Science.gov

Sample records for processes trapping mechanisms

  1. Reactive Transport Modelling of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers to Elucidate Fundamental Processes, Trapping Mechanisms, and Sequestration Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Knauss, K G

    2004-07-26

    The ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers for environmental isolation is governed by three interdependent yet conceptually distinct processes: CO{sub 2} migration as a buoyant immiscible fluid phase, direct chemical interaction of this rising plume with ambient saline waters, and its indirect chemical interaction with aquifer and cap-rock minerals through the aqueous wetting phase. Each process is directly linked to a corresponding trapping mechanism: immiscible plume migration to hydrodynamic trapping, plume-water interaction to solubility trapping, and plume-mineral interaction to mineral trapping. In this study, reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage in a shale-capped sandstone aquifer at Sleipner has elucidated and established key parametric dependencies of these fundamental processes, the associated trapping mechanisms, and sequestration partitioning among them during consecutive 10-year prograde (active-injection) and retrograde (post-injection) regimes. Intra-aquifer permeability structure controls the path of immiscible CO{sub 2} migration, thereby establishing the spatial framework of plume-aquifer interaction and the potential effectiveness of solubility and mineral trapping. Inter-bedded thin shales--which occur at Sleipner--retard vertical and promote lateral plume migration, thereby significantly expanding this framework and enhancing this potential. Actual efficacy of these trapping mechanisms is determined by compositional characteristics of the aquifer and cap rock: the degree of solubility trapping decreases with increasing formation-water salinity, while that of mineral trapping is proportional to the bulk concentration of carbonate-forming elements--principally Fe, Mg, Ca, Na, and Al. In the near-field environment of Sleipner-like settings, 80-85% by mass of injected CO{sub 2} remains and migrates as an immiscible fluid phase, 15-20% dissolves into formation waters, and less than 1% precipitates as carbonate minerals

  2. Conversion process of the dominant electroluminescence mechanism in a molecularly doped organic light-emitting device with only electron trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Hongjie; Deng, Ruiping; Li, Zhefeng; Yu, Jiangbo; Guo, Zhiyong

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the detailed conversion process of the dominant electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in a device with Eu(TTA)3phen (TTA =thenoyltrifluoroacetone, phen =1,10-phenanthroline) doped CBP (4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl) film as the emitting layer was investigated by analyzing the evolution of carrier distribution on dye and host molecules with increasing voltage. Firstly, it was confirmed that only electrons can be trapped in Eu(TTA)3phen doped CBP. As a result, holes and electrons would be situated on CBP and Eu(TTA)3phen molecules, respectively, and thus creates an unbalanced carrier distribution on both dye and host molecules. With the help of EL and photoluminescence spectra, the distribution of holes and electrons on both Eu(TTA)3phen and CBP molecules was demonstrated to change gradually with increasing voltage. Therefore, the dominant EL mechanism in this device changes gradually from carrier trapping at relatively low voltage to Förster energy transfer at relatively high voltage.

  3. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  4. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of Dionaea muscipula trap closing.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Adesina, Tejumade; Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-02-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) possesses an active trapping mechanism to capture insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom, as described by Darwin. This article presents a detailed experimental investigation of trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli and the mechanism of this process. Trap closure consists of three distinctive phases: a silent phase with no observable movement; an accelerated movement of the lobes; and the relaxation of the lobes in their closed state, resulting in a new equilibrium. Uncouplers and blockers of membrane channels were used to investigate the mechanisms of different phases of closing. Uncouplers increased trap closure delay and significantly decreased the speed of trap closure. Ion channel blockers and aquaporin inhibitors increased time of closing. Transmission of a single electrical charge between a lobe and the midrib causes closure of the trap and induces an electrical signal propagating between both lobes and midrib. The Venus flytrap can accumulate small subthreshold charges, and when the threshold value is reached, the trap closes. Repeated application of smaller charges demonstrates the summation of stimuli. The cumulative character of electrical stimuli points to the existence of electrical memory in the Venus flytrap. The observed fast movement can be explained by the hydroelastic curvature model without invoking buckling instability. The new hydroelastic curvature mechanism provides an accurate description of the authors' experimental data.

  6. Mechanical Performance of Rat, Mouse and Mole Spring Traps, and Possible Implications for Welfare Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sandra E.; Ellwood, Stephen A.; Tagarielli, Vito L.; Macdonald, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Lethal spring traps are widely used for killing small mammals in the UK. Many require government approval, based primarily on humaneness. However, mole traps and break-back traps for rats and mice are exempt; those available vary widely in price and apparent quality. The EU is considering implementing a Trapping Directive that would alter UK legislation, and a recent report advised the EU that trapping legislation should cover all trapped species and encourage improvement of traps. Mechanical trap performance is often used as an indicator of welfare impact. We examined the mechanical evidence for scope to improve the welfare standards of rat, mouse and mole spring traps. We measured mechanical performance among a range of rat, mouse and mole traps. Impact momentum values varied 6-8 fold, and clamping force values 4-5.5 fold, among traps for killing each species. There was considerable overlap in the performance of rat and mouse traps. Trap-opening angle and spring type were related to impact momentum and clamping force in traps for both species. There was no relationship between price and mechanical performance in traps for any species, except talpa mole traps. We are unable to judge the direct welfare impact of the traps tested, but rather the potential welfare threat associated with their exemption from approval. The wide variation in mechanical performance in traps for each species, overlap in performance between rat and mouse traps and increasing availability of weaker plastic rodent traps indicate considerable scope for improving the humaneness of spring traps for rats, mice and moles. We conclude that all such traps should be subject to the UK approval process. New welfare categories might improve trap standards further. Our results could also help improve rodent trap design and assist consumers in selecting more powerful traps. Many thousands of rats, mice and moles might benefit. PMID:22768073

  7. Molten Hydroxide Trapping Process for Radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2003-01-28

    A molten hydroxide trapping process has been considered for removing radioiodine species from off-gas streams whereby iodine is reacted directly with molten hydroxides such as NaOH or KOH. The resulting product is the corresponding iodide, which can be separated by simple cooling of the molten mixture to grow the iodide primary phase once the mixture reaches 70-80 mol% in the iodide component. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that such a chemical process is highly favorable. Experimental testing of the trapping process using molecular iodine showed trapping of up to 96% of the volatile iodine. The trapping efficiency was dependent on operational parameters such as temperature and gas-melt contact efficiency, and higher efficiencies are expected as the process is further developed. While an iodide phase could be effectively isolated by slow cooling of a molten iodide-hydroxide mixture, the persistent appearance of hydroxide indicated that an appreciable solubility of hydroxide occurred in the iodide phase.

  8. Eliminating Impurity Traps in the Silane Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Redistribution reaction section of silane process progressively separates heavier parts of chlorosilane feedstock until light silane product is available for pyrolysis. Small amount of liquid containing impurities is withdrawn from processing stages in which trapping occurs and passed to earlier processing stage in which impurities tend to be removed via chemical reactions.

  9. CO2 Capillary-Trapping Processes in Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert W., Jr.; Dominic, David F.

    2014-05-01

    The idea of reducing the Earth's greenhouse effect by sequestration of CO2 into the Earth's crust has been discussed and evaluated for more than two decades. Deep saline aquifers are the primary candidate formations for realization of this idea. Evaluation of reservoir capacity and the risk of CO2 leakage require a detailed modeling of the migration and distribution of CO2 in the subsurface structure. There is a finite risk that structural (or hydrodynamic) trapping by caprock may be compromised (e.g. by improperly abandoned wells, stratigraphic discontinuities, faults, etc.). Therefore, other trapping mechanisms (capillary trapping, dissolution, and mineralization) must be considered. Capillary trapping may be very important in providing a "secondary-seal", and is the focus of our investigation. The physical mechanism of CO2 trapping in porous media by capillary trapping incorporates three related processes, i.e. residual trapping, trapping due to hysteresis of the relative permeability, and trapping due to hysteresis of the capillary pressure. Additionally CO2 may be trapped in heterogeneous media due to difference in capillary pressure entry points for different materials. The amount of CO2 trapped by these processes is a complicated nonlinear function of the spatial distribution of permeability, permeability anisotropy, capillary pressure, relative permeability of brine and CO2, permeability hysteresis and residual gas saturation (as well as the rate, total amount and placement of injected CO2). Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. We investigated how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such

  10. Trapped rubber processing for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Trapped rubber processing is a molding technique for composites in which precast silicone rubber is placed within a closed cavity where it thermally expands against the composite's surface supported by the vessel walls. The method has been applied by the Douglas Aircraft Company, under contract to NASA-Langley, to the design and fabrication of 10 DC-10 graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder assemblies. A three-bay development tool form mold die has been designed and manufactured, and tooling parameters have been established. Fabrication procedures include graphite layup, assembly of details in the tool, and a cure cycle. The technique has made it possible for the cocured fabrication of complex primary box structures otherwise impracticable via standard composite material processes.

  11. Mechanisms for mechanical trapping of geologically sequestered carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yossi; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in subsurface reservoirs is important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, a complete physical picture able to predict the structure developing within the porous medium is lacking. We investigate theoretically reactive transport in the long-time evolution of carbon in the brine–rock environment. As CO2 is injected into a brine–rock environment, a carbonate-rich region is created amid brine. Within the carbonate-rich region minerals dissolve and migrate from regions of high-to-low concentration, along with other dissolved carbonate species. This causes mineral precipitation at the interface between the two regions. We argue that precipitation in a small layer reduces diffusivity, and eventually causes mechanical trapping of the CO2. Consequently, only a small fraction of the CO2 is converted to solid mineral; the remainder either dissolves in water or is trapped in its original form. We also study the case of a pure CO2 bubble surrounded by brine and suggest a mechanism that may lead to a carbonate-encrusted bubble owing to structural diffusion. PMID:25792961

  12. Identification of microscopic hole-trapping mechanisms in nitride semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    John L. Lyons; Krishnaswamy, Karthik; Luke Gordon; ...

    2015-12-17

    Hole trapping has been observed in nitride heterostructure devices, where the Fermi level is in the vicinity of the valence-band maximum. Using hybrid density functional calculations, we examine microscopic mechanisms for hole trapping in GaN and AlN. In a defect-free material, hole trapping does not spontaneously occur, but trapping can occur in the vicinity of impurities, such as C-a common unintentional impurity in nitrides. As a result, using Schrodinger-Poisson simulations, we assess the effects of C-derived hole traps on N-face high-electron mobility transistors, which we find to be more detrimental than the previously proposed interface traps.

  13. A Mechanically Tunable Microfluidic Cell-Trapping Device

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Shang, Junyi; Olsen, Timothy; Liu, Kun; Brenner, David; Lin, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation, such as isolation, positioning and trapping of cells, is important in basic biological research and clinical diagnostics. Micro/nanotechnologies have been enabling more effective and efficient cell trapping than possible with conventional platforms. Currently available micro/nanoscale methods for cell trapping, however, still lack flexibility in precisely controlling the number of trapped cells. We exploited the large compliance of elastomers to create an array of cell-trapping microstructures, whose dimensions can be mechanically modulated by inducing uniformly distributed strain via application of external force on the chip. The device consists of two elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets, one of which bears dam-like, cup-shaped geometries to physically capture cells. The mechanical modulation is used to tune the characteristics of cell trapping to capture a predetermined number of cells, from single cells to multiple cells. Thus, enhanced utility and flexibility for practical applications can be attained, as demonstrated by tunable trapping of MCF-7 cells, a human breast cancer cell line. PMID:25821347

  14. Mechanism of follicular trapping: similarities and differences in trapping of antibody-complexed antigens and carbon particles in the follicles of the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, P.H.; Eikelenboom, P.; van Rooijen, N.

    1983-02-01

    Both immune complexes and carbon particles were trapped in spleen follicles soon after intravenous injection. The localization pattern of carbon particles and immune complexes were identical 24 hr after injection. Since there is no reason to believe that lymphocytes are involved in the transport of carbon particles from the marginal zone towards the follicle centers, these results indicate that follicular trapping is based on a purely mechanical process. Pretreatment with endotoxin completely prevented the trapping of immune complexes but not carbon particles. Endotoxin administered after the injection of immune complexes caused the rapid removal of trapped complexes from the follicles. However, the effect of endotoxin on trapped carbon particles was less pronounced. Apart from a mechanical trapping of diffusing compounds in the follicular web, a distinct phase is suggested in which immune complexes are fixed to and retained on the surface of the follicular dendritic cells.

  15. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  16. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  17. Toward Scalable Ion Traps for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits Nature 429 737 [15] Jost J D, Home J P, Amini J M, Hanneke D, Ozeri R, Langer C, Bollinger J J, Leibfried...Toward scalable ion traps for quantum information processing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full...AND SUBTITLE Toward Scalable ion Traps For Quantum Information Processing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  18. Mechanical model of the ultrafast underwater trap of Utricularia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyeux, Marc; Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2011-02-01

    The underwater traps of the carnivorous plants of the Utricularia species catch their prey through the repetition of an “active slow deflation followed by passive fast suction” sequence. In this paper, we propose a mechanical model that describes both phases and strongly supports the hypothesis that the trap door acts as a flexible valve that buckles under the combined effects of pressure forces and the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs, and not as a panel articulated on hinges. This model combines two different approaches, namely (i) the description of thin membranes as triangle meshes with strain and curvature energy, and (ii) the molecular dynamics approach, which consists of computing the time evolution of the position of each vertex of the mesh according to Langevin equations. The only free parameter in the expression of the elastic energy is the Young's modulus E of the membranes. The values for this parameter are unequivocally obtained by requiring that the trap model fires, like real traps, when the pressure difference between the outside and the inside of the trap reaches about 15 kPa. Among other results, our simulations show that, for a pressure difference slightly larger than the critical one, the door buckles, slides on the threshold, and finally swings wide open, in excellent agreement with the sequence observed in high-speed videos.

  19. Integrated optics architecture for trapped-ion quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, D.; Volin, C.; Streed, E. W.; Lenzini, F.; Lobino, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standard schemes for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP) involve the manipulation of ions in a large array of interconnected trapping potentials. The basic set of QIP operations, including state initialization, universal quantum logic, and state detection, is routinely executed within a single array site by means of optical operations, including various laser excitations as well as the collection of ion fluorescence. Transport of ions between array sites is also routinely carried out in microfabricated trap arrays. However, it is still not possible to perform optical operations in parallel across all array sites. The lack of this capability is one of the major obstacles to scalable trapped-ion QIP and presently limits exploitation of current microfabricated trap technology. Here we present an architecture for scalable integration of optical operations in trapped-ion QIP. We show theoretically that diffractive mirrors, monolithically fabricated on the trap array, can efficiently couple light between trap array sites and optical waveguide arrays. Integrated optical circuits constructed from these waveguides can be used for sequencing of laser excitation and fluorescence collection. Our scalable architecture supports all standard QIP operations, as well as photon-mediated entanglement channels, while offering substantial performance improvements over current techniques.

  20. RNA-Seq reveals the molecular mechanism of trapping and killing of root-knot nematodes by nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Ramesh; Patel, Reena; Patel, Namrata; Bhatt, Vaibhav; Joshi, Chaitanya; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kunjadia, Anju

    2017-04-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are well known for their inherent potential to trap and kill nematodes using specialized trapping devices. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trapping and subsequent processes are still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined differential genes expression in two nematode-trapping fungi after baiting with nematode extracts. In Arthrobotrys conoides, 809 transcripts associated with diverse functions such as signal transduction, morphogenesis, stress response and peroxisomal proteins, proteases, chitinases and genes involved in the host-pathogen interaction showed differential expression with fold change (>±1.5 fold) in the presence of nematode extract with FDR (p-value < 0.001). G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases are considered crucial for signal transduction mechanism. Results of qRT-PCR of 20 genes further validated the sequencing data. Further, variations in gene expression among Duddingtonia flagrans and A. conoides showed septicity of nematode-trapping fungi for its host. The findings illustrate the molecular mechanism of fungal parasitism in A. conoides which may be helpful in developing a potential biocontrol agent against parasitic nematodes.

  1. Pore-scale study of capillary trapping mechanism during CO2 injection in geological formations

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2011-11-01

    Geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} gas emerged as a promising solution for reducing amount of green house gases in atmosphere. A number of continuum scale models are available to describe the transport phenomena of CO{sub 2} sequestration. These models rely heavily on a phenomenological description of subsurface transport phenomena and the predictions can be highly uncertain. Pore-scale models provide a better understanding of fluid displacement processes, nonetheless such models are rare. In this work we use a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study pore-scale displacement and capillary trapping mechanisms of super-critical CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Simulations are carried out to investigate the effects of gravitational, viscous, and capillary forces in terms of Gravity, Capillary, and Bond numbers. Contrary to the other published continuum scale investigations, we found that not only Gravity number but also Capillary number plays an important role on the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. For large Gravity numbers (on the order of 10), most of the injected CO{sub 2} reaches the cap-rock due to gravity segregation. A significant portion of CO{sub 2} gets trapped by capillary forces when Gravity number is small (on the order of 0.1). When Gravity number is moderately high (on the order of 1), trapping patterns are heavily dependent on Capillary number. If Capillary number is very small (less than 0.001), then capillary forces dominate the buoyancy forces and a significant fraction of injected CO{sub 2} is trapped by the capillary forces. Conversely, if Capillary number is high (higher than 0.001), capillary trapping is relatively small since buoyancy dominates the capillary forces. In addition, our simulations reveal different types of capillary trapping and flow displacement mechanisms during and after injection. In gravity dominated cases leave behind was the widespread trapping mechanism. Division was the primary trapping mechanism in viscous

  2. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped 43Ca+ Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-18

    state 11 Fig.3: Deterministic quantum teleportation protocol 12 Fig.4: Density matrix of an entangled eight-ion state 13 Fig.5: Quantum process...4.3.4 Deterministic quantum teleportation Teleportation of a quantum state encompasses the complete transfer of information from one particle to...allow quantum -state teleportation to be performed. We succeeded in demonstrating deterministic quantum -state teleportation between a pair of trapped

  3. Ultrahigh-Q mechanical oscillators through optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H. Jeff

    2011-05-01

    Rapid advances are being made toward optically cooling a single mode of a micro-mechanical system to its quantum ground state and observing quantum behavior at macroscopic scales. Reaching this regime in room-temperature environments requires a stringent condition on the mechanical quality factor Qm and frequency fm, QmfmkBTbath / h , which so far has been marginally satisfied only in a small number of systems. Here we propose and analyze a new class of systems that should enable unprecedented Qmfm values. The technique is based upon using optical forces to ``trap'' and stiffen the motion of a tethered mechanical structure, thereby freeing the resultant mechanical frequencies and decoherence rates from underlying material properties. We have lithographically fabricated a diverse set of planar structures in Silicon Nitride, made measurements of their optical and mechanical properties, and compared these results to numerical models by finite element analysis. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. E. Chang, K.-K. Ni, R. Norte, O. J. Painter, and D. J. Wilson. Work supported by DARPA ORCHID program, NSF, and NSSEFF.

  4. Determination of active oxide trap density and 1/f noise mechanism in RESURF LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik-Butler, Z.; Mahmud, M. I.; Hao, P.; Hou, F.; Amey, B. L.; Pendharkar, S.

    2015-09-01

    The physical origin of majority charge carrier fluctuations in the SiO2 interface of Si at accumulation has been investigated and analyzed for differently processed and voltage-rated reduced surface field (RESURF), lateral-double-diffused MOS (LDMOS) transistors. Surface carrier mobility fluctuation due to remote Coulomb scattering by the trapped charge in the gate oxide is identified as the dominant physical mechanism for LDMOS 1/f noise irrespective of process technologies. A significant contribution to the measured noise has been noted from the surface majority carrier mobility fluctuation due to trapped charge at the accumulation region of the extended drain region, dominant over other sources including the surface minority charge carrier fluctuations in the channel. Active oxide trap density was characterized spatially and for the first time up to ∼0.4 eV above the conduction band-edge of Si. The interface trap density in the unstressed devices (∼8 × 106 cm-2) increased more than an order of magnitude (∼1 × 108 cm-2) after the devices were stressed for 10,000 sec at their individual worst drain current and on-resistance degradation conditions. The extracted Si/SiO2 interface trap density above the silicon conduction band edge was found to be several orders of magnitude lower than that reported for silicon mid-gap energies, even after stressing. Since the traps near the quasi-Fermi level for electrons are active in trapping-detrapping, and the Fermi level is energetically positioned above the conduction band edge of Si in the investigated devices as compared to the previously reported observations, the lower trap density obtained here is an indication for reversal of the well-known exponential trap energy distribution beyond the conduction band-edge of Si. These findings shift the focus from the channel to the gate overlap section of the extended drain and the quality of the Si/SiO2 interface in that region.

  5. Measurements of cell wall mechanical properties using optically trapped fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey; Qian, Feng; Murdock, David; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-10-01

    Information on plasma membrane (PM) and cell wall mechanical properties is important for many biophysical applications, especially for those, which involve cells, undergoing significant mechanical stress (red blood cells, outer hair cells, fibrocytes, etc.). Optical tweezers is frequently used to study PM mechanics, particularly by pulling long PM tethers. One of the limitations on using optical tweezers to study cell wall mechanics is associated with transillumination technique of the trapped object position sensing, which prevents accurate mechanical testing in the proximity to the cell. In this work we use an optical tweezers in conjunction with a position-sensing system, which spectrally separates signals from the trapped fluorescent microsphere and imaging background. We have used this setup to study mechanics of the cell wall and PM separated from the underlying cytoskeleton on human embryonic kidney cells. We measured the force exerted by the cell on the trapped microsphere as a function of the cell wall displacement during the process of tether formation, and as a function of time during the process of tether growth and relaxation. Tethering force - cell wall displacement profiles have shown a behavior, implying that tether formation process starts with elastic deformation of the intact cell wall, followed by the plastic deformations and sliding of the PM over the underlying cytoskeleton, and ends with the local separation of a PM. Tethering force - cell wall displacement profiles have been used to estimate tether formation force, stiffness parameter of the cell wall and the works of tether formation, elastic and plastic deformations of the cell wall, related to the mechanical properties of a composite cell wall and cell wall - plasma membrane association strength. Temporal steady-state and relaxation tethering force profiles have been similar to the ones measured using transillumination position sensing, however average force values have been smaller in

  6. Arraying single microbeads in microchannels using dielectrophoresis-assisted mechanical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Temiz, Yuksel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Manipulating and immobilizing single microbeads in flowing fluids is relevant for biological assays and chemical tests but typically requires expensive laboratory equipment and trapping mechanisms that are not reversible. In this paper, we present a highly efficient and reversible mechanism for trapping microbeads by combining dielectrophoresis (DEP) with mechanical traps. The integration of planar electrodes and mechanical traps in a microchannel enables versatile manipulation of microbeads via DEP for their docking in recessed structures of mechanical traps. By simulating the combined effects of the hydrodynamic drag and DEP forces on microbeads, we explore a configuration of periodic traps where the beads are guided by the electrodes and immobilized in recess areas of the traps. The design of the electrode layout and operating configuration are optimized for the efficient trapping of single microbeads. We demonstrated the predicted guiding and trapping effectiveness of the design as well as the reversibility of the system on 10 μm polystyrene beads. Experimental verification used an array of 96 traps in an area of 420 × 420 μm2, reaching a trapping efficiency of 63% when 7 Vpp is applied to the electrodes under 80 nl min-1 flow rate conditions, and 98% of bead release when the voltage is turned off.

  7. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.˚ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  8. Silicon surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Slusher, Richart

    2010-03-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is designing, building, and testing scalable surface-electrode ion traps for quantum information applications, fabricated using silicon VLSI technology. A wide range of trap architectures have been developed, including a linear trap capable of holding long chains of equally spaced ions, a 90-degree X-junction, and an integrated micromirror with collection efficiency approaching 20%. Fabrication features that can be integrated with the surface electrodes include multilayer interconnects, optics for enhanced light collection, flexible optical access through beveled slots extending through the substrate, and recessed wire bonds for clear laser access across the trap surface. Traps are designed at GTRI using in-house codes that calculate trap fields, compute the full motion of ions confined in the trap, including micromotion, and optimize electrode shapes and transport waveforms using genetic algorithms. We will present designs and initial test results for several of these traps, as well as plans for their use in future experiments.

  9. Origin of traps and charge transport mechanism in hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Islamov, D. R. Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the charge transport in HfO{sub 2}. Basing on the model of phonon-assisted tunneling between traps, and assuming that the electron traps are oxygen vacancies, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. The thermal trap energy of 1.25 eV in HfO{sub 2} was determined based on the charge transport experiments.

  10. Fiber-based optical trapping for cell mechanics study and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M.; Yu, Xiaokong; Wen, Qi; Tao, Mingjiang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we developed fiber based optical trapping system and explored its applications in biology and physics. We aim to replace objective lenses with optical fibers, both for optical trapping and particle position detection. Compared with objective lens based counterparts, fiber based optical trapping systems are small, low-cost, integratable, independent of objective lenses, and can work in turbid mediums. These advantages make fiber optical trapping systems ideal for applications in tightly confined spaces as well as integration with various microscopy techniques. We demonstrate the applications of fiber optical trapping systems in both single-cell mechanics and microrheology study of asphalt binders. Fiber optical trapping system is being used to study mechanical properties of viscoelastic hydrogel, as an important extra cellular matrix (ECM) material that is used to understand the force propagation on cell membranes on 2D substrates or in 3D compartments. Moreover, the fiber optical trapping system has also been demonstrated to measure the cellular response to the external mechanical stimuli. Direct measurements of cellular traction forces in 3D compartments are underway. In addition, fiber optical trapping systems are used to measure the microscale viscoelastic properties of asphalt binders, in order to improve the fundamental understanding of the relationship between mechanical and chemical properties of asphalt binders. This fundamental understanding could help targeted asphalt recycling and pavement maintenance. Fiber optical trapping systems are versatile and highly potential tools that can find applications in various areas ranging from mechanobiology to complex fluids.

  11. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2010-03-31

    Lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs) represent a promising technology for the abatement of NO{sub x} under lean conditions. Although LNTs are starting to find commercial application, the issue of catalyst durability remains problematic. LNT susceptibility to sulfur poisoning is the single most important factor determining effective catalyst lifetime. The NO{sub x} storage element of the catalyst has a greater affinity for SO{sub 3} than it does for NO{sub 2}, and the resulting sulfate is more stable than the stored nitrate. Although this sulfate can be removed from the catalyst by means of high temperature treatment under rich conditions, the required conditions give rise to deactivation mechanisms such as precious metal sintering, total surface area loss, and solid state reactions between the various oxides present. The principle objective of this project was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of lean NO{sub x} trap aging, and to understand the effect of washcoat composition on catalyst aging characteristics. The approach utilized involved detailed characterization of model catalysts prior to and after aging, in tandem with measurement of catalyst performance in NO{sub x} storage and reduction. In this manner, NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics were correlated with the evolution of catalyst physico-chemical properties upon aging. Rather than using poorly characterized proprietary catalysts, or simple model catalysts of the Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} type (representing the first generation of LNTs), Pt/Rh/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were employed which also incorporated CeO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, representing a model system which more accurately reflects current LNT formulations. Catalysts were prepared in which the concentration of each of the main components was systematically varied: Pt (50, 75 or 100 g/ft{sup 3}), Rh (10 or 20 g/ft{sup 3}), BaO (15, 30 or 45 g/L), and either CeO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L) or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (0, 50

  12. Evidence of interfacial charge trapping mechanism in polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Rakibul; Brun, Jean-François; Roussel, Frederick; Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Chan Yu King, Roch

    2015-08-03

    Relaxation mechanisms in polyaniline (PANI)/Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) nanocomposites are investigated using broad band dielectric spectroscopy. The multilayered nanostructural features of the composites and the intimate interactions between PANI and RGO are evidenced by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Increasing the RGO fraction in the composites results in a relaxation process observed at a frequency of ca. 5 kHz. This mechanism is associated with an electrical charge trapping phenomenon occurring at the PANI/RGO interfaces. The dielectric relaxation processes are interpreted according to the Sillars approach and the results are consistent with the presence of conducting prolate spheroids (RGO) embedded into a polymeric matrix (PANI). Dielectric permittivity data are analyzed within the framework of the Kohlrausch-William-Watts model, evidencing a Debye-like relaxation process.

  13. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  14. A mechanism study of sound wave-trapping barriers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Pan, Jie; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a sound barrier is usually degraded if a large reflecting surface is placed on the source side. A wave-trapping barrier (WTB), with its inner surface covered by wedge-shaped structures, has been proposed to confine waves within the area between the barrier and the reflecting surface, and thus improve the performance. In this paper, the deterioration in performance of a conventional sound barrier due to the reflecting surface is first explained in terms of the resonance effect of the trapped modes. At each resonance frequency, a strong and mode-controlled sound field is generated by the noise source both within and in the vicinity outside the region bounded by the sound barrier and the reflecting surface. It is found that the peak sound pressures in the barrier's shadow zone, which correspond to the minimum values in the barrier's insertion loss, are largely determined by the resonance frequencies and by the shapes and losses of the trapped modes. These peak pressures usually result in high sound intensity component impinging normal to the barrier surface near the top. The WTB can alter the sound wave diffraction at the top of the barrier if the wavelengths of the sound wave are comparable or smaller than the dimensions of the wedge. In this case, the modified barrier profile is capable of re-organizing the pressure distribution within the bounded domain and altering the acoustic properties near the top of the sound barrier.

  15. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  16. Hydrodynamic mechanisms of cell and particle trapping in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, A.; Yazdi, S.; Ardekani, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Focusing and sorting cells and particles utilizing microfluidic phenomena have been flourishing areas of development in recent years. These processes are largely beneficial in biomedical applications and fundamental studies of cell biology as they provide cost-effective and point-of-care miniaturized diagnostic devices and rare cell enrichment techniques. Due to inherent problems of isolation methods based on the biomarkers and antigens, separation approaches exploiting physical characteristics of cells of interest, such as size, deformability, and electric and magnetic properties, have gained currency in many medical assays. Here, we present an overview of the cell/particle sorting techniques by harnessing intrinsic hydrodynamic effects in microchannels. Our emphasis is on the underlying fluid dynamical mechanisms causing cross stream migration of objects in shear and vortical flows. We also highlight the advantages and drawbacks of each method in terms of throughput, separation efficiency, and cell viability. Finally, we discuss the future research areas for extending the scope of hydrodynamic mechanisms and exploring new physical directions for microfluidic applications. PMID:24404005

  17. Studies on the Enantioselective Iminium Ion Trapping of Radicals Triggered by an Electron-Relay Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic, computational, and kinetic studies has been used to elucidate the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported enantioselective iminium ion trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centered radicals. The process, which provides a direct way to forge quaternary stereocenters with high fidelity, relies on the interplay of two distinct catalytic cycles: the aminocatalytic electron-relay system, which triggers the stereoselective radical trap upon iminium ion formation, and the photoredox cycle, which generates radicals under mild conditions. Critical to reaction development was the use of a chiral amine catalyst, bearing a redox-active carbazole unit, which could rapidly reduce the highly reactive and unstable intermediate generated upon radical interception. The carbazole unit, however, is also involved in another step of the electron-relay mechanism: the transiently generated carbazole radical cation acts as an oxidant to return the photocatalyst into the original state. By means of kinetic and spectroscopic studies, we have identified the last redox event as being the turnover-limiting step of the overall process. This mechanistic framework is corroborated by the linear correlation between the reaction rate and the reduction potential of the carbazole unit tethered to the aminocatalyst. The redox properties of the carbazole unit can thus be rationally tuned to improve catalytic activity. This knowledge may open a path for the mechanistically driven design of the next generation of electron-relay catalysts. PMID:28281754

  18. Studies on the Enantioselective Iminium Ion Trapping of Radicals Triggered by an Electron-Relay Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Ana; Murphy, John J; Savarese, Marika; Brémond, Éric; Cavalli, Andrea; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2017-03-29

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic, computational, and kinetic studies has been used to elucidate the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported enantioselective iminium ion trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centered radicals. The process, which provides a direct way to forge quaternary stereocenters with high fidelity, relies on the interplay of two distinct catalytic cycles: the aminocatalytic electron-relay system, which triggers the stereoselective radical trap upon iminium ion formation, and the photoredox cycle, which generates radicals under mild conditions. Critical to reaction development was the use of a chiral amine catalyst, bearing a redox-active carbazole unit, which could rapidly reduce the highly reactive and unstable intermediate generated upon radical interception. The carbazole unit, however, is also involved in another step of the electron-relay mechanism: the transiently generated carbazole radical cation acts as an oxidant to return the photocatalyst into the original state. By means of kinetic and spectroscopic studies, we have identified the last redox event as being the turnover-limiting step of the overall process. This mechanistic framework is corroborated by the linear correlation between the reaction rate and the reduction potential of the carbazole unit tethered to the aminocatalyst. The redox properties of the carbazole unit can thus be rationally tuned to improve catalytic activity. This knowledge may open a path for the mechanistically driven design of the next generation of electron-relay catalysts.

  19. Genomic Mechanisms Accounting for the Adaptation to Parasitism in Nematode-Trapping Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Meerupati, Tejashwari; Andersson, Karl-Magnus; Friman, Eva; Kumar, Dharmendra; Tunlid, Anders; Ahrén, Dag

    2013-01-01

    Orbiliomycetes is one of the earliest diverging branches of the filamentous ascomycetes. The class contains nematode-trapping fungi that form unique infection structures, called traps, to capture and kill free-living nematodes. The traps have evolved differently along several lineages and include adhesive traps (knobs, nets or branches) and constricting rings. We show, by genome sequencing of the knob-forming species Monacrosporium haptotylum and comparison with the net-forming species Arthrobotrys oligospora, that two genomic mechanisms are likely to have been important for the adaptation to parasitism in these fungi. Firstly, the expansion of protein domain families and the large number of species-specific genes indicated that gene duplication followed by functional diversification had a major role in the evolution of the nematode-trapping fungi. Gene expression indicated that many of these genes are important for pathogenicity. Secondly, gene expression of orthologs between the two fungi during infection indicated that differential regulation was an important mechanism for the evolution of parasitism in nematode-trapping fungi. Many of the highly expressed and highly upregulated M. haptotylum transcripts during the early stages of nematode infection were species-specific and encoded small secreted proteins (SSPs) that were affected by repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). An active RIP mechanism was revealed by lack of repeats, dinucleotide bias in repeats and genes, low proportion of recent gene duplicates, and reduction of recent gene family expansions. The high expression and rapid divergence of SSPs indicate a striking similarity in the infection mechanisms of nematode-trapping fungi and plant and insect pathogens from the crown groups of the filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina). The patterns of gene family expansions in the nematode-trapping fungi were more similar to plant pathogens than to insect and animal pathogens. The observation of RIP activity

  20. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics.

  1. Microfabricated Surface-Electrode Ion Trap for Scalable Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-06-01

    Individual laser-cooled Mg+24 ions are confined in a linear Paul trap with a novel geometry where gold electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are trapped 40μm above this plane. The relatively simple trap design and fabrication procedure are important for large-scale quantum information processing (QIP) using ions. Measured ion motional frequencies are compared to simulations. Measurements of ion recooling after cooling is temporarily suspended yield a heating rate of approximately 5 motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 2.83 MHz, sufficiently low to be useful for QIP.

  2. Surface ion trap structures with excellent optical access for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, P.; Blain, M.; Benito, F.; Chou, C.; Clark, C.; Descour, M.; Ellis, R.; Haltli, R.; Heller, E.; Kemme, S.; Sterk, J.; Tabakov, B.; Tigges, C.; Stick, D.

    2013-05-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode ion traps are necessary for the advancement of trapped ion quantum information processing as it offers a scalable way for realizing complex trap structures capable of storing and controlling many ions. The most promising way of performing two-qubit quantum gates in a chain of trapped ions is to focus laser beams on individual ions of the chain to drive gates. However, in surface ion traps the close proximity of the ions to the surface and the size of the chips usually cannot accommodate the tightly focused laser beams necessary to address individual ions parallel to the chip surface. Here we present a surface electrode ion trap monolithically fabricated in standard silicon technology that implements a linear quadrupole trap on a bowtie shaped chip with a narrow section that is only 1.2 mm wide. Laser beams parallel to the surface can be focused down to a waist of 4 μm with enough separation from the trap chip to prevent light scattering. The trap structure incorporates two Y-junctions for reordering ions and is optimized for quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Bioluminescence is produced from a trapped firefly luciferase conformation predicted by the domain alternation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Fontaine, Danielle M; Southworth, Tara L; Behney, Curran E; Uzasci, Lerna

    2011-07-27

    According to the domain alternation mechanism and crystal structure evidence, the acyl-CoA synthetases, one of three subgroups of a superfamily of adenylating enzymes, catalyze adenylate- and thioester-forming half-reactions in two different conformations. The enzymes accomplish this by presenting two active sites through an ~140° rotation of the C-domain. The second half-reaction catalyzed by another subgroup, the beetle luciferases, is a mechanistically dissimilar oxidative process that produces bioluminescence. We have demonstrated that a firefly luciferase variant containing cysteine residues at positions 108 and 447 can be intramolecularly cross-linked by 1,2-bis(maleimido)ethane, trapping the enzyme in a C-domain-rotated conformation previously undocumented in the available luciferase crystal structures. The cross-linked luciferase cannot adenylate luciferin but is nearly fully capable of bioluminescence with synthetic luciferyl adenylate because it retains the ability to carry out the oxidative half-reaction. The cross-linked luciferase is apparently trapped in a conformation similar to those adopted by acyl-CoA synthetases as they convert acyl adenylates into the corresponding CoA thioesters.

  4. Use dependence of tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels: a revival of the trapped-ion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Gheri, A; Pusch, M; Moran, O

    1996-01-01

    The use-dependent block of sodium channels by tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been studied in cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes expressing the alpha-subunit of rat brain IIA channels. The kinetics of stimulus-induced extra block are consistent with an underlying relaxation process involving only three states. Cumulative extra block induced by repetitive stimulations increases with hyperpolarization, with TTX concentration, and with extracellular Ca2+ concentration. We have developed a theoretical model based on the suggestion by Salgado et al. that TTX blocks the extracellular mouth of the ion pore less tightly when the latter has its external side occupied by a cation, and that channel opening favors a tighter binding by allowing the escape of the trapped ion. The model provides an excellent fit of the data, which are consistent with Ca2+ being more efficient than Na+ in weakening TTX binding and with bound Ca2+ stabilizing the closed state of the channel, as suggested by Armstrong and Cota. Reports arguing against the trapped-ion mechanism are critically discussed. PMID:8874004

  5. Experimental progress with novel surface electrode ion trap structures for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig; Blain, Matthew; Benito, Francisco; Chou, Chin-Wen; Descour, Mike; Ellis, Rob; Haltli, Ray; Heller, Edwin; Kemme, Shanalyn; Sterk, Jon; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Maunz, Peter; Stick, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Segmented surface electrode ion traps are one of the most mature platforms among candidates for scalable quantum information processing. In this poster, an overview of current results from four specific projects will be presented. Two projects involve increased light collection from trapped ion for state detection and/or remote entangling of distant ions. The first involves cavity integration into a linear surface trap, and the second, involves integration of diffractive optical elements into a linear surface trap for increased light collection. Another project involves a trap with a ring geometry which could be used to trap long chains of equally spaced ions. Finally, we report on initial testing of a trap structure with vastly improved in-plane optical access. In this structure in-plane beams can be focused to less than 8 microns while keeping a distance of at least 5 beam radii to the trap structure. Along with these projects other relevant progress from Sandia National Laboratory's ion trap group will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Dynamical traps in Wang-Landau sampling of continuous systems: Mechanism and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yang Wei; Sim, Adelene Y. L.; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2015-08-01

    We study the mechanism behind dynamical trappings experienced during Wang-Landau sampling of continuous systems reported by several authors. Trapping is caused by the random walker coming close to a local energy extremum, although the mechanism is different from that of the critical slowing-down encountered in conventional molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. When trapped, the random walker misses the entire or even several stages of Wang-Landau modification factor reduction, leading to inadequate sampling of the configuration space and a rough density of states, even though the modification factor has been reduced to very small values. Trapping is dependent on specific systems, the choice of energy bins, and the Monte Carlo step size, making it highly unpredictable. A general, simple, and effective solution is proposed where the configurations of multiple parallel Wang-Landau trajectories are interswapped to prevent trapping. We also explain why swapping frees the random walker from such traps. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated.

  7. Dynamical traps in Wang-Landau sampling of continuous systems: Mechanism and solution.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yang Wei; Sim, Adelene Y L; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2015-08-01

    We study the mechanism behind dynamical trappings experienced during Wang-Landau sampling of continuous systems reported by several authors. Trapping is caused by the random walker coming close to a local energy extremum, although the mechanism is different from that of the critical slowing-down encountered in conventional molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. When trapped, the random walker misses the entire or even several stages of Wang-Landau modification factor reduction, leading to inadequate sampling of the configuration space and a rough density of states, even though the modification factor has been reduced to very small values. Trapping is dependent on specific systems, the choice of energy bins, and the Monte Carlo step size, making it highly unpredictable. A general, simple, and effective solution is proposed where the configurations of multiple parallel Wang-Landau trajectories are interswapped to prevent trapping. We also explain why swapping frees the random walker from such traps. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated.

  8. Ion sponge: a 3-dimentional array of quadrupole ion traps for trapping and mass-selectively processing ions in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-05-06

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations.

  9. A review of silicon microfabricated ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dong-Il "Dan"; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Kim, Taehyun

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has become a hot research topic as evidenced by S. Haroche and D. J. Wineland receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2012. Various MEMS-based microfabrication methods will be a key enabling technology in implementing novel and scalable ion traps for QIP. This paper provides a brief introduction of ion trap devices, and reviews ion traps made using conventional precision machining as well as MEMS-based microfabrication. Then, microfabrication methods for ion traps are explained in detail. Finally, current research issues in microfabricated ion traps are presented. The QIP renders significant new challenges for MEMS, as various QIP technologies are being developed for secure encrypted communication and complex computing applications.

  10. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  11. Radiative and collisional processes in translationally cold samples of hydrogen Rydberg atoms studied in an electrostatic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Ch; Agner, J. A.; Pillet, P.; Merkt, F.

    2016-05-01

    magnetic quantum number m than the optically prepared Rydberg-Stark states, and this observation led to the conclusion that a much more efficient mechanism than a purely radiative one must exist to induce transitions to Rydberg-Stark states of higher | m| values. While searching for such a mechanism, we discovered that resonant dipole-dipole collisions between Rydberg atoms in the trap represent an extremely efficient way of inducing transitions to states of higher | m| values. The efficiency of the mechanism is a consequence of the almost perfectly linear nature of the Stark effect at the moderate field strengths used to trap the atoms, which permits cascades of transitions between entire networks of near-degenerate Rydberg-atom-pair states. To include such cascades of resonant dipole-dipole transitions in the numerical simulations, we have generalized the two-state Förster-type collision model used to describe resonant collisions in ultracold Rydberg gases to a multi-state situation. It is only when considering the combined effects of collisional and radiative processes that the observed decay of the population of Rydberg atoms in the trap could be satisfactorily reproduced for all n values studied experimentally.

  12. Laying a trap to kill cancer cells: PARP inhibitors and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; O'Connor, Mark J; de Bono, Johann

    2016-10-26

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are the first DNA damage response targeted agents approved for cancer therapy. Here, we focus on their molecular mechanism of action by PARP "trapping" and what this means for both clinical monotherapy and combination with chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Trapping processes in CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Dongdong; Jia, Weiyi; Evans, D. R.; Dennis, W. M.; Liu, Huimin; Zhu, Jing; Yen, W. M.

    2000-09-15

    CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+} is a persistent red phosphor. Thermoluminescence was measured under different excitation and thermal treatment conditions. The results reveal that the charge defects, created by substituting Tm{sup 3+} for Ca{sup 2+}, serve as hole traps for the afterglow at room temperature. Tm{sup 3+} plays the role of deep electron trapping centers, capturing electrons either through the conduction band or directly from the excited Eu{sup 2+} ions. These two processes, in which two different sites of Tm{sup 3+} are involved, correspond to two traps with different depths. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Trapping and Activating Emotional Memories

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Denise J.; Sano, Yoshitake; Lee, Yong-Seok; Zhou, Yu; Bekal, Pallavi; Deisseroth, Karl; Silva, Alcino J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that memory allocation to specific neurons (i.e., neuronal allocation) in the amygdala is not random, but rather the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) modulates this process, perhaps by regulating the transcription of channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, optogenetic studies in the mouse lateral amygdala (LA) were used to demonstrate that CREB and neuronal excitability regulate which neurons encode an emotional memory. To test the role of CREB in memory allocation, we overexpressed CREB in the lateral amygdala to recruit the encoding of an auditory-fear conditioning (AFC) memory to a subset of neurons. Then, post-training activation of these neurons with Channelrhodopsin-2 was sufficient to trigger recall of the memory for AFC, suggesting that CREB regulates memory allocation. To test the role of neuronal excitability in memory allocation, we used a step function opsin (SFO) to transiently increase neuronal excitability in a subset of LA neurons during AFC. Post-training activation of these neurons with Volvox Channelrhodopsin-1 was able to trigger recall of that memory. Importantly, our studies show that activation of the SFO did not affect AFC by either increasing anxiety or by strengthening the unconditioned stimulus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that CREB regulates memory allocation by modulating neuronal excitability. PMID:27579481

  15. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2009-11-24

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria.

  16. On the mechanism of trap closure of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis).

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1989-08-01

    The rapid trap closure of Dionaea muscinula Ellis has been explained by either a loss of turgor pressure of the upper epidermis, which should thus become flexible, or by a sudden acid-induced wall loosening of the motor cells. According to our experiments both explanations are doubtful. Objections against the turgor mechanism come from the determination by extracellular measurements from the upper epidermis of action-potential amplitudes before and after trap closure. Neither time course nor amplitude of the action potentials are altered by trap closure. In contrast a rise in the apoplastic concentration of K(+) or Na(+), which are the only ions present in the trap in osmotically significant concentrations, from 1 to 10 mM reduces the action-potential amplitudes by 25% and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, after trap closure the upper epidermal cells retain a considerable cell sap osmolality of 0.41 mol·kg(-1) which equals that of the mesophyll cells as determined by incipient plasmolysis. A sudden cell-wall acidification causing movement is improbable since an acidification of the apoplast from pH 6 to pH 4 reduces action-potential amplitudes by 33% whereas the amplitudes measured extracellylarly from the mesophyll and lower epidermis remain unchanged by trap closure. In addition, buffering the apoplast at pH 6 does not prevent movement in traps which have been incised several times from the margin to the midrib to facilitate buffer diffusion into the mesophyll. Even an alkalinization of cell walls of plasmolysed leaf segments to pH 9 does not prevent considerable extensions of the mesophyll and subsequent movement of the specimens during deplasmolysis.These experiments make it very likely that the mesophyll cells are already extensible but are kept compressed in the open trap, thus developing tissue tension. The mechanism which prevents their extension as long as the trap is open can so far only be explained for traps which have been paralysed by a long

  17. With a flick of the lid: a novel trapping mechanism in Nepenthes gracilis pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ulrike; Di Giusto, Bruno; Skepper, Jeremy; Grafe, T Ulmar; Federle, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Carnivorous pitcher plants capture prey with modified leaves (pitchers), using diverse mechanisms such as 'insect aquaplaning' on the wet pitcher rim, slippery wax crystals on the inner pitcher wall, and viscoelastic retentive fluids. Here we describe a new trapping mechanism for Nepenthes gracilis which has evolved a unique, semi-slippery wax crystal surface on the underside of the pitcher lid and utilises the impact of rain drops to 'flick' insects into the trap. Depending on the experimental conditions (simulated 'rain', wet after 'rain', or dry), insects were captured mainly by the lid, the peristome, or the inner pitcher wall, respectively. The application of an anti-slip coating to the lower lid surface reduced prey capture in the field. Compared to sympatric N. rafflesiana, N. gracilis pitchers secreted more nectar under the lid and less on the peristome, thereby directing prey mainly towards the lid. The direct contribution to prey capture represents a novel function of the pitcher lid.

  18. Active movements in plants: Mechanism of trap closure by Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Markin, Vladislav S; Volkov, Alexander G; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-10-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) captures insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom. We investigated trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli using the novel charge-injection method and high-speed recording. We proposed a new hydroelastic curvature mechanism, which is based on the assumption that the lobes possess curvature elasticity and are composed of outer and inner hydraulic layers with different hydrostatic pressure. The open state of the trap contains high elastic energy accumulated due to the hydrostatic pressure difference between the hydraulic layers of the lobe. Stimuli open pores connecting the two layers, water rushes from one hydraulic layer to another, and the trap relaxes to the equilibrium configuration corresponding to the closed state. In this paper we derived equations describing this system based on elasticity Hamiltonian and found closing kinetics. The novel charge-injection stimulation method gives insight into mechanisms of the different steps of signal transduction and response in the plant kingdom.

  19. Electron microscopic time-lapse visualization of surface pore filtration on particulate matter trapping process.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ryoko; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to dynamically visualize the particulate matter (PM) trapping process on diesel particulate filter (DPF) walls at a micro scale as 'time-lapse' images corresponding to the increase in pressure drop simultaneously measured through the DPF. This visualization and pressure drop measurement led to the conclusion that the PM trapping in surface pores was driven by PM bridging and stacking at constricted areas in porous channels. This caused a drastic increase in the pressure drop during PM accumulation at the beginning of the PM trapping process. The relationship between the porous structure of the DPF and the depth of the surface pore was investigated in terms of the porosity distribution and PM penetration depth near the wall surface with respect to depth. The pressure drop calculated with an assumed surface pore depth showed a good correspondence to the measured pressure drop.

  20. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Britton, Joe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Amini, Jason; Brown, Kenton; Home, Jonathan; Hume, David; Shiga, Nobu; Itano, Wayne; Jost, John; Knill, Emmanuel; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Wineland, David

    2007-03-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in an rf Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane [1,2,3]. This device is realized with simple fabrication procedures, making it a potential candidate for a scalable ion trap for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled ions 40 micrometers above planar electrodes. These electrodes are fabricated from gold on a fused quartz substrate. The heating rate of the ions is low enough to make the trap useful for quantum information processing. [1] J. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005). [2] S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). [3] J. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.

  1. Microfabricated surface-electrode ion traps for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Reichle, R.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Blakestad, R. B.; Epstein, R. J.; Amini, J. M.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-06-01

    We confine individual atomic ions in rf Paul traps with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions are confined above this plane ootnotetextJ. Chiaverini et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005).^, ootnotetextS. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006).^, ootnotetextJ. Britton et al., quant-ph/0605170.. These devices are realized with simple fabrication procedures, making them potentially scalable for quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. For traps fabricated from gold on fused quartz, the ions are 40 micrometers above the planar electrodes and their heating rate is low enough to make the traps useful for quantum information processing.

  2. Electrolytic trapping of iodine from process gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Horner, Donald E.; Mailen, James C.; Posey, Franz A.

    1977-01-25

    A method for removing molecular, inorganic, and organic forms of iodine from process gas streams comprises the electrolytic oxidation of iodine in the presence of cobalt-III ions. The gas stream is passed through the anode compartment of a partitioned electrolytic cell having a nitric acid anolyte containing a catalytic amount of cobalt to cause the oxidation of effluent iodine species to aqueous soluble species.

  3. Control Processes and Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    HOROWITZ, MARDI; COOPER, STEVEN; FRIDHANDLER, BRAM; PERRY, J. CHRISTOPHER; BOND, MICHAEL; VAILLANT, GEORGE

    1992-01-01

    Defense-mechanism theory and control-process theory are related psychodynamic approaches to explaining and classifying how people ward off emotional upsets. Although both theories explain defensive maneuvers in the same motivational terms, each defines categories different1y. Classic categories define defense mechanisms at a relatively macroscopic level, whereas control-process theory aims at relatively microgenetic analysis of how cognitive maneuvers—involving what is thought, how it is thought, and how it is organized—may generate defensive states. The theories are not contradictory, but they are focused on different levels of observation; it is useful to compare how these classifications are applied to specific case material. PMID:22700114

  4. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

    2008-06-10

    The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

  5. Trapping toxins within lipid droplets is a resistance mechanism in fungi.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Ming; Zheng, Sha; Li, Ying; Li, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Li, Gang; Lin, Zhaomin; Xie, Zhiyu; Zhao, Zuntian; Lou, Hongxiang

    2015-10-14

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as intracellular storage organelles in most types of cells and are principally involved in energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. However, the role of LDs in resistance to toxins in fungi remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the trapping of endogenous toxins by LDs is a self-resistance mechanism in the toxin producer, while absorbing external lipophilic toxins is a resistance mechanism in the toxin recipient that acts to quench the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that an endolichenic fungus that generates phototoxic perylenequinones (PQs) trapped the PQs inside LDs. Using a model that incorporates the fungicidal action of hypocrellin A (HA), a PQ derivative, we showed that yeast cells escaped killing by trapping toxins inside LDs. Furthermore, LD-deficient mutants were hypersusceptible to HA-mediated phototoxins and other fungicides. Our study identified a previously unrecognised function of LDs in fungi that has implications for our understanding of environmental adaptation strategies for fungi and antifungal drug discovery.

  6. Trapping toxins within lipid droplets is a resistance mechanism in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Ming; Zheng, Sha; Li, Ying; Li, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Li, Gang; Lin, Zhaomin; Xie, Zhiyu; Zhao, Zuntian; Lou, Hongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as intracellular storage organelles in most types of cells and are principally involved in energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. However, the role of LDs in resistance to toxins in fungi remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the trapping of endogenous toxins by LDs is a self-resistance mechanism in the toxin producer, while absorbing external lipophilic toxins is a resistance mechanism in the toxin recipient that acts to quench the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that an endolichenic fungus that generates phototoxic perylenequinones (PQs) trapped the PQs inside LDs. Using a model that incorporates the fungicidal action of hypocrellin A (HA), a PQ derivative, we showed that yeast cells escaped killing by trapping toxins inside LDs. Furthermore, LD-deficient mutants were hypersusceptible to HA-mediated phototoxins and other fungicides. Our study identified a previously unrecognised function of LDs in fungi that has implications for our understanding of environmental adaptation strategies for fungi and antifungal drug discovery. PMID:26463663

  7. Technical Note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, T.; Bach, L. T.; Czerny, J.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-11-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial decoupling between particle formation and collection often handicaps reconciliation of these two processes even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to study how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently concentrated by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride and we discuss the advantages of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranges from fine to coarse silt (2-63 μm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight on various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  8. A microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap for scalable quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelin, Signe; Chiaverini, John; Reichle, Rainer; Bollinger, John; Leibfried, Didi; Britton, Joe; Wesenberg, Janus; Blakestad, Brad; Epstein, Ryan; Hume, David; Jost, John; Langer, Chris; Ozeri, Roee; Shiga, Nobu; Wineland, David

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate confinement of individual atomic ions in a radio-frequency Paul trap with a novel geometry where the electrodes are located in a single plane and the ions confined above this plane. This device is realized with a relatively simple fabrication procedure and has important implications for quantum state manipulation and quantum information processing using large numbers of ions. We confine laser-cooled Mg-24 ions approximately 40 micrometer above planar gold electrodes. We measure the ions' motional frequencies and compare them to simulations. From measurements of the escape time of ions from the trap, we also determine a heating rate of approximately five motional quanta per millisecond for a trap frequency of 5.3 MHz.

  9. Membrane-Based Gas Traps for Ammonia, Freon-21, and Water Systems to Simplify Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Gas traps are critical for the smooth operation of coolant loops because gas bubbles can cause loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and blockage of passages to remote systems. Coolant loops are ubiquitous in space flight hardware, and thus there is a great need for this technology. Conventional gas traps will not function in micro-gravity due to the absence of buoyancy forces. Therefore, clever designs that make use of adhesion and momentum are required for adequate separation, preferable in a single pass. The gas traps currently used in water coolant loops on the International Space Station are composed of membrane tube sets in a shell. Each tube set is composed of a hydrophilic membrane (used for water transport and capture of bubbles) and a hydrophobic membrane (used for venting of air bubbles). For the hydrophilic membrane, there are two critical pressures, the pressure drop and the bubble pressure. The pressure drop is the decrease in system pressure across the gas trap. The bubble pressure is the pressure required for air bubbles to pass across the water filled membrane. A significant difference between these pressures is needed to ensure complete capture of air bubbles in a single pass. Bubbles trapped by the device adsorb on the hydrophobic membrane in the interior of the hydrophilic membrane tube. After adsorption, the air is vented due to a pressure drop of approximately 1 atmosphere across the membrane. For water systems, the air is vented to the ambient (cabin). Because water vapor can also transport across the hydrophobic membrane, it is critical that a minimum surface area is used to avoid excessive water loss (would like to have a closed loop for the coolant). The currently used gas traps only provide a difference in pressure drop and bubble pressure of 3-4 psid. This makes the gas traps susceptible to failure at high bubble loading and if gas venting is impaired. One mechanism for the latter

  10. Potential Use of BEST® Sediment Trap in Splash - Saltation Transport Process by Simultaneous Wind and Rain Tests.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Mustafa; Uzun, Oguzhan; Cornelis, Wim; Gabriels, Donald; Erpul, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    The research on wind-driven rain (WDR) transport process of the splash-saltation has increased over the last twenty years as wind tunnel experimental studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of simultaneous wind and rain (WDR) transport. The present study was conducted to investigate the efficiency of the BEST® sediment traps in catching the sand particles transported through the splash-saltation process under WDR conditions. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility with water sprayed through sprinkler nozzles and free-flowing wind at different velocities to simulate the WDR conditions. Not only for vertical sediment distribution, but a series of experimental tests for horizontal distribution of sediments was also performed using BEST® collectors to obtain the actual total sediment mass flow by the splash-saltation in the center of the wind tunnel test section. Total mass transport (kg m-2) were estimated by analytically integrating the exponential functional relationship using the measured sediment amounts at the set trap heights for every run. Results revealed the integrated efficiency of the BEST® traps at 6, 9, 12 and 15 m s-1 wind velocities under 55.8, 50.5, 55.0 and 50.5 mm h-1 rain intensities were, respectively, 83, 106, 105, and 102%. Results as well showed that the efficiencies of BEST® did not change much as compared with those under rainless wind condition.

  11. Potential Use of BEST® Sediment Trap in Splash - Saltation Transport Process by Simultaneous Wind and Rain Tests

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, Mustafa; Uzun, Oguzhan; Cornelis, Wim; Gabriels, Donald; Erpul, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    The research on wind-driven rain (WDR) transport process of the splash-saltation has increased over the last twenty years as wind tunnel experimental studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of simultaneous wind and rain (WDR) transport. The present study was conducted to investigate the efficiency of the BEST® sediment traps in catching the sand particles transported through the splash-saltation process under WDR conditions. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility with water sprayed through sprinkler nozzles and free-flowing wind at different velocities to simulate the WDR conditions. Not only for vertical sediment distribution, but a series of experimental tests for horizontal distribution of sediments was also performed using BEST® collectors to obtain the actual total sediment mass flow by the splash-saltation in the center of the wind tunnel test section. Total mass transport (kg m-2) were estimated by analytically integrating the exponential functional relationship using the measured sediment amounts at the set trap heights for every run. Results revealed the integrated efficiency of the BEST® traps at 6, 9, 12 and 15 m s-1 wind velocities under 55.8, 50.5, 55.0 and 50.5 mm h-1 rain intensities were, respectively, 83, 106, 105, and 102%. Results as well showed that the efficiencies of BEST® did not change much as compared with those under rainless wind condition. PMID:27898716

  12. Experimental Investigation of CO2 Trapping and Leakage Mechanisms in Deep Geologic Formations for Model Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Trevisan, L.; Agartan, E.; Vargas-Johnson, J.; Plampin, M. R.; Pini, R.; Pawar, R.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental and a comprehensive understanding of trapping and leakage processes will be of value to develop strategies for efficient and secure storage of CO2 in deep geologic formations and assess environmental and ecological risks associated with potential leakage. It is our contention that to make observations and collect data to obtain a fundamental understanding of how the natural formation heterogeneity manifested at all scales affects trapping is highly challenging or impossible to obtain in real field settings in deep geologic formations. A test scale intermediary between small laboratory columns and field scales that is referred to as "intermediate scale" provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes under controlled conditions in the laboratory. Heterogeneities at all needed test scales can be designed using soils with known properties and experiments can be conducted under controlled conditions to obtain accurate data. Conducting intermediate scale laboratory experiments under ambient pressure and temperature conditions to understand the processes that occur in deep formations with very higher pressures and drastically different temperatures pose many challenges. This paper presents the approaches that were used to conduct multi-scale experiments from column to intermediate scale to understand the factors that contribute to capillary and dissolution trapping using surrogate fluids for supercritical CO2 and saline water combination. In addition, experiments were conducted in soil columns and two-dimensional tanks to study the effects of formation heterogeneity on CO2 gas evolution during leakage of water with dissolved CO2. The results from these experiments are presented to show how the new insights have helped to improve the conceptual understanding of effects of heterogeneity on CO2 trapping and leakage. This understanding has helped to improve numerical models that can be used to better engineer CO2 storage systems for permanence

  13. Motor protein and microtubule mechanics: Application of a novel high-resolution optical trapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allersma, Miriam W.

    Using optical tweezers and a novel detection technique (a quadrant photodiode at the back focal plane or, BFP-QD), this thesis investigates two problems in biophysics, ncd motility and microtubule flexural rigidity. We use optically trapped microspheres to probe the samples. The technique detects the displacements of the microspheres relative to the trap center by monitoring the laser intensity shifts in the back focal plane of the microscope condenser. We use a quadrant diode to detect the shifts, which are due to far-field interference between the trapping laser and scattered laser light from the trapped object. The method yields high-resolution (nm-spatial and μsec-temporal), two-dimensional data, which is largely independent of trap position in the field of view. We first studied the motility of ncd, a kinesin-related motor protein. Motor proteins are able to harness the energy of ATP hydrolysis to perform mechanical work for the cell. Many ncd molecules were adsorbed onto silica microspheres and their motions along the microtubule surface lattice were observed with the BFP-QD method. Since the method is two-dimensional, we were able to monitor axial and lateral motions simultaneously. The average axial velocity was 230 +/- 30 nm/sec (average +/- SD). The high temporal resolution allowed us to investigate dynamical parameters. Spectral analysis showed an increase in viscous drag near the surface for ncd-driven microspheres. In addition, we found that the binding of the motors to microtubules in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable nucleotide adenylylimidodiphosphate caused an increase in the motor elastic constraint. Using a dual optical trap configuration in conjunction with the BFP-QD, we also investigated the elastic properties of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Cytoskeletal filaments are responsible for myriad structural cell functions. Our results were not readily interpreted by a standard bent strut treatment because of the finite size of the microspheres

  14. Anomalous Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers Reveals Underlying Mechanisms of Trapping and Percolation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While transport in conjugated polymers has many similarities to that in crystalline inorganic materials, several key differences reveal the unique relationship between the morphology of polymer films and the charge mobility. We develop a model that directly incorporates the molecular properties of the polymer film and correctly predicts these unique transport features. At low degree of polymerization, the increase of the mobility with the polymer chain length reveals trapping at chain ends, and saturation of the mobility at high degree of polymerization results from conformational traps within the chains. Similarly, the inverse field dependence of the mobility reveals that transport on single polymer chains is characterized by the ability of the charge to navigate around kinks and loops in the chain. These insights emphasize the connection between the polymer conformations and the transport and thereby offer a route to designing improved device morphologies through molecular design and materials processing. PMID:28058280

  15. Technical note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, Tim; Bach, Lennart T.; Czerny, Jan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial and temporal decoupling between particle formation in the surface ocean and particle collection in sediment traps at depth often handicaps reconciliation of production and sedimentation even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms are restricted to the surface ocean, but have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to studying how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples for biogeochemical analysis. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently separated from bulk seawater by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride, and we discuss the advantages and efficiencies of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranged from fine to coarse silt (2-63 µm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements, and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight into various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate the processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  16. Energy efficient of ethanol recovery in pervaporation membrane bioreactor with mechanical vapor compression eliminating the cold traps.

    PubMed

    Fan, Senqing; Xiao, Zeyi; Li, Minghai

    2016-07-01

    An energy efficient pervaporation membrane bioreactor with mechanical vapor compression was developed for ethanol recovery during the process of fermentation coupled with pervaporation. Part of the permeate vapor at the membrane downstream under the vacuum condition was condensed by running water at the first condenser and the non-condensed vapor enriched with ethanol was compressed to the atmospheric pressure and pumped into the second condenser, where the vapor was easily condensed into a liquid by air. Three runs of fermentation-pervaporation experiment have been carried out lasting for 192h, 264h and 360h respectively. Complete vapor recovery validated the novel pervaporation membrane bioreactor. The total flux of the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was in the range of 350gm(-2)h(-1) and 600gm(-2)h(-1). Compared with the traditional cold traps condensation, mechanical vapor compression behaved a dominant energy saving feature.

  17. A Novel Method to Reduce Time Investment When Processing Videos from Camera Trap Studies

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Kristijn R. R.; Reijniers, Jonas; Breno, Matteo; Leirs, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps have proven very useful in ecological, conservation and behavioral research. Camera traps non-invasively record presence and behavior of animals in their natural environment. Since the introduction of digital cameras, large amounts of data can be stored. Unfortunately, processing protocols did not evolve as fast as the technical capabilities of the cameras. We used camera traps to record videos of Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber). However, a large number of recordings did not contain the target species, but instead empty recordings or other species (together non-target recordings), making the removal of these recordings unacceptably time consuming. In this paper we propose a method to partially eliminate non-target recordings without having to watch the recordings, in order to reduce workload. Discrimination between recordings of target species and non-target recordings was based on detecting variation (changes in pixel values from frame to frame) in the recordings. Because of the size of the target species, we supposed that recordings with the target species contain on average much more movements than non-target recordings. Two different filter methods were tested and compared. We show that a partial discrimination can be made between target and non-target recordings based on variation in pixel values and that environmental conditions and filter methods influence the amount of non-target recordings that can be identified and discarded. By allowing a loss of 5% to 20% of recordings containing the target species, in ideal circumstances, 53% to 76% of non-target recordings can be identified and discarded. We conclude that adding an extra processing step in the camera trap protocol can result in large time savings. Since we are convinced that the use of camera traps will become increasingly important in the future, this filter method can benefit many researchers, using it in different contexts across the globe, on both videos and photographs. PMID:24918777

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of Ultrasonic Activation of Persulfate: An in Situ EPR Spin Trapping Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Villamena, Frederick A; Weavers, Linda K

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) was shown to activate persulfate (PS) providing an alternative activation method to base or heat as an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) method. The kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic activation of PS were examined in aqueous solution using an in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique and radical trapping with probe compounds. Using the spin trap, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and sulfate radical anion (SO4(•-)) were measured from ultrasonic activation of persulfate (US-PS). The yield of (•)OH was up to 1 order of magnitude greater than that of SO4(•-). The comparatively high (•)OH yield was attributed to the hydrolysis of SO4(•-) in the warm interfacial region of cavitation bubbles formed from US. Using steady-state approximations, the dissociation rate of PS in cavitating bubble systems was determined to be 3 orders of magnitude greater than control experiments without sonication at ambient temperature. From calculations of the interfacial volume surrounding cavitation bubbles and using the Arrhenius equation, an effective mean temperature of 340 K at the bubble-water interface was estimated. Comparative studies using the probe compounds tert-butyl alcohol and nitrobenzene verified the bubble-water interface as the location for PS activation by high temperature with (•)OH contributing a minor role in activating PS to SO4(•-). The mechanisms unveiled in this study provide a basis for optimizing US-PS as an ISCO technology.

  19. Long persistent and optically stimulated luminescence behaviors of calcium aluminates with different trap filling processes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Buhao; Xu, Xuhui; Li, Qianyue; Wu, Yumei; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2014-09-15

    Properties of long persistent luminescence (LPL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) materials were investigated. The observed phenomenon indicates that R{sup 3+} ions (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) have different effects on trap properties of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}. The greatly improved LPL performance was observed in Nd{sup 3+} co-doped samples, which indicates that the incorporation of Nd{sup 3+} creates suitable traps for LPL. While co-doping Tm{sup 3+} ions, the intensity of high temperature of thermoluminescence band in CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors is enhanced for the formation of the most suitable traps which benefits the intense and stable OSL. These results suggest that the effective traps contributed to the LPL/OSL are complex, of which could be an aggregation formation with shallow and deep traps other than simple traps from co-doped R{sup 3+} ions. The mechanism presented in the end potentially provides explanations of why the OSL of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} exhibits different read-in/read-out performance as well. - Graphical abstract: OSL emission spectra of Ca{sub 0.995}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4}:0.0025Eu{sup 2+}, 0.0025R{sup 3+} (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) taken under varying stimulation time (0, 25, 50, 75, 100 s). Inset: Blue emission pictures under varying stimulation time. - Highlights: • The LPL and OSL properties of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} were investigated. • An alternative approach to control the trap depth of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor was proposed. • A new oxide ETM phosphor exhibiting intense and stable OSL was explored.

  20. The mechanics of manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.; Stori, J.; King, C.

    1996-10-01

    Economic pressures, particularly related to the quality of manufactured goods and `time-to-market` are forcing designers to think not only in terms of product design but also in terms of integrated product and process design, and finally in terms of deterministic manufacturing planning and control. As a result of these three high level needs, there is now an even greater need for comprehensive simulations that predict material behavior during a manufacturing process, the stresses and/or temperatures on associated tooling, and the final-product integrity. The phrase `manufacturing processes` of course covers a broad scope; it includes semiconductor manufacturing, injection molding of polymers, metal machining and precision lapping, wood and textile production, and the final assembly of piece-parts into a consumer product. It can be seen from this partial listing that the fields of fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, dynamics and tribology can all play a role. The introduction to the paper will contain a review of manufacturing processes and describe where simulations have been successfully applied, and where simulations are still lacking. The best of the simulations are those where the models accurately fit the physical phenomena, where accurate constitutive equations are available, and where boundary conditions are realistic. Thus, the body of the paper will focus on the results from one of these more successful simulations. It has been used to predict the deflections of tooling and the most appropriate operating conditions for the manufacturing process under study. A new method for manufacturing planning is described. In this method, closed form, somewhat simplified, analytical models are used to determine manufacturing planning parameters and then the results from these simpler models are refined by the fuller simulations. A case study in machining parameter selection for peripheral finish milling operations is developed.

  1. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  2. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  3. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  4. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  5. Impacts of relative permeability on CO2 phase behavior, phase distribution, and trapping mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodie, N.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.; Pan, F.

    2015-12-01

    A critical aspect of geologic carbon storage, a carbon-emissions reduction method under extensive review and testing, is effective multiphase CO2 flow and transport simulation. Relative permeability is a flow parameter particularly critical for accurate forecasting of multiphase behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The relative per­meability relationship assumed and especially the irreducible saturation of the gas phase greatly impacts predicted CO2 trapping mechanisms and long-term plume migration behavior. A primary goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of relative permeability on efficacy of regional-scale CO2 sequestration models. To accomplish this we built a 2-D vertical cross-section of the San Rafael Swell area of East-central Utah. This model simulated injection of CO2 into a brine aquifer for 30 years. The well was then shut-in and the CO2 plume behavior monitored for another 970 years. We evaluated five different relative permeability relationships to quantify their relative impacts on forecasted flow results of the model, with all other parameters maintained uniform and constant. Results of this analysis suggest that CO2 plume movement and behavior are significantly dependent on the specific relative permeability formulation assigned, including the assumed irreducible saturation values of CO2 and brine. More specifically, different relative permea­bility relationships translate to significant differences in CO2 plume behavior and corresponding trapping mechanisms.

  6. Quantum Control, Quantum Information Processing, and Quantum-Limited Metrology with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Barrett, M. D.; Ben-Kish, A.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Demarco, B.; Hume, D.; Itano, W. M.; Jensen, M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Koelemeij, J.; Langer, C.; Oskay, W.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.

    2005-12-01

    We briefly discuss recent experiments on quantum information processing using trapped ions at NIST. A central theme of this work has been to increase our capabilities in terms of quantum computing protocols, but we have also applied the same concepts to improved metrology, particularly in the area of frequency standards and atomic clocks. Such work may eventually shed light on more fundamental issues, such as the quantum measurement problem.

  7. The mechanism of radical-trapping antioxidant activity of plant-derived thiosulfinates.

    PubMed

    Lynett, Philip T; Butts, Krista; Vaidya, Vipraja; Garrett, Graham E; Pratt, Derek A

    2011-05-07

    It has long been recognized that garlic and petiveria, two plants of the Allium genus--which also includes onions, leeks and shallots--possess great medicinal value. In recent times, the biological activities of extracts of these plants have been ascribed to the antioxidant properties of the thiosulfinate secondary metabolites allicin and S-benzyl phenylmethanethiosulfinate (BPT), respectively. Herein we describe our efforts to probe the mechanism of the radical-trapping antioxidant activity of these compounds, as well as S-propyl propanethiosulfinate (PPT), a saturated analog representative of the thiosulfinates that predominate in non-medicinal alliums. Our experimental results, which include thiosulfinate-inhibited autoxidations of the polyunsaturated fatty acid (ester) methyl linoleate, investigations of their decomposition kinetics, and radical clock experiments aimed at obtaining some quantitative insights into their reactions with peroxyl radicals, indicate that the radical-trapping activity of thiosulfinates is paralleled by their propensity to undergo Cope elimination to yield a sulfenic acid. Since sulfenic acids are transient species, we complement our experimental studies with the results of theoretical calculations aimed at understanding the radical-trapping behaviour of the sulfenic acids derived from allicin, BPT and PPT, and contrasting the predicted thermodynamics and kinetics of their reactions with those of the parent thiosulfinates. The calculations reveal that sulfenic acids have among the weakest O-H bonds known (ca. 70 kcal mol(-1)), and that their reactions with peroxyl radicals take place by a near diffusion-controlled proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism. As such, it is proposed that the abundance of a thiosulfinate in a given plant species, and the ease with which it undergoes Cope elimination to form a sulfenic acid, accounts for the differences in antioxidant activity, and perhaps medicinal value, of extracts of these plants

  8. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of “dispensable” mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  9. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  10. Relevance of trapping mechanisms in certain Michigan formation stray sandstone gas reservoirs to gas storage operations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowaczewski, S.F. )

    1994-08-01

    The Stray sandstones of the Michigan Formation were early exploration targets in the Michigan basin. Subsequent to primary production, some of these reservoirs were converted to gas storage. Many of the Stray fields were discovered in an underpressured state, whereas peak storage pressures often exceed native brine gradients. It can be demonstrated that the Stray sandstones exist in sheets and lenses throughout the central basin area, and that gas/water contacts exist in the gas reservoirs but behave volumetrically. Various indirect and direct evidence indicates that gas is trapped structurally by the antiformal geometry of the sandstone bodies, by probable fracture-controlled porosity, stratigraphically by the isolation of parts of the sand bodies due to depositional and diagenetic influences, and by structurally controlled stratigraphic relationships. The understanding of the trapping mechanisms allows successful high pressure-gradient gas storage and leads to understanding reservoir behavior, which should result in efficient storage development and operation. Additional direct and secondary benefits of understanding Stray sandstone structure and stratigraphy are demonstrated for gas storage operation nuisances such as water production, and for use of the Stray as a window to or a type for deeper formations.

  11. Insect Biometrics: Optoacoustic Signal Processing and Its Applications to Remote Monitoring of McPhail Type Traps.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Ilyas; Rigakis, Iraklis; Fysarakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring traps are important components of integrated pest management applied against important fruit fly pests, including Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin) and Ceratitis capitata (Widemann), Diptera of the Tephritidae family, which effect a crop-loss/per year calculated in billions of euros worldwide. Pests can be controlled with ground pesticide sprays, the efficiency of which depends on knowing the time, location and extent of infestations as early as possible. Trap inspection is currently carried out manually, using the McPhail trap, and the mass spraying is decided based on a decision protocol. We introduce the term 'insect biometrics' in the context of entomology as a measure of a characteristic of the insect (in our case, the spectrum of its wingbeat) that allows us to identify its species and make devices to help face old enemies with modern means. We modify a McPhail type trap into becoming electronic by installing an array of photoreceptors coupled to an infrared emitter, guarding the entrance of the trap. The beating wings of insects flying in the trap intercept the light and the light fluctuation is turned to a recording. Custom-made electronics are developed that are placed as an external add-on kit, without altering the internal space of the trap. Counts from the trap are transmitted using a mobile communication network. This trap introduces a new automated remote-monitoring method different to audio and vision-based systems. We evaluate our trap in large number of insects in the laboratory by enclosing the electronic trap in insectary cages. Our experiments assess the potential of delivering reliable data that can be used to initialize reliably the spraying process at large scales but to also monitor the impact of the spraying process as it eliminates the time-lag between acquiring and delivering insect counts to a central agency.

  12. Insect Biometrics: Optoacoustic Signal Processing and Its Applications to Remote Monitoring of McPhail Type Traps

    PubMed Central

    Potamitis, Ilyas; Rigakis, Iraklis; Fysarakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring traps are important components of integrated pest management applied against important fruit fly pests, including Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin) and Ceratitis capitata (Widemann), Diptera of the Tephritidae family, which effect a crop-loss/per year calculated in billions of euros worldwide. Pests can be controlled with ground pesticide sprays, the efficiency of which depends on knowing the time, location and extent of infestations as early as possible. Trap inspection is currently carried out manually, using the McPhail trap, and the mass spraying is decided based on a decision protocol. We introduce the term ‘insect biometrics’ in the context of entomology as a measure of a characteristic of the insect (in our case, the spectrum of its wingbeat) that allows us to identify its species and make devices to help face old enemies with modern means. We modify a McPhail type trap into becoming electronic by installing an array of photoreceptors coupled to an infrared emitter, guarding the entrance of the trap. The beating wings of insects flying in the trap intercept the light and the light fluctuation is turned to a recording. Custom-made electronics are developed that are placed as an external add-on kit, without altering the internal space of the trap. Counts from the trap are transmitted using a mobile communication network. This trap introduces a new automated remote-monitoring method different to audio and vision-based systems. We evaluate our trap in large number of insects in the laboratory by enclosing the electronic trap in insectary cages. Our experiments assess the potential of delivering reliable data that can be used to initialize reliably the spraying process at large scales but to also monitor the impact of the spraying process as it eliminates the time-lag between acquiring and delivering insect counts to a central agency. PMID:26544845

  13. Investigation of charge trapping mechanism for nanocrystal-based organic nonvolatile floating gate memory devices by band structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Ki-Tae; Park, Eung-Kyu; Shin, Ha-Chul; Kim, Chung Soo; Park, Kee-Chan; Ahn, Joung-Real; Bang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the charge trapping mechanism and electrical performance of CdSe nanocrystals, such as nanoparticles and nanowires in organic floating gate memory devices. Despite of same chemical component, each nanocrystals show different electrical performances with distinct trapping mechanism. CdSe nanoparticles trap holes in the memory device; on the contrary, nanowires trap electrons. This phenomenon is mainly due to the difference of energy band structures between nanoparticles and nanowires, measured by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, we investigated the memory performance with C- V characteristics, charging and discharging phenomena, and retention time. The nanoparticle based hole trapping memory device has large memory window while the nanowire based electron trapping memory shows a narrow memory window. In spite of narrow memory window, the nanowire based memory device shows better retention performance of about 55% of the charge even after 104 sec of charging. The contrasting performance of nanoparticle and nanowire is attributed to the difference in their energy band and the morphology of thin layer in the device. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. An RNA trapping mechanism in Alphavirus mRNA promotes ribosome stalling and translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, René; Díaz-López, Irene; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ventoso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    During translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) delivers the Met-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit to locate the initiation codon (AUGi) of mRNA during the scanning process. Stress-induced eIF2 phosphorylation leads to a general blockade of translation initiation and represents a key antiviral pathway in mammals. However, some viral mRNAs can initiate translation in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2 via stable RNA stem-loop structures (DLP; Downstream LooP) located in their coding sequence (CDS), which promote 43S preinitiation complex stalling on the initiation codon. We show here that during the scanning process, DLPs of Alphavirus mRNA become trapped in ES6S region (680–914 nt) of 18S rRNA that are projected from the solvent side of 40S subunit. This trapping can lock the progress of the 40S subunit on the mRNA in a way that places the upstream initiator AUGi on the P site of 40S subunit, obviating the participation of eIF2. Notably, the DLP structure is released from 18S rRNA upon 60S ribosomal subunit joining, suggesting conformational changes in ES6Ss during the initiation process. These novel findings illustrate how viral mRNA is threaded into the 40S subunit during the scanning process, exploiting the topology of the 40S subunit solvent side to enhance its translation in vertebrate hosts. PMID:26984530

  15. Fostered Thermomagnetic Stabilities and Boosted Mechanical Reliability Related to High Trapped Field in Composite Bulk YBa2Cu3O(7-δ) Cryomagnets.

    PubMed

    Kenfaui, Driss; Sibeud, Pierre-Frédéric; Gomina, Moussa; Louradour, Eric; Chaud, Xavier; Noudem, Jacques G

    2015-08-06

    In the quest of YBa2Cu3O(7-δ) (Y123) bulk superconductors providing strong magnetic fields without failure, it is of paramount importance to achieve high thermal stabilities to safeguard the magnetic energy inside them during the trapping-field process, and sufficient mechanical reliability to withstand the stresses derived from the Lorenz force. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate a temperature rise induced by dissipative flux motion inside an Y123 thin-wall superconductor, and a significant thermal exchange in a composite bulk Y123 cryomagnet realized by embedding this superconductor with high thermal-conductivity metal network. It resulted in stimulating the maximum trapped field Bm, which reached 6.46 T on 15.9 mm-diameter single disk superconductor after magnetization by field cooling to 17 K under 7 T, leading to an improvement of 18% compared to the thin-wall superconductor. The composite cryomagnet particularly revealed the potential to trap stronger fields if larger magnetic activation is available. By virtue of the pore-free and crack-free microstructure of this cryomagnet, its strength σR was estimated to be 363 MPa, the largest one obtained so far for Y123 bulk superconductors, thus suggesting a striking mechanical reliability that seems to be sufficient to sustain stresses derived from trapped fields stronger than any values hitherto reported.

  16. Microstructure, critical current density and trapped field experiments in IG-processed Y-123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, M.; Ide, N.; Koblischka, M. R.; Diko, P.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we adapted the top-seeded infiltration growth ‘IG’ technique and produced several YBa2Cu3O y ‘Y-123’ samples with an addition of Y2BaCuO5 ‘Y-211’ secondary phase particles with varying sizes by the sintering process and the ball milling technique. For the first set of samples, Y-211 disks were sintered at temperatures ranging between 900 °C and 1100 °C and were used for the production of Y-123 material by the IG process. Magnetization measurements showed a sharp superconducting transition with an onset T c at around 92 K, irrespective of the sintering temperature. However, the trapped field and critical current density (J c) values were dependent on the sintering temperature and it was found that the best temperature is around 925 °C. Further, the trapped field distribution measurements at 77 K indicated that all samples are of single grain nature. The highest trapped field was recorded around 0.31 T at 77 K for the Y-123 sample with 20 mm in diameter and 5 mm thickness produced by Y-211 pre-from around 925 °C. On the other hand, a second set of samples Y-211 were controlled by ball milling technique combined with an optimized slow cooling process. As a result, the critical current density (J c) at 77 K and zero field was determined to be 225 kA cm-2. The improved performance of the Y-123 material can be understood in terms of homogeneous distribution of fine secondary phase particles which is demonstrated by AFM micrographs.

  17. Monitoring stored-product pests in food processing plants with pheromone trapping, contour mapping, and mark-recapture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J F; Mullen, M A; Dowdy, A K

    2002-10-01

    Distribution and movement patterns of several species of stored-product pests in a food processing plant were investigated. The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal and spatial variation in abundance of stored-product pests using pheromone traps; assess the effectiveness of trap type, location, and number on monitoring insect populations; and to evaluate the nature of pheromone trap capture hot spots by measuring patterns of insect movement. We determined that the distributions of Trogoderma variabile Ballion, Lasioderina serricorne (F.), Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) within the facility were typically clumped and that foci of high trap captures, based on visual observation of contour maps, varied among species and over time. Trap type and location influenced the number of T. variabile captured: traps on the floor and along walls captured more individuals than hanging traps and traps next to support pillars. T. variabile was the predominant insect pest at this facility and from mark-recapture studies, we found that individual beetles moved across multiple floors in the facility and from 7 to 216 m though the warehouse.

  18. Remote trap passivation in colloidal quantum dot bulk nano-heterojunctions and its effect in solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Arup K; Pelayo Garcia de Arquer, F; Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Lasanta, Tania; Bernechea, Maria; Diedenhofen, Silke L; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2014-07-16

    More-efficient charge collection and suppressed trap recombination in colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells is achieved by means of a bulk nano-heterojunction (BNH) structure, in which p-type and n-type materials are blended on the nanometer scale. The improved performance of the BNH devices, compared with that of bilayer devices, is displayed in higher photocurrents and higher open-circuit voltages (resulting from a trap passivation mechanism).

  19. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, Tissa; Trevisan, Luca; Agartan, Elif; Mori, Hiroko; Vargas-Johnson, Javier; Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  20. The control mechanism of surface traps on surface charge behavior in alumina-filled epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role surface traps play in the charge injection and transfer behavior of alumina-filled epoxy composites, surface traps with different trap levels are introduced by different surface modification methods which include dielectric barrier discharges plasma, direct fluorination, and Cr2O3 coating. The resulting surface physicochemical characteristics of experimental samples were observed using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The surface potential under dc voltage was detected and the trap level distribution was measured. The results suggest that the surface morphology of the experimental samples differs dramatically after treatment with different surface modification methods. Different surface trap distributions directly determine the charge injection and transfer property along the surface. Shallow traps with trap level of 1.03-1.11 eV and 1.06-1.13 eV introduced by plasma and fluorination modifications are conducive for charge transport along the insulating surface, and the surface potential can be modified, producing a smoother potential curve. The Cr2O3 coating can introduce a large number of deep traps with energy levels ranging from 1.09 to 1.15 eV. These can prevent charge injection through the reversed electric field formed by intensive trapped charges in the Cr2O3 coatings.

  1. Effect of pH on Fenton process using estimation of hydroxyl radical with salicylic acid as trapping reagent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Yu; Hsieh, Yung-Hsu; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Ta-Chih; Yao, Kuo-Shan

    2008-01-01

    This study estimates the yield of hydroxyl radical using salicylic acid as the trapping reagent and investigates the relationship between hydroxyl radical and pH value. The formation and variation of hydroxyl radical under different pH values were evaluated using reaction products, 2,3-DHBA, 2,5-DHBA, and catechol. The formation rate of hydroxyl radical was dependent on the ratio of ferrous ion to hydrogen peroxide and pH values. The difference between various pH values was explored. The kinetics and mechanisms of hydroxyl radical reactions were established in the Fenton process. Experimental results showed that the best reaction conditions were 8.5 mM H(2)O(2), 1.25 mM Fe(2 + ), Fe(2 + )/H(2)O(2) = 0.147 at pH 3 and the formation rate constant of hydroxyl radical was 1.12 x 10(11) M(-1) s(-1).

  2. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  3. New Insights into Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: Mechanisms of Formation and Role in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Biermann, Mona Helena; Brauner, Jan Markus; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yi; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Recent data suggest that NETosis plays a crucial role in the innate immune response and disturbs the homeostasis of the immune system. NETosis is a form of neutrophil-specific cell death characterized by the release of large web-like structures referred to as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are composed of DNA strands associated with histones and decorated with about 20 different proteins, including neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, cathepsin G, proteinase 3, high mobility group protein B1, and LL37. Reportedly, NETosis can be induced by several microbes, and particulate matter including sterile stimuli, via distinct cellular mechanisms. Meanwhile, suicidal NETosis and vital NETosis are controversial. As we enter the second decade of research on NETosis, we have partly understood NETs as double-edged swords of innate immunity. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of NETosis, its antimicrobial action, and role in autoimmune diseases, as well as the relatively new field of NET-associated mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27570525

  4. Different mechanics of snap-trapping in the two closely related carnivorous plants Dionaea muscipula and Aldrovanda vesiculosa.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Joyeux, Marc

    2011-10-01

    The carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Sol. ex J. Ellis) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Traditionally, Aldrovanda is considered as a miniature, aquatic Dionaea, an assumption which was already established by Charles Darwin. However, videos of snapping traps from both species suggest completely different closure mechanisms. Indeed, the well-described snapping mechanism in Dionaea comprises abrupt curvature inversion of the two trap lobes, while the closing movement in Aldrovanda involves deformation of the trap midrib but not of the lobes, which do not change curvature. In this paper, we present detailed mechanical models for these plants, which are based on the theory of thin solid membranes and explain this difference by showing that the fast snapping of Aldrovanda is due to kinematic amplification of the bending deformation of the midrib, while that of Dionaea unambiguously relies on the buckling instability that affects the two lobes.

  5. Different mechanics of snap-trapping in the two closely related carnivorous plants Dionaea muscipula and Aldrovanda vesiculosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, Simon; Joyeux, Marc

    2011-10-01

    The carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Sol. ex J. Ellis) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Traditionally, Aldrovanda is considered as a miniature, aquatic Dionaea, an assumption which was already established by Charles Darwin. However, videos of snapping traps from both species suggest completely different closure mechanisms. Indeed, the well-described snapping mechanism in Dionaea comprises abrupt curvature inversion of the two trap lobes, while the closing movement in Aldrovanda involves deformation of the trap midrib but not of the lobes, which do not change curvature. In this paper, we present detailed mechanical models for these plants, which are based on the theory of thin solid membranes and explain this difference by showing that the fast snapping of Aldrovanda is due to kinematic amplification of the bending deformation of the midrib, while that of Dionaea unambiguously relies on the buckling instability that affects the two lobes.

  6. Collisional and Radiative Processes in Adiabatic Deceleration, Deflection, and Off-Axis Trapping of a Rydberg Atom Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, Ch.; Hogan, S. D.; Schmutz, H.; Agner, J. A.; Merkt, F.

    2011-02-18

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90 deg., decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25 {mu}s, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed.

  7. The use of optical trap and microbeam to investigate the mechanical and transport characteristics of tunneling nanotubes in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Patheja, Pooja; Dasgupta, Raktim; Dube, Alok; Ahlawat, Sunita; Verma, Ravi Shanker; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The use of optical trap and microbeam for investigating mechanical and transport properties of inter cellular tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) in tumor spheroids has been demonstrated. TnTs in tumor spheroids have been visualized by manipulating TnT connected cells using optical tweezers. Functionality of the TnTs for transferring cytoplasmic vesicles and injected dye molecules by optoporation method has been studied. Further, the TnTs could be longitudinally stretched by manipulating the connected cells and their elastic response was studied. Manipulation of cells at the surface of tumor spheroid using optical tweezers and injection of fluorescent dye into a trapped cell using optoporation technique.

  8. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-09

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process.

  9. Characterisation of FOGs in grease trap waste from the processing of chickens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nitayapat, Nuttakan; Chitprasert, Pakamon

    2014-06-01

    Industrial firms that kill and process chickens generate wastewater that contains fat, oil, and grease (FOG). The FOGs are located in the fatty waste that is collected by floatation in grease traps. Chemical and physical characterisation of FOGs would provide useful information that would help in the development of methods designed to decrease the extent of pollution caused by disposal of the waste and to utilise commercially some of its lipid constituents. Employing these methods would enhance the profitability and competitive potential of these commercial organisations. Samples of grease trap waste from 14 firms in central Thailand have been examined. Due to the very different schemes of waste management employed by these firms, the physical appearance of their fatty wastes showed considerable variation. The chemical and physical properties of the FOGs present in these wastes showed considerable variation also. Large amounts of free fatty acids (10-70% as oleic acid) were detected in most of the 14 wastes and palmitic, cis-9-oleic, cis,cis-9,12-linoleic, stearic, and palmitoleic acids were the predominant species of free and esterified acids. Most of the FOGs were solid at temperatures below 40 °C. Many of them contained traces of heavy metals (Cu and Pb) and some contained traces of the pesticides dimethoate and cypermethrin. The content of these potentially hazardous substances would have to be considered very carefully before discarding the fatty wastes and during the development of methods designed to isolate their potentially profitable lipid constituents.

  10. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  11. Printed light-trapping nanorelief Cu electrodes for full-solution-processed flexible organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Zhang, Yaokang; Zhen, Hongyu; Niu, Liyong; Fang, Xu; Liu, Zhike; Yan, Feng; Shen, Weidong; Li, Haifeng; Zheng, Zijian

    2016-07-01

    Light-trapping nanorelief metal electrodes have been proven to be an effective approach to improve the absorption performance of flexible organic solar cells (FOSCs). These nanorelief electrodes have been made by conventional vacuum deposition techniques, which are difficult to integrate with roll-to-roll fabrication processes. To address this challenge, this paper reports, for the first time, the fabrication of highly conductive nanorelief Cu electrodes on the flexible substrates through solution printing and polymer-assisted metal deposition at room temperature in the air. FOSCs made with these printed nanorelief Cu electrodes possess not only much improved power conversion efficiency, by 13.5%, but also significant enhancement in flexibility when compared with those made with flat Cu electrodes. Because of the low material and fabrication cost, these printed nanorelief Cu electrodes show great promise in roll-to-roll fabrication of FOSCs in the future.

  12. An extracellular matrix-based mechanism of rapid neutrophil extracellular trap formation in response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Angel S; O'Brien, Xian M; Johnson, Courtney M; Lavigne, Liz M; Reichner, Jonathan S

    2013-04-15

    The armament of neutrophil-mediated host defense against pathogens includes the extrusion of a lattice of DNA and microbicidal enzymes known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The receptor/ligand interactions and intracellular signaling mechanisms responsible for elaborating NETs were determined for the response to Candida albicans. Because the host response of extravasated neutrophils to mycotic infections within tissues necessitates contact with extracellular matrix, this study also identified a novel and significant regulatory role for the ubiquitous matrix component fibronectin (Fn) in NET release. We report that recognition of purified fungal pathogen-associated molecular pattern β-glucan by human neutrophils causes rapid (≤ 30 min) homotypic aggregation and NET release by a mechanism that requires Fn. Alone, immobilized β-glucan induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production but not NET release, whereas in the context of Fn, ROS production is suppressed and NETs are extruded. NET release to Fn with β-glucan is robust, accounting for 17.2 ± 3.4% of total DNA in the cell population. Release is dependent on β-glucan recognition by complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18), but not Dectin-1, or ROS. The process of NET release included filling of intracellular vesicles with nuclear material that was eventually extruded. We identify a role for ERK in homotypic aggregation and NET release. NET formation to C. albicans hyphae was also found to depend on β-glucan recognition by complement receptor 3, require Fn and ERK but not ROS, and result in hyphal destruction. We report a new regulatory mechanism of NETosis in which the extracellular matrix is a key component of the rapid antifungal response.

  13. [Probing the mechanism and Ca-DPA concentration of individual Bacillus spores using trapping and Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xi; Huang, Rong-shao; Lai, Jun-zhuo; Xu, Lan-lan; Li, Yong-qing; Li, Zhen-chong; Huang, Shu-shi

    2010-08-01

    Measuring the levels of 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (DPA) in bacteria spores could provide the information about the DPA function, resistance mechanism and the mechanism of spore germination. The authors have measured levels of Ca-DPA of individual spores of different 19 kinds of Bacillus which from different sources, species, and strains by using laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). Also we have verified the reproducibility of the system simultaneously. To investigate the biochemical components and structure in single spore, a Raman tweezers setup was used to record the Raman spectrum of single spore. A NIR laser beam (30 mW, 785 nm) was introduced into an inverted microscope to form a tweezers for trapping the spore suspended in water, and the Raman scatter was excited by the same beam. Raman spectra of 30 spores of 19 bacillus strains which collected from different area in China were recorded, and 100 spores of B. subtilis ACCC10243 were measured. A spore of the same strain was probed 100 times for verifying the reproducibility of the LTRS system. A Matlab 7.0 edited program and Origin 8.0 were used to process the spectral data. Because Ca-DPA is the chelate of DPA and the calcium ion, and the strongest Raman bands at 1 017 cm(-1) was from Ca-DPA component of the spore, its intensity was linearly with the Ca-DPA concentration. Therefore, the 1017 cm(-1) bands of Ca-DPA could be used as the quantitative standard peak, and then calculated the concentration of Ca-DPA could be calculated according the intensity of 1017 cm(-1) peak. The results showed that Raman spectra of single spore can reflect the characteristics information of it. The diversity of Ca-DPA levels not only happened between different species and strains of bacillus, but also happened between different individual spores in the same strains of bacillus. Conclusion from these measurements is that there is heterogeneity in different individual spores. It is convenient to trapping and collecting

  14. A Native Ternary Complex Trapped in a Crystal Reveals the Catalytic Mechanism of a Retaining Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Mendoza, Fernanda; Rodrigo-Unzueta, Ane; Gomollón-Bel, Fernando; Cifuente, Javier O; Urresti, Saioa; Comino, Natalia; Gómez, Hansel; Romero-García, Javier; Lluch, José M; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Merino, Pedro; Masgrau, Laura; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-08-17

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) comprise a prominent family of enzymes that play critical roles in a variety of cellular processes, including cell signaling, cell development, and host-pathogen interactions. Glycosyl transfer can proceed with either inversion or retention of the anomeric configuration with respect to the reaction substrates and products. The elucidation of the catalytic mechanism of retaining GTs remains a major challenge. A native ternary complex of a GT in a productive mode for catalysis is reported, that of the retaining glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase GpgS from M. tuberculosis in the presence of the sugar donor UDP-Glc, the acceptor substrate phosphoglycerate, and the divalent cation cofactor. Through a combination of structural, chemical, enzymatic, molecular dynamics, and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, the catalytic mechanism was unraveled, thereby providing a strong experimental support for a front-side substrate-assisted SN i-type reaction.

  15. Steam Trap Users’ Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    traps do not work well in a system where the condensate can back against the operating mechanism of the trap and open it when there is no condensate flow ...a flow through the trap. h. Float and thermostatic traps are widely used in low pressure heating 0 systems . If they are properly installed below the... system or trap problem. * Blowdown strainer. SOUND CHECK HOT TRAPS: • Listen to trap operate. * Check for continuous flow : - low pitch condensate flow

  16. Threat processing: models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Dorothée; Schiller, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The experience of fear is closely linked to the survival of species. Fear can be conceptualized as a brain state that orchestrates defense reactions to threats. To avoid harm, an organism must be equipped with neural circuits that allow learning, detecting, and rapidly responding to threats. Past experience with threat can transform neutral stimuli present at the time of experience into learned threat-related stimuli via associative learning. Pavlovian threat conditioning is the central experimental paradigm to study associative learning. Once learned, these stimulus-response associations are not always expressed depending on context or new experiences with the conditioned stimuli. Neural circuits mediating threat learning have the inherent plasticity to adapt to changing environmental threats. Encounters devoid of danger pave the way for extinction or reconsolidation to occur. Extinction and reconsolidation can both lead to changes in the expression of threat-induced defense responses, but differ in stability and have a different neural basis. This review presents the behavioral models and the system-level neural mechanisms in animals and humans of threat learning and modulation.

  17. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a commercial mechanical trap to reduce abundance of adult nuisance mosquito populations.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael J; Gow, Jennifer L; Evelyn, Michelle J; McMahon, T J Scott; Howay, Tim J; Campbell, Harlan; Blancard, Jennifer; Thielman, Aynsley

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we explore the potential of a commercially available mechanical mosquito control device, the Liberty Plus Mosquito Magnet (hereafter referred to as Mosquito Magnet), to reduce the abundance of adult nuisance mosquito populations in public recreational areas. Mosquitoes were trapped on 2 replicate sites close to a campground at Brae Island Regional Park near Fort Langley, British Columbia, Canada. Each site comprised a treatment (Mosquito Magnets used) and control subsection (Mosquito Magnets not used). Mosquito numbers were assessed before and after the treatment period in both subsections at each site with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) black light traps. Although nearly 200,000 mosquitoes from 14 different species were collected over 366 trap-nights from May 31 to July 31, 2008, the majority of those identified were Aedes sticticus (68%) and Ae. vexans (22%)-2 of the most notorious nuisance mosquito species in British Columbia. The number of mosquitoes captured by CDC black light traps increased overall during the study period due to natural seasonal variation. Nevertheless, a significant treatment effect (P = 0.0389) was associated with an average decrease of about 32% in the average number of adult mosquitoes collected per day. These results strongly suggest that Mosquito Magnets can reduce the abundance of nuisance mosquitoes, potentially reducing the biting pressure on the public, and providing another tool in mosquito control operations.

  18. Switching mechanism transition induced by annealing treatment in nonvolatile Cu/ZnO/Cu/ZnO/Pt resistive memory: From carrier trapping/detrapping to electrochemical metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. C.; Pan, F.; Zeng, F.; Liu, M.

    2009-12-01

    ZnO/Cu/ZnO trilayer films sandwiched between Cu and Pt electrodes were prepared for nonvolatile resistive memory applications. These structures show resistance switching under electrical bias both before and after a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, while it is found that the resistive switching effects in the two cases exhibit distinct characteristics. Compared with the as-fabricated device, the memory cell after RTA demonstrates remarkable device parameter improvements including lower threshold voltages, lower write current, and higher Roff/Ron ratio. A high-voltage forming process is avoided in the annealed device as well. Furthermore, the RTA treatment has triggered a switching mechanism transition from a carrier trapping/detrapping type to an electrochemical-redox-reaction-controlled conductive filament formation/rupture process, as indicated by different features in current-voltage characteristics. Both scanning electron microscopy observations and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles reveal that the Cu charge trapping layer in ZnO/Cu/ZnO disperses uniformly into the storage medium after RTA, while x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrate that the Cu atoms have lost electrons to become Cu2+ ions after dispersion. The above experimental facts indicate that the altered status of Cu in the ZnO/Cu/ZnO trilayer films during RTA treatment should be responsible for the switching mechanism transition. This study is envisioned to open the door for understanding the interrelation between different mechanisms that currently exist in the field of resistive memories.

  19. Differential clearance mechanisms, neutrophil extracellular trap degradation and phagocytosis, are operative in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with distinct autoantibody specificities.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Richa; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are generally presented with autoantibodies against either dsDNA or RNA-associated antigens (also known as extractable nuclear antigens, ENA) or both. However, the mechanisms and processes that lead to this distinctive autoantibody profile are not well understood. Defects in clearance mechanism i.e. phagocytosis may lead to enhanced microbial and cellular debris of immunogenic potential. In addition to defective phagocytosis, impaired neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation has been recently reported in SLE patients. However, the extent to which both these clearance processes (NET-degradation and phagocytosis) are operative in serologically distinguished subsets of SLE patients is not established. Therefore, in this report, we evaluated NET-degradation and phagocytosis efficiency among SLE patients with different autoantibody specificities. SLE patients were classified into three subsets based on their autoantibody profile (anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA or both) as determined by ELISA. NET-degradation by SLE and control sera was assessed by sytox orange-based fluorescence assay. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis in the presence of SLE and control sera was determined by flowcytometry. The segregation of SLE patients revealed significant differences in NET-degradation and phagocytosis in SLE patients with autoantibodies against dsDNA and ENA. We report that NET-degradation efficiency was significantly impaired in SLE patients with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies and not in those with anti-ENA autoantibodies. In contrast to NET-degradation, neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis was impaired in all three subsets independent of autoantibody specificity. These observations suggest that varying clearance mechanisms are operative in SLE subsets with anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA autoantibodies. The results outlined in this manuscript also suggest that sub-grouping of SLE patients could be useful in delineating the molecular and pathological

  20. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21829.001 PMID:27935481

  1. Plasmon-Based Optical Trapping of Polymer Nano-Spheres as Explored by Confocal Fluorescence Microspectroscopy: A Possible Mechanism of a Resonant Excitation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Ishihara, Hajime; Kitamura, Noboru; Takase, Mai; Murakoshi, Kei; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki

    2012-09-01

    In optical trapping using photon force much enhanced by localized surface plasmon (LSP) in solution, we found that a resonant excitation effect can further enhance photon force. In this LSP-based optical trapping under a resonant excitation condition, an incident laser beam excites both LSP and electronic resonant transition of a target object simultaneously. Fluorescence microspectroscopy clearly showed that nanospheres under the resonant condition were much more efficiently trapped as compared to that under a non-resonant condition. The resonant LSP-based trapping mechanism was further reinforced by theoretical calculations taking the resonant excitation effect into account. Such resonant LSP-based trapping methodology will provide a novel approach for efficient trapping of small molecules.

  2. Random walk theory of a trap-controlled hopping transport process

    PubMed Central

    Scher, H.; Wu, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    A random walk theory of hopping motion in the presence of a periodic distribution of traps is presented. The solution of the continuous-time random walk equations is exact and valid for arbitrary intersite interactions and trap concentration. The treatment is shown to be equivalent to an exact solution of the master equation for this trapping problem. These interactions can be a general function of electric field and are not restricted to nearest neighbors. In particular, with the inclusion of trap-to-trap interactions, as well as trap-to-host interactions, an exact treatment of the change from one hopping channel to another has been obtained. The trap-modulated propagator has been derived in terms of a type of Green's function that is introduced. The results are specialized to spatial moments of the propagator, from which expressions for the drift velocity and diffusion coefficient are obtained. Numerical results for the drift velocity are presented and shown to account for the change in hopping channels in recent transport measurements in mixed molecularly doped polymers. PMID:16592944

  3. Opto-Mechanical and Electronic Design of a Tunnel-Trap Si Radiometer.

    PubMed

    Eppeldauer, G P; Lynch, D C

    2000-01-01

    A transmission-type light-trap silicon radiometer has been developed to hold the NIST spectral power and irradiance responsivity scales between 406 nm and 920 nm. The device is built from replaceable input apertures and tightly packed different-size silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are positioned in a triangular shape tunnel such that beam clipping is entirely eliminated within an 8 field-of-view (FOV). A light trap is attached to the output of the radiometer to collect the transmitted radiation and to minimize the effect of ambient light. The photodiodes, selected for equal shunt resistance, are connected in parallel. The capacitance and the resultant shunt resistance of the device were measured and frequency compensations were applied in the feedback network of the photocurrent-to-voltage converter to optimize signal-, voltage-, and loop-gain characteristics. The trap radiometer can measure either dc or ac optical radiation with high sensitivity. The noise-equivalent-power of the optimized device is 47 fW in dc mode and 5.2 fW at 10 Hz chopping. The relative deviation from the cosine responsivity in irradiance mode was measured to be equal to or less than 0.02 % within 5° FOV and 0.05 % at 8° FOV. The trap-radiometer can transfer irradiance responsivities with uncertainties comparable to those of primary standard radiometers. Illuminance and irradiance meters, holding the SI units (candela, color- and radiance-temperature), will be calibrated directly against the transfer standard trap-radiometer to obtain improved accuracy in the base-units.

  4. Quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology using trapped ions at NIST.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, David

    2007-03-01

    With the use of atomic ions confined in a multi-zone array, we implement simple quantum algorithms and study the problems in scaling such a device to tens of qubits [1]. Current work is devoted to better control of classical parameters such as laser intensity, suppression of heating from ambient fluctuating electric fields, and studying limitations caused by more fundamental sources of decoherence, such as spontaneous emission. Along with other groups, we are studying ways to increase the number of trap zones; in particular, we concentrate on a surface-electrode multi-zone geometry. Although a general purpose quantum computer appears to be a distant goal, simple applications of quantum information processing methods enable new techniques for spectroscopy and efficient quantum detection. [1] Current research in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. Amini, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, K. Brown, R. J. Epstein, D. B. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, T. Rosenband, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. H. Wesenberg.

  5. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  6. Trapped antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  7. Processing and Mechanical Characterization of Polyurea Aerogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    PROCESSING AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYUREA AEROGELS by JARED MICHAEL LOEBS A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of...SUBTITLE Processing and Mechanical Characterization of Polyurea Aerogels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The use of aerogels historically has been limited to extreme cases largely in part to the nature

  8. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2007-04-15

    We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the 'almost isolated' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons.

  9. Mechanism-based strategies for trapping and crystallizing complexes of RNA-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Guelorget, Amandine; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2011-03-09

    Posttranscriptional chemical modifications of RNA are maturation steps necessary for their correct functioning in translation during protein synthesis. Various structures of RNA-modifying enzymes complexed with RNA fragments or full-length tRNA have been obtained, mimicking several stages along the catalytic cycle such as initial RNA binding, covalent intermediate formation, or RNA-product binding. We summarize here the strategies that have been used to trap and crystallize these stable complexes. Absence of the cosubstrate transferring the chemical group leads to the Michaelis complex, whereas use of a cosubstrate analog to a ternary complex. 5-fluoro-pyrimidine-containing mini RNAs have been used as a general means to trap RNA m(5)U methyltransferase covalent complexes and RNA product/pseudouridine synthase complexes. Altogether, these structures have brought key information about enzyme/RNA recognition and highlighted the details of several catalytic steps of the reactions.

  10. Influence of interlayer trapping and detrapping mechanisms on the electrical characterization of hafnium oxide/silicon nitride stacks on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H.; Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Gomez, A.; Bailon, L.; Toledano-Luque, M.; Prado, A. del; Martil, I.; Gonzalez-Diaz, G.

    2008-11-01

    Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors have been studied by electrical characterization. Films of silicon nitride were directly grown on n-type silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance assisted chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride thickness was varied from 3 to 6.6 nm. Afterwards, 12 nm thick hafnium oxide films were deposited by the high-pressure sputtering approach. Interface quality was determined by using current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), conductance transients, and flatband voltage transient techniques. Leakage currents followed the Poole-Frenkel emission model in all cases. According to the simultaneous measurement of the high and low frequency capacitance voltage curves, the interface trap density obtained for all the samples is in the 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range. However, a significant increase in this density of about two orders of magnitude was obtained by DLTS for the thinnest silicon nitride interfacial layers. In this work we probe that this increase is an artifact that must be attributed to traps existing at the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface. These traps are more easily charged or discharged as this interface comes near to the substrate, that is, as thinner the SiN{sub x}:H interface layer is. The trapping/detrapping mechanism increases the capacitance transient and, in consequence, the DLTS measurements have contributions not only from the insulator/substrate interface but also from the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface.

  11. Light-bias coupling erase process for non-volatile zinc tin oxide TFT memory with a nickel nanocrystals charge trap layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Liu, Li-Chih; Ke, Po-Hsien; Chen, Jen-Sue; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2016-03-01

    A nonvolatile charge trapping memory is demonstrated on a thin film transistor (TFT) using a solution processed ultra-thin (~7 nm) zinc tin oxide (ZTO) semiconductor layer with an Al2O3/Ni-nanocrystals (NCs)/SiO2 dielectric stack. A positive threshold voltage (V TH) shift of 7 V is achieved at gate programming voltage of 40 V for 1 s but the state will not be erased by applying negative gate voltage. However, the programmed V TH shift can be expediently erased by applying a gate voltage of  -10 V in conjunction with visible light illumination for 1 s. It is found that the sub-threshold swing (SS) deteriorates slightly under light illumination, indicating that photo-ionized oxygen vacancies (V\\text{o}+ and/or V\\text{o}++ ) are trapped at the interface between Al2O3 and ZTO, which assists the capture of electrons discharged from the Ni NCs charge trapping layer. The light-bias coupling action and the role of ultra-thin ZTO thickness are discussed to elucidate the efficient erasing mechanism.

  12. Dissolving, trapping and detrapping mechanisms of hydrogen in bcc and fcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xue-Bang; Xu, Yi-Chun; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.; Liu, C. S.; Pan, B. C.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2013-01-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the dissolving, trapping and detrapping of H in six bcc (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W) and six fcc (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au) metals. We find that the zero-point vibrations do not change the site-preference order of H at interstitial sites in these metals except Pt. One vacancy could trap a maximum of 4 H atoms in Au and Pt, 6 H atoms in V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag, and 12 H atoms in Mo and W. The zero-point vibrations never change the maximum number of H atoms trapped in a single vacancy in these metals. By calculating the formation energy of vacancy-H (Vac-Hn) complex, the superabundant vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni is demonstrated to be much more easily formed than in the other metals, which has been found in many metals including Pd, Ni and Nb experimentally. Besides, we find that it is most energetically favorable to form Vac-H1 complex in Pt, Cu, Ag and Au, Vac-H4 in Cr, Mo and W, and Vac-H6 in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni. At last, we examine the detrapping behaviors of H atoms in a single vacancy and find that with the heating rate of 10 K/min a vacancy could accommodate 4, 5 and 6 H atoms in Cr, Mo and W at room temperature, respectively. The detrapping temperatures of all H atoms in a single vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag are below room temperature.

  13. Transient processes under dynamic excitation of a coherent population trapping resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khripunov, S. A.; Radnatarov, D. A.; Kobtsev, S. M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu; Balabas, M. V.; Andryushkov, V. A.; Popkov, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown for the first time that under dynamic excitation of a coherent population trapping resonance in Rb vapours at different bichromatic pump modulation frequencies from a few tens of hertz and higher, the resonance is dramatically deformed as a result of emerging intensity oscillations of radiation transmitted through an Rb vapour cell. A significant change in the shape of the resonance under its dynamic excitation is confirmed experimentally and theoretically. A possible impact of the identified changes in the shape of the coherent population trapping resonance on the stability of an atomic clock is qualitatively discussed.

  14. Constraints on Transport and Emplacement Mechanisms of Labile Fractions in Lunar Cold Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D.; Gertsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining the scientific exploration of the Solar System will require a significant proportion of the necessary fuels and propellants, as well as other bulk commodities, to be produced from local raw materials [1]. The viability of mineral production depends on the ability to locate and characterize mineable deposits of the necessary feedstocks. This requires, among other things, a workable understanding of the mechanisms by which such deposits form, which is the subject of Economic Geology. Multiple deposition scenarios are possible for labile materials on the Moon. This paper suggests labile fractions moved diffusely through space; deposits may grow richer with depth until low porosity rock; lateral transport is likely to have occurred with the regolith, at least for short distances; crystalline ice may not exist; the constituent phases could be extremely complex. At present we can constrain the sources only mildly; once on the Moon, the transport mechanisms inherently mix and therefore obscure the origins. However, the importance of expanding our understanding of ore-forming processes on the Moon behooves us to make the attempt. Thus begins a time of new inquiry for Economic Geology.

  15. Charge-trap non-volatile memories fabricated by laser-enabled low-thermal budget processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shieh, Jia-Min; Pan, Fu-Ming; Yang, Chih-Chao; Shen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Hsing-Hsiang; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Wu, Ssu-Yu; Wu, Meng-Chyi

    2015-11-01

    We fabricated charge-trap non-volatile memories (NVMs) using low thermal budget processes, including laser-crystallization of poly-Si thin film, chemical vapor deposition deposition of a stacked memory layer, and far-infrared-laser dopant activation. The thin poly-Si channel has a low defect-density at the interface with the bulk, resulting in a steep subthreshold swing for the NVM transistors. The introduction of the stacked SiO2/AlOxNy tunnel layer and the SiNx charge-trap layer with a gradient bandgap leads to reliable retention and endurance at low voltage for the NVMs. The low thermal budget processes are desirable for the integration of the nano-scaled NVMs into system on panels.

  16. Effect of ion-neutral collision mechanism on the trapped-ion equation of motion: a new mass spectral line shape for high-mass trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Li, Guo-Zhong; Marshall, Alan G.

    1997-11-01

    The decay amplitude envelope of an ICR time-domain signal determines its corresponding Fourier transform mass spectral line shape. The commonly accepted FT-ICR frequency-domain unapodized Lorentzian spectral line shape originates from the Langevin ion-neutral collision model, in which an ion is treated as a point charge that induces an electric dipole moment in a neutral collision partner. The Langevin model provides a good description of reactions of low-energy collisions of low-mass positive ions with neutrals. However, the Langevin model is inappropriate for collisions of high-mass gas-phase biopolymer ions with low-mass neutrals. Here, we examine ion trajectories for both Langevin and hard-sphere ion-neutral collision models. For the Langevin model, collision frequency is independent of ion speed, leading to a linear differential equation of ion motion with a frictional damping term linearly proportional to ion velocity. For the hard-sphere model, collision frequency is proportional to ion speed and the frictional damping term is proportional to the square of ion velocity. We show that the resulting (non-linear) equation of ion motion leads to a non-exponential time-domain ICR signal whose amplitude envelope has the form, 1/(1 + [sigma]t), in which [sigma] is a constant. Dispersion-vs-absorption (DISPA) line shape analysis reveals that the `hard-sphere' spectral line shape resembles that of overlaid narrow and broad Lorentzians. We discuss several important implications of the new `hard-sphere' line shape for ICR spectral analysis, ICR signal processing, collision-based ion activation, and ion axialization. Finally, in the hard-sphere limit, a non-linear frictional damping term will also apply to ions in a Paul trap.

  17. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement.

  18. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement. PMID:27453496

  19. Toxicologically Relevant Aldehydes Produced during the Frying Process Are Trapped by Food Phenolics.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Aguilar, Isabel; Granvogl, Michael; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2016-07-13

    The lipid-derived carbonyl trapping ability of phenolic compounds under common food processing conditions was studied by determining the presence of carbonyl-phenol adducts in both onions fried in the laboratory and commercially crispy fried onions. Four carbonyl-phenol adducts produced between quercetin and acrolein, crotonaldehyde, or (E)-2-pentenal were prepared and characterized by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS). The synthesized compounds were 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,8-trihydroxy-9,10-dihydro-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (4), 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,8-trihydroxy-10-methyl-9,10-dihydro-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (5), 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5-dihydroxy-8-methyl-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (9), and 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-8-ethyl-3,5-dihydroxy-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (10). When onions were fried in fresh rapeseed oil spiked with acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and (E)-2-pentenal (2.7 μmol/g of oil), adduct 10 was the major compound produced, and trace amounts of adducts 4 and 5, but not of adduct 9, were also detected. In contrast, compound 4 was the major adduct present in commercially crispy fried onions. Compound 10 was also present to a lower extent, and trace amounts of compound 5, but not of compound 9, were also detected. These data suggested that lipid-derived carbonyl-phenol adducts are formed in food products under standard cooking conditions. They also pointed to a possible protective role of food polyphenols, which might contribute to the removal of toxicologically relevant aldehydes produced during deep-frying, assuming that the formed products are stable during food consumption in the human organism.

  20. Electrical trapping mechanism of single-microparticles in a pore sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Akihide; Tsutsui, Makusu; He, Yuhui; Ryuzaki, Sou; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-11-01

    Nanopore sensing via resistive pulse technique are utilized as a potent tool to characterize physical and chemical property of single -molecules and -particles. In this article, we studied the influence of particle trajectory to the ionic conductance through a pore. We performed the optical/electrical simultaneous sensing of electrophoretic capture dynamics of single-particles at a pore using a microchannel/nanopore system. We detected ionic current drops synchronous to a fluorescently dyed particle being electrophoretically drawn and become immobilized at a pore in the optical imaging. We also identified anomalous trapping events wherein particles were captured at nanoscale pin-holes formed unintentionally in a SiN membrane that gave rise to relatively small current drops. This method is expected to be a useful platform for testing novel nanopore sensor design wherein current behaves in unpredictable manner.

  1. Antioxidants, mechanisms, and recovery by membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Laurent; Doyen, Alain

    2017-03-04

    Antioxidants molecules have a great interest for bio-food and nutraceutical industries since they play a vital role for their capacity to reduce oxidative processes. Consequently, these molecules, generally present in complex matrices, have to be fractionated and purified to characterize them and to test their antioxidant activity. However, as natural or synthetics antioxidant molecules differ in terms of structural composition and physico-chemical properties, appropriate separation technologies must be selected. Different fractionation technologies are available but the most commonly used are filtration processes. Indeed, these technologies allow fractionation according to molecular size (pressure-driven processes), charge, or both size and charge (electrically driven processes). In this context, and after summarizing the reaction mechanisms of the different classes and nature of antioxidants as well as membrane fractionation technologies, this manuscript presents the specific applications of these membranes processes for the recovery of antioxidant molecules.

  2. Versatile microwave-driven trapped ion spin system for quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Piltz, Christian; Sriarunothai, Theeraphot; Ivanov, Svetoslav S; Wölk, Sabine; Wunderlich, Christof

    2016-07-01

    Using trapped atomic ions, we demonstrate a tailored and versatile effective spin system suitable for quantum simulations and universal quantum computation. By simply applying microwave pulses, selected spins can be decoupled from the remaining system and, thus, can serve as a quantum memory, while simultaneously, other coupled spins perform conditional quantum dynamics. Also, microwave pulses can change the sign of spin-spin couplings, as well as their effective strength, even during the course of a quantum algorithm. Taking advantage of the simultaneous long-range coupling between three spins, a coherent quantum Fourier transform-an essential building block for many quantum algorithms-is efficiently realized. This approach, which is based on microwave-driven trapped ions and is complementary to laser-based methods, opens a new route to overcoming technical and physical challenges in the quest for a quantum simulator and a quantum computer.

  3. Versatile microwave-driven trapped ion spin system for quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Piltz, Christian; Sriarunothai, Theeraphot; Ivanov, Svetoslav S.; Wölk, Sabine; Wunderlich, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Using trapped atomic ions, we demonstrate a tailored and versatile effective spin system suitable for quantum simulations and universal quantum computation. By simply applying microwave pulses, selected spins can be decoupled from the remaining system and, thus, can serve as a quantum memory, while simultaneously, other coupled spins perform conditional quantum dynamics. Also, microwave pulses can change the sign of spin-spin couplings, as well as their effective strength, even during the course of a quantum algorithm. Taking advantage of the simultaneous long-range coupling between three spins, a coherent quantum Fourier transform—an essential building block for many quantum algorithms—is efficiently realized. This approach, which is based on microwave-driven trapped ions and is complementary to laser-based methods, opens a new route to overcoming technical and physical challenges in the quest for a quantum simulator and a quantum computer. PMID:27419233

  4. Initial process of photoluminescence dynamics of self-trapped excitons in a β -Ga2O3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Suguru; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of self-trapped excitons (STEs) in a β -Ga2O3 single crystal from the viewpoint of the transition process from the free exciton to the STE. We succeed in measuring the PL rise time (˜24 ps) at 8 K corresponding to the tunneling time through the barrier between the free exciton and STE states in the adiabatic potential. From the analysis of the PL rise time of the STE based on perturbation theory for the tunneling time considering exciton-phonon interactions, we obtain the following results. Acoustic phonons near the Brillouin zone center contribute to the tunneling process. This suggests that the wave function of the STE is still spatially extended at the final state in the tunneling process. Furthermore, we investigate temperature dependence of the PL rise time of the STE. It is found that the PL rise time decreases with increasing temperature. The PL rise times in the temperature range from 8 to 100 K can be quantitatively explained by an adiabatic theory for the tunneling process. Consequently, the self-trapping process is dominated by the tunneling process at low temperatures.

  5. A high-speed vertical optical trap for the mechanical testing of living cells at piconewton forces

    SciTech Connect

    Bodensiek, Kai Li, Weixing; Sánchez, Paula; Nawaz, Schanila; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-11-15

    Although atomic force microscopy is often the method of choice to probe the mechanical response of (sub)micrometer sized biomaterials, the lowest force that can be reliably controlled is limited to ≈0.1 nN. For soft biological samples, like cells, such forces can already lead to a strain large enough to enter the non-elastic deformation regime. To be able to investigate the response of single cells at lower forces we developed a vertical optical trap. The force can be controlled down to single piconewtons and most of the advantages of atomic force microscopy are maintained, such as the symmetrical application of forces at a wide range of loading rates. Typical consequences of moving the focus in the vertical direction, like the interferometric effect between the bead and the coverslip and a shift of focus, were quantified and found to have negligible effects on our measurements. With a fast responding force feedback loop we can achieve deformation rates as high as 50 μm/s, which allow the investigation of the elastic and viscous components of very soft samples. The potential of the vertical optical trap is demonstrated by measuring the linearity of the response of single cells at very low forces and a high bandwidth of deformation rates.

  6. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results from airfoils in the Mach number, Reynolds number, or reduced frequency ranges typical of helicopter rotor blades have identified the most influential flow mechanisms in the dynamic stall process. The importance of secondary shed vortices, downstream wake action, and the flow in the separated region is generally acknowledged but poorly understood. By means of surface pressure cross-correlations and flow field measurements in static stall, several new hypotheses have been generated. It is proposed that vortex shedding may be caused by acoustic disturbances propagating forward in the lower (pressure) surface boundary layer, that wake closure is a misnomer, and that the shed vortex leaves a trail of vorticity that forms a turbulent free shear layer. The known dynamic stall flow mechanisms are reviewed and the potential importance of recently proposed and hypothetical flow phenomena with respect to helicopter blade aeroelastic response are assessed.

  7. Mechanism on brain information processing: Energy coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rubin; Zhang, Zhikang; Jiao, Xianfa

    2006-09-01

    According to the experimental result of signal transmission and neuronal energetic demands being tightly coupled to information coding in the cerebral cortex, the authors present a brand new scientific theory that offers a unique mechanism for brain information processing. They demonstrate that the neural coding produced by the activity of the brain is well described by the theory of energy coding. Due to the energy coding model's ability to reveal mechanisms of brain information processing based upon known biophysical properties, they cannot only reproduce various experimental results of neuroelectrophysiology but also quantitatively explain the recent experimental results from neuroscientists at Yale University by means of the principle of energy coding. Due to the theory of energy coding to bridge the gap between functional connections within a biological neural network and energetic consumption, they estimate that the theory has very important consequences for quantitative research of cognitive function.

  8. Mechanical Trap Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Three-Dimensional Surface Molecular Imaging of Single Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qianru; Li, Ming; Polat, Beril; Paidi, Santosh K; Dai, Aimee; Zhang, Amy; Pagaduan, Jayson V; Barman, Ishan; Gracias, David H

    2017-03-27

    Reported is a new shell-based spectroscopic platform, named mechanical trap surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (MTSERS), for simultaneous capture, profiling, and 3D microscopic mapping of the intrinsic molecular signatures on the membrane of single live cells. By leveraging the functionalization of the inner surfaces of the MTs with plasmonic gold nanostars, and conformal contact of the cell membrane, MTSERS permits excellent signal enhancement, reliably detects molecular signatures, and allows non-perturbative, multiplex 3D surface imaging of analytes, such as lipids and proteins on the surface of single cells. The demonstrated ability underscores the potential of MTSERS to perform 3D spectroscopic microimaging and to furnish biologically interpretable, quantitative, and dynamic molecular maps in live cell populations.

  9. Theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-08-01

    The speed of site-specific binding of transcription factor (TFs) proteins with genomic DNA seems to be strongly retarded by the randomly occurring sequence traps. Traps are those DNA sequences sharing significant similarity with the original specific binding sites (SBSs). It is an intriguing question how the naturally occurring TFs and their SBSs are designed to manage the retarding effects of such randomly occurring traps. We develop a simple random walk model on the site-specific binding of TFs with genomic DNA in the presence of sequence traps. Our dynamical model predicts that (a) the retarding effects of traps will be minimum when the traps are arranged around the SBS such that there is a negative correlation between the binding strength of TFs with traps and the distance of traps from the SBS and (b) the retarding effects of sequence traps can be appeased by the condensed conformational state of DNA. Our computational analysis results on the distribution of sequence traps around the putative binding sites of various TFs in mouse and human genome clearly agree well the theoretical predictions. We propose that the distribution of traps can be used as an additional metric to efficiently identify the SBSs of TFs on genomic DNA.

  10. Increased biogas production at wastewater treatment plants through co-digestion of sewage sludge with grease trap sludge from a meat processing plant.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, S; Luste, S; Sillanpää, M

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of co-digesting grease trap sludge from a meat-processing plant and sewage sludge was studied in batch and reactor experiments at 35 degrees C. Grease trap sludge had high methane production potential (918 m(3)/tVS(added)), but methane production started slowly. When mixed with sewage sludge, methane production started immediately and the potential increased with increasing grease trap sludge content. Semi-continuous co-digestion of the two materials was found feasible up to grease trap sludge addition of 46% of feed volatile solids (hydraulic retention time 16d; maximum organic loading rate 3.46 kgVS/m(3)d). Methane production was significantly higher and no effect on the characteristics of the digested material was noticed as compared to digesting sewage sludge alone. At higher grease trap sludge additions (55% and 71% of feed volatile solids), degradation was not complete and methane production either remained the same or decreased.

  11. Role of Krev Interaction Trapped-1 in Prostacyclin-Induced Protection against Lung Vascular Permeability Induced by Excessive Mechanical Forces and Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide 6

    PubMed Central

    Meliton, Angelo; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Shah, Alok A.; Birukova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier regulation during acute lung injury (ALI) or other pathologies associated with increased vascular leakiness are an active area of research. Adaptor protein krev interaction trapped-1 (KRIT1) participates in angiogenesis, lumen formation, and stabilization of EC adherens junctions (AJs) in mature vasculature. We tested a role of KRIT1 in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling induced by mechanical stimulation and barrier dysfunction relevant to ventilator-induced lung injury and investigated KRIT1 involvement in EC barrier protection by prostacyclin (PC). PC stimulated Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1)–dependent association of KRIT1 with vascular endothelial cadherin at AJs, with KRIT1-dependent cortical cytoskeletal remodeling leading to EC barrier enhancement. KRIT1 knockdown exacerbated Rho-GTPase activation and EC barrier disruption induced by pathologic 18% cyclic stretch and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) 6 and attenuated the protective effects of PC. In the two-hit model of ALI caused by high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation and TRAP6 injection, KRIT1 functional deficiency in KRIT1+/− mice increased basal lung vascular leak and augmented vascular leak and lung injury caused by exposure to HTV and TRAP6. Down-regulation of KRIT1 also diminished the protective effects of PC against TRAP6/HTV-induced lung injury. These results demonstrate a KRIT1-dependent mechanism of vascular EC barrier control in basal conditions and in the two-hit model of ALI caused by excessive mechanical forces and TRAP6 via negative regulation of Rho activity and enhancement of cell junctions. We also conclude that the stimulation of the Rap1-KRIT1 signaling module is a major mechanism of vascular endothelial barrier protection by PC in the injured lung. PMID:25923142

  12. Fluid Assisted Fault Weakening: Mechanical vs. Chemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.

    2011-12-01

    The influx of fluids into fault zones can trigger two main types of weakening process that operate over different timescales, facilitate fault movement and influence fault slip behaviour. During the seismic cycle fluids can be trapped by low permeability fault zones or stratigraphic barriers favoring fluid overpressure (mechanical weakening) and earthquake nucleation. In the entire fault history fluids can react with fault rocks to produce weak mineral phases (chemical weakening) that alter the mechanical properties of the fault zones. Here I will present two examples of mechanical and chemical fault-weakening from the Apennines of Italy. Seismic profiles and deep borehole data show that the strongest earthquakes of the Apennines nucleate within overpressured Evaporites consisting of dolostones and anhydrites. Field and experimental studies on exhumed faults within the same lithology depict a cataclastic inner fault that can generate frictional instabilities with localization and increasing sliding velocity. The outer fault core presents barrier-like portions associated with foliated anhydrites, 10-21 ≤ permeability ≤10-19 m2. The combination of field observations and rock deformation measurements suggests a fault zone structure capable of developing fluid overpressures during the seismic cycle: fluid overpressures can potentially promote earthquake nucleation and aftershock triggering. Field studies from an exhumed regional low-angle normal fault show that in the long term fluids reacted (diffusion-mass transfer processes) with fine-grained cataclasites in the fault core to produce a phyllosilicates-rich and foliated fault rock. Within the foliated microstructure, that is rich in talc, smectite and chlorite, deformation occurs by frictional sliding along 50-200-nm-thick lamellae. Rock deformation experiments show that the foliated fault rock is weak, 0.2 < friction< 0.35, it is characterized by a stable sliding slip-behaviour with no strength recovery with

  13. LAYERED CERAMICS: Processing and Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Helen M.

    1997-08-01

    Recent progress in the field of mechanical behavior of layered ceramics is reviewed. Several processing techniques are described with reference to the fabrication of ceramic laminates. These include tape-casting, centrifugal casting, slip-casting, electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and the production of fibrous monolith materials. The review discusses various laminar design approaches for achieving improvements in strength, toughness, work of fracture, R-Curve behavior, and contact damage resistance. Examples of effective strategies include manipulation of residual stresses, the incorporation of weak interlayers to induce crack deflection, and promotion of synergistic effects between layer materials that exhibit intrinsically different responses.

  14. A time-resolved current method and TSC under vacuum conditions of SEM: Trapping and detrapping processes in thermal aged XLPE insulation cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukezzi, L.; Rondot, S.; Jbara, O.; Boubakeur, A.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal aging of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) can cause serious concerns in the safety operation in high voltage system. To get a more detailed picture on the effect of thermal aging on the trapping and detrapping process of XLPE in the melting temperature range, Thermal Stimulated Current (TSC) have been implemented in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with a specific arrangement. The XLPE specimens are molded and aged at two temperatures (120 °C and 140 °C) situated close to the melting temperature of the material. The use of SEM allows us to measure both leakage and displacement currents induced in samples under electron irradiation. The first represents the conduction process of XLPE and the second gives information on the trapping of charges in the bulk of the material. TSC associated to the SEM leads to show spectra of XLPE discharge under thermal stimulation using both currents measured after electron irradiation. It was found that leakage current in the charging process may be related to the physical defects resulting in crystallinity variation under thermal aging. However the trapped charge can be affected by the carbonyl groups resulting from the thermo-oxidation degradation and the disorder in the material. It is evidenced from the TSC spectra of unaged XLPE that there is no detrapping charge under heat stimulation. Whereas the presence of peaks in the TSC spectra of thermally aged samples indicates that there is some amount of trapped charge released by heating. The detrapping behavior of aged XLPE is supported by the supposition of the existence of two trap levels: shallow traps and deep traps. Overall, physico-chemical reactions under thermal aging at high temperatures leads to the enhancement of shallow traps density and changes in range of traps depth. These changes induce degradation of electrical properties of XLPE.

  15. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  16. System Enhancements for Mechanical Inspection Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Myers IV

    2011-01-01

    Quality inspection of parts is a major component to any project that requires hardware implementation. Keeping track of all of the inspection jobs is essential to having a smooth running process. By using HTML, the programming language ColdFusion, and the MySQL database, I created a web-based job management system for the 170 Mechanical Inspection Group that will replace the Microsoft Access based management system. This will improve the ways inspectors and the people awaiting inspection view and keep track of hardware as it is in the inspection process. In the end, the management system should be able to insert jobs into a queue, place jobs in and out of a bonded state, pre-release bonded jobs, and close out inspection jobs.

  17. Controlling the efficiency of trapping in treelike fractals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-07-14

    Efficiently controlling the trapping process, especially the trapping efficiency, is central in the study of trap problem in complex systems, since it is a fundamental mechanism for diverse other dynamic processes. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to study the control technique for trapping problem. In this paper, we study the trapping problem in a family of proposed directed fractals with a deep trap at a central node. The directed fractals are a generalization of previous undirected fractals by introducing the directed edge weights dominated by a parameter. We characterize all the eigenvalues and their degeneracies for an associated matrix governing the trapping process. The eigenvalues are provided through an exact recursive relation deduced from the self-similar structure of the fractals. We also obtain the expressions for the smallest eigenvalue and the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a measure of trapping efficiency, which is the expected time for the walker to first visit the trap. The MFPT is evaluated according to the proved fact that it is approximately equal to reciprocal of the smallest eigenvalue. We show that the MFPT is controlled by the weight parameter by modifying which the MFPT can scale superlinealy, linearly, or sublinearly with the system size. Thus, this work paves a way to delicately controlling the trapping process in the fractals.

  18. Incorporation of Xe in silicates at high P and T: a mechanism for isotope fractionation and trapping at depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanloup, C.; Schmidt, B. C.; Gudfinnsson, G. H.; Dewaele, A.; Mezouar, M.

    2011-12-01

    Xenon in the atmospheres of the Earth and Mars is characterized by a low abundance compared to other noble gases and by a depletion in light isotopes. By means of combined chemical analysis, in situ x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, we propose that Xe reacts with olivine at the high pressures and temperatures found in the upper mantle and in pre-terrestrial bodies. That provides a mechanism for the incorporation of Xe at depth and consequent isotopic fractionation. The substitution mechanism of Xe to Si depends on the type of silicate framework, forming XeO2 molecules in fully polymerized phases of silica, and XeO4 molecules in the isolated tetrahedra structure of olivine. Consequently, Xe retention in (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is less thermodynamically favored than in SiO2,implying lesser amounts of Xe trapped in olivine. This chemistry does not extend to the lighter noble gas Ar in the investigated pressure range. The incorporation of both Xe and Ar in olivine is correlated to its trace element content likely through the formation of vacancies, a pre-requisite for the retention of Xe on tetrahedral sites and Ar on octahedral sites.

  19. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  20. Gas chromatographic ion trap mass spectrometry determination of zoxamide residues in grape, grape processing, and in the fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Alberto; Garau, Anna; Caboni, Pierluigi; Russo, Maria Teresa; Farris, Giovanni Antonio; Zara, Severino; Cabras, Paolo

    2005-12-02

    A gas chromatographic ion-trap mass spectrometry (GC-ITMS) method was developed for the determination of the fungicide zoxamide in grape, must, wine, and spirits. Samples were extracted with hexane and analyzed without any clean up. The gas chromatograph was fitted with a carbofrit inserted into the glass liner to allow large volume injections. Analyses were carried out both in EI and CI mode. Recoveries from fortified samples ranged between 86 and 114% at four different fortification levels (n=6 each), ranging between 0.05 and 2.00 mg/kg. The relative standard deviation was below 19%. Both in EI and CI mode the calculated limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.01 and 0.05 mg/kg (0.08 mg/kg in CI), respectively. Moreover the influence of yeasts and bacteria fermentation was evaluated.

  1. Microbial invasions: the process, patterns, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mallon, Cyrus Alexander; Elsas, Jan Dirk van; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2015-11-01

    There has recently been a surge of literature examining microbial invasions into a variety of environments. These studies often include a component of biological diversity as a major factor determining an invader's fate, yet common results are rarely cross-compared. Since many studies only present a snapshot of the entire invasion process, a bird's eye view is required to piece together the entire continuum, which we find consists of introduction, establishment, spread, and impact phases. We further examine the patterns and mechanisms associated with invasion resistance and create a mechanistic synthesis governed by the species richness, species evenness, and resource availability of resident communities. We conclude by exploring the advantages of using a theoretical invasion framework across different fields.

  2. Brain mechanisms involved in processing unreal perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jeonghun; Kim, Jae-Jin; Jung, Young Chul; Park, Il Ho; Lee, Hyeongrae; Han, Kiwan; Yoon, Kang Jun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun I

    2008-12-01

    Individuals sometimes experience an illusory or hallucinatory perception. This unreal perception is usually resolved after the individual recognizes that the perception was not real. In this study, we investigated the brain mechanisms involved in the process to an illusory or hallucinatory perception through 'obtaining insight into unreality'. We used a novel and intuitive paradigm designed by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and augmented reality technology to simulate visual illusory stimuli that mimic hallucinations during brain scanning. The results showed various brain activations, predominantly in the amygdala in the early phase, the medial frontal cortex and the occipitotemporal junction in the middle phase, and the thalamus in the late phase, which correlated with a subject's proneness to hallucinating. These activations may correspond to a 'responding stage' for a perception-based immediate emotional reaction, a 'monitoring stage' for integration and recalibration to ascertain that the perception was not real, and a 'resolving stage' for controlling the information and finally settling it, respectively. Our paradigm and findings may be useful in understanding the mechanisms for discriminating and coping with hallucinatory perceptions.

  3. Communication: Trapping upconverted energy in neat platinum porphyrin films via an unexpected fusion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hinke, Jonathan A; Pundsack, Tom J; Luhman, Wade A; Holmes, Russell J; Blank, David A

    2013-09-14

    Direct observation of an unexpected product from excited state fusion of two excited triplet states in platinum octaethylporphyrin is reported. Transient spectroscopy was used to identify the product as a metal centered (d, d) state that decays slowly compared with the rate of fusion. The reaction was demonstrated to be second order with a rate coefficient of k(TTF) = (5.4 ± 0.4) × 10(-10) cm(3) · s(-1). The results contrast with the common assumption that fusion proceeds directly to annihilation via rapid non-radiative deactivation of the products. Following visible photo-excitation, the fusion process results in energetic upconversion of the incident photons stored in the higher energy (d, d) state at irradiances below the threshold for multi-photon absorption.

  4. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: A theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  5. Adhesion to the yeast cell surface as a mechanism for trapping pathogenic bacteria by Saccharomyces probiotics.

    PubMed

    Tiago, F C P; Martins, F S; Souza, E L S; Pimenta, P F P; Araujo, H R C; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2012-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of probiotics as an adjuvant for the prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal pathology. The great advantage of therapy with probiotics is that they have few side effects such as selection of resistant bacteria or disturbance of the intestinal microbiota, which occur when antibiotics are used. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the surface of probiotics instead of onto intestinal receptors could explain part of the probiotic effect. Thus, this study evaluated the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the cell wall of Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains UFMG 905, W303 and BY4741. To understand the mechanism of adhesion of pathogens to yeast, cell-wall mutants of the parental strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 were used because of the difficulty of mutating polyploid yeast, as is the case for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces boulardii. The tests of adhesion showed that, among 11 enteropathogenic bacteria tested, only Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi adhered to the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. The presence of mannose, and to some extent bile salts, inhibited this adhesion, which was not dependent on yeast viability. Among 44 cell-wall mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, five lost the ability to fix the bacteria. Electron microscopy showed that the phenomenon of yeast-bacteria adhesion occurred both in vitro and in vivo (in the digestive tract of dixenic mice). In conclusion, some pathogenic bacteria were captured on the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, thus preventing their adhesion to specific receptors on the intestinal epithelium and their subsequent invasion of the host.

  6. Ballooning Instability: A Possible Mechanism for Impulsive Heating of Plasma Trapped in a Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma confined in curved magnetic field are unstable when the plasma beta (= gas pressure / magnetic pressure) exceeds a critical value determined mainly by the loop geometry (~ loop thickness / curvature radius). In TOKAMAK (one type of fusion experiment device), sudden disruption of confined plasma are observed when plasma beta is high and is called high-beta disruption. The main cause of the disruption is ballooning instability (or localized interchange instability). This instability can happen also in the solar atmosphere when conditions are satisfied. Not only high gas pressure but also plasma flow along curved magnetic field triggers ballooning instability. The most probable location of the instability is around the loop top where the magnetic field is the weakest. Impulsive heating of confined plasma and particle acceleration can be expected by discharge process of the space charge which is created by drift motion of plasma particles perpendicular to the magnetic field. Associated with disruption, shock waves and turbulences will be generated due to sudden expansion of plasma. Recent high-resolution, high-cadence and multiple wavelength (visible-UV-EUV) observations by SDO show many of these events.

  7. Processing and mechanical characterization of alumina laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, John K.

    2002-08-01

    Single-phase ceramics that combine property gradients or steps in monolithic bodies are sought as alternatives to ceramic composites made of dissimilar materials. This work describes novel processing methods to produce stepped-density (or laminated) alumina single-phase bodies that maintain their mechanical integrity. One arrangement consists of a stiff, dense bulk material with a thin, flaw tolerant, porous exterior layer. Another configuration consists of a lightweight, low-density bulk material with a thin, hard, wear resistant exterior layer. Alumina laminates with strong interfaces have been successfully produced in this work using two different direct-casting processes. Gelcasting is a useful near-net shape processing technique that has been combined with several techniques, such as reaction bonding of aluminum oxide and the use of starch as a fugative filler, to successfully produced stepped-density alumina laminates. The other direct casting process that has been developed in this work is thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG). This is a reversible gelation process that has been used to produce near-net shape dense ceramic bodies. Also, individual layers can be stacked together and heated to produce laminates. Bilayer laminate samples were produced with varied thickness of porous and dense layers. It was shown that due to the difference in modulus and hardness, transverse cracking is found upon Hertzian contact when the dense layer is on the exterior. In the opposite arrangement, compacted damage zones formed in the porous material and no damage occurred in the underlying dense layer. Flaw tolerant behavior of the porous exterior/dense underlayer was examined by measuring biaxial strength as a function of Vickers indentation load. It was found that the thinnest layer of porous material results in the greatest flaw tolerance. Also, higher strength was exhibited at large indentation loads when compared to dense monoliths. The calculated stresses on the surfaces

  8. Neural mechanisms of spatiotemporal signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbabaie Shoub, Shaban (Reza)

    We have studied the synaptic, dendritic, and network mechanisms of spatiotemporal signal processing underlying the computation of visual motion in the avian tectum. Such mechanisms are critical for information processing in all vertebrates, but have been difficult to elucidate in mammals because of anatomical limitations. We have therefore developed a chick tectal slice preparation, which has features that help us circumvent these limitations. Using single-electrode multi-pulse synaptic stimulation experiments we found that the SGC-I cell responds to synaptic stimulation in a binary manner and its response is phasic in a time dependent probabilistic manner over large time scales. Synaptic inputs at two locations typically interact in a mutually exclusive manner when delivered within the "interaction time" of approximately 30 ms. Then we constructed a model of SGC-I cell and the retinal inputs to examine the role of the observed non-linear cellular properties in shaping the response of SGC-I neurons to assumed retinal representations of dynamic spatiotemporal visual stimuli. We found that by these properties, SGC-I cells can classify different stimuli. Especially without the phasic synaptic signal transfer the model SGC-I cell fails to distinguish between the static stationary stimuli and dynamic spatiotemporal stimuli. Based on one-site synaptic response probability and the assumption of independent neighboring dendritic endings we predicted the response probability of SGC-I cells to multiple synaptic inputs. We tested this independence-based model prediction and found that the independency assumption is not valid. The measured SGC-I response probability to multiple synaptic inputs does not increase with the number of synaptic inputs. The presence of GABAergic horizontal cells in layer 5 suggest an inhibitory effect of these cells on the SGC-I retino-tectal synaptic responses. In our experiment we found that the measured SGC-I response probability to multiple

  9. Heating rate and electrode charging measurements in a scalable, microfabricated, surface-electrode ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, D. T. C.; Harty, T. P.; Janacek, H. A.; Linke, N. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.; Jarecki, R. L.; Habermehl, S. D.; Blain, M. G.; Stick, D.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We characterise the performance of a surface-electrode ion "chip" trap fabricated using established semiconductor integrated circuit and micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microfabrication processes, which are in principle scalable to much larger ion trap arrays, as proposed for implementing ion trap quantum information processing. We measure rf ion micromotion parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the trap electrodes, and find that on-package capacitors reduce this to ≲10 nm in amplitude. We also measure ion trapping lifetime, charging effects due to laser light incident on the trap electrodes, and the heating rate for a single trapped ion. The performance of this trap is found to be comparable with others of the same size scale.

  10. Study of dynamical process of heat denaturation in optically trapped single microorganisms by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing; Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J.

    2003-11-01

    The development of laser traps has made it possible to investigate single cells and record real-time Raman spectra during a heat-denaturation process when the temperature of the surrounding medium is increased. Large changes in the phenylalanine band (1004 cm-1) of near-infrared spectra between living and heat-treated cells were observed in yeast and Escerichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. This change appears to reflect the change in environment of phenylalanine as proteins within the cells unfold as a result of increasing temperatures. As a comparison, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-denatured solutions of bovine serum albumin proteins, and a similar change in the phenylalanine band of spectra was observed. In addition, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-treated solutions of pure phenylalanine molecules; no observable difference in vibrational spectra was observed. These findings may make it possible to study conformational changes in proteins within single cells.

  11. Mechanism in the reaction of cytochrome c oxidase with organic hydroperoxides: an ESR spin-trapping investigation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yeong-Renn; Mason, Ronald P

    2002-07-15

    Organic hydroperoxides are of great utility in probing the reaction mechanism and the toxicological consequences of lipid peroxidation. In the present study, ESR spin-trapping was employed to investigate the peroxidation of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) with t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) and cumene hydroperoxide (CumOOH). The spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) was used to detect the radical species formed from the reaction of CcO with t-BuOOH. The presence of t-BuOOH-derived alkoxyl radical (t-BuO*) as the primary radical indicates reductive scission of the O-O bond by CcO. The ESR signal of DMPO/*Ot-Bu can be partially abolished by cyanide, implying that the reductive cleavage involved the haem a(3)Cu(B) binuclear site of CcO. A nitroso spin trap, 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP), was used to detect and identify radical species from the reaction of CcO with CumOOH. In addition to the t-BuOOH-derived methyl, hydroxylmethyl and tertiary carbon-centred radicals, a protein-derived radical was detected. The intensity of the ESR signal from the protein radical increased with the CumOOH concentration at low CumOOH/CcO ratios, with maximal intensity at a ratio of 100 mol of CumOOH/mol of CcO. The immobilized protein radical adduct of MNP was stable and persistent after dialysis; it was also resistant to proteolytic digestion, suggesting that it was formed in the transmembrane region, a region that is not accessible to proteases. Its signal was greatly enhanced when CcO cysteine residues were chemically modified by N-ethylmaleimide, when the tryptophan residues in CcO were oxidized by N-bromosuccimide, and when tyrosine residues on the surface of CcO were iodinated, showing that a radical equilibrium was established among the cysteine, tryptophan and tyrosine residues of the protein-centred radical. Pre-treatment of CcO with cyanide prevented detectable MNP adduct formation, confirming that the haem a(3)-Cu(B) binuclear centre was the initial

  12. Mechanical-mathematical modeling for landslide process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalova, V.

    2009-04-01

    500 m and displacement of a landslide in the plan over 1 m. Last serious activization of a landslide has taken place in 2002 with a motion on 53 cm. Catastrophic activization of the deep blockglide landslide in the area of Khoroshevo in Moscow took place in 2006-2007. A crack of 330 m long appeared in the old sliding circus, along which a new 220 m long creeping block was separated from the plateau and began sinking with a displaced surface of the plateau reaching to 12 m. Such activization of the landslide process was not observed in Moscow since mid XIX century. The sliding area of Khoroshevo was stable during long time without manifestations of activity. Revealing of the reasons of deformation and development of ways of protection from deep landslide motions is extremely actual and difficult problem which decision is necessary for preservation of valuable historical monuments and modern city constructions. The reasons of activization and protective measures are discussed. Structure of monitoring system for urban territories is elaborated. Mechanical-mathematical model of high viscous fluid was used for modeling of matter behavior on landslide slopes. Equation of continuity and an approximated equation of the Navier-Stockes for slow motions in a thin layer were used. The results of modelling give possibility to define the place of highest velocity on landslide surface, which could be the best place for monitoring post position. Model can be used for calibration of monitoring equipment and gives possibility to investigate some fundamental aspects of matter movement on landslide slope.

  13. The structure and processes of the Siberian Traps sub-volcanic complex and consequences for end-Permian environmental crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, H.; Polozov, A. G.; Planke, S.

    2013-12-01

    The emplacement of the Siberian Traps Large igneous province is regarded as the key processes that initiated the end-Permian environmental crisis. The details of this link are however still under investigation. Among the suggestions are lava degassing of mantle- and crustal-derived gases, explosive lava and phreatomagmatic eruptions, and gas release from contact metamorphism related to the sub-volcanic sill complex. Whereas the lava pile is relatively well studied and investigated, the sub-volcanic sills, dikes, and contact aureoles are poorly studied and documented. We present borehole and field data of sills and contact aureoles from across the Siberian Traps, from Norilsk in the north to Bratsk in the south. The data have been compiled during three field campaigns in 2004, 2006, and 2010. The sill geometries and thicknesses varies considerably from kilometer-scale intrusive complexes to individual thin sills of a few tens of meters. In contrast to several other LIPs, sills are also emplaced within the extrusive pile. Thick sills (30-80 meters) occur in high abundance in the upper part of the sedimentary succession, affecting the coal-rich Tungusska Series sediments. Moreover, very thick sills (100-300 meters) are also emplaced within the vast Cambrian salt formations. We show that depending on the specific location within the province and the emplacement depth, the potential for degassing of both greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2), aerosols (SO2), and ozone destructive gases (CH3Cl, CH3Br) was in the 103 to 104 Gt range.

  14. Demonstration of a Scalable, Multiplexed Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-09

    ion shuttling, storage, and manipulation, Appl. Phys. Letters 88, pp. 034101. 6. M. Riebe, et al. (2004), Deterministic quantum teleportation with atoms...Nature 429, pp. 734. 7. M. D. Barrett, et al. (2004), Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits, Nature 429, pp. 737. 8. J. Chiaverini...REPORT DEMONSTRATION OF A SCALABLE, MULTIPLEXED ION TRAPFOR QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: A scalable

  15. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF SOIL BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of kinetic studies to soil chemistry is useful to determine reaction mechanisms and fate of nutrients and environmental contaminants. How deeply one wishes to query the mechanism depends on the detail sought. Reactions that involve chemical species in more than on...

  16. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  17. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  18. A STIM1-dependent 'trafficking trap' mechanism regulates Orai1 plasma membrane residence and Ca²⁺ influx levels.

    PubMed

    Hodeify, Rawad; Selvaraj, Senthil; Wen, Jennifer; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Hubrack, Satanay; Dib, Maya; Al-Thani, Sara N; McGraw, Timothy; Machaca, Khaled

    2015-08-15

    The key proteins mediating store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-selective channel Orai1. Here, we quantitatively dissect Orai1 trafficking dynamics and show that Orai1 recycles rapidly at the plasma membrane (Kex≃0.1 min(-1)), with ∼40% of the total Orai1 pool localizing to the plasma membrane at steady state. A subset of intracellular Orai1 localizes to a sub-plasmalemal compartment. Store depletion is coupled to Orai1 plasma membrane enrichment in a STIM1-dependent fashion. This is due to trapping of Orai1 into cortical ER STIM1 clusters, leading to its removal from the recycling pool and enrichment at the plasma membrane. Interestingly, upon high STIM1 expression, Orai1 is trapped into STIM1 clusters intracellularly, thus preventing its plasma membrane enrichment following store depletion. Consistent with this, STIM1 knockdown prevents trapping of excess Orai1 into limiting STIM1 clusters in the cortical ER. SOCE-dependent Ca(2+) influx shows a similar biphasic dependence on the Orai1:STIM1 ratio. Therefore, a STIM1-dependent Orai1 'trafficking trap' mechanism controls Orai1 plasma membrane enrichment and SOCE levels, thus modulating the SOCE 'bandwidth' for downstream signaling.

  19. Reduction of the interfacial trap density of indium-oxide thin film transistors by incorporation of hafnium and annealing process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Fang E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Gao, Xu; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Aikawa, Shinya; Nabatame, Toshihide

    2015-01-15

    The stable operation of transistors under a positive bias stress (PBS) is achieved using Hf incorporated into InO{sub x}-based thin films processed at relatively low temperatures (150 to 250 °C). The mobilities of the Hf-InO{sub x} thin-film transistors (TFTs) are higher than 8 cm{sup 2}/Vs. The TFTs not only have negligible degradation in the mobility and a small shift in the threshold voltage under PBS for 60 h, but they are also thermally stable at 85 °C in air, without the need for a passivation layer. The Hf-InO{sub x} TFT can be stable even annealed at 150 °C for positive bias temperature stability (PBTS). A higher stability is achieved by annealing the TFTs at 250 °C, originating from a reduction in the trap density at the Hf-InO{sub x}/gate insulator interface. The knowledge obtained here will aid in the realization of stable TFTs processed at low temperatures.

  20. Trapping in TITANs Cooler Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootte, Brian; Lascar, Daniel; Paul, Stefan; Gwinner, Gerald; Dilling, Jens; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry provides an excellent means of determining the masses of nuclei to high precision. Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) have been successfully used at TRIUMFs Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) to enhance the precision of mass measurements for short-lived species. The gain in precision can theoretically scale with the charge state of the ion, but recent measurements of beam properties have shown that the process of charge breeding ions to higher charge states increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap. This reduces the gain from using HCIs. In order to maximize the precision of mass measurements, we are currently performing offline commissioning of a Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET) with the purpose of sympathetically cooling HCI bunches to an energy of 1 eV/q using a plasma of electrons. This will require implementing a nested potential configuration to trap the ions and electrons in the same region so they can interact via coulomb scattering. Recent progress in testing the trapping of electrons and singly charged ions in CPET, leading towards the cooling of HCIs prior to mass measurements in TITANs will be discussed.

  1. Free Radical Mechanisms in Autoxidation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Michael G.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the use of steady-state radiation chemistry and pulse radiolysis for the generation of initial free radicals and formation of peroxy radicals in the autoxidation process. Provides information regarding the autoxidation process. Defines autoxidation reactions and antioxidant action. (CS)

  2. Process for predicting structural performance of mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, D.R.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1998-05-19

    A process for predicting the structural performance of a mechanical system represents the mechanical system by a plurality of surface elements. The surface elements are grouped according to their location in the volume occupied by the mechanical system so that contacts between surface elements can be efficiently located. The process is well suited for efficient practice on multiprocessor computers. 12 figs.

  3. Process for predicting structural performance of mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, David R.; Hendrickson, Bruce A.; Plimpton, Steven J.; Attaway, Stephen W.; Heinstein, Martin W.; Vaughan, Courtenay T.

    1998-01-01

    A process for predicting the structural performance of a mechanical system represents the mechanical system by a plurality of surface elements. The surface elements are grouped according to their location in the volume occupied by the mechanical system so that contacts between surface elements can be efficiently located. The process is well suited for efficient practice on multiprocessor computers.

  4. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism from a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped during Turnover‡

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Akanksha; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Orville, Allen M.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5–FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Å resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Å, and there are six subunits (1½ holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (Eox). The active-site structures of Eox, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the α proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Å. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO. PMID:16430210

  5. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  6. Migration Processes and Mechanisms of Youth Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitev, Peter-Emil

    The dramatic changes in Bulgaria's agriculture, labor structure, and demography caused by the establishment of socialism in the country in the mid-1940s have resulted in changing mechanisms of youth socialization. Industrialization and agricultural consolidation precipitated a rural-urban migration boom and a resulting higher education level,…

  7. Plume Mechanics and Aerosol Growth Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO NO ACCESSION NO %. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423 II 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Plume Mechanics and...formulation and a finite element sc hem e ......... ..................... 192 c. Diffusion of aerosols in laminar flow in a cylindrical tube...The principal elements are the liquid oil and carrier gas metering systems, the oil vaporizer, coaxial jet system, and the sampling and aerosol

  8. On Heat in a Quantum Mechanical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deesuwan, Tanapat; Anders, Janet

    2013-05-01

    Heat is the portion of energy exchange between systems in thermodynamic process which, unlike work, is always associated with the change of the entropies of the systems. In the context of quantum thermodynamics, heat process is described by an incoherent generalised quantum evolution, which is a map between two quantum states that does not preserve the entropy. Based on an information-theoretic reasoning, we propose that heat involving in a general quantum thermodynamic process can be separated into two types: one that is due to the unital subclass of the evolutions and another one that is due to the others. According to these categories, we show how the former type of heat can be incorporated into Jarzynski equality, resulting in a generalised version of the equality. We also derive a Jarzynski inequality which incorporates all heat into the picture and show that this situation is just equivalent to the presence of Maxwell's demon.

  9. Benchmarking Peer Production Mechanisms, Processes & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Thomas; Kretschmer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable identifies key approaches for quality management in peer production by benchmarking peer production practices and processes in other areas. (Contains 29 footnotes, 13 figures and 2 tables.)[This report has been authored with contributions of: Kaisa Honkonen-Ratinen, Matti Auvinen, David Riley, Jose Pinzon, Thomas Fischer, Thomas…

  10. Respiratory fluid mechanics and transport processes.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, J B

    2001-01-01

    The field of respiratory flow and transport has experienced significant research activity over the past several years. Important contributions to the knowledge base come from pulmonary and critical care medicine, surgery, physiology, environmental health sciences, biophysics, and engineering. Several disciplines within engineering have strong and historical ties to respiration including mechanical, chemical, civil/environmental, aerospace and, of course, biomedical engineering. This review draws from a wide variety of scientific literature that reflects the diverse constituency and audience that respiratory science has developed. The subject areas covered include nasal flow and transport, airway gas flow, alternative modes of ventilation, nonrespiratory gas transport, aerosol transport, airway stability, mucus transport, pulmonary acoustics, surfactant dynamics and delivery, and pleural liquid flow. Within each area are a number of subtopics whose exploration can provide the opportunity of both depth and breadth for the interested reader.

  11. Defects and Charge Trapping Mechanisms of Double Active Layer In-Zn-O and Al-Sn-Zn-In-O Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Goh, Youngin; Kim, Taeho; Yang, Jong-Heon; Choi, Ji-Hun; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Cho, Sung Haeng; Jeon, Sanghun

    2017-03-02

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLED) are considered as a core component of next-generation display technology, which can be used for wearable and flexible devices. Reliable thin-film transistors (TFTs) with high mobility are required to drive AMOLEDs. Recently, amorphous oxide TFTs, owing to their high mobility, have been considered as excellent substitutes for driving AMOLEDs. However, the device instabilities of high-mobility oxide TFTs have remained a key issue to be used in production. In this letter, we present the charge trapping and device instability mechanisms of high-mobility oxide TFTs with double active layers, using In-Zn-O (IZO) and Al-doped Sn-Zn-In-O (ATZIO) with various interfacial IZO thicknesses (0-6nm). To this end, we employed microsecond fast I-V, single-pulse I-V, transient current, and discharging current analysis. These AC device characterization methodologies enable the extraction of various trap parameters and defect densities as well as the understanding of dynamic charge transport in double active-layer TFTs. The results show that the number of defect sites decreases with an increase in the interfacial IZO thickness. From these results, we conclude that the interfacial IZO layer plays a crucial role in minimizing the charge trapping in ATZIO TFTs.

  12. Impact of inelastic processes on the chaotic dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped into a moving optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchatchueng, Sylvin; Siewe Siewe, Martin; Marie Moukam Kakmeni, François; Tchawoua, Clément

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive two-body and repulsive three-body interactions between atoms trapped into a moving optical lattice and subjected to some inelastic processes (a linear atomic feeding and two dissipative terms related to dipolar relaxation and three-body recombination). We are interested in finding out how the nonconservative terms mentioned above act on the dynamical behaviour of the condensate, and how they can be used in the control of possible chaotic dynamics. Seeking the wave function of condensate on the form of Bloch waves, we notice that the real amplitude of the condensate is governed by an integro-differential equation. As theoretical tool of prediction of homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos, we use the Melnikov method, which provides two Melnikov functions related to homoclinic and heteroclinic bifurcations. Applying the Melnikov criterion, some regions of instability are plotted in the parameter space and reveal complex dynamics (solitonic stable solutions, weak and strong instabilities leading to collapse, growth-collapse cycles and finally to chaotic oscillations). It comes from some parameter space that coupling the optical intensity and parameters related to atomic feeding and atomic losses (dissipations) as control parameters can help to reduce or annihilate chaotic behaviours of the condensate. Moreover, the theoretical study reveals that there is a certain ratio between the atomic feeding parameter and the parameters related to the dissipation for the occurrence of chaotic oscillations in the dynamics of condensate. The theoretical predictions are verified by numerical simulations (Poincaré sections), and there is a certain reliability of our analytical treatment.

  13. Nano trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new ac/dc monopole trap for neutral polar particles, introduced and explored by Blümel (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 045402 and 2011 Eur. Phys. J. D 64 85-101), is significantly advanced in several directions. (1) Previously shown to work only for polar classical particles and polar macro-molecules, the trap is shown to work for polar diatomic molecules. (2) A homogeneous electric field, optionally switched on for improved stability in the angular direction, leads to stable trapping in higher order stability regions of the Mathieu equation. (3) Based on the Floquet formalism, analytical and numerical calculations are presented that show that the trap is quantum mechanically stable. (4) Definition and derivation of a quantum pseudo-potential allow a qualitative understanding of the quantum trapping mechanism. (5) It is shown that the proposed ac/dc trap may be realized experimentally using currently available scanning tunnelling microscopy technology.

  14. Process Mechanics Analysis in Single Point Incremental Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, G.; Filice, L.; Fratini, L.; Micari, F.

    2004-06-01

    The request of highly differentiated products and the need of process flexibility have brought the researchers to focus the attention on innovative sheet forming processes. Industrial application of conventional processes is, in fact, economically convenient just for large scale productions; furthermore conventional processes do not allow to fully satisfy the mentioned demand of flexibility. In this contest, single point incremental forming (SPIF) is an innovative and flexible answer to market requests. The process is characterized by a peculiar process mechanics, being the sheet plastically deformed only through a localised stretching mechanism. Some recent experimental studies have shown that SPIF permits a relevant increase of formability limits, just as a consequence of the peculiar deformation mechanics. The research here addressed is focused on the theoretical investigation of process mechanics; the aim was to achieve a deeper understanding of basic phenomena involved in SPIF which justify the above mentioned formability enhancing.

  15. Mass measurements in the vicinity of the r p-process and the {nu} p-process paths with the Penning trap facilities JYFLTRAP and SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Aeystoe, J.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilae, H.; Rahaman, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Sonoda, T.; Ferrer, R.; Froehlich, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Dworschak, M.; Herfurth, F.

    2008-11-15

    The masses of very neutron-deficient nuclides close to the astrophysical r p- and {nu} p-process paths have been determined with the Penning trap facilities JYFLTRAP at JYFL/Jyvaeskylae and SHIPTRAP at GSI/Darmstadt. Isotopes from yttrium (Z=39) to palladium (Z=46) have been produced in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions. In total, 21 nuclides were studied, and almost half of the mass values were experimentally determined for the first time: {sup 88}Tc, {sup 90-92}Ru, {sup 92-94}Rh, and {sup 94,95}Pd. For the {sup 95}Pd{sup m}, (21/2{sup +}) high-spin state, a first direct mass determination was performed. Relative mass uncertainties of typically {delta}m/m=5x10{sup -8} were obtained. The impact of the new mass values has been studied in {nu} p-process nucleosynthesis calculations. The resulting reaction flow and the final abundances are compared with those obtained with the data of the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003.

  16. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  17. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  18. Evaluation of Electrical Characteristics and Trap-State Density in Bottom-Gate Polycrystalline Thin Film Transistors Processed with High-Pressure Water Vapor Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    This paper discusses electrical characteristics and trap-state density in polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) used in bottom-gate poly-Si thin film transistors (TFTs) processed with high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA). The threshold voltage uniformity of the HWA-processed TFTs is improved by 42% for N-channel and 38% for P-channel TFTs in terms of standard deviation, and carrier mobility is enhanced by 10% or greater for both N- and P-channel TFTs than those TFTs processed conventionally. Subthreshold swing is also improved by HWA, showing that HWA postannealing is effective for improving the Si/SiO2 interface of the bottom-gate TFTs. Two types of TFTs having different poly-Si crystallinities are examined to investigate carrier transport in poly-Si processed by HWA postannealing. The evaluation of trap-state density for the two types of poly-Si reveals that HWA postannealing is more efficient for N-channel than for P-channel TFTs. Furthermore, HWA postannealing is more effective for poly-Si with high crystallinity to improve TFT characteristics. The analysis of the trap-state distributions and the activation energy of TFT drain current indicate that HWA deactivates dangling bonds highly localized at poly-Si grain boundaries (GBs). Thus, HWA postannealing effects can be interpreted by a GB barrier potential model similar to that applied to conventional hydrogenation.

  19. Integrating Thermal Tools Into the Mechanical Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Siebes, Georg; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of mechanical design is to deliver a hardware product that meets or exceeds customer expectations, while reducing cycle time and cost. To this end, an integrated mechanical design process enables the idea of parallel development (concurrent engineering). This represents a shift from the traditional mechanical design process. With such a concurrent process, there are significant issues that have to be identified and addressed before re-engineering the mechanical design process to facilitate concurrent engineering. These issues also assist in the integration and re-engineering of the thermal design sub-process since it resides within the entire mechanical design process. With these issues in mind, a thermal design sub-process can be re-defined in a manner that has a higher probability of acceptance, thus enabling an integrated mechanical design process. However, the actual implementation is not always problem-free. Experience in applying the thermal design sub-process to actual situations provides the evidence for improvement, but more importantly, for judging the viability and feasibility of the sub-process.

  20. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  1. Carnivorous plants: trapping, digesting and absorbing all in one.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, Colin

    2013-09-09

    The Venus flytrap digests and absorbs its prey, but how does it coordinate digestion and absorption to maximise the efficiency of this highly evolved mechanism? A new study that combines direct recordings from cells within the trap along with molecular characterization of nutrient transport reveals a complex and coordinated suite of mechanisms that underlie this elegant process.

  2. Energy of charged states in the acetanilide crystal: trapping of charge-transfer states at vacancies as a possible mechanism for optical damage.

    PubMed

    Tsiaousis, D; Munn, R W

    2004-04-15

    Calculations for the acetanilide crystal yield the effective polarizability (16.6 A(3)), local electric field tensor, effective dipole moment (5.41 D), and dipole-dipole energy (-12.8 kJ/mol). Fourier-transform techniques are used to calculate the polarization energy P for a single charge in the perfect crystal (-1.16 eV); the charge-dipole energy W(D) is zero if the crystal carries no bulk dipole moment. Polarization energies for charge-transfer (CT) pairs combine with the Coulomb energy E(C) to give the screened Coulomb energy E(scr); screening is nearly isotropic, with E(scr) approximately E(C)/2.7. For CT pairs W(D) reduces to a term deltaW(D) arising from the interaction of the charge on each ion with the change in dipole moment on the other ion relative to the neutral molecule. The dipole moments calculated by density-functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G(**) level are 3.62 D for the neutral molecule, changing to 7.13 D and 4.38 D for the anion and cation, relative to the center of mass. Because of the large change in the anion, deltaW(D) reaches -0.9 eV and modifies the sequence of CT energies markedly from that of E(scr), giving the lowest two CT pairs at -1.98 eV and -1.41 eV. The changes in P and W(D) near a vacancy are calculated; W(D) changes for the individual charges because the vacancy removes a dipole moment and modifies the crystal dielectric response, but deltaW(D) and E(C) do not change. A vacancy yields a positive change DeltaP that scatters a charge or CT pair, but the change DeltaW(D) can be negative and large enough to outweigh DeltaP, yielding traps with depths that can exceed 150 meV for single charges and for CT pairs. Divacancies yield traps with depths nearly equal to the sum of those produced by the separate vacancies and so they can exceed 300 meV. These results are consistent with a mechanism of optical damage in which vacancies trap optically generated CT pairs that recombine and release energy; this can

  3. Energy of charged states in the acetanilide crystal: Trapping of charge-transfer states at vacancies as a possible mechanism for optical damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Calculations for the acetanilide crystal yield the effective polarizability (16.6 Å3), local electric field tensor, effective dipole moment (5.41 D), and dipole-dipole energy (-12.8 kJ/mol). Fourier-transform techniques are used to calculate the polarization energy P for a single charge in the perfect crystal (-1.16 eV); the charge-dipole energy WD is zero if the crystal carries no bulk dipole moment. Polarization energies for charge-transfer (CT) pairs combine with the Coulomb energy EC to give the screened Coulomb energy Escr; screening is nearly isotropic, with Escr≈EC/2.7. For CT pairs WD reduces to a term δWD arising from the interaction of the charge on each ion with the change in dipole moment on the other ion relative to the neutral molecule. The dipole moments calculated by density-functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level are 3.62 D for the neutral molecule, changing to 7.13 D and 4.38 D for the anion and cation, relative to the center of mass. Because of the large change in the anion, δWD reaches -0.9 eV and modifies the sequence of CT energies markedly from that of Escr, giving the lowest two CT pairs at -1.98 eV and -1.41 eV. The changes in P and WD near a vacancy are calculated; WD changes for the individual charges because the vacancy removes a dipole moment and modifies the crystal dielectric response, but δWD and EC do not change. A vacancy yields a positive change ΔP that scatters a charge or CT pair, but the change ΔWD can be negative and large enough to outweigh ΔP, yielding traps with depths that can exceed 150 meV for single charges and for CT pairs. Divacancies yield traps with depths nearly equal to the sum of those produced by the separate vacancies and so they can exceed 300 meV. These results are consistent with a mechanism of optical damage in which vacancies trap optically generated CT pairs that recombine and release energy; this can disrupt the lattice around the vacancy, thereby favoring

  4. Trapped-electron runaway effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Fisch, N. J.; Peysson, Y.

    2015-08-01

    In a tokamak, trapped electrons subject to a strong electric field cannot run away immediately, because their parallel velocity does not increase over a bounce period. However, they do pinch toward the tokamak center. As they pinch toward the center, the trapping cone becomes more narrow, so eventually they can be detrapped and run away. When they run away, trapped electrons will have a very different signature from circulating electrons subject to the Dreicer mechanism. The characteristics of what are called trapped-electron runaways are identified and quantified, including their distinguishable perpendicular velocity spectrum and radial extent.

  5. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  6. Uptake Mechanisms of Eu(III) on Hydroxyapatite: A Potential Permeable Reactive Barrier Backfill Material for Trapping Trivalent Minor Actinides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zheng, Tao; Yang, Shitong; Zhang, Linjuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-05

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique has attracted an increasing level of attention for the in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, the macroscopic uptake behaviors and microscopic speciation of Eu(III) on hydroxyapatite (HAP) were investigated by a combination of theoretical modeling, batch experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) fitting, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The underlying removal mechanisms were identified to further assess the application potential of HAP as an effective PRB backfill material. The macroscopic analysis revealed that nearly all dissolved Eu(III) in solution was removed at pH 6.5 within an extremely short reaction time of 5 min. In addition, the thermodynamic calculations, desorption experiments, and PXRD and XAS analyses definitely confirmed the formation of the EuPO4·H2O(s) phase during the process of uptake of dissolved Eu(III) by HAP via the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A detailed comparison of the present experimental findings and related HAP-metal systems suggests that the relative contribution of precipitation to the total Eu(III) removal increases as the P:Eu ratio decreases. The dosage of HAP-based PRB for the remediation of groundwater polluted by Eu(III) and analogous trivalent actinides [e.g., Am(III) and Cm(III)] should be strictly controlled depending on the dissolved Eu(III) concentration to obtain an optimal P:M (M represents Eu, Am, or Cm) ratio and treatment efficiency.

  7. Mechanical pre-treatment (MPT) - revitalised by MBR process.

    PubMed

    Schier, W; Drensla, K; Janot, A; Exler, H; Engelhardt, N; Frechen, F-B

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-nineties membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has been introduced to municipal wastewater treatment in Europe. The first MBR plants went into operation performing a conventional mechanical pre-treatment (MPT) without any advanced treatment units. After a short operation period, clogging caused by fibrous substances and hence module sludging was observed. Thus, MPT was upgraded introducing sieves. Several investigations had been carried out to determine the removal efficiency of different sieve units and entire MPT systems. Meanwhile experiences from long-term operation at different MBR sites indicate dependencies between different MPT units, especially between the aerated grit chamber/grease trap and the subsequent sieve unit. Usually the sieve is the final MPT unit and its performance depends on the performance of the upstream MPT units. This report describes and discusses results from a research project at MBR Kaarst-Nordkanal in Germany conducted in 2008 to 2010 by the Water Board of River Erft and the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering. Main focus is addressed for the parameters SS (settable solids) and grease. One major experience is the confirmation of relevant interactions between the grit chamber and the downstream sieve unit. Stable operation of the grit chamber and grease trap is essential to achieve a constantly high removal performance of the sieve unit and therefore the entire MPT stage. In turn, negative impacts on the grit chamber performance from the return flow concept have to be avoided. Finally, it is shown that the appropriate two-dimensional sieve gap size should not go beyond 1 mm when operating hollow fibre membranes.

  8. Direct measurement of optical-trap-induced decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Komori, Kentaro; Ito, Sosuke; Michimura, Yuta; Aso, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    Thermal decoherence is a major obstacle to the realization of quantum coherence for massive mechanical oscillators. Although optical trapping has been used to reduce the thermal decoherence rate for such oscillators, it also increases the rate by subjecting the oscillator to stochastic forces resulting from the frequency fluctuations of the optical field, thereby setting a fundamental limit on the reduction. This is analogous to the noise penalty in an active feedback system. Here, we directly measure the rethermalization process for an initially cooled and optically trapped suspended mirror, and identify the current limiting decoherence rate as due to the optical trap. Our experimental study of the trap-induced decoherence rate will enable future advances in the probing of fundamental quantum mechanics in the bad-cavity regime, such as testing of deformed commutators.

  9. Functional characterization of TRAP1-like protein involved in modulating fibrotic processes mediated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Chu, J.; Wen, C.J.; Fu, S.B.; Qian, Y.L.; Wo, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, D.R.

    2015-03-15

    The transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β)-mediated signaling pathway is believed to be closely associated with wound healing and scar formation, in which TRAP1-like protein (TLP) plays a role in regulating the balance of Smad2 vs. Smad3 signaling. Our previous study revealed the relation between TLP and collagen synthesis in normal human skin fibroblasts. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the effects of TLP on the process of hypertrophic scar formation and contraction. To explore and verify a contribution of TLP to the pathological mechanism of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFb), we constructed lentiviral vectors that either overexpressed TLP or encoded small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting TLP, then we transfected them into HSFb. TLP knockdown in HSFb resulted in reduced levels of cell contraction, type I and type III collagen mRNA transcripts and protein expression, and higher levels of fibronectin (FN) compared to control groups. In addition, knockdown of TLP promoted the phosphorylation of Smad3 but repressed Smad2 and Erk-1/2 phosphorylation in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts compared to control groups. The reduction of TLP did not interfere with HSF proliferative ability, but exogenous TLP cooperated with TGF-β1 to increase cell viability. Together, our findings demonstrate evidence for a contribution of TLP expression in hypertrophic scar formation and contraction. - Highlights: • TLP acted different roles in the activating of Smad2- and Smad3-dependent signaling. • TLP may induce TGF-β1-mediated collagens expression through Smad signalings and MAPK signaling. • TLP may enhance HSFb contraction by increasing the expression of α-SMA. • Exogenous TLP can cooperate with TGF-β1 to increase cell viability.

  10. Experimental investigation of supercritical CO2 trapping mechanisms at the Intermediate Laboratory Scale in well-defined heterogeneous porous media

    DOE PAGES

    Trevisan, Luca; Pini, Ronny; Cihan, Abdullah; ...

    2014-12-31

    The heterogeneous nature of typical sedimentary formations can play a major role in the propagation of the CO2 plume, eventually dampening the accumulation of mobile phase underneath the caprock. From core flooding experiments, it is also known that contrasts in capillary threshold pressure due to different pore size can affect the flow paths of the invading and displaced fluids and consequently influence the build- up of non-wetting phase (NWP) at interfaces between geological facies. The full characterization of the geologic variability at all relevant scales and the ability to make observations on the spatial and temporal distribution of the migrationmore » and trapping of supercritical CO2 is not feasible from a practical perspective. To provide insight into the impact of well-defined heterogeneous systems on the flow dynamics and trapping efficiency of supercritical CO2 under drainage and imbibition conditions, we present an experimental investigation at the meter scale conducted in synthetic sand reservoirs packed in a quasi-two-dimensional flow-cell. Two immiscible displacement experiments have been performed to observe the preferential entrapment of NWP in simple heterogeneous porous media. The experiments consisted of an injection, a fluid redistribution, and a forced imbibition stages conducted in an uncorrelated permeability field and a homogeneous base case scenario. We adopted x-ray attenuation analysis as a non-destructive technique that allows a precise measurement of phase saturations throughout the entire flow domain. By comparing a homogeneous and a heterogeneous scenario we have identified some important effects that can be attributed to capillary barriers, such as dampened plume advancement, higher non-wetting phase saturations, larger contact area between the injected and displaced phases, and a larger range of non-wetting phase saturations.« less

  11. Transprocessing: A Proposed Neurobiological Mechanism of Psychotherapeutic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    How does the human brain absorb information and turn it into skills of its own in psychotherapy? In an attempt to answer this question, the authors will review the intricacies of processing channels in psychotherapy and propose the term transprocessing (as in transduction and processing combined) for the underlying mechanisms. Through transprocessing the brain processes multimodal memories and creates reparative solutions in the course of psychotherapy. Transprocessing is proposed as a stage-sequenced mechanism of deconstruction of engrained patterns of response. Through psychotherapy, emotional-cognitive reintegration and its consolidation is accomplished. This process is mediated by cellular and neural plasticity changes. PMID:25478135

  12. Efficiently engineering pore-scale processes: The role of force dominance and topology during nonwetting phase trapping in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Anna L.; Andersson, Linnéa; Schlüter, Steffen; Sheppard, Adrian; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2015-05-01

    We investigate trapping of a nonwetting (NW) phase, air, within Bentheimer sandstone cores during drainage-imbibition flow experiments, as quantified on a three dimensional (3D) pore-scale basis via x-ray computed microtomography (X-ray CMT). The wetting (W) fluid in these experiments was deionized water doped with potassium iodide (1:6 by weight). We interpret these experiments based on the capillary-viscosity-gravity force dominance exhibited by the Bentheimer-air-brine system and compare to a wide range of previous drainage-imbibition experiments in different media and with different fluids. From this analysis, we conclude that viscous and capillary forces dominate in the Bentheimer-air-brine system as well as in the Bentheimer-supercritical CO2-brine system. In addition, we further develop the relationship between initial (post-drainage) NW phase connectivity and residual (post-imbibition) trapped NW phase saturation, while also taking into account initial NW phase saturation and imbibition capillary number. We quantify NW phase connectivity via a topological measure as well as by a statistical percolation metric. These metrics are evaluated for their utility and appropriateness in quantifying NW phase connectivity within porous media. Here, we find that there is a linear relationship between initial NW phase connectivity (as quantified by the normalized Euler number, χ ˆ) and capillary trapping efficiency; for a given imbibition capillary number, capillary trapping efficiency (residual NW phase saturation normalized by initial NW phase saturation) can decrease by up to 60% as initial NW phase connectivity increases from low connectivity (χ ˆ ≈ 0) to very high connectivity (χ ˆ ≈ 1). We propose that multiphase fluid-porous medium systems can be efficiently engineered to achieve a desired residual state (optimal NW phase saturation) by considering the dominant forces at play in the system along with the impacts of NW phase topology within the porous

  13. Using mechanical processing in recycling printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veit, Hugo M.; de Pereira, Carolina C.; Bernardes, Andréa M.

    2002-06-01

    tAs the number of electronic products in use increases, so does the need to dispose of defective and obsolete equipment, including printed circuit boards. The utilization of mechanical processing in recycling this type of waste enables recovery of the metals and allows components to be separated for proper waste disposal. Mechanical processing allows the recovery of 80% of the metals in printed circuit boards, especially copper, which represents approximately 75% of the metallic fraction.

  14. Magnetospheric dynamics of trapped solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, B. A.; Engel, M.; Chen, Y.; Friedel, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    Solar proton events (SEP) are sometimes trapped in the magnetosphere creating a new trapped belt or protons in the L=3 to L=4 range that can last for months. We note that there is a commonly observed and unexplained time gap between the SEP event and flux being observed in the L=3 to L=4 trapping region from the POES spacecraft. We present two hypotheses to explain the time gap and explore each. First the SEP trapping mechanism is thought to be driven by interplanetary shocks, required to drive the protons deep into the magnetosphere to regions where geomagnetic shielding does not normally grant them access where they then can become trapped. The processes that drive the protons are highly peaked at equatorial pitch angles near 90 degrees explaining the time gap as the time required for pitch angle diffusion to change the particles to pitch angles observable by POES in low-Earth orbit. The second hypothesis is that the time gap is the result of radial transport preserving the first adiabatic invariant thus energizing the protons from one energy channel to another. The time gap is then the time required for radial transport to move and energize the particles into the L=3 to L=4 region. Evidence and conclusions about each hypothesis is presented.

  15. Mechanization and automation of production processes in turbine building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodyanyuk, V. P.

    1984-02-01

    Specialists at the All-Union Institute of Planning and Technology of Energy Machine Building are working on the problem of mechanization and automation of production processes. One of the major technological processes being worked on is the production of welded units. At the present time the Institute has designed a centralized cutting and manufacturing shop in use at several metallurgical plants, clamping devices for materials hoists based on permanent magnets, a program controlled installation for driving shaped apertures in welded diaphragm rims and an automated system for planning technological processes involved in manufacturing operations. Even in the manufacture of such individualized devices as turbines, mechanization and automation of production processes are economically justified. During the 11th Five Year Plan, the Institute will continue to develop progressive technological processes and equipment for precise shaping of turbine blade blanks, mechanical working of parts of steam, gas and hydraulic turbines, as well as nuclear powerplant turbines.

  16. In situ plasma removal of surface contaminants from ion trap electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haltli, Raymond A.

    2015-05-01

    In this thesis, the construction and implementation of an in situ plasma discharge designed to remove surface contaminants from electrodes in an ion trapping experimental system is presented with results. In recent years, many advances have been made in using ion traps for quantum information processing. All of the criteria defined by DiVincenzo for using ion traps for implementing a quantum computer have been individually demonstrated, and in particular surface traps provide a scalable platform for ions. In order to be used for quantum algorithms, trapped ions need to be cooled to their motional (quantum mechanical) ground state. One of the hurdles in integrating surface ion traps for a quantum computer is minimizing electric field noise, which causes the ion to heat out of its motional ground state and which increases with smaller ion-to-electrode distances realized with surface traps. Surface contamination of trap electrodes is speculated to be the primary source of electric field noise. The main goal achieved by this work was to implement an in situ surface cleaning solution for surface electrode ion traps, which would not modify the ion trap electrode surface metal. Care was taken in applying the RF power in order to localize a plasma near the trap electrodes. A method for characterizing the energy of the plasma ions arriving at the ion trap surface is presented and results for plasma ion energies are shown. Finally, a method for quantifying the effectiveness of plasma cleaning of trap electrodes, using the surface analysis technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for measuring the amount and kind of surface contaminants, is described. A significant advantage of the trap electrode surface cleaning method presented here is the minimal changes necessary for implementation on a working ion trap experimental system.

  17. Process sampling module coupled with purge and trap-GC-FID for in situ auto-monitoring of volatile organic compounds in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Wang; Liu, Yung-Tsun; Wu, Bei-Zen; Nian, Hung-Chi; Chen, Hsing-Jung; Chiu, Kong-Hwa; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    2009-12-15

    An automatic sampling device, i.e., process sampling module (PSM), connected with a purge and trap-GC-FID system has been developed for real-time monitoring of VOCs in wastewater. The system was designed to simultaneously monitor 17 compounds, including one polar compound, i.e., acetone, and 16 non-polar compounds. The trapping tube is packed with two adsorbents, Carbopack B and Carbosieve III, to trap target compounds. For the purpose of in situ monitoring, the flush valve of the sampling tube is composed of two two-way valves and a time controller to prevent absorption interference of the residue. The optimal conditions for the analytical system include a 12 min purge time at a temperature of 60 degrees C, and 4 min of desorption time with a desorption temperature of 260 degrees C. Good chromatograms have been obtained with the analytical system even if a cryogenic device and de-misting were not used. The relative standards deviation (RSD) of the system is between 2% and 13.4%, and accuracies between 0.3 and 23.5% have been achieved. The detection limits of the method range from 0.32 to 2.39 ppb. In this system, the four parts, i.e., PSM, P&T, GC, and FID, were simple, reliable and rugged. Also, the interface of these four parts was simple and dependable.

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Processing Parameters for the INCONEL ALLOY 740

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.; Smith, G.

    2007-11-19

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Special Metals Corporation (SMC) to determine the mechanical property response of the IN740 alloy to help establish thermo-mechanical processing parameters for the use of this alloy in supercritical and ultra-critical boiler tubes with the potential for other end uses. SMC had developed an alloy, commercially known as INCONEL alloy 740, which exhibited various beneficial physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. As part of SMC's on-going efforts to optimize this alloy for targeted boiler applications there was a need to develop an understanding of the thermo-mechanical response of the material, characterize the resulting microstructure from this processing, and possibly, utilize models to develop the appropriate processing scheme for this product.

  19. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  20. Trapping the transition state of an ATP-binding cassette transporter: Evidence for a concerted mechanism of maltose transport

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jue; Sharma, Susan; Quiocho, Florante A.; Davidson, Amy L.

    2001-01-01

    High-affinity uptake into bacterial cells is mediated by a large class of periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport systems, members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily. In the maltose transport system of Escherichia coli, the periplasmic maltose-binding protein binds its substrate maltose with high affinity and, in addition, stimulates the ATPase activity of the membrane-associated transporter when maltose is present. Vanadate inhibits maltose transport by trapping ADP in one of the two nucleotide-binding sites of the membrane transporter immediately after ATP hydrolysis, consistent with its ability to mimic the transition state of the γ-phosphate of ATP during hydrolysis. Here we report that the maltose-binding protein becomes tightly associated with the membrane transporter in the presence of vanadate and simultaneously loses its high affinity for maltose. These results suggest a general model explaining how ATP hydrolysis is coupled to substrate transport in which a binding protein stimulates the ATPase activity of its cognate transporter by stabilizing the transition state. PMID:11171984

  1. Switching Oxide Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  2. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  3. Experimental analysis of the magnetic field shielding and trapping properties of bulk melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. H.; Astill, D. M.; Lo, W.; Cardwell, D. A.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.; Larsen, J. G.

    1995-02-01

    A scanning Hall probe has been used to map the distributions of magnetic field in melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) discs prepared by seeded and controlled molten-zone techniques. Both shielded and trapped fields were studied as a function of applied magnetic field for each speciment. A clear four-fold symmetry has been observed in the field distribution of the seeded melt-processed sample, suggesting that there are two planes in the disc which exhibit a weak response to an applied field. Similar magnetic properties were observed for the molten-zone processed sample and attributed to the presence of cracks in the specimen. It was found that the applied field required to saturate each sample was much higher than the maximum observed trapped field, in contradiction to the Bean model for a slab geometry. This effect, which is probably due to the plate geometry of the specimens and the variation of critical current density with magnetic field, has implications for practical applications of bulk melt-processed YBCO.

  4. Mechanical Design Support System Based on Thinking Process Development Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Hisao; Kinukawa, Hiroshi; Morii, Hiroshi; Nakao, Masayuki; Hatamura, Yotaro

    This paper describes a system that directly supports a design process in a mechanical domain. This system is based on a thinking process development diagram that draws distinctions between requirement, tasks, solutions, and implementation, which enables designers to expand and deepen their thoughts of design. The system provides five main functions that designers require in each phase of the proposed design process: (1) thinking process description support which enables designers to describe their thoughts, (2) creativity support by term association with thesauri, (3) timely display of design knowledge including know-how obtained through earlier failures, general design theories, standard-parts data, and past designs, (4) design problem solving support using 46 kinds of thinking operations, and (5) proper technology transfer support which accumulates not only design conclusions but also the design process. Though this system is applied to mechanical engineering as the first target domain, it can be easily expanded to many other domains such as architecture and electricity.

  5. Adiabatic shear mechanisms for the hard cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Wang, Bo; Liu, Xianli; Feng, Huize; Cai, Chunbin

    2015-05-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remains some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high strain domain caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  6. Solar trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1988-02-09

    A solar trap for collecting solar energy at a concentrated level is described comprising: (a) a compound light funnel including a pair of light reflecting substantially planar members arranged into a trough having a substantially V-shaped cross section; (b) a two dimensional Fresnel lens cover covering the opening of the compound light funnel, the opening being the open diverging end of the substantially V-shaped cross section of the compound light funnel; (c) at least one conduit for carrying a heat transfer fluid disposed substantially adjacent and substantially parallel to the apex line of the compound light funnel.

  7. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  8. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  9. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  10. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA-processing defects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2014-06-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here, we discuss how RNA-processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer.

  11. Social Information Processing Mechanisms and Victimization: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    van Reemst, Lisa; Fischer, Tamar F C; Zwirs, Barbara W C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current literature review, which is based on 64 empirical studies, was to assess to what extent mechanisms of the Social Information Processing (SIP) model of Crick and Dodge (1994) are related to victimization. The reviewed studies have provided support for the relation between victimization and several social information processing mechanisms, especially the interpretation of cues and self-efficacy (as part of the response decision). The relationship between victimization and other mechanisms, such as the response generation, was only studied in a few articles. Until now research has often focused on just one step of the model, instead of attempting to measure the associations between multiple mechanisms and victimization in multivariate analyses. Such analyses would be interesting to gain more insight into the SIP model and its relationship with victimization. The few available longitudinal studies show that mechanisms both predict victimization (internal locus of control, negative self-evaluations and less assertive response selection) and are predicted by victimization (hostile attribution of intent and negative evaluations of others). Associations between victimization and SIP mechanisms vary across different types and severity of victimization (stronger in personal and severe victimization), and different populations (stronger among young victims). Practice could focus on these stronger associations and the interpretation of cues. More research is needed however, to investigate whether intervention programs that address SIP mechanisms are suitable for victimization and all relevant populations.

  12. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  13. Processing dependence of mechanical properties of metallic glass nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2015-02-16

    Compared to their crystalline counterparts, nanowires made of metallic glass have not only superb properties but also remarkable processing ability. They can be processed easily and cheaply like plastics via a wide range of methods. To date, the underlying mechanisms of how these different processing routes affect the wires' properties as well as the atomic structure remains largely unknown. Here, by using atomistic modeling, we show that different processing methods can greatly influence the mechanical properties. The nanowires made via focused ion beam milling and embossing exhibit higher strength but localized plastic deformation, whereas that made by casting from liquid shows excellent ductility with homogeneous deformation but reduced strength. The different responses are reflected sensitively in the underlying atomic structure and packing density, some of which have been observed experimentally. The presence of the gradient of alloy concentration and surface effect will be discussed.

  14. Direct Experimental Evidence of Hole Trapping in Negative Bias Temperature Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao-Li; Liao, Yi-Ming; Yan, Feng; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Guan; Guo, Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) in ultrathin-plasma-nitrided-oxide (PNO) based p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (pMOSFETs) is investigated at temperatures ranging from 220K to 470K. It is found that the threshold voltage VT degradation below 290 K is dominated by the hole trapping process. Further studies unambiguously show that this process is unnecessarily related to nitrogen but the incorporation of nitrogen in the gate dielectric increases the probability of hole trapping in the NBTI process as it introduces extra trap states located in the upper half of the Si band gap. The possible hole trapping mechanism in NBTI stressed PNO pMOSFETs is suggested by taking account of oxygen and nitrogen related trap centers.

  15. Hemispheric Differences in the Recruitment of Semantic Processing Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandhadai, Padmapriya; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how the two cerebral hemispheres recruit semantic processing mechanisms by combining event-related potential measures and visual half-field methods in a word priming paradigm in which semantic strength and predictability were manipulated using lexically associated word pairs. Activation patterns on the late positive complex…

  16. Antibiotic trapping by plasmid-encoded CMY-2 β-lactamase combined with reduced outer membrane permeability as a mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goessens, Wil H F; van der Bij, Akke K; van Boxtel, Ria; Pitout, Johann D D; van Ulsen, Peter; Melles, Damian C; Tommassen, Jan

    2013-08-01

    A liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane protein profiles showed that both CS and CR E. coli lacked the porins OmpF and OmpC. Furthermore, PCR and sequence analysis revealed that both CS and CR E. coli possessed bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(OXA-1). The CR E. coli strain additionally harbored bla(CMY-2) and demonstrated a >15-fold increase in β-lactamase activity against nitrocefin, but no hydrolysis of meropenem was detected. However, nitrocefin hydrolysis appeared strongly inhibited by meropenem. Furthermore, the CMY-2 enzyme demonstrated lower electrophoretic mobility after its incubation either in vitro or in vivo with meropenem, indicative of its covalent modification with meropenem. The presence of the acyl-enzyme complex was confirmed by mass spectrometry. By transformation of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid into various E. coli strains, it was established that both porin deficiency and high-level expression of the enzyme were needed to confer meropenem resistance. In conclusion, carbapenem resistance emerged by a combination of elevated β-lactamase production and lack of porin expression. Due to the reduced outer membrane permeability, only small amounts of meropenem can enter the periplasm, where they are trapped but not degraded by the large amount of the β-lactamase. This study, therefore, provides evidence that the mechanism of "trapping" by CMY-2 β-lactamase plays a role in carbapenem resistance.

  17. Processing carbon nanotube/thermoplastic composites for enhanced mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Kern

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/thermoplastic composites have many potential applications. However, processing CNT/thermoplastic composites has been extremely challenging due to the inherently strong affinity of CNT to themselves. Two major issues in processing CNT/thermoplastic composites for enhanced mechanical properties are achieving uniform dispersion and producing alignment of the nanotubes in the polymer matrix. This study used a combination of surfactant-aided mixing, extrusion, and various drawing processing techniques to successfully obtain significant improvement of nanotube dispersion and alignment in a semi-crystalline polymer matrix.

  18. Trapped particle absorption by the ring of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.

    1985-01-01

    The ring systems of Jupiter and Saturn, and their interaction with the magnetosphere were studied. Opportunities to improve the understanding of the sweeping effect of orbiting material on trapped radiation, and the use of this process to gain insight on both the trapped radiation and the target material are outlined. Within the cosmogony of Hannes Alfven, this mechanism is also the key to understanding the formation of many of the features of the Saturnian rings. A better understanding of the sweeping effect would also help to clarify this process.

  19. Mechanisms of acoustic processing of a metal melt containing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, O.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Dubkova, Ya.; Stepkina, M.

    2016-11-01

    Wave processing with the frequencies from subsound (vibration) to ultrasound is used to produce nanopowder-modified composite alloys. This work considers mechanisms of such processing of metal melts, which lead to deagglomeration and wettability of particles of a metal melt and to the destruction of growing crystals during solidification. The main dependences for the threshold of the turbulence and cavitation were obtained. Resonance phenomena that contribute to positive changes in the melt are discussed. Possible mechanisms of the destruction of growing crystals and agglomerates of particles at the high-frequency processing of the melt are considered, including the destruction of agglomerates in the front of an acoustic wave and the destruction of crystals by oscillating solid particles.

  20. Photons and evolution: quantum mechanical processes modulate sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2009-09-01

    This paper will show that the fractional difference in the human gender ratio (GR) between the GR(at death) for those born in solar cycle peak years (maxima) and the GR(at death) in those born in solar cycle non-peak years (minima), e.g., 0.023, divided by Pi, yields a reasonable approximation of the quantum mechanical constant, alpha, or the fine structure constant (FSC) approximately 0.007297... or approximately 1/137. This finding is based on a sample of approximately 50 million cases using common, readily available demographic data, e.g., state of birth, birth date, death date, and gender. Physicists Nair, Geim et al. had found precisely the same fractional difference, 0.023, in the absorption of white light (sunlight) by a single-atom thick layer of graphene, a carbon skeleton resembling chicken wire fencing. This absorption fraction, when divided by Pi, yielded the FSC and was the first time this constant could "so directly be assessed practically by the naked eye". As the GR is a reflection of sexual differentiation, this paper reveals that a quantum mechanical process, as manifested by the FSC, is playing a role in the primordial process of replication, a necessary requirement of life. Successful replication is the primary engine driving evolution, which at a biochemical level, is a quantum mechanical process dependent upon photonic energy from the Sun. We propose that a quantum-mechanical, photon-driven chemical evolution preceded natural selection in biology and the mechanisms of mitosis and meiosis are manifestations of this chemical evolution in ancient seas over 3 billion years ago. Evolutionary processes became extant first in self-replicating molecules forced to adapt to high energy photons, mostly likely in the ultraviolet spectrum. These events led to evolution by natural selection as complex mixing of genetic material within species creating the variety needed to match changing environments reflecting the same process initiated at the dawn of life

  1. Covalent Intermediate in the Catalytic Mechanism of the Radical SAM Methyl Synthase RlmN Trapped by Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Kevin P.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Shiver, Anthony L.; Nichols, Robert J.; Yan, Feng; Maltby, David A.; Gross, Carol A.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2012-01-01

    The posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) modulates ribosomal function and confers resistance to antibiotics targeted to the ribosome. The radical SAM (S-adenosyl-L-methionine) methyl synthases, RlmN and Cfr, both methylate A2503 within the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of prokaryotic ribosomes, yielding 2-methyl- and 8-methyl-adenosine, respectively. The C2 and C8 positions of adenosine are unusual methylation substrates due to their electrophilicity. To accomplish this reaction, RlmN and Cfr proceed by a shared radical-mediated mechanism. However, in addition to the radical SAM CX3CX2C motif, both RlmN and Cfr contain two conserved cysteine residues required for in vivo function. These conserved cysteine residues are putatively involved in a covalent intermediate employed by RlmN and Cfr in order to achieve this challenging transformation. Currently, there is no direct evidence for this proposed covalent intermediate. We have further investigated the roles of these conserved cysteines in the mechanism of RlmN. Cysteine 118 mutants of RlmN are unable to resolve the covalent intermediate, either in vivo or in vitro, enabling us to isolate and characterize this intermediate. Additionally, tandem mass spectrometric analyses of mutant RlmN reveal a methylene-linked adenosine modification at cysteine 355. Employing deuterium-labeled SAM and RNA substrates in vitro has allowed us to further elucidate the mechanism of formation of this intermediate. Together, these experiments provide compelling evidence for the formation of a covalent intermediate species formed between RlmN and its rRNA substrate and the roles of the conserved cysteine residues in catalysis. PMID:23088750

  2. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  3. Experiments with an ion-neutral hybrid trap: cold charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. W.; Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Banerjee, S.; Côté, R.; Michels, H. H.; Mongtomery, J. A.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their large trap depths (˜1 eV or 10,000 K), versatility, and ease of construction, Paul traps have important uses in high-resolution spectroscopy, plasma physics, and precision measurements of fundamental constants. An ion-neutral hybrid trap consisting of two separate but spatially concentric traps [a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for the neutral species and a mass-selective linear Paul trap for the ionic species] is an ideal apparatus for sympathetic cooling. However, over the past few years, hybrid traps have proven most useful in measuring elastic and charge-exchange rate constants of ion-neutral collisions over a wide temperature range from kilo-Kelvin to nano-Kelvin. We report some initially surprising results from a hybrid trap system in our laboratory where we have loaded the Paul trap with Ca+ ions in the presence of a Na MOT (localized dense gas of cold Na atoms). We find a strong loss of Ca+ ions with MOT exposure, attributed to an exothermic, non-resonant ion-neutral charge-exchange process with an activation barrier, which leads to the formation of Na+ ions. We propose a detailed mechanism for this process. We obtain an estimated measure of the rate constant for this charge exchange of ˜2 × 10-11 cm3/s, much less than the Langevin rate, which suggests that the Langevin assumption of unit efficiency in the reaction region is not correct in this case.

  4. Comparing Ultrasound and Mechanical Steering in a Biodiesel Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.; Ferreira, Jerusa R. L.

    The analysis of the kinetics of the transesterification reaction is crucial to compare different routes or routes with different catalysts or reaction accelerators. The use of ultrasound is considereda method for accelerating the biodiesel production. However, little effort has been done and is reported in the literature about how and under what conditions the use of ultrasound really speeds up the process, or the conditions under which its use is unnecessary or even harmful, burdening the process. Two dissimilar energy injections into a typical route were tested: ultrasound (@ 1 MHz and no heating) and mechanical steering (with heating), both applied in an 8:1 ratio of soybean oil and methanol, adding 1% of KOH as catalyzer. As results, during the first 10 minutes of reaction ultrasound showed unbearable effect on the transesterification, whilst mechanical steering and heating achieved almost 70% of conversion ratio. However, during the following 10 minutes, the mechanical steering and heating got nothing more than 80% of conversion, a considerable less efficient process than ultrasound assisted one, which achieved more than 90%. The straightforward explanation is that ultrasound continually inserts energy in a slower rate, what can result in a more stable conversion scenario. On the other hand, mechanical steering and heating provides more energy at a glance, but cannot push the final conversion rate beyond a limit, as the transesterification is a double-way chemical process. The instability mechanical steering and heating settles in the reaction medium pulls the components back to their original states more than pushes than to the converted equilibrium state of the matter.

  5. Process Improvement Through Tool Integration in Aero-Mechanical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Clark

    2010-01-01

    Emerging capabilities in commercial design tools promise to significantly improve the multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary design and analysis coverage for aerospace mechanical engineers. This paper explores the analysis process for two example problems of a wing and flap mechanical drive system and an aircraft landing gear door panel. The examples begin with the design solid models and include various analysis disciplines such as structural stress and aerodynamic loads. Analytical methods include CFD, multi-body dynamics with flexible bodies and structural analysis. Elements of analysis data management, data visualization and collaboration are also included.

  6. Damages to optical silica glass: processes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Zheng, Lianqing; An, Qi; Wu, Heng-An; Xia, Kaiwen; Ni, Sidao

    2007-01-01

    We present recent results of molecular dynamics simulations to illustrate the processes and mechanisms in damages to silica glass, including densification, cavitation, fragmentation and agglomeration via photon, electron, ion and neutron radiations and stresses. Radiation of glass creates point defects (vacancies and interstitials), and subsequent structure relaxation induces densification. Nanovoid below a certain size and rapid-quenching of silica liquid can also densify a glass. Hot spots due to photon-absorbing impurities in glass may cause local densification and cavitation as well. Densification can also be induced by compressional stress, and spall, by tensile stress. The densified glasses, regardless of the exact processes, share similar structural and vibrational properties, for example, the five-fold coordinated Si atoms. Densification is essentially a kinetic frustration during structure relaxation driven by excessive free energy, e.g., due to defects or stresses. The point-defect mechanism is dominant for densification without compression and complemented by thermal spike mechanism in thermal processes. Defects, thermal effects and stresses may interplay in a general damage process in silica glass.

  7. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  8. Quantum processes as a mechanism in olfaction for smell recognition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    The physics of smell is not well understood. The biological processes that occur following a signalling event are well understood (Buck 1991). However, the reasons how and why a signalling event occurs when a particular smell molecule and receptor combination is made, remains un-established. Luca Turin proposes a signalling mechanism which determines smell molecules by quantum mechanics (Turin 1996). Investigation of this mechanism shows it to be physically robust (Brookes,et al, 2007), and consequences of the theory provides quantitative measurements of smell and interesting potential experiments that may determine whether the recognition of smell is a quantum event. Brookes, J.C, Hartoutsiou, F, Horsfield, A.P and Stoneham, A.M. (2007). Physical Review Letters 98, no. 3 038101 Buck, L. (1991) Cell, 65, no.1 (4): 175-187. Turin, L. (1996) Chemical Sences 21, no 6. 773-791 With many thanks to the Wellcome Trust.

  9. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Judith M; McCombe, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways. PMID:23055689

  10. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  11. The interplay between cell signaling and mechanics in developmental processes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Callie Johnson; Davidson, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Force and stress production within embryos and organisms are crucial physical processes that direct morphogenesis. In addition, there is mounting evidence that biomechanical cues created by these processes guide cell behaviors and cell fates. Here we review key roles for biomechanics during development to directly shape tissues, provide positional information for cell fate decisions, and enable robust programs of development. Several recently identified molecular mechanisms suggest how cells and tissues might coordinate their responses to biomechanical cues. Lastly, we outline long-term challenges in integrating biomechanics with genetic analysis of developing embryos. PMID:24045690

  12. Process entanglement as a neuronal anchorage mechanism to rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorkin, Raya; Greenbaum, Alon; David-Pur, Moshe; Anava, Sarit; Ayali, Amir; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Hanein, Yael

    2009-01-01

    The organization of neurons and glia cells on substrates composed of pristine carbon nanotube islands was investigated using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Neurons were found bound and preferentially anchored to the rough surfaces; moreover, the morphology of the neuronal processes on the small, isolated islands of high density carbon nanotubes was found to be conspicuously curled and entangled. We further demonstrate that the roughness of the surface must match the diameter of the neuronal processes in order to allow them to bind. The results presented here suggest that entanglement, a mechanical effect, may constitute an additional mechanism by which neurons (and possibly other cell types) anchor themselves to rough surfaces. Understanding the nature of the interface between neurons and carbon nanotubes is essential to effectively harness carbon nanotube technology in neurological applications such as neuro-prosthetic and retinal electrodes.

  13. Transport Processes from Mechanics: Minimal and Simplest Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunimovich, Leonid A.; Grigo, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    We review the current state of a fundamental problem of rigorous derivation of transport processes in classical statistical mechanics from classical mechanics. Such derivations for diffusion and momentum transport (viscosities) were obtained for minimal models of these processes involving one and two particles respectively. However, a minimal model which demonstrates heat conductivity contains three particles. Its rigorous analysis is currently out of reach for existing mathematical techniques. The gas of localized balls is widely accepted as a basis for a simplest model for derivation of Fourier's law. We suggest a modification of the localized balls gas and argue that this gas of localized activated balls is a good candidate to rigorously prove Fourier's law. In particular, hyperbolicity is derived for a reduced version of this model.

  14. Transport Processes from Mechanics: Minimal and Simplest Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunimovich, Leonid A.; Grigo, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    We review the current state of a fundamental problem of rigorous derivation of transport processes in classical statistical mechanics from classical mechanics. Such derivations for diffusion and momentum transport (viscosities) were obtained for minimal models of these processes involving one and two particles respectively. However, a minimal model which demonstrates heat conductivity contains three particles. Its rigorous analysis is currently out of reach for existing mathematical techniques. The gas of localized balls is widely accepted as a basis for a simplest model for derivation of Fourier's law. We suggest a modification of the localized balls gas and argue that this gas of localized activated balls is a good candidate to rigorously prove Fourier's law. In particular, hyperbolicity is derived for a reduced version of this model.

  15. Deployment Process, Mechanization, and Testing for the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Ted

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mar Exploration Rover (MER) robotic prospectors were produced in an environment of unusually challenging schedule, volume, and mass restrictions. The technical challenges pushed the system s design towards extensive integration of function, which resulted in complex system engineering issues. One example of the system's integrated complexity can be found in the deployment process for the rover. Part of this process, rover "standup", is outlined in this paper. Particular attention is given to the Rover Lift Mechanism's (RLM) role and its design. Analysis methods are presented and compared to test results. It is shown that because prudent design principles were followed, a robust mechanism was created that minimized the duration of integration and test, and enabled recovery without perturbing related systems when reasonably foreseeable problems did occur. Examples of avoidable, unnecessary difficulty are also presented.

  16. Investigation of formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting of mild steel and the transformation conditions between various morphology chips. It is supposed that the modeling material follows the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. In orthogonal cutting process, both the plastic flow and the instability behaviors of chip materials are caused by the plane strain loadings. Therefore, the general instability behaviors of materials in plane strain state are first analyzed with linear perturbation method and a universal instability criterion is established. Based on the analytical results, the formation mechanisms of chips and the transformation conditions between continuous and serrated chips are further studied by instability phase diagram method. The results show that the chip formation strongly depends on the intensity ratios between shear and normal stresses. The ratios of dissipative rates of plastic work done by compression and shear stresses govern the transformation from continuous to serrated chips. These results are verified by the numerical simulations on the orthogonal cutting process.

  17. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  18. Mechanisms of Excitation and Ionization Processes in Sputtering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    PROCESSES IN SPUTTERING cFINAL REPORT In IGNATIUS S.T. TSONG AUGUST 7, 1985 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT NO. N00014-81-K-0844 CARIZONA STATE...interactions. To this end, we direct our investigation on the particles sputtered when a solid surface is subjected to energetic ion bombardment. An...understanding of the basic mechanisms will allow better interpretation of experimental data obtained by surface analytical techniques which make use of sputtering

  19. Trapping ions in a segmented ring trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakov, B. P.; Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Haltli, R.; Tigges, C. P.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.; Moehring, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate robust trapping in an ion trap which has a ring shaped RF node. Ions are back-side loaded through a small 10 μm diameter loading hole and we have demonstrated thousands of complete circuits around the trap. Each circuit passes through 44 trapping zones; the trap has 89 independent DC control electrodes. Measurements of the tangential secular frequency indicate a weak dependence on the RF and the loading hole. The ion trap is fabricated using four metal layers, allowing for the inner islanded electrodes to be electrically routed underneath the trap with negligible effects on the trapped ions. [4pt] This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Study of formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Vikas; Kaur, Jagjeet; Parganiha, Yogita; Suryanarayana, N S; Murthy, K V R

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence properties of Eu(3+) doped different host matrix phosphors (SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9). The phosphor is prepared by high temperature solid state reaction method. The method is suitable for large scale production and fixed concentration of boric acid using as a flux. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and the crystallite size calculated by Scherer's formula. The prepared phosphor characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), thermoluminescence (TL) and Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) techniques. The prepared phosphors for different concentration of Eu(3+) ions were examined by TL glow curve for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. The UV 254nm source used for UV irradiation, Sr(90) source was used for beta irradiation and Co(60) source used for gamma irradiation. SrY2O4:Eu(3+)and Y4Al2O9:Eu(3+) phosphors which shows both higher temperature peaks and lower temperature peaks for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. Here UV irradiated sample shows the formation of shallow trap (surface trapping) and the gamma irradiated sample shows the formation of deep trapping. The estimation of trap formation was evaluated by knowledge of trapping parameters. The trapping parameters such as activation energy, order of kinetics and frequency factor were calculated by peak shape method. Here most of the peak shows second order of kinetics. The effect of gamma, beta and UV exposure on TL studies was also examined and it shows linear response with dose which indicate that the samples may be useful for TL dosimetry. Formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors is discussed in this paper.

  1. Suppressive mechanisms in visual motion processing: from perception to intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Tadin, Duje

    2015-01-01

    Perception operates on an immense amount of incoming information that greatly exceeds the brain's processing capacity. Because of this fundamental limitation, the ability to suppress irrelevant information is a key determinant of perceptual efficiency. Here, I will review a series of studies investigating suppressive mechanisms in visual motion processing, namely perceptual suppression of large, background-like motions. These spatial suppression mechanisms are adaptive, operating only when sensory inputs are sufficiently robust to guarantee visibility. Converging correlational and causal evidence links these behavioral results with inhibitory center-surround mechanisms, namely those in cortical area MT. Spatial suppression is abnormally weak in several special populations, including the elderly and those with schizophrenia—a deficit that is evidenced by better-than-normal direction discriminations of large moving stimuli. Theoretical work shows that this abnormal weakening of spatial suppression should result in motion segregation deficits, but direct behavioral support of this hypothesis is lacking. Finally, I will argue that the ability to suppress information is a fundamental neural process that applies not only to perception but also to cognition in general. Supporting this argument, I will discuss recent research that shows individual differences in spatial suppression of motion signals strongly predict individual variations in IQ scores. PMID:26299386

  2. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition.

  3. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition. PMID:27830709

  4. Micromachined Dust Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromachined traps devised to capture dust particles for analysis without contaminating them. Based on micromachined structures retaining particles, rather than adhesives or greases interfering with scanning-electron-microscope analysis or x-ray imaging. Unlike maze traps and traps enmeshing particles in steel wool or similar materials, micromachined traps do not obscure trapped particles. Internal geometries of traps range from simple cones to U-shapes, all formed by etching silicon.

  5. Mechanical Properties Studies of Components Formulation for Mixing Process Contain of Polypropylene, Polyethylene, and Aluminium Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamsi, A.; Dinzi, R.

    2017-03-01

    Certain powder and others components can induce toxic reactions if not properly handled in the mixing stage. During handling, the small particles can become airborne and be trapped in the lungs, another concern is inhomogeneities in the mixing process. Uniform quantities of the particles of the components are needed in all portions of the mixture. This paper reports the results of mechanical properties studies of mixing three components formulation for mixing process. Contain of Polyethylene (PE), Polyprophylene (PP) and Aluminium Powder. Powder mixer, Autodesk mold flow and computer based on excell method was carried out to study the influence of each formulation component on the flow %, PE 20% and Aluminium powder 2%. Macroscopic optic and macro photo was carried out to identify the homogenity of mixing, tensile test for identify the strength of component after mixing. Finally the optimal tensile test with composition PP 785,PE 20% and Aluminium powder 2% at speed 52 rpm, temperature 1500C, the tensile strength 20,92 N/mm2. At temperature 1600C, speed 100 rpm the optimum tensile strength 17,91 N/mm2. The result of simulation autodesk mold flow adviser the filling time 6 seconds. Otherwise on manual hot hidraulic press the time of filling 10 seconds.

  6. Disappearance of Barrier Metal during Cu Chemical Mechanical Planarization Processing and Its Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akihito; Hirano, Tatsuhiko; Tamai, Kazusei; Morinaga, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    The bald disappearance of barrier metal had been observed on the wafer after Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processing. It was speculated that this phenomenon occurs because the excessively oxidized Ta by electrochemical reaction with Cu ion was removed more easily than the normal Ta oxide around it. The inhibition of the electrochemical reaction is necessary to solve this phenomenon.

  7. Study on carrier trapping and emission processes in InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots by varying filling pulse width during DLTS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Soak; Kim, Eun Kyu; Kim, Jun Oh; Lee, Sang Jun; Noh, Sam Kyu

    2009-07-01

    The carrier trapping and emission processes of InAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs substrates were measured and analyzed using capacitance-voltage techniques and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). We used different applied biases and filling pulse widths. This allowed the determination of the activation energies of defect/electronic states of the QDs within a range of 0.08-0.59 eV. These values represent the energy levels of the QDs with respect to the host matrix, showing that QDs have band-like interacting energy levels and that DLTS signals are largely affected by the electron density of states of QDs.

  8. Mechanical Clogging Processes in Unconsolidated Porous Media Near Pumping Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zwart, B.; Schotting, R.; Hassanizadeh, M.

    2003-12-01

    In the Netherlands water supply companies produce over more than one billion cubic meters of drinking water every year. About 2500 water wells are used to pump up the groundwater from aquifers in the Dutch subsurface. More than 50% of these wells will encounter a number of technical problems during their lifetime. The main problem is the decrease in capacity due to well clogging. Clogging shows up after a number of operation years and results in extra, expensive cleaning operations and in early replacement of the pumping wells. This problem has been acknowledged by other industries, for example the metal, petroleum, beer industry and underground storage projects. Well clogging is the result of a number of interacting mechanisms creating a complex problem in the subsurface. In most clogging cases mechanical mechanisms are involved. A large number of studies have been performed to comprehend these processes. Investigations on mechanical processes are focused on transport of small particles through pores and deposition of particles due to physical or physical-chemical processes. After a period of deposition the particles plug the pores and decrease the permeability of the medium. Particle deposition in porous media is usually modelled using filtration theory. In order to get the dynamics of clogging this theory is not sufficient. The porous media is continuously altered due to deposition and mobilization. Therefore the capture characteristics will also continuously change and deposition rates will change in time. A new formula is derived to describe (re)mobilization of particles and allow changing deposition rates. This approach incorporates detachment and reattachment of deposited particles. This work also includes derivation of the filtration theory in radial coordinates. A comparison between the radial filtration theory and the new formula will be shown.

  9. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Padma

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  10. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, Sho C.; de Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-03-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently `explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies.

  11. Plant uprooting by flow as a fatigue mechanical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perona, Paolo; Edmaier, Katharina; Crouzy, Benoît

    2015-04-01

    In river corridors, plant uprooting by flow mostly occurs as a delayed process where flow erosion first causes root exposure until residual anchoring balances hydrodynamic forces on the part of the plant that is exposed to the stream. Because a given plant exposure time to the action of the stream is needed before uprooting occurs (time-to-uprooting), this uprooting mechanism has been denominated Type II, in contrast to Type I, which mostly affect early stage seedlings and is rather instantaneous. In this work, we propose a stochastic framework that describes a (deterministic) mechanical fatigue process perturbed by a (stochastic) process noise, where collapse occurs after a given exposure time. We test the model using the experimental data of Edmaier (2014) and Edmaier et al. (submitted), who investigated vegetation uprooting by flow in the limit of low plant stem-to-sediment size ratio by inducing parallel riverbed erosion within an experimental flume. We first identify the proper timescale and lengthscale for rescaling the model. Then, we show that it describes well all the empirical cumulative distribution functions (cdf) of time-to-uprooting obtained under constant riverbed erosion rate and assuming additive gaussian process noise. By this mean, we explore the level of determinism and stochasticity affecting the time-to-uprooting for Avena sativa in relation to root anchoring and flow drag forces. We eventually ascribe the overall dynamics of the Type II uprooting mechanism to the memory of the plant-soil system that is stored by root anchoring, and discuss related implications thereof. References Edmaier, K., Uprooting mechansims of juvenile vegetation by flow erosion, Ph.D. thesis, EPFL, 2014. Edmaier, K., Crouzy, B. and P. Perona. Experimental characterization of vegetation uprooting by flow. J. of Geophys. Res. - Biogeosci., submitted

  12. Origin DNA Melting—An Essential Process with Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Matthew P.; Jones, John M.; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Origin DNA melting is an essential process in the various domains of life. The replication fork helicase unwinds DNA ahead of the replication fork, providing single-stranded DNA templates for the replicative polymerases. The replication fork helicase is a ring shaped-assembly that unwinds DNA by a steric exclusion mechanism in most DNA replication systems. While one strand of DNA passes through the central channel of the helicase ring, the second DNA strand is excluded from the central channel. Thus, the origin, or initiation site for DNA replication, must melt during the initiation of DNA replication to allow for the helicase to surround a single-DNA strand. While this process is largely understood for bacteria and eukaryotic viruses, less is known about how origin DNA is melted at eukaryotic cellular origins. This review describes the current state of knowledge of how genomic DNA is melted at a replication origin in bacteria and eukaryotes. We propose that although the process of origin melting is essential for the various domains of life, the mechanism for origin melting may be quite different among the different DNA replication initiation systems. PMID:28085061

  13. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  14. How varying pest and trap densities affect Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) capture in pheromone traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest in food processing facilities. Pheromone trapping is frequently used to monitor red flour beetle populations in structures; however, the optimal trap density and the relationship between trap ...

  15. A Trapped Covalent Intermediate of a Glycoside Hydrolase on the Pathway to Transglycosylation. Insights from Experiments and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Raich, Lluís; Borodkin, Vladimir; Fang, Wenxia; Castro-López, Jorge; van Aalten, Daan M F; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Rovira, Carme

    2016-03-16

    The conversion of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) into transglycosylases (TGs), i.e., from enzymes that hydrolyze carbohydrates to enzymes that synthesize them, represents a promising solution for the large-scale synthesis of complex carbohydrates for biotechnological purposes. However, the lack of knowledge about the molecular details of transglycosylation hampers the rational design of TGs. Here we present the first crystallographic structure of a natural glycosyl-enzyme intermediate (GEI) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gas2 in complex with an acceptor substrate and demonstrate, by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations, that it is tuned for transglycosylation (ΔG(⧧) = 12 kcal/mol). The 2-OH···nucleophile interaction is found to be essential for catalysis: its removal raises the free energy barrier significantly (11 and 16 kcal/mol for glycosylation and transglycosylation, respectively) and alters the conformational itinerary of the substrate (from (4)C1 → [(4)E](⧧) → (1,4)B/(4)E to (4)C1 → [(4)H3](⧧) → (4)C1). Our results suggest that changes in the interactions involving the 2-position could have an impact on the transglycosylation activity of several GHs.

  16. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  17. Neutron stars. [quantum mechanical processes associated with magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes associated with the presence of high magnetic fields and the effect of such fields on the evolution of neutron stars are reviewed. A technical description of the interior of a neutron star is presented. The neutron star-pulsar relation is reviewed and consideration is given to supernovae explosions, flux conservation in neutron stars, gauge-invariant derivation of the equation of state for a strongly magnetized gas, neutron beta-decay, and the stability condition for a neutron star.

  18. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  19. Positron trapping at vacancies in electron-irradiated Si at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Maekinen, J.; Corbel, C.; Hautojaervi, P.; Moser, P.; Pierre, F.

    1989-05-15

    Experimental results on positron trapping at vacancies in electron-irradiated silicon are presented. The positron lifetimes 273 +- 3 and 248 +- 2 ps in pure Si and heavily-phosphorus-doped Si ((P) = 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/) are assigned to a negative monovacancy V/sup -/ and a negative vacancy-phosphorus pair (V-P)/sup -/, respectively. In pure Si, positron trapping displays a strong negative temperature dependence, and the specific trapping rate reaches very large values (10/sup 17//sup --/10/sup 18/ s/sup -1/) at low temperatures. In Si:P the trapping rate is independent of temperature. These different temperature behaviors are attributed to different positron-trapping mechanisms, a cascade of one-phonon transitions in pure Si, and an Auger process in Si:P.

  20. [Sponge cell reaggregation: mechanisms and dynamics of the process].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A I; Kosevich, I A

    2014-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are lower metazoans whose organization is characterized by a high plasticity of anatomical and cellular structures. One of the manifestations of this plasticity is the ability of sponge cells to reaggregate after dissociation of tissues. This review brings together the available data on the reaggregation of sponge cells that have been obtained to date since the beginning of the 20th century. It considers the behavior of dissociated cells in suspension, the mechanisms and factors involved in reaggregation, and the rate and stages of this process in different representatives of this phylum. In addition, this review provides information about the histological structure of multicellular aggregates formed during reaggregation of cells and the regenerative morphogenetic processes leading to the formation of normal sponges from these multicellular aggregates.

  1. [Determination of residual pesticides in processed foods manufactured from livestock foods and seafoods using ion trap GC/MS].

    PubMed

    Makabe, Yuhki; Miyamoto, Fumio; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Kiyoko; Hasegawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous method using iontrap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the determination of pesticide residues in four processed foods (frozen Chinese dumpling, eel kabayaki, corned beef and retort curry). Pesticide residues were extracted from samples with ethyl acetate-cyclohexane (1:1) in the presence of anhydrous sodium sulfate. The extract was concentrated and the residue was dissolved in n-hexane. The lipids in the extract were removed by acetonitrile-n-hexane partitioning, following which the acetonitrile layer was cleaned up using a C(18) mini-cartridge column and a graphite carbon/PSA silica (GCB/PSA) mini-cartridge column. The limits of quantification of compounds in 4 processed foods were below 0.01 microg/g. The recoveries of 292 compounds spiked at 0.1 microg/g in 4 kinds of processed foods, and 210 to 262 pesticides showed acceptable recoveries of 70-120% with low repeatability (15%) and intermediate precision (<20%) only at the 0.1 microg/g spiked level. This method is expected to be useful for multi-residue analysis of pesticide residues in processed foods manufactured using livestock and seafoods as the main raw materials.

  2. Temperature dependence of frequency dispersion in III–V metal-oxide-semiconductor C-V and the capture/emission process of border traps

    SciTech Connect

    Vais, Abhitosh Martens, Koen; DeMeyer, Kristin; Lin, Han-Chung; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Dou, Chunmeng; Xie, Qi; Maes, Jan; Tang, Fu; Givens, Michael; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-03

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion observed in capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The dispersion in the accumulation region of the capacitance data is found to change from 4%–9% (per decade frequency) to ∼0% when the temperature is reduced from 300 K to 4 K in a wide range of MOS capacitors with different gate dielectrics and III-V substrates. We show that such significant temperature dependence of C-V frequency dispersion cannot be due to the temperature dependence of channel electrostatics, i.e., carrier density and surface potential. We also show that the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion, and hence, the capture/emission process of border traps can be modeled by a combination of tunneling and a “temperature-activated” process described by a non-radiative multi-phonon model, instead of a widely believed single-step elastic tunneling process.

  3. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  4. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  5. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: Mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, F.; Harvey, J. W.; Marion, A.; Packman, A. I.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.; Wörman, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed.

  6. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  7. Evolution of attention mechanisms for early visual processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Knoll, Alois

    2011-03-01

    Early visual processing as a method to speed up computations on visual input data has long been discussed in the computer vision community. The general target of a such approaches is to filter nonrelevant information from the costly higher-level visual processing algorithms. By insertion of this additional filter layer the overall approach can be speeded up without actually changing the visual processing methodology. Being inspired by the layered architecture of the human visual processing apparatus, several approaches for early visual processing have been recently proposed. Most promising in this field is the extraction of a saliency map to determine regions of current attention in the visual field. Such saliency can be computed in a bottom-up manner, i.e. the theory claims that static regions of attention emerge from a certain color footprint, and dynamic regions of attention emerge from connected blobs of textures moving in a uniform way in the visual field. Top-down saliency effects are either unconscious through inherent mechanisms like inhibition-of-return, i.e. within a period of time the attention level paid to a certain region automatically decreases if the properties of that region do not change, or volitional through cognitive feedback, e.g. if an object moves consistently in the visual field. These bottom-up and top-down saliency effects have been implemented and evaluated in a previous computer vision system for the project JAST. In this paper an extension applying evolutionary processes is proposed. The prior vision system utilized multiple threads to analyze the regions of attention delivered from the early processing mechanism. Here, in addition, multiple saliency units are used to produce these regions of attention. All of these saliency units have different parameter-sets. The idea is to let the population of saliency units create regions of attention, then evaluate the results with cognitive feedback and finally apply the genetic mechanism

  8. Trapping kinetics in mutants of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides: influence of the charge separation rate and consequences for the rate-limiting step in the light-harvesting process.

    PubMed

    Beekman, L M; van Mourik, F; Jones, M R; Visser, H M; Hunter, C N; van Grondelle, R

    1994-03-22

    The primary light-harvesting processes, energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna, and trapping of the excited states by reaction centers were studied in several mutant strains of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The mutants had reaction centers in which the rates of electron transfer were modified by site-directed mutations at the M210 position. Low-intensity pump-probe laser spectroscopy was used to monitor the absorbance transients in the Qy region of the antenna pigments, and it was found that despite a wide variation in charge separation rates within the RC, produced by the alterations at Tyr M210, there was relatively little corresponding variation in the overall trapping rate. These effects of the mutations on the trapping kinetics demonstrate that the rate-limiting step of the overall light-harvesting process is the transfer of the excitations from the antenna to the reaction center.

  9. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  10. Editorial: Process to progress? Investigative trials, mechanism and clinical science.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2002 Helena Kraemer and colleagues published an important article on the analysis of clinical trials in mental health, which advocated a planned focus on mechanisms to investigate the processes behind treatment effects. Kraemer et al. considered not only new approaches to mediation analysis, but also a theoretical approach to factors, both pre-treatment and during treatment, that might moderate this mediation. Trials should not just be about whether a treatment 'worked', but how it worked; with the results informing modification of the intervention for the next trial by discarding aspects that were not effective and reinforcing aspects that were - an iterative procedure towards greater effectiveness. Can we enjoy similar ambitions for complex interventions within mental health? It is not so long ago when the received wisdom within the clinical and much of the research community was that it was simply impossible in practice to mount randomised controlled trials relevant to the kind of psychosocial interventions we use in child and adolescent mental health (CAMHS). How different the situation is now, with burgeoning interest in a systematic evidence base for psychological treatment and the possibilities for unexpected advances (as well as unexpected harms). Nevertheless it is probably still fair to say that the systematic use of process and mechanism study within trials in our field is the exception rather than the rule. What are the possibilities and implications for our field?

  11. Mechanical model of precursory source processes for some large earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Dmorvska, R.; Li, V.C.

    1982-04-01

    A mechanical model is presented of precursory source processes for some large earthquakes along plate boundaries. It is assumed that the pre-seismic period consists of the upward progression of a zone of slip from lower portions of the lithosphere towards the Earth's surface. The slip front is blocked by local asperities of different size and strength; these asperities may be zones of real alteration of inherent strength, or instead may be zones which are currently stronger due to a local slowdown of a basically rate-dependent frictional response. Such blocking by a single, large asperity, or array of asperities, produces quiescence over a segment of plate boundary, until gradual increase of the stress concentration forces the slip zone through the blocked region at one end of the gap, thus nucleating a seismic rupture that propogates upwards and towards the other end. This model is proposed to explain certain distinctive seismicity patterns that have been observed before large earthquakes, notably quiescence over the gap zone followed by clustering at its end prior to the main event. A discussion of mechanical factors influencing the process is presented and some introductory modelling, performed with the use of a generalized Elsasser model for lithospheric plates and the ''line spring'' model for part-through flaws (slip zones) at plate boundaries, is outlined briefly.

  12. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  13. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  14. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-28

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  15. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  16. Trapped Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel; Horn, Bart; Senatore, Leonardo; Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-06-19

    We analyze a distinctive mechanism for inflation in which particle production slows down a scalar field on a steep potential, and show how it descends from angular moduli in string compactifications. The analysis of density perturbations - taking into account the integrated effect of the produced particles and their quantum fluctuations - requires somewhat new techniques that we develop. We then determine the conditions for this effect to produce sixty e-foldings of inflation with the correct amplitude of density perturbations at the Gaussian level, and show that these requirements can be straightforwardly satisfied. Finally, we estimate the amplitude of the non-Gaussianity in the power spectrum and find a significant equilateral contribution.

  17. Cassini observations of seasonal exospheres at Saturn's icy satellites: Source and loss processes, and role of surface cold trapping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Cassini's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has revealed dayside sputtered exospheres of radiolytic O2 and CO2 at Rhea and Dione, seasonally modulated by polar winter adsorption and equinox desorption likely to/from the porous icy regolith surfaces of seasonally shadowed polar terrains. In this talk we review current models and understanding of the global exospheric physics: including source and loss processes, spatial structure and time evolution, and discuss topographical thermal / adsorption and diffusion modeling to estimate the amounts of locally adsorbed O2 and CO2, the regolith diffusion depth of these species, and the local spatial and time variation of adsorption. We will discuss complimentary Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) observations also indicating a seasonal pickup ion source consistent with the exospheric neutral densities measured by INMS. The global exospheric loss through pickup ionization inferred from CAPS is consistent with known cross sections and estimated rates for the different ionization processes, i.e., charge exchange, dissociative ionization, and photo and electron impact ionization. The implied CO2 source rate is much less than that of O2 (e.g. ~0.1 and 1 ×10^22 CO2 and O2 / sec, respectively, at Rhea), but CO2 is on average more effectively retained by Rhea and Dione due to its lower volatility and greater surface stickiness, resulting in the similar measured exospheric densities of these species (INMS detections are of order 10^10 per m3 at roughly 100 km altitude). The O2 source rate is two orders of magnitude less than the ~2×10^24 / sec predicted on the basis of the estimated magnetospheric ion and electrons surface irradiation fluxes and measured O2 formation yields from irradiated laboratory water ice. We will discuss possible explanations, and implications for exospheric oxygen generation at other solar system icy satellites.

  18. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  19. Testing for Dark Matter Trapped in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the possibility of dark matter trapped in the solar system in bound solar orbits. If there exist mechanisms for dissipating excess kinetic energy by an amount sufficient for generating bound solar orbits, then trapping of galactic dark matter might have taken place during formation of the solar system, or could be an ongoing process. Possible locations for acumulation of trapped dark matter are orbital resonances with the planets or regions in the outer solar system. It is posible to test for the presence of unseen matter by detecting its gravitational effects. Current results for dynamical limits obtained from analyses of planetary ephemeris data and spacecraft tracking data are presented. Possible future improvements are discussed.

  20. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  1. Divided versus selective attention: evidence for common processing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Britta; Wolkenberg, Frank A; Ross, Thomas J; Myers, Carol S; Heishman, Stephen J; Stein, Dan J; Kurup, Pradeep K; Stein, Elliot A

    2008-06-18

    The current study revisited the question of whether there are brain mechanisms specific to divided attention that differ from those used in selective attention. Increased neuronal activity required to simultaneously process two stimulus dimensions as compared with each separate dimension has often been observed, but rarely has activity induced by a divided attention condition exceeded the sum of activity induced by the component tasks. Healthy participants performed a selective-divided attention paradigm while undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The task required participants to make a same-different judgment about either one of two simultaneously presented stimulus dimensions, or about both dimensions. Performance accuracy was equated between tasks by dynamically adjusting the stimulus display time. Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal differences between tasks were identified by whole-brain voxel-wise comparisons and by region-specific analyses of all areas modulated by the divided attention task (DIV). No region displayed greater activation or deactivation by DIV than the sum of signal change by the two selective attention tasks. Instead, regional activity followed the tasks' processing demands as reflected by reaction time. Only a left cerebellar region displayed a correlation between participants' BOLD signal intensity and reaction time that was selective for DIV. The correlation was positive, reflecting slower responding with greater activation. Overall, the findings do not support the existence of functional brain activity specific to DIV. Increased activity appears to reflect additional processing demands by introducing a secondary task, but those demands do not appear to qualitatively differ from processes of selective attention.

  2. Association between central auditory processing mechanism and cardiac autonomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to describe the association between central auditory processing mechanism and the cardiac autonomic regulation. Methods It was researched papers on the topic addressed in this study considering the following data bases: Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs, Scopus and Cochrane. The key words were: “auditory stimulation, heart rate, autonomic nervous system and P300”. Results The findings in the literature demonstrated that auditory stimulation influences the autonomic nervous system and has been used in conjunction with other methods. It is considered a promising step in the investigation of therapeutic procedures for rehabilitation and quality of life of several pathologies. Conclusion The association between auditory stimulation and the level of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has received significant contributions in relation to musical stimuli. PMID:24834128

  3. Enhancement of Stainless Steel's Mechanical Properties via Carburizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Alias, S. K.; Abdullah, B.; Hafiz Mohd Bakri, Mohd.; Hafizuddin Jumadin, Muhammad; Mat Shah, Muhammad Amir

    2016-11-01

    Carburizing process is a method to disperse carbon into the steel surface in order to enhance its mechanical properties such as hardness and wear resistance. This paper study investigates the effect of carburizing temperature to the carbon dispersion layer in stainless steel. The standard AISI 304 stainless steel was carburized in two different temperatures which were 900°C and 950°C. The effect of carbon dispersion layers were observed and the results indicated that the increasing value of the average dispersion layer from 1.30 mm to 2.74 mm thickness was found to be related to increment of carburizing holding temperature . The increment of carbon thickness layer also resulted in improvement of hardness and tensile strength of carburized stainless steel.

  4. Probabilistic structural mechanics research for parallel processing computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sues, Robert H.; Chen, Heh-Chyun; Twisdale, Lawrence A.; Martin, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerospace structures and spacecraft are a complex assemblage of structural components that are subjected to a variety of complex, cyclic, and transient loading conditions. Significant modeling uncertainties are present in these structures, in addition to the inherent randomness of material properties and loads. To properly account for these uncertainties in evaluating and assessing the reliability of these components and structures, probabilistic structural mechanics (PSM) procedures must be used. Much research has focused on basic theory development and the development of approximate analytic solution methods in random vibrations and structural reliability. Practical application of PSM methods was hampered by their computationally intense nature. Solution of PSM problems requires repeated analyses of structures that are often large, and exhibit nonlinear and/or dynamic response behavior. These methods are all inherently parallel and ideally suited to implementation on parallel processing computers. New hardware architectures and innovative control software and solution methodologies are needed to make solution of large scale PSM problems practical.

  5. Formal mechanization of device interactions with a process algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, E. Thomas; Levitt, Karl; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1992-01-01

    The principle emphasis is to develop a methodology to formally verify correct synchronization communication of devices in a composed hardware system. Previous system integration efforts have focused on vertical integration of one layer on top of another. This task examines 'horizontal' integration of peer devices. To formally reason about communication, we mechanize a process algebra in the Higher Order Logic (HOL) theorem proving system. Using this formalization we show how four types of device interactions can be represented and verified to behave as specified. The report also describes the specification of a system consisting of an AVM-1 microprocessor and a memory management unit which were verified in previous work. A proof of correct communication is presented, and the extensions to the system specification to add a direct memory device are discussed.

  6. Thermo-mechanical process for treatment of welds

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, R K

    1980-03-01

    Benefits from thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) of austenitic stainless steel weldments, analogous to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of castings, most likely result from compressive plastic deformation, enhanced diffusion, and/or increased dislocation density. TMP improves ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel welds owing to: conversion of cast dendrites into equiaxed austenitic grains, reduction in size and number of stringers and inclusions, and reduction of delta ferrite content. TMP induces structural homogenization and healing of void-type defects and thus contributes to an increase in elongation, impact strength, and fracture toughness as well as a significant reduction in data scatter for these properties. An optimum temperature for TMP or HIP of welds is one which causes negligible grain growth and an acceptable reduction in yield strength, and permits healing of porosity.

  7. Medial efferent mechanisms in children with auditory processing disorders.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing disorder (APD) affects about 2-5% of children. However, the nature of this disorder is poorly understood. Children with APD typically have difficulties in complex listening situations. One mechanism thought to aid in listening-in-noise is the medial olivocochlear (MOC) inhibition. The purpose of this review was to critically analyze the published data on MOC inhibition in children with APD to determine whether the MOC efferents are involved in these individuals. The otoacoustic emission (OAE) methods used to assay MOC reflex were examined in the context of the current understanding of OAE generation mechanisms. Relevant literature suggests critical differences in the study population and OAE methods. Variables currently known to influence MOC reflex measurements, for example, middle-ear muscle reflexes or OAE signal-to-noise ratio, were not controlled in most studies. The use of potentially weaker OAE methods and the remarkable heterogeneity across studies does not allow for a definite conclusion whether or not the MOC reflex is altered in children with APD. Further carefully designed studies are needed to confirm the involvement of MOC efferents in APD. Knowledge of efferent functioning in children with APD would be mechanistically and clinically beneficial.

  8. Dual-Pitch Processing Mechanisms in Primate Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bendor, Daniel; Osmanski, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Pitch, our perception of how high or low a sound is on a musical scale, is a fundamental perceptual attribute of sounds and is important for both music and speech. After more than a century of research, the exact mechanisms used by the auditory system to extract pitch are still being debated. Theoretically, pitch can be computed using either spectral or temporal acoustic features of a sound. We have investigated how cues derived from the temporal envelope and spectrum of an acoustic signal are used for pitch extraction in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a vocal primate species, by measuring pitch discrimination behaviorally and examining pitch-selective neuronal responses in auditory cortex. We find that pitch is extracted by marmosets using temporal envelope cues for lower pitch sounds composed of higher-order harmonics, whereas spectral cues are used for higher pitch sounds with lower-order harmonics. Our data support dual-pitch processing mechanisms, originally proposed by psychophysicists based on human studies, whereby pitch is extracted using a combination of temporal envelope and spectral cues. PMID:23152599

  9. On biodiversity conservation and poverty traps

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christopher B.; Travis, Alexander J.; Dasgupta, Partha

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a special feature on biodiversity conservation and poverty traps. We define and explain the core concepts and then identify four distinct classes of mechanisms that define important interlinkages between biodiversity and poverty. The multiplicity of candidate mechanisms underscores a major challenge in designing policy appropriate across settings. This framework is then used to introduce the ensuing set of papers, which empirically explore these various mechanisms linking poverty traps and biodiversity conservation. PMID:21873176

  10. Habitat selection and the perceptual trap.

    PubMed

    Patten, Michael A; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2010-12-01

    The concept of "ecological traps" was introduced over three decades ago. An ecological trap occurs when, by various mechanisms, low-quality (yielding low fitness) habitat is more attractive than good habitat, thus coaxing individuals to settle there despite a resultant loss of fitness. Empirical work on such traps has increased dramatically in the past decade, but the converse-avoidance of high-quality habitat because it is less attractive, what we term a "perceptual trap" has remained largely unexplored. Even so, depending on conditions (growth rate, strength of habitat preference, and mortality rate), such perceptual traps can be more limiting than ecological traps to population persistence. An example from field experiments with the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) lends empirical support to the concept, and several other potential examples suggest that these traps are perhaps more prevalent than has been appreciated. Because demographic Allee effects are expected to prevent a population from growing sufficiently in a habitat that is avoided, a perceptual trap may persist even though fitness is high. Unlike an ecological trap, which may be negated by increasing habitat quality, biologists will be hard pressed to negate a perceptual trap, which will require determining which cues an animal uses to select high-quality habitat and then devising a means of enhancing those cues so that an animal is lured into the habitat.

  11. Principles of an enhanced MBR-process with mechanical cleaning.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, S; Helmus, F P; Krause, S; Bareth, A; Meyer-Blumenroth, U

    2011-01-01

    Up to date, different physical and chemical cleaning protocols are necessary to limit membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors. This paper deals with a mechanical cleaning process, which aims at the avoidance of hypochlorite and other critical chemicals in MBR with submerged flat sheet modules. The process basically consists of the addition of plastic particles into the loop circulation within submerged membrane modules. Investigations of two pilot plants are presented: Pilot plant 1 is equipped with a 10 m(2) membrane module and operated with a translucent model suspension; pilot plant 2 is equipped with four 50 m(2) membrane modules and operated with pretreated sewage. Results of pilot plant 1 show that the establishment of a fluidised bed with regular particle distribution is possible for a variety of particles. Particles with maximum densities of 1.05 g/cm(3) and between 3 and 5 mm diameter form a stable fluidised bed almost regardless of activated sludge concentration, viscosity and reactor geometry. Particles with densities between 1.05 g/cm(3) and 1.2 g/cm(3) form a stable fluidised bed, if the velocity at the reactor bottom is sufficiently high. Activities within pilot plant 2 focused on plant optimisation and the development of an adequate particle retention system.

  12. Mechanisms of placement and stability of dry process shotcrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolin, Marc

    The knowledge available today in shotcrete technology usually permits the production of strong and durable shotcretes. Unfortunately, very few research projects have focused on the development of the shotcrete process itself. Consequently, the fundamental knowledge on the properties and behaviour of fresh dry-mix shotcrete is very limited. The objective of this research project is thus to develop methods to evaluate the properties of fresh dry-mix shotcrete in order to better understand its behaviour, or its shootability. Shootability is defined by the ease and efficiency with which a shotcrete mix can be placed; the main parameters which characterise shootability are rebound, maximum buildup thickness and reinforcement encasement. To understand and control these characteristics requires an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the placement and the stability of a shotcrete layer. These mechanisms involve both rheological and mechanical concepts: the dynamic placement of the material, without external vibration, implies high shear rates, whereas the in-place stability of the fresh material is more closely related to plasticity in terms of shear resistance. The consistency of fresh dry-mix shotcrete is considerably stiffer than that of conventional concrete, and therefore special apparatus and new testing procedures had to be created or adapted to evaluate the fresh properties of this unique material. The tests included the penetration test, fresh tensile strength test and fresh shear strength test. These tests along with detailed analysis of the in-place proportions of the mixtures helped to provide an understanding of the mechanisms needed to optimise the shootability of dry-mix shotcrete. Apart from the properties related to shootability, fundamental properties such as the yield value, the cohesion and the angle of friction were also determined. Additional information has also been gathered on the fresh dynamic properties of shotcrete, which are especially

  13. Using semi-automated bubble traps, bubble survey transects, and point process models to understand ebullition spatial heterogeneity in thermokarst lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, P. M.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Engram, M. J.; Regmi, P.; Strohm, A. J.; Grosse, G.

    2012-12-01

    Ebullition is an important but highly heterogeneous mode of methane emission in lakes. Variability in both its spatial distribution and temporal flux results in large uncertainties in whole-lake emission estimates based on limited field measurements. Analysis of 213,600 short-and long-term flux measurements using submerged bubble traps on 162 ebullition seeps in 24 panarctic lakes confirmed that seep classes, identified according to bubble patterns in winter lake ice, have statistically distinct associated fluxes irrespective of lake or region. To understand the drivers of ebullition's spatial variability we combined point-process modeling with field measurements of 2,679 GPS-marked and classified ebullition seeps in three Alaskan thermokarst (thaw) lakes that varied by region, permafrost type, and seep distribution. Spatial analysis of field data revealed that seeps cluster above thawed permafrost soil mounds in lake bottoms. Soil mounds are the ice wedge polygon centers and thus part of a regular micro-scale landscape pattern across permafrost landscapes, which makes their distribution (including on lake bottoms) also predictable.

  14. 40 CFR 408.170 - Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.170 Section 408.170 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alaskan Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.170 Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  15. 40 CFR 408.190 - Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.190 Section 408.190 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.190 Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  16. 40 CFR 408.190 - Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.190 Section 408.190 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.190 Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  17. 40 CFR 408.190 - Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.190 Section 408.190 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.190 Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 408.170 - Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.170 Section 408.170 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alaskan Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.170 Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  19. 40 CFR 408.190 - Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.190 Section 408.190 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.190 Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  20. 40 CFR 408.170 - Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.170 Section 408.170 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alaskan Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.170 Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  1. 40 CFR 408.170 - Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.170 Section 408.170 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alaskan Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.170 Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  2. 40 CFR 408.170 - Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.170 Section 408.170 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Alaskan Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.170 Applicability; description of the Alaskan mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  3. 40 CFR 408.190 - Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. 408.190 Section 408.190 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.190 Applicability; description of the West Coast mechanized salmon processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of SPD processed nanocrystalline tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang

    In this study, the refractory metal, Tantalum (Ta), having a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) structure is selected as a model material. Bulk nanocrystalline Ta (NC-Ta) is used to study the process-microstructure-property relationship for a nano-structured BCC metal. For the first time, high pressure torsion (HPT) technique was applied to produce NC-Ta. Microstructural features of HPT NC-Ta were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microcopy (TEM). The resulting microstructures show nano-size grains (grain size smaller than 100 nm) together with high angle grain boundaries. The grain size was estimated to be around 35 nm based on the broadening of the (110) peak of XRD, while a few tens of nanometers based on TEM observation. A high density of atomic steps and ledges were observed along the grain boundaries while a large population of edge dislocations within the grains by high resolution TEM. It shows the non-equilibrium and high-energy nature of the grain boundaries. The mechanical properties of HPT NC-Ta were investigated using instrumented nanoindentation and micro-compression techniques, respectively. Instrumented nanoindentation intends to study the uniformity of the distribution of mechanical properties, the strain rate effect, and the thermally activated processes associated with plastic deformation. The results show that the elastic modulus of HPT NC-Ta is considerably reduced compared to the coarse-grain counterparts. The results are explained based on the hypothesis that in the HPT NC-Ta greatly increased populations of grain boundaries (GBs) and triple junctions (TJs) have been induced along with a high concentration of lattice vacancies in the severely deformed metal. The microhardness measurement shows a peak across the radial direction. It is believed this indicates an inverse Hall-Petch effect. Also, the nanoindentation hardness measurement, independent of the indentation depth, indicates the absence of indentation size effect

  6. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Enzymatic Processes: Caveats and Breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Quesne, Matthew G; Borowski, Tomasz; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-02-18

    Nature has developed large groups of enzymatic catalysts with the aim to transfer substrates into useful products, which enables biosystems to perform all their natural functions. As such, all biochemical processes in our body (we drink, we eat, we breath, we sleep, etc.) are governed by enzymes. One of the problems associated with research on biocatalysts is that they react so fast that details of their reaction mechanisms cannot be obtained with experimental work. In recent years, major advances in computational hardware and software have been made and now large (bio)chemical systems can be studied using accurate computational techniques. One such technique is the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) technique, which has gained major momentum in recent years. Unfortunately, it is not a black-box method that is easily applied, but requires careful set-up procedures. In this work we give an overview on the technical difficulties and caveats of QM/MM and discuss work-protocols developed in our groups for running successful QM/MM calculations.

  7. Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Fear, R C; Milan, S E; Maggiolo, R; Fazakerley, A N; Dandouras, I; Mende, S B

    2014-12-19

    The structure of Earth's magnetosphere is poorly understood when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward. Under this condition, uncharacteristically energetic plasma is observed in the magnetotail lobes, which is not expected in the textbook model of the magnetosphere. Using satellite observations, we show that these lobe plasma signatures occur on high-latitude magnetic field lines that have been closed by the fundamental plasma process of magnetic reconnection. Previously, it has been suggested that closed flux can become trapped in the lobe and that this plasma-trapping process could explain another poorly understood phenomenon: the presence of auroras at extremely high latitudes, called transpolar arcs. Observations of the aurora at the same time as the lobe plasma signatures reveal the presence of a transpolar arc. The excellent correspondence between the transpolar arc and the trapped closed flux at high altitudes provides very strong evidence of the trapping mechanism as the cause of transpolar arcs.

  8. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  9. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  10. Ion trap simulation tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  11. Volatile Release From The Siberian Traps Inferred From Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Rowe, Michael C.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    concentrations in the range of one weight percent. Visscher et al. (2004) proposed that chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  12. Dynamic Charge Carrier Trapping in Quantum Dot Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qian; Alivisatos, A Paul; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-07-08

    Noncrystalline semiconductor materials often exhibit hysteresis in charge transport measurements whose mechanism is largely unknown. Here we study the dynamics of charge injection and transport in PbS quantum dot (QD) monolayers in a field effect transistor (FET). Using Kelvin probe force microscopy, we measured the temporal response of the QDs as the channel material in a FET following step function changes of gate bias. The measurements reveal an exponential decay of mobile carrier density with time constants of 3-5 s for holes and ∼10 s for electrons. An Ohmic behavior, with uniform carrier density, was observed along the channel during the injection and transport processes. These slow, uniform carrier trapping processes are reversible, with time constants that depend critically on the gas environment. We propose that the underlying mechanism is some reversible electrochemical process involving dissociation and diffusion of water and/or oxygen related species. These trapping processes are dynamically activated by the injected charges, in contrast with static electronic traps whose presence is independent of the charge state. Understanding and controlling these processes is important for improving the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, and memory devices based on disordered semiconductors.

  13. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  14. Effect of pore structure on gas trapping in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Sadjad; Geistlinger, Helmut; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Capillary trapping of nonwetting phase in porous media plays an important role in many geological processes. For example, large portions of hydrocarbons cannot be extracted from reservoirs due to capillary forces, while in carbon sequestration processes; capillary trapping might improve the storage efficiency. An important case is when the wetting phase (mostly water) displaces a low-viscosity low-density fluid. In such cases, like water encroachment into gas reservoirs or rising of water table in soils, competition of gravity, viscous, and capillary forces determines the final configuration of the fluids in invaded zone. The trapped nonwetting phase and its distribution within the porous media will affect many other processes such as flow of the other fluids and mass transfer phenomena. Thus, investigating the parameters affecting phase trapping and distribution, especially their relation to pore structure, which controls the capillary action, is required. The aim is to predict gas trapping from structural properties of the material. We conducted a series of column experiments, in which water displaces air at a range of flow rates in different glass-bead packs. The final 3D configuration and morphology of fluids was observed using X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). We extracted 3D structure of porous media as well as of the trapped gas phase, and quantified them in terms of volume ratios, interfacial area, and morphology. Then we investigated the relations of the trapped phase to capillary forces (pore structure) and viscous forces (front velocity). The results give us new insights to explore the flow and dissolution processes: We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min what corresponds to capillary numbers from 2 to 12 ×10^-6. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by

  15. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  16. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  17. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  18. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  19. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  20. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  1. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  5. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen M.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  6. Process optimization and consumable development for Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudhivarthi, Subrahmanya R.

    Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) is one of the most critical processing steps that enables fabrication of multilevel interconnects. The success of CMP process is limited by the implementation of an optimized process and reduction of process generated defects along with post CMP surface characteristics such as dishing and erosion. This thesis investigates to identify various sources of defects and studies the effect of factors that can be used to optimize the process. The major contributions of this work are: Understanding the effect of temperature rise on surface tribology, electrochemistry and post CMP pattern effects during the CMP process; investigating the effect of pad conditioning temperature and slurry flow rate on tribology and post CMP characteristics; development of novel slurries using polymer hybrid particles and improvement in slurry metrology to reduce surface damage during CMP. From the current research, it was shown that the effect of temperature on CMP tribology is predominantly affected by the polishing parameters and the polishing pad characteristics more than the chemical nature of the slurry. The effect of temperature is minimal on the resulting surface roughness but the with-in die non-uniformity is significantly affected by the temperature at the interface. Secondly, in this research it was shown that the effectiveness and aggressiveness of the pad conditioning process is highly influenced by the conditioning temperature. This aspect can be utilized to optimize the parameters for the pad conditioning process. Further, post CMP characteristics such as dishing, erosion and metal loss on patterned samples were shown to decrease with increase in slurry flow rate. This research then concentrates on the development of novel low defect slurry using polymer hybrid abrasive particles. Several varieties of surface functionalized polymer particles were employed to make oxide CMP slurries. These novel slurries proved to be potential candidates to

  7. A trapped field of 17.6 T in melt-processed, bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O reinforced with shrink-fit steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrell, J. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Jaroszynski, J.; Ainslie, M. D.; Palmer, K. G. B.; Shi, Y.-H.; Campbell, A. M.; Hull, J.; Strasik, M.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of large-grain (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-δ ((RE)BCO; RE = rare earth) bulk superconductors to trap magnetic fields is determined by their critical current. With high trapped fields, however, bulk samples are subject to a relatively large Lorentz force, and their performance is limited primarily by their tensile strength. Consequently, sample reinforcement is the key to performance improvement in these technologically important materials. In this work, we report a trapped field of 17.6 T, the largest reported to date, in a stack of two silver-doped GdBCO superconducting bulk samples, each 25 mm in diameter, fabricated by top-seeded melt growth and reinforced with shrink-fit stainless steel. This sample preparation technique has the advantage of being relatively straightforward and inexpensive to implement, and offers the prospect of easy access to portable, high magnetic fields without any requirement for a sustaining current source.

  8. Age and sex selectivity in trapping mule deer

    SciTech Connect

    Garrott, R.A.; White, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    A mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) trapping experiment is described using modified Clover traps in which changes in the placement of bait and height of the trap door modified the ratio of adult does to male and female fawns captured. The mechanisms responsible for the changes in age-sex capture ratios are discussed and indicate that modified Clover traps selectivity capture mule deer, thus introducing bias into population sampling. (JMT)

  9. Final report of “A Detailed Study of the Physical Mechanisms Controlling CO2-Brine Capillary Trapping in the Subsurface” (University of Arizona, DE-SC0006696)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaap, Marcel G.

    2016-07-25

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) of carbon dioxide emissions generated by production or combustion of fossil fuels is a technologically viable means to reduce the build-up of CO2 in the atmosphere and oceans. Using advantages of scale and location, CCS is particularly suitable for large point sources near ubiquitous deep saline aquifers, depleted gas reservoirs, or at production reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the BES-funded research project, Oregon State University (OSU) carried out capillary trapping experiments with proxy fluids that mimic the properties of the scCO2/brine system under ambient temperatures and pressures, and successfully developed a unique and novel x-ray compatible, high-pressure, elevated temperature setup to study the scCO2/brine system under challenging reservoir conditions. Both methodologies were applied to a variety of porous media, including synthetic (glass bead) and geologic (Bentheimer sandstone) materials. The University of Arizona (UA) developed pore-scale lattice Boltzmann (LB) models which are able to handle the experimental conditions for proxy fluids, as well as the scCO2/brine system, that are capable of simulating permeability in volumes of tens of millions of fluid elements. We reached the following summary findings (main institute indicated): 1. (OSU/UA) To understand capillary trapping in a multiphase fluid-porous medium system, the system must be analyzed from a pore-scale force balance perspective; trapping can be enhanced by manipulating wetting and nonwetting phase fluid properties. 2. (OSU) Pore-scale fluid connectivity and topology has a clear and direct effect on nonwetting phase capillary trapping efficiency. 3. (OSU) Rock type and flow regime also have a pronounced effects on capillary trapping. 4. (OSU/UA) There is a predictable relationship between NWP connectivity and NWP saturation, which allows for development of injection strategies that optimize trapping. The commonly used Land model (Land

  10. QCD mechanisms of (semi)exclusive Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovarov, A.A.; Teryaev, O.V.

    2015-04-10

    Two mechanisms for the lepton pair production in exclusive proton-meson collisions are considered and compared. Amplitudes and differential cross sections are calculated. The interference of these mechanisms is taken into account. The skewness dependence of the result is discussed.

  11. New evidence for geomagnetically trapped anomalous cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Selesnick, R. S.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    We report new observations of 15 MeV/nuc or greater trapped heavy ions with Z equal to or greater than 2, made on the polar-orbiting SAMPEX spacecraft in late 1992 and early 1993. A trapped population that includes He, N, O, and Ne is found to be located at L = 2. We conclude that the observed N, O, and Ne ions are 'anomalous' cosmic rays, trapped by the mechanism proposed by Blake and Friesen (1977). While it is not expected that this mechanism would also trap anomalous He, the characteristics of the trapped He population are generally consistent with those of N, O, and Ne.

  12. Characterization of scalable ion traps for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R. J.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Shiga, N.; Amini, J. M.; Blakestad, R. B.; Brown, K. R.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    We discuss the experimental characterization of several scalable ion trap architectures for quantum information processing. We have developed an apparatus for testing planar ion trap chips which features: a standardized chip carrier for ease of interchanging traps, a single-laser Raman cooling scheme, and photo-ionization loading of Mg^+ ions. The primary benchmark for a given trap is the heating rate of the ion motional degrees of freedom, which can reduce multi-ion quantum gate fidelities. As the heating rate depends on the ion trap geometry and materials, our testing apparatus allows for efficient iteration and optimization of trap parameters. With the recent ability to fabricate planar traps with sufficiently low heating rates for quantum computation ^2, we describe current results on the simulation and fabrication of planar traps with multiple intersecting trapping zones for versatile ion choreography. S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). J. Kim, et al., Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 515 (2005).

  13. Quantification of capillary trapping of gas clusters using X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Schlueter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Joerg

    2014-05-01

    A major difficulty in modeling multiphase flow in porous media is the emergence of trapped phases. Our experiments demonstrate that gas can be trapped in either single-pores, multipores, or in large connected networks. These large connected clusters can comprise up to eight grain volumes and can contain up to 50% of the whole trapped gas volume. About 85% of the gas volume is trapped by multipore gas clusters. This variety of possible trapped gas clusters of different shape and volume will lead to a better process understanding of bubble-mediated mass transfer. Since multipore gas bubbles are in contact with the solid surface through ultrathin adsorbed water films the interfacial area between trapped gas clusters and intergranular capillary water is only about 80% of the total gas surface. We could derive a significant (R2 = 0.98) linear relationship between the gas-water-interface and gas saturation. We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min corresponding to capillary numbers from 2 × 10-7 to 10-6. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by thermodynamics, i.e., by the minimum of the Free Energy, at least in the considered velocity range. Consistent with this physical picture is our finding that the trapping frequency (= bubble-size distribution) reflects the pore size distribution for the whole range of pore radii, i.e., the capillary trapping process is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics.

  14. Processing effects on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishi, Toshihito; German, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys exhibit significant mechanical property sensitivities to the fabrication variables. These sensitivities are illustrated in this examination of vacuum sintering and the effects of composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys. Measurements were conducted to assess the density, strength, hardness, and elongation dependencies. A detrimental aspect of vacuum sintering is matrix phase evaporation, although vacuum sintering does eliminate the need for postsintering heat treatments.

  15. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  16. Volatile Release from the Siberian Traps Inferred from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Rowe, M. C.; Ukstins Peate, I.

    2009-12-01

    compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-phase joining, or welding process that was invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute (TWI). The process is potentially capable of joining a wide variety of aluminum alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. The friction stir welding (FSW) process produces welds by moving a non-consumable rotating pin tool along a seam between work pieces that are firmly clamped to an anvil. At the start of the process, the rotating pin is plunged into the material to a pre-determined load. The required heat is produced by a combination of frictional and deformation heating. The shape of the tool shoulder and supporting anvil promotes a high hydrostatic pressure along the joint line as the tool shears and literally stirs the metal together. To produce a defect free weld, process variables (RPM, transverse speed, and downward force) and tool pin design must be chosen carefully. An accurate model of the material flow during the process is necessary to guide process variable selection. At MSFC a plastic slip line model of the process has been synthesized based on macroscopic images of the resulting weld material. Although this model appears to have captured the main features of the process, material specific interactions are not understood. The objective of the present research was to develop a basic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure to be able to relate it to the deformation process variables of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  18. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  19. Ultrasonic and mechanical soil washing processes for the remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seulgi; Lee, Wontae; Son, Younggyu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic/mechanical soil washing process was investigated and compared with ultrasonic process and mechanical process using a relatively large lab-scale sonoreactor. It was found that higher removal efficiencies were observed in the combined processes for 0.1 and 0.3 M HCl washing liquids. It was due to the combination effects of macroscale removal for the overall range of slurry by mechanical mixing and microscale removal for the limited zone of slurry by cavitational actions.

  20. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  1. Evaluating steam trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, N.Y.

    1985-08-08

    This paper presents a method for evaluating the performance level of steam traps by preparing an economic analysis of several types to determine the equivalent uniform annual cost. A series of tests on steam traps supplied by six manufacturers provided data for determining the relative efficiencies of each unit. The comparison was made using a program developed for the Texas Instruments T1-59 programmable calculator to evaluate overall steam trap economics.

  2. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  3. Attraction of walking Tribolium castaneum adults to traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), is a major pest of food processing facilities and can be monitored using pitfall type traps. To determine how beetles interact with these traps under field situations, the behavior of individual beetles released in the vicinity of traps was observe...

  4. Mechanisms of Verbal Morphology Processing in Heritage Speakers of Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanova, Natalia

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the study is to analyze the morphological processing of real and novel verb forms by heritage speakers of Russian in order to determine whether it differs from that of native (L1) speakers and second language (L2) learners; if so, how it is different; and which factors may guide the acquisition process. The experiment involved three…

  5. Micronization processes with supercritical fluids: fundamentals and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martín, A; Cocero, M J

    2008-02-14

    Supercritical fluid techniques for materials precipitation have been proposed as an alternative to conventional precipitation processes as they allow to improve the performance of these processes in terms of reduction of particle size and control of morphology and particle size distribution, without degradation or contamination of the product. These techniques have received much attention during the last years, and their feasibility and performance have been experimentally demonstrated for many substances. One of the main pending tasks is the development of a systematic procedure for the design and scale-up of these processes. This requires not only empirical knowledge, but also information about the fundamentals of the process. This work aims to review the published literature dealing with a fundamental investigation or modeling of supercritical fluid precipitation processes.

  6. Fastest predators in the plant kingdom: functional morphology and biomechanics of suction traps found in the largest genus of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Weisskopf, Carmen; Westermeier, Anna Sophia; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2015-11-24

    Understanding the physics of plant movements, which describe the interplay between plant architecture, movement speed and actuation principles, is essential for the comprehension of important processes like plant morphogenesis. Recent investigations especially on rapid plant movements at the interface of biology, physics and engineering sciences highlight how such fast motions can be achieved without the presence of muscles, nerves and technical hinge analogies. The suction traps (bladders) of carnivorous bladderworts (Utricularia spp., Lentibulariaceae, Lamiales) are considered as some of the most elaborate moving structures in the plant kingdom. A complex interplay of morphological and physiological adaptations allows the traps to pump water out of their body and to store elastic energy in the deformed bladder walls. Mechanical stimulation by prey entails opening of the otherwise watertight trapdoor, followed by trap wall relaxation, sucking in of water and prey, and consecutive trapdoor closure. Suction can also occur spontaneously in non-stimulated traps. We review the current state of knowledge about the suction trap mechanism with a focus on architectonically homogeneous traps of aquatic bladderwort species from section Utricularia (the so-called 'Utricularia vulgaris trap type'). The functional morphology and biomechanics of the traps are described in detail. We discuss open questions and propose promising aspects for future studies on these sophisticated ultra-fast trapping devices.

  7. Fastest predators in the plant kingdom: functional morphology and biomechanics of suction traps found in the largest genus of carnivorous plants

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Weisskopf, Carmen; Westermeier, Anna Sophia; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physics of plant movements, which describe the interplay between plant architecture, movement speed and actuation principles, is essential for the comprehension of important processes like plant morphogenesis. Recent investigations especially on rapid plant movements at the interface of biology, physics and engineering sciences highlight how such fast motions can be achieved without the presence of muscles, nerves and technical hinge analogies. The suction traps (bladders) of carnivorous bladderworts (Utricularia spp., Lentibulariaceae, Lamiales) are considered as some of the most elaborate moving structures in the plant kingdom. A complex interplay of morphological and physiological adaptations allows the traps to pump water out of their body and to store elastic energy in the deformed bladder walls. Mechanical stimulation by prey entails opening of the otherwise watertight trapdoor, followed by trap wall relaxation, sucking in of water and prey, and consecutive trapdoor closure. Suction can also occur spontaneously in non-stimulated traps. We review the current state of knowledge about the suction trap mechanism with a focus on architectonically homogeneous traps of aquatic bladderwort species from section Utricularia (the so-called ‘Utricularia vulgaris trap type’). The functional morphology and biomechanics of the traps are described in detail. We discuss open questions and propose promising aspects for future studies on these sophisticated ultra-fast trapping devices. PMID:26602984

  8. Trapping effects in irradiated and avalanche-injected MOS capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakowski, M.; Cockrum, R. H.; Zamani, N.; Maserjian, J.; Viswanathan, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    The trapping parameters for holes, and for electrons in the presence of trapped holes, have been measured from a set of wafers with different oxide thickness processed under controlled conditions. The trap cross-sections and densities indicate at least three trap species, including an interfacial species, a dominant bulk species which is determined to tail off from the silicon interface, and a third, lower density bulk species that is distributed throughout the oxide.

  9. Evaluating the Learning Process of Mechanical CAD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamade, R. F.; Artail, H. A.; Jaber, M. Y.

    2007-01-01

    There is little theoretical or experimental research on how beginner-level trainees learn CAD skills in formal training sessions. This work presents findings on how trainees develop their skills in utilizing a solid mechanical CAD tool (Pro/Engineer version 2000i[squared] and later version Wildfire). Exercises at the beginner and intermediate…

  10. Process Demands of Rejection Mechanisms of Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odegard, Timothy N.; Koen, Joshua D.; Gama, Jorge M.

    2008-01-01

    A surge of research has been conducted to examine memory editing mechanisms that help distinguish accurate from inaccurate memories. In the present experiment, the authors examined the ability of participants to use novelty detection, recollection rejection, and plausibility judgments to reject lures presented on a recognition memory test.…

  11. Elementary Quantum Mechanics in a High-Energy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denville, A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compares two approaches to strong absorption in elementary quantum mechanics; the black sphere and a model based on the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. Examines the application to proton-antiproton interactions at low momenta and concludes that the second model is the appropriate and simplest to use. (Author/GA)

  12. Computer model for analyzing sodium cold traps

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C C; Raue, D J

    1983-05-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions. The calculated pressure drop as a function of impurity mass content determines the capacity of the cold trap. The accuracy of the model was checked by comparing calculated mass distributions with experimentally determined mass distributions from literature publications and with results from our own cold trap experiments. The comparisons were excellent in all cases. A parametric study was performed to determine which design variables are most important in maximizing cold trap capacity.

  13. Fabrication Processes and Mechanical Behavior of CNT/Metal Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    process, were investigated and applied for fabrication of CNT/Cu and CNT/Ni nanocomposite powders. The spark plasma sintering process was applied... spark plasma sintering process to fabricate CNT/NiTi and CNT/Al-Cu nanocomposites. It is confirmed that the CNTs were homogeneously dispersed in NiTi...can be seen in Figure 1-1. The CNT/NiTi composite powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, Dr. Sinter Lab., Sumitomo). The CNT/NiTi

  14. [Autophagic processes in plants: mechanisms, regulation and function].

    PubMed

    Guiboileau, Anne; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2012-06-01

    Large numbers of publications investigating the molecular details, the regulation and the physiological roles of autophagic processes have appeared over the last few years, dealing with animals, plants and unicellular eukaryotic organisms. This strong interest is caused by the fact that autophagic processes are ubiquitous in eukaryotic organisms. They are involved in the adaptation of organisms to their environment and to stressful conditions, thereby contributing to cell and organism survival and longevity. This review article aims to describe the discovery of autophagy, the molecular details of this complex process, its regulation, and its specific functions in plants.

  15. Grammatical Processing Using the Mechanisms of Physical Inference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-07

    empty-category principle, subjacency and the anaphoric binding principles that occur in some form in most mature formal theories of human syntax...that a single cognitive process (meronomic inhibition) can help syntactic inference conform to a grammatical constraint (on anaphoric binding ) and on...condition on binding , can be explained by a cognitive process used in physical reasoning. Several consequences for language development and the

  16. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  17. Initial Carbon–Carbon Bond Formation during the Early Stages of the Methanol‐to‐Olefin Process Proven by Zeolite‐Trapped Acetate and Methyl Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Houben, Klaartje; Whiting, Gareth T.; Mokhtar, Mohamed; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al‐Thabaiti, Shaeel A.; Basahel, Suliman N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methanol‐to‐olefin (MTO) catalysis is a very active field of research because there is a wide variety of sometimes conflicting mechanistic proposals. An example is the ongoing discussion on the initial C−C bond formation from methanol during the induction period of the MTO process. By employing a combination of solid‐state NMR spectroscopy with UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry on an active H‐SAPO‐34 catalyst, we provide spectroscopic evidence for the formation of surface acetate and methyl acetate, as well as dimethoxymethane during the MTO process. As a consequence, new insights in the formation of the first C−C bond are provided, suggesting a direct mechanism may be operative, at least in the early stages of the MTO reaction. PMID:27805783

  18. Thalamic Circuit Mechanisms Link Sensory Processing in Sleep and Attention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wimmer, Ralf D; Wilson, Matthew A; Halassa, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sleep integrity and attentional performance is normally interpreted as poor sleep causing impaired attention. Here, we provide an alternative explanation for this correlation: common thalamic circuits regulate sensory processing across sleep and attention, and their disruption may lead to correlated dysfunction. Using multi-electrode recordings in mice, we find that rate and rhythmicity of thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons are predictive of their functional organization in sleep and suggestive of their participation in sensory processing across states. Surprisingly, TRN neurons associated with spindles in sleep are also associated with alpha oscillations during attention. As such, we propose that common thalamic circuit principles regulate sensory processing in a state-invariant manner and that in certain disorders, targeting these circuits may be a more viable therapeutic strategy than considering individual states in isolation.

  19. Experimental investigation of supercritical CO2 trapping mechanisms at the Intermediate Laboratory Scale in well-defined heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Luca; Pini, Ronny; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-31

    The heterogeneous nature of typical sedimentary formations can play a major role in the propagation of the CO2 plume, eventually dampening the accumulation of mobile phase underneath the caprock. From core flooding experiments, it is also known that contrasts in capillary threshold pressure due to different pore size can affect the flow paths of the invading and displaced fluids and consequently influence the build- up of non-wetting phase (NWP) at interfaces between geological facies. The full characterization of the geologic variability at all relevant scales and the ability to make observations on the spatial and temporal distribution of the migration and trapping of supercritical CO2 is not feasible from a practical perspective. To provide insight into the impact of well-defined heterogeneous systems on the flow dynamics and trapping efficiency of supercritical CO2 under drainage and imbibition conditions, we present an experimental investigation at the meter scale conducted in synthetic sand reservoirs packed in a quasi-two-dimensional flow-cell. Two immiscible displacement experiments have been performed to observe the preferential entrapment of NWP in simple heterogeneous porous media. The experiments consisted of an injection, a fluid redistribution, and a forced imbibition stages conducted in an uncorrelated permeability field and a homogeneous base case scenario. We adopted x-ray attenuation analysis as a non-destructive technique that allows a precise measurement of phase saturations throughout the entire flow domain. By comparing a homogeneous and a heterogeneous scenario we have identified some important effects that can be attributed to capillary barriers, such as dampened plume advancement, higher non-wetting phase saturations, larger contact area between the injected and displaced phases, and a larger range of non-wetting phase saturations.

  20. Optical trapping of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-15

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec, which has serious implications for biological matter. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres and 3.4 nm hydrodynamic radius

  1. Exchange effects and collision mechanisms in (e, 2e) processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang-jin, Chen; Zhi-xiang, Ni; Qi-cun, Shi; Ke-zun, Xu

    1998-07-01

    In this work the triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium at an incident energy of 64.6 eV is considered in the coplanar symmetric energy-sharing and fixed relative angles of the two out-going electrons kinematics. A new collision process called triple-binary collision is identified. It has been shown that the ordinary double-binary collision process is excluded from the collision kinematics considered here. It has also been shown how the exchange effects symmetrically contribute to the peaks in the cross sections.

  2. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  3. Gyrotactic trapping: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorai, S.

    2016-04-01

    Gyrotactic trapping is a mechanism proposed by Durham et al. ["Disruption of vertical motility by shear triggers formation of thin Phytoplankton layers," Science 323, 1067-1070 (2009)] to explain the formation of thin phytoplankton layer just below the ocean surface. This mechanism is examined numerically using a rational model based on the generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The crucial role of sedimentation speed in the thin layer formation is demonstrated. The effects of variation in different parameters on the thin layer formation are also investigated.

  4. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  5. A mechanized process algebra for verification of device synchronization protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, E. Thomas

    1992-01-01

    We describe the formalization of a process algebra based on CCS within the Higher Order Logic (HOL) theorem-proving system. The representation of four types of device interactions and a correctness proof of the communication between a microprocessor and MMU is presented.

  6. Collective Memory, A Fusion of cognitive Mechanisms and cultural Processes.

    PubMed

    Cicourel, Aaron V

    2015-12-01

    The paper assumes a theoretical-empirical interface exists between top-down (structural concepts) and bottom-up (cognitive mechanisms and socio-cultural interactions) approaches to collective memory. Both deal with collaborative group accounts, material culture such as artefacts and representational re-descriptive technologies. Anthropology has shown how communal life was based on story telling, rituals, artefacts, routine practices constitutive of daily life representational re-descriptions and the reproduction of implicit and explicit emotional normative belief systems embedded in kinship and social network relations.

  7. Rapid increase in relativistic electron flux controlled by nonlinear phase trapping of whistler chorus elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shinji; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Seki, Kanako

    2016-07-01

    Wave-particle interactions with whistler chorus waves are believed to provide a primary acceleration for electrons in the outer radiation belt. Previous models for flux enhancement of the radiation belt have assumed the stochastic process as a diffusion manner of successive random-phase interactions, but physical mechanisms for the acceleration are not fully incorporated in these models because of the lack of a nonlinear scattering process. Here we report rapid increase in relativistic electron flux by using an innovative computer simulation model that incorporates not only diffusive process but also nonlinear scattering processes. The simulations show that three types of scattering simultaneously occur, which are diffusive, phase trapping, and phase bunching. It is found that the phase trapping is the most efficient mechanism to produce the MeV electrons rapidly in the scattering processes. The electrons are accelerated from 400 keV to over 1 MeV in time scale less than 60 s. On the other hand, as the phase trapping is suppressed by the breaking of relative phase angle between waves and gyrating electrons during the interaction, the increase of electron flux at MeV energy is clearly reduced. Our simulations conclude that the phase-trapping process causes a significant effect for the increase in relativistic electron flux and suggest that a quasi-linear diffusion model is not always valid to fully describe the relativistic electron acceleration.

  8. Knowledge Discovery Process for Characterization of Materials Failure Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.

    1999-01-01

    It is the intent of this project to provide a platform to visualize the various data collected from stress-strain testing of composite ceramic matrix materials. The data collected from the stress-strain tests are acoustic emissions (AE). As a material is subjected to a stress-strain test, various failure mechanisms occur in the material. The recorded sounds emitted during the test may correspond to various failure mechanisms. This project, thus, will give a possible way to visualize the data and data derived from the recorded AE. The stress-strain testing was performed on several composite matrix material combinations. Each of these tests produced anywhere from 1000 to 10,000+ AE events. For each AE event recorded, several characteristics in both the time and frequency domains are created. This project has two goals. First, this project will provide a summation page for a selected waveform. This page will include all of the characteristics determined from the AE event waveform along with graphs of the AE event waveform and its corresponding Power Spectrum. The other function of this project is to retrieve and display selected AE event waveforms for comparison.

  9. Orientation processing mechanisms revealed by the plaid tilt illusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S.; Wenderoth, P.; van der Zwan, R.

    2001-01-01

    The tilt after-effect (TAE) and tilt illusion (TI) have revealed a great deal about the nature of orientation coding of 1-dimensional (1D) lines and gratings. Comparatively little research however has addressed the mechanisms responsible for encoding the orientation of 2-dimensional (2D) plaid stimuli. A multi-stage model of edge detection has recently been proposed [Georgeson, M. A. (1998) Image & Vision Computing, 16(6-7), 389-405] to account for the perceived structure of a plaid stimulus that incorporates extraction of the zero-crossings (ZCs) of the plaid. Data is presented showing that the ZCs of a plaid inducing stimulus can interact with vertical grating test stimulus to induce a standard tilt illusion. However, by considering the second-order structure of a plaid rather than ZCs, it was shown that the perceived orientation of the vertical test grating results from the combination of orientation illusions due to the first- and second-order components of an inducing plaid. The data suggest that the mechanisms encoding the orientation of second-order contours are similar to, and interact directly with, those that encode first-order contours.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Human Cells Change during Neoplastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin; Guo, Xinyi; Bonin, Keith; Scarpinato, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Using an AFM with a spherical probe of 5.3 μm, we determined mechanical properties of individual human mammary epithelial cells that have progressed through four stages of neoplastic transformation: normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic. Measurements on cells in all four stages were taken over both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Moreover, the measurements were made for cells outside of a colony (isolated), on the periphery of a colony, and inside a colony. By fitting the AFM force vs. indentation curves to a Hertz model, we determined the Young's modulus, E. We found a distinct contrast in the influence a cell's colony environment has on its stiffness depending on whether the cells are normal or cancer cells. We also found that cells become softer as they advance to the tumorigenic stage and then stiffen somewhat in the final step to metastatic cells. For cells averaged over all locations the stiffness values of the nuclear region for normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic cells were (mean +/- sem) 880 +/- 50, 940+/-50, 400 +/- 20, and 600 +/-20 Pa respectively. Cytoplasmic regions followed a similar trend. These results point to a complex picture of the mechanical changes that occur as cells undergo neoplastic transformation. This work is supported by NSF Materials and Surface Engineering grant CMMI-1152781.

  11. Public acceptance of wildlife trapping in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manfredo, M.J.; Pierce, C.L.; Fulton, D.; Pate, J.; Gill, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    In November 1994, the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) initiated a stakeholder process to develop trapping regulations that would seek to achieve compromise among divergent interests. A telephone survey was conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the Colorado public's acceptance of trapping. A random sample of 900 residents, stratified by geographic region, indicated that the public would vote to ban trapping and that they believed the ban would eliminate a cruel activity and help to preserve endangered wildlife. Most, however, agreed that trapping was acceptable to prevent spread of disease and to protect livestock, but unacceptable on the basis of providing recreation or making money. Beliefs about trapping were found to be rooted in a protection versus use value orientation about wildlife. The regulations subsequently adopted by the CDOW were consistent with survey findings; however, the regulatory process was bypassed by legislative action, giving trapping authority to the Colorado Department of Agriculture. In response, citizen activists succeeded in placing a ballot initiative before voters. In 1996, the ballot initiative passed, banning trapping in Colorado.

  12. Reconstruction of mechanically recorded sound by image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Haber, Carl

    2003-03-26

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with no or minimal contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods and digital image processing. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Various aspects of this approach are discussed. A feasibility test is reported which used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the record and with a digitally re-mastered version of the original magnetic recording. A more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software, is considered.

  13. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; McLachlan, B. G.

    1987-10-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  14. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  15. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  16. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    2000-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  17. Healing mechanism of nanocrack in nanocrystalline metals during creep process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed to demonstrate the fate of cracks present inside ultrafine-grained (grain size 7 nm) nanocrystalline Ni specimen during creep deformation process. It is observed that internal nanocracks are healed within a few pico-seconds of initial part of creep process even if the constant applied load on the specimen is tensile in nature and acting normal to crack surface in the outward direction. This kind of crack-healing phenomenon can be accounted by the facts such as stress-driven grain boundary migration, grain boundary diffusion and amorphization of specimen as per results obtained from this MD simulation. This MD study also reveals that the presence of nanocrack inside ultrafine-grained NC Ni in fact slightly improves creep properties and such enhancement of the creep properties is intensified as the size of internal crack increases.

  18. Improving Tools and Processes in Mechanical Design Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Clark

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative product development projects in the aerospace and defense industry are held hostage to high cost and risk due to poor alignment of collaborative design tools and processes. This impasse can be broken if companies will jointly develop implementation approaches and practices in support of high value working arrangements. The current tools can be used to better advantage in many situations and there is reason for optimism that tool vendors will provide significant support.

  19. Enterobacter cloacae as biosurfactant producing bacterium: differentiating its effects on interfacial tension and wettability alteration Mechanisms for oil recovery during MEOR process.

    PubMed

    Sarafzadeh, Pegah; Hezave, Ali Zeinolabedini; Ravanbakhsh, Moosa; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-05-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process utilizes microorganisms or their metabolites to mobilize the trapped oil in the oil formation after primary and secondary oil recovery stages. MEOR technique is considered as more environmentally friendly and low cost process. There are several identified mechanisms for more oil recovery using MEOR processes however; wettability alteration and interfacial tension (IFT) reduction are the important ones. Enterobacter Cloacae, a facultative bio-surfactant producer bacterium, was selected as a bacterial formulation due to its known performance on IFT reduction and wettability alteration. To quantify the effects of these two mechanisms, different tests including oil spreading, in situ and ex situ core flooding, wettability measurement (Amott), IFT, viscosity and pH measurements were performed. The obtained results revealed that the experimental procedure used in this study was able to quantitatively identify the individual effects of both mechanisms on the ultimate microbial oil recovery. The results demonstrated considerable effects of both mechanisms on the tertiary oil recovery; however after a proper shut in time period, more tertiary oil was recovered because of wettability alteration mechanism. Finally, SEM images taken from the treated cores showed biofilm formation on the rock pore surfaces, which is responsible for rock surface wettability alteration.

  20. Thermodynamic Mechanism Analysis of Calcification Roasting Process of Bastnaesite Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Peng; Wu, Wenyuan; Bian, Xue

    2017-03-01

    A novel calcification roasting decomposition method for bastnaesite concentrates has been proposed previously. In this work, the thermodynamic mechanism was investigated via simultaneous measurements of thermogravimetry and differential thermal analyses, combined with X-ray diffraction analyses. Rare earth oxides and calcium fluorides were generated after bastnaesite and calcium hydroxide broke down, respectively. The generation and decomposition of calcium carbonate occurred at the same time. Considering the difficulties in obtaining pure substances, theoretical calculations were applied to determine the standard enthalpy of formation (Δf H 298), Gibbs free energies of formation (Δf G 298), and heat capacities at constant pressure (C p) of some rare earth minerals (CeFCO3 and CeOF). Based on these results, the standard Gibbs energy of reaction at different temperatures (Δr G T) was ascertained, and the major reactions were verified to be thermodynamically reasonable.

  1. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  2. Capture and identification of the volatile components in crude and processed herbal medicines through on-line purge and trap technique coupled with GC × GC-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Xu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xin; Li, Qingli; Chen, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to investigate the volatile components in crude and processed herbal medicines (HMs). Using Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma (AMR) as a model HM, the volatile components were captured through on-line purge and trap technique and identified by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF MS) system. A total of 224 and 171 volatile compounds were identified in crude and processed AMR samples, respectively. After frying with honey-bran, 52 compounds which were found in crude AMR samples disappeared in processed AMR samples, and 15 compounds were newly generated in processed AMR. The established method can be applied in different research areas such as HM and food processing.

  3. Quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary story of the three-dimensional radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap, accompanied by a seemingly unintelligible theoretical treatment, is told in some detail because of the quite considerable degree of commercial success that quadrupole technology has achieved. The quadrupole ion trap, often used in conjunction with a quadrupole mass filter, remained a laboratory curiosity until 1979 when, at the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Conference in Seattle, George Stafford, Jr., of Finnigan Corp., learned of the Masters' study of Allison Armitage of a combined quadrupole ion trap/quadrupole mass filter instrument for the observation of electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectra of simple compounds eluting from a gas chromatograph. Stafford developed subsequently the mass-selective axial instability method for obtaining mass spectra from the quadrupole ion trap alone and, in 1983, Finnigan Corp. announced the first commercial quadrupole ion trap instrument as a detector for a gas chromatograph. In 1987, confinement of ions generated externally to the ion trap was demonstrated and, soon after, the new technique of electrospray ionization was shown to be compatible with the ion trap.

  4. Trap diversity and evolution in the family Droseraceae

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Hartmeyer, Siegfried R.H.; Masselter, Tom; Hartmeyer, Irmgard; Speck, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We review trapping mechanisms in the carnivorous flowering plant family Droseraceae (order Caryophyllales). Its members are generally known to attract, capture, retain and digest prey animals (mainly arthropods) with active snap-traps (Aldrovanda, Dionaea) or with active sticky flypaper traps (Drosera) and to absorb the resulting nutrients. Recent investigations revealed how the snap-traps of Aldrovanda vesiculosa (waterwheel plant) and Dionaea muscipula (Venus’ flytrap) work mechanically and how these apparently similar devices differ as to their functional morphology and shutting mechanics. The Sundews (Drosera spp.) are generally known to possess leaves covered with glue-tentacles that both can bend toward and around stuck prey. Recently, it was shown that there exists in this genus a higher diversity of different tentacle types and trap configurations than previously known which presumably reflect adaptations to different prey spectra. Based on these recent findings, we finally comment on possible ways for intrafamiliar trap evolution. PMID:23603942

  5. Trap diversity and evolution in the family Droseraceae.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Hartmeyer, Siegfried R H; Masselter, Tom; Hartmeyer, Irmgard; Speck, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    We review trapping mechanisms in the carnivorous flowering plant family Droseraceae (order Caryophyllales). Its members are generally known to attract, capture, retain and digest prey animals (mainly arthropods) with active snap-traps (Aldrovanda, Dionaea) or with active sticky flypaper traps (Drosera) and to absorb the resulting nutrients. Recent investigations revealed how the snap-traps of Aldrovanda vesiculosa (waterwheel plant) and Dionaea muscipula (Venus' flytrap) work mechanically and how these apparently similar devices differ as to their functional morphology and shutting mechanics. The Sundews (Drosera spp.) are generally known to possess leaves covered with glue-tentacles that both can bend toward and around stuck prey. Recently, it was shown that there exists in this genus a higher diversity of different tentacle types and trap configurations than previously known which presumably reflect adaptations to different prey spectra. Based on these recent findings, we finally comment on possible ways for intrafamiliar trap evolution.

  6. Evolutionary traps as keys to understanding behavioral maladaptation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Bruce A.; Chalfoun, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary traps are severe cases of behavioral maladaptation that occur when, due to human activity, the cues animals use to guide their behavior become uncoupled from their fitness consequences. The result is that animals can prefer the most dangerous resources or behaviors, even when better options are available. Traps are increasingly common and represent a significant wildlife conservation problem. Understanding of the more proximate sensory-cognitive mechanisms underpinning traps remains poor, which highlights the need for interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to investigating traps. Key to advancing basic trap theory and its conservation applications will be the development of appropriate and tractable model systems to investigate the mechanisms that cause traps within species, and how mechanisms vary across species.

  7. Quantum Mechanics and Perceptive Processes: A Reply to Elio Conte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2015-07-01

    Recently, Elio Conte has commented a paper by the present author devoted to analyze the possibility of checking experimentally whether the perceptual process can lead to the collapse of the wavefunction. Here we answer to the comments by Conte and we show that he has missed to grasp the crucial elements of our proposal. Morever, we discuss some ideas put forward by Conte concerning the occurrence of quantum superpositions of different states of consciousness and we show that they are rather vague and not cogent.

  8. Mechanisms of shark skin suppression by novel polymer processing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. H.; Himmel, T.; Kulikov, O.; Hornung, K.

    2014-05-01

    The extrusion rate of polyethylene (PE) with narrow molar weight distribution, as e.g. metallocen catalysed polyethylene (m-PE), is limited by melt fracture. The first level of fracture is a surface defect called sharkskin. Common polymer processing aids based on fluorinated polymers shift the onset of sharkskin to higher extrusion rates by creating a "low energy surface" at the die wall and promoting wall slip. Alternatively, Kulikov et al. [1, 2] suggested thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) for sharkskin suppression, and Müller [3] showed the suitability of some TPEs as polymer processing aids. We investigated the slip velocity of several TPEs against steel, and the slip velocity in a polymeric interface between polyethylene (PE) and TPE by rotational plate-plate rheometry in the Newtonian flow regime. TPEs with lower viscosities showed higher slip velocities against steel. However, the interfacial slip velocities between PE and TPE were found to be viscosity independent. In both cases, the slip velocity was found to be proportional to the applied shear stress.

  9. Processing and mechanical behavior of hypereutectoid steel wires

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.; Kim, D.K.

    1996-06-25

    Hypereutectoid steels have the potential for dramatically increasing the strength of wire used in tire cord and in other high strength wire applications. The basis for this possible breakthrough is the elimination of a brittle proeutectoid network that can form along grain boundaries if appropriate processing procedures and alloy additions are used. A review is made of work done by Japanese and other researchers on eutectoid and mildly hypereutectoid wires. A linear extrapolation of the tensile strength of fine wires predicts higher strengths at higher carbon contents. The influence of processing, alloy additions and carbon content in optimizing the strength, ductility and fracture behavior of hypereutectoid steels is presented. It is proposed that the tensile strength of pearlitic wires is dictated by the fracture strength of the carbide lamella at grain boundary locations in the carbide. Methods to improve the strength of carbide grain boundaries and to decrease the carbide plate thickness will contribute to enhancing the ultrahigh strength obtainable in hypereutectoid steel wires. 23 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  11. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, V.; Friis, N.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  12. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  13. Psychosocial processes and mechanisms of risk and protection.

    PubMed

    Psychosocial research on adolescent drinking includes studies of personality and the impact of particular personality traits on drinking risk, expectancies (that is, the effects someone expects after drinking alcohol), and cognitive development. Although studies involving adolescents have not identified specific sets of personality traits that uniquely predict alcohol use, some traits have been shown to be associated with heavy alcohol use and alcohol use disorders. These traits include disinhibition or poor self-regulation, impulsiveness and aggression, novelty-seeking, and negative affectivity. Externalizing behaviors in childhood and early adolescence have been found to predict alcohol use disorders in early adulthood, as have certain internalizing behaviors. This article examines the theories and psychosocial processes thought to underlie underage drinking.

  14. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb2+: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, S.; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A. R.; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The direct photodissociation of trapped 85Rb2+ (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the 85Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb2+ ions are created by photoionization of Rb2 molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb2+ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  15. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb_{2}^{+}: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, S; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A R; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S A

    2016-11-18

    The direct photodissociation of trapped ^{85}Rb_{2}^{+} (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the ^{85}Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb_{2}^{+} ions are created by photoionization of Rb_{2} molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb_{2}^{+} ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  16. Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorini, Grahame; Wright, Kenneth; Brown, Kenneth R.; Harter, Alexa W.; Doret, S. Charles

    2013-04-01

    We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps, designed around an affordable, large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access and enables rapid turnaround and flexibility for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360° of optical access in the plane of the ion trap, while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+, finding small stray electric fields, long ion lifetimes, and low ion heating rates.

  17. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  18. Fault zone processes in mechanically layered mudrock and chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Evans, Mark A.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Morris, Alan P.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Gulliver, Kirk D. H.; Lehrmann, Daniel; de Zoeten, Erich; Sickmann, Zach

    2017-04-01

    A 1.5 km long natural cliff outcrop of nearly horizontal Eagle Ford Formation in south Texas exposes northwest and southeast dipping normal faults with displacements of 0.01-7 m cutting mudrock, chalk, limestone, and volcanic ash. These faults provide analogs for both natural and hydraulically-induced deformation in the productive Eagle Ford Formation - a major unconventional oil and gas reservoir in south Texas, U.S.A. - and other mechanically layered hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fault dips are steep to vertical through chalk and limestone beds, and moderate through mudrock and clay-rich ash, resulting in refracted fault profiles. Steeply dipping fault segments contain rhombohedral calcite veins that cross the fault zone obliquely, parallel to shear segments in mudrock. The vertical dimensions of the calcite veins correspond to the thickness of offset competent beds with which they are contiguous, and the slip parallel dimension is proportional to fault displacement. Failure surface characteristics, including mixed tensile and shear segments, indicate hybrid failure in chalk and limestone, whereas shear failure predominates in mudrock and ash beds - these changes in failure mode contribute to variation in fault dip. Slip on the shear segments caused dilation of the steeper hybrid segments. Tabular sheets of calcite grew by repeated fault slip, dilation, and cementation. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope geochemistry analyses of fault zone cements indicate episodic reactivation at 1.4-4.2 km depths. The results of these analyses document a dramatic bed-scale lithologic control on fault zone architecture that is directly relevant to the development of porosity and permeability anisotropy along faults.

  19. Localized Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Processed Sensitized 5456-H116 Al

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    FSP is applied to a sensitized 5456-H116 aluminum plate and the resulting microstructure is linked to local mechanical properties (0.2% yield...have negatively affected the mechanical properties 15. SUBJECT TERMS Aluminum Alloys, Friction Stir Processing, Sensitization, Mechanical Testing... aluminum 5456-H116 (wt. %) ..............................................3 Table 2. Bulk base material properties for H116, O, and sensitized H116

  20. On the Penning trap coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, M.; Lindroth, E.

    2009-07-01

    Recently, a class of coherent states of a particle in a Penning trap was derived by Fernández and Velázquez (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 085304). By means of the Wigner function and density matrix associated with these states, we show that they are fully consistent with Morikawa's definition of the decoherence degree and hence they provide a possibility to directly access the decoherence process in a Penning trap.

  1. Trapping and sorting active granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Kumar, Nitin; Soni, Harsh; Gupta, Rahul; Sood, Ajay

    We report experiments and simulations on collective trapping in a horizontal monolayer of tapered granular rods rendered motile by mechanical vibration. A macroscopic fraction of the particles are trapped by a V-shaped obstacle if its opening angle is less than a threshold value of about 120 degrees, consistent with active Brownian simulations [PRL 108, 268307 (2012)]. the transition between trapped and untrapped states becomes sharper with increasing system size in our numerical studies. We offer a theoretical understanding of this nonequilibrium phase transition based on collective noise suppression and an analysis of fluxes. We show also that the trap can serve to separate particles based on their motility and rotational diffusivity. On leave from Dept of Physics, Indian Institute of Science.

  2. Focused plasmonic trapping of metallic particles

    PubMed Central

    Min, Changjun; Shen, Zhe; Shen, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuquan; Fang, Hui; Yuan, Guanghui; Du, Luping; Zhu, Siwei; Lei, Ting; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2013-01-01

    Scattering forces in focused light beams push away metallic particles. Thus, trapping metallic particles with conventional optical tweezers, especially those of Mie particle size, is difficult. Here we investigate a mechanism by which metallic particles are attracted and trapped by plasmonic tweezers when surface plasmons are excited and focused by a radially polarized beam in a high-numerical-aperture microscopic configuration. This contrasts the repulsion exerted in optical tweezers with the same configuration. We believe that different types of forces exerted on particles are responsible for this contrary trapping behaviour. Further, trapping with plasmonic tweezers is found not to be due to a gradient force balancing an opposing scattering force but results from the sum of both gradient and scattering forces acting in the same direction established by the strong coupling between the metallic particle and the highly focused plasmonic field. Theoretical analysis and simulations yield good agreement with experimental results. PMID:24305554

  3. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  4. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  5. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  6. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to paragraph (j)...

  7. 42 CFR 433.116 - FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and information retrieval systems. 433.116 Section 433.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.116 FFP for operation of mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems. (a) Subject to 42 CFR...

  8. 9 CFR 318.18 - Handling of certain material for mechanical processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. 318.18 Section 318.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.18 Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. Material...

  9. 9 CFR 318.18 - Handling of certain material for mechanical processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. 318.18 Section 318.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.18 Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. Material...

  10. 9 CFR 318.18 - Handling of certain material for mechanical processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. 318.18 Section 318.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.18 Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. Material...

  11. 9 CFR 318.18 - Handling of certain material for mechanical processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. 318.18 Section 318.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.18 Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. Material...

  12. 9 CFR 318.18 - Handling of certain material for mechanical processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. 318.18 Section 318.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.18 Handling of certain material for mechanical processing. Material...

  13. Enhancement of CO2 Trapping in Saline Aquifers Using a Water-Alternating-Gas Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodaki, Saba; Niemi, Auli; Rasmusson, Kristina; Yang, Zhibing; Bensabat, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Geological formations in general and saline aquifer in particular can be used to store considerable amount of CO2. The efficiency and durability of the storage are not only defined by the formation hydro-geological properties but also by injection strategy employed. Previous studies have shown that certain injection strategies result in enhanced residual trapping and dissolution trapping that can noticeably increase CO2 immobilization and the efficiency of the aquifer to store CO2. One such enhancement method to increase the trapping mechanisms is water-alternating-gas (WAG) in which intermittent slugs of gas and water are injected. The injection rate, injection duration, the WAG ratio and the total volume of the injected components affect the efficiency of trapping. The objective of this study is to investigate different WAG injection schemes considering a heterogeneous field and find an optimized method to enhance the storage efficiency. The Heletz site in Israel, where CO2 trapping will be quantified in a field injection experiment, is selected as an example for the optimization. We use the iTOUGH2-EOS7C code to simulate the trapping processes. The formation heterogeneity is considered; gas injection and migration are simulated in spatially correlated random permeability fields, which are generated based on currently available geological information and borehole data at Heletz.

  14. A monolithic array of three-dimensional ion traps fabricated with conventional semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Wilpers, Guido; See, Patrick; Gill, Patrick; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2012-09-01

    The coherent control of quantum-entangled states of trapped ions has led to significant advances in quantum information, quantum simulation, quantum metrology and laboratory tests of quantum mechanics and relativity. All of the basic requirements for processing quantum information with arrays of ion-based quantum bits (qubits) have been proven in principle. However, so far, no more than 14 ion-based qubits have been entangled with the ion-trap approach, so there is a clear need for arrays of ion traps that can handle a much larger number of qubits. Traps consisting of a two-dimensional electrode array have undergone significant development, but three-dimensional trap geometries can create a superior confining potential. However, existing three-dimensional approaches, as used in the most advanced experiments with trap arrays, cannot be scaled up to handle greatly increased numbers of ions. Here, we report a monolithic three-dimensional ion microtrap array etched from a silica-on-silicon wafer using conventional semiconductor fabrication technology. We have confined individual (88)Sr(+) ions and strings of up to 14 ions in a single segment of the array. We have measured motional frequencies, ion heating rates and storage times. Our results demonstrate that it should be possible to handle several tens of ion-based qubits with this approach.

  15. Chemical aspects of the trapping and recovery of uranium hexafluoride and fluorine during remediation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Decontamination and decommission activities related to the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) involve the trapping and recovery of radiolitically generated uranium hexafluoride and fluorine. Although fission product radiolysis was known to generate F{sub 2}, the formation of UF{sub 6} and its transport from the fuel salt was unexpected. Some of these gaseous radiolysis products have been moving through the gas piping to a charcoal bed since the reactor was shut down in 1969. Current and planned remediation and clean-up activities involve the trapping of the gaseous products, deactivation and treatment of the activated charcoal bed, stabilization and reconditioning of the fuel salt, and recovery of the uranium. The chemical aspects of these processes, including radiolytic generation mechanisms, reactions between uranium hexafluoride and fluorine and trapping materials such as activated charcoal, activated alumina, and sodium fluoride, along with the analytical techniques used for the characterization of the materials and process control will be described.

  16. An active bubble trap and debubbler for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Skelley, Alison M; Voldman, Joel

    2008-10-01

    We present a novel, fully integrated microfluidic bubble trap and debubbler. The 2-layer structure, based on a PDMS valve design, utilizes a featured membrane to stop bubble progression through the device. A pneumatic chamber directly above the trap is evacuated, and the bubble is pulled out through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane. Normal device operation, including continuous flow at atmospheric pressure, is maintained during the entire trapping and debubbling process. We present a range of trap sizes, from 2 to 10 mm diameter, and can trap and remove bubbles up to 25 microL in under 3 h.

  17. Trapping of radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Alford, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors analyze the problem of radiation trapping (imprisonment) by the method of Holstein. The process is described by an integrodifferential equation which shows that the effective radiative decay rate of the system depends on the size and the shape of the active medium. Holstein obtains a global decay rate for a particular geometry by assuming that the radiating excited species evolves into a steady state spatial mode. The authors derive a new approximation for the trapped decay which has a space dependent decay rate and is easy to implement in a detailed computer simulation of a plasma confined within an arbitrary geometry. They analyze the line shapes that are relevant to a near-atmospheric-pressure mixture of He and Xe. This line-shape analysis can be utilized in either the Holstein formulae or the space-dependent decay approximation.

  18. Traps and Interface Fixed Charge Effects on a Solution-Processed n-Type Polymeric-Based Organic Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, B.; Boubaker, A.; Guerin, D.; Lenfant, S.; Kalboussi, A.; Lmimouni, K.

    2017-02-01

    Organic field-effect transistors based on poly{[ N, N0- bis(2-octyldodecyl)- naphthalene-1,4,5,8- bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,50-(2,20-bithiophene)}, [P(NDI2OD-T2)n], were fabricated and characterized. The effect of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) grafted on to a SiO2 gate dielectric was investigated. A significant improvement of the charge mobility ( μ), up to 0.22 cm2/V s, was reached thanks to the OTS treatment. Modifying some technological parameters relating to fabrication, such as solvents, was also studied. We have analyzed the electrical properties of these thin-film transistors by using a two-dimensional drift-diffusion simulator, Integrated System Engineering-Technology Computer Aided Design (ISE-TCAD®). We studied the fixed surface charges at the organic semiconductor/oxide interface and the bulk traps effect. The dependence of the threshold voltage on the density and energy level of the trap states has also been considered. We finally found a good agreement between the output and transfer characteristics for experimental and simulated data.

  19. On the mechanism of influence of explosive compounds: Destruction process on sensitivity of these compounds to mechanic impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Filin, V.P.; Loboyko, B.G.; Averin, A.N.; Litvinov, B.V.; Korotkikh, I.G.; Alekseev, A.V.; Belenovsky, Y.A.; Taibinov, N.P.

    1996-05-01

    The results of investigations into sensitivity of the HMX-based explosive compound samples to mechanic stimuli are shown in the presented report. As a result of experimental studies it was illustrated, that explosives deformation and destruction processes under mechanical stimuli are accompanied by occurrence of different electric phenomena. The hypothesis on possible influence of electric phenomena occurring under deformation and destruction on the mechanism of formation of zones with high density of energy is discussed in the report. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Processing and mechanical behavior of aluminium oxide microstructure composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlacka, Robert J.

    concluded that densification was impeded by the dopant at lower temperatures but enhanced significantly above 1450°C. Texture is highly developed in samples with no dopant and 0.14 wt% dopant by 1550°C and in samples with 2 wt% dopant by 1350°C. We proposed a new class of composites (called microstructure composites) that accesses different component properties not through the use of distinct materials, but rather through the exploitation of the microstructure-property relationship within a single material. Microstructure composites, therefore, are single phase ceramics that combine components with distinct microstructures within a single composite to obtain unique property combinations. Spatial control and composite connectivity of the individual microstructural 'components' of a microstructure composite are ultimately the key to developing and controlling useful and unique properties. Microstructural components are developed by controlling the starting location and transport of dopants during processing and sintering. This work focuses on alpha-Al2O3 microstructure composites that combine textured components, developed in situ using templated grain growth (TGG), and fine-grained equiaxed components. To control microstructure development locally during composite fabrication, it is important to use relatively low levels of dopant to mitigate the effects of dopant interdiffusion. Therefore, the development of texture in alpha-Al 2O3 using low liquid-phase dopant concentrations was explored, with a focus on the effect of template constraint on texture plane shrinkage. High quality texture was obtained with just 0.14 wt% (SiO2 + CaO) dopant. Textured Al2O3 exhibited transgranular fracture, as well as lower strength and fracture toughness than the fine-grained equiaxed Al2O3. A processing strategy using tape casting was developed for the fabrication of textured-equiaxed Al2O3 microstructure composites with 2-2 connectivity. Dopants used to promote TGG (SiO2 + CaO) were

  1. Microkinetic modeling of lean NOx trap chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Rich; Chakravathy, Kalyana; Pihl, Josh A; Daw, C Stuart

    2012-01-01

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, NO{sub x} storage, and oxygen storage sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used with a transient plug flow reactor code (including boundary layer mass transfer) to simulate not only storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a simpler steady state code. The results imply that NO{sub x} storage was not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all gas phase species. It is found that nearly all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with the transient simulations.

  2. [Discussion about research progress and ideas on processing mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Sun, E; Xu, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-02-01

    Study on the processing mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine is the key to science of processing Chinese materia medica and modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. At present, chemical and pharmacology methods are mainly used to discuss the processing principle of efficiency, attenuated, delayed or cooked with different treatment. So that the processing mechanism of Chinese herbal medicine has made breakthrough progress. With the introduction of modern science and technology, biotransformation, intestinal absorption, pharmacokinetics and metabolomics methods have been gradually applied in traditional Chinese medicine processing mechanism. This article summarizes the achievements in the processing mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine in recent years, analyses and discusses some main problems, and points out to in-depth study on absorption and metabolism, strengthening excipient processing mechanism, paying attention to the integration of multiple disciplines and data statistical analysis. Combined with years of exploration and practice, the project group proposes a new idea "traditional Chinese medicine processing mechanism based on coupled effect of chemical composition transformation and intestinal absorption barrier" , which provides reference for the study of the mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine processing.

  3. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  4. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  5. Single trap dynamics in electrolyte-gated Si-nanowire field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Pud, S.; Li, J.; Offenhäusser, A.; Vitusevich, S. A.; Gasparyan, F.; Petrychuk, M.

    2014-06-21

    Liquid-gated silicon nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) are fabricated and their transport and dynamic properties are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Random telegraph signal (RTS) fluctuations were registered in the nanolength channel FETs and used for the experimental and theoretical analysis of transport properties. The drain current and the carrier interaction processes with a single trap are analyzed using a quantum-mechanical evaluation of carrier distribution in the channel and also a classical evaluation. Both approaches are applied to treat the experimental data and to define an appropriate solution for describing the drain current behavior influenced by single trap resulting in RTS fluctuations in the Si NW FETs. It is shown that quantization and tunneling effects explain the behavior of the electron capture time on the single trap. Based on the experimental data, parameters of the single trap were determined. The trap is located at a distance of about 2 nm from the interface Si/SiO{sub 2} and has a repulsive character. The theory of dynamic processes in liquid-gated Si NW FET put forward here is in good agreement with experimental observations of transport in the structures and highlights the importance of quantization in carrier distribution for analyzing dynamic processes in the nanostructures.

  6. Radio Frequency Generation of an Electron Plasma in a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Rome, M.; Maero, G.

    2010-06-16

    The generation of an electron plasma via low-power Radio Frequency (RF) excitation has been observed in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The process is sensitive to the RF parameters as well as to the trapping length. The electron heating mechanism necessary to reach the ionization energy of the residual gas has been modeled with the use of a simple one-dimensional iterative map, whose properties show a behavior similar to that of the Fermi acceleration map.

  7. Broadband radio frequency plasma generation in a Penning-Malmberg trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paroli, B.; De Luca, F.; Maero, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.

    2010-08-01

    Plasma generation is observed in a cylindrical Penning-Malmberg trap in the ultra-high vacuum pressure regime for a large bandwidth of low-power radio frequency (RF) excitations. The process of plasma formation is investigated by measuring the density profiles and a simplified model is developed to characterize the electron heating mechanism. The total charge confined at equilibrium is systematically studied for RF drives in the 0.1-20 MHz range and with different geometrical configurations. With electron densities of some 106 cm-3 at least, the scheme represents an alternative source of non-neutral plasmas for Penning-Malmberg traps.

  8. Optical trapping of nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Brooke C.; Crawford, Alice; Kishore, Rani B.; Helmerson, Kristian; Halas, Naomi J.; Levin, Carly

    2007-09-01

    We investigate near-resonant trapping of Rayleigh particles in optical tweezers. Although optical forces due to a near-resonant laser beam have been extensively studied for atoms, the situation for larger particles is that the laser wavelength is far from any absorption resonance. Theory predicts, however, that the trapping force exerted on a Rayleigh particle is enhanced, and may be three to fifty times larger for frequencies near resonance than for frequencies far off resonance. The ability to selectively trap only particles with a given absorption peak may have many practical applications. In order to investigate near-resonant trapping we are using nanoshells, particles with a dielectric core and metallic coating that can exhibit plasmon resonances. The resonances of the nanoshells can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of the radius of the dielectric core, r I, to the overall radius, r II, which includes the thickness of the metallic coating. Our nanoshells, fabricated at Rice University, consist of a silica core with a gold coating. Using back focal plane detection, we measure the trap stiffness of a single focus optical trap (optical tweezers), from a diode laser at 853 nm for nanoshells with several different r I/r II ratios.

  9. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  10. Effect on Two-Step Polishing Process of Electrochemical Mechanical Planarization and Chemical-Mechanical Planarization on Planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sukhoon; Joo, Sukbae; Kim, Hyoungjae; Kim, Sungryul; Jeong, Haedo

    2009-06-01

    Chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) is a technique used for planarizing an overburden film in the fabrication of semiconductor devices by chemical treatment and mechanical abrasion. However, a variety of defects such as dishing of metal interconnects, erosion, delamination, and metal layer peeling are generated by a high down force in CMP. A high down force is required to generate a high material removal rate (MRR), which results in greater defects. To minimize these defects, a new planarization process is used, known as electrochemical mechanical planarization (ECMP), which requires electrochemical and mechanical energies. ECMP first involves using an electrochemical reaction to change the surface on the target material into a passivation film. Then, the passivation film is worn down using a polishing pad or abrasives on the contacted areas of the metal film with the polishing pad under a low down force. The electrochemical energy dissolves the copper solid into copper ions in an aqueous electrolyte on the contacted areas of the metal film and the polishing pad. Therefore, the low-down-force ECMP reduces the defects such as dishing, erosion, delamination and metal layer peeling to a greater degree than a conventional high-down-force CMP. Also, the MRR of the ECMP process is higher than that of the low-down-force CMP process because the MRR of the ECMP process is proportional to current density. However, some residual metal between the dielectric material was generated through the use of a nonconductive polishing pad in the ECMP process. Therefore, the CMP process is required for the final process to remove residual metals. In this research, we investigated a two-step polishing method that consists of ECMP with a nonconductive polishing pad and a conventional CMP process to planarize a micro-patterned wafer for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). First, the ECMP process using a nonconductive polishing pad removed several tens of micrometers (µm) of bulk

  11. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  12. Optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles in resonant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Juejun; Lin Shiyun; Crozier, Kenneth; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2010-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the opto-mechanical interactions between a dielectric nanoparticle and the resonantly enhanced optical field inside a high Q, small-mode-volume optical cavity. We develop an analytical method based on open system analysis to account for the resonant perturbation due to particle introduction and predict trapping potential in good agreement with three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations. Strong size-dependent trapping dynamics distinctly different from free-space optical tweezers arise as a consequence of the finite cavity perturbation. We illustrate single nanoparticle trapping from an ensemble of monodispersed particles based on size-dependent trapping dynamics. We further discover that the failure of the conventional dipole approximation in the case of resonant cavity trapping originates from a new perturbation interaction mechanism between trapped particles and spatially localized photons.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultra-Fine Grain Al-Zr Alloy Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying Process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Seok; Kim, Il-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The ultra-fine grain Al-4Zr alloy has been successfully fabricated by a mechanical alloying process. The intermetallic Al3Zr phases strongly enhance the mechanical properties of Al-based alloy and prevent grain growth of alloy. The phase stability and transformation during mechanical alloying process have been investigated. The ultra-fine grain alloy has been successfully obtained. The thin film of Al-4Zr alloy has been observed by a transmission electron microscope. The equivalent grain size of as-milling specimen is 55 nm. After milling process, the specimens were heat treated at 350 °C to 650 °C. The equivalent grain size of heat treated specimens were 80 nm at 350 °C and 130 nm at 650 °C. Some of Zr atoms were dissolved into the Al matrix and most of them reacted with hydrogen produced by decomposition of PCA to form ZrH2 during mechanical alloying process. These ZrH2 hydrides decomposed gradually after the heat treatment. Stable A13Zr with a D023 structure was formed by heat treatment at temperature of 550 °C.

  14. Photoluminescence study of time- and spatial-dependent light induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Jacobs, Daniel A; Beck, Fiona J; Duong, The; Shen, Heping; Catchpole, Kylie R; White, Thomas P

    2016-08-10

    Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have rapidly achieved high efficiency in recent years. However, many fundamental recombination mechanisms underlying the excellent performance are still not well understood. Here we apply confocal photoluminescence microscopy to investigate the time and spatial characteristics of light-induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films. Trap de-activation is characterized by a dramatic increase in PL emission during continuous laser illumination accompanied by a lateral expansion of the PL enhancement far beyond the laser spot. These observations are attributed to an oxygen-assisted trap de-activation process associated with carrier diffusion. To model this effect, we add a trap de-activation term to the standard semiconductor carrier recombination and diffusion models. With this approach we are able to reproduce the observed temporal and spatial dependence of laser induced PL enhancement using realistic physical parameters. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the role of trap diffusion in this process, and demonstrate that the trap de-activation is not permanent, with the traps appearing again once the illumination is turned off. This study provides new insights into recombination and trap dynamics in perovskite films that could offer a better understanding of perovskite solar cell performance.

  15. Receptor response in Venus's fly-trap.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S L

    1965-09-01

    The insect-trapping movement of the plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus's fly-trap) is mediated by the stimulation of mechanosensory hairs located on the surface of the trap. It is known that stimulation of the hairs is followed by action potentials which are propagated over the surface of the trap. It has been reported that action potentials always precede trap closure. The occurrence of non-propagated receptor potentials is reported here. Receptor potentials always precede the action potentials. The receptor potential appears to couple the mechanical stimulation step to the action potential step of the preying sequence. Receptor potentials elicited by mechanical stimulation of a sensory hair were measured by using the hair as an integral part of the current-measuring path. The tip of the hair was cut off exposing the medullary tissue; this provided a natural extension of the measuring electrode into the receptor region at the base of the hair. A measuring pipette electrode was slipped over the cut tip of the hair. Positive and negative receptor potentials were measured. Evidence is presented which supports the hypothesis that the positive and negative receptor potentials originate from independent sources. An analysis is made of (a) the relation of the parameters of mechanical stimuli to the magnitude of the receptor potential, and (b) the relation of the receptor potentials to the action potential. The hypothesis that the positive receptor potential is the generator of the action potential is consistent with these data.

  16. Scaling the ion trap quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C; Kim, J

    2013-03-08

    Trapped atomic ions are standards for quantum information processing, serving as quantum memories, hosts of quantum gates in quantum computers and simulators, and nodes of quantum communication networks. Quantum bits based on trapped ions enjoy a rare combination of attributes: They have exquisite coherence properties, they can be prepared and measured with nearly 100% efficiency, and they are readily entangled with each other through the Coulomb interaction or remote photonic interconnects. The outstanding challenge is the scaling of trapped ions to hundreds or thousands of qubits and beyond, at which scale quantum processors can outperform their classical counterparts in certain applications. We review the latest progress and prospects in that effort, with the promise of advanced architectures and new technologies, such as microfabricated ion traps and integrated photonics.

  17. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, T; Wilpers, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-09-17

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of (40)Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 microK by operating a magnetooptical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method, more than 10% of precooled atoms from a standard magnetooptical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments.

  18. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  19. A review of OSHA PSM citations relating to mechanical integrity of process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, M.L.; Remson, A.C.; Yerger, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    OSHA`s process safety management (PSM) regulation has been in effect for more than three years. The regulation poses challenges for facilities in documenting the integrity of process piping systems. This paper summarizes the results of a project sponsored by the Materials Technology Institute (MTI) to compile PSM enforcement information relating to mechanical integrity W and process safety information (PSI) relating to equipment. This paper provides an analysis of how OSHA is citing violations of the PSM regulation as it relates to process piping. This information should be helpful to engineers and maintenance personnel who need guidance on how to ``OSHA-proof`` their mechanical integrity compliance for process piping systems.

  20. Semi-analytical model for quasi-double-layer surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Yaohua

    2016-11-01

    To realize scale quantum processors, the surface-electrode ion trap is an effective scaling approach, including single-layer, double-layer, and quasi-double-layer traps. To calculate critical trap parameters such as the trap center and trap depth, the finite element method (FEM) simulation was widely used, however, it is always time consuming. Moreover, the FEM simulation is also incapable of exhibiting the direct relationship between the geometry dimension and these parameters. To eliminate the problems above, House and Madsen et al. have respectively provided analytic models for single-layer traps and double-layer traps. In this paper, we propose a semi-analytical model for quasi-double-layer traps. This model can be applied to calculate the important parameters above of the ion trap in the trap design process. With this model, we can quickly and precisely find the optimum geometry design for trap electrodes in various cases.

  1. Color Processing in Synesthesia: What Synesthesia Can and Cannot Tell Us About Mechanisms of Color Processing.

    PubMed

    Janik McErlean, Agnieszka B; Banissy, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Synesthetic experiences of color have been traditionally conceptualized as a perceptual phenomenon. However, recent evidence suggests a role of higher order cognition in the formation of synesthetic experiences. Here, we discuss how synesthetic experiences of color differ from and influence veridical color processing, and how non-perceptual processes such as imagery and color memory might play a role in eliciting synesthetic color experience.

  2. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  3. Dynamic analysis of trapping and escaping in dual beam optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqiang; Hu, Huizhu; Su, Heming; Li, Zhenggang; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we simulate the dynamic movement of a dielectric sphere in optical trap. This dynamic analysis can be used to calibrate optical forces, increase trapping efficiency and measure viscous coefficient of surrounding medium. Since an accurate dynamic analysis is based on a detailed force calculation, we calculate all forces a sphere receives. We get the forces of dual-beam gradient radiation pressure on a micron-sized dielectric sphere in the ray optics regime and utilize Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck to deal with its Brownian motion forces. Hydrodynamic viscous force also exists when the sphere moves in liquid. Forces from buoyance and gravity are also taken into consideration. Then we simulate trajectory of a sphere when it is subject to all these forces in a dual optical trap. From our dynamic analysis, the sphere can be trapped at an equilibrium point in static water, although it permanently fluctuates around the equilibrium point due to thermal effects. We go a step further to analyze the effects of misalignment of two optical traps. Trapping and escaping phenomena of the sphere in flowing water are also simulated. In flowing water, the sphere is dragged away from the equilibrium point. This dragging distance increases with the decrease of optical power, which results in escaping of the sphere with optical power below a threshold. In both trapping and escaping process we calculate the forces and position of the sphere. Finally, we analyze a trapping region in dual optical tweezers.

  4. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  5. Ferroelectric Diodes with Charge Injection and Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen; Fan, Hua; Lu, Zengxing; Li, Peilian; Huang, Zhifeng; Tian, Guo; Yang, Lin; Yao, Junxiang; Chen, Chao; Chen, Deyang; Yan, Zhibo; Lu, Xubing; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Ferroelectric diodes with polarization-modulated Schottky barriers are promising for applications in resistive switching (RS) memories. However, they have not achieved satisfactory performance reliability as originally hoped. The physical origins underlying this issue have not been well studied, although they deserve much attention. Here, by means of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy we show that the electrical poling of ferroelectric diodes can cause significant charge injection and trapping besides polarization switching. We further show that the reproducibility and stability of switchable diode-type RS behavior are significantly affected by the interfacial traps. A theoretical model is then proposed to quantitatively describe the modifications of Schottky barriers by charge injection and trapping. This model is able to reproduce various types of hysteretic current-voltage characteristics as experimentally observed. It is further revealed that the charge injection and trapping can significantly modify the electroresistance ratio, RS polarity, and high- or low-resistance states initially defined by the polarization direction. Several approaches are suggested to suppress the effect of charge injection and trapping so as to realize high-performance polarization-reversal-induced RS. This study, therefore, reveals the microscopic mechanisms for the RS behavior comodulated by polarization reversal and charge trapping in ferroelectric diodes, and also provides useful suggestions for developing reliable ferroelectric RS memories.

  6. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  7. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. PMID:26941065

  8. The Processing and Mechanical Properties of High Temperature/High Performance Composites. Book 5. Processing and Miscellaneous Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    Processing and Mechanical Properties of High Texniperature/ High Performance Composites by A.G. Evans & F. Leckie University of California, Santa Barbara...University Carnegie Mellon University University of Virginia 93- 13752 Book 5of 5: PROCESSING AND MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES 93e • • SUMMARY OF TABLE OF...CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY BOOK 1: CONSTITUENT PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITES BOOK 2: CONSTITUENT PROPERTIES AND MACROSCOPIC PERFORMANCE: CMCs BOOK 3

  9. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  10. Mechanical behavior of post-processed Inconel 718 manufactured through the electron beam melting process

    DOE PAGES

    Kirka, Michael M.; Medina, Frank; Dehoff, Ryan R.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Here, the electron beam melting (EBM) process was used to fabricate Inconel 718. The microstructure and tensile properties were characterized in both the as-fabricated and post-processed state transverse (T-orientation) and longitudinal (L-orientation) to the build direction. Post-processing involved both a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) to homogenize the microstructure. In the as-fabricated state, EBM Inconel 718 exhibits a spatially dependent microstructure that is a function of build height. Spanning the last few layers is a cored dendritic structure comprised of the products (carbides and Laves phase) predicted under equilibrium solidification conditions. With increasing distance frommore » the build's top surface, the cored dendritic structure becomes increasingly homogeneous with complete dissolution of the secondary dendrite arms. Further, temporal phase kinetics are observed to lead to the dissolution of the strengthening γ"γ" and precipitation of networks of fine δ needles that span the grains. Microstructurally, post-processing resulted in dissolution of the δ networks and homogeneous precipitation of γ'"γ'" throughout the height of the build. In the as-fabricated state, the monotonic tensile behavior exhibits a height sensitivity within the T-orientation at both 20 and 650 °C. Along the L-orientation, the tensile behavior exhibits strength values comparable to the reference wrought material in the fully heat-treated state. After post-processing, the yield strength, ultimate strength, and elongation at failure for the EBM Inconel 718 were observed to have beneficially increased compared to the as-fabricated material. Further, as a result of post-processing the spatial variance of the ultimate yield strength and elongation at failure within the transverse direction decreased by 4 and 3× respectively.« less

  11. Mechanical behavior of post-processed Inconel 718 manufactured through the electron beam melting process

    SciTech Connect

    Kirka, Michael M.; Medina, Frank; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Okello, Alfred O.

    2016-10-21

    Here, the electron beam melting (EBM) process was used to fabricate Inconel 718. The microstructure and tensile properties were characterized in both the as-fabricated and post-processed state transverse (T-orientation) and longitudinal (L-orientation) to the build direction. Post-processing involved both a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) to homogenize the microstructure. In the as-fabricated state, EBM Inconel 718 exhibits a spatially dependent microstructure that is a function of build height. Spanning the last few layers is a cored dendritic structure comprised of the products (carbides and Laves phase) predicted under equilibrium solidification conditions. With increasing distance from the build's top surface, the cored dendritic structure becomes increasingly homogeneous with complete dissolution of the secondary dendrite arms. Further, temporal phase kinetics are observed to lead to the dissolution of the strengthening γ"γ" and precipitation of networks of fine δ needles that span the grains. Microstructurally, post-processing resulted in dissolution of the δ networks and homogeneous precipitation of γ'"γ'" throughout the height of the build. In the as-fabricated state, the monotonic tensile behavior exhibits a height sensitivity within the T-orientation at both 20 and 650 °C. Along the L-orientation, the tensile behavior exhibits strength values comparable to the reference wrought material in the fully heat-treated state. After post-processing, the yield strength, ultimate strength, and elongation at failure for the EBM Inconel 718 were observed to have beneficially increased compared to the as-fabricated material. Further, as a result of post-processing the spatial variance of the ultimate yield strength and elongation at failure within the transverse direction decreased by 4 and 3× respectively.

  12. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  13. Dynamics of a single ion in a perturbed Penning trap: octupolar perturbation.

    PubMed

    Lara, Martín; Salas, J Pablo

    2004-09-01

    Imperfections in the design or implementation of Penning traps may give rise to electrostatic perturbations that introduce nonlinearities in the dynamics. In this paper we investigate, from the point of view of classical mechanics, the dynamics of a single ion trapped in a Penning trap perturbed by an octupolar perturbation. Because of the axial symmetry of the problem, the system has two degrees of freedom. Hence, this model is ideal to be managed by numerical techniques like continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincaré surfaces of section. We find that, through the variation of the two parameters controlling the dynamics, several periodic orbits emanate from two fundamental periodic orbits. This process produces important changes (bifurcations) in the phase space structure leading to chaotic behavior.

  14. Mechanisms Underlying Lexical Access in Native and Second Language Processing of Gender and Number Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence suggesting that second language (L2) learners experience difficulties when processing morphosyntactic aspects of L2 in online tasks, the mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain unknown. The aim of this dissertation is to explore possible causes for the difficulties by comparing attentional mechanisms engaged…

  15. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  16. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  17. Enhancement of tunability of MAPK cascade due to coexistence of processive and distributive phosphorylation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianqiang; Yi, Ming; Yang, Lijian; Wei, Wenbin; Ding, Yiming; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-04

    The processive phosphorylation mechanism becomes important when there is macromolecular crowding in the cytoplasm. Integrating the processive phosphorylation mechanism with the traditional distributive one, we propose a mixed dual-site phosphorylation (MDP) mechanism in a single-layer phosphorylation cycle. Further, we build a degree model by applying the MDP mechanism to a three-layer mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. By bifurcation analysis, our study suggests that the crowded-environment-induced pseudoprocessive mechanism can qualitatively change the response of this biological network. By adjusting the degree of processivity in our model, we find that the MAPK cascade is able to switch between the ultrasensitivity, bistability, and oscillatory dynamical states. Sensitivity analysis shows that the theoretical results remain unchanged within a reasonably chosen variation of parameter perturbation. By scaling the reaction rates and also introducing new connections into the kinetic scheme, we further construct a proportion model of the MAPK cascade to validate our findings. Finally, it is illustrated that the spatial propagation of the activated MAPK signal can be improved (or attenuated) by increasing the degree of processivity of kinase (or phosphatase). Our research implies that the MDP mechanism makes the MAPK cascade become a flexible signal module, and the coexistence of processive and distributive phosphorylation mechanisms enhances the tunability of the MAPK cascade.

  18. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C6 H5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics.

  19. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  20. Ti Alloys Processed By Selective Laser Melting And By Laser Cladding: Microstructures And Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Anne; Contrepois, Quentin; Dormal, Thierry; Lemaire, Olivier; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2012-07-01

    In this study, samples of alloy Ti-6Al-4V have been processed by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and by Laser Cladding (LC), two layer-by-layer near-net-shape processes allowing for economic production of complex parts. The resulting microstructures have been characterised in details, so as to allow for a better understanding of the solidification process and of the subsequent phase transformations taking place upon cooling for both techniques. On the one hand, a new “MesoClad” laser with a maximum power of 300 W has been used successfully to produce thin wall samples by LC. On the other hand, the influence of processing parameters on the mechanical properties was investigated by means of uniaxial tensile testing performed on samples produced by SLM with different orientations with respect to the direction of mechanical solicitation. A strong anisotropy in mechanical behaviour was thus interpreted in relations with the microstructures and processing conditions.

  1. Measurement of Trap Length for an Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2009-01-01

    The trap length along the beam axis for an optical trap formed with an upright, oil-immersion microscope was measured. The goals for this effort were twofold. It was deemed useful to understand the depth to which an optical trap can reach for purposes of developing a tool to assist in the fabrication of miniature devices. Additionally, it was desired to know whether the measured trap length favored one or the other of two competing theories to model an optical trap. The approach was to trap a microsphere of known size and mass and raise it from its initial trap position. The microsphere was then dropped by blocking the laser beam for a pre-determined amount of time. Dropping the microsphere in a free-fall mode from various heights relative to the coverslip provides an estimate of how the trapping length changes with depth in water in a sample chamber on a microscope slide. While it was not possible to measure the trap length with sufficient precision to support any particular theory of optical trap formation, it was possible to find regions where the presence of physical boundaries influenced optical traps, and determine that the trap length, for the apparatus studied, is between 6 and 7 m. These results allow more precise control using optical micromanipulation to assemble miniature devices by providing information about the distance over which an optical trap is effective.

  2. Optical trapping force reduction and manipulation of nanoporous beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Fan; Oehrlein, Stefan; Zeng, Erliang; Kershner, Ryan; Cerrina, Franco

    2012-04-01

    We studied the interaction of infrared optical traps with controlled-pore glass (CPG) beads in aqueous medium. The lateral optical trapping force and stiffness were experimentally found considerably smaller than those of their solid counterparts. The simulation using an average refractive index revealed significant losses of effective trapping efficiency, which quantitatively agreed well with experimentally fitted curves. This effect was ascribed to the reduced relative refractive index of medium-filled CPG beads with respect to the medium. Combining optical trapping with mechanical confinements, we demonstrated a microfluidic platform allowing for the synthesis of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences on individual beads of interest.

  3. Analysis of optical trap mediated aerosol coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, N. S.; Power, R.; Anand, S.; McGloin, D.; Almohamedi, A.; Downie, M.; Reid, J. P.; Hudson, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of optical tweezers for the analysis of aerosols is valuable for understanding the dynamics of atmospherically relevant particles. However to be able to make accurate measurements that can be directly tied to real-world phenomena it is important that we understand the influence of the optical trap on those processes. One process that is seemingly straightforward to study with these techniques is binary droplet coalescence, either using dual beam traps, or by particle collision with a single trapped droplet. This binary coalescence is also of interest in many other processes that make use of dense aerosol sprays such as spray drying and the use of inhalers for drug delivery in conditions such as asthma or hay fever. In this presentation we discuss the use of high speed (~5000 frames per second) video microscopy to track the dynamics of particles as they approach and interact with a trapped aqueous droplet and develop this analysis further by considering elastic light scattering from droplets as they undergo coalescence. We find that we are able to characterize the re-equilibration time of droplets of the same phase after they interact and that the trajectories taken by airborne particles influenced by an optical trap are often quite complex. We also examine the role of parameters such as the salt concentration of the aqueous solutions used and the influence of laser wavelength.

  4. Optical Trap Kits: Issues to Be Aware of

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexeev, I.; Quentin, U.; Leitz, K. -H.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-01-01

    An inexpensive and robust optical trap system can be built from off-the-shelf optical and opto-mechanical components or acquired as a kit to be assembled in a laboratory. The primary advantages of such a trap, besides being significantly more affordable, are its flexibility, and ease of modification and upgrade. In this paper, we consider several…

  5. Do capture data from mosquito traps represent reality?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collectively, the effects of mechanical trap style, the method of trap placement in the field, mosquito activity phase, and other biological phenomena are manifest as sample bias that leads to vector detection failure(s) and/or erroneous predictions of mosquito activity. The goal of this research i...

  6. Subordinated continuous-time AR processes and their application to modeling behavior of mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Janusz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2016-12-01

    Many real data exhibit behavior adequate to subdiffusion processes. Very often it is manifested by so-called "trapping events". The visible evidence of subdiffusion we observe not only in financial time series but also in technical data. In this paper we propose a model which can be used for description of such kind of data. The model is based on the continuous time autoregressive time series with stable noise delayed by the infinitely divisible inverse subordinator. The proposed system can be applied to real datasets with short-time dependence, visible jumps and mentioned periods of stagnation. In this paper we extend the theoretical considerations in analysis of subordinated processes and propose a new model that exhibits mentioned properties. We concentrate on the main characteristics of the examined subordinated process expressed mainly in the language of the measures of dependence which are main tools used in statistical investigation of real data. We present also the simulation procedure of the considered system and indicate how to estimate its parameters. The theoretical results we illustrate by the analysis of real technical data.

  7. Dissipative Solitons that Cannot be Trapped

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, Rosa; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2006-12-22

    We show that dissipative solitons in systems with high-order nonlinear dissipation cannot survive in the presence of trapping potentials of the rigid wall or asymptotically increasing type. Solitons in such systems can survive in the presence of a weak potential but only with energies out of the interval of existence of linear quantum mechanical stationary states.

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  9. Perfect error processing: Perfectionism-related variations in action monitoring and error processing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Jutta; Acharki, Manuela; Kresimon, Miriam; Völler, Frederike; Gibbons, Henning

    2015-08-01

    Showing excellent performance and avoiding poor performance are the main characteristics of perfectionists. Perfectionism-related variations (N=94) in neural correlates of performance monitoring were investigated in a flanker task by assessing two perfectionism-related trait dimensions: Personal standard perfectionism (PSP), reflecting intrinsic motivation to show error-free performance, and evaluative concern perfectionism (ECP), representing the worry of being poorly evaluated based on bad performance. A moderating effect of ECP and PSP on error processing - an important performance monitoring system - was investigated by examining the error (-related) negativity (Ne/ERN) and the error positivity (Pe). The smallest Ne/ERN difference (error-correct) was obtained for pure-ECP participants (high-ECP-low-PSP), whereas the highest difference was shown for those with high-ECP-high-PSP (i.e., mixed perfectionists). Pe was positively correlated with PSP only. Our results encouraged the cognitive-bias hypothesis suggesting that pure-ECP participants reduce response-related attention to avoid intense error processing by minimising the subjective threat of negative evaluations. The PSP-related variations in late error processing are consistent with the participants' high in PSP goal-oriented tendency to optimise their behaviour.

  10. 40 CFR 408.220 - Applicability; description of the non-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory. 408.220 Section 408.220 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Alaskan Mechanized Bottom Fish Processing Subcategory § 408.220 Applicability; description of the non-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory. The provisions...

  11. 40 CFR 408.220 - Applicability; description of the non-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory. 408.220 Section 408.220 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Alaskan Mechanized Bottom Fish Processing Subcategory § 408.220 Applicability; description of the non-Alaskan mechanized bottom fish processing subcategory. The provisions...

  12. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions.

  13. Ion traps, quantum computing, and the measurement problem^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a useful information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high- fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. NIST and other groups are addressing this scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly- parallel processing. As the number of qubits increases, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics becomes more glaring; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on this fundamental issue. Recent NIST work in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, J. Chiaverini, R. E. Drullinger, R. Epstein, D. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, J. Koelemeij, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, R. Reichle, T. Rosenband, P. O. Schmidt, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. Wesenberg, and supported by DTO, ONR, and NIST.

  14. Mechanism of hologram formation in fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neipp, Cristian; Pascual, Inmaculada; Belendez, Augusto

    2002-07-01

    The mechanism of hologram formation in fixation-free rehalogenating bleaching processes have been treated by different authors. The experiments carried out on Agfa 8E75 HD plates led to the conclusion that material transfer from the exposed to the unexposed zones is the main mechanism under the process. We present a simple model that explains the mechanism of hologram formation inside the emulsion. Also quantitative data obtained using both Agfa 8E75 HD and Slavich PFG-01 fine-grained red-sensitive emulsions are given and good agreement between theory and experiments are found.

  15. Cosine light-trapping nanostructures for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Bang; Li, Yi

    2015-08-15

    In this Letter, we present a cosine light-trapping texture for thin-film silicon solar cells. The surface texture was numerically demonstrated to exhibit comparable light-trapping performance to the inverted pyramid one, which is classic high-efficiency light-trapping structure. The cosine texture can be directly formed by interference lithography, while the inverted pyramid needs more complicated processing. The proposed structure has the potential to play a key role in thin-film solar cells.

  16. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  17. Water-trapped Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  18. Practical axial optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Regan, L.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for calibrating optical trapping measurements in which tension is applied in the direction of the laser beam to a molecule tethered between a surface and an optically trapped bead. Specifically, we present a generally-applicable procedure for converting from the measured scattering intensity and the measured stage displacement to applied tension and bead-coverslip separation, using measurements of the light intensity scattered from an untethered, trapped bead. Our calibration accounts for a number of effects, including aberrations and the interference of forward-reflected bead-scattered light with the trapping beam. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we show measurements of the DNA force-versus-extension relation using a range of laser intensities, and show that these measurements match the expected extensible wormlike-chain (WLC) behavior. Finally, we also demonstrate a force-clamp, in which the tension in a tether is held fixed while the extension varies as a result of molecular events. PMID:23126750

  19. Field evaluation of four widely used mosquito traps in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To monitor adult mosquitoes several trapping devices are available. These are differently constructed and use various mechanisms for mosquito attraction, thus resulting in different trapping sensitivities and efficacies for the various species. Mosquito monitoring and surveillance programs in Europe use various types of mosquito traps, but only a few comparisons have been conducted so far. This study compared the performance of four commercial trapping devices, which are commonly used in Europe. Methods Four different traps, Biogents Sentinel trap (BG trap), Heavy Duty Encephalitis Vector Survey trap (EVS trap), Centres for Disease Control miniature light trap (CDC trap) and Mosquito Magnet Patriot Mosquito trap (MM trap) were compared in a 4 × 4 latin square study. In the years 2012 and 2013, more than seventy 24-hour trap comparisons were conducted at ten different locations in northern and southern Germany, representing urban, forest and floodplain biotopes. Results Per 24-hour trapping period, the BG trap caught the widest range of mosquito species, the highest number of individuals of the genus Culex as well as the highest number of individuals of the species Ochlerotatus cantans, Aedes cinereus/geminus, Oc. communis and Culex pipiens/torrentium. The CDC trap revealed best performance for Aedes vexans, whereas the MM trap was most efficient for mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles and the species Oc. geniculatus. The EVS trap did not catch more individuals of any genus or species compared to the other three trapping devices. The BG trap caught the highest number of individuals per trapping period in urban environments as well as in wet forest, while the CDC trap caught the highest number of individuals in the floodplain biotopes. Additionally, the BG trap was most efficient for the number of mosquito species in urban locations. Conclusion The BG trap showed a significantly better or similar performance compared to the CDC, EVS or MM trap with

  20. 45 CFR 205.35 - Mechanized claims processing and information retrieval systems; definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... retrieval systems; definitions. 205.35 Section 205.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... claims processing and information retrieval systems; definitions. Section 205.35 through 205.38 contain...: (a) A mechanized claims processing and information retrieval system, hereafter referred to as...