex 'context' influencing the final decision outcomes. The master equation can be considered as a pioneering and promising apparatus for modeling the dynamics of decision making in different contexts.

  13. Evolution of quantum-like modeling in decision making processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikova, Polina

    2012-12-01

    The application of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to model behavioral patterns in social science and economics is a novel and constantly emerging field. The aim of the so called 'quantum like' models is to model the decision making processes in a macroscopic setting, capturing the particular 'context' in which the decisions are taken. Several subsequent empirical findings proved that when making a decision people tend to violate the axioms of expected utility theory and Savage's Sure Thing principle, thus violating the law of total probability. A quantum probability formula was devised to describe more accurately the decision making processes. A next step in the development of QL-modeling in decision making was the application of Schrödinger equation to describe the evolution of people's mental states. A shortcoming of Schrödinger equation is its inability to capture dynamics of an open system; the brain of the decision maker can be regarded as such, actively interacting with the external environment. Recently the master equation, by which quantum physics describes the process of decoherence as the result of interaction of the mental state with the environmental 'bath', was introduced for modeling the human decision making. The external environment and memory can be referred to as a complex 'context' influencing the final decision outcomes. The master equation can be considered as a pioneering and promising apparatus for modeling the dynamics of decision making in different contexts.

  14. Founding Gravitation in 4D Euclidean Space-Time Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Franz-Guenter

    2010-11-24

    The Euclidean interpretation of special relativity which has been suggested by the author is a formulation of special relativity in ordinary 4D Euclidean space-time geometry. The natural and geometrically intuitive generalization of this view involves variations of the speed of light (depending on location and direction) and a Euclidean principle of general covariance. In this article, a gravitation model by Jan Broekaert, which implements a view of relativity theory in the spirit of Lorentz and Poincare, is reconstructed and shown to fulfill the principles of the Euclidean approach after an appropriate reinterpretation.

  15. MEDOF - MINIMUM EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE OPTIMAL FILTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter program, MEDOF, generates filters for use in optical correlators. The algorithm implemented in MEDOF follows theory put forth by Richard D. Juday of NASA/JSC. This program analytically optimizes filters on arbitrary spatial light modulators such as coupled, binary, full complex, and fractional 2pi phase. MEDOF optimizes these modulators on a number of metrics including: correlation peak intensity at the origin for the centered appearance of the reference image in the input plane, signal to noise ratio including the correlation detector noise as well as the colored additive input noise, peak to correlation energy defined as the fraction of the signal energy passed by the filter that shows up in the correlation spot, and the peak to total energy which is a generalization of PCE that adds the passed colored input noise to the input image's passed energy. The user of MEDOF supplies the functions that describe the following quantities: 1) the reference signal, 2) the realizable complex encodings of both the input and filter SLM, 3) the noise model, possibly colored, as it adds at the reference image and at the correlation detection plane, and 4) the metric to analyze, here taken to be one of the analytical ones like SNR (signal to noise ratio) or PCE (peak to correlation energy) rather than peak to secondary ratio. MEDOF calculates filters for arbitrary modulators and a wide range of metrics as described above. MEDOF examines the statistics of the encoded input image's noise (if SNR or PCE is selected) and the filter SLM's (Spatial Light Modulator) available values. These statistics are used as the basis of a range for searching for the magnitude and phase of k, a pragmatically based complex constant for computing the filter transmittance from the electric field. The filter is produced for the mesh points in those ranges and the value of the metric that results from these points is computed. When the search is concluded, the

  16. Quantum tomography of near-unitary processes in high-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysne, Nathan; Sosa Martinez, Hector; Jessen, Poul; Baldwin, Charles; Kalev, Amir; Deutsch, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Quantum Tomography (QT) is often considered the ideal tool for experimental debugging of quantum devices, capable of delivering complete information about quantum states (QST) or processes (QPT). In practice, the protocols used for QT are resource intensive and scale poorly with system size. In this situation, a well behaved model system with access to large state spaces (qudits) can serve as a useful platform for examining the tradeoffs between resource cost and accuracy inherent in QT. In past years we have developed one such experimental testbed, consisting of the electron-nuclear spins in the electronic ground state of individual Cs atoms. Our available toolkit includes high fidelity state preparation, complete unitary control, arbitrary orthogonal measurements, and accurate and efficient QST in Hilbert space dimensions up to d = 16. Using these tools, we have recently completed a comprehensive study of QPT in 4, 7 and 16 dimensions. Our results show that QPT of near-unitary processes is quite feasible if one chooses optimal input states and efficient QST on the outputs. We further show that for unitary processes in high dimensional spaces, one can use informationally incomplete QPT to achieve high-fidelity process reconstruction (90% in d = 16) with greatly reduced resource requirements.

  17. The Manipulation, Transmission and Processing of Quantum Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    systems, Santa Fe, January 2004. 16. “ Fermi liquid renormalizations of low density electrons in silicon MOSFETs,” M.E. Gershenson, The APS March...attention. In recent years, multi- component quantum-degenerate gases, including two-species BECs (TBECs), spinor BECs, and Fermi -BEC mixtures have...as expressed in the famous EPR paper. The roles of Bohm, Bell, Clauser and Mandel in resolving the "EPR paradox " were mentioned and the process of

  18. Quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology using trapped ions at NIST.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, David

    2007-03-01

    With the use of atomic ions confined in a multi-zone array, we implement simple quantum algorithms and study the problems in scaling such a device to tens of qubits [1]. Current work is devoted to better control of classical parameters such as laser intensity, suppression of heating from ambient fluctuating electric fields, and studying limitations caused by more fundamental sources of decoherence, such as spontaneous emission. Along with other groups, we are studying ways to increase the number of trap zones; in particular, we concentrate on a surface-electrode multi-zone geometry. Although a general purpose quantum computer appears to be a distant goal, simple applications of quantum information processing methods enable new techniques for spectroscopy and efficient quantum detection. [1] Current research in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. Amini, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, K. Brown, R. J. Epstein, D. B. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, T. Rosenband, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. H. Wesenberg.

  19. Euclidean supergravity and multi-centered solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, W. A.

    2017-04-01

    In ungauged supergravity theories, the no-force condition for BPS states implies the existence of stable static multi-centered solutions. The first solutions to Einstein-Maxwell theory with a positive cosmological constant describing an arbitrary number of charged black holes were found by Kastor and Traschen. Generalisations to five and higher dimensional theories were obtained by London. Multi-centered solutions in gauged supergravity, even with time-dependence allowed, have yet to be constructed. In this letter we construct supersymmetry-preserving multi-centered solutions for the case of D = 5, N = 2 Euclidean gauged supergravity coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets. Higher dimensional Einstein-Maxwell multi-centered solutions are also presented.

  20. Lattice reduction using a Euclidean algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mujica, A

    2017-01-01

    The need to reduce a periodic structure given in terms of a large supercell and associated lattice generators arises frequently in different fields of application of crystallography, in particular in the ab initio theoretical modelling of materials at the atomic scale. This paper considers the reduction of crystals and addresses the reduction associated with the existence of a commensurate translation that leaves the crystal invariant, providing a practical scheme for it. The reduction procedure hinges on a convenient integer factorization of the full period of the cycle (or grid) generated by the repeated applications of the invariant translation, and its iterative reduction into sub-cycles, each of which corresponds to a factor in the decomposition of the period. This is done in successive steps, each time solving a Diophantine linear equation by means of a Euclidean reduction algorithm in order to provide the generators of the reduced lattice.

  1. Shape Selection in Non-Euclidean Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Venkataramani, Shankar

    2010-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of free non-Euclidean plates with a disc geometry and a prescribed metric that corresponds to a constant negative Gaussian curvature. We take the equilibrium configuration taken by the these sheets to be a minimum of a F"oppel Von-Kàrmàn type functional in which configurations free of any in plane stretching correspond to isometric embeddings of the metric. We show for all radii there exists low bending energy configurations free of any in plane stretching that obtain a periodic profile. The number of periods in these configurations is set by the condition that the principle curvatures of the surface remain finite and grows approximately exponentially with the radius of the disc.

  2. A sub-ensemble theory of ideal quantum measurement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties currently attributed to ideal measurements, one must explain how the concept of an individual event with a well-defined outcome may emerge from quantum theory which deals with statistical ensembles, and how different runs issued from the same initial state may end up with different final states. This so-called "measurement problem" is tackled with two guidelines. On the one hand, the dynamics of the macroscopic apparatus A coupled to the tested system S is described mathematically within a standard quantum formalism, where " q-probabilities" remain devoid of interpretation. On the other hand, interpretative principles, aimed to be minimal, are introduced to account for the expected features of ideal measurements. Most of the five principles stated here, which relate the quantum formalism to physical reality, are straightforward and refer to macroscopic variables. The process can be identified with a relaxation of S + A to thermodynamic equilibrium, not only for a large ensemble E of runs but even for its sub-ensembles. The different mechanisms of quantum statistical dynamics that ensure these types of relaxation are exhibited, and the required properties of the Hamiltonian of S + A are indicated. The additional theoretical information provided by the study of sub-ensembles remove Schrödinger's quantum ambiguity of the final density operator for E which hinders its direct interpretation, and bring out a commutative behaviour of the pointer observable at the final time. The latter property supports the introduction of a last interpretative principle, needed to switch from the statistical ensembles and sub-ensembles described by quantum theory to individual experimental events. It amounts to identify some formal " q-probabilities" with ordinary frequencies, but only those which refer to the final indications of the pointer. The desired properties of ideal measurements, in particular the uniqueness of the result for each individual

  3. Photons and evolution: quantum mechanical processes modulate sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2009-09-01

    This paper will show that the fractional difference in the human gender ratio (GR) between the GR(at death) for those born in solar cycle peak years (maxima) and the GR(at death) in those born in solar cycle non-peak years (minima), e.g., 0.023, divided by Pi, yields a reasonable approximation of the quantum mechanical constant, alpha, or the fine structure constant (FSC) approximately 0.007297... or approximately 1/137. This finding is based on a sample of approximately 50 million cases using common, readily available demographic data, e.g., state of birth, birth date, death date, and gender. Physicists Nair, Geim et al. had found precisely the same fractional difference, 0.023, in the absorption of white light (sunlight) by a single-atom thick layer of graphene, a carbon skeleton resembling chicken wire fencing. This absorption fraction, when divided by Pi, yielded the FSC and was the first time this constant could "so directly be assessed practically by the naked eye". As the GR is a reflection of sexual differentiation, this paper reveals that a quantum mechanical process, as manifested by the FSC, is playing a role in the primordial process of replication, a necessary requirement of life. Successful replication is the primary engine driving evolution, which at a biochemical level, is a quantum mechanical process dependent upon photonic energy from the Sun. We propose that a quantum-mechanical, photon-driven chemical evolution preceded natural selection in biology and the mechanisms of mitosis and meiosis are manifestations of this chemical evolution in ancient seas over 3 billion years ago. Evolutionary processes became extant first in self-replicating molecules forced to adapt to high energy photons, mostly likely in the ultraviolet spectrum. These events led to evolution by natural selection as complex mixing of genetic material within species creating the variety needed to match changing environments reflecting the same process initiated at the dawn of life

  4. Limits Of Quantum Information In Weak Interaction Processes Of Hyperons

    PubMed Central

    Hiesmayr, B. C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the achievable limits of the quantum information processing of the weak interaction revealed by hyperons with spin. We find that the weak decay process corresponds to an interferometric device with a fixed visibility and fixed phase difference for each hyperon. Nature chooses rather low visibilities expressing a preference to parity conserving or violating processes (except for the decay Σ+→ pπ0). The decay process can be considered as an open quantum channel that carries the information of the hyperon spin to the angular distribution of the momentum of the daughter particles. We find a simple geometrical information theoretic interpretation of this process: two quantization axes are chosen spontaneously with probabilities where α is proportional to the visibility times the real part of the phase shift. Differently stated, the weak interaction process corresponds to spin measurements with an imperfect Stern-Gerlach apparatus. Equipped with this information theoretic insight we show how entanglement can be measured in these systems and why Bell’s nonlocality (in contradiction to common misconception in literature) cannot be revealed in hyperon decays. Last but not least we study under which circumstances contextuality can be revealed. PMID:26144247

  5. Mean first-passage time of quantum transition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rong-Tao; Dai, Wu-Sheng; Xie, Mi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of mean first-passage time (MFPT) in quantum mechanics; the MFPT is the average time of the transition from a given initial state, passing through some intermediate states, to a given final state for the first time. We apply the method developed in statistical mechanics for calculating the MFPT of random walks to calculate the MFPT of a transition process. As applications, we (1) calculate the MFPT for multiple-state systems, (2) discuss transition processes occurring in an environmental background, (3) consider a roundabout transition in a hydrogen atom, and (4) apply the approach to laser theory.

  6. Quantum processes as a mechanism in olfaction for smell recognition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    The physics of smell is not well understood. The biological processes that occur following a signalling event are well understood (Buck 1991). However, the reasons how and why a signalling event occurs when a particular smell molecule and receptor combination is made, remains un-established. Luca Turin proposes a signalling mechanism which determines smell molecules by quantum mechanics (Turin 1996). Investigation of this mechanism shows it to be physically robust (Brookes,et al, 2007), and consequences of the theory provides quantitative measurements of smell and interesting potential experiments that may determine whether the recognition of smell is a quantum event. Brookes, J.C, Hartoutsiou, F, Horsfield, A.P and Stoneham, A.M. (2007). Physical Review Letters 98, no. 3 038101 Buck, L. (1991) Cell, 65, no.1 (4): 175-187. Turin, L. (1996) Chemical Sences 21, no 6. 773-791 With many thanks to the Wellcome Trust.

  7. Being qua becoming: Aristotle's "Metaphysics", quantum physics, and Process Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Kelley

    In Aristotle's First Philosophy, science and philosophy were partners, but with the rise of empiricism, went their separate ways. Metaphysics combined the rational and irrational (i.e. final cause/unmoved mover) elements of existence to equate being with substance, postulating prime matter as pure potential that was actuated by form to create everything. Modern science reveres pure reason and postulates its theory of being by a rigorous scientific methodology. The Standard Model defines matter as energy formed into fundamental particles via forces contained in fields. Science has proved Aristotle's universe wrong in many ways, but as physics delves deeper into the quantum world, empiricism is reaching its limits concerning fundamental questions of existence. To achieve its avowed mission of explaining existence completely, physics must reunite with philosophy in a metascience modeled on the First Philosophy of Aristotle. One theory of being that integrates quantum physics and metaphysics is Process Philosophy.

  8. Counting statistics of non-Markovian quantum stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Flindt, Christian; Novotný, Tomás; Braggio, Alessandro; Sassetti, Maura; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-04-18

    We derive a general expression for the cumulant generating function (CGF) of non-Markovian quantum stochastic transport processes. The long-time limit of the CGF is determined by a single dominating pole of the resolvent of the memory kernel from which we extract the zero-frequency cumulants of the current using a recursive scheme. The finite-frequency noise is expressed not only in terms of the resolvent, but also initial system-environment correlations. As an illustrative example we consider electron transport through a dissipative double quantum dot for which we study the effects of dissipation on the zero-frequency cumulants of high orders and the finite-frequency noise.

  9. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable to the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We introduce a model of a bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum-optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model, we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  10. Minimal Paths in the City Block: Human Performance on Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walwyn, Amy L.; Navarro, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is reported comparing human performance on two kinds of visually presented traveling salesperson problems (TSPs), those reliant on Euclidean geometry and those reliant on city block geometry. Across multiple array sizes, human performance was near-optimal in both geometries, but was slightly better in the Euclidean format. Even so,…

  11. Scalability, Complexity and Reliability in Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Information and Quantum Computation, Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, “Quantum algorithm for the hidden shift...Future (and Past) of Quantum Lower Bounds by Polynomials,” October 17, 2002 W. van Dam, Workshop on Quantum Information and Quantum Computation, Abdus ... Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, “Quantum algorithms: Fourier transforms and group theory,” October 21, 2002 K

  12. Review of solar fuel-producing quantum conversion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. B.; Biddle, J. R.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The status and potential of fuel-producing solar photochemical processes are discussed. Research focused on splitting water to produce dihydrogen and is at a relatively early stage of development. Current emphasis is primarily directed toward understanding the basic chemistry underlying such quantum conversion processes. Theoretical analyses by various investigators predict a limiting thermodynamic efficiency of 31% for devices with a single photosystem operating with unfocused sunlight at 300 K. When non-idealities are included, it appears unlikely that actual devices will have efficiencies greater than 12 to 15%. Observed efficiencies are well below theoretical limits. Cyclic homogeneous photochemical processes for splitting water have efficiencies considerably less than 1%. Efficiency can be significantly increased by addition of a sacrificial reagent; however, such systems are no longer cyclic and it is doubtful that they would be economical on a commercial scale. The observed efficiencies for photoelectrochemical processes are also low but such systems appear more promising than homogeneous photochemical systems. Operating and systems options, including operation at elevated temperature and hybrid and coupled quantum-thermal conversion processes, are also considered.

  13. Quantum optical implementation of quantum information processing and classical simulation of many-body physics from quantum information perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin

    This thesis is composed of two parts. In the first part we summarize our study on implementation of quantum information processing (QIP) in optical cavity QED systems, while in the second part we present our numerical investigations on strongly interacting Fermi systems using a powerful numerical algorithm developed from the perspective of quantum information theory. We explore various possible applications of cavity QED in the strong coupling regime to quantum information processing tasks theoretically, including efficient preparation of Schrodinger-cat states for traveling photon pulses, robust implementation of conditional quantum gates on neutral atoms, as well as implementation of a hybrid controlled SWAP gate. We analyze the feasibility and performance of our schemes by solving corresponding physical models either numerically or analytically. We implement a novel numerical algorithm called Time Evolving Block Decimation (TEBD), which was proposed by Vidal from the perspective of quantum information science. With this algorithm, we numerically study the ground state properties of strongly interacting fermions in an anisotropic optical lattice across a wide Feshbach resonance. The interactions in this system can be described by a general Hubbard model with particle assisted tunneling. For systems with equal spin population, we find that the Luther-Emery phase, which has been known to exist only for attractive on-site interactions in the conventional Hubbard model, could also be found even in the case with repulsive on-site interactions in the general Hubbard model. Using the TEBD algorithm, we also study the effect of particle assisted tunneling in spin-polarized systems. Fermi systems with unequal spin population and attractive interaction could allow the existence of exotic superfluidity, such as the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state. In the general Hubbard model, such exotic FFLO pairing of fermions could be suppressed by high particle assisted

  14. An Overview of HP's Research Towards Optical Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil, Ray

    2006-05-01

    Quantum Information Science is an emerging discipline with the potential to revolutionize computation and communication, but with an extremely high barrier to realizing practical results. After describing a framework for performing optical quantum information processing [1], we will outline a set of key scientific and engineering challenges which must be met before a quantum information technology industry can materialize. As a first step toward developing scalable systems, we will describe experiments showing coherent population trapping in nitrogen- vacancy centers in diamond under optical excitation at zero magnetic field. [2] In addition, we will describe experiments demonstrating fabrication of massive photonic crystals using nanoimprint lithography, and the construction of an all-fiber self-calibrating random number generator based on polarization-entangled photons that generates high-quality cryptographic random numbers and is immune to back-door attacks. [1] W. J. Munro, et al., J. Opt. B: Quant. Semiclass. Opt. 7, S135--S140 (2005). [2] C. Santori et. al., arXiv:cond-mat/0602573 (2006).

  15. A quantum theoretical approach to information processing in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona da Fonseca, José; Barahona da Fonseca, Isabel; Suarez Araujo, Carmen Paz; Simões da Fonseca, José

    2000-05-01

    A reinterpretation of experimental data on learning was used to formulate a law on data acquisition similar to the Hamiltonian of a mechanical system. A matrix of costs in decision making specifies values attributable to a barrier that opposed to hypothesis formation about decision making. The interpretation of the encoding costs as frequencies of oscillatory phenomena leads to a quantum paradigm based in the models of photoelectric effect as well as of a particle against a potential barrier. Cognitive processes are envisaged as complex phenomena represented by structures linked by valence bounds. This metaphor is used to find some prerequisites to certain types of conscious experience as well as to find an explanation for some pathological distortions of cognitive operations as they are represented in the context of the isolobal model. Those quantum phenomena are understood as representing an analogue programming for specific special purpose computations. The formation of complex chemical structures within the context of isolobal theory is understood as an analog quantum paradigm for complex cognitive computations.

  16. Quantum Mechanics and Perceptive Processes: A Reply to Elio Conte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2015-07-01

    Recently, Elio Conte has commented a paper by the present author devoted to analyze the possibility of checking experimentally whether the perceptual process can lead to the collapse of the wavefunction. Here we answer to the comments by Conte and we show that he has missed to grasp the crucial elements of our proposal. Morever, we discuss some ideas put forward by Conte concerning the occurrence of quantum superpositions of different states of consciousness and we show that they are rather vague and not cogent.

  17. Graphics Processing Unit Accelerated Hirsch-Fye Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Conrad; Abu Asal, Sameer; Rajagoplan, Kaushik; Poliakoff, David; Caprino, Joseph; Tomko, Karen; Thakur, Bhupender; Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2012-02-01

    In Dynamical Mean Field Theory and its cluster extensions, such as the Dynamic Cluster Algorithm, the bottleneck of the algorithm is solving the self-consistency equations with an impurity solver. Hirsch-Fye Quantum Monte Carlo is one of the most commonly used impurity and cluster solvers. This work implements optimizations of the algorithm, such as enabling large data re-use, suitable for the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architecture. The GPU's sheer number of concurrent parallel computations and large bandwidth to many shared memories takes advantage of the inherent parallelism in the Green function update and measurement routines, and can substantially improve the efficiency of the Hirsch-Fye impurity solver.

  18. Neutron stars. [quantum mechanical processes associated with magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes associated with the presence of high magnetic fields and the effect of such fields on the evolution of neutron stars are reviewed. A technical description of the interior of a neutron star is presented. The neutron star-pulsar relation is reviewed and consideration is given to supernovae explosions, flux conservation in neutron stars, gauge-invariant derivation of the equation of state for a strongly magnetized gas, neutron beta-decay, and the stability condition for a neutron star.

  19. Quantum processes in short and intensive electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. I.; Kämpfer, Burkhard; Hosaka, Atsushi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    This work provides an overview of our recent results in studying two most important and widely discussed quantum processes: electron-positron pairs production off a probe photon propagating through a polarized short-pulsed electromagnetic (e.g. laser) wave field or generalized Breit-Wheeler process, and a single a photon emission off an electron interacting with the laser pules, so-called non-linear Compton scattering. We show that the probabilities of particle production in both processes are determined by interplay of two dynamical effects, where the first one is related to the shape and duration of the pulse and the second one is non-linear dynamics of the interaction of charged fermions with a strong electromagnetic field. We elaborate suitable expressions for the production probabilities and cross sections, convenient for studying evolution of the plasma in presence of strong electromagnetic fields.

  20. Wick rotation for quantum field theories on degenerate Moyal space(-time)

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Lechner, Gandalf; Ludwig, Thomas; Verch, Rainer

    2013-02-15

    In this paper the connection between quantum field theories on flat noncommutative space(-times) in Euclidean and Lorentzian signature is studied for the case that time is still commutative. By making use of the algebraic framework of quantum field theory and an analytic continuation of the symmetry groups which are compatible with the structure of Moyal space, a general correspondence between field theories on Euclidean space satisfying a time zero condition and quantum field theories on Moyal Minkowski space is presented ('Wick rotation'). It is then shown that field theories transferred to Moyal space(-time) by Rieffel deformation and warped convolution fit into this framework, and that the processes of Wick rotation and deformation commute.

  1. Experimental characterization of quantum correlated triple beams generated by cascaded four-wave mixing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhongzhong; Cao, Leiming; Jing, Jietai

    2015-05-25

    Quantum correlations and entanglement shared among multiple modes are fundamental ingredients of most continuous-variable quantum technologies. Recently, a method used to generate multiple quantum correlated beams using cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes was theoretically proposed and experimentally realized by our group [Z. Qin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 023602 (2014)]. Our study of triple-beam quantum correlation paves the way to showing the tripartite entanglement in our system. Our system also promises to find applications in quantum information and precision measurement such as the controlled quantum communications, the generation of multiple quantum correlated images, and the realization of a multiport nonlinear interferometer. For its applications, the degree of quantum correlation is a crucial figure of merit. In this letter, we experimentally study how various parameters, such as the cell temperatures, one-photon, and two-photon detunings, influence the degree of quantum correlation between the triple beams generated from the cascaded two-FWM configuration.

  2. Time Series, Stochastic Processes and Completeness of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2011-03-01

    Most of physical experiments are usually described as repeated measurements of some random variables. Experimental data registered by on-line computers form time series of outcomes. The frequencies of different outcomes are compared with the probabilities provided by the algorithms of quantum theory (QT). In spite of statistical predictions of QT a claim was made that it provided the most complete description of the data and of the underlying physical phenomena. This claim could be easily rejected if some fine structures, averaged out in the standard descriptive statistical analysis, were found in time series of experimental data. To search for these structures one has to use more subtle statistical tools which were developed to study time series produced by various stochastic processes. In this talk we review some of these tools. As an example we show how the standard descriptive statistical analysis of the data is unable to reveal a fine structure in a simulated sample of AR (2) stochastic process. We emphasize once again that the violation of Bell inequalities gives no information on the completeness or the non locality of QT. The appropriate way to test the completeness of quantum theory is to search for fine structures in time series of the experimental data by means of the purity tests or by studying the autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation functions.

  3. Infinitesimal rigidity of hyperquadrics in semi-Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, An Sook; Kim, Hobum; Han, Hyelim

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we show that hyperquadrics are infinitesimally rigid in a semi-Euclidean space. We also show that hypersurfaces of hyperquadrics cut by hyperplanes not passing through the origin are infinitesimally rigid in the hyperquadrics, whereas those cut by hyperplanes through the origin are not infinitesimally rigid in hyperquadrics. Furthermore, we prove that any hypersurface in a semi-Euclidean space containing some open subset of a hyperplane is not infinitesimally rigid.

  4. Myoelectric control of artificial limb inspired by quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael; Jiang, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Precise and elegant coordination of a prosthesis across many degrees of freedom represents a significant challenge to efficient rehabilitation of people with limb deficiency. Processing the electrical neural signals collected from the surface of the remnant muscles of the stump is a common way to initiate and control the different movements available to the artificial limb. Based on the assumption that there are distinguishable and repeatable signal patterns among different types of muscular activation, the problem of prosthesis control reduces to one of pattern recognition. Widely accepted classical methods for pattern recognition, however, cannot provide simultaneous and proportional control of the artificial limb. Here we show that, in principle, quantum information processing of the neural signals allows us to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties, suggesting a very simple scheme for myoelectric control of artificial limb with advanced functionalities.

  5. Purification-based metric to measure the distance between quantum states and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osán, Tristán M.; Lamberti, Pedro W.

    2013-06-01

    In this work we study the properties of a purification-based entropic metric for measuring the distance between both quantum states and quantum processes. This metric is defined as the square root of the entropy of the average of two purifications of mixed quantum states which maximize the overlap between the purified states. We analyze this metric and show that it satisfies many appealing properties, which suggest this metric is an interesting proposal for theoretical and experimental applications of quantum information.

  6. Integrated optics architecture for trapped-ion quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, D.; Volin, C.; Streed, E. W.; Lenzini, F.; Lobino, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standard schemes for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP) involve the manipulation of ions in a large array of interconnected trapping potentials. The basic set of QIP operations, including state initialization, universal quantum logic, and state detection, is routinely executed within a single array site by means of optical operations, including various laser excitations as well as the collection of ion fluorescence. Transport of ions between array sites is also routinely carried out in microfabricated trap arrays. However, it is still not possible to perform optical operations in parallel across all array sites. The lack of this capability is one of the major obstacles to scalable trapped-ion QIP and presently limits exploitation of current microfabricated trap technology. Here we present an architecture for scalable integration of optical operations in trapped-ion QIP. We show theoretically that diffractive mirrors, monolithically fabricated on the trap array, can efficiently couple light between trap array sites and optical waveguide arrays. Integrated optical circuits constructed from these waveguides can be used for sequencing of laser excitation and fluorescence collection. Our scalable architecture supports all standard QIP operations, as well as photon-mediated entanglement channels, while offering substantial performance improvements over current techniques.

  7. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  8. On refractive processes in strong laser field quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.

    2013-11-15

    Refractive processes in strong-field QED are pure quantum processes, which involve only external photons and the background electromagnetic field. We show analytically that such processes occurring in a plane-wave field and involving external real photons are all characterized by a surprisingly modest net exchange of energy and momentum with the laser field, corresponding to a few laser photons, even in the limit of ultra-relativistic laser intensities. We obtain this result by a direct calculation of the transition matrix element of an arbitrary refractive QED process and accounting exactly for the background plane-wave field. A simple physical explanation of this modest net exchange of laser photons is provided, based on the fact that the laser field couples with the external photons only indirectly through virtual electron–positron pairs. For stronger and stronger laser fields, the pairs cover a shorter and shorter distance before they annihilate again, such that the laser can transfer to them an energy corresponding to only a few photons. These results can be relevant for the future experiments aiming to test strong-field QED at present and next-generation facilities. -- Highlights: •Investigation of the one-loop amplitude of refractive QED processes in a laser field. •The amplitude is suppressed for a large number of net-exchanged laser photons. •Suggestion for first observation of high-nonlinear vacuum effects in a laser field.

  9. One-dimensional Euclidean matching problem: exact solutions, correlation functions, and universality.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Sergio; Sicuro, Gabriele

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the equivalence relation between the Euclidean bipartite matching problem on the line and on the circumference and the Brownian bridge process on the same domains. The equivalence allows us to compute the correlation function and the optimal cost of the original combinatorial problem in the thermodynamic limit; moreover, we solve also the minimax problem on the line and on the circumference. The properties of the average cost and correlation functions are discussed.

  10. Capture process in nuclear reactions with a quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2009-09-15

    Projectile-nucleus capture by a target nucleus at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier is treated with the reduced-density-matrix formalism. The effects of dissipation and fluctuations on the capture process are taken self-consistently into account within the quantum model suggested. The excitation functions for the capture in the reactions {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, {sup 26}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32,34,36,38}S, {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 52}Cr+{sup 208}Pb with spherical nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. At bombarding energies about (15-25) MeV above the Coulomb barrier the maximum of capture cross section is revealed for the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 208}Pb reaction.

  11. Quantum thermodynamic processes: a control theory for machine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjukov, J.; Jahnke, T.; Mahler, G.

    2008-07-01

    The minimal set of thermodynamic control parameters consists of a statistical (thermal) and a mechanical one. These suffice to introduce all the pertinent thermodynamic variables; thermodynamic processes can then be defined as paths on this 2-dimensional control plane. Putting aside coherence we show that for a large class of quantum objects with discrete spectra and for the cycles considered the Carnot efficiency applies as a universal upper bound. In the dynamic (finite time) regime renormalized thermodynamic variables allow to include non-equilibrium phenomena in a systematic way. The machine function ceases to exist in the large speed limit; the way, in which this limit is reached, depends on the type of cycle considered.

  12. Quantum signal processing-based visual cryptography with unexpanded shares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Surya Sarathi; Sharma, Kaushik Das; Chandra, Jayanta K.; Bera, Jitendra Nath

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a visual cryptography scheme (VCS) based on quantum signal processing (QSP). VCS is an image encryption technique that is very simple in formulation and is secure. In (k,n)-VCS, a secret binary image is encoded into n share images and minimum k shares are needed to decrypt the secret image. The efforts to encrypt a grayscale image are few in number and the majority are related to grayscale to binary conversion. Thus, a generalized approach of encryption for all types of images, i.e., binary, gray, and color is needed. Here, a generic VCS is proposed based on QSP where all types of images can be encrypted without pixel expansion along with a smoothing technique to enhance the quality of the decrypted image. The proposed scheme is tested and compared for benchmark images, and the result shows the effectiveness of the scheme.

  13. Quantum superpositions and entanglement of thermal states at high temperatures and their applications to quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2007-10-15

    We study characteristics of superpositions and entanglement of thermal states at high temperatures and discuss their applications to quantum-information processing. We introduce thermal-state qubits and thermal-Bell states, which are a generalization of pure-state qubits and Bell states to thermal mixtures. A scheme is then presented to discriminate between the four thermal-Bell states without photon number resolving detection but with Kerr nonlinear interactions and two single-photon detectors. This enables one to perform quantum teleportation and gate operations for quantum computation with thermal-state qubits.

  14. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiography has gained popularity in many areas of clinical practice. This transition brings interest in advancing the methodologies for image quality characterization. However, as the methodologies for such characterizations have not been standardized, the results of these studies cannot be directly compared. The primary objective of this study was to standardize methodologies for image quality characterization. The secondary objective was to evaluate affected factors to Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) according to image processing algorithm. Image performance parameters such as MTF, NPS, and DQE were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) images of hand posterior-anterior (PA) for measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR), slit image for measuring MTF, white image for measuring NPS were obtained and various Multi-Scale Image Contrast Amplification (MUSICA) parameters were applied to each of acquired images. In results, all of modified images were considerably influence on evaluating SNR, MTF, NPS, and DQE. Modified images by the post-processing had higher DQE than the MUSICA=0 image. This suggests that MUSICA values, as a post-processing, have an affect on the image when it is evaluating for image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing could be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study could be guided as a baseline to evaluate imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by measuring MTF, NPS, and DQE.

  15. Ultrafast Quantum Process Tomography via Continuous Measurement and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Charles; Riofrio, Carlos; Deutsch, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Quantum process tomography (QPT) is an essential tool to diagnose the implementation of a dynamical map. However, the standard protocol is extremely resource intensive. For a Hilbert space of dimension d, it requires d2 different input preparations followed by state tomography via the estimation of the expectation values of d2 - 1 orthogonal observables. We show that when the process is nearly unitary, we can dramatically improve the efficiency and robustness of QPT through a collective continuous measurement protocol on an ensemble of identically prepared systems. Given the measurement history we obtain the process matrix via a convex program that optimizes a desired cost function. We study two estimators: least-squares and compressive sensing. Both allow rapid QPT due to the condition of complete positivity of the map; this is a powerful constraint to force the process to be physical and consistent with the data. We apply the method to a real experimental implementation, where optimal control is used to perform a unitary map on a d = 8 dimensional system of hyperfine levels in cesium atoms, and obtain the measurement record via Faraday spectroscopy of a laser probe. Supported by the NSF

  16. Synthesis and engineering of diamond for nanoelectronics, photonics, and quantum information processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-25

    diamond and SiC”, Low Energy Electrodynamics of Solids conference (LEES-2012), Napa, California July 22-27, 2012. 21. D.D. Awschalom, “ Quantum control...SYSTHESIS AND ENGINEERING OF DIAMOND FOR NANOELECTRONICS, PHOTONICS AND QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AFOSR #FA9550...motivate many applications from sensing to quantum information processing. Still, external electron and nuclear spin sensing are limited by weak

  17. A Euclidean bridge to the relativistic constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Timothy; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    We explore the potential of a Euclidean constituent quark model (ECQM) to bridge the lingering gap between Euclidean and Minkowski field theories in studies of nucleon structure. Specifically, we develop our ECQM using a simplified quark-scalar diquark picture of the nucleon as a first calculation. Our treatment in Euclidean space necessitates a hyperspherical formalism involving polynomial expansions of diquark propagators in order to marry our ECQM with results from Bethe-Salpeter Equation (BSE) analyses. From this framework, we define and compute a new quantity - a Euclidean density function (EDF) - an object that characterizes the nucleon's various charge distributions as functions of the quark's Euclidean momentum. Applying this technology and incorporating information from BSE analyses, we find the quenched dressing effect on the proton's axial-singlet charge to be small in magnitude and consistent with zero, while use of recent determinations of unquenched BSEs results in a large suppression. The substantial effect we obtain for the impact on the axial-singlet charge of the unquenched dressed vertex compared to the quenched demands further investigation. Work supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-97ER-41014 and NSF Grant No. 1516105.

  18. Efficient Algorithm for Optimizing Adaptive Quantum Metrology Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Alexander; Sanders, Barry C.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum-enhanced metrology infers an unknown quantity with accuracy beyond the standard quantum limit (SQL). Feedback-based metrological techniques are promising for beating the SQL but devising the feedback procedures is difficult and inefficient. Here we introduce an efficient self-learning swarm-intelligence algorithm for devising feedback-based quantum metrological procedures. Our algorithm can be trained with simulated or real-world trials and accommodates experimental imperfections, losses, and decoherence.

  19. Quantum information processing in the radical-pair mechanism: Haberkorn's theory violates the Ozawa entropy bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouloudakis, K.; Kominis, I. K.

    2017-02-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions, central for understanding the avian magnetic compass and spin transport in photosynthetic reaction centers, were recently shown to be a fruitful paradigm of the new synthesis of quantum information science with biological processes. We show here that the master equation so far constituting the theoretical foundation of spin chemistry violates fundamental bounds for the entropy of quantum systems, in particular the Ozawa bound. In contrast, a recently developed theory based on quantum measurements, quantum coherence measures, and quantum retrodiction, thus exemplifying the paradigm of quantum biology, satisfies the Ozawa bound as well as the Lanford-Robinson bound on information extraction. By considering Groenewold's information, the quantum information extracted during the reaction, we reproduce the known and unravel other magnetic-field effects not conveyed by reaction yields.

  20. Quantum information processing in the radical-pair mechanism: Haberkorn's theory violates the Ozawa entropy bound.

    PubMed

    Mouloudakis, K; Kominis, I K

    2017-02-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions, central for understanding the avian magnetic compass and spin transport in photosynthetic reaction centers, were recently shown to be a fruitful paradigm of the new synthesis of quantum information science with biological processes. We show here that the master equation so far constituting the theoretical foundation of spin chemistry violates fundamental bounds for the entropy of quantum systems, in particular the Ozawa bound. In contrast, a recently developed theory based on quantum measurements, quantum coherence measures, and quantum retrodiction, thus exemplifying the paradigm of quantum biology, satisfies the Ozawa bound as well as the Lanford-Robinson bound on information extraction. By considering Groenewold's information, the quantum information extracted during the reaction, we reproduce the known and unravel other magnetic-field effects not conveyed by reaction yields.

  1. One-loop diagrams in the random Euclidean matching problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucibello, Carlo; Parisi, Giorgio; Sicuro, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    The matching problem is a notorious combinatorial optimization problem that has attracted for many years the attention of the statistical physics community. Here we analyze the Euclidean version of the problem, i.e., the optimal matching problem between points randomly distributed on a d -dimensional Euclidean space, where the cost to minimize depends on the points' pairwise distances. Using Mayer's cluster expansion we write a formal expression for the replicated action that is suitable for a saddle point computation. We give the diagrammatic rules for each term of the expansion, and we analyze in detail the one-loop diagrams. A characteristic feature of the theory, when diagrams are perturbatively computed around the mean field part of the action, is the vanishing of the mass at zero momentum. In the non-Euclidean case of uncorrelated costs instead, we predict and numerically verify an anomalous scaling for the sub-sub-leading correction to the asymptotic average cost.

  2. Certifying single-system steering for quantum-information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Lambert, Neill; Chiu, Ching-Yi; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes how different ensembles of quantum states can be remotely prepared by measuring one particle of an entangled pair. Here, we investigate quantum steering for single quantum d -dimensional systems (qudits) and devise efficient conditions to certify the steerability therein, which we find are applicable both to single-system steering and EPR steering. In the single-system case our steering conditions enable the unambiguous ruling out of generic classical means of mimicking steering. Ruling out "false-steering" scenarios has implications for securing channels against both cloning-based individual attack and coherent attacks when implementing quantum key distribution using qudits. We also show that these steering conditions also have applications in quantum computation, in that they can serve as an efficient criterion for the evaluation of quantum logic gates of arbitrary size. Finally, we describe how the nonlocal EPR variant of these conditions also function as tools for identifying faithful one-way quantum computation, secure entanglement-based quantum communication, and genuine multipartite EPR steering.

  3. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullans, Michael John

    Quantum information science involves the use of precise control over quantum systems to explore new technologies. However, as quantum systems are scaled up they require an ever deeper understanding of many-body physics to achieve the required degree of control. Current experiments are entering a regime which requires active control of a mesoscopic number of coupled quantum systems or quantum bits (qubits). This thesis describes several approaches to this goal and shows how mesoscopic quantum systems can be controlled and utilized for quantum information tasks. The first system we consider is the nuclear spin environment of GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. We show that the through appropriate control of dynamic nuclear polarization one can prepare the nuclear spin environment in three distinct collective quantum states which are useful for quantum information processing with electron spin qubits. We then investigate a hybrid system in which an optical lattice is formed in the near field scattering off an array of metallic nanoparticles by utilizing the plasmonic resonance of the nanoparticles. We show that such a system would realize new regimes of dense, ultra-cold quantum matter and can be used to create a quantum network of atoms and plasmons. Finally we investigate quantum nonlinear optical systems. We show that the intrinsic nonlinearity for plasmons in graphene can be large enough to make a quantum gate for single photons. We also consider two nonlinear optical systems based on ultracold gases of atoms. In one case, we demonstrate an all-optical single photon switch using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and slow light. In the second case, we study few photon physics in strongly interacting Rydberg polariton systems, where we demonstrate the existence of two and three photon bound states and study their properties.

  4. Parameterized runtime analyses of evolutionary algorithms for the planar euclidean traveling salesperson problem.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew M; Neumann, Frank; Nallaperuma, Samadhi

    2014-01-01

    Parameterized runtime analysis seeks to understand the influence of problem structure on algorithmic runtime. In this paper, we contribute to the theoretical understanding of evolutionary algorithms and carry out a parameterized analysis of evolutionary algorithms for the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem (Euclidean TSP). We investigate the structural properties in TSP instances that influence the optimization process of evolutionary algorithms and use this information to bound their runtime. We analyze the runtime in dependence of the number of inner points k. In the first part of the paper, we study a [Formula: see text] EA in a strictly black box setting and show that it can solve the Euclidean TSP in expected time [Formula: see text] where A is a function of the minimum angle [Formula: see text] between any three points. Based on insights provided by the analysis, we improve this upper bound by introducing a mixed mutation strategy that incorporates both 2-opt moves and permutation jumps. This strategy improves the upper bound to [Formula: see text]. In the second part of the paper, we use the information gained in the analysis to incorporate domain knowledge to design two fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) evolutionary algorithms for the planar Euclidean TSP. We first develop a [Formula: see text] EA based on an analysis by M. Theile, 2009, "Exact solutions to the traveling salesperson problem by a population-based evolutionary algorithm," Lecture notes in computer science, Vol. 5482 (pp. 145-155), that solves the TSP with k inner points in [Formula: see text] generations with probability [Formula: see text]. We then design a [Formula: see text] EA that incorporates a dynamic programming step into the fitness evaluation. We prove that a variant of this evolutionary algorithm using 2-opt mutation solves the problem after [Formula: see text] steps in expectation with a cost of [Formula: see text] for each fitness evaluation.

  5. Quantum cognition: The possibility of processing with nuclear spins in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility that quantum processing with nuclear spins might be operative in the brain is explored. Phosphorus is identified as the unique biological element with a nuclear spin that can serve as a qubit for such putative quantum processing-a neural qubit-while the phosphate ion is the only possible qubit-transporter. We identify the "Posner molecule", Ca9(PO4)6, as the unique molecule that can protect the neural qubits on very long times and thereby serve as a (working) quantum-memory. A central requirement for quantum-processing is quantum entanglement. It is argued that the enzyme catalyzed chemical reaction which breaks a pyrophosphate ion into two phosphate ions can quantum entangle pairs of qubits. Posner molecules, formed by binding such phosphate pairs with extracellular calcium ions, will inherit the nuclear spin entanglement. A mechanism for transporting Posner molecules into presynaptic neurons during vesicle endocytosis is proposed. Quantum measurements can occur when a pair of Posner molecules chemically bind and subsequently melt, releasing a shower of intra-cellular calcium ions that can trigger further neurotransmitter release and enhance the probability of post-synaptic neuron firing. Multiple entangled Posner molecules, triggering non-local quantum correlations of neuron firing rates, would provide the key mechanism for neural quantum processing. Implications, both in vitro and in vivo, are briefly mentioned.

  6. Modeling of Euclidean braided fiber architectures to optimize composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong-Carroll, E.; Pastore, C.; Ko, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional braided fiber reinforcements are a very effective toughening mechanism for composite materials. The integral yarn path inherent to this fiber architecture allows for effective multidirectional dispersion of strain energy and negates delamination problems. In this paper a geometric model of Euclidean braid fiber architectures is presented. This information is used to determine the degree of geometric isotropy in the braids. This information, when combined with candidate material properties, can be used to quickly generate an estimate of the available load-carrying capacity of Euclidean braids at any arbitrary angle.

  7. Discrimination of correlated and entangling quantum channels with selective process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Eugene; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-10-01

    The accurate and reliable characterization of quantum dynamical processes underlies efforts to validate quantum technologies, where discrimination between competing models of observed behaviors inform efforts to fabricate and operate qubit devices. We present a protocol for quantum channel discrimination that leverages advances in direct characterization of quantum dynamics (DCQD) codes. We demonstrate that DCQD codes enable selective process tomography to improve discrimination between entangling and correlated quantum dynamics. Numerical simulations show selective process tomography requires only a few measurement configurations to achieve a low false alarm rate and that the DCQD encoding improves the resilience of the protocol to hidden sources of noise. Our results show that selective process tomography with DCQD codes is useful for efficiently distinguishing sources of correlated crosstalk from uncorrelated noise in current and future experimental platforms.

  8. Discrimination of correlated and entangling quantum channels with selective process tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrescu, Eugene; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-10-10

    The accurate and reliable characterization of quantum dynamical processes underlies efforts to validate quantum technologies, where discrimination between competing models of observed behaviors inform efforts to fabricate and operate qubit devices. We present a protocol for quantum channel discrimination that leverages advances in direct characterization of quantum dynamics (DCQD) codes. We demonstrate that DCQD codes enable selective process tomography to improve discrimination between entangling and correlated quantum dynamics. Numerical simulations show selective process tomography requires only a few measurement configurations to achieve a low false alarm rate and that the DCQD encoding improves the resilience of the protocol to hiddenmore » sources of noise. Lastly, our results show that selective process tomography with DCQD codes is useful for efficiently distinguishing sources of correlated crosstalk from uncorrelated noise in current and future experimental platforms.« less

  9. Discrimination of correlated and entangling quantum channels with selective process tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Eugene; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-10-10

    The accurate and reliable characterization of quantum dynamical processes underlies efforts to validate quantum technologies, where discrimination between competing models of observed behaviors inform efforts to fabricate and operate qubit devices. We present a protocol for quantum channel discrimination that leverages advances in direct characterization of quantum dynamics (DCQD) codes. We demonstrate that DCQD codes enable selective process tomography to improve discrimination between entangling and correlated quantum dynamics. Numerical simulations show selective process tomography requires only a few measurement configurations to achieve a low false alarm rate and that the DCQD encoding improves the resilience of the protocol to hidden sources of noise. Lastly, our results show that selective process tomography with DCQD codes is useful for efficiently distinguishing sources of correlated crosstalk from uncorrelated noise in current and future experimental platforms.

  10. Demonstration of a Scalable, Multiplexed Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-09

    ion shuttling, storage, and manipulation, Appl. Phys. Letters 88, pp. 034101. 6. M. Riebe, et al. (2004), Deterministic quantum teleportation with atoms...Nature 429, pp. 734. 7. M. D. Barrett, et al. (2004), Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits, Nature 429, pp. 737. 8. J. Chiaverini...REPORT DEMONSTRATION OF A SCALABLE, MULTIPLEXED ION TRAPFOR QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: A scalable

  11. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  12. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  13. Quantum simulation of dissipative processes without reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-05-29

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy.

  14. Quantum Simulation of Dissipative Processes without Reservoir Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy. PMID:26024437

  15. Phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave-mixing processes for generating three quantum correlated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Hailong; Li, Sijin; Wang, Yaxian; Jing, Jietai

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical studies and experimental implementations of quantum correlation are the important contents of continuous variables quantum optics and quantum information science. There are various systems for the study of quantum correlation. Here, we study an experimental scheme for generating three quantum correlated beams based on phase-sensitive cascaded four-wave-mixing (FWM) processes in rubidium vapor. Quantum correlation including intensity difference or sum squeezing, two other combinatorial squeezing, and quantum entanglement among the three output light fields are theoretically analyzed in this paper. Also, the comparison of the quantum correlations have been made between the phase-sensitive cascaded FWM processes and the phase-insensitive cascaded FWM processes. By changing the phases and intensities of the input beams, it is interesting to find that the maximum degrees of various combinatorial squeezing are equal when the two FWM processes share a common intensity gain. When the common intensity gain of the two FWM processes changes, the maximum degrees of different combinatorial squeezing will be synchronously controlled. At last we discuss the genuine tripartite entanglement and steering in our phase-sensitive cascaded scheme, and compare them with the cases of the phase-insensitive cascaded scheme.

  16. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  17. The Role of Structure in Learning Non-Euclidean Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmuth, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    How do people learn novel mathematical information that contradicts prior knowledge? The focus of this thesis is the role of structure in the acquisition of knowledge about hyperbolic geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry. In a series of three experiments, I contrast a more holistic structure--training based on closed figures--with a mathematically…

  18. Vectorial moments of curves in Euclidean 3-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçer, Yılmaz

    In this study, we introduced the vectorial moments as a new curves as w-dual curve, where w ∈{T(s),N(s),B(s)}, constructed by the Frenet vectors of a regular curve in Euclidean 3-space and we gave the Frenet apparatus of w-dual curves and also we applied to helices and curve pairs of constant breadth.

  19. Peripatetic and Euclidean theories of the visual ray.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    1994-01-01

    The visual ray of Euclid's Optica is endowed with properties that reveal the concept to be an abstraction of a specific physical account of vision. The evolution of a physical theory of vision compatible with the Euclidean model can be traced in Peripatetic writings of the late fourth and third centuries B.C.

  20. Euclidean bridge to the relativistic constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald A.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Knowledge of nucleon structure is today ever more of a precision science, with heightened theoretical and experimental activity expected in coming years. At the same time, a persistent gap lingers between theoretical approaches grounded in Euclidean methods (e.g., lattice QCD, Dyson-Schwinger equations [DSEs]) as opposed to traditional Minkowski field theories (such as light-front constituent quark models). Purpose: Seeking to bridge these complementary world views, we explore the potential of a Euclidean constituent quark model (ECQM). This formalism enables us to study the gluonic dressing of the quark-level axial-vector vertex, which we undertake as a test of the framework. Method: To access its indispensable elements with a minimum of inessential detail, we develop our ECQM using the simplified quark + scalar diquark picture of the nucleon. We construct a hyperspherical formalism involving polynomial expansions of diquark propagators to marry our ECQM with the results of Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) analyses, and constrain model parameters by fitting electromagnetic form factor data. Results: From this formalism, we define and compute a new quantity—the Euclidean density function (EDF)—an object that characterizes the nucleon's various charge distributions as functions of the quark's Euclidean momentum. Applying this technology and incorporating information from BSE analyses, we find the quenched dressing effect on the proton's axial-singlet charge to be small in magnitude and consistent with zero, while use of recent determinations of unquenched BSEs results in a large suppression. Conclusions: The quark + scalar diquark ECQM is a step toward a realistic quark model in Euclidean space, and needs additional refinements. The substantial effect we obtain for the impact on the axial-singlet charge of the unquenched dressed vertex compared to the quenched demands further investigation.

  1. Quantum information processing with long-wavelength radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, David; Weidt, Sebastian; Randall, Joseph; Lekitsch, Bjoern; Webster, Simon; Navickas, Tomas; Grounds, Anton; Rodriguez, Andrea; Webb, Anna; Standing, Eamon; Pearce, Stuart; Sari, Ibrahim; Kiang, Kian; Rattanasonti, Hwanjit; Kraft, Michael; Hensinger, Winfried

    To this point, the entanglement of ions has predominantly been performed using lasers. Using long wavelength radiation with static magnetic field gradients provides an architecture to simplify construction of a large scale quantum computer. The use of microwave-dressed states protects against decoherence from fluctuating magnetic fields, with radio-frequency fields used for qubit manipulation. I will report the realisation of spin-motion entanglement using long-wavelength radiation, and a new method to efficiently prepare dressed-state qubits and qutrits, reducing experimental complexity of gate operations. I will also report demonstration of ground state cooling using long wavelength radiation, which may increase two-qubit entanglement fidelity. I will then report demonstration of a high-fidelity long-wavelength two-ion quantum gate using dressed states. Combining these results with microfabricated ion traps allows for scaling towards a large scale ion trap quantum computer, and provides a platform for quantum simulations of fundamental physics. I will report progress towards the operation of microchip ion traps with extremely high magnetic field gradients for multi-ion quantum gates.

  2. Quantum information processing, operational quantum logic, convexity, and the foundations of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard

    Quantum information science is a source of task-related axioms whose consequences can be explored in general settings encompassing quantum mechanics, classical theory, and more. Quantum states are compendia of probabilities for the outcomes of possible operations we may perform on a system: "operational states." I discuss general frameworks for "operational theories" (sets of possible operational states of a system), in which convexity plays key role. The main technical content of the paper is in a theorem that any such theory naturally gives rise to a "weak effect algebra" when outcomes having the same probability in all states are identified and in the introduction of a notion of "operation algebra" that also takes account of sequential and conditional operations. Such frameworks are appropriate for investigating what things look like from an "inside view," i.e., for describing perspectival information that one subsystem of the world can have about another. Understanding how such views can combine, and whether an overall "geometric" picture ("outside view") coordinating them all can be had, even if this picture is very different in structure from the perspectives within it, is the key to whether we may be able to achieve a unified, "objective" physical view in which quantum mechanics is the appropriate description for certain perspectives, or whether quantum mechanics is truly telling us we must go beyond this "geometric" conception of physics.

  3. Quantum Dot-Photonic Crystal Cavity QED Based Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    Vuckovic, Andrei Faraon . Integrated quantum optical networks based on quantum dots and photonic crystals, New Journal of Physics, (05 2011): 55025. doi...Review A, (04 2012): 41801. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.041801 2012/08/14 15:15:51 25 Arka Majumdar, Michal Bajcsy, Andrei Faraon , Pierre Petroff...at telecommunications wavelength, Applied Physics Letters, (02 2011): 83105. doi: 10.1063/1.3556644 2012/08/14 14:54:12 30 A. Majumdar, A. Faraon

  4. Photoinduced Single- and Multiple- Electron Dynamics Processes Enhanced by Quantum Confinement in Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Dayton Jon; Kryjevski, Andrei; Inerbaev, Talgat M; Kilin, Dmitri S

    2017-03-21

    Methyl-ammonium lead iodide perovskite (MAPbI3) is a promising material for photovoltaic devices. A modification of the MAPbI3 into confined nanostructures is expected to further increase efficiency of solar energy conversion. Photo-excited dynamic processes in a MAPbI3 quantum dot (QD) have been modeled by many-body perturbation theory and nonadiabatic dynamics. A photoexcitation is followed by either exciton cooling (EC), its radiative (RR) or non-radiative recombination (NRR), or multi-exciton generation (MEG) processes. Computed times of these processes fall in the order of MEG < EC < RR < NRR, where MEG is in the order of a few femtoseconds, EC at the picosecond range while RR and NRR are in the order of nanoseconds. Computed timescales indicate which electronic transition pathways can contribute to increase in charge collection efficiency. Simulated mechanism relaxation rates show that quantum confinement promotes MEG in MAPbI3 QDs.

  5. Toward quantum-like modeling of financial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choustova, Olga

    2007-05-01

    We apply methods of quantum mechanics for mathematical modeling of price dynamics at the financial market. We propose to describe behavioral financial factors (e.g., expectations of traders) by using the pilot wave (Bohmian) model of quantum mechanics. Trajectories of prices are determined by two financial potentials: classical-like V(q) ("hard" market conditions, e.g., natural resources) and quantum-like U(q) (behavioral market conditions). On the one hand, our Bohmian model is a quantum-like model for the financial market, cf. with works of W. Segal, I. E. Segal, E. Haven, E. W. Piotrowski, J. Sladkowski. On the other hand, (since Bohmian mechanics provides the possibility to describe individual price trajectories) it belongs to the domain of extended research on deterministic dynamics for financial assets (C.W.J. Granger, W.A. Barnett, A. J. Benhabib, W.A. Brock, C. Sayers, J. Y. Campbell, A. W. Lo, A. C. MacKinlay, A. Serletis, S. Kuchta, M. Frank, R. Gencay, T. Stengos, M. J. Hinich, D. Patterson, D. A. Hsieh, D. T. Caplan, J.A. Scheinkman, B. LeBaron and many others).

  6. Elementary Quantum Mechanics in a High-Energy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denville, A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compares two approaches to strong absorption in elementary quantum mechanics; the black sphere and a model based on the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. Examines the application to proton-antiproton interactions at low momenta and concludes that the second model is the appropriate and simplest to use. (Author/GA)

  7. Optimizing the choice of spin-squeezed states for detecting and characterizing quantum processes

    DOE PAGES

    Rozema, Lee A.; Mahler, Dylan H.; Blume-Kohout, Robin; ...

    2014-11-07

    Quantum metrology uses quantum states with no classical counterpart to measure a physical quantity with extraordinary sensitivity or precision. Most such schemes characterize a dynamical process by probing it with a specially designed quantum state. The success of such a scheme usually relies on the process belonging to a particular one-parameter family. If this assumption is violated, or if the goal is to measure more than one parameter, a different quantum state may perform better. In the most extreme case, we know nothing about the process and wish to learn everything. This requires quantum process tomography, which demands an informationallymore » complete set of probe states. It is very convenient if this set is group covariant—i.e., each element is generated by applying an element of the quantum system’s natural symmetry group to a single fixed fiducial state. In this paper, we consider metrology with 2-photon (“biphoton”) states and report experimental studies of different states’ sensitivity to small, unknown collective SU(2) rotations [“SU(2) jitter”]. Maximally entangled N00N states are the most sensitive detectors of such a rotation, yet they are also among the worst at fully characterizing an a priori unknown process. We identify (and confirm experimentally) the best SU(2)-covariant set for process tomography; these states are all less entangled than the N00N state, and are characterized by the fact that they form a 2-design.« less

  8. Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms and their Fueter subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Guersey, F.; Jiang, W. )

    1992-02-01

    Holomorphic Fueter functions of the position quaternion form a subgroup of Euclidean space-time diffeomorphisms. An {ital O}(4) covariant treatment of such mappings is presented with the quaternionic argument {ital x} being replaced by either {ital {bar p}x} or {ital x{bar p}} involving self-dual and anti-self-dual structures and {ital p} denoting an arbitrary Euclidean time direction. An infinite group (the quasiconformal group) is exhibited that admits the conformal group SO(5,1) as a subgroup, in analogy to the two-dimensional case in which the Moebius group SO(3,1) is a subgroup of the infinite Virasoro group. The ensuing (3+1) covariant decomposition of diffeomorphisms suggests covariant gauges that throw the metric and the stress tensors in standard forms suitable for canonical quantization, leading to improved'' energy-momentum tensors. Other possible applications to current algebra and gravity will be mentioned.

  9. Riemannian Means on Special Euclidean Group and Unipotent Matrices Group

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaomin; Sun, Huafei

    2013-01-01

    Among the noncompact matrix Lie groups, the special Euclidean group and the unipotent matrix group play important roles in both theoretic and applied studies. The Riemannian means of a finite set of the given points on the two matrix groups are investigated, respectively. Based on the left invariant metric on the matrix Lie groups, the geodesic between any two points is gotten. And the sum of the geodesic distances is taken as the cost function, whose minimizer is the Riemannian mean. Moreover, a Riemannian gradient algorithm for computing the Riemannian mean on the special Euclidean group and an iterative formula for that on the unipotent matrix group are proposed, respectively. Finally, several numerical simulations in the 3-dimensional case are given to illustrate our results. PMID:24282378

  10. Tackling higher derivative ghosts with the Euclidean path integral

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanini, Michele; Trodden, Mark

    2011-05-15

    An alternative to the effective field theory approach to treat ghosts in higher derivative theories is to attempt to integrate them out via the Euclidean path integral formalism. It has been suggested that this method could provide a consistent framework within which we might tolerate the ghost degrees of freedom that plague, among other theories, the higher derivative gravity models that have been proposed to explain cosmic acceleration. We consider the extension of this idea to treating a class of terms with order six derivatives, and find that for a general term the Euclidean path integral approach works in the most trivial background, Minkowski. Moreover we see that even in de Sitter background, despite some difficulties, it is possible to define a probability distribution for tensorial perturbations of the metric.

  11. Euclidean to Minkowski Bethe-Salpeter amplitude and observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, J.; Frederico, T.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in Minkowski space given the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude - or alternatively the light-front wave function - as input. The method is based on the numerical inversion of the Nakanishi integral representation and computing the corresponding weight function. This inversion procedure is, in general, rather unstable, and we propose several ways to considerably reduce the instabilities. In terms of the Nakanishi weight function, one can easily compute the BS amplitude, the LF wave function and the electromagnetic form factor. The latter ones are very stable in spite of residual instabilities in the weight function. This procedure allows both, to continue the Euclidean BS solution in the Minkowski space and to obtain a BS amplitude from a LF wave function.

  12. Rigid body dynamics in non-Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. V.; Mamaev, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we focus on the study of two-dimensional plate dynamics on the Lobachevskii plane L 2. First of all, we consider the free motion of such a plate, which is a pseudospherical analog of dynamics of the Euler top, and also present an analog of the Euler-Poisson equations enabling us to study the motion of the body in potential force fields having rotational symmetry. We present a series of integrable cases, having analogs in Euclidean space, for different fields. Moreover, in the paper, a partial qualitative analysis of the dynamics of free motion of a plate under arbitrary initial conditions is made and a number of computer illustrations are presented which show a substantial difference of the motion from the case of Euclidean space. The study undertaken in the present paper leads to interesting physical consequences, which enable us to detect the influence of curvature on the body dynamics.

  13. Optimal recovery of linear operators in non-Euclidean metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, K Yu

    2014-10-31

    The paper looks at problems concerning the recovery of operators from noisy information in non-Euclidean metrics. A number of general theorems are proved and applied to recovery problems for functions and their derivatives from the noisy Fourier transform. In some cases, a family of optimal methods is found, from which the methods requiring the least amount of original information are singled out. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  14. Euclidean Complex Relativistic Mechanics: A New Special Relativity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossos, Spyridon; Vossos, Elias

    2015-09-01

    Relativity Theory (RT) was fundamental for the development of Quantum Mechanics (QMs). Special Relativity (SR), as is applied until now, cancels the transitive attribute in parallelism, when three observers are related, because Lorentz Boost (LB) is not closed transformation. In this presentation, considering Linear Spacetime Transformation (LSTT), we demand the maintenance of Minkowski Spacetime Interval (S2). In addition, we demand this LSTT to be closed, so there is no need for axes rotation. The solution is the Vossos Matrix (ΛB) containing real and imaginary numbers. As a result, space becomes complex, but time remains real. Thus, the transitive attribute in parallelism, which is equivalent to the Euclidean Request (ER), is also valid for moving observers. Choosing real spacetime for the unmoved observer (O), all the natural sizes are real, too. Using Vossos Transformation (VT) for moving observers, the four-vectors’ zeroth component (such as energy) is real, in contrast with spatial components that are complex, but their norm is real. It is proved that moving (relative to O) human O' meter length, according to Lorentz Boost (LB). In addition, we find Rotation Matrix Vossos-Lorentz (RBL) that turns natural sizes’ complex components to real. We also prove that Speed of Light in Vacuum (c) is invariant, when complex components are used and VT is closed for three sequential observers. After, we find out the connection between two moving (relative to O) observers: X"= ΛLO"(o) ΛLO(O') X', using Lorentz Matrix (ΛL). We applied this theory, finding relations between natural sizes, that are the same as these extracted by Classic Relativity (CR), when two observers are related (i.e. relativistic Doppler shift is the same). But, the results are different, when more than two observers are related. VT of Electromagnetic Tensor (Fμv), leads to Complex Electromagnetic Fields (CEMFs) for a moving observer. When the unmoved observer O and a moving observer O' are

  15. Note on quantum Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Bentalha, Z.; Tahiri, M.

    2008-09-15

    In this work, some interesting details about quantum Minkowski space and quantum Lorentz group structures are revealed. The task is accomplished by generalizing an approach adopted in a previous work where quantum rotation group and quantum Euclidean space structures have been investigated. The generalized method is based on a mapping relating the q-spinors (precisely the tensor product of dotted and undotted fondamental q-spinors) to Minkowski q-vectors. As a result of this mapping, the quantum analog of Minkowski space is constructed (with a definite metric). Also, the matrix representation of the quantum Lorentz group is determined together with its corresponding q-deformed orthogonality relation.

  16. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing).

  17. A Model of the Creative Process Based on Quantum Physics and Vedic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laura Hall

    1988-01-01

    Using tenets from Vedic science and quantum physics, this model of the creative process suggests that the unified field of creation is pure consciousness, and that the development of the creative process within individuals mirrors the creative process within the universe. Rational and supra-rational creative thinking techniques are also described.…

  18. Interacting Photons in Waveguide-QED and Applications in Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu

    Strong coupling between light and matter has been demonstrated both in classical cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems and in more recent circuit-QED experiments. This enables the generation of strong nonlinear photon-photon interactions at the single-photon level, which is of great interest for the observation of quantum nonlinear optical phenomena, the control of light quanta in quantum information protocols such as quantum networking, as well as the study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems using light. Recently, strong coupling has also been realized in a variety of one-dimensional (1D) waveguide- QED experimental systems, which in turn makes them promising candidates for quantum information processing. Compared to cavity-QED systems, there are two new features in waveguide-QED: the existence of a continuum of states and the restricted 1D phase space, which together bring in new physical effects, such as the bound-state effects. This thesis consists of two parts: 1) understanding the fundamental interaction between local quantum objects, such as two-level systems and four-level systems, and photons confined in the waveguide; 2) exploring its implications in quantum information processing, in particular photonic quantum computation and quantum key distribution. First, we demonstrate that by coupling a two-level system (TLS) or three/four-level system to a 1D continuum, strongly-correlated photons can be generated inside the waveguide. Photon-photon bound states, which decay exponentially as a function of the relative coordinates of photons, appear in multiphoton scattering processes. As a result, photon bunching and antibunching can be observed in the photon-photon correlation function, and nonclassical light source can be generated on demand. In the case of an N-type four-level system, we show that the effective photon-photon interaction mediated by the four-level system, gives rise to a variety of nonlinear optical phenomena, including

  19. Classical analogs of quasifree quantum stochastic processes given by stochastic states of the quantized electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertfelder, C.; Kümmerer, B.

    2001-03-01

    The mathematical model describing a light beam prepared in an arbitrary quantum optical state is a quasifree quantum stochastic process on the C* algebra of the canonical commutatation relations. For such quantum stochastic processes the concept of stochastic states is introduced. Stochastic quantum states have a classical analog in the following sense: If the light beam is prepared in a stochastic state, one can construct a generalized classical stochastic process, such that the distributions of the quantum observables and the classical random variables coincide. A sufficient algebraic condition for the stochasticity of a quantum state is formulated. The introduced formalism generalizes the Wigner representation from a single field mode to a continuum of modes. For the special case of a single field mode the stochasticity condition provides a new criterion for the positivity of the Wigner function related to the given state. As an example the quantized eletromagnetic field in empty space at temperature T=0 is discussed. It turns out that the corresponding classical stochastic process is not a white noise but a colored noise with a linearly increasing spectrum.

  20. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of "quantum physical brain" reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a variety of concrete images given by temporal realizations of the corresponding (Gaussian) random signal. This signal has the covariance operator coinciding with the density operator encoding the abstract concept under consideration. The presence of various temporal scales in the brain plays the crucial role in creation of QLR in the brain. Moreover, in our model electromagnetic noise produced by neurons is a source of superstrong QL correlations between processes in different spatial domains in the brain; the binding problem is solved on the QL level, but with the aid of the classical background fluctuations.

  1. Applying the simplest Kochen-Specker set for quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Gustavo; Arias, Mauricio; Etcheverry, Sebastián; Gómez, Esteban S; Cabello, Adán; Xavier, Guilherme B; Lima, Gustavo

    2014-08-29

    Kochen-Specker (KS) sets are key tools for proving some fundamental results in quantum theory and also have potential applications in quantum information processing. However, so far, their intrinsic complexity has prevented experimentalists from using them for any application. The KS set requiring the smallest number of contexts has been recently found. Relying on this simple KS set, here we report an input state-independent experimental technique to certify whether a set of measurements is actually accessing a preestablished quantum six-dimensional space encoded in the transverse momentum of single photons.

  2. Quantum learning of classical stochastic processes: The completely positive realization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monràs, Alex; Winter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Among several tasks in Machine Learning, a specially important one is the problem of inferring the latent variables of a system and their causal relations with the observed behavior. A paradigmatic instance of this is the task of inferring the hidden Markov model underlying a given stochastic process. This is known as the positive realization problem (PRP), [L. Benvenuti and L. Farina, IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 49(5), 651-664 (2004)] and constitutes a central problem in machine learning. The PRP and its solutions have far-reaching consequences in many areas of systems and control theory, and is nowadays an important piece in the broad field of positive systems theory. We consider the scenario where the latent variables are quantum (i.e., quantum states of a finite-dimensional system) and the system dynamics is constrained only by physical transformations on the quantum system. The observable dynamics is then described by a quantum instrument, and the task is to determine which quantum instrument — if any — yields the process at hand by iterative application. We take as a starting point the theory of quasi-realizations, whence a description of the dynamics of the process is given in terms of linear maps on state vectors and probabilities are given by linear functionals on the state vectors. This description, despite its remarkable resemblance with the hidden Markov model, or the iterated quantum instrument, is however devoid of any stochastic or quantum mechanical interpretation, as said maps fail to satisfy any positivity conditions. The completely positive realization problem then consists in determining whether an equivalent quantum mechanical description of the same process exists. We generalize some key results of stochastic realization theory, and show that the problem has deep connections with operator systems theory, giving possible insight to the lifting problem in quotient operator systems. Our results have potential applications in quantum machine

  3. Quantum learning of classical stochastic processes: The completely positive realization problem

    SciTech Connect

    Monràs, Alex; Winter, Andreas

    2016-01-15

    Among several tasks in Machine Learning, a specially important one is the problem of inferring the latent variables of a system and their causal relations with the observed behavior. A paradigmatic instance of this is the task of inferring the hidden Markov model underlying a given stochastic process. This is known as the positive realization problem (PRP), [L. Benvenuti and L. Farina, IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 49(5), 651–664 (2004)] and constitutes a central problem in machine learning. The PRP and its solutions have far-reaching consequences in many areas of systems and control theory, and is nowadays an important piece in the broad field of positive systems theory. We consider the scenario where the latent variables are quantum (i.e., quantum states of a finite-dimensional system) and the system dynamics is constrained only by physical transformations on the quantum system. The observable dynamics is then described by a quantum instrument, and the task is to determine which quantum instrument — if any — yields the process at hand by iterative application. We take as a starting point the theory of quasi-realizations, whence a description of the dynamics of the process is given in terms of linear maps on state vectors and probabilities are given by linear functionals on the state vectors. This description, despite its remarkable resemblance with the hidden Markov model, or the iterated quantum instrument, is however devoid of any stochastic or quantum mechanical interpretation, as said maps fail to satisfy any positivity conditions. The completely positive realization problem then consists in determining whether an equivalent quantum mechanical description of the same process exists. We generalize some key results of stochastic realization theory, and show that the problem has deep connections with operator systems theory, giving possible insight to the lifting problem in quotient operator systems. Our results have potential applications in quantum machine

  4. Path integration and perturbation theory with complex Euclidean actions

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Garnik; MacKenzie, R.; Paranjape, M. B.; Ruel, Jonathan

    2008-05-15

    The Euclidean path integral quite often involves an action that is not completely real, i.e. a complex action. This occurs when the Minkowski action contains t-odd CP-violating terms. This usually consists of topological terms, such as the Chern-Simons term in odd dimensions, the Wess-Zumino term, the {theta} term or Chern character in 4-dimensional gauge theories, or other topological densities. Analytic continuation to Euclidean time yields an imaginary term in the Euclidean action. It also occurs when the action contains fermions, the fermion path integral being in general a sum over positive and negative real numbers. Negative numbers correspond to the exponential of i{pi} and hence indicate the presence of an imaginary term in the action. In the presence of imaginary terms in the Euclidean action, the usual method of perturbative quantization can fail. Here the action is expanded about its critical points, the quadratic part serving to define the Gaussian free theory and the higher order terms defining the perturbative interactions. For a complex action, the critical points are generically obtained at complex field configurations. Hence the contour of path integration does not pass through the critical points and the perturbative paradigm cannot be directly implemented. The contour of path integration has to be deformed to pass through the complex critical point using a generalized method of steepest descent, in order to do so. Typically, this procedure is not followed. Rather, only the real part of the Euclidean action is considered, and its critical points are used to define the perturbation theory, a procedure that can lead to incorrect results. In this article we present a simple example to illustrate this point. The example consists of N scalar fields in 0+1 dimensions interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the presence of a Chern-Simons term. In this example the path integral can be done exactly, the procedure of deformation of the contour of path

  5. Some remarks on quantum physics, stochastic processes, and nonlinear filtering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2016-05-01

    The mathematical similarities between quantum mechanics and stochastic processes has been studied in the literature. Some of the major results are reviewed, such as the relationship between the Fokker-Planck equation and the Schrödinger equation. Also reviewed are more recent results that show the mathematical similarities between quantum many particle systems and concepts in other areas of applied science, such as stochastic Petri nets. Some connections to filtering theory are discussed.

  6. Space–time-bounded quantum fields for detection processes

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, Fernando J.; Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a quantum field detection model comprising two types of detection procedures: maximal detection, where the initial state of the system and detectors undergoes an irreversible evolution, and minimal detection, where the system–detector interaction consists of a small, reversible coupling and posterior maximal detection performed over the detector system. Combined, these detection procedures allow for a time-dependent description of signalling experiments involving yes/no type of questions. A particular minimal detection model, stable in the presence of the vacuum, is presented and studied, successfully reproducing the localization of the state after a detection. PMID:24711717

  7. Scalable and Robust Randomized Benchmarking of Quantum Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, J. M.; Emerson, Joseph

    2011-05-01

    In this Letter we propose a fully scalable randomized benchmarking protocol for quantum information processors. We prove that the protocol provides an efficient and reliable estimate of the average error-rate for a set operations (gates) under a very general noise model that allows for both time and gate-dependent errors. In particular we obtain a sequence of fitting models for the observable fidelity decay as a function of a (convergent) perturbative expansion of the gate errors about the mean error. We illustrate the protocol through numerical examples.

  8. Theoretical Study of Solid State Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-28

    odd effects of Heisenberg chains on long-range interaction and entanglement, Physical Review B, (10 2010): 140403. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.140403 08...interface-bound electrons in silicon: An effective mass study, Physical Review B, (10 2011): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.155320 08/31/2012 18.00 Xuedong...Xuedong Hu. Effect of randomness on quantum data buses of Heisenberg spin chains, Physical Review B, (06 2012): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.224418

  9. Solution-processed, high-performance light-emitting diodes based on quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xingliang; Zhang, Zhenxing; Jin, Yizheng; Niu, Yuan; Cao, Hujia; Liang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Liwei; Wang, Jianpu; Peng, Xiaogang

    2014-11-06

    Solution-processed optoelectronic and electronic devices are attractive owing to the potential for low-cost fabrication of large-area devices and the compatibility with lightweight, flexible plastic substrates. Solution-processed light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using conjugated polymers or quantum dots as emitters have attracted great interest over the past two decades. However, the overall performance of solution-processed LEDs--including their efficiency, efficiency roll-off at high current densities, turn-on voltage and lifetime under operational conditions-remains inferior to that of the best vacuum-deposited organic LEDs. Here we report a solution-processed, multilayer quantum-dot-based LED with excellent performance and reproducibility. It exhibits colour-saturated deep-red emission, sub-bandgap turn-on at 1.7 volts, high external quantum efficiencies of up to 20.5 per cent, low efficiency roll-off (up to 15.1 per cent of the external quantum efficiency at 100 mA cm(-2)), and a long operational lifetime of more than 100,000 hours at 100 cd m(-2), making this device the best-performing solution-processed red LED so far, comparable to state-of-the-art vacuum-deposited organic LEDs. This optoelectronic performance is achieved by inserting an insulating layer between the quantum dot layer and the oxide electron-transport layer to optimize charge balance in the device and preserve the superior emissive properties of the quantum dots. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for further research, leading to high-performance, all-solution-processed quantum-dot-based LEDs ideal for next-generation display and solid-state lighting technologies.

  10. Quantum One Go Computation and the Physical Computation Level of Biological Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnoli, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    By extending the representation of quantum algorithms to problem-solution interdependence, the unitary evolution part of the algorithm entangles the register containing the problem with the register containing the solution. Entanglement becomes correlation, or mutual causality, between the two measurement outcomes: the string of bits encoding the problem and that encoding the solution. In former work, we showed that this is equivalent to the algorithm knowing in advance 50% of the bits of the solution it will find in the future, which explains the quantum speed up. Mutual causality between bits of information is also equivalent to seeing quantum measurement as a many body interaction between the parts of a perfect classical machine whose normalized coordinates represent the qubit populations. This “hidden machine” represents the problem to be solved. The many body interaction (measurement) satisfies all the constraints of a nonlinear Boolean network “together and at the same time”—in one go—thus producing the solution. Quantum one go computation can formalize the physical computation level of the theories that place consciousness in quantum measurement. In fact, in visual perception, we see, thus recognize, thus process, a significant amount of information “together and at the same time”. Identifying the fundamental mechanism of consciousness with that of the quantum speed up gives quantum consciousness, with respect to classical consciousness, a potentially enormous evolutionary advantage.

  11. Merging quantum dots, biomolecules, and polymers for record performance from solution-processed optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Edward H.

    2006-02-01

    We apply discoveries in nanoscience towards applications relevant to health, environment, security, and connectedness. A materials fundamental to our research is the quantum dot. Each quantum dot is a particle of semiconductor only a few nanometers in diameter. These semiconductor nanoparticles confine electrons to within their characteristic wavelength. Thus, just as changing the length of a guitar string changes the frequency of sound produced, so too does changing the size of a quantum dot alter the frequency - hence energy - the electron can adopt. As a result, quantum dots are tunable matter (Fig. 2). We work with colloidal quantum dots, nanoparticles produced in, and processed from, solution. They can be coated onto nearly anything - a semiconductor substrate, a window, a wall, fabric. Compared to epitaxially-grown semiconductors used to make optical detectors, lasers, and modulators, they are cheap, safe to work with, and easy to produce. Much of our work with quantum dots involves infrared light - its measurement, production, modulation, and harnessing. While there exists an abundance of work in colloidal quantum dots active in the visible, there are fewer results in the infrared. The wavelengths between 1000 and 2000 nm are nonetheless of great practical importance: half of the sun's power reaching the earth lies in this wavelength range; 'biological windows' in which tissue is relatively transparent and does not emit background light (autofluorescence) exist in the infrared; fiber-optic networks operate at 1.3 and 1.5 um.

  12. Space-time topology and quantum gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. L.

    Characteristic features are discussed of a theory of quantum gravity that allows space-time with a non-Euclidean topology. The review begins with a summary of the manifolds that can occur as classical vacuum space-times and as space-times with positive energy. Local structures with non-Euclidean topology - topological geons - collapse, and one may conjecture that in asymptotically flat space-times non-Euclidean topology is hiden from view. In the quantum theory, large diffeos can act nontrivially on the space of states, leading to state vectors that transform as representations of the corresponding symmetry group π0(Diff). In particular, in a quantum theory that, at energies E < EPlanck, is a theory of the metric alone, there appear to be ground states with half-integral spin, and in higher-dimensional gravity, with the kinematical quantum numbers of fundamental fermions.

  13. Chern-Simons quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, John Paul

    The first two chapters provide background information for the dissertation. In the first chapter, a brief history of Chern-Simons quantum field theories is given and motivation for studying these models is given by examining their physical properties and their mathematical difficulties. The second chapter gives a brief overview of quantum field theory, by presenting the Garding-Wightman formalism and the necessary modifications for studying quantum gauge field theories. Finally, the mathematical tools used in the following chapters are described. In the third chapter, Chern-Simons Quantum Electrodynamics is presented and its main features are developed. The gauge field is canonically quantized and the underlying indefinite metric is identified. Next, the physical subspace is characterized by functions that are analytic in harmonic oscillator coordinates. This property is used to show an equivalence between the Gauss vectors, gauge invariance, and positivity with respect to the indefinite metric. The fourth chapter presents the Euclidean formulation of this model, where the covariance for the free gauge field is calculated, and shown to generate a complex, Gaussian measure describing a real, random process. Next, a path-space formula on the Gauss vectors is developed, from which it follows that the physical vectors satisfy the Osterwalder-Schrader positivity requirement.

  14. Quantum Catalytic Extraction Process{trademark}:Applications to low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, C.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation details the Quantum method for catalytic extraction processing of low-level radioactive wastes. Resource recovery, waste volume reduction, and fundamentals of the processing technology are discussed. The results of two case studies, and a description of two demonstration units are provided.

  15. Spintronic characteristics of self-assembled neurotransmitter acetylcholine molecular complexes enable quantum information processing in neural networks and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Majauskaite, Kristina; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zborowski, Krzysztof; Adhikari, Kapil; Krisciukaitis, Sarunas

    2016-09-01

    Implementation of liquid state quantum information processing based on spatially localized electronic spin in the neurotransmitter stable acetylcholine (ACh) neutral molecular radical is discussed. Using DFT quantum calculations we proved that this molecule possesses stable localized electron spin, which may represent a qubit in quantum information processing. The necessary operating conditions for ACh molecule are formulated in self-assembled dimer and more complex systems. The main quantum mechanical research result of this paper is that the neurotransmitter ACh systems, which were proposed, include the use of quantum molecular spintronics arrays to control the neurotransmission in neural networks.

  16. Silicon surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Slusher, Richart

    2010-03-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is designing, building, and testing scalable surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information applications, fabricated using silicon VLSI technology. A wide range of trap architectures have been developed, including a linear trap capable of holding long chains of equally spaced ions, a 90-degree X-junction, and an integrated micromirror with collection efficiency approaching 20%. Fabrication features that can be integrated with the surface electrodes include multilayer interconnects, optics for enhanced light collection, flexible optical access through beveled slots extending through the substrate, and recessed wire bonds for clear laser access across the trap surface. Traps are designed at GTRI using in-house codes that calculate trap fields, compute the full motion of ions confined in the trap, including micromotion, and optimize electrode shapes and transport waveforms using genetic algorithms. We will present designs and initial test results for several of these traps, as well as plans for their use in future experiments.

  17. Multiple particle production processes in the light'' of quantum optics

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Ever since the observation that high-energy nuclear active'' cosmic-ray particles create bunches of penetrating particles upon hitting targets, a controversy has raged about whether these secondaries are created in a single act'' or whether many hadrons are just the result of an intra-nuclear cascade, yielding one meson in every step. I cannot escape the impression that: the latter kind of model appeals naturally as a consequence of an innate bio-morphism in our way of thinking and that in one guise or another it has tenaciously survived to this day, also for hadron-hadron collisions, via multi-peripheral models to the modern parton shower approach. Indeed, from the very beginning of theoretical consideration of multiparticle production, the possibility of many particles arising from a single hot'' system has been explored, with many fruitful results, not the least of which are the s{sup 1/4} dependence of the mean produced particle multiplicity and the thermal'' shape of the P{sub T} spectra. An important consequence of the thermodynamical-hydrodynamical models is that particle emission is treated in analogy to black-body radiation, implying for the secondaries a set of specific Quantum-Statistical properties, very similar to those observed in quantum optics. From here on I shall try to review a number of implications and applications of this QS analogy in the study of multiplicity distributions of the produced secondaries. I will touch only in passing another very important topic of this class, the Bose-Einstein two-particle correlations.

  18. Multi-stability in folded shells: non-Euclidean origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    Both natural and man-made structures benefit from having multiple mechanically stable states, from the quick snapping motion of hummingbird beaks to micro-textured surfaces with tunable roughness. Rather than discuss special fabrication techniques for creating bi-stability through material anisotropy, in this talk I will present several examples of how folding a structure can modify the energy landscape and thus lead to multiple stable states. Using ideas from origami and differential geometry, I will discuss how deforming a non-Euclidean surface can be done either continuously or discontinuously, and explore the effects that global constraints have on the ultimate stability of the surface.

  19. Loop-erased random walk on a percolation cluster: crossover from Euclidean to fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, E; Rouhani, S

    2014-06-01

    We study loop-erased random walk (LERW) on the percolation cluster, with occupation probability p ≥ p_{c}, in two and three dimensions. We find that the fractal dimensions of LERW_{p} are close to normal LERW in a Euclidean lattice, for all p>p_{c}. However, our results reveal that LERW on critical incipient percolation clusters is fractal with d_{f}=1.217 ± 0.002 for d=2 and 1.43 ± 0.02 for d=3, independent of the coordination number of the lattice. These values are consistent with the known values for optimal path exponents in strongly disordered media. We investigate how the behavior of the LERW_{p} crosses over from Euclidean to fractal geometry by gradually decreasing the value of the parameter p from 1 to p_{c}. For finite systems, two crossover exponents and a scaling relation can be derived. This work opens up a theoretical window regarding the diffusion process on fractal and random landscapes.

  20. Two-stage sparse coding of region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels to detect saliency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Cai; Zhang, Ping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel bottom-up saliency detection algorithm from the perspective of covariance matrices on a Riemannian manifold. Each superpixel is described by a region covariance matrix on Riemannian Manifolds. We carry out a two-stage sparse coding scheme via Log-Euclidean kernels to extract salient objects efficiently. In the first stage, given background dictionary on image borders, sparse coding of each region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels is performed. The reconstruction error on the background dictionary is regarded as the initial saliency of each superpixel. In the second stage, an improvement of the initial result is achieved by calculating reconstruction errors of the superpixels on foreground dictionary, which is extracted from the first stage saliency map. The sparse coding in the second stage is similar to the first stage, but is able to effectively highlight the salient objects uniformly from the background. Finally, three post-processing methods-highlight-inhibition function, context-based saliency weighting, and the graph cut-are adopted to further refine the saliency map. Experiments on four public benchmark datasets show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and mean absolute error, and demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Optimizing the choice of spin-squeezed states for detecting and characterizing quantum processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozema, Lee A.; Mahler, Dylan H.; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2014-11-07

    Quantum metrology uses quantum states with no classical counterpart to measure a physical quantity with extraordinary sensitivity or precision. Most such schemes characterize a dynamical process by probing it with a specially designed quantum state. The success of such a scheme usually relies on the process belonging to a particular one-parameter family. If this assumption is violated, or if the goal is to measure more than one parameter, a different quantum state may perform better. In the most extreme case, we know nothing about the process and wish to learn everything. This requires quantum process tomography, which demands an informationally complete set of probe states. It is very convenient if this set is group covariant—i.e., each element is generated by applying an element of the quantum system’s natural symmetry group to a single fixed fiducial state. In this paper, we consider metrology with 2-photon (“biphoton”) states and report experimental studies of different states’ sensitivity to small, unknown collective SU(2) rotations [“SU(2) jitter”]. Maximally entangled N00N states are the most sensitive detectors of such a rotation, yet they are also among the worst at fully characterizing an a priori unknown process. We identify (and confirm experimentally) the best SU(2)-covariant set for process tomography; these states are all less entangled than the N00N state, and are characterized by the fact that they form a 2-design.

  2. Quantum-dynamical picture of a multistep enzymatic process: reaction catalyzed by phospholipase A(2).

    PubMed Central

    Bała, P; Grochowski, P; Nowiński, K; Lesyng, B; McCammon, J A

    2000-01-01

    A quantum-classical molecular dynamics model (QCMD), applying explicit integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (QD) and Newtonian equations of motion (MD), is presented. The model is capable of describing quantum dynamical processes in complex biomolecular systems. It has been applied in simulations of a multistep catalytic process carried out by phospholipase A(2) in its active site. The process includes quantum-dynamical proton transfer from a water molecule to histidine localized in the active site, followed by a nucleophilic attack of the resulting OH(-) group on a carbonyl carbon atom of a phospholipid substrate, leading to cleavage of an adjacent ester bond. The process has been simulated using a parallel version of the QCMD code. The potential energy function for the active site is computed using an approximate valence bond (AVB) method. The dynamics of the key proton is described either by QD or classical MD. The coupling between the quantum proton and the classical atoms is accomplished via Hellmann-Feynman forces, as well as the time dependence of the potential energy function in the Schrödinger equation (QCMD/AVB model). Analysis of the simulation results with an Advanced Visualization System revealed a correlated rather than a stepwise picture of the enzymatic process. It is shown that an sp(2)--> sp(3) configurational change at the substrate carbonyl carbon is mostly responsible for triggering the activation process. PMID:10968989

  3. 3D Lorentzian loop quantum gravity and the spinor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girelli, Florian; Sellaroli, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We consider the generalization of the "spinor approach" to the Lorentzian case, in the context of three-dimensional loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant Λ =0 . The key technical tool that allows this generalization is the recoupling theory between unitary infinite-dimensional representations and nonunitary finite-dimensional ones, obtained in the process of generalizing the Wigner-Eckart theorem to SU(1,1). We use SU(1,1) tensor operators to build observables and a solvable quantum Hamiltonian constraint, analogous to the one introduced by V. Bonzom and his collaborators in the Euclidean case (with both Λ =0 and Λ ≠0 ). We show that the Lorentzian Ponzano-Regge amplitude is the solution of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint by recovering the Biedenharn-Elliott relation [generalized to the case where unitary and nonunitary SU(1,1) representations are coupled to each other]. Our formalism is sufficiently general that both the Lorentzian and the Euclidean case can be recovered (with Λ =0 ).

  4. Experimentally modeling stochastic processes with less memory by the use of a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Matthew S; Gu, Mile; Ho, Joseph; Wiseman, Howard M; Pryde, Geoff J

    2017-02-01

    Computer simulation of observable phenomena is an indispensable tool for engineering new technology, understanding the natural world, and studying human society. However, the most interesting systems are often so complex that simulating their future behavior demands storing immense amounts of information regarding how they have behaved in the past. For increasingly complex systems, simulation becomes increasingly difficult and is ultimately constrained by resources such as computer memory. Recent theoretical work shows that quantum theory can reduce this memory requirement beyond ultimate classical limits, as measured by a process' statistical complexity, C. We experimentally demonstrate this quantum advantage in simulating stochastic processes. Our quantum implementation observes a memory requirement of Cq = 0.05 ± 0.01, far below the ultimate classical limit of C = 1. Scaling up this technique would substantially reduce the memory required in simulations of more complex systems.

  5. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Britton, Joe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Amini, Jason; Brown, Kenton; Home, Jonathan; Hume, David; Shiga, Nobu; Itano, Wayne; Jost, John; Knill, Emmanuel; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Wineland, David

    2007-03-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in an rf Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane [1,2,3]. This device is realized with simple fabrication procedures, making it a potential candidate for a scalable ion trap for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled ions 40 micrometers above planar electrodes. These electrodes are fabricated from gold on a fused quartz substrate. The heating rate of the ions is low enough to make the trap useful for quantum information processing. [1] J. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005). [2] S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). [3] J. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.

  6. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Amini, J. M.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-06-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in rf Paul traps with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are confined above this plane ootnotetextJ. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005).^, ootnotetextS. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006).^, ootnotetextJ. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.. These devices are realized with simple fabrication procedures, making them potentially scalable for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. For traps fabricated from gold on fused quartz, the ions are 40 micrometers above the planar electrodes and their heating rate is low enough to make the traps useful for quantum information processing.

  7. Characterization of Pairwise Correlations from Multiple Quantum Correlated Beams Generated from Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailong; Cao, Leiming; Jing, Jietai

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically characterize the performance of the pairwise correlations (PCs) from multiple quantum correlated beams based on the cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. The presence of the PCs with quantum corre- lation in these systems can be verified by calculating the degree of intensity difference squeezing for any pair of all the output fields. The quantum correlation characteristics of all the PCs under different cascaded schemes are also discussed in detail and the repulsion effect between PCs in these cascaded FWM processes is theoretically predicted. Our results open the way for the classification and application of quantum states generated from the cascaded FWM processes. PMID:28071759

  8. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity

    PubMed Central

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction. PMID:26585904

  9. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Psaker, Ales

    2005-12-01

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  10. Processes models, environmental analyses, and cognitive architectures: quo vadis quantum probability theory?

    PubMed

    Marewski, Julian N; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    A lot of research in cognition and decision making suffers from a lack of formalism. The quantum probability program could help to improve this situation, but we wonder whether it would provide even more added value if its presumed focus on outcome models were complemented by process models that are, ideally, informed by ecological analyses and integrated into cognitive architectures.

  11. Study of the self-organization processes in lead sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, S. A. Aleksandrova, O. A.; Maksimov, A. I.; Maraeva, E. V.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Men’kovich, E. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Musikhin, S. F.

    2014-12-15

    A procedure is described for the synthesis of nanoparticles based on lead chalcogenides. The procedure combines the synthesis of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous solutions with simultaneous organization of the QDs into ordered arrays. The processes of the self-organization of QDs are analyzed at the nano- and microscopic levels by the photoluminescence method, atomic-force microscopy, and optical microscopy.

  12. Quantum Process Tomography of a Room Temperature Optically-Controlled Phase Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Figueroa, Eden; Stony Brook University Team

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a room temperature setup capable of optically controlled phase shifts on a weak probe field. Our system is realized in a vapor of 87Rb atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency utilizing a N-type energy level scheme coupled by three optical fields. By varying the power of the signal field, we can control the size of an optical phase shift experienced by weak coherent state pulses of < n > ~ 1 , propagating through the vapor. We quantify the optical phase shift by measuring the process output via balanced homodyne tomography which provides us with the complete quadrature and phase information of the output states. Furthermore, we measure the output for a set of states over a subspace of the coherent state basis and gain the information to completely reconstruct our phase shift procedure by coherent state quantum process tomography. The reconstruction yields a rank-4 process superoperator which grants the ability to predict how our phase shift process will behave on an arbitrary quantum optical state in the mode of the reconstruction. Our results demonstrate progress towards room temperature systems for possible quantum gates; a key component of a future quantum processor designed to operate at room temperature. US-Navy Office of Naval Research N00141410801, National Science Foundation PHY-1404398, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  13. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical and quantum processes for scale-invariant driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian; Jarzynski, Christopher; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2014-03-01

    All real physical processes in classical as well as in quantum devices operate in finite-time. For most applications, however, adiabatic, i.e. infinitely-slow processes, are more favorable, as these do not cause unwanted, parasitic excitations. A shortcut to adiabaticity is a driving protocol which reproduces in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic process. A particular powerful technique to engineer such shortcuts is transitionless quantum driving by means of counterdiabatic fields. However, determining closed form expressions for the counterdiabatic field has generally proven to be a daunting task. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach, with which we find the explicit form of the counterdiabatic driving field in arbitrary scale-invariant dynamical processes, encompassing expansions and transport. Our approach originates in the formalism of generating functions, and unifies previous approaches independently developed for classical and quantum systems. We show how this new approach allows to design shortcuts to adiabaticity for a large class of classical and quantum, single-particle, non-linear, and many-body systems. SD and CJ acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (USA) under grant DMR-1206971. This research is further supported by the U.S Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and a LANL J. Robert Oppenheimer fellowship (AdC).

  14. Fluctuations and Stochastic Processes in One-Dimensional Many-Body Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stimming, H.-P.; Mauser, N. J.; Mazets, I. E.

    2010-07-02

    We study the fluctuation properties of a one-dimensional many-body quantum system composed of interacting bosons and investigate the regimes where quantum noise or, respectively, thermal excitations are dominant. For the latter, we develop a semiclassical description of the fluctuation properties based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process. As an illustration, we analyze the phase correlation functions and the full statistical distributions of the interference between two one-dimensional systems, either independent or tunnel-coupled, and compare with the Luttinger-liquid theory.

  15. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. The intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields. PMID:27869230

  16. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. The intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields.

  17. Generating Optical Schrödinger Kittens for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Laurat, Julien; Grangier, Philippe

    2006-04-01

    We present a detailed experimental analysis of a free-propagating light pulse prepared in a ``Schrödinger kitten'' state, which is defined as a quantum superposition of ``classical'' coherent states with small amplitudes. This kitten state is generated by subtracting one photon from a squeezed vacuum beam, and it clearly presents a negative Wigner function. The predicted influence of the experimental parameters is in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The amplitude of the coherent states can be amplified to transform our ``Schrödinger kittens'' into bigger Schrödinger cats, providing an essential tool for quantum information processing.

  18. Isolated many-body quantum systems far from equilibrium: Relaxation process and thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Santos, Lea F.

    2014-10-15

    We present an overview of our recent numerical and analytical results on the dynamics of isolated interacting quantum systems that are taken far from equilibrium by an abrupt perturbation. The studies are carried out on one-dimensional systems of spins-1/2, which are paradigmatic models of many-body quantum systems. Our results show the role of the interplay between the initial state and the post-perturbation Hamiltonian in the relaxation process, the size of the fluctuations after equilibration, and the viability of thermalization.

  19. Experimentally modeling stochastic processes with less memory by the use of a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Matthew S.; Gu, Mile; Ho, Joseph; Wiseman, Howard M.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulation of observable phenomena is an indispensable tool for engineering new technology, understanding the natural world, and studying human society. However, the most interesting systems are often so complex that simulating their future behavior demands storing immense amounts of information regarding how they have behaved in the past. For increasingly complex systems, simulation becomes increasingly difficult and is ultimately constrained by resources such as computer memory. Recent theoretical work shows that quantum theory can reduce this memory requirement beyond ultimate classical limits, as measured by a process’ statistical complexity, C. We experimentally demonstrate this quantum advantage in simulating stochastic processes. Our quantum implementation observes a memory requirement of Cq = 0.05 ± 0.01, far below the ultimate classical limit of C = 1. Scaling up this technique would substantially reduce the memory required in simulations of more complex systems. PMID:28168218

  20. Description of quantum coherence in thermodynamic processes requires constraints beyond free energy

    PubMed Central

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have developed fundamental limitations on nanoscale thermodynamics, in terms of a set of independent free energy relations. Here we show that free energy relations cannot properly describe quantum coherence in thermodynamic processes. By casting time-asymmetry as a quantifiable, fundamental resource of a quantum state, we arrive at an additional, independent set of thermodynamic constraints that naturally extend the existing ones. These asymmetry relations reveal that the traditional Szilárd engine argument does not extend automatically to quantum coherences, but instead only relational coherences in a multipartite scenario can contribute to thermodynamic work. We find that coherence transformations are always irreversible. Our results also reveal additional structural parallels between thermodynamics and the theory of entanglement. PMID:25754774

  1. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  2. Certifying quantumness: Benchmarks for the optimal processing of generalized coherent and squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-10-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionary advantages in information processing and transmission compared to classical technology; however, determining which specific resources are needed to surpass the capabilities of classical machines often remains a nontrivial problem. To address such a problem, one first needs to establish the best classical solutions, which set benchmarks that must be beaten by any implementation claiming to harness quantum features for an enhanced performance. Here we introduce and develop a self-contained formalism to obtain the ultimate, generally probabilistic benchmarks for quantum information protocols including teleportation and approximate cloning, with arbitrary ensembles of input states generated by a group action, so-called Gilmore-Perelomov coherent states. This allows us to construct explicit fidelity thresholds for the transmission of multimode Gaussian and non-Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems, as well as qubit and qudit pure states drawn according to nonuniform distributions on the Bloch hypersphere, which accurately model the current laboratory facilities. The performance of deterministic classical procedures such as square-root measurement strategies is further compared with the optimal probabilistic benchmarks, and the state-of-the-art performance of experimental quantum implementations against our newly derived thresholds is discussed. This work provides a comprehensive collection of directly useful criteria for the reliable certification of quantum communication technologies.

  3. On the Euclidean version of the photon number integral

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijsenaars, S.; Stodolsky, L.

    2008-02-15

    We reconsider the Euclidean version of the photon number integral introduced by Stodolsky [Acta Phys. Pol. B 33, 2659 (2002), e-print hep-th/02053131].This integral is well defined for any smooth non-self-intersecting curve in R{sup N}. Besides studying general features of this integral (including its conformal invariance), we evaluate it explicitly for the ellipse. The result is n{sub ellipse}=({xi}{sup -1}+{xi}){pi}{sup 2}, where {xi} is the ratio of the minor and major axes. This is in agreement with the previous result n{sub circle}=2{pi}{sup 2} and also with the conjecture that the minimum value of n for any plane curve occurs for the circle.

  4. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-12-01

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in d = 4 N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, d = 3 N = 2 super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and d = 3 N = 6 Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribute this to the conflicts of the reality conditions of the spinors. However, spacelike Wilson loops do exist in Euclidean space. There are both BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circular BPS Wilson loops. This is because the reality conditions of the spinors are lost after Wick rotation. The result is reasonable in view of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  5. Action with Acceleration II: Euclidean Hamiltonian and Jordan Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2013-10-01

    The Euclidean action with acceleration has been analyzed in Ref. 1, and referred to henceforth as Paper I, for its Hamiltonian and path integral. In this paper, the state space of the Hamiltonian is analyzed for the case when it is pseudo-Hermitian (equivalent to a Hermitian Hamiltonian), as well as the case when it is inequivalent. The propagator is computed using both creation and destruction operators as well as the path integral. A state space calculation of the propagator shows the crucial role played by the dual state vectors that yields a result impossible to obtain from a Hermitian Hamiltonian. When it is not pseudo-Hermitian, the Hamiltonian is shown to be a direct sum of Jordan blocks.

  6. Solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation in Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorkin, S. M.; Kaptari, L. P.; Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Kämpfer, B.

    2011-03-01

    Different approaches to solve the spinor-spinor Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation in Euclidean space are considered. It is argued that the complete set of Dirac matrices is the most appropriate basis to define the partial amplitudes and to solve numerically the resulting system of equations with realistic interaction kernels. Other representations can be obtained by performing proper unitary transformations. A generalization of the iteration method for finding the energy spectrum of the BS equation is discussed and examples of concrete calculations are presented. Comparison of relativistic calculations with available experimental data and with corresponding non relativistic results together with an analysis of the role of Lorentz boost effects and relativistic corrections are presented. A novel method related to the use of hyperspherical harmonics is considered for a representation of the vertex functions suitable for numerical calculations.

  7. Twistor Geometry of Null Foliations in Complex Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi-Chabert, Arman

    2017-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the geometric correspondence between a smooth complex projective quadric hypersurface Q^n of dimension n ≥ 3, and its twistor space PT, defined to be the space of all linear subspaces of maximal dimension of Q^n. Viewing complex Euclidean space CE^n as a dense open subset of Q^n, we show how local foliations tangent to certain integrable holomorphic totally null distributions of maximal rank on CE^n can be constructed in terms of complex submanifolds of PT. The construction is illustrated by means of two examples, one involving conformal Killing spinors, the other, conformal Killing-Yano 2-forms. We focus on the odd-dimensional case, and we treat the even-dimensional case only tangentially for comparison.

  8. Euclidean and Noetherian entropies in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Suvankar; Gopakumar, Rajesh

    2006-08-15

    We examine the Euclidean action approach, as well as that of Wald, to the entropy of black holes in asymptotically AdS spaces. From the point of view of holography these two approaches are somewhat complementary in spirit and it is not obvious why they should give the same answer in the presence of arbitrary higher derivative gravity corrections. For the case of the AdS{sub 5} Schwarzschild black hole, we explicitly study the leading correction to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in the presence of a variety of higher derivative corrections studied in the literature, including the Type IIB R{sup 4} term. We find a nontrivial agreement between the two approaches in every case. Finally, we give a general way of understanding the equivalence of these two approaches.

  9. Sensor Network Localization by Eigenvector Synchronization Over the Euclidean Group.

    PubMed

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Lipman, Yaron; Singer, Amit

    2012-07-01

    We present a new approach to localization of sensors from noisy measurements of a subset of their Euclidean distances. Our algorithm starts by finding, embedding, and aligning uniquely realizable subsets of neighboring sensors called patches. In the noise-free case, each patch agrees with its global positioning up to an unknown rigid motion of translation, rotation, and possibly reflection. The reflections and rotations are estimated using the recently developed eigenvector synchronization algorithm, while the translations are estimated by solving an overdetermined linear system. The algorithm is scalable as the number of nodes increases and can be implemented in a distributed fashion. Extensive numerical experiments show that it compares favorably to other existing algorithms in terms of robustness to noise, sparse connectivity, and running time. While our approach is applicable to higher dimensions, in the current article, we focus on the two-dimensional case.

  10. Application of Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis for gene identification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Antara; Barman, Soma

    2016-06-01

    Gene systems are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and noisy in nature. Many statistical tools which are used to extract relevant feature from genes provide fuzzy and ambiguous information. High-dimensional gene expression database available in public domain usually contains thousands of genes. Efficient prediction method is demanding nowadays for accurate identification of such database. Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis methods are applied on such databases to identify the genes. In both methods, prediction algorithm is based on homology search approach. Digital Signal Processing technique along with statistical method is used for analysis of genes in both cases. A two-level decision logic is used for gene classification as healthy or cancerous. This binary logic minimizes the prediction error and improves prediction accuracy. Superiority of the method is judged by receiver operating characteristic curve.

  11. Artificial immune system via Euclidean Distance Minimization for anomaly detection in bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montechiesi, L.; Cocconcelli, M.; Rubini, R.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years new diagnostics methodologies have emerged, with particular interest into machinery operating in non-stationary conditions. In fact continuous speed changes and variable loads make non-trivial the spectrum analysis. A variable speed means a variable characteristic fault frequency related to the damage that is no more recognizable in the spectrum. To overcome this problem the scientific community proposed different approaches listed in two main categories: model-based approaches and expert systems. In this context the paper aims to present a simple expert system derived from the mechanisms of the immune system called Euclidean Distance Minimization, and its application in a real case of bearing faults recognition. The proposed method is a simplification of the original process, adapted by the class of Artificial Immune Systems, which proved to be useful and promising in different application fields. Comparative results are provided, with a complete explanation of the algorithm and its functioning aspects.

  12. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  13. Two-photon exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1986-07-01

    QCD predictions for ..gamma gamma.. annihilation into single mesons, meson pairs, and baryon pairs are reviewed. Two-photon exclusive processes provide the most sensitive and practical measure of the distribution amplitudes, and thus a critical confrontation between QCD and experiment. Both the angular distribution and virtual photon mass dependence of these amplitudes are sensitive to the shapes of the phi (chi, Q). Novel effects involving the production of qq anti q anti q states at threshold are also discussed, and a new method is presented for systematically incorporating higher-order QCD corrections in ..gamma gamma.. reactions.

  14. Quantum effects in the diffusion process to form a heavy nucleus in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Washiyama, Kouhei; Takigawa, Noboru; Yilmaz, Buelent; Ayik, Sakir

    2006-08-14

    We discuss quantum effects in the diffusion process which is used to describe the shape evolution from the touching configuration of fusing two nuclei to a compound nucleus. Applying the theory with quantum effects to the case where the potential field, the mass and friction parameters are adapted to realistic values of heavy-ion collisions, we show that the quantum effects play significant roles at low temperatures which are relevant to the synthesis of superheavy elements.

  15. Evidence for transcriptase quantum processing implies entanglement and decoherence of superposition proton states.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W Grant

    2009-08-01

    Evidence requiring transcriptase quantum processing is identified and elementary quantum methods are used to qualitatively describe origins and consequences of time-dependent coherent proton states populating informational DNA base pair sites in T4 phage, designated by G-C-->G'-C', G-C-->*G-*C and AT-->*A-*T. Coherent states at these 'point' DNA lesions are introduced as consequences of hydrogen bond arrangement, keto-amino-->enol-imine, where product protons are shared between two sets of indistinguishable electron lone-pairs, and thus, participate in coupled quantum oscillations at frequencies of approximately 10(13) s(-1). This quantum mixing of proton energy states introduces stability enhancements of approximately 0.25-7 kcal/mole. Transcriptase genetic specificity is determined by hydrogen bond components contributing to the formation of complementary interstrand hydrogen bonds which, in these cases, is variable due to coupled quantum oscillations of coherent enol-imine protons. The transcriptase deciphers and executes genetic specificity instructions by implementing measurements on superposition proton states at G'-C', *G-*C and *A-*T sites in an interval Deltat<10(-13) s. After initiation of transcriptase measurement, model calculations indicate proton decoherence time, tau(D), satisfies the relation DeltatT, G'-->C, *C-->T and *G-->A. Measurements of 37 degrees C lifetimes of the keto-amino DNA hydrogen bond indicate a range of approximately 3200-68,000 yrs. Arguments are presented that quantum uncertainty limits on amino protons may drive the keto-amino-->enol-imine arrangement. Data imply that natural selection at the quantum level has generated effective schemes (a) for introducing superposition proton states--at rates appropriate for DNA evolution--in decoherence-free subspaces and (b) for creating entanglement states that augment (i

  16. Geostatistical analysis of groundwater level using Euclidean and non-Euclidean distance metrics and variable variogram fitting criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, Panagiota G.; Karatzas, George P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Corzo Perez, Gerald A.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater level is an important information in hydrological modelling. Geostatistical methods are often employed to map the free surface of an aquifer. In geostatistical analysis using Kriging techniques the selection of the optimal variogram model is very important for the optimal method performance. This work compares three different criteria, the least squares sum method, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Cressie's Indicator, to assess the theoretical variogram that fits to the experimental one and investigates the impact on the prediction results. Moreover, five different distance functions (Euclidean, Minkowski, Manhattan, Canberra, and Bray-Curtis) are applied to calculate the distance between observations that affects both the variogram calculation and the Kriging estimator. Cross validation analysis in terms of Ordinary Kriging is applied by using sequentially a different distance metric and the above three variogram fitting criteria. The spatial dependence of the observations in the tested dataset is studied by fitting classical variogram models and the Matérn model. The proposed comparison analysis performed for a data set of two hundred fifty hydraulic head measurements distributed over an alluvial aquifer that covers an area of 210 km2. The study area is located in the Prefecture of Drama, which belongs to the Water District of East Macedonia (Greece). This area was selected in terms of hydro-geological data availability and geological homogeneity. The analysis showed that a combination of the Akaike information Criterion for the variogram fitting assessment and the Brays-Curtis distance metric provided the most accurate cross-validation results. The Power-law variogram model provided the best fit to the experimental data. The aforementioned approach for the specific dataset in terms of the Ordinary Kriging method improves the prediction efficiency in comparison to the classical Euclidean distance metric. Therefore, maps of the spatial

  17. Intraband Auger processes and simple models of the ionization balance in semiconductor quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Janet L.

    1994-04-01

    The importance of intraband Auger processes in determining the ionization balance in quantum dots is reported. The numerically inexpensive binary-encounter model for a Coulomb collision between identical particles is found to be a good estimator of the intraband Auger rates out of a quantum dot. Intraband and the conventional interband Auger processes differ in that the former involve only intraband transitions whereas the latter always involve a radiationless interband transition. As such, intraband Auger rates do not involve the evaluation of the very small overlap integral of a conduction band with a valence band Bloch wave function and are thus much larger than interband Auger rates, especially for large-band-gap semiconductors like GaAs. Though intraband Auger processes are not strong enough to establish a quasiequilibrium within the entire conduction band at the room-temperature free-carrier concentrations (1016 cm-3) and bound energy separations (greater than an LO phonon energy) commonly assumed in the quantum-dot literature, they are capable of placing almost as many bound carriers in states near the band edge as would be predicted erroneously by a quasiequilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution. Such large bound state occupations are important for quantum-dot laser design. A sufficient condition for a quasiequilibrium to exist within all of an energy (conduction or valence) band is found to be the existence of many inverse Auger processes faster than interband spontaneous emission, which occurs for total (bound plus free) electron concentrations greater than 5×1017 cm-3 at room temperature in 100 Å radius GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum dots whose centers are separated by 400 Å. The nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium populations in quantum dots can be understood from a simple model in which states connected by fast Auger or phonon processes are in Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium. All other states have occupation factors which are determined by the ratio of intraband

  18. All-solution-processed inverted quantum-dot light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Castan, Alice; Kim, Hyo-Min; Jang, Jin

    2014-02-26

    Quantum dots are a promising new candidate for the emissive material in light-emitting devices for display applications. The fabrication of such devices by solution processing allows considerable cost reduction and is therefore very attractive for industrial manufacturers. We report all solution-processed colloidal quantum-dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) with an inverted structure. The red, green, and blue devices showed maximum luminances of 12 510, 32 370, and 249 cd/m(2) and turn-on voltages of 2.8, 3.6, and 3.6 V, respectively. We investigate the effect of a surfactant addition in the hole injection layer (HIL), with the aim of facilitating layer deposition and thereby enhancing device performance. We demonstrate that in the device structure presented in this study, a small amount of surfactant in the HIL can significantly improve the performance of the QLED.

  19. Strong field control of the interatomic Coulombic decay process in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Anika; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Menger, Maximilian; Aziz, Emad F.; Bande, Annika

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the laser-induced interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) process in paired quantum dots has been predicted (Bande, 2013). In this work we target the enhancement of ICD by scanning over a range of strong-field laser intensities. The GaAs quantum dots are modeled by a one-dimensional double-well potential in which simulations are done with the space-resolved multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method including antisymmetrization to account for the fermions. As a novelty a complementary state-resolved ansatz is developed to consolidate the interpretation of transient state populations, widths obtained for the ICD and the competing direct ionization channel, and Fano peak profiles in the photoelectron spectra. The major results are that multi-photon processes are unimportant even for the strongest fields. Further, below- π to π pulses display the highest ICD efficiency while the direct ionization becomes less dominant.

  20. Implications of the general constraints for single-qubit quantum process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Ramesh; Peters, Nicholas

    We revisit the general constraints of single qubit quantum process tomography and derive simplified forms in the Pauli basis. These forms give insight into the structure of the process matrix, which we examine in light of several examples. Specifically, we study some qubit leakage error models and show how different error models are manifest in the process matrix. NAP's research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  1. A note on the possible existence of an instanton-like self-dual solution to lattice Euclidean gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergeles, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    The self-dual solution to lattice Euclidean gravity is constructed. In contrast to the well known Eguchi-Hanson solution to continuous Euclidean Gravity, the lattice solution is asymptotically globally Euclidean, i.e., the boundary of the space as r -→ ∞ is S 3 = SU(2).

  2. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  3. PEET: a Matlab tool for estimating physical gate errors in quantum information processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Kosut, Robert; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-09-01

    A Physical Error Estimation Tool (PEET) is introduced in Matlab for predicting physical gate errors of quantum information processing (QIP) operations by constructing and then simulating gate sequences for a wide variety of user-defined, Hamiltonian-based physical systems. PEET is designed to accommodate the interdisciplinary needs of quantum computing design by assessing gate performance for users familiar with the underlying physics of QIP, as well as those interested in higher-level computing operations. The structure of PEET separates the bulk of the physical details of a system into Gate objects, while the construction of quantum computing gate operations are contained in GateSequence objects. Gate errors are estimated by Monte Carlo sampling of noisy gate operations. The main utility of PEET, though, is the implementation of QuantumControl methods that act to generate and then test gate sequence and pulse-shaping techniques for QIP performance. This work details the structure of PEET and gives instructive examples for its operation.

  4. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states.

  5. Multifunctional Dendrimer Ligands for High-Efficiency, Solution-Processed Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ikjun; Jung, Heeyoung; Jeong, Byeong Guk; Chang, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Younghoon; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Doh C; Lee, Changhee; Cho, Jinhan; Bae, Wan Ki

    2017-01-24

    We present multifunctional dendrimer ligands that serve as the charge injection controlling layer as well as the adhesive layer at the interfaces between quantum dots (QDs) and the electron transport layer (ETL) in quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs). Specifically, we use primary amine-functionalized dendrimer ligands (e.g., a series of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PADs, also referred to PAMAM)) that bind to the surface of QDs by replacing the native ligands (oleic acids) and also to the surface of ZnO ETL. PAD ligands control the electron injection rate from ZnO ETL into QDs by altering the electronic energy levels of the surface of ZnO ETL and thereby improve the charge balance within QDs in devices, leading to the enhancement of the device efficiency. As an ultimate achievement, the device efficiency (peak external quantum efficiency) improves by a factor of 3 by replacing the native ligands (3.86%) with PAD ligands (11.36%). In addition, multibranched dendrimer ligands keep the QD emissive layer intact during subsequent solution processing, enabling us to accomplish solution-processed QLEDs. The approach and results in the present study emphasize the importance of controlling the ligands of QDs to enhance QLED performance and also offer simple yet effective chemical mean toward all-solution-processed QLEDs.

  6. Aspects of type IIB theory on asymptotically locally Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.; Myers, Robert C.

    1997-05-01

    D-brane technology and strong/weak coupling duality supplement traditional orbifold techniques by making certain background geometries more accessible. In this spirit, we consider some of the geometric properties of the type IIB theory on R6×M, where M is an ``asymptotically locally Euclidean'' (ALE) gravitational instanton. Given the self-duality of the theory, we can extract the geometry (both singular and resolved) seen by the weakly coupled IIB string by studying the physics of a D1-brane probe. The construction is both amusing and instructive, as the physics of the probe completely captures the mathematics of the construction of ALE instantons via ``hyper-Kähler quotients,'' as presented by Kronheimer. This relation has been noted by Douglas and Moore for the A series. We extend the explicit construction to the case of the D and E series-uncovering a quite beautiful structure-and highlight how all of the elements of the mathematical construction find their counterparts in the physics of the type IIB D-string. We discuss the explicit ALE metrics which may be obtained using these techniques, and comment on the role duality plays in relating gauged linear σ models to conformal field theories.

  7. Surface ion trap structures with excellent optical access for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, P.; Blain, M.; Benito, F.; Chou, C.; Clark, C.; Descour, M.; Ellis, R.; Haltli, R.; Heller, E.; Kemme, S.; Sterk, J.; Tabakov, B.; Tigges, C.; Stick, D.

    2013-05-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode ion traps are necessary for the advancement of trapped ion quantum information processing as it offers a scalable way for realizing complex trap structures capable of storing and controlling many ions. The most promising way of performing two-qubit quantum gates in a chain of trapped ions is to focus laser beams on individual ions of the chain to drive gates. However, in surface ion traps the close proximity of the ions to the surface and the size of the chips usually cannot accommodate the tightly focused laser beams necessary to address individual ions parallel to the chip surface. Here we present a surface electrode ion trap monolithically fabricated in standard silicon technology that implements a linear quadrupole trap on a bowtie shaped chip with a narrow section that is only 1.2 mm wide. Laser beams parallel to the surface can be focused down to a waist of 4 μm with enough separation from the trap chip to prevent light scattering. The trap structure incorporates two Y-junctions for reordering ions and is optimized for quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Process output nonclassicality and nonclassicality depth of quantum-optical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabapathy, Krishna Kumar

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a quantum-optical notion of nonclassicality that we call the process output nonclassicality for multimode quantum channels. The motivation comes from an information-theoretic point of view and the emphasis is on the output states of a channel. We deem a channel to be "classical" if its outputs are always classical irrespective of the input, i.e., if the channel is nonclassicality breaking, and nonclassical otherwise. Our condition is stronger than the one considered by Rahimi-Keshari et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160401 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.160401 and we compare the two approaches. Using our framework we then quantify the nonclassicality of a quantum process by introducing a noise-robustness type of measure that we call the nonclassicality depth of a channel. It characterizes a certain threshold noise beyond which a given channel outputs only classical states. We achieve this by generalizing a prescription by Lee [Phys. Rev. A 44, R2775 (1991), 10.1103/PhysRevA.44.R2775] to multimode states and then by extension to multimode channels.

  9. Integer, fractional, and anomalous quantum Hall effects explained with Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2017-02-22

    The Hall effects, especially the integer, fractional and anomalous quantum Hall effects, have been addressed using Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept. The basic assumptions are that the conduction process is a common rate controlled "reaction" process that can be described with Eyring's absolute rate process theory; the mobility of electrons should be dependent on the free volume available for conduction electrons. The obtained Hall conductivity is clearly quantized as with prefactors related to both the magnetic flux quantum number and the magnetic quantum number via the azimuthal quantum number, with and without an externally applied magnetic field. This article focuses on two dimensional (2D) systems, but the approaches developed in this article can be extended to 3D systems.

  10. Modified surface loading process for achieving improved performance of the quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongxiu; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Yafeng; Zhou, Li; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-06-01

    Achieving high surface coverage of the colloidal quantum dots (QDs) on TiO2 films has been challenging for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Herein, a general surface engineering approach was proposed to increase the loading of these QDs. It was found that S2- treatment/QD re-uptake process can significantly improve the attachment of the QDs on TiO2 films. Surface concentration of the QDs was improved by ∼60%, which in turn greatly enhances light absorption and decreases carrier recombination in QDSCs. Ensuing QDSCs with optimized QD loading exhibit a power conversion efficiency of 3.66%, 83% higher than those fabricated with standard procedures.

  11. Distribution of chirality in the quantum walk: Markov process and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, Alejandro

    2010-06-15

    The asymptotic behavior of the quantum walk on the line is investigated, focusing on the probability distribution of chirality independently of position. It is shown analytically that this distribution has a longtime limit that is stationary and depends on the initial conditions. This result is unexpected in the context of the unitary evolution of the quantum walk as it is usually linked to a Markovian process. The asymptotic value of the entanglement between the coin and the position is determined by the chirality distribution. For given asymptotic values of both the entanglement and the chirality distribution, it is possible to find the corresponding initial conditions within a particular class of spatially extended Gaussian distributions.

  12. Entangled coherent states versus entangled photon pairs for practical quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kimin; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2010-12-15

    We compare effects of decoherence and detection inefficiency on entangled coherent states (ECSs) and entangled photon pairs (EPPs), both of which are known to be particularly useful for quantum-information processing (QIP). When decoherence effects caused by photon losses are heavy, the ECSs outperform the EPPs as quantum channels for teleportation both in fidelities and in success probabilities. On the other hand, when inefficient detectors are used, the teleportation scheme using the ECSs suffers undetected errors that result in the degradation of fidelity, while this is not the case for the teleportation scheme using the EPPs. Our study reveals the merits and demerits of the two types of entangled states in realizing practical QIP under realistic conditions.

  13. A microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Britton, Joe; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Hume, David; Jost, John; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Shiga, Nobu; Wineland, David

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate confinement of individual atomic ions in a radio-frequency Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane. This device is realized with a relatively simple fabrication procedure and has important implications for quantum state manipulation and quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled Mg-24 ions approximately 40 micrometer above planar gold electrodes. We measure the ions' motional frequencies and compare them to simulations. From measurements of the escape time of ions from the trap, we also determine a heating rate of approximately five motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 5.3 MHz.

  14. Quantum spaces are modular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2016-11-01

    At present, our notion of space is a classical concept. Taking the point of view that quantum theory is more fundamental than classical physics, and that space should be given a purely quantum definition, we revisit the notion of Euclidean space from the point of view of quantum mechanics. Since space appears in physics in the form of labels on relativistic fields or Schrödinger wave functionals, we propose to define Euclidean quantum space as a choice of polarization for the Heisenberg algebra of quantum theory. We show, following Mackey, that generically, such polarizations contain a fundamental length scale and that contrary to what is implied by the Schrödinger polarization, they possess topologically distinct spectra. These are the modular spaces. We show that they naturally come equipped with additional geometrical structures usually encountered in the context of string theory or generalized geometry. Moreover, we show how modular space reconciles the presence of a fundamental scale with translation and rotation invariance. We also discuss how the usual classical notion of space comes out as a form of thermodynamical limit of modular space while the Schrödinger space is a singular limit.

  15. Entanglement and the process of measuring the position of a quantum particle

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, V.M.; Curilef, S.; Plastino, A.R.

    2015-03-15

    We explore the entanglement-related features exhibited by the dynamics of a composite quantum system consisting of a particle and an apparatus (here referred to as the “pointer”) that measures the position of the particle. We consider measurements of finite duration, and also the limit case of instantaneous measurements. We investigate the time evolution of the quantum entanglement between the particle and the pointer, with special emphasis on the final entanglement associated with the limit case of an impulsive interaction. We consider entanglement indicators based on the expectation values of an appropriate family of observables, and also an entanglement measure computed on particular exact analytical solutions of the particle–pointer Schrödinger equation. The general behavior exhibited by the entanglement indicators is consistent with that shown by the entanglement measure evaluated on particular analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation. In the limit of instantaneous measurements the system’s entanglement dynamics corresponds to that of an ideal quantum measurement process. On the contrary, we show that the entanglement evolution corresponding to measurements of finite duration departs in important ways from the behavior associated with ideal measurements. In particular, highly localized initial states of the particle lead to highly entangled final states of the particle–pointer system. This indicates that the above mentioned initial states, in spite of having an arbitrarily small position uncertainty, are not left unchanged by a finite-duration position measurement process. - Highlights: • We explore entanglement features of a quantum position measurement. • We consider instantaneous and finite-duration measurements. • We evaluate the entanglement of exact time-dependent particle–pointer states.

  16. Euclidean and fractal geometry of microvascular networks in normal and neoplastic pituitary tissue.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Grizzi, Fabio; Gaetani, Paolo; Goglia, Umberto; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Mortini, Pietro; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo

    2008-07-01

    In geometrical terms, tumour vascularity is an exemplary anatomical system that irregularly fills a three-dimensional Euclidean space. This physical characteristic and the highly variable shapes of the vessels lead to considerable spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the delivery of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, and the removal of metabolites. Although these biological characteristics are well known, quantitative analyses of newly formed vessels in two-dimensional histological sections still fail to view their architecture as a non-Euclidean geometrical entity, thus leading to errors in visual interpretation and discordant results from different laboratories concerning the same tumour. We here review the literature concerning microvessel density estimates (a Euclidean-based approach quantifying vascularity in normal and neoplastic pituitary tissues) and compare the results. We also discuss the limitations of Euclidean quantitative analyses of vascularity and the helpfulness of a fractal geometry-based approach as a better means of quantifying normal and neoplastic pituitary microvasculature.

  17. Euclidean sections of protein conformation space and their implications in dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Mojie; Li, Minghai; Han, Li; Huo, Shuanghong

    2014-10-01

    Dimensionality reduction is widely used in searching for the intrinsic reaction coordinates for protein conformational changes. We find the dimensionality-reduction methods using the pairwise root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) as the local distance metric face a challenge. We use Isomap as an example to illustrate the problem. We believe that there is an implied assumption for the dimensionality-reduction approaches that aim to preserve the geometric relations between the objects: both the original space and the reduced space have the same kind of geometry, such as Euclidean geometry vs. Euclidean geometry or spherical geometry vs. spherical geometry. When the protein free energy landscape is mapped onto a 2D plane or 3D space, the reduced space is Euclidean, thus the original space should also be Euclidean. For a protein with N atoms, its conformation space is a subset of the 3N-dimensional Euclidean space R(3N). We formally define the protein conformation space as the quotient space of R(3N) by the equivalence relation of rigid motions. Whether the quotient space is Euclidean or not depends on how it is parameterized. When the pairwise RMSD is employed as the local distance metric, implicit representations are used for the protein conformation space, leading to no direct correspondence to a Euclidean set. We have demonstrated that an explicit Euclidean-based representation of protein conformation space and the local distance metric associated to it improve the quality of dimensionality reduction in the tetra-peptide and β-hairpin systems.

  18. Quantum photonic base states: concept and molecular modeling. Managing chemical process descriptions beyond semi-classic schemes.

    PubMed

    Tapia, O

    2014-02-01

    Four fundamental aspects bearing on molecular simulations are considered: (1) A different perception of quantum states; mappings from abstract Hilbert space down to laboratory levels; (2) Introduction of photon number Fock space; photonic bases tie together matter-to-photon quantum states: coherent photon-matter states. (3) Chemical tenets framed via photonic-base-states incorporating and defining multi-partite basis sets. (4) Entanglement provides a quantum-physical view connectable to a chemical bond concept. Amplitude modulations of physical quantum states realize (express) chemical change; Feshbach resonance states as a royal path to handle an equivalent to bond breaking/forming by coupling continuum-to-discrete base states. We observe that, for driving chemical processes within photonic framework, microwaves enter not only as heating sources but can act naturally in a quantum physical manner as causes for catalytic activity.

  19. Quantum information processing using quasiclassical electromagnetic interactions between qubits and electrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Electrical resonators are widely used in quantum information processing with any qubits that are manipulated via electromagnetic interactions. In most cases they are engineered to interact with qubits via real or virtual exchange of (typically microwave) photons, and the resonator must therefore have both a high quality factor and strong quantum fluctuations, corresponding to the strong-coupling limit of cavity QED. Although great strides in the control of quantum information have been made using this so-called ``circuit QED'' architecture, it also comes with some important disadvantages. In this talk, we discuss a new paradigm for coupling qubits electromagnetically via resonators, in which the qubits do not exchange photons with the resonator, but instead exert quasi-classical, effective ``forces'' on it. We show how this type of interaction is similar to that induced between the internal state of a trapped atomic ion and its center-of-mass motion by the photon recoil momentum, and that the resulting entangling operations are insensitive both to the state of the resonator and to its quality factor. The methods we describe are applicable to a variety of qubit-resonator systems, including superconducting and semiconducting solid-state qubits, and trapped molecular ions. This work is sponsored by the ASDR&E under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, recommendations and conclusions are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  20. Solution-Processed Gas Sensors Employing SnO2 Quantum Dot/MWCNT Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Wenkai; Yu, Haoxiong; Gao, Liang; Song, Zhilong; Xu, Songman; Li, Min; Wang, Yang; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2016-01-13

    Solution-processed SnO2 colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged as an important new class of gas-sensing materials due to their potential for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. Here we employed the design strategy based on the synergetic effect from highly sensitive SnO2 CQDs and excellent conductive properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to overcome the transport barrier in CQD gas sensors. The attachment and coverage of SnO2 CQDs on the MWCNT surfaces were achieved by simply mixing the presynthesized SnO2 CQDs and MWCNTs at room temperature. Compared to the pristine SnO2 CQDs, the sensor based on SnO2 quantum dot/MWCNT nanocomposites exhibited a higher response upon exposure to H2S, and the response toward 50 ppm of H2S at 70 °C was 108 with the response and recovery time being 23 and 44 s. Because of the favorable energy band alignment, the MWCNTs can serve as the acceptor of the electrons that are injected from H2S into SnO2 quantum dots in addition to the charge transport highway to direct the electron flow to the electrode, thereby enhancing the sensor response. Our research results open an easy pathway for developing highly sensitive and low-cost gas sensors.

  1. Experimental implementation of quantum information processing by Zeeman-perturbed nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, João; Rivera-Ascona, Christian; Polli, Roberson S.; Oliveira-Silva, Rodrigo; Vidoto, Edson L. G.; Andreeta, José P.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used in the context of quantum information processing (QIP). However, despite the great similarities between NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), no experimental implementation for QIP using NQR has been reported. We describe the implementation of basic quantum gates and their applications on the creation and manipulation of pseudopure states using linearly polarized radiofrequency pulses under static magnetic field perturbation. The NQR quantum operations were implemented using a single-crystal sample of and observing nuclei, which possess spin 3/2 and give rise to a two-qubit system. The results are very promising and indicate that NQR can be successfully used for performing fundamental experiments in QIP. One advantage of NQR in comparison with NMR is that the main interaction is internal to the sample, which makes the system more compact, lowering its cost and making it easier to be miniaturized to solid-state devices. Furthermore, as an example, the study of squeezed spin states could receive relevant contributions from NQR.

  2. Initial conditions and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of initial conditions is necessary for a complete explanation of the presently observed large scale structural features of the universe, and a quantum theory of cosmology is probably needed for its formulation. The kinematics of quantum cosmology are reviewed, and some candidates for a law of initial conditions are discussed. The proposal that the quantum state of a closed universe is the natural analog of the ground state for closed cosmologies and is specified by a Euclidean sum over histories is sketched. When implemented in simple models, this proposal is consistent with the most important large-scale observations.

  3. First observation of quantum interference in the process ϕ→KK→ππππ: A test of quantum mechanics and CPT symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KLOE Collaboration; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Beltrame, P.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocchetta, S.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Bowring, D.; Branchini, P.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ceradini, F.; Chi, S.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; de Lucia, E.; de Santis, A.; de Simone, P.; de Zorzi, G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Falco, S.; di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fiore, S.; Forti, C.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D.; Martini, M.; Massarotti, P.; Mei, W.; Meola, S.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Müller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nguyen, F.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Testa, M.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Xu, G.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of quantum interference in the process ϕ→KK→ππππ, using the KLOE detector at the Frascati ee collider DAΦNE. From about 5×10 neutral kaon pairs both decaying to ππ pairs we obtain the distribution of Δt, the difference between the two kaon decay times, which allows testing the validity of quantum mechanics and CPT invariance: no violation of either is observed. New or improved limits on coherence loss and CPT violation are presented.

  4. Nonequilibrium charge susceptibility and dynamical conductance: identification of scattering processes in quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Ness, H; Dash, L K

    2012-03-23

    We calculate the nonequilibrium charge transport properties of nanoscale junctions in the steady state and extend the concept of charge susceptibility to the nonequilibrium conditions. We show that the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility is related to the nonlinear dynamical conductance. In spectroscopic terms, both contain the same features versus applied bias when charge fluctuation occurs in the corresponding electronic resonances. However, we show that, while the conductance exhibits features at biases corresponding to inelastic scattering with no charge fluctuations, the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility does not. We suggest that measuring both the nonequilibrium conductance and charge susceptibility in the same experiment will permit us to differentiate between different scattering processes in quantum transport.

  5. The free energy in a class of quantum spin systems and interchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnberg, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    We study a class of quantum spin systems in the mean-field setting of the complete graph. For spin S = 1/2, the model is the Heisenberg ferromagnet, and for general spin S ∈ 1/2 N, it has a probabilistic representation as a cycle-weighted interchange process. We determine the free energy and the critical temperature (recovering results by Tóth and by Penrose when S = 1/2). The critical temperature is shown to coincide (as a function of S) with that of the q = 2S + 1 state classical Potts model, and the phase transition is discontinuous when S ≥ 1.

  6. Microfabricated Surface-Electrode Ion Trap for Scalable Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-06-01

    Individual laser-cooled Mg+24 ions are confined in a linear Paul trap with a novel geometry where gold electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are trapped 40μm above this plane. The relatively simple trap design and fabrication procedure are important for large-scale quantum information processing (QIP) using ions. Measured ion motional frequencies are compared to simulations. Measurements of ion recooling after cooling is temporarily suspended yield a heating rate of approximately 5 motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 2.83 MHz, sufficiently low to be useful for QIP.

  7. Failure mode and effects analysis using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; Liu, Long; Li, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has shown its effectiveness in examining potential failures in products, process, designs or services and has been extensively used for safety and reliability analysis in a wide range of industries. However, its approach to prioritise failure modes through a crisp risk priority number (RPN) has been criticised as having several shortcomings. The aim of this paper is to develop an efficient and comprehensive risk assessment methodology using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance (IFHWED) operator to overcome the limitations and improve the effectiveness of the traditional FMEA. The diversified and uncertain assessments given by FMEA team members are treated as linguistic terms expressed in intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs). Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA) operator is used to aggregate the FMEA team members' individual assessments into a group assessment. IFHWED operator is applied thereafter to the prioritisation and selection of failure modes. Particularly, both subjective and objective weights of risk factors are considered during the risk evaluation process. A numerical example for risk assessment is given to illustrate the proposed method finally.

  8. Efficient vacuum-free-processed quantum dot light-emitting diodes with printable liquid metal cathodes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huiren; Jiang, Yibin; Chen, Shuming

    2016-10-20

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) are recognized as promising candidates for next generation displays. QLEDs can be fabricated by low-cost solution processing except for the metal electrodes, which, in general, are deposited by costly vacuum evaporation. To be fully compatible with the low-cost solution process, we herein demonstrate vacuum-free and solvent-free fabrication of electrodes using a printable liquid metal. With eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) based liquid metal cathodes, vacuum-free-processed QLEDs are demonstrated with superior external quantum efficiencies of 11.51%, 12.85% and 5.03% for red, green and blue devices, respectively, which are about 2-, 1.5- and 1.1-fold higher than those of the devices with thermally evaporated Al cathodes. The improved performance is attributable to the reduction of electron injection by the native oxide of EGaIn, which serves as an electron-blocking layer for the devices and thus improves the balance of carrier injection. Also, the T50 half-lifetime of the vacuum-free-processed QLEDs is about 2-fold longer than that of the devices with Al cathodes. Our results demonstrate that EGaIn-based solvent-free liquid metals are promising printable electrodes for realizing efficient, low-cost and vacuum-free-processed QLEDs. The elimination of vacuum and high-temperature processes significantly reduces the production cost and paves the way for industrial roll-to-roll manufacturing of large area displays.

  9. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized “Giant” Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Park, Young-Shin; Kundu, Janardan; Htoon, Han

    2012-06-07

    Due to their characteristic bright and stable photoluminescence, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient light emitters for applications from single-particle tracking to solid-state lighting. Despite their numerous enabling traits, however, NQD optical properties are frustratingly sensitive to their chemical environment, exhibit fluorescence intermittency ('blinking'), and are susceptible to Auger recombination, an efficient nonradiative decay process. Previously, we showed for the first time that colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) comprising ultrathick shells (number of shell monolayers, n, > 10) grown by protracted successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) leads to remarkable photostability and significantly suppressed blinking behavior as a function of increasing shell thickness. We have also shown that these so-called 'giant' NQDs (g-NQDs) afford nearly complete suppression of non-radiative Auger recombination, revealed in our studies as long biexciton lifetimes and efficient multiexciton emission. The unique behavior of this core/shell system prompted us to assess correlations between specific physicochemical properties - beyond shell thickness - and functionality. Here, we demonstrate the ability of particle shape/faceting, crystalline phase, and core size to determine ensemble and single-particle optical properties (quantum yield/brightness, blinking, radiative lifetimes). Significantly, we show how reaction process parameters (surface-stabilizing ligands, ligand:NQD ratio, choice of 'inert' solvent, and modifications to the SILAR method itself) can be tuned to modify these function-dictating NQD physical properties, ultimately leading to an optimized synthetic approach that results in the complete suppression of blinking. We find that the resulting 'guiding principles' can be applied to other NQD compositions, allowing us to achieve non-blinking behavior in the near

  10. Experimental quantum key distribution with simulated ground-to-satellite photon losses and processing limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Gigov, Nikolay; Higgins, Brendon L.; Yan, Zhizhong; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Khandani, Amir K.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Jennewein, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has the potential to improve communications security by offering cryptographic keys whose security relies on the fundamental properties of quantum physics. The use of a trusted quantum receiver on an orbiting satellite is the most practical near-term solution to the challenge of achieving long-distance (global-scale) QKD, currently limited to a few hundred kilometers on the ground. This scenario presents unique challenges, such as high photon losses and restricted classical data transmission and processing power due to the limitations of a typical satellite platform. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of such a system by implementing a QKD protocol, with optical transmission and full post-processing, in the high-loss regime using minimized computing hardware at the receiver. Employing weak coherent pulses with decoy states, we demonstrate the production of secure key bits at up to 56.5 dB of photon loss. We further illustrate the feasibility of a satellite uplink by generating a secure key while experimentally emulating the varying losses predicted for realistic low-Earth-orbit satellite passes at 600 km altitude. With a 76 MHz source and including finite-size analysis, we extract 3374 bits of a secure key from the best pass. We also illustrate the potential benefit of combining multiple passes together: while one suboptimal "upper-quartile" pass produces no finite-sized key with our source, the combination of three such passes allows us to extract 165 bits of a secure key. Alternatively, we find that by increasing the signal rate to 300 MHz it would be possible to extract 21 570 bits of a secure finite-sized key in just a single upper-quartile pass.

  11. Versatile microwave-driven trapped ion spin system for quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Piltz, Christian; Sriarunothai, Theeraphot; Ivanov, Svetoslav S; Wölk, Sabine; Wunderlich, Christof

    2016-07-01

    Using trapped atomic ions, we demonstrate a tailored and versatile effective spin system suitable for quantum simulations and universal quantum computation. By simply applying microwave pulses, selected spins can be decoupled from the remaining system and, thus, can serve as a quantum memory, while simultaneously, other coupled spins perform conditional quantum dynamics. Also, microwave pulses can change the sign of spin-spin couplings, as well as their effective strength, even during the course of a quantum algorithm. Taking advantage of the simultaneous long-range coupling between three spins, a coherent quantum Fourier transform-an essential building block for many quantum algorithms-is efficiently realized. This approach, which is based on microwave-driven trapped ions and is complementary to laser-based methods, opens a new route to overcoming technical and physical challenges in the quest for a quantum simulator and a quantum computer.

  12. Versatile microwave-driven trapped ion spin system for quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Piltz, Christian; Sriarunothai, Theeraphot; Ivanov, Svetoslav S.; Wölk, Sabine; Wunderlich, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Using trapped atomic ions, we demonstrate a tailored and versatile effective spin system suitable for quantum simulations and universal quantum computation. By simply applying microwave pulses, selected spins can be decoupled from the remaining system and, thus, can serve as a quantum memory, while simultaneously, other coupled spins perform conditional quantum dynamics. Also, microwave pulses can change the sign of spin-spin couplings, as well as their effective strength, even during the course of a quantum algorithm. Taking advantage of the simultaneous long-range coupling between three spins, a coherent quantum Fourier transform—an essential building block for many quantum algorithms—is efficiently realized. This approach, which is based on microwave-driven trapped ions and is complementary to laser-based methods, opens a new route to overcoming technical and physical challenges in the quest for a quantum simulator and a quantum computer. PMID:27419233

  13. Perovskite light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed self-organized multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nana; Cheng, Lu; Ge, Rui; Zhang, Shuting; Miao, Yanfeng; Zou, Wei; Yi, Chang; Sun, Yan; Cao, Yu; Yang, Rong; Wei, Yingqiang; Guo, Qiang; Ke, You; Yu, Maotao; Jin, Yizheng; Liu, Yang; Ding, Qingqing; di, Dawei; Yang, Le; Xing, Guichuan; Tian, He; Jin, Chuanhong; Gao, Feng; Friend, Richard H.; Wang, Jianpu; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Organometal halide perovskites can be processed from solutions at low temperatures to form crystalline direct-bandgap semiconductors with promising optoelectronic properties. However, the efficiency of their electroluminescence is limited by non-radiative recombination, which is associated with defects and leakage current due to incomplete surface coverage. Here we demonstrate a solution-processed perovskite light-emitting diode (LED) based on self-organized multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with excellent film morphologies. The MQW-based LED exhibits a very high external quantum efficiency of up to 11.7%, good stability and exceptional high-power performance with an energy conversion efficiency of 5.5% at a current density of 100 mA cm-2. This outstanding performance arises because the lower bandgap regions that generate electroluminescence are effectively confined by perovskite MQWs with higher energy gaps, resulting in very efficient radiative decay. Surprisingly, there is no evidence that the large interfacial areas between different bandgap regions cause luminescence quenching.

  14. Solution-processed PbS quantum dot infrared photodetectors and photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Steven A; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Zhang, Shiguo; Cyr, Paul W; Klem, Ethan J D; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2005-02-01

    In contrast to traditional semiconductors, conjugated polymers provide ease of processing, low cost, physical flexibility and large area coverage. These active optoelectronic materials produce and harvest light efficiently in the visible spectrum. The same functions are required in the infrared for telecommunications (1,300-1,600 nm), thermal imaging (1,500 nm and beyond), biological imaging (transparent tissue windows at 800 nm and 1,100 nm), thermal photovoltaics (>1,900 nm), and solar cells (800-2,000 nm). Photoconductive polymer devices have yet to demonstrate sensitivity beyond approximately 800 nm (refs 2,3). Sensitizing conjugated polymers with infrared-active nanocrystal quantum dots provides a spectrally tunable means of accessing the infrared while maintaining the advantageous properties of polymers. Here we use such a nanocomposite approach in which PbS nanocrystals tuned by the quantum size effect sensitize the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (MEH-PPV) into the infrared. We achieve, in a solution-processed device and with sensitivity far beyond 800 nm, harvesting of infrared-photogenerated carriers and the demonstration of an infrared photovoltaic effect. We also make use of the wavelength tunability afforded by the nanocrystals to show photocurrent spectra tailored to three different regions of the infrared spectrum.

  15. Convexity and the Euclidean Metric of Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeropoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-02-01

    We address the question about the reasons why the "Wick-rotated", positive-definite, space-time metric obeys the Pythagorean theorem. An answer is proposed based on the convexity and smoothness properties of the functional spaces purporting to provide the kinematic framework of approaches to quantum gravity. We employ moduli of convexity and smoothness which are eventually extremized by Hilbert spaces. We point out the potential physical significance that functional analytical dualities play in this framework. Following the spirit of the variational principles employed in classical and quantum Physics, such Hilbert spaces dominate in a generalized functional integral approach. The metric of space-time is induced by the inner product of such Hilbert spaces.

  16. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  17. Efficient bit sifting scheme of post-processing in quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiong; Le, Dan; Wu, Xianyan; Niu, Xiamu; Guo, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Bit sifting is an important step in the post-processing of quantum key distribution (QKD). Its function is to sift out the undetected original keys. The communication traffic of bit sifting has essential impact on the net secure key rate of a practical QKD system. In this paper, an efficient bit sifting scheme is presented, of which the core is a lossless source coding algorithm. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate that the performance of the scheme is approaching the Shannon limit. The proposed scheme can greatly decrease the communication traffic of the post-processing of a QKD system, which means the proposed scheme can decrease the secure key consumption for classical channel authentication and increase the net secure key rate of the QKD system, as demonstrated by analyzing the improvement on the net secure key rate. Meanwhile, some recommendations on the application of the proposed scheme to some representative practical QKD systems are also provided.

  18. High efficiency in Mode Selective Frequency Conversion for Optical Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Nicolas; Sipe, J. E.

    Mode selective Frequency conversion (FC) is an enabling process in many quantum information protocols. Recently, it has been observed that upconversion efficiencies in single-photon, mode-selective FC are limited to around 80%. In this contribution we show that these limits can be understood as time ordering corrections (TOCs) that modify the joint conversion amplitude of the process. Furthermore we show, using a simple scaling argument, that recently proposed cascaded FC protocols that overcome the aforementioned limitations act as ``attenuators'' of the TOCs. This observation allows us to argue that very similar cascaded architectures can be used to attenuate TOCs in photon generation via spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Finally, by using the Magnus expansion, we argue that the TOCs, which are usually considered detrimental for FC efficiency, can also be used to increase the efficiency of conversion in partially mode selective FC.

  19. Optimization of the Multi-Spectral Euclidean Distance Calculation for FPGA-based Spaceborne Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cristo, Alejandro; Fisher, Kevin; Perez, Rosa M.; Martinez, Pablo; Gualtieri, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the high quantity of operations that spaceborne processing systems must carry out in space, new methodologies and techniques are being presented as good alternatives in order to free the main processor from work and improve the overall performance. These include the development of ancillary dedicated hardware circuits that carry out the more redundant and computationally expensive operations in a faster way, leaving the main processor free to carry out other tasks while waiting for the result. One of these devices is SpaceCube, a FPGA-based system designed by NASA. The opportunity to use FPGA reconfigurable architectures in space allows not only the optimization of the mission operations with hardware-level solutions, but also the ability to create new and improved versions of the circuits, including error corrections, once the satellite is already in orbit. In this work, we propose the optimization of a common operation in remote sensing: the Multi-Spectral Euclidean Distance calculation. For that, two different hardware architectures have been designed and implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA, the same model of FPGAs used by SpaceCube. Previous results have shown that the communications between the embedded processor and the circuit create a bottleneck that affects the overall performance in a negative way. In order to avoid this, advanced methods including memory sharing, Native Port Interface (NPI) connections and Data Burst Transfers have been used.

  20. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods.

  1. Non-Gaussian influence functional for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allinger, Kurt; Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1986-02-01

    We consider the quantum paths (in Euclidean time) through a space of N multiparticle states, and we derive the influence functional for a subset of m primary states in this space. The influence functional results from integrating out the occupation of the N-m nonprimary or bath states holding fixed the time-dependent occupation path through the primary states. The division into bath states and primary states is completely general in principle, though in practice, physical considerations will guide the choice of partitioning. The exact influence functional is nonlocal in time and very complicated in form. We argue, however, by a variational calculation that a simplified approximate functional can be constructed which is very accurate. Unlike the standard Gaussian influence functionals which are inapplicable for processes involving the large amplitude fluctuations of charge transfer and fermionic exchange, the influence functionals described herein are appropriate for models of these processes.

  2. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence OLEDs with fully solution processed organic layers exhibiting nearly 10% external quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Ken; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Sakai, Yoshiya; Nakayama, Akira; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-02-21

    New solution processable and laminatable terminally modified carbazole-triazine thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) dendrimers are reported. An OLED device with fully solution processed organic layers exhibited an external quantum efficiency of up to 9.4% at 100 cd m(-2).

  3. Application of Non-Kolmogorovian Probability and Quantum Adaptive Dynamics to Unconscious Inference in Visual Perception Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Recently a novel quantum information formalism — quantum adaptive dynamics — was developed and applied to modelling of information processing by bio-systems including cognitive phenomena: from molecular biology (glucose-lactose metabolism for E.coli bacteria, epigenetic evolution) to cognition, psychology. From the foundational point of view quantum adaptive dynamics describes mutual adapting of the information states of two interacting systems (physical or biological) as well as adapting of co-observations performed by the systems. In this paper we apply this formalism to model unconscious inference: the process of transition from sensation to perception. The paper combines theory and experiment. Statistical data collected in an experimental study on recognition of a particular ambiguous figure, the Schröder stairs, support the viability of the quantum(-like) model of unconscious inference including modelling of biases generated by rotation-contexts. From the probabilistic point of view, we study (for concrete experimental data) the problem of contextuality of probability, its dependence on experimental contexts. Mathematically contextuality leads to non-Komogorovness: probability distributions generated by various rotation contexts cannot be treated in the Kolmogorovian framework. At the same time they can be embedded in a “big Kolmogorov space” as conditional probabilities. However, such a Kolmogorov space has too complex structure and the operational quantum formalism in the form of quantum adaptive dynamics simplifies the modelling essentially.

  4. The Random Link Approximation for the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Bohigas, O.; Martin, O. C.; Percus, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) consists of finding the length of the shortest closed tour visiting N “cities”. We consider the Euclidean TSP where the cities are distributed randomly and independently in a d-dimensional unit hypercube. Working with periodic boundary conditions and inspired by a remarkable universality in the kth nearest neighbor distribution, we find for the average optimum tour length <~ngle L_Erangle =β_E(d)N^{1-1/d}[1+O(1/N)] with β_E=0.7120± 0.0002 and β_E(3)=0.6979± 0.0002. We then derive analytical predictions for these quantities using the random link approximation, where the lengths between cities are taken as independent random variables. From the “cavity” equations developed by Krauth, Mézard and Parisi, we calculate the associated random link values β_RL(d). For d=1, 2, 3, numerical results show that the random link approximation is a good one, with a discrepancy of less than 2.1% between β_E(d) and β_RL(d). For large d, we argue that the approximation is exact up to O(1d^2) and give a conjecture for β_E(d), in terms of a power series in 1/d, specifying both leading and subleading coefficients. Le problème du voyageur de commerce (TSP) consiste à trouver le chemin fermé le plus court qui relie N “villes”. Nous étudions le TSP euclidien où les villes sont distribuées au hasard de manière décorrélée dans l'hypercube de côté 1, en dimension d. En imposant des conditions aux bords périodiques et guidés par une universalité remarquable de la distribution des kièmes voisins, nous trouvons la longueur moyenne du chemin optimal <~ngle L_Erangle = β_E(d)N^{1-1/d}[1+O(1/N)] , avec β_E= 0,7120 ± 0,0002 et β_E(3)= 0,6979 ± 0,0002. Nous établissons ensuite des prédictions analytiques sur ces quantités à l'aide de l'approximation de liens aléatoires, où les longueurs entre les villes sont des variables aléatoires indépendantes. Grâce aux équations “cavité” développées par Krauth, M

  5. The Second Law as a Selection Principle: The Microscopic Theory of Dissipative Processes in Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigogine, I.; George, Cl.

    1983-07-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, for quantum systems, is formulated, on the microscopic level. As for classical systems, such a formulation is only possible when specific conditions are satisfied (continuous spectrum, nonvanishing of the collision operator, etc.). The unitary dynamical group can then be mapped into two contractive semigroups, reaching equilibrium either for t → +∞ or for t → -∞. The second law appears as a symmetry-breaking selection principle, limiting the observables and density functions to the class that tends to thermodynamic equilibrium in the future (for t → +∞). The physical content of the dynamical structure is now displayed in terms of the appropriate semigroup, which is realized through a nonunitary transformation. The superposition principle of quantum mechanics has to be reconsidered as irreversible processes transform pure states into mixtures and unitary transformations are limited by the requirement that entropy remains invariant. In the semigroup representation, interacting fields lead to units that behave incoherently at equilibrium. Inversely, nonequilibrium constraints introduce correlations between these units.

  6. Electrical Detection of Quantum Dot Hot Electrons Generated via a Mn(2+)-Enhanced Auger Process.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Nagaoka, Hirokazu; deQuilettes, Dane W; Salvador, Michael; Chen, Jennifer I L; Ginger, David S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2017-01-05

    An all-solid-state quantum-dot-based photon-to-current conversion device is demonstrated that selectively detects the generation of hot electrons. Photoexcitation of Mn(2+)-doped CdS quantum dots embedded in the device is followed by efficient picosecond energy transfer to Mn(2+) with a long-lived (millisecond) excited-state lifetime. Electrons injected into the QDs under applied bias then capture this energy via Auger de-excitation, generating hot electrons that possess sufficient energy to escape over a ZnS blocking layer, thereby producing current. This electrically detected hot-electron generation is correlated with a quench in the steady-state Mn(2+) luminescence and the introduction of a new nonradiative excited-state decay process, consistent with electron-dopant Auger cross-relaxation. The device's efficiency at detecting hot-electron generation provides a model platform for the study of hot-electron ionization relevant to the development of novel photodetectors and alternative energy-conversion devices.

  7. Alternative Patterning Process for Realization of Large-Area, Full-Color, Active Quantum Dot Display.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon-Suh; Kyhm, Jihoon; Kim, Hong Hee; Jeong, Shinyoung; Kang, JoonHyun; Lee, Song-Ee; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Park, Kisun; Barange, Nilesh; Han, JiYeong; Song, Jin Dong; Choi, Won Kook; Han, Il Ki

    2016-11-09

    Although various colloidal quantum dot (QD) coating and patterning techniques have been developed to meet the demands in optoelectronic applications over the past years, each of the previously demonstrated methods has one or more limitations and trade-offs in forming multicolor, high-resolution, or large-area patterns of QDs. In this study, we present an alternative QD patterning technique using conventional photolithography combined with charge-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to solve the trade-offs of the traditional patterning processes. From our demonstrations, we show repeatable QD patterning process that allows multicolor QD patterns in both large-area and microscale. Also, we show that the QD patterns are robust against additional photolithography processes and that the thickness of the QD patterns can be controlled at each position. To validate that this process can be applied to actual device applications as an active material, we have fabricated inverted, differently colored, active QD light-emitting device (QD-LED) on a pixelated substrate, which achieved maximum electroluminescence intensity of 23 770 cd/m(2), and discussed the results. From our findings, we believe that our process provides a solution to achieving both high-resolution and large-scale QD pattern applicable to not only display, but also to practical photonic device research and development.

  8. Quantum circuit for the proof of the security of quantum key distribution without encryption of error syndrome and noisy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Kato, Go

    2010-02-01

    One of the simplest security proofs of quantum key distribution is based on the so-called complementarity scenario, which involves the complementarity control of an actual protocol and a virtual protocol [M. Koashi, e-print arXiv:0704.3661 (2007)]. The existing virtual protocol has a limitation in classical postprocessing, i.e., the syndrome for the error-correction step has to be encrypted. In this paper, we remove this limitation by constructing a quantum circuit for the virtual protocol. Moreover, our circuit with a shield system gives an intuitive proof of why adding noise to the sifted key increases the bit error rate threshold in the general case in which one of the parties does not possess a qubit. Thus, our circuit bridges the simple proof and the use of wider classes of classical postprocessing.

  9. Quantum circuit for the proof of the security of quantum key distribution without encryption of error syndrome and noisy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Kato, Go

    2010-02-15

    One of the simplest security proofs of quantum key distribution is based on the so-called complementarity scenario, which involves the complementarity control of an actual protocol and a virtual protocol [M. Koashi, e-print arXiv:0704.3661 (2007)]. The existing virtual protocol has a limitation in classical postprocessing, i.e., the syndrome for the error-correction step has to be encrypted. In this paper, we remove this limitation by constructing a quantum circuit for the virtual protocol. Moreover, our circuit with a shield system gives an intuitive proof of why adding noise to the sifted key increases the bit error rate threshold in the general case in which one of the parties does not possess a qubit. Thus, our circuit bridges the simple proof and the use of wider classes of classical postprocessing.

  10. Approximability of the d-dimensional Euclidean capacitated vehicle routing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Michael; Dubinin, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP) is the well known intractable combinatorial optimization problem, which remains NP-hard even in the Euclidean plane. Since the introduction of this problem in the middle of the 20th century, many researchers were involved into the study of its approximability. Most of the results obtained in this field are based on the well known Iterated Tour Partition heuristic proposed by M. Haimovich and A. Rinnoy Kan in their celebrated paper, where they construct the first Polynomial Time Approximation Scheme (PTAS) for the single depot CVRP in ℝ2. For decades, this result was extended by many authors to numerous useful modifications of the problem taking into account multiple depots, pick up and delivery options, time window restrictions, etc. But, to the best of our knowledge, almost none of these results go beyond the Euclidean plane. In this paper, we try to bridge this gap and propose a EPTAS for the Euclidean CVRP for any fixed dimension.

  11. A Complete Physical Germanium-on-Silicon Quantum Dot Self-Assembly Process

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Amro; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    Achieving quantum dot self-assembly at precise pre-defined locations is of vital interest. In this work, a novel physical method for producing germanium quantum dots on silicon using nanoindentation to pre-define nucleation sites is described. Self-assembly of ordered ~10 nm height germanium quantum dot arrays on silicon substrates is achieved. Due to the inherent simplicity and elegance of the proposed method, the results describe an attractive technique to manufacture semiconductor quantum dot structures for future quantum electronic and photonic applications. PMID:23807261

  12. A review of silicon microfabricated ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dong-Il "Dan"; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Kim, Taehyun

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has become a hot research topic as evidenced by S. Haroche and D. J. Wineland receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2012. Various MEMS-based microfabrication methods will be a key enabling technology in implementing novel and scalable ion traps for QIP. This paper provides a brief introduction of ion trap devices, and reviews ion traps made using conventional precision machining as well as MEMS-based microfabrication. Then, microfabrication methods for ion traps are explained in detail. Finally, current research issues in microfabricated ion traps are presented. The QIP renders significant new challenges for MEMS, as various QIP technologies are being developed for secure encrypted communication and complex computing applications.

  13. Solution-processed high-performance colloidal quantum dot tandem photodetectors on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu; You, Guanjun; Wang, Li; Liu, Jie; Xu, Jian; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-28

    We report a high-performance colloidal quantum dot (CQD)-based near-infrared tandem photodetector fabricated on flexible substrates via solution-processed method. The tandem photodetector on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates exhibited low dark current and high detectivities over ∼8.8 × 10{sup 11} Jones at near infrared range at −0.5 V bias and over ∼10{sup 13} Jones near 0 bias. The critical bend radii of ∼8 mm and ∼3 mm have been demonstrated for tensile and compressive bending, respectively. The performance of photodetectors remains stable under mechanical stress, making PbSe CQD material a promise candidate for flexible infrared sensing applications.

  14. Quantum-Gravity Thermodynamics, Incorporating the Theory of Exactly Soluble Active Stochastic Processes, with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, K.

    2009-08-01

    A re-visitation of QFT is first cited, deriving the Feynman integral from the theory of active stochastic processes (Glueck and Hueffler, Phys. Lett. B. 659(1-2):447-451, 2008; Hueffel and Kelnhofer, Phys. Lett. B 588(1-2):145-150, 2004). We factor the lie group “generator” of the inverse wavefunction over an entropy-maximizing basis. Performing term-by-term Ito-integration leads us to an analytical, evaluable trajectory for a charged particle in an arbitrary field given a Maximum-Entropy distribution. We generalize this formula to many-body electrodynamics. In theory, it is capable of predicting plasma’s thermodynamic properties from ionic spectral data and thermodynamic and optical distributions. Blessed with the absence of certain limitations (e.g., renormalization) strongly present in competing formalisms and the incorporation of research related to many different phenomena, we outline a candidate quantum gravity theory based on these developments.

  15. Synthesis and photochemical applications of processable polymers enclosing photoluminescent carbon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Dario; Mazzier, Daniela; Silvestrini, Simone; Privitera, Alberto; Marega, Carla; Franco, Lorenzo; Moretto, Alessandro

    2015-04-28

    Herein, we propose convenient routes to produce hybrid-polymers that covalently enclosed, or confined, N-doped carbon quantum dots (CQDs). We focus our attention on polyamide, polyurea-urethane, polyester, and polymethylmetacrylate polymers, some of the most common resources used to create everyday materials. These hybrid materials can be easily prepared and processed to obtain macroscopic objects of different shapes, i.e., fibers, transparent sheets, and bulky forms, where the characteristic luminescence properties of the native N-doped CQDs are preserved. More importantly we explore the potential use of these hybrid composites to achieve photochemical reactions as those of photoreduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles (under UV-light), the selective photo-oxidation of benzylalcohol to the benzaldehyde (under vis-light), and the photocatalytic generation of H2 (under UV-light).

  16. Schwinger-Dyson equations in large-N quantum field theories and nonlinear random processes

    SciTech Connect

    Buividovich, P. V.

    2011-02-15

    We propose a stochastic method for solving Schwinger-Dyson equations in large-N quantum field theories. Expectation values of single-trace operators are sampled by stationary probability distributions of the so-called nonlinear random processes. The set of all the histories of such processes corresponds to the set of all planar diagrams in the perturbative expansions of the expectation values of singlet operators. We illustrate the method on examples of the matrix-valued scalar field theory and the Weingarten model of random planar surfaces on the lattice. For theories with compact field variables, such as sigma models or non-Abelian lattice gauge theories, the method does not converge in the physically most interesting weak-coupling limit. In this case one can absorb the divergences into a self-consistent redefinition of expansion parameters. A stochastic solution of the self-consistency conditions can be implemented as a 'memory' of the random process, so that some parameters of the process are estimated from its previous history. We illustrate this idea on the two-dimensional O(N) sigma model. The extension to non-Abelian lattice gauge theories is discussed.

  17. Generalized Thomson problem in arbitrary dimensions and non-euclidean geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Bagdasaryan, Armen; Abdel-Aty, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-06-01

    Systems of identical particles with equal charge are studied under a special type of confinement. These classical particles are free to move inside some convex region S and on the boundary of it Ω (the S d - 1 -sphere, in our case). We shall show how particles arrange themselves under the sole action of the Coulomb repulsion in many dimensions in the usual Euclidean space, therefore generalizing the so called Thomson problem to many dimensions. Also, we explore how the problem varies when non-Euclidean geometries are considered. We shall see that optimal configurations in all cases possess a high degree of symmetry, regardless of the concomitant dimension or geometry.

  18. Double vibronic process in the quantum spin ice candidate Tb2Ti2O7 revealed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, E.; Ballou, R.; Robert, J.; Decorse, C.; Brubach, J.-B.; Roy, P.; Lhotel, E.; Del-Rey, L.; Simonet, V.; Petit, S.; deBrion, S.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of quantum fluctuations responsible for the spin liquid state in Tb2Ti2O7 has remained a long-standing problem. By synchrotron-based terahertz measurements, we show evidence of strong coupling between the magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom that provides a path to the quantum melting process. As revealed by hybrid crystal electric field-phonon excitations that appear at 0.67 THz below 200 K, and around 0.42 THz below 50 K, the double vibronic process is unique for Tb3 + in the titanate family due to adequate energy matching and strong quadrupolar moments. The results suggest that lattice motion can indeed be the driving force behind spin flips within the hybridized ground and first excited states, promoting quantum terms in the effective Hamiltonian that describes Tb2Ti2O7 .

  19. Quantum homogeneous spaces and special functions with a dimensional deformation parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonechi, F.; Giachetti, R.; del Olmo, M. A.; Sorace, E.; Tarlini, M.

    1996-12-01

    We study the most elementary aspects of harmonic analysis on a homogeneous space of a deformation of the two-dimensional Euclidean group, admitting generalizations to dimensions three and four, whose quantum parameter has the physical dimensions of length. The homogeneous space is recognized as a new quantum plane and the action of the Euclidean quantum group is used to determine an eigenvalue problem for the Casimir operator, which constitutes the analogue of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of such a deformation. The solutions are given in the plane-wave and angular-momentum bases and are expressed in terms of hypergeometric series with non-commuting parameters.

  20. Spin-vibronic quantum dynamics for ultrafast excited-state processes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Julien; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Gindensperger, Etienne; Daniel, Chantal

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast intersystem crossing (ISC) processes coupled to nuclear relaxation and solvation dynamics play a central role in the photophysics and photochemistry of a wide range of transition metal complexes. These phenomena occurring within a few hundred femtoseconds are investigated experimentally by ultrafast picosecond and femtosecond transient absorption or luminescence spectroscopies, and optical laser pump-X-ray probe techniques using picosecond and femtosecond X-ray pulses. The interpretation of ultrafast structural changes, time-resolved spectra, quantum yields, and time scales of elementary processes or transient lifetimes needs robust theoretical tools combining state-of-the-art quantum chemistry and developments in quantum dynamics for solving the electronic and nuclear problems. Multimode molecular dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation has been successfully applied to many small polyatomic systems. Its application to large molecules containing a transition metal atom is still a challenge because of the nuclear dimensionality of the problem, the high density of electronic excited states, and the spin-orbit coupling effects. Rhenium(I) α-diimine carbonyl complexes, [Re(L)(CO)3(N,N)](n+) are thermally and photochemically robust and highly flexible synthetically. Structural variations of the N,N and L ligands affect the spectroscopy, the photophysics, and the photochemistry of these chromophores easily incorporated into a complex environment. Visible light absorption opens the route to a wide range of applications such as sensors, probes, or emissive labels for imaging biomolecules. Halide complexes [Re(X)(CO)3(bpy)] (X = Cl, Br, or I; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) exhibit complex electronic structure and large spin-orbit effects that do not correlate with the heavy atom effects. Indeed, the (1)MLCT → (3)MLCT intersystem crossing (ISC) kinetics is slower than in [Ru(bpy)3](2+) or [Fe(bpy)3](2+) despite the presence of a third-row transition metal

  1. Quantum cosmology with nontrivial topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, T.

    2008-10-10

    Quantum creation of a universe with a nontrivial spatial topology is considered. Using the Euclidean functional integral prescription, we calculate the wave function of such a universe with cosmological constant and without matter. The minisuperspace path integral is calculated in the semiclassical approximation, and it is shown that in order to include the nontrivial topologies in the path integral approach to quantum cosmology, it is necessary to generalize the sum over compact and smooth 4-manifolds to sum over finite-volume compact 4-orbifolds.

  2. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  3. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  4. All-solution-processed PbS quantum dot solar modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jihoon; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Ju, Yeonkyeong; Song, Jung Hoon; An, Hyejin; Yu, Jong-Su; Kwak, Sun-Woo; Lee, Taik-Min; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Sohee

    2015-05-01

    A rapid increase in power conversion efficiencies in colloidal quantum dot (QD) solar cells has been achieved recently with lead sulphide (PbS) QDs by adapting a heterojunction architecture, which consists of small-area devices associated with a vacuum-deposited buffer layer with metal electrodes. The preparation of QD solar modules by low-cost solution processes is required to further increase the power-to-cost ratio. Herein we demonstrate all-solution-processed flexible PbS QD solar modules with a layer-by-layer architecture comprising polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate/indium tin oxide (ITO)/titanium oxide (TiO2)/PbS QD/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) : poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT : PSS)/Ag, with an active area of up to 30 cm2, exhibiting a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.3% under AM 1.5 conditions (PCE of 2.2% for a 1 cm2 unit cell). Our approach affords trade-offs between power and the active area of the photovoltaic devices, which results in a low-cost power source, and which is scalable to larger areas.A rapid increase in power conversion efficiencies in colloidal quantum dot (QD) solar cells has been achieved recently with lead sulphide (PbS) QDs by adapting a heterojunction architecture, which consists of small-area devices associated with a vacuum-deposited buffer layer with metal electrodes. The preparation of QD solar modules by low-cost solution processes is required to further increase the power-to-cost ratio. Herein we demonstrate all-solution-processed flexible PbS QD solar modules with a layer-by-layer architecture comprising polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate/indium tin oxide (ITO)/titanium oxide (TiO2)/PbS QD/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) : poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT : PSS)/Ag, with an active area of up to 30 cm2, exhibiting a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.3% under AM 1.5 conditions (PCE of 2.2% for a 1 cm2 unit cell). Our approach affords trade

  5. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  6. Thermally Activated Site Exchange and Quantum Exchange Coupling Processes in Unsymmetrical Trihydride Osmium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Amaya; Barea, Guada; Esteruelas, Miguel A.; Lahoz, Fernando J.; LLedós, Agustí; Maseras, Feliu; Modrego, Javier; Oñate, Enrique; Oro, Luis A.; Ruiz, Natividad; Sola, Eduardo

    1999-04-19

    Reaction of the hexahydride complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) with pyridine-2-thiol leads to the trihydride derivative OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-S-(2-Spy)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2). The structure of 2 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The geometry around the osmium atom can be described as a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with the phosphine ligands occupying axial positions. The equatorial plane contains the pyridine-2-thiolato group, attached through a bite angle of 65.7(1) degrees, and the three hydride ligands. The theoretical structure determination of the model complex OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-S-(2-Spy)}(PH(3))(2) (2a) reveals that the hydride ligands form a triangle with sides of 1.623, 1.714, and 2.873 Å, respectively. A topological analysis of the electron density of 2a indicates that there is no significant electron density connecting the hydrogen atoms of the OsH(3) unit. In solution, the hydride ligands of 2 undergo two different thermally activated site exchange processes, which involve the central hydride with each hydride ligand situated close to the donor atoms of the chelate group. The activation barriers of both processes are similar. Theoretical calculations suggest that the transition states have a cis-hydride-dihydrogen nature. In addition to the thermally activated exchange processes, complex 2 shows quantum exchange coupling between the central hydride and the one situated close to the sulfur atom of the pyridine-2-thiolato group. The reactions of 1 with L-valine and 2-hydroxypyridine afford OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-O-OC(O)CH[CH(CH(3))(2)]NH(2)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3) and OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-O-(2-Opy)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (4) respectively, which according to their spectroscopic data have a similar structure to that of 2. In solution, the hydride ligands of 3 and 4 also undergo two different thermally activated site exchange processes. However, they do not show quantum exchange coupling. The tetranuclear complexes [(P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(3)Os(&mgr;-biim)M(TFB)](2) [M = Rh

  7. Open parallel cooperative and competitive decision processes: a potential provenance for quantum probability decision models.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Ian G; Navarro, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    In recent years quantum probability models have been used to explain many aspects of human decision making, and as such quantum models have been considered a viable alternative to Bayesian models based on classical probability. One criticism that is often leveled at both kinds of models is that they lack a clear interpretation in terms of psychological mechanisms. In this paper we discuss the mechanistic underpinnings of a quantum walk model of human decision making and response time. The quantum walk model is compared to standard sequential sampling models, and the architectural assumptions of both are considered. In particular, we show that the quantum model has a natural interpretation in terms of a cognitive architecture that is both massively parallel and involves both co-operative (excitatory) and competitive (inhibitory) interactions between units. Additionally, we introduce a family of models that includes aspects of the classical and quantum walk models.

  8. Pure Gaussian states from quantum harmonic oscillator chains with a single local dissipative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shan; Woolley, Matthew J.; Petersen, Ian R.; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    We study the preparation of entangled pure Gaussian states via reservoir engineering. In particular, we consider a chain consisting of (2\\aleph +1) quantum harmonic oscillators where the central oscillator of the chain is coupled to a single reservoir. We then completely parametrize the class of (2\\aleph +1) -mode pure Gaussian states that can be prepared by this type of quantum harmonic oscillator chain. This parametrization allows us to determine the steady-state entanglement properties of such quantum harmonic oscillator chains.

  9. Thinking Outside the Euclidean Box: Riemannian Geometry and Inter-Temporal Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Mishra, Arul

    2016-01-01

    Inter-temporal decisions involves assigning values to various payoffs occurring at different temporal distances. Past research has used different approaches to study these decisions made by humans and animals. For instance, considering that people discount future payoffs at a constant rate (e.g., exponential discounting) or at variable rate (e.g., hyperbolic discounting). In this research, we question the widely assumed, but seldom questioned, notion across many of the existing approaches that the decision space, where the decision-maker perceives time and monetary payoffs, is a Euclidean space. By relaxing the rigid assumption of Euclidean space, we propose that the decision space is a more flexible Riemannian space of Constant Negative Curvature. We test our proposal by deriving a discount function, which uses the distance in the Negative Curvature space instead of Euclidean temporal distance. The distance function includes both perceived values of time as well as money, unlike past work which has considered just time. By doing so we are able to explain many of the empirical findings in inter-temporal decision-making literature. We provide converging evidence for our proposal by estimating the curvature of the decision space utilizing manifold learning algorithm and showing that the characteristics (i.e., metric properties) of the decision space resembles those of the Negative Curvature space rather than the Euclidean space. We conclude by presenting new theoretical predictions derived from our proposal and implications for how non-normative behavior is defined.

  10. Usability Evaluation of an Augmented Reality System for Teaching Euclidean Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Gonzalez, Anabel; Chi-Poot, Angel; Uc-Cetina, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is one of the emerging technologies that has demonstrated to be an efficient technological tool to enhance learning techniques. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of an AR system for teaching Euclidean vectors in physics and mathematics. The goal of this pedagogical tool is to facilitate user's…

  11. Studies in Mathematics, Volume II. Euclidean Geometry Based on Ruler and Protractor Axioms. Second Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Charles W.; And Others

    These materials were developed to help high school teachers to become familiar with the approach to tenth-grade Euclidean geometry which was adopted by the School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG). It is emphasized that the materials are unsuitable as a high school textbook. Each document contains material too difficult for most high school students.…

  12. An orbit analysis approach to the study of superintegrable systems in the Euclidean plane

    SciTech Connect

    Adlam, C. M. McLenaghan, R. G. Smirnov, R. G.

    2007-03-15

    We classify the superintegrable potentials in the Euclidean plane by means of an orbit analysis of the space of valence two Killing tensors under the action of the group of rigid motions. Our approach generalizes the classical approach of Winternitz and collaborators by considering pairs of Killing tensors that are not both in canonical form.

  13. Thinking Outside the Euclidean Box: Riemannian Geometry and Inter-Temporal Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inter-temporal decisions involves assigning values to various payoffs occurring at different temporal distances. Past research has used different approaches to study these decisions made by humans and animals. For instance, considering that people discount future payoffs at a constant rate (e.g., exponential discounting) or at variable rate (e.g., hyperbolic discounting). In this research, we question the widely assumed, but seldom questioned, notion across many of the existing approaches that the decision space, where the decision-maker perceives time and monetary payoffs, is a Euclidean space. By relaxing the rigid assumption of Euclidean space, we propose that the decision space is a more flexible Riemannian space of Constant Negative Curvature. We test our proposal by deriving a discount function, which uses the distance in the Negative Curvature space instead of Euclidean temporal distance. The distance function includes both perceived values of time as well as money, unlike past work which has considered just time. By doing so we are able to explain many of the empirical findings in inter-temporal decision-making literature. We provide converging evidence for our proposal by estimating the curvature of the decision space utilizing manifold learning algorithm and showing that the characteristics (i.e., metric properties) of the decision space resembles those of the Negative Curvature space rather than the Euclidean space. We conclude by presenting new theoretical predictions derived from our proposal and implications for how non-normative behavior is defined. PMID:27018787

  14. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  15. Quantum simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Somma, Rolando; Barnum, Howard

    2008-03-01

    We develop a quantum algorithm to solve combinatorial optimization problems through quantum simulation of a classical annealing process. Our algorithm combines techniques from quantum walks and quantum phase estimation, and can be viewed as the quantum analogue of the discrete-time Markov Chain Monte Carlo implementation of classical simulated annealing.

  16. Anomalies of Dirac Type Operators on Euclidean Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Alan; Grosse, Harald; Kaad, Jens

    2015-04-01

    We develop by example a type of index theory for non-Fredholm operators. A general framework using cyclic homology for this notion of index was introduced in a separate article (Carev and Kaad, Topological invariance of the homological index. arXiv:1402.0475 [math.KT], 2014) where it may be seen to generalise earlier ideas of Carey-Pincus and Gesztesy-Simon on this problem. Motivated by an example in two dimensions in Bollé et al. (J Math Phys 28:1512-1525, 1987) we introduce in this paper a class of examples of Dirac type operators on that provide non-trivial examples of our homological approach. Our examples may be seen as extending old ideas about the notion of anomaly introduced by physicists to handle topological terms in quantum action principles, with an important difference, namely, we are dealing with purely geometric data that can be seen to arise from the continuous spectrum of our Dirac type operators.

  17. Behavior in strong fields of Euclidean gauge theories. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    1984-04-01

    Functional determinants resulting from functional integration in quantum gauge theories are studied. We derive an expansion around the constant field strength for the (renormalized) spinor determinant detMF in QED. We show that, if the field strength F is large and its derivatives are bounded, then detMF≡exp(-W)~exp(cF2lnF2), where c>0. Hence, the effective action W in (four-dimensional) QED is unbounded from below. Moreover, we prove that exp(-W) is not integrable. A similar result is established in the Yukawa model [detMY~exp(φ4lnφ4)]. We estimate the scalar determinant detMA2 for a non-Abelian gauge field. We show that (like in the Abelian case studied earlier) detMA2=exp[c|F|2ln|F|2+r2(F,DF,DDF)], where c>0 and r2 is bounded by a quadratic form of the gauge-invariant variables |F|, |DF|, and |DDF|. We investigate the effect of gluon self-interaction on the stability of models with broken gauge symmetry G-->H (we discuss in detail the Georgi-Glashow model). We sum up (in an approximation) the contribution of massive gluons to the O(2)-invariant effective action. It is shown that this effective action is bounded from below for slowly varying fields, if the couplings are asymptotically free at the one-loop level.

  18. Multiphoton amplification processes and quantum-path interferences in a coherently driven atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Soler, J.J.; Font, J.L.; Vilaseca, R.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Kul'minskii, A.

    2003-10-01

    We develop a theoretical model of two-photon amplification in laser-driven potassium atoms and use it to analyze the recent experiments reported by Pfister et al. [Phys. Rev. A 60, R4249 (1999)]. The model takes into account most of the essential factors influencing the amplification process, including the atomic hyperfine structure (which makes multiphoton emission possible) and the simultaneous interaction with intense drive and probe beams with arbitrary detunings. We determine the origin and analyze the properties of different multiphoton gain resonances that appear in the light-matter interaction. In particular, the influence of the drive and probe field amplitudes and detunings on the strength and frequency of the two-photon amplification resonance is studied in detail, showing clearly the differences with respect to the behavior of single-photon or other multiphoton amplification processes. In addition, we investigate interferences between different quantum pathways originating from the hyperfine structure and determine the conditions under which they can enhance or suppress multiphoton resonances. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the observations, indicating that it can be used to understand recent experiments on two-photon lasing reported by Pfister et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 4512 (2001)].

  19. Design of single flux quantum cells for a 10-Nb-layer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaike, H.; Tanaka, M.; Takagi, K.; Kataeva, I.; Kasagi, R.; Fujimaki, A.; Takagi, K.; Igarashi, M.; Park, H.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Fujiwara, K.; Nagasawa, S.; Hidaka, M.; Takagi, N.

    2009-10-01

    We present design of single flux quantum (SFQ) cells for a 10-Nb-layer process which has been developed to fabricate SFQ VLSI circuits. The device fabricated by the process has a structure of an active layer on the top, two passive transmission line (PTL) layers in the middle, and a DC power (DCP) layer at the bottom. We have determined a unit cell size of 30 μm × 30 μm and a unit cell structure by taking accounts of the design rules and the experimental data on the PTLs. This cell size enables us to draw two PTLs of each PTL layer. PTL driver and receiver cells have a unit cell size, whereas a half unit cell with a size of 15 μm × 15 μm is used for PTL segments and vias. On the active layer, circuit parameters in analog simulation level are based on those of CONNECT cells, except for junction parameters with McCumber parameter βc of 2.0. Major cells including logic cells and PTL driver/receiver cells have been developed. We have designed a 2 × 2 switch on-chip test circuit using the cells and successfully tested them at high speed.

  20. General route for the decomposition of InAs quantum dots during the capping process.

    PubMed

    González, D; Reyes, D F; Utrilla, A D; Ben, T; Braza, V; Guzman, A; Hierro, A; Ulloa, J M

    2016-03-29

    The effect of the capping process on the morphology of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) by using different GaAs-based capping layers (CLs), ranging from strain reduction layers to strain compensating layers, has been studied by transmission microscopic techniques. For this, we have measured simultaneously the height and diameter in buried and uncapped QDs covering populations of hundreds of QDs that are statistically reliable. First, the uncapped QD population evolves in all cases from a pyramidal shape into a more homogenous distribution of buried QDs with a spherical-dome shape, despite the different mechanisms implicated in the QD capping. Second, the shape of the buried QDs depends only on the final QD size, where the radius of curvature is function of the base diameter independently of the CL composition and growth conditions. An asymmetric evolution of the QDs' morphology takes place, in which the QD height and base diameter are modified in the amount required to adopt a similar stable shape characterized by a averaged aspect ratio of 0.21. Our results contradict the traditional model of QD material redistribution from the apex to the base and point to a different universal behavior of the overgrowth processes in self-organized InAs QDs.

  1. Quantum control of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki

    2015-11-01

    In photoexcitation processes, if the motion of excited electrons can be precisely steered by the instantaneous electric field of an arbitrary waveform of a Fourier-synthesized laser field, the resultant matter response can be achieved within one optical cycle, usually within the attosecond (1 as =10-18s) regime. Fourier synthesis of laser fields has been achieved in various ways. However, the general use of Fourier-synthesized laser fields for the control of matter is extremely limited. Here, we report the quantum control of a nonlinear response of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 ×1012W /c m2) Fourier-synthesized laser fields consisting of fundamental, second-, third-, and fourth-harmonic light achieves the orientation-selective ionization; we utilized the orientation-selective ionization for measurement of the relative phase differences between the fundamental and each harmonic light. Our findings impact not only light-wave engineering but also the control of matter, possibly triggering the creation and establishment of a new methodology that uses Fourier-synthesized laser fields.

  2. A strategy of combining SILAR with solvothermal process for In2S3 sensitized quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peizhi; Tang, Qunwei; Ji, Chenming; Wang, Haobo

    2015-12-01

    Pursuit of an efficient strategy for quantum dot-sensitized photoanode has been a persistent objective for enhancing photovoltaic performances of quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSC). We present here the fabrication of the indium sulfide (In2S3) quantum dot-sensitized titanium dioxide (TiO2) photoanode by combining successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) with solvothermal processes. The resultant QDSC consists of an In2S3 sensitized TiO2 photoanode, a liquid polysulfide electrolyte, and a Co0.85Se counter electrode. The optimized QDSC with photoanode prepared with the help of a SILAR method at 20 deposition cycles and solvothermal method yields a maximum power conversion efficiency of 1.39%.

  3. Quantum-Like Model for Decision Making Process in Two Players Game. A Non-Kolmogorovian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Ohya, Masanori; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-03-01

    In experiments of games, players frequently make choices which are regarded as irrational in game theory. In papers of Khrennikov (Information Dynamics in Cognitive, Psychological and Anomalous Phenomena. Fundamental Theories of Physics, Kluwer Academic, Norwell, 2004; Fuzzy Sets Syst. 155:4-17, 2005; Biosystems 84:225-241, 2006; Found. Phys. 35(10):1655-1693, 2005; in QP-PQ Quantum Probability and White Noise Analysis, vol. XXIV, pp. 105-117, 2009), it was pointed out that statistics collected in such the experiments have "quantum-like" properties, which can not be explained in classical probability theory. In this paper, we design a simple quantum-like model describing a decision-making process in a two-players game and try to explain a mechanism of the irrational behavior of players. Finally we discuss a mathematical frame of non-Kolmogorovian system in terms of liftings (Accardi and Ohya, in Appl. Math. Optim. 39:33-59, 1999).

  4. Post-processing Free Quantum Random Number Generator Based on Avalanche Photodiode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Sheng-Kai, Liao; Fu-Tian, Liang; Qi, Shen; Hao, Liang; Cheng-Zhi, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Not Available Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, Shanghai Branch, University of Science and Technology of China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11405172.

  5. Quantum wormholes and harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Luis J.

    1993-01-01

    The quantum state of a wormhole can be represented by a path integral over all asymptotically Euclidean four-geometries and all matter fields which have prescribed values, the arguments of the wave function, on a three-surface which divides the space time manifold into two disconnected parts. Minisuperspace models which consist of a homogeneous massless scalar field coupled to a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space time are considered. Once the path integral over the lapse function is performed, the requirement that the space time be asymptotically Euclidean can be accomplished by fixing the asymptotic gravitational momentum in the remaining path integral. It is argued that there does not exist any wave function which corresponds to asymptotic field configurations such that the effective gravitational constant is negative in the asymptotic region. Then, the wormhole wave functions can be written as linear combinations of harmonic oscillator wave functions.

  6. Graviton propagator from background-independent quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2006-10-13

    We study the graviton propagator in Euclidean loop quantum gravity. We use spin foam, boundary-amplitude, and group-field-theory techniques. We compute a component of the propagator to first order, under some approximations, obtaining the correct large-distance behavior. This indicates a way for deriving conventional spacetime quantities from a background-independent theory.

  7. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Enzymatic Processes: Caveats and Breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Quesne, Matthew G; Borowski, Tomasz; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-02-18

    Nature has developed large groups of enzymatic catalysts with the aim to transfer substrates into useful products, which enables biosystems to perform all their natural functions. As such, all biochemical processes in our body (we drink, we eat, we breath, we sleep, etc.) are governed by enzymes. One of the problems associated with research on biocatalysts is that they react so fast that details of their reaction mechanisms cannot be obtained with experimental work. In recent years, major advances in computational hardware and software have been made and now large (bio)chemical systems can be studied using accurate computational techniques. One such technique is the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) technique, which has gained major momentum in recent years. Unfortunately, it is not a black-box method that is easily applied, but requires careful set-up procedures. In this work we give an overview on the technical difficulties and caveats of QM/MM and discuss work-protocols developed in our groups for running successful QM/MM calculations.

  8. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, Nathalie Goldner, Philippe; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Ikesue, Akio

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  9. Bayesian signal processing techniques for the detection of highly localised gravity anomalies using quantum interferometry technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gareth; Ridley, Kevin; Rodgers, Anthony; de Villiers, Geoffrey

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of quantum technology offer the exciting possibility of gravimeters and gravity gradiometers capable of performing rapid surveys with unprecedented precision and accuracy. Measurements with sub nano-g (a billionth of the acceleration due to gravity) precision should enable the resolution of underground structures on metre length scales. However, deducing the exact dimensions of the structure producing the measured gravity anomaly is known to be an ill-posed inversion problem. Furthermore, the measurement process will be affected by multiple sources of uncertainty that increase the range of plausible solutions that fit the measured data. Bayesian inference is the natural framework for accommodating these uncertainties and providing a fully probabilistic assessment of possible structures producing inhomogeneities in the gravitational field. Previous work introduced the probability of excavation map as a means to convert the high-dimensional space belonging to the posterior distribution to an easily interpretable map. We now report on the development of the inference model to account for spatial correlations in the gravitational field induced by variations in soil density.

  10. Experimental progress with novel surface electrode ion trap structures for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig; Blain, Matthew; Benito, Francisco; Chou, Chin-Wen; Descour, Mike; Ellis, Rob; Haltli, Ray; Heller, Edwin; Kemme, Shanalyn; Sterk, Jon; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Maunz, Peter; Stick, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Segmented surface electrode ion traps are one of the most mature platforms among candidates for scalable quantum information processing. In this poster, an overview of current results from four specific projects will be presented. Two projects involve increased light collection from trapped ion for state detection and/or remote entangling of distant ions. The first involves cavity integration into a linear surface trap, and the second, involves integration of diffractive optical elements into a linear surface trap for increased light collection. Another project involves a trap with a ring geometry which could be used to trap long chains of equally spaced ions. Finally, we report on initial testing of a trap structure with vastly improved in-plane optical access. In this structure in-plane beams can be focused to less than 8 microns while keeping a distance of at least 5 beam radii to the trap structure. Along with these projects other relevant progress from Sandia National Laboratory's ion trap group will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Efficient and accurate evaluation of potential energy matrix elements for quantum dynamics using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborzpour, Jonathan P.; Tew, David P.; Habershon, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a linear combination of basis functions, such as Gaussian wavepackets (GWPs), requires costly evaluation of integrals over the entire potential energy surface (PES) of the system. The standard approach, motivated by computational tractability for direct dynamics, is to approximate the PES with a second order Taylor expansion, for example centred at each GWP. In this article, we propose an alternative method for approximating PES matrix elements based on PES interpolation using Gaussian process regression (GPR). Our GPR scheme requires only single-point evaluations of the PES at a limited number of configurations in each time-step; the necessity of performing often-expensive evaluations of the Hessian matrix is completely avoided. In applications to 2-, 5-, and 10-dimensional benchmark models describing a tunnelling coordinate coupled non-linearly to a set of harmonic oscillators, we find that our GPR method results in PES matrix elements for which the average error is, in the best case, two orders-of-magnitude smaller and, in the worst case, directly comparable to that determined by any other Taylor expansion method, without requiring additional PES evaluations or Hessian matrices. Given the computational simplicity of GPR, as well as the opportunities for further refinement of the procedure highlighted herein, we argue that our GPR methodology should replace methods for evaluating PES matrix elements using Taylor expansions in quantum dynamics simulations.

  12. Scalable, chip-based optically-controlled gates for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenkov, I. A.; Tikhonova, O. V.; Polyakov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present a simple and robust method to build on-the-fly configurable quantum gates based on a photonic exchange between quantum nodes. The idea is based on a high reflectivity of Bragg grating structures near resonant wavelengths. The control is exerted by applying an external strongly off-resonant or even a static electromagnetic field and taking advantage of the Kerr effect. When the nonlinear phase shift is strong enough, the Bragg mirror disappears, thereby allowing a transmission of a wave packet from one node to another. An example of a protocol for quantum logic gates that relies on this framework is offered.

  13. Quantum Metaphotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    This included optimizing the MBE growth conditions of a near-surface quantum wells with emission around 1500nm and fabrication of arrays of various...antennas and near-surface quantum-confined structures. This included optimizing the molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions of a near-surface quantum...due to the single process epitaxial growth , increases the interaction. Low densities of indium islands have been shown to increase the

  14. The Colloidal Stabilization of Quantum Dots: Towards Manufacturable, Efficient Solution-Processed Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollny, Lisa

    Understanding colloidal stabilization can influence the design of optoelectronic devices and enable improvements to their performance and stability. For photovoltaics, important characteristics of the active layer material are high conductivity along with a minimum of recombination centers. In order to capitalize on the benefits of solution-processed materials, it is important to minimize the number of processing steps: ideally, to achieve a low-cost solution, materials would be deposited using a single process step compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. Prior to this work, the highest-performing colloidal quantum dots (CQD) solar cells have relied on several deposition steps that are repeated in a layer-by-layer (LBL) fashion. The purpose of these process steps has been to remove the long insulating ligands used in synthesis and replace them with short ligands that allow electrical conduction. The large number of steps combined, typically implemented via spin coating, leads to inefficient materials utilization and fails to show a path to a manufacturable solution. In this work, the first CQD solar cells were designed, built, and characterized combining state-of-art performance with scalable manufacture. Firstly, I report the first automated CQD synthesis to result in CQDs that form high-performance CQD solar cells. I analyze the CQD synthesis and by separating it into two phases---nucleation and growth phase---my insights are used to create higher-quality CQDs exhibiting enhanced monodispersity. I then proceed to develop a CQD ink: a CQD solution ready for direct deposition to form a semiconducting film exhibiting low trap state density. In early trials the CQD ink showed only limited power conversion efficiencies of 2%. I designed a new ink strategy, which I term cleavable hemiketal ligands. This novel two-component ligand strategy enables the combination of colloidal stabilization (via this longer two-component ligand) and cleavability (enabling excellent

  15. PEG-Phospholipids Coated Quantum Rods as Amplifiers of the Photosensitization Process by FRET.

    PubMed

    Timor, Reut; Weitman, Hana; Waiskopf, Nir; Banin, Uri; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2015-09-30

    Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generated upon photostimulation of photosensitizer molecules is a highly reactive specie which is utilized in photodynamic therapy. Recent studies have shown that semiconductor nanoparticles can be used as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process to excite attached photosensitizer molecules. In these studies, their unique properties, such as low nanoscale size, long-term photostability, wide broad absorbance band, large absorption cross section, and narrow and tunable emission bands were used to provide advantages over the traditional methods to produce singlet oxygen. Previous studies that achieved this goal, however, showed some limitations, such as low FRET efficiency, poor colloidal stability, nonspecific interactions, and/or complex preparation procedure. In this work, we developed and characterized a novel system of semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) and the photosensitizer meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC), as a model system that produces singlet oxygen without these limitations. A simple two-step preparation method is shown; Hydrophobic CdSe/CdS QRs are solubilized in aqueous solutions by encapsulation with lecithin and PEGylated phospholipid (PEG-PL) of two lipid lengths: PEG350 or PEG2000. Then, the hydrophobic photosensitizer mTHPC, was intercalated into the new amphiphilic PEG-PL coating of the QR, providing a strong attachment to the nanoparticle without covalent linkage. These PEGylated QR (eQR)-mTHPC nanocomposites show efficient FRET processes upon light stimulation of the QR component which results in efficient production of singlet oxygen. The results demonstrate the potential for future use of this concept in photodynamic therapy schemes.

  16. Recombination processes in structures with GaN/ALN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, I. A.; Mansurov, V. G.; Zhuravlev, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the generation and the radiative and nonradiative recombination of carriers in structures with GaN quantum dots in the AlN matrix are studied experimentally and theoretically. Absorption, stationary and nonstationary photoluminescence of quantum dots at different temperatures are investigated. It is found that the photoluminescence intensity considerably decreases with the temperature while the photoluminescence kinetics weakly depends on the temperature. The photoluminescence kinetics is shown to be determined by radiative recombination inside quantum dots. A mechanism of nonradiative recombination is proposed, according to which the main reason for the thermal quenching of photoluminescence is nonradiative recombination of charge carriers, generated by optical transitions between quantum dots and wetting layer states.

  17. Backreaction due to quantum tunneling and modification to the black hole evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Sujoy K.

    2014-08-01

    We study the effect of backreaction on the evaporation of quantum black holes. The method used is based on quantum tunneling formalism as proposed by Banerjee and Majhi [Phys. Lett. B 675, 243 (2009)]. We give a more realistic picture by considering the fact that a black hole looses its energy while modes are tunneled outside the event horizon. It is shown how the tunneling quantum field modes affect the geometry and how this change in geometry is arrested in the quantum field. Exploiting this, we calculate the modified (nonthermal) radiation spectrum and associating energy fluxes and discuss various issues related with these. The results obtained here are often expected on physical grounds, but, importantly, we find them in a quantitative manner.

  18. Quantum cellular automata and free quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    In a series of recent papers [1-4] it has been shown how free quantum field theory can be derived without using mechanical primitives (including space-time, special relativity, quantization rules, etc.), but only considering the easiest quantum algorithm encompassing a countable set of quantum systems whose network of interactions satisfies the simple principles of unitarity, homogeneity, locality, and isotropy. This has opened the route to extending the axiomatic information-theoretic derivation of the quantum theory of abstract systems [5, 6] to include quantum field theory. The inherent discrete nature of the informational axiomatization leads to an extension of quantum field theory to a quantum cellular automata theory, where the usual field theory is recovered in a regime where the discrete structure of the automata cannot be probed. A simple heuristic argument sets the scale of discreteness to the Planck scale, and the customary physical regime where discreteness is not visible is the relativistic one of small wavevectors. In this paper we provide a thorough derivation from principles that in the most general case the graph of the quantum cellular automaton is the Cayley graph of a finitely presented group, and showing how for the case corresponding to Euclidean emergent space (where the group resorts to an Abelian one) the automata leads to Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell field dynamics in the relativistic limit. We conclude with some perspectives towards the more general scenario of non-linear automata for interacting quantum field theory.

  19. Transitivity vs. intransitivity in decision making process - an example in quantum game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Marcin

    2009-06-01

    We compare two different ways of quantum modification in a simple sequential game called Cat's Dilemma in the context of the debate on intransitive and transitive preferences. This kind of analysis can have essential meaning for research on artificial intelligence (some possibilities are discussed). Nature has both transitive and intransitive properties and perhaps quantum models will be more able to capture this dualism than the classical models. We also present an electoral interpretation of the game.

  20. I. Advances in NMR Signal Processing. II. Spin Dynamics in Quantum Dissipative Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yung-Ya

    1998-11-01

    Part I. Advances in IVMR Signal Processing. Improvements of sensitivity and resolution are two major objects in the development of NMR/MRI. A signal enhancement method is first presented which recovers signal from noise by a judicious combination of a priordmowledge to define the desired feasible solutions and a set theoretic estimation for restoring signal properties that have been lost due to noise contamination. The effect of noise can be significantly mitigated through the process of iteratively modifying the noisy data set to the smallest degree necessary so that it possesses a collection of prescribed properties and also lies closest to the original data set. A novel detection-estimation scheme is then introduced to analyze noisy and/or strongly damped or truncated FIDs. Based on exponential modeling, the number of signals is detected based on information estimated using the matrix pencil method. theory and the spectral parameters are Part II. Spin Dynamics in body dipole-coupled systems Quantum Dissipative Systems. Spin dynamics in manyconstitutes one of the most fundamental problems in magnetic resonance and condensed-matter physics. Its many-spin nature precludes any rigorous treatment. ‘Therefore, the spin-boson model is adopted to describe in the rotating frame the influence of the dipolar local fields on a tagged spin. Based on the polaronic transform and a perturbation treatment, an analytical solution is derived, suggesting the existence of self-trapped states in the. strong coupling limit, i.e., when transverse local field >> longitudinal local field. Such nonlinear phenomena originate from the joint action of the lattice fluctuations and the reaction field. Under semiclassical approximation, it is found that the main effect of the reaction field is the renormalization of the Hamiltonian of interest. Its direct consequence is the two-step relaxation process: the spin is initially localized in a quasiequilibrium state, which is later detrapped by

  1. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  2. A Low-Complexity Euclidean Orthogonal LDPC Architecture for Low Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Revathy, M.; Saravanan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes have been implemented in latest digital video broadcasting, broadband wireless access (WiMax), and fourth generation of wireless standards. In this paper, we have proposed a high efficient low-density parity-check code (LDPC) decoder architecture for low power applications. This study also considers the design and analysis of check node and variable node units and Euclidean orthogonal generator in LDPC decoder architecture. The Euclidean orthogonal generator is used to reduce the error rate of the proposed LDPC architecture, which can be incorporated between check and variable node architecture. This proposed decoder design is synthesized on Xilinx 9.2i platform and simulated using Modelsim, which is targeted to 45 nm devices. Synthesis report proves that the proposed architecture greatly reduces the power consumption and hardware utilizations on comparing with different conventional architectures. PMID:26065017

  3. A Low-Complexity Euclidean Orthogonal LDPC Architecture for Low Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Revathy, M; Saravanan, R

    2015-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes have been implemented in latest digital video broadcasting, broadband wireless access (WiMax), and fourth generation of wireless standards. In this paper, we have proposed a high efficient low-density parity-check code (LDPC) decoder architecture for low power applications. This study also considers the design and analysis of check node and variable node units and Euclidean orthogonal generator in LDPC decoder architecture. The Euclidean orthogonal generator is used to reduce the error rate of the proposed LDPC architecture, which can be incorporated between check and variable node architecture. This proposed decoder design is synthesized on Xilinx 9.2i platform and simulated using Modelsim, which is targeted to 45 nm devices. Synthesis report proves that the proposed architecture greatly reduces the power consumption and hardware utilizations on comparing with different conventional architectures.

  4. Exactly constructing model of quantum mechanics with random environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2010-02-15

    Dissipation and decoherence, interaction with the random media, continuous measurements and many other complicated problems of open quantum systems are a result of interaction of quantum system with the random environment. These problems mathematically are described in terms of complex probabilistic processes (CPP). Note that CPP satisfies the stochastic differential equation (SDE) of Langevin-Schroedinger(L-Sch)type, and is defined on the extended space R{sup 1} - R{sub {l_brace}{gamma}{r_brace}}, where R{sup 1} and R{sub {l_brace}{gamma}{r_brace}} are the Euclidean and the functional spaces, correspondingly. For simplicity, the model of 1D quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) with the stochastic environment is considered. On the basis of orthogonal CPP, the method of stochastic density matrix (SDM) is developed. By S DM method, the thermodynamical potentials, such as the nonequilibrium entropy and the energy of the 'ground state' are constructed in a closed form. The expressions for uncertain relations and Wigner function depending on interaction's constant between 1D QHO and the environment are obtained.

  5. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer.

  6. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  7. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  8. Dunkl Operators as Covariant Derivatives in a Quantum Principal Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdevich, Micho; Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2013-05-01

    A quantum principal bundle is constructed for every Coxeter group acting on a finite-dimensional Euclidean space E, and then a connection is also defined on this bundle. The covariant derivatives associated to this connection are the Dunkl operators, originally introduced as part of a program to generalize harmonic analysis in Euclidean spaces. This gives us a new, geometric way of viewing the Dunkl operators. In particular, we present a new proof of the commutativity of these operators among themselves as a consequence of a geometric property, namely, that the connection has curvature zero.

  9. Geometric properties of the magnetic Laplacian on the Euclidean 4-space

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierowski, Dominique; Zinoun, Azzouz; Intissar, Ahmed

    2010-12-15

    When the four-dimensional Euclidean space is endowed with a covariant derivative that is either self-dual or antiself-dual and of constant curvature, the corresponding magnetic Laplacian is closely related to the sub-Laplacian of the quaternionic Heisenberg group. Some geometric properties of this operator are studied. In particular, it is proved that there exists a canonical orthogonal complex structure which provides a factorization in the sense of Schroedinger.

  10. Dynamical systems and quantum bicrossproduct algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Oscar; del Olmo, Mariano A.

    2002-06-01

    We present a unified study of some aspects of quantum bicrossproduct algebras of inhomogeneous Lie algebras, such as Poincaré, Galilei and Euclidean in N dimensions. The action associated with the bicrossproduct structure allows us to obtain a nonlinear action over a new group linked to the translations. This new nonlinear action associates a dynamical system with each generator which is the object of our study.

  11. Quantum-like model of cognitive decision making and information processing.

    PubMed

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we offer the quantum-like (QL) representation of the Shafir-Tversky statistical effect which is well known in cognitive psychology. We apply the so-called contextual approach. We consider the Shafir-Tversky effect to result from mixing statistical data obtained in incompatible contexts which are involved, e.g. in Prisoner's Dilemma or in more general games in which the disjunction effect can be found. As a consequence, the law of total probability is violated for the experimental data obtained in experiments on cognitive psychology by Shafir and Tversky [Shafir, E., Tversky, A., 1992. Thinking through uncertainty: nonconsequential reasoning and choice. Cogn. Psychol. 24, 449-474] as well as Tversky and Shafir [Tversky, A., Shafir, E., 1992. The disjunction effect in choice under uncertainty. Psychol. Sci. 3, 305-309]. Moreover, we can find a numerical measure of contextual incompatibility (the so-called coefficient of interference) as well as represent contexts which are involved in Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) by probability amplitudes-normalized vectors ("mental wave functions"). We remark that statistical data from Shafir and Tversky [Shafir, E., Tversky, A., 1992. Thinking through uncertainty: nonconsequential reasoning and choice. Cogn. Psychol. 24, 449-474] and Tversky and Shafir [Tversky, A., Shafir, E., 1992. The disjunction effect in choice under uncertainty. Psychol. Sci. 3, 305-309] experiments differ crucially from the point of view of mental interference. The second one exhibits the conventional trigonometric (cos-type) interference while the first one exhibits even the so-called hyperbolic (cosh-type) interference. We discuss the QL processing of information by cognitive systems, especially, the QL decision making and both classical and QL rationality and ethics.

  12. ETEA: a Euclidean minimum spanning tree-based evolutionary algorithm for multi-objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Miqing; Yang, Shengxiang; Zheng, Jinhua; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    The Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST), widely used in a variety of domains, is a minimum spanning tree of a set of points in space where the edge weight between each pair of points is their Euclidean distance. Since the generation of an EMST is entirely determined by the Euclidean distance between solutions (points), the properties of EMSTs have a close relation with the distribution and position information of solutions. This paper explores the properties of EMSTs and proposes an EMST-based evolutionary algorithm (ETEA) to solve multi-objective optimization problems (MOPs). Unlike most EMO algorithms that focus on the Pareto dominance relation, the proposed algorithm mainly considers distance-based measures to evaluate and compare individuals during the evolutionary search. Specifically, in ETEA, four strategies are introduced: (1) An EMST-based crowding distance (ETCD) is presented to estimate the density of individuals in the population; (2) A distance comparison approach incorporating ETCD is used to assign the fitness value for individuals; (3) A fitness adjustment technique is designed to avoid the partial overcrowding in environmental selection; (4) Three diversity indicators-the minimum edge, degree, and ETCD-with regard to EMSTs are applied to determine the survival of individuals in archive truncation. From a series of extensive experiments on 32 test instances with different characteristics, ETEA is found to be competitive against five state-of-the-art algorithms and its predecessor in providing a good balance among convergence, uniformity, and spread.

  13. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-22

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  14. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-07-15

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks.

  15. FKG inequality for the Yukawa/sub 2/ quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, G.A.; Rosen, L.

    1980-02-01

    WE establish the FKG correlation inequality for the Euclidean scalar Yukawa/sub 2/ quantum field model and, when the Fermi mass is zero, for pseudoscalar Yukawa/sub 2/. To do so we approximate the quantum field model by a lattice spin system and show that the FKG inequality for this system follows from a positivity condition on the fundamental solution of the Euclidean Dirac equation with external field. We prove this positivity condition by applying the Vekua--Bers theory of generalized analytic functions.

  16. Relation between physical time-energy cost of a quantum process and its information fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.

    2014-08-01

    A quantum system can be described and characterized by at least two different concepts, namely, its physical and informational properties. Here, we explicitly connect these two concepts, by equating the time-energy cost which is the product of the largest energy of a Hamiltonian of quantum dynamics and the evolution time, and the entanglement fidelity which is the informational difference between an input state and the corresponding output state produced by a quantum channel characterized by the Hamiltonian. Specifically, the worst-case entanglement fidelity between the input and output states is exactly the cosine of the channel's time-energy cost (except when the fidelity is zero). The exactness of our relation makes a strong statement about the intimate connection between information and physics. Our exact result may also be regarded as a time-energy uncertainty relation for the fastest state that achieves a certain fidelity.

  17. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  18. A Quantum-BDI Model for Information Processing and Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisconti, Cristian; Corallo, Angelo; Fortunato, Laura; Gentile, Antonio A.

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to develop a novel BDI agent programming framework, which embeds the reasoning under uncertainty (probabilistic logic) and is capable of a realistic simulation of human reasoning. We claim that such a development can be addressed through the adoption of the mathematical and logical formalism derived from Quantum Mechanics: a scheme fulfilling the necessary requirements is described, useful for both the interpretation of some peculiarities in human behavior, and eventually the adoption of `quantum computing' formalism for the agent programming. This last possibility could exploit the power of quantum parallelism in practical reasoning applications. Integration with the BDI paradigm enables the straightforward adoption of efficient learning algorithms and procedures, enhancing the behavior and adaptation of the agent to the environment.

  19. Simulation of the Burgers equation by NMR quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhiying; Cory, David G.; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-10-15

    We report on the implementation of Burgers equation as a type-II quantum computation on a NMR quantum-information processor. Since the flow field evolving under the Burgers equation develops sharp features over time, this is a better test of liquid-state NMR implementations of type-II quantum computers than the previous examples using the diffusion equation. In particular, we show that Fourier approximations used in the encoding step are not the dominant error. Small systematic errors in the collision operator accumulate and swamp all other errors. We propose, and demonstrate, that the accumulation of this error can be avoided to a large extent by replacing the single collision operator with a set of operators with random errors and similar fidelities. Experiments have been implemented on 16 two-qubit sites for eight successive time steps for the Burgers equation.

  20. Hadamard NMR spectroscopy for two-dimensional quantum information processing and parallel search algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Kumar, Anil

    2006-12-01

    Hadamard spectroscopy has earlier been used to speed-up multi-dimensional NMR experiments. In this work, we speed-up the two-dimensional quantum computing scheme, by using Hadamard spectroscopy in the indirect dimension, resulting in a scheme which is faster and requires the Fourier transformation only in the direct dimension. Two and three qubit quantum gates are implemented with an extra observer qubit. We also use one-dimensional Hadamard spectroscopy for binary information storage by spatial encoding and implementation of a parallel search algorithm.

  1. Quantum isothermal reversible process of particles in a box with a delta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minho; Yi, Su Do; Baek, Seung Ki

    2015-03-01

    For an understanding of a heat engine working in the microscopic scale, it is often necessary to estimate the amount of reversible work extracted by isothermal expansion of the quantum gas used as its working substance. We consider an engine with a movable wall, modeled as an infinite square well with a delta peak inside. By solving the resulting one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation, we obtain the energy levels and the thermodynamic potentials. Our result shows how quantum tunneling degrades the engine by decreasing the amount of reversible work during the isothermal expansion.

  2. Simplified optical quantum-information processing via weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Qi; Bai Juan; Cheng Liuyong; Wang Hongfu; Zhang Shou; Shao Xiaoqiang

    2011-05-15

    We propose a simplified parity meter for photonic qubits with cross-Kerr nonlinearities, homodyne measurement, and some optical elements. Our scheme has lower error probability than the protocol proposed in Nemoto and Munro [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 250502 (2004)]. Based on the present parity meter, we achieve cluster-state preparation, a complete Bell-state analyzer, and quantum teleportation. All of these schemes are nearly deterministic in the regime with little noise and include less optical elements, which makes our schemes more meaningful for large-scale quantum computing.

  3. Toward quantum processing in molecules: a THz-bandwidth coherent memory for light.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Philip J; Lausten, Rune; England, Duncan G; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2013-08-23

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics. These devices utilize nonclassical phenomena in the states of atoms, ions, and solid-state media as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate molecular states as a distinct alternative. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules. The THz-bandwidth molecular memory is used to store 100-fs pulses for durations up to ~1 ns, enabling ~10(4) operational time bins. The results demonstrate the promise of molecules for constructing compact ultrafast quantum photonic technologies.

  4. Processing and characterization of stable, pH-sensitive layer-by-layer modified colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Ashvin T; Sooresh, Aishwarya; Meissner, Kenith E; McShane, Michael J

    2013-07-23

    Quantum Dots (QDs) stabilized with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) were used as a template for layer-by-layer (LbL) modification to study the effect on the QD optical properties. We studied several different polyelectrolytes to determine that large quantities of monodisperse DHLA-QDs could only be obtained with the weak polyelectrolyte pair of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The key to this success was the development of a two-step method to split the LbL process into adsorption and centrifugation phases, which require different pH solutions for optimum success. Solution pH is highlighted as an important factor to achieve sufficient QD surface coverage and QD recovery during wash cycles. We optimized the process to scale up synthesis by introducing a solvent precipitation step before ultracentrifugation that, when coupled with the correct pH conditions, results in a mean QD recovery of 86-90% after three wash cycles. We found that adsorption of PAH had a negligible effect on the quantum yield and lifetime but an additional layer of PAA resulted in a substantial decrease in both quantum yield and lifetime that could not be recovered by the addition of more layers. The PAH coating provides a protective coating that extends DHLA-QDs stability, prevents photo-oxidation mediated aggregation, alleviates concerns over batch variability, and results in pH-dependent emission.

  5. Polyethylenimine Ethoxylated-Mediated All-Solution-Processed High-Performance Flexible Inverted Quantum Dot-Light-Emitting Device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyoung; Fu, Yan; Kim, Sunho; Lee, Woosuk; Lee, Ki-Heon; Chung, Ho Kyoon; Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Yang, Heesun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2017-02-28

    We report on an all-solution-processed fabrication of highly efficient green quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) with an inverted architecture, where an interfacial polymeric surface modifier of polyethylenimine ethoxylated (PEIE) is inserted between a quantum dot (QD) emitting layer (EML) and a hole transport layer (HTL), and a MoOx hole injection layer is solution deposited on top of the HTL. Among the inverted QLEDs with varied PEIE thicknesses, the device with an optimal PEIE thickness of 15.5 nm shows record maximum efficiency values of 65.3 cd/A in current efficiency and 15.6% in external quantum efficiency (EQE). All-solution-processed fabrication of inverted QLED is further implemented on a flexible platform by developing a high-performing transparent conducting composite film of ZnO nanoparticles-overcoated on Ag nanowires. The resulting flexible inverted device possesses 35.1 cd/A in current efficiency and 8.4% in EQE, which are also the highest efficiency values ever reported in flexible QLEDs.

  6. Multi-metastable states induced by the optical pump-probe process in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Guo, X. G. Wang, C.; Cao, J. C.

    2014-07-14

    The optical pump-probe process in terahertz quantum cascade lasers is studied theoretically by using the open system simulation method. The emitter injection is considered and the charge neutrality in the active region is broken. We find that nonequilibrium oscillations may appear in the recovery processes. In particular, the formation of different equilibrium values of the population change after the periodic pulse pumping is observed clearly. Here, the phenomenon of multi-metastable states stems from the electron regulation by the emitter injection. Finally, we discuss the important impacts of the equilibrium stabilization time and obtain an in-depth understanding of the emitter injection.

  7. Temperature and Wavelength Dependence of Energy Transfer Process Between Quantized States and Surface States in CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Qinfeng; Liu, Mingliang; Kong, Lingbin; Jiao, Mengmeng; Mu, Haifeng; Wang, Dehua; Wang, Honggang; Chen, Jiannong; Yang, Chuanlu

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and wavelength dependence of energy transfer (ET) process between quantized states and surface trap states of CdSe quantum dots was investigated, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the quantized states decreases with respect to the trap state emission, especially at lower temperatures. The observed ET process between quantized states and trap states which is influenced by the thermal population behavior. At the same temperature, the silver films can greatly enhance the energy transfer (ET) rate from the quantized states to trap states due to surface plasmonic coupling effect.

  8. From quantum mechanics to finance: Microfoundations for jumps, spikes and high volatility phases in diffusion price processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Christof

    2017-03-01

    We present an agent behavior based microscopic model that induces jumps, spikes and high volatility phases in the price process of a traded asset. We transfer dynamics of thermally activated jumps of an unexcited/excited two state system discussed in the context of quantum mechanics to agent socio-economic behavior and provide microfoundations. After we link the endogenous agent behavior to price dynamics we establish the circumstances under which the dynamics converge to an Itô-diffusion price processes in the large market limit.

  9. Accelerating quantum chemistry calculations with graphical processing units - toward in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohno, Kazuki; Orita, Masaya; Koga, Ryota; Endo, Toshio; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2013-09-01

    The growing power of central processing units (CPU) has made it possible to use quantum mechanical (QM) calculations for in silico drug discovery. However, limited CPU power makes large-scale in silico screening such as virtual screening with QM calculations a challenge. Recently, general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) has offered an alternative, because of its significantly accelerated computational time over CPU. Here, we review a GPGPU-based supercomputer, TSUBAME2.0, and its promise for next generation in silico drug discovery, in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

  10. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-03

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  11. Quantum-state storage and processing for polarization qubits in an inhomogeneously broadened {Lambda}-type three-level medium

    SciTech Connect

    Viscor, D.; Ferraro, A.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.; Loiko, Yu.

    2011-10-15

    We address the propagation of a single-photon pulse with two polarization components, i.e., a polarization qubit, in an inhomogeneously broadened ''phaseonium''{Lambda}-type three-level medium. We combine some of the nontrivial propagation effects characteristic for this kind of coherently prepared systems and the controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening technique to propose several quantum information-processing applications, such as a protocol for polarization qubit filtering and sieving as well as a tunable polarization beam splitter. Moreover, we show that by imposing a spatial variation of the atomic coherence phase, an efficient quantum memory for the incident polarization qubit can be also implemented in {Lambda}-type three-level systems.

  12. Self-assembly and photoluminescence evolution of hydrophilic and hydrophobic quantum dots in sol–gel processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ping; Matras-Postolek, Katarzyna; Song, Xueling; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Yumeng; Ding, Kun; Nie, Shijie

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelength were assembled into various morphologies including chain, hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures through sol–gel processes. The PL properties during assembly as investigated. - Highlights: • Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized from several ligands. • The evolution of PL in self-assembly via sol–gel processes was investigated. • CdTe QDs were assembled into a chain by controlling hydrolysis and condensation reactions. • Hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures were created via CdSe/ZnS QDs in sol–gel processes. - Abstract: Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelength were synthesized from several ligands to investigate the PL evolution in QD self-assembly via sol–gel processes. After ligand exchange, CdTe QDs were assembled into a chain by controlling the hydrolysis and condensation reaction of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane. The chain was then coated with a SiO{sub 2} shell from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures were created from CdSe/ZnS QDs via various sol–gel processes. CdTe QDs revealed red-shifted and narrowed PL spectrum after assembly compared with their initial one. In contrast, the red-shift of PL spectra of CdSe/ZnS QDs is small. By optimizing experimental conditions, SiO{sub 2} spheres with multiple CdSe/ZnS QDs were fabricated using TEOS and MPS. The QDs in these SiO{sub 2} spheres retained their initial PL properties. This result is useful for application because of their high stability and high PL efficiency of 33%.

  13. Non-Abelian statistics and topological quantum information processing in 1D wire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicea, Jason; Oreg, Yuval; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2011-03-01

    Topological quantum computation provides an elegant way around decoherence, as one encodes quantum information in a non-local fashion that the environment finds difficult to corrupt. Here we establish that one of the key operations---braiding of non-Abelian anyons---can be implemented in one-dimensional semiconductor wire networks. Previous work [Lutchyn et al., arXiv:1002.4033 and Oreg et al., arXiv:1003.1145] provided a recipe for driving semiconducting wires into a topological phase supporting long-sought particles known as Majorana fermions that can store topologically protected quantum information. Majorana fermions in this setting can be transported, created, and fused by applying locally tunable gates to the wire. More importantly, we show that networks of such wires allow braiding of Majorana fermions and that they exhibit non-Abelian statistics like vortices in a p+ip superconductor. We propose experimental setups that enable the Majorana fusion rules to be probed, along with networks that allow for efficient exchange of arbitrary numbers of Majorana fermions. This work paves a new path forward in topological quantum computation that benefits from physical transparency and experimental realism.

  14. Quantum computation and entangled state generation through a cavity output process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Hu, Chun; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2011-10-01

    We propose a protocol to realize quantum phase gates and generate entangled states between two atoms trapped in one cavity. In Lamb-Dick limits, it is not necessary to require coincidence detections, which will relax the conditions for the experimental realization. The protocol can be generalized to generate N-atom entangled states.

  15. Process, System, Causality, and Quantum Mechanics: A Psychoanalysis of Animal Faith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, Tom; Noyes, H. Pierre

    We shall argue in this paper that a central piece of modern physics does not really belong to physics at all but to elementary probability theory. Given a joint probability distribution J on a set of random variables containing x and y, define a link between x and y to be the condition x=y on J. Define the {\\it state} D of a link x=y as the joint probability distribution matrix on x and y without the link. The two core laws of quantum mechanics are the Born probability rule, and the unitary dynamical law whose best known form is the Schrodinger's equation. Von Neumann formulated these two laws in the language of Hilbert space as prob(P) = trace(PD) and D'T = TD respectively, where P is a projection, D and D' are (von Neumann) density matrices, and T is a unitary transformation. We'll see that if we regard link states as density matrices, the algebraic forms of these two core laws occur as completely general theorems about links. When we extend probability theory by allowing cases to count negatively, we find that the Hilbert space framework of quantum mechanics proper emerges from the assumption that all D's are symmetrical in rows and columns. On the other hand, Markovian systems emerge when we assume that one of every linked variable pair has a uniform probability distribution. By representing quantum and Markovian structure in this way, we see clearly both how they differ, and also how they can coexist in natural harmony with each other, as they must in quantum measurement, which we'll examine in some detail. Looking beyond quantum mechanics, we see how both structures have their special places in a much larger continuum of formal systems that we have yet to look for in nature.

  16. Nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics with Fundamental Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Ashot S.

    2011-03-01

    Spontaneous transitions between bound states of an atomic system, "Lamb Shift" of energy levels and many other phenomena in real nonrelativistic quantum systems are connected within the influence of the quantum vacuum fluctuations ( fundamental environment (FE)) which are impossible to consider in the limits of standard quantum-mechanical approaches. The joint system "quantum system (QS) + FE" is described in the framework of the stochastic differential equation (SDE) of Langevin-Schrödinger (L-Sch) type, and is defined on the extended space R 3 ⊗ R { ξ}, where R 3 and R { ξ} are the Euclidean and functional spaces, respectively. The density matrix for single QS in FE is defined. The entropy of QS entangled with FE is defined and investigated in detail. It is proved that as a result of interaction of QS with environment there arise structures of various topologies which are a new quantum property of the system.

  17. Influence of built-in charge on photogeneration and recombination processes in InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratenko, S.; Yakovliev, A.; Iliash, S.; Mazur, Y.; Ware, M.; Lam, Phu; Tang, Mingchu; Wu, Jiang; Liu, Huiyun; Salamo, G.

    2017-04-01

    Selective doping of quantum dots is often used to improve efficiency of intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) due to IR harvesting and built-in-dot charge. To investigate the effects of the built-in-dot charge on recombination processes and device performance InAs/GaAs quantum dot IBSCs with direct Si doping in the quantum dots are fabricated, and the I–V characteristics and transients of the open circuit voltage and short circuit current are measured. The decay times of both the open circuit voltage and the short circuit current increase as the concentration of n-type doping increases in the quantum dots. The observed increase in the charge carrier lifetime is attributed to suppressed recombination of electron–hole pairs through the states of quantum dots and shrinking the depletion layer. This is supported by measurements of both photovoltage and photoluminescence spectra.

  18. Sexual dimorphism in the human face assessed by euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Pizzini, G; Vogel, G; Miani, A

    1993-01-01

    The form of any object can be viewed as a combination of size and shape. A recently proposed method (euclidean distance matrix analysis) can differentiate between size and shape differences. It has been applied to analyse the sexual dimorphism in facial form in a sample of 108 healthy young adults (57 men, 51 women). The face was wider and longer in men than in women. A global shape difference was demonstrated, the male face being more rectangular and the female face more square. Gender variations involved especially the lower third of the face and, in particular, the position of the pogonion relative to the other structures. PMID:8300436

  19. Relation between Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames in Euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Amine; Özyilmaz, Emin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we investigate relationships between Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames in Euclidean space. Then, we obtain the geodesic curvature of the spherical image curve of the Darboux vector of the type-2 Bishop frame. Also, we give transition matrix between the Darboux and type-2 Bishop frames of the type-2 Bishop frames of the spherical images of the edges N→1,N→2 and b→. Finally, we express some interesting relations and illustrate of the examples by the aid Maple programe.

  20. Convex hull and tour crossings in the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem: implications for human performance studies.

    PubMed

    Van Rooij, Iris; Stege, Ulrike; Schactman, Alissa

    2003-03-01

    Recently there has been growing interest among psychologists in human performance on the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem (E-TSP). A debate has been initiated on what strategy people use in solving visually presented E-TSP instances. The most prominent hypothesis is the convex-hull hypothesis, originally proposed by MacGregor and Ormerod (1996). We argue that, in the literature so far, there is no evidence for this hypothesis. Alternatively we propose and motivate the hypothesis that people aim at avoiding crossings.

  1. Vanishing current hysteresis under competing nuclear spin pumping processes in a quadruplet spin-blockaded double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Amaha, S.; Hatano, T.; Tarucha, S.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2015-04-27

    We investigate nuclear spin pumping with five-electron quadruplet spin states in a spin-blockaded weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Two types of hysteretic steps in the leakage current are observed on sweeping the magnetic field and are associated with bidirectional polarization of nuclear spin. Properties of the steps are understood in terms of bias-voltage-dependent conditions for the mixing of quadruplet and doublet spin states by the hyperfine interaction. The hysteretic steps vanish when up- and down-nuclear spin pumping processes are in close competition.

  2. Suppression of dark current through barrier engineer for solution-processed colloidal quantum-dots infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Liu, Yan; Mo, Chen; Wang, Li; Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Liu, Jie; Kurhade, Kandhar K.; Xu, Jian E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Wenjun; You, Guanjun; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-31

    In an attempt to suppress the dark current, the barrier layer engineer for solution-processed PbSe colloidal quantum-dot (CQD) photodetectors has been investigated in the present study. It was found that the dark current can be significantly suppressed by implementing two types of carrier blocking layers, namely, hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, sandwiched in between two active PbSe CQD layers. Meanwhile no adverse impact has been observed for the photo current. Our study suggests that this improvement resides on the transport pathway created via carrier recombination at intermediate layer, which provides wide implications for the suppression of dark current for infrared photodetectors.

  3. Quantum-noise quenching in the correlated spontaneous-emission laser as a multiplicative noise process. I. A geometrical argument

    SciTech Connect

    Schleich, W.; Scully, M.O.

    1988-02-15

    We show, via simple geometrical arguments, the quantum-noise quenching in a correlated (spontaneous) emission laser (CEL). This noise quenching is a consequence of the correlation between noise sources which results in a multiplicative noise process. The steady-state distribution for the phase difference between the two electric fields in a CEL is compared and contrasted to that of a standard phase-locked laser. Noise quenching is shown to occur in the case of the CEL via an explicit solution of the Fokker-Planck equation.

  4. A model for the simultaneous analysis of reflectance spectra and basis factors of Munsell color samples under D65 illumination in three-dimensional Euclidean space

    PubMed Central

    Romney, A. Kimball; Indow, Tarow

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the physically measured surface reflectance spectra of 360 matte Munsell chromatic color chips plus 10 flat achromatic vectors corresponding to Munsell value levels 10 (white) to 1 (near black) for a total sample size of 370. Each of the 370 spectra was multiplied by the spectral radiant power distribution of D65 light so that the final results represent the spectra of reflected light from Munsell color chips under D65 illumination. We simultaneously model the structure of the color chips and the spectra in a common three-dimensional Euclidean space, oriented to yield the most interpretable structure with respect of the Munsell color structure. In this orientation, axis 1 roughly corresponds to the mean power of the spectral reflectance (approximate Munsell value), axis 2 goes from Munsell red to blue-green, and axis 3 goes from Munsell green-yellow to purple. Basis factors for the spectra are also plotted against wavelength and Munsell hue. These plots have implications for theories of opponent processes. By plotting the chips and spectra in the same space we obtain virtually exact correspondences between the various Munsell hues and spectral values in nanometers for comparison to those obtained by previous researchers. Mathematical derivations are provided to validate the common Euclidean model. PMID:12161561

  5. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  6. Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM)

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alexander J.

    2016-11-18

    There is a lack of state-of-the-art HPC simulation tools for simulating general quantum computing. Furthermore, there are no real software tools that integrate current quantum computers into existing classical HPC workflows. This product, the Quantum Virtual Machine (QVM), solves this problem by providing an extensible framework for pluggable virtual, or physical, quantum processing units (QPUs). It enables the execution of low level quantum assembly codes and returns the results of such executions.

  7. Present Status and Future Prospects of Quantum Information Processing: With Special Focus on Optically Controlled Semiconductor Spins and Single-Photon Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-10-01

    The scheme of directly controlling electron spins trapped in semiconductor quantum dots or donor impurities as qubits using optical pulses has various advantages, such as the achievements of local excitation and fast operation, low power consumption, easy implementation of an interface with optical fiber communication networks, and the capability of transferring information to nuclear spins, which are expected to serve as quantum memories with a long coherence time. In this report, I introduce the present status of the research and development of this scheme and discuss its potential application to quantum information processing.

  8. High quality metal-quantum dot-metal structure fabricated with a highly compatible self-aligned process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingchun, Fu; Xiaofeng, Wang; Liuhong, Ma; Yaling, Zhou; Xiang, Yang; Xiaodong, Wang; Fuhua, Yang

    2015-12-01

    A self-aligned process to fabricate a “metal-quantum dot-metal” structure is presented, based on an “electron beam lithography, thin film deposition and dry etching process”. The sacrificial layers used can improve the lift-off process, and novel lithography layouts design can improve the mechanical strength of the fabricated nanostructures. The superiority of the self-aligned process includes low request for overlay accuracy, high compatibility with a variety of materials, and applicable to similar structure devices fabrication. Finally, a phase change memory with fully confined phase-change material node, with the length × width × height of 255 × 45 × 30 nm3 was demonstrated. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB922103), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61376420, 61404126, A040203).

  9. Multi-resolution Shape Analysis via Non-Euclidean Wavelets: Applications to Mesh Segmentation and Surface Alignment Problems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Hwa; Chung, Moo K; Singh, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of 3-D shape meshes is a fundamental problem in computer vision, graphics, and medical imaging. Frequently, the needs of the application require that our analysis take a multi-resolution view of the shape's local and global topology, and that the solution is consistent across multiple scales. Unfortunately, the preferred mathematical construct which offers this behavior in classical image/signal processing, Wavelets, is no longer applicable in this general setting (data with non-uniform topology). In particular, the traditional definition does not allow writing out an expansion for graphs that do not correspond to the uniformly sampled lattice (e.g., images). In this paper, we adapt recent results in harmonic analysis, to derive Non-Euclidean Wavelets based algorithms for a range of shape analysis problems in vision and medical imaging. We show how descriptors derived from the dual domain representation offer native multi-resolution behavior for characterizing local/global topology around vertices. With only minor modifications, the framework yields a method for extracting interest/key points from shapes, a surprisingly simple algorithm for 3-D shape segmentation (competitive with state of the art), and a method for surface alignment (without landmarks). We give an extensive set of comparison results on a large shape segmentation benchmark and derive a uniqueness theorem for the surface alignment problem.

  10. Quantum Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-04

    1227–1230 (2009). 31. Olmschenk, S. et al. Quantum teleportation between distant matter qubits. Science 323, 486–489 (2009). 32. Dür, W., Briegel, H...REVIEWS Quantum computers T. D. Ladd1{, F. Jelezko2, R. Laflamme3,4,5, Y. Nakamura6,7, C. Monroe8,9 & J. L. O’Brien10 Over the past several decades... quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing

  11. Human dental arch shape evaluated by euclidean-distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Tartaglia, G

    1993-04-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. When landmark data are available, a recently proposed method (euclidean-distance matrix analysis) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. This method also localizes those areas which differ most between the two structures. We have applied it to analyze the sexual dimorphism in dental arch form in a sample of 50 men and 45 women. Subjects ranged in age between 20 and 27 years, and had sound dentitions. Fourteen landmarks, corresponding to the centers of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar), were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. All the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth were computed, thus creating four mean form matrices (one for each arch within sex). Gender differences were tested by using euclidean-distance matrix analysis. No significant differences were demonstrated in the shape of arches, while male arches proved to be slightly bigger than female arches.

  12. Enhancement of recombination process using silver and graphene quantum dot embedded intermediate layer for efficient organic tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Nhu Thuy; Tien, Huynh Ngoc; Jang, Se-Joeng; Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Park, Yun Chang; Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-07-01

    High performance of organic tandem solar cell is largely dependent on transparent and conductive intermediate layer (IML). The current work reports the design and fabrication of an IML using a simple solution process. The efficiency of a homo-tandem device with poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester as an active layer and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly(ethylenimine) as an IML was initially found to be 3.40%. Further enhancement of the cell efficiency was achieved using silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) of different sizes and graphene quantum dot embedded IML. A maximum efficiency of 4.03% was achieved using 7 nm Ag-NPs that contribute to a better recombination process. Also, the performance of the tandem cell was solely based on the electrical improvements indicated by the current - voltage measurements, external quantum efficiency and impedance analysis. The use of Ag-NPs in the IML has been shown to lengthen the life time of electron-hole pairs in the device. This study thus paves way to develop such efficient IMLs for more efficient tandem solar cells.

  13. Enhancement of recombination process using silver and graphene quantum dot embedded intermediate layer for efficient organic tandem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nhu Thuy; Tien, Huynh Ngoc; Jang, Se-Joeng; Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Park, Yun Chang; Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    High performance of organic tandem solar cell is largely dependent on transparent and conductive intermediate layer (IML). The current work reports the design and fabrication of an IML using a simple solution process. The efficiency of a homo-tandem device with poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester as an active layer and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly(ethylenimine) as an IML was initially found to be 3.40%. Further enhancement of the cell efficiency was achieved using silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) of different sizes and graphene quantum dot embedded IML. A maximum efficiency of 4.03% was achieved using 7 nm Ag-NPs that contribute to a better recombination process. Also, the performance of the tandem cell was solely based on the electrical improvements indicated by the current - voltage measurements, external quantum efficiency and impedance analysis. The use of Ag-NPs in the IML has been shown to lengthen the life time of electron-hole pairs in the device. This study thus paves way to develop such efficient IMLs for more efficient tandem solar cells. PMID:27453530

  14. Preparation of surface-modified ZnO quantum dots through an ultrasound assisted sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, E.; Youzbashi, AA; Kazemzadeh, A.; Eshraghi, MJ

    2015-08-01

    A synthetic process of zinc oxide quantum dots (QDs) is presented. It is based on a sol-gel process, carried out in an ultrasonic bath. It allows the formation of the stable colloids, containing surface-modified ZnO QDs with the aid of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as a capping agent. For this purpose, alcoholic solutions of zinc acetate dihydrate and potassium hydroxide were used as the reactants. Effect of KOH concentration, ultrasonic irradiation, and also the presence of capping agent on the characteristics of the final product were investigated. The synthesized samples were characterized by various analytical techniques such as XRD, TEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and PL spectroscopy. XRD analysis revealed the direct formation of hexagonal wurtzite nanocrystals with average size of ∼3 nm confirmed by TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. The PL spectroscopy indicated the influence of the capping agent on reducing the defects formation during the growth of the QDs. The present synthesis method was found to be a cost-effective and simple solution route for producing pure semiconductor ZnO QDs, exhibiting the quantum confinement effects, suitable for optical and optoelectronic applications.

  15. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Harold Baranger; 26. Critique of fault-tolerant quantum information processing Robert Alicki; References; Index.

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of many-body processes and fundamental quantum mechanical phenomena in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Shah, Jagdeep

    2000-01-01

    The large dielectric constant and small effective mass in a semiconductor allows a description of its electronic states in terms of envelope wavefunctions whose energy, time, and length scales are mesoscopic, i.e., halfway between those of atomic and those of condensed matter systems. This property makes it possible to demonstrate and investigate many quantum mechanical, many-body, and quantum kinetic phenomena with tabletop experiments that would be nearly impossible in other systems. This, along with the ability to custom-design semiconductor nanostructures, makes semiconductors an ideal laboratory for experimental investigations. We present an overview of some of the most exciting results obtained in semiconductors in recent years using the technique of ultrafast nonlinear optical spectrocopy. These results show that Coulomb correlation plays a major role in semiconductors and makes them behave more like a strongly interacting system than like an atomic system. The results provide insights into the physics of strongly interacting systems that are relevant to other condensed matter systems, but not easily accessible in other materials. PMID:10716981

  17. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library designed using a 10 kA cm-2 niobium fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Nagasawa, Shuichi; China, Fumihiro; Ando, Takumi; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-01

    Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic is an energy-efficient superconductor logic with zero static power consumption and very small switching energy. In this paper, we report a new AQFP cell library designed using the AIST 10 kA cm-2 Nb high-speed standard process (HSTP), which is a high-critical-current-density version of the AIST 2.5 kA cm-2 Nb standard process (STP2). Since the intrinsic damping of the Josephson junction (JJ) of HSTP is relatively strong, shunt resistors for JJs were removed and the energy efficiency improved significantly. Also, excitation transformers in the new cells were redesigned so that the cells can operate in a four-phase excitation mode. We described the detail of HSTP and the AQFP cell library designed using HSTP, and showed experimental results of cell test circuits.

  18. Typical Unpreparability of Quantum States with Quantum Circuit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingxing

    2014-04-01

    The quantum entanglement is an interesting resource in quantum information processing, especially in measurement-based quantum computing. However, most quantum states may be too entangled to be prepared efficiently in terms of quantum circuit theory, in that high values of the geometric measure of entanglement preclude states from holding a polynomial quantum preparation circuit. We prove that this phenomenon experiences occurs in a dramatic majority of all states using a novel circuit tree-state correspondence. This work highlights new aspects of the roles both entanglement and quantum circuit theory play for quantum information processing.

  19. Charge, quantum state, and energy distributions of impurities released in plasma-wall interaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Conventional wisdom has it that total sputtering yields correlate with high Z-impurity levels found in fusion plasmas. The charge, quantum states and energy distributions of sputtered atoms have been virtually ignored in these considerations. Impurity transport from the wall or limiter to the plasma is, however, strongly influenced by these factors which may play a crucial role in determining impurity levels in the deeper plasma regions. Preliminary calculations have shown that positively charged impurities would most likely be redeposited on their surfaces of origin. The conditions leading to charged or excited state atoms emission and the energy distributions of such species are reviewed. Techniques for measuring these quantities are discussed and the need for a wider data base in this field is pointed out.

  20. Quantum-Electrodynamic Processes in a Radiation-Dominated Robertson-Walker Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Tsaregorodtsev, L. I.

    Quantum electrodynamics in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe with the line element ds2=dt2 - a2(t)(dx2+dy2+dz2) (radiation-dominated universe) is considered. The differential probability of bremsstrahlung of an electron in the external gravitational field and the differential probability of an electron-positron pair and photon creation from the vacuum are calculated by using the perturbative S-matrix formalism. The behavior of these probabilities in different kinematic regions is investigated. The total probabilities are shown to be finite. In conclusion, the total probability of a pair and photon creation from vacuum We is compared with the total probability of pair production due to an expansion of the universe W0. The comparison shows that We=1.9·10-2W0 at about the Compton time of an electron.

  1. Controlling atomistic processes on Pb films via quantum size effects and lattice rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Binz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The two main techniques used to record the data in this dissertation were Spot Profile Analysis - Low Energy Electron Diffraction (SPA-LEED) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). A specific data analysis technique for LEED data called G(S) curves is described in depth. G(S) curves can provide a great deal of structural information about the surface; including step heights, island size, and island separation. The effects of quantum size effects (QSE) on the diffusion and critical island sizes of Pb and In on Pb films are reported. Pb depositions on the 2D In phases {radical}3 and {radical}31 to see how the phases affect the Pb growth and its strong QSE are reported.

  2. Direct observation of the carrier transport process in InGaN quantum wells with a pn-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiyan; Ma, Ziguang; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Yang, Haojun; Li, Yangfeng; Zuo, Peng; Jia, Haiqiang; Wang, Wenxin; Zhou, Junming; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2016-11-01

    A new mechanism of light-to-electricity conversion that uses InGaN/GaN QWs with a p-n junction is reported. According to the well established light-to-electricity conversion theory, quantum wells (QWs) cannot be used in solar cells and photodetectors because the photogenerated carriers in QWs usually relax to ground energy levels, owing to quantum confinement, and cannot form a photocurrent. We observe directly that more than 95% of the photoexcited carriers escape from InGaN/GaN QWs to generate a photocurrent, indicating that the thermionic emission and tunneling processes proposed previously cannot explain carriers escaping from QWs. We show that photoexcited carriers can escape directly from the QWs when the device is under working conditions. Our finding challenges the current theory and demonstrates a new prospect for developing highly efficient solar cells and photodetectors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574362, 61210014, and 11374340) and the Innovative Clean-energy Research and Application Program of Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. Z151100003515001).

  3. Quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  4. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  5. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.; Röpcke, J.; van Helden, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm-1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  6. Cyclic networks of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabauy, Peter

    In this thesis we first give an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum computation followed by an analysis of networks of quantum logic gates where the qubit lines are loops (cyclic). Thus far, investigations into cyclic networks of quantum logic gates have not been examined (as far as we know) by the quantum information community. In our investigations of cyclic quantum networks we have studied simple, one and two qubit systems. The analysis includes: classifying networks into groups, the dynamics of the qubits in a cyclic quantum network, and the perturbation effects of an external qubit acting on a cyclic quantum network. The analysis will be followed by a discussion on quantum algorithms and quantum information processing with cyclic quantum networks, a novel implementation of a cyclic network quantum memory and a discussion of quantum sensors via cyclic quantum networks.

  7. Quantum-enhanced Sensing and Efficient Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0039 Quantum -enhanced sensing and efficient quantum computation Ian Walmsley THE UNIVERSITY OF...COVERED (From - To) 1 February 2013 - 31 January 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum -enhanced sensing and efficient quantum computation 5a. CONTRACT...accuracy. The system was used to improve quantum boson sampling tests. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Quantum Information Processing, Transition Edge Sensors

  8. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  9. Probing protein environment in an enzymatic process: All-electron quantum chemical analysis combined with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical modeling of chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2008-09-28

    In this study, we investigated the electronic character of protein environment in enzymatic processes by performing all-electron QM calculations based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. By introducing a new computational strategy combining all-electron QM analysis with ab initio QM/MM modeling, we investigated the details of molecular interaction energy between a reactive substrate and amino acid residues at a catalytic site. For a practical application, we selected the chorismate mutase catalyzed reaction as an example. Because the computational time required to perform all-electron QM reaction path searches was very large, we employed the ab initio QM/MM modeling technique to construct reliable reaction profiles and performed all-electron FMO calculations for the selected geometries. The main focus of the paper is to analyze the details of electrostatic stabilization, which is considered to be the major feature of enzymatic catalyses, and to clarify how the electronic structure of proteins is polarized in response to the change in electron distribution of the substrate. By performing interaction energy decomposition analysis from a quantum chemical viewpoint, we clarified the relationship between the location of amino acid residues on the protein domain and the degree of electronic polarization of each residue. In particular, in the enzymatic transition state, Arg7, Glu78, and Arg90 are highly polarized in response to the delocalized electronic character of the substrate, and as a result, a large amount of electrostatic stabilization energy is stored in the molecular interaction between the enzyme and the substrate and supplied for transition state stabilization.

  10. Device Processing of II-VI Semiconductor Films and Quantum Well Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-07

    The objectives of this program is to develop a device processing technology necessary for proper utilization of Hg-based heterostructures and...superlattices in device applications. The specific focus or long term goal guiding the direction of the program is to develop the devices and processing ... technology required for an IR focal plane integrated with on-board signal processing electronics.

  11. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  12. Quantum theory of time-resolved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy: direct versus cascade processes and application to CDCl3.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Lee, Soo-Y

    2011-01-14

    We present a quantum mechanical wave packet treatment of time-resolved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), or two-dimensional (2D) FSRS, where a vibrational coherence is initiated with an impulsive Raman pump which is subsequently probed by FSRS. It complements the recent classical treatment by Mehlenbacher et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 244512 (2009)]. In this 2D-FSRS, two processes can occur concurrently but with different intensities: a direct fifth-order process taking place on one molecule, and a cascade process comprising two third-order processes on two different molecules. The cascade process comprises a parallel and a sequential cascade. The theory is applied to the 2D-FSRS of CDCl(3) where calculations showed that: (a) the cascade process is stronger than the direct fifth-order process by one order of magnitude, (b) the sidebands assigned to C-Cl E and A(1) bends, observed on both sides of the Stokes C-D stretch frequency, are not due to anharmonic coupling between the C-D stretch and the C-Cl bends, but are instead due to the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CSRS) fields produced in the first step of the cascade process, (c) for each delay time between the femtosecond impulsive pump and FSRS probe pulses, the line shape of the sidebands shows an inversion symmetry about the C-D stretch frequency, and this is due to the 180(∘) phase difference between the CARS and CSRS fields that produced the left and right sidebands, and (d) for each sideband, the line shape changes from positive Lorentzian to dispersive to negative Lorentzian, then to negative dispersive and back to positive Lorentzian with the period of the bending vibration, and it is correlated with the momentum of the wave packet prepared on the ground-state surface by the impulsive pump along the sideband normal coordinate.

  13. Existence and blowup results for asymptotically Euclidean initial data sets generated by the conformal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilts, James; Isenberg, James

    2016-11-01

    For each set of (freely chosen) seed data, the conformal method reduces the Einstein constraint equations to a system of elliptic equations, the conformal constraint equations. We prove an admissibility criterion, based on a (conformal) prescribed scalar curvature problem, which provides a necessary condition on the seed data for the conformal constraint equations to (possibly) admit a solution. We then consider sets of asymptotically Euclidean (AE) seed data for which solutions of the conformal constraint equations exist, and examine the blowup properties of these solutions as the seed data sets approach sets for which no solutions exist. We also prove that there are AE seed data sets which include a Yamabe nonpositive metric and lead to solutions of the conformal constraints. These data sets allow the mean curvature function to have 0's.

  14. Non-perturbative BRST quantization of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in Curci-Ferrari gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, A. D.; Sobreiro, R. F.; Sorella, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we address the issue of the non-perturbative quantization of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in the Curci-Ferrari gauge. In particular, we construct a refined Gribov-Zwanziger action for this gauge, which takes into account the presence of gauge copies as well as the dynamical formation of dimension-two condensates. This action enjoys a non-perturbative BRST symmetry recently proposed in Capri et al. (Phys. Rev. D 92(4), 045039. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.045039 arXiv:1506.06995 [hep-th], 2015). Finally, we pay attention to the gluon propagator in different space-time dimensions.

  15. A Log-Euclidean polyaffine registration for articulated structures in medical images.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Miguel Angel; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Log-Euclidean polyaffine registration framework of Arsigny et al. to deal with articulated structures. This framework has very useful properties as it guarantees the invertibility of smooth geometric transformations. In articulated registration a skeleton model is defined for rigid structures such as bones. The final transformation is affine for the bones and elastic for other tissues in the image. We extend the Arsigny el al.'s method to deal with locally-affine registration of pairs of wires. This enables the possibility of using this registration framework to deal with articulated structures. In this context, the design of the weighting functions, which merge the affine transformations defined for each pair of wires, has a great impact not only on the final result of the registration algorithm, but also on the invertibility of the global elastic transformation. Several experiments, using both synthetic images and hand radiographs, are also presented.

  16. ILP, the Blind, and the Elephant: Euclidean Embedding of Co-proven Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hannes; Kersting, Kristian; Karwath, Andreas

    Relational data is complex. This complexity makes one of the basic steps of ILP difficult: understanding the data and results. If the user cannot easily understand it, he draws incomplete conclusions. The situation is very much as in the parable of the blind men and the elephant that appears in many cultures. In this tale the blind work independently and with quite different pieces of information, thereby drawing very different conclusions about the nature of the beast. In contrast, visual representations make it easy to shift from one perspective to another while exploring and analyzing data. This paper describes a method for embedding interpretations and queries into a single, common Euclidean space based on their co-proven statistics. We demonstrate our method on real-world datasets showing that ILP results can indeed be captured at a glance.

  17. Distributed stochastic multi-vehicle routing in the Euclidean plane with no communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrabissa, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for the multi-vehicle routing problem with no communications among the vehicles. The scenario consists in a convex Euclidean mission space, where targets are generated according to a Poisson distribution in time and to a generic continuous spatial distribution. The targets must be visited by the vehicles, which, therefore, must act in coordination. Even if no communications are required, the proposed routing strategy succeeds in effectively partitioning the mission space among the vehicles: at low target generation rates, the algorithm leads to the well-known centroidal Voronoi tessellation, whereas at high target generation rates, simulation results show that it has better performances with respect to a reference algorithm with no communications among vehicles.

  18. Preservice Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions of Using a Web 2.0 Technology as a Supportive Teaching-Learning Tool in a College Euclidean Geometry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Md. Mokter

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined preservice secondary mathematics teachers' perceptions of a blogging activity used as a supportive teaching-learning tool in a college Euclidean Geometry course. The effect of a 12-week blogging activity that was a standard component of a college Euclidean Geometry course offered for preservice secondary…

  19. Preparation of highly luminescent hybrid gel incorporating NAC-capped CdTe quantum dots through sol-gel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Hang-Beom; Watanabe, Taichi; Hizume, Masayuki; Takagi, Tomomi; Sobue, Susumu; Kawai, Shoichi; Okuno, Eiichi; Kim, DaeGwi

    2015-03-01

    Highly photoluminescent gel was prepared by embedding water soluble quantum dots (QDs) in an inorganic-organic hybrid gel matrix using a conventional sol-gel process. Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and citric acid (CA) were found to be the best combination for the gel preparation. 13C-NMR and FT-IR studies indicated hydrogen bond formation between the amine group of APS and the carboxyl group of CA. IR-light radiation curing was comparable to thermal curing and reduced the gelation time to a considerable extent (71 %). The resulting composite formed a hybrid gel phosphor with excellent transparency by embedding CdTe QDs into the matrix and emitted light of various colors with high photoluminescence efficiency (40 %). The gel phosphor retained the PL properties after storage in air for one year. In addition, the strength of the hybrid phosphor was demonstrated by a coin-flipping test.

  20. Non-linear optical processes involving excited subbands in laser-dressed quantum wires with triangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, A.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    The conduction subband structure of a triangular cross-section GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well wire under intense laser field is theoretically investigated by taking into account a finite confining potential. The calculation of the subband energy levels is based on a two-dimensional finite element method within the effective mass approximation. It is shown that a transversally polarized laser field non-uniformly shifts the subband energy levels and could be used for tuning the intersubband transitions and altering the related optical susceptibilities. We found that the non-resonant laser field allows the magnification and the red- or blueshift of the third-order non-linear susceptibility peaks for particular polarizations of the pump light and proper laser parameter values. The effects of the laser dressing field on the intersubband third harmonic generation and quadratic electro-optical process are discussed.

  1. Efficient quantum dot light-emitting diodes with solution-processable molybdenum oxide as the anode buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shaojian; Li, Shusheng; Wang, Fuzhi; Wang, Andrew Y.; Lin, Jun; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) are characterized by pure and saturated emission colors with narrow bandwidth. Optimization of the device interface is an effective way to achieve stable and high-performance QD-LEDs. Here we utilized solution-processed molybdenum oxide (MoOx) as the anode buffer layer on ITO to build efficient QD-LEDs. Using MoOx as the anode buffer layer provides the QD-LED with good Ohmic contact and a small charge transfer resistance. The device luminance is nearly independent of the thickness of the MoOx anode buffer layer. The QD-LEDs with a MoOx anode buffer layer exhibit a maximum luminance and luminous efficiency of 5230 cd m-2 and 0.67 cd A-1 for the yellow emission at 580 nm, and 7842 cd m-2 and 1.49 cd A-1 for the red emission at 610 nm, respectively.

  2. Planarized process for resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of mid-IR quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Kirch, J. D.; Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Zutter, B.; Buelow, P.; Schulte, K.; Kuech, T.; Earles, T.

    2015-03-01

    On-chip resonant leaky-wave coupling of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting at 8.36 μm has been realized by selective regrowth of interelement layers in curved trenches, defined by dry and wet etching. The fabricated structure provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array element and interelement regions. In-phase-mode operation to 5.5 W front-facet emitted power in a near-diffraction-limited far-field beam pattern, with 4.5 W in the main lobe, is demonstrated. A refined fabrication process has been developed to produce phased-locked antiguided arrays of QCLs with planar geometry. The main fabrication steps in this process include non-selective regrowth of Fe:InP in interelement trenches, defined by inductive-coupled plasma (ICP) etching, a chemical polishing (CP) step to planarize the surface, non-selective regrowth of interelement layers, ICP selective etching of interelement layers, and non-selective regrowth of InP cladding layer followed by another CP step to form the element regions. This new process results in planar InGaAs/InP interelement regions, which allows for significantly improved control over the array geometry and the dimensions of element and interelement regions. Such a planar process is highly desirable to realize shorter emitting wavelength (4.6 μm) arrays, where fabrication tolerance for single-mode operation are tighter compared to 8 μm-emitting devices.

  3. Spin-dependent quantum interference in photoemission process from spin-orbit coupled states

    PubMed Central

    Yaji, Koichiro; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Harasawa, Ayumi; Ishida, Yukiaki; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2017-01-01

    Spin–orbit interaction entangles the orbitals with the different spins. The spin–orbital-entangled states were discovered in surface states of topological insulators. However, the spin–orbital-entanglement is not specialized in the topological surface states. Here, we show the spin–orbital texture in a surface state of Bi(111) by laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (laser-SARPES) and describe three-dimensional spin-rotation effect in photoemission resulting from spin-dependent quantum interference. Our model reveals that, in the spin–orbit-coupled systems, the spins pointing to the mutually opposite directions are independently locked to the orbital symmetries. Furthermore, direct detection of coherent spin phenomena by laser-SARPES enables us to clarify the phase of the dipole transition matrix element responsible for the spin direction in photoexcited states. These results permit the tuning of the spin polarization of optically excited electrons in solids with strong spin–orbit interaction. PMID:28232721

  4. Spin-dependent quantum interference in photoemission process from spin-orbit coupled states.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Koichiro; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Harasawa, Ayumi; Ishida, Yukiaki; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2017-02-24

    Spin-orbit interaction entangles the orbitals with the different spins. The spin-orbital-entangled states were discovered in surface states of topological insulators. However, the spin-orbital-entanglement is not specialized in the topological surface states. Here, we show the spin-orbital texture in a surface state of Bi(111) by laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (laser-SARPES) and describe three-dimensional spin-rotation effect in photoemission resulting from spin-dependent quantum interference. Our model reveals that, in the spin-orbit-coupled systems, the spins pointing to the mutually opposite directions are independently locked to the orbital symmetries. Furthermore, direct detection of coherent spin phenomena by laser-SARPES enables us to clarify the phase of the dipole transition matrix element responsible for the spin direction in photoexcited states. These results permit the tuning of the spin polarization of optically excited electrons in solids with strong spin-orbit interaction.

  5. Majorana fermion realization and relevant transport processes in a triple-quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-Xun, Deng; Shi-Han, Zheng; Mou, Yang; Liang-Bin, Hu; Rui-Qiang, Wang

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium electronic transports through a system hosting three quantum dots hybridized with superconductors are investigated. By tuning the relative positions of the dot levels, we illustrate the existence of Majorana fermions and show that the Majorana feimions will either survive separately on single dots or distribute themselves among different dots with tunable probabilities. As a result, different physical mechanisms appear, including local Andreev reflection (LAR), cross Andreev reflection (CAR), and cross resonant tunneling (CRT). The resulting characteristics may be used to reveal the unique properties of Majorana fermions. In addition, we discuss the spin-polarized transports and find a pure spin current and a spin filter effect due to the joint effect of CRT and CAR, which is important for designing spintronic devices. Project supported by the New Century Excellent Talents in University of China (Grant No. NCET-10-0090), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474106, 11174088, and 11274124), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of China (Grant No. IRT1243), and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. S2012010010681).

  6. Evidence for asymptotic safety from lattice quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Laiho, J; Coumbe, D

    2011-10-14

    We calculate the spectral dimension for nonperturbative quantum gravity defined via Euclidean dynamical triangulations. We find that it runs from a value of ∼3/2 at short distance to ∼4 at large distance scales, similar to results from causal dynamical triangulations. We argue that the short-distance value of 3/2 for the spectral dimension may resolve the tension between asymptotic safety and the holographic principle.

  7. Two-slit experiment: quantum and classical probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Inter-relation between quantum and classical probability models is one of the most fundamental problems of quantum foundations. Nowadays this problem also plays an important role in quantum technologies, in quantum cryptography and the theory of quantum random generators. In this letter, we compare the viewpoint of Richard Feynman that the behavior of quantum particles cannot be described by classical probability theory with the viewpoint that quantum-classical inter-relation is more complicated (cf, in particular, with the tomographic model of quantum mechanics developed in detail by Vladimir Man'ko). As a basic example, we consider the two-slit experiment, which played a crucial role in quantum foundational debates at the beginning of quantum mechanics (QM). In particular, its analysis led Niels Bohr to the formulation of the principle of complementarity. First, we demonstrate that in complete accordance with Feynman's viewpoint, the probabilities for the two-slit experiment have the non-Kolmogorovian structure, since they violate one of basic laws of classical probability theory, the law of total probability (the heart of the Bayesian analysis). However, then we show that these probabilities can be embedded in a natural way into the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) probability model. To do this, one has to take into account the randomness of selection of different experimental contexts, the joint consideration of which led Feynman to a conclusion about the non-classicality of quantum probability. We compare this embedding of non-Kolmogorovian quantum probabilities into the Kolmogorov model with well-known embeddings of non-Euclidean geometries into Euclidean space (e.g., the Poincaré disk model for the Lobachvesky plane).

  8. Quantum Brownian Motions and Navier-Stokes Weakly Turbulence — a Path Integral Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botelho, Luiz C. L.

    In this paper, we present a new method to solve exactly the Schrödinger Harmonic oscillator wave equation in the presence of time-dependent parameter. We also apply such technique to solve exactly the problem of random frequency averaged quantum propagator of a harmonic oscillator with white-noise statistics frequency. We still apply our technique to solve exactly the Brownian Quantum Oscillator in the presence of an electric field. Finally, we use these quantum mechanic techniques to solve exactly the Statistical-Turbulence of the Navier-Stokes in a region of fluid random stirring weakly (analytical) coupling through time-dependent Euclidean-Quantum oscillators path-integrals.

  9. Application of CdS quantum dots modified carbon paste electrode for monitoring the process of acetaminophen preparation.

    PubMed

    Pasandideh-Nadamani, M; Omrani, A; Sadeghi-Maleki, M R; Samadi-Maybodi, A

    2016-06-01

    In this research article, a novel, selective, and sensitive modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) using CdS quantum dots (QDs) is presented. The highly stable CdS QDs were successfully synthesized in an in situ process using Na2S2O3 as a precursor and thioglycolic acid as a catalyst and capping agent. The synthesis of CdS QDs was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The synthesized CdS QDs were used for preparation of a modified carbon paste electrode (CdS/CPE). The electrochemical behavior of the electrode toward p-aminophenol (PAP) and acetaminophen (Ac) was studied, and the results demonstrated that the CdS/CPE exhibited good electrocatalytic performance toward PAP and Ac oxidation. The oxidation peak potential of each analyte in the mixture was well separated. As a result, a selective and reliable method was developed for the determination of PAP and Ac simultaneously without any chemical separations. Application of the fabricated electrode for monitoring the process of Ac preparation from PAP was investigated. The obtained results show that CdS/CPE has satisfactory analytical performance; it could be a kind of attractive and promising nanomaterial-based sensor for process monitoring via the electrochemical approach.

  10. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  11. Tests of quantum chromodynamics in exclusive e sup + e sup minus and. gamma. gamma. processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Factorization theorem for exclusive processes; Electromagnetic form factors of baryons; Suppression of final state interactions; The {gamma}{pi}{sub 0} Transition form factor; Exclusive charmonium decays; The {pi}-{rho} puzzle; Time-like compton processes; Multi-hadron production; Heavy Quark exclusive states and form factor zeros in QCD; Exclusive {gamma}{gamma} reactions; Higher twist effects; and Tauonium and threshold {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} production. 41 refs., 15 figs. (LSP)

  12. Full analysis of multi-photon pair effects in spontaneous parametric down conversion based photonic quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeoka, Masahiro; Jin, Rui-Bo; Sasaki, Masahide

    2015-04-01

    In spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) based quantum information processing (QIP) experiments, there is a tradeoff between the coincidence count rates (i.e. the pumping power of the SPDC), which limits the rate of the protocol, and the visibility of the quantum interference, which limits the quality of the protocol. This tradeoff is mainly caused by the multi-photon pair emissions from the SPDCs. In theory, the problem is how to model the experiments without truncating these multi-photon emissions while including practical imperfections. In this paper, we establish a method to theoretically simulate SPDC-based QIPs which fully incorporates the effect of multi-photon emissions and various practical imperfections. The key ingredient in our method is the application of the characteristic function formalism which has been used in continuous variable QIPs. We apply our method to three examples, the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen interference experiments, and the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol. For the first two examples, we show that our theoretical results quantitatively agree with the recent experimental results. Also we provide the closed expressions for these interference visibilities with the full multi-photon components and various imperfections. For the last example, we provide the general theoretical form of the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol in our method and show the numerical results up to five concatenations. Our method requires only a small computational resource (a few minutes by a commercially available computer), which was not possible in the previous theoretical approach. Our method will have applications in a wide range of SPDC-based QIP protocols with high accuracy and a reasonable computational resource.

  13. Euclidean Closed Linear Transformations of Complex Spacetime and generally of Complex Spaces of dimension four endowed with the Same or Different Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossos, Spyridon; Vossos, Elias

    2016-08-01

    Relativity Theory and the corresponding Relativistic Quantum Mechanics are the fundamental theories of physics. Special Relativity (SR) relates the frames of Relativistic Inertial observers (RIOs), through Linear Spacetime Transformation (LSTT) of linear spacetime. Classic Special Relativity uses real spacetime endowed with Lorentz metric and the frames of two RIOs with parallel spatial axes are always related through Lorentz Boost (LB). This cancels the transitive attribute in parallelism, when three RIOs are related, because LB is not closed transformation, causing Thomas Rotation. In this presentation, we consider closed LSTT of Complex Spacetime, so there is no necessity for spatial axes rotation and all the frames are chosen having parallel spatial axes. The solution is expressed by a 4x4 matrix (Λ) containing components of the complex velocity of one Observer wrt another and two functions depended by the metric of Spacetime. Demanding isometric transformation, it emerges a class of metrics that are in accordance with the closed LSTT and the transformation matrix contains one parameter ω depended by the metric of Spacetime. In case that we relate RIOs with steady metric, it emerges one steady number (ωI ) depended by the metric of Spacetime of the specific SR. If ωI is an imaginary number, the elements of the Λ are complex numbers, so the corresponding spacetime is necessarily complex and there exists real Universal Speed (UI). The specific value ωI =±i gives Vossos transformation (VT) endowed with Lorentz metric (for gii=1) of complex spacetime and invariant spacetime interval (or equivalently invariant speed of light in vacuum), which produce the theory of Euclidean Complex Relativistic Mechanics (ECRMs). If ωI is a real number (ωI #0) the elements of the Λ are real numbers, so the corresponding spacetime is real, but there exist imaginary UI. The specific value ωI =0 gives Galileo Transformation (GT) with the invariant time, in which any other

  14. Realism vs. Constructivism in Contemporary Physics: The Impact of the Debate on the Understanding of Quantum Theory and Its Instructional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakostas, Vassilios; Hadzidaki, Pandora

    2005-01-01

    In the present study we attempt to incorporate the philosophical dialogue about physical reality into the instructional process of quantum mechanics. Taking into account that both scientific realism and constructivism represent, on the basis of a rather broad spectrum, prevalent philosophical currents in the domain of science education, the…

  15. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  16. Noisy cooperative intermittent processes: From blinking quantum dots to human consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, Paolo; Paradisi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Bedini, Remo; Gemignani, Angelo; Fronzoni, Leone

    2011-07-01

    We study the superposition of a non-Poisson renewal process with the presence of a superimposed Poisson noise. The non-Poisson renewals mark the passage between meta-stable states in system with self-organization. We propose methods to measure the amount of information due to the two independent processes independently, and we see that a superficial study based on the survival probabilities yield stretched-exponential relaxations. Our method is in fact able to unravel the inverse-power law relaxation of the isolated non-Poisson processes, even when noise is present. We provide examples of this behavior in system of diverse nature, from blinking nano-crystals to weak turbulence. Finally we focus our discussion on events extracted from human electroencephalograms, and we discuss their connection with emerging properties of integrated neural dynamics, i.e. consciousness.

  17. Random walk of processive, quantum dot-labeled myosin Va molecules within the actin cortex of COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Ali, M Yusuf; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M

    2009-07-22

    Myosin Va (myoVa) is an actin-based intracellular cargo transporter. In vitro experiments have established that a single myoVa moves processively along actin tracks, but less is known about how this motor operates within cells. Here we track the movement of a quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled myoVa HMM in COS-7 cells using total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy. This labeling approach is unique in that it allows myoVa, instead of its cargo, to be tracked. Single-particle analysis showed short periods (processive myoVa motors undergoing a random walk through the dense and randomly oriented cortical actin network.

  18. Random Walk of Processive, Quantum Dot-Labeled Myosin Va Molecules within the Actin Cortex of COS-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Ali, M. Yusuf; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Myosin Va (myoVa) is an actin-based intracellular cargo transporter. In vitro experiments have established that a single myoVa moves processively along actin tracks, but less is known about how this motor operates within cells. Here we track the movement of a quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled myoVa HMM in COS-7 cells using total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy. This labeling approach is unique in that it allows myoVa, instead of its cargo, to be tracked. Single-particle analysis showed short periods (≤0.5 s) of ATP-sensitive linear motion. The mean velocity of these trajectories was 604 nm/s and independent of the number of myoVa molecules attached to the Qdot. With high time (16.6 ms) and spatial (15 nm) resolution imaging, Qdot-labeled myoVa moved with sequential 75 nm steps per head, at a rate of 16 s−1, similarly to myoVa in vitro. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that the random nature of the trajectories represents processive myoVa motors undergoing a random walk through the dense and randomly oriented cortical actin network. PMID:19619465

  19. Effect of Relaxation Processes on Auger Recombination in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-18

    and the common sense. The solution to this paradox is the direct taking into account of various scattering processes. Finally we note here that it is...not the case for QWs. It was assumed that both electrons in the conduction band and holes in the va- lence band have Fermi -Dirac distribution with

  20. Concept of Quantum Geometry in Optoelectronic Processes in Solids: Application to Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Morimoto, Takahiro

    2017-03-20

    The concept of topology is becoming more and more relevant to the properties and functions of electronic materials including various transport phenomena and optical responses. A pedagogical introduction is given here to the basic ideas and their applications to optoelectronic processes in solids.

  1. Quantum probabilities for inflation from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, James B.; Hawking, S.W.; Hertog, Thomas E-mail: S.W.Hawking@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the universe is determined by its quantum state. The wave function of the universe obeys the constraints of general relativity and in particular the Wheeler-DeWitt equation (WDWE). For non-zero Λ, we show that solutions of the WDWE at large volume have two domains in which geometries and fields are asymptotically real. In one the histories are Euclidean asymptotically anti-de Sitter, in the other they are Lorentzian asymptotically classical de Sitter. Further, the universal complex semiclassical asymptotic structure of solutions of the WDWE implies that the leading order in h-bar quantum probabilities for classical, asymptotically de Sitter histories can be obtained from the action of asymptotically anti-de Sitter configurations. This leads to a promising, universal connection between quantum cosmology and holography.

  2. Determination of lung segments in computed tomography images using the Euclidean distance to the pulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stoecker, Christina; Moltz, Jan H.; Lassen, Bianca; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Welter, Stefan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) imaging is the modality of choice for lung cancer diagnostics. With the increasing number of lung interventions on sublobar level in recent years, determining and visualizing pulmonary segments in CT images and, in oncological cases, reliable segment-related information about the location of tumors has become increasingly desirable. Computer-assisted identification of lung segments in CT images is subject of this work.Methods: The authors present a new interactive approach for the segmentation of lung segments that uses the Euclidean distance of each point in the lung to the segmental branches of the pulmonary artery. The aim is to analyze the potential of the method. Detailed manual pulmonary artery segmentations are used to achieve the best possible segment approximation results. A detailed description of the method and its evaluation on 11 CT scans from clinical routine are given.Results: An accuracy of 2–3 mm is measured for the segment boundaries computed by the pulmonary artery-based method. On average, maximum deviations of 8 mm are observed. 135 intersegmental pulmonary veins detected in the 11 test CT scans serve as reference data. Furthermore, a comparison of the presented pulmonary artery-based approach to a similar approach that uses the Euclidean distance to the segmental branches of the bronchial tree is presented. It shows a significantly higher accuracy for the pulmonary artery-based approach in lung regions at least 30 mm distal to the lung hilum.Conclusions: A pulmonary artery-based determination of lung segments in CT images is promising. In the tests, the pulmonary artery-based determination has been shown to be superior to the bronchial tree-based determination. The suitability of the segment approximation method for application in the planning of segment resections in clinical practice has already been verified in experimental cases. However, automation of the method accompanied by an evaluation on a larger

  3. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  4. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  5. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  6. Modeling electronic quantum transport with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-06-01

    We present a machine learning approach to solve electronic quantum transport equations of one-dimensional nanostructures. The transmission coefficients of disordered systems were computed to provide training and test data sets to the machine. The system's representation encodes energetic as well as geometrical information to characterize similarities between disordered configurations, while the Euclidean norm is used as a measure of similarity. Errors for out-of-sample predictions systematically decrease with training set size, enabling the accurate and fast prediction of new transmission coefficients. The remarkable performance of our model to capture the complexity of interference phenomena lends further support to its viability in dealing with transport problems of undulatory nature.

  7. Non-standard symmetries and quantum anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinescu, Anca; Visinescu, Mihai

    2008-08-31

    Quantum anomalies are investigated on curved spacetimes. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard symmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated to a Killing-Yano tensor. The axial anomaly in a background gravitational field is directly related with the index of the Dirac operator. In the Dirac theory on curved spaces, Killing-Yano tensors generate Dirac-type operators involved in interesting algebraic structures. The general results are applied to the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space.

  8. Quantum Boolean image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastriani, Mario

    2015-05-01

    A quantum Boolean image processing methodology is presented in this work, with special emphasis in image denoising. A new approach for internal image representation is outlined together with two new interfaces: classical to quantum and quantum to classical. The new quantum Boolean image denoising called quantum Boolean mean filter works with computational basis states (CBS), exclusively. To achieve this, we first decompose the image into its three color components, i.e., red, green and blue. Then, we get the bitplanes for each color, e.g., 8 bits per pixel, i.e., 8 bitplanes per color. From now on, we will work with the bitplane corresponding to the most significant bit (MSB) of each color, exclusive manner. After a classical-to-quantum interface (which includes a classical inverter), we have a quantum Boolean version of the image within the quantum machine. This methodology allows us to avoid the problem of quantum measurement, which alters the results of the measured except in the case of CBS. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too. After filtering of the inverted version of MSB (inside quantum machine), the result passes through a quantum-classical interface (which involves another classical inverter) and then proceeds to reassemble each color component and finally the ending filtered image. Finally, we discuss the more appropriate metrics for image denoising in a set of experimental results.

  9. Pictures of Processes: Automated Graph Rewriting for Monoidal Categories and Applications to Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupendra

    nanowire morphology of the p-Si photocathode on the homogeneous catalytic reduction of CO2 by using p-Si/Re-catalyst junction are also described in this dissertation. For phenyl ethyl modified p-Si photocathode, the rate of homogeneous catalysis for CO2 reduction by Re-catalyst is three times greater than glassy carbon electrode and six times greater than the hexyl modified and the hydrogen terminated p-Si photocathodes. When hexyl modified p-Si nanowires are used as photocathode, the homogeneous catalytic current density increased by a factor of two compared to planar p-Si (both freshly etched and hexyl modified) photocathode. A successful light assisted generation of syngas (H2:CO = 2:1) from CO2 and water is achieved by using p-Si/Re-catalyst. In this system, water is reduced heterogeneously on p-Si surface and CO2 is reduced homogeneously by Re-catalyst. The same principle is extended to the homogeneous proton reduction by using p-Si/[FeFe] complex junction where [FeFe] complex [Fe2(micro-bdt)(CO) 6] (bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate)] is a proton reduction molecular catalyst. A short circuit quantum efficiency of 79 % with 100 % Faradaic efficiency and 600 mV open circuit are achieved by using p-Si/[FeFe] complex for proton reduction with 300 mM perchloric acid as a proton source. Cobalt difluororyl-diglyoximate (Co-catalyst) is a proton reduction catalyst with only 200 mV of overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HRE). The Co-catalyst is photoelectrochemically reduced with a photovoltage of 470 mV on illuminated p-Si photocathode. For p-Si photocathodes, the overpotential for proton reduction is over 1 V. In principle, p-Si/Co-catalyst junction can reduce proton to hydrogen homogeneously at underpotential. In a concluding effort, a wireless monolithic dual face single photoelectrode (multi junction photovoltaic cell which can generate a voltage higher 1.7 V) based photochemical cell is proposed for direct conversion of solar energy into liquid fuel. In this

  10. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Quantum computers and quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, Kamil'A.

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review.

  11. Scheme of thinking quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2009-11-01

    A general approach describing quantum decision procedures is developed. The approach can be applied to quantum information processing, quantum computing, creation of artificial quantum intelligence, as well as to analyzing decision processes of human decision makers. Our basic point is to consider an active quantum system possessing its own strategic state. Processing information by such a system is analogous to the cognitive processes associated to decision making by humans. The algebra of probability operators, associated with the possible options available to the decision maker, plays the role of the algebra of observables in quantum theory of measurements. A scheme is advanced for a practical realization of decision procedures by thinking quantum systems. Such thinking quantum systems can be realized by using spin lattices, systems of magnetic molecules, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices, ensembles of quantum dots, or multilevel atomic systems interacting with electromagnetic field.

  12. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  13. Unified model of loop quantum gravity and matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Olson, S. Jay; Pullin, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    We reconsider the unified model of gravitation and Yang Mills interactions proposed by Chakraborty and Peldán, in the light of recent formal developments in loop quantum gravity. In particular, we show that one can promote the Hamiltonian constraint of the unified model to a well defined anomaly-free quantum operator using the techniques introduced by Thiemann, at least for the Euclidean theory. The Lorentzian version of the model can be consistently constructed, but at the moment appears to yield a correct weak field theory only under restrictive assumptions, and its quantization appears problematic.

  14. Quantum Approach to Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenholm, Stig; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2005-08-01

    An essential overview of quantum information Information, whether inscribed as a mark on a stone tablet or encoded as a magnetic domain on a hard drive, must be stored in a physical object and thus made subject to the laws of physics. Traditionally, information processing such as computation occurred in a framework governed by laws of classical physics. However, information can also be stored and processed using the states of matter described by non-classical quantum theory. Understanding this quantum information, a fundamentally different type of information, has been a major project of physicists and information theorists in recent years, and recent experimental research has started to yield promising results. Quantum Approach to Informatics fills the need for a concise introduction to this burgeoning new field, offering an intuitive approach for readers in both the physics and information science communities, as well as in related fields. Only a basic background in quantum theory is required, and the text keeps the focus on bringing this theory to bear on contemporary informatics. Instead of proofs and other highly formal structures, detailed examples present the material, making this a uniquely accessible introduction to quantum informatics. Topics covered include: * An introduction to quantum information and the qubit * Concepts and methods of quantum theory important for informatics * The application of information concepts to quantum physics * Quantum information processing and computing * Quantum gates * Error correction using quantum-based methods * Physical realizations of quantum computing circuits A helpful and economical resource for understanding this exciting new application of quantum theory to informatics, Quantum Approach to Informatics provides students and researchers in physics and information science, as well as other interested readers with some scientific background, with an essential overview of the field.

  15. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)
    ], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  16. Evaluation of superconducting quantum interference devices interfaced with digital signal processing electronics for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Pang-Jen, Flynn, E.R.; Bracht, R.R.; Lewis, P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a dc-SQUID magnetometer driven by both analog electronics and digital signal processors are investigated and compared for biomagnetic applications. Low-noise ( < 5 {mu} {Phi} {sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 1 Hz) dc-SQUIDs were fabricated by Conductus, Inc. using the all-refractory Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb process on silicon substrates with on-chip modulation coils and integral washer damping resistors. A second-order gradiometer was magnetically coupled to the input coil of the SQUID to maximize the detected signal strength. The readout of this SQUID gradiometer was achieved using a conventional flux-locked loop (FLL) circuit to provide a linearized voltage output that was proportional to the flux applied to the SQUID. A shielded cylinder was constructed to house the magnetometer to reduce ambient field noise. To realize the digital feedback loop, the analog FLL is replaced except for the preamplifier by a digital signal processing board with dual 16-bit A/D and D/A converters. This approach shows several advantages over the analog scheme including operational flexibility, cost reduction, and possibly, the enhancement of dynamic ranges and slew rates.

  17. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  18. Quantitative analysis of Euclidean distance to complement qualitative analysis of facial expression during deception

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ananya; Mukhopadhyay, Pritha; Basu, Nabanita; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar; Chatterjee, Tanima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate evaluation of an individuals' veracity is a fundamental aspect of social functioning that allows individuals to act in adaptive ways. The domain of deception detection ability is still young, and many components in this field are yet to be touched which demands more research in this field. Aims: The present study aims at deciphering the structural composition of face during felt, posed, and deceived emotions in facial expression unique to Indian culture, using Facial Action Coding System (FACS). Quantitative analysis of Euclidean distance has been done to complement qualitative FACS analysis. Methods: In this study, thirty female, young adults with age range of 23–27 years were chosen randomly for portraying their (felt, posed, and deceived) facial expression. All facial expressions were captured through instruction, and videos were converted into static images. The static images were coded on the basis of FACS to decipher the felt, posed, and deceived expressions. Quantitative analysis of the data has been done using MATLAB to meet the objectives of the study and to complement the qualitative analysis. Results: Felt and posed emotions differ in terms of intensity of the expression and subjective experience. Posed emotional and deceived expressions differ in intent. Facial asymmetry is an important indicator for detecting deception. PMID:28163412

  19. Dental arch asymmetry in young healthy human subjects evaluated by Euclidean distance matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G

    1993-03-01

    Form differences between biological structures can be evaluated using several approaches. A recently proposed method (Euclidean distance matrix analysis; EDMA) seems to be able to differentiate between size and shape differences. Here it has been applied to study the asymmetry of mandibular and maxillary arches in 50 men and 45 women with sound dentitions. The centres of gravity (centroids) of the occlusal surfaces of all permanent teeth (right second molar to left second molar) were individualized on the dental casts of subjects. The form of the right and left maxillary and mandibular hemi-arches was separately assessed by calculating all the possible linear distances between pairs of teeth within arch and side. Side differences were tested by EDMA. In men, the maxillary and the mandibular arches were both symmetrical (i.e. there were no significant differences in size or shape between the left and right hemi-arches). In women, the mandibular arch was symmetrical, but in the maxillary arch the two antimeres had a significantly different shape. No size differences were found between the left and right female hemi-arches.

  20. A weighted Euclidean distance method for rural settlements traffic location evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongkun; Chen, Zhenjie; Chen, Dong; Jia, Mingchao

    2007-06-01

    Traffic location is one of the most important factors which affect the development of rural settlements. However, there is no effective method to evaluation traffic location of rural settlements at present. Focusing on large numbers of scattered rural settlements with complicated and fragmentized traffic networks, a weighted euclidean distance method for rural settlements traffic location evaluation is put forward in this paper. In order to differentiate the affection that different levels of roads put on rural settlements, roads are sorted into two classes: the level-roads (such as national and provincial roads, county and town roads) and the village-roads. Then the total quantized value of traffic location of rural settlements, obtained by weighing traffic location quantized values on different road levels, was calculated by GIS spatial analysis module. This method was put into practice to analyze the traffic location of Tonglu County, Zhejiang Province, which showed that it has obtained a fairly good result on the evaluation of the traffic location of rural settlements.