Science.gov

Sample records for processive carbohydrate polymerization

  1. Polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, R.J.

    1987-03-03

    An improved process is described for preparing a hydrocarbon fluid friction reducing composition comprising mixing two or more alpha-monoolefins having 2 to about 30 carbon atoms in a diluent or an organic solvent and copolymerizing the alpha-monoolefins in the presence of a catalyst. The catalyst is comprised of a reducible or reduced titanium halide and an organo metal catalyst activator consisting of, per each 100 total moles of activator, about 1 to 20 moles of at least one trialkylaluminium compound, each alkyl group of which has 1 to 10 carbon atoms and about 99 to 80 moles of at least one dialkylaluminium halide compound, each alkyl group of which has 1 to about 10 carbon atoms. The mole ratio of activator to catalyst in the reaction mixture is in the range of about 0.001:1 to 50:1.

  2. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  3. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  4. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  5. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  6. Carbohydrate-binding module assisting glycosynthase-catalysed polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Codera, Victoria; Gilbert, Harry J; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-08-15

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are found within multi-modular polysaccharide degrading enzymes [glycoside hydrolases (GHs)]. CBMs play a critical role in the recognition of plant cell-wall polysaccharides and enhance the hydrolase activity of their cognate catalytic domains by increasing enzyme substrate proximity. Mimicking their role in Nature, we, in the present study, propose that CBMs may assist in vitro glycosynthase-catalysed polymerization reactions to produce artificial polysaccharides. Glycosynthases are GHs that have been engineered to catalyse glycoside bond formation for the synthesis of oligosaccharides, glycoconjugates and glycans. The degree of polymerization (DP) of the glycans generated is limited by the solubility of the polymeric product. In the present study, we have targeted the synthesis of artificial 1,3-1,4-β-glucans with a regular sequence using the glycosynthase E(134)S derived from a Bacillus licheniformis lichenase. We show that the addition of CBM11, which binds mixed-linked β-glucans, either as an isolated protein or fused to the glycosynthase E(134)S, has an effect on the DP of the polysaccharide products that is dependent on the rate of polymerization. The mechanism by which CBM influences the DP of the synthesized glycans is discussed.

  7. Triennial Growth Symposium: effects of polymeric carbohydrates on growth and development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bach Knudsen, K E

    2011-07-01

    Polymeric carbohydrates, starch and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), quantitatively represent the largest portion of the diets for pigs and are, therefore, the largest energy contributor. The 2 types of polysaccharides, however, have different fates and functions in the gastrointestinal tract and lead to different metabolites upon digestion. Pancreatic and mucosal enzymes in the small intestine break down the majority of starch, whereas NSP primarily are degraded by the microflora in the large intestine. Starch degradation leads to the release of glucose, which is absorbed by an active absorption process that triggers the release of insulin from the pancreas, whereas the fermentation of NSP to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; i.e., acetate, propionate, and butyrate) occurs at a slower and more constant rate and with SCFA being absorbed by passive diffusion. Type and amounts of polymeric carbohydrates influence growth and development through different mechanisms. First, the proportion of starch to NSP plays an important role for the content of available energy (i.e., DE, ME, and NE); available energy relative to protein is crucial for performance and carcass quality. Second, the proportion of starch to NSP will influence rate and type of metabolites (i.e., glucose vs. SCFA) deriving from carbohydrate assimilation. Third and finally, the type of starch (i.e., types A, B, and C) and soluble NSP will influence the release of insulin, the hormone that facilitates nutrient uptake by tissues, organs, and cells, and thus plays a critically essential role in protein synthesis and muscle growth, as well as lipid synthesis and adipose tissue growth. In conclusion, polymeric carbohydrates influence growth and development through events in the gut and direct and indirect effects of different metabolites deriving from carbohydrate assimilation.

  8. Processing polymeric powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of uniformly and continuously depositing and sinter-fusing nominal 0.1 to 40 microns dimensioned electrostatically charged polymer powder particles onto essentially uniformly spread 5 to 20 micron grounded continuous fiber tow to produce a respoolable thermoplastic composite two-preg was formulated at NASA Langley. The process was reduced to practice under a NASA grant at the University of Akron this spring. The production of tow-preg is called phase 1. The production of ultrafine polymer powders from 5 to 10 percent (wt) polymer solids in solvent is considered. This is phase 0 and is discussed. The production of unitape from multi tow-pregs was also considered. This is phase 2 and is also discussed. And another approach to phase 1, also proposed last summer, was scoped. This is phase 1A and is also discussed.

  9. Carbohydrate-Based Initiators for the Cationic Ring-Opening Polymerization of 2-Ethyl-2-Oxazoline.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Gottschaldt, Michael; Hoogenboom, Richard; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-01-01

    The advancement in the field of living and controlled polymerization techniques provides the opportunity for careful bottom-up design of polymers for biomedical applications according to their specific needs. This contribution describes the detailed methodology to functionalize poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline), a polymer with properties very similar to polyethylene glycol, in a stereo-selective manner with a range of carbohydrates that can serve as biological targeting units. The obtained building blocks can subsequently be applied for the synthesis of more complex polymeric architectures.

  10. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  11. Photo-Click Immobilization of Carbohydrates on Polymeric Surfaces - A Quick Method to Functionalize Surfaces for Biomolecular Recognition Studies

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Oscar; Deng, Lingquan; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Methods to rapidly functionalize specific polymeric surfaces with alkynes, which can subsequently be linked to azide-containing carbohydrates, are presented. The methods are comprised of two main concepts: azide photoligation and Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. 2-Azidoethyl functionalized α-d-mannopyranoside was synthesized, and covalently attached to alkyne-functionalized polymeric surfaces using the techniques. The protein recognition properties of the carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated using quartz crystal microbalance biosensor instrumentation. PMID:19888719

  12. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Carbohydrates Carbohydrates Carbohydrates (say: kar-boh-HEYE-drayts) are the body's main source of energy. They are sometimes called "carbs" for short. If ...

  13. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  14. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  15. Chemical Changes in Carbohydrates Produced by Thermal Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoseney, R. Carl

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical changes that occur in the carbohydrates found in food products when these products are subjected to thermal processing. Topics considered include browning reactions, starch found in food systems, hydrolysis of carbohydrates, extrusion cooking, processing of cookies and candies, and alterations in gums. (JN)

  16. Chemical Changes in Carbohydrates Produced by Thermal Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoseney, R. Carl

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical changes that occur in the carbohydrates found in food products when these products are subjected to thermal processing. Topics considered include browning reactions, starch found in food systems, hydrolysis of carbohydrates, extrusion cooking, processing of cookies and candies, and alterations in gums. (JN)

  17. The isolation, and amino acid and carbohydrate composition, of polymeric collagens prepared from various human tissues.

    PubMed

    Schofield, J D; Freeman, I L; Jackson, D S

    1971-09-01

    1. Insoluble polymeric collagens from various human tissues were prepared by the EDTA method. Almost all of the collagen from simple soft tissues such as dermis, tendon, submucosa, sclera and cornea could be extracted, whereas the more complex tissues such as intercostal cartilage and intervertebral disc yielded only small amounts of collagen. Amino acid and carbohydrate analysis indicated that most of the preparations were highly purified on the basis of their tyrosine, hexosamine, mannose, xylose and fucose contents. 2. Wide variation in the total hexose content was observed, the lowest being 8.5 residues/3000 amino acid residues for collagen from dermis and the highest being 42.1 residues/3000 in corneal collagen. The molar ratios of sugars also varied, submucosal collagen having a galactose/glucose ratio of 1.0 and corneal collagen having a ratio of 2.3. 3. The presence of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine was confirmed in submucosal collagen by compositional and chromatographic analysis of this component after its isolation from alkaline hydrolysates of the collagen. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of galactosylhydroxylysine. 4. Determination of the hydroxylysyl glycosides was carried out and it was observed that the amounts of these components varied widely from tissue to tissue. Corneal collagen contained 19.1 hydroxylysine-linked carbohydrate units/3000 amino acid residues, whereas tendon collagen contained only 4.1 units/3000. Variation in the ratio disaccharide unit/monosaccharide unit was also observed, the ratio being 1.2 in intercostal cartilage collagen and 4.1 in submucosal collagen. The proportion of the total hydroxylysine that was substituted by carbohydrate also varied from tissue to tissue.

  18. The isolation, and amino acid and carbohydrate composition, of polymeric collagens prepared from various human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, J. D.; Freeman, I. L.; Jackson, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. Insoluble polymeric collagens from various human tissues were prepared by the EDTA method. Almost all of the collagen from simple soft tissues such as dermis, tendon, submucosa, sclera and cornea could be extracted, whereas the more complex tissues such as intercostal cartilage and intervertebral disc yielded only small amounts of collagen. Amino acid and carbohydrate analysis indicated that most of the preparations were highly purified on the basis of their tyrosine, hexosamine, mannose, xylose and fucose contents. 2. Wide variation in the total hexose content was observed, the lowest being 8.5 residues/3000 amino acid residues for collagen from dermis and the highest being 42.1 residues/3000 in corneal collagen. The molar ratios of sugars also varied, submucosal collagen having a galactose/glucose ratio of 1.0 and corneal collagen having a ratio of 2.3. 3. The presence of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine was confirmed in submucosal collagen by compositional and chromatographic analysis of this component after its isolation from alkaline hydrolysates of the collagen. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of galactosylhydroxylysine. 4. Determination of the hydroxylysyl glycosides was carried out and it was observed that the amounts of these components varied widely from tissue to tissue. Corneal collagen contained 19.1 hydroxylysine-linked carbohydrate units/3000 amino acid residues, whereas tendon collagen contained only 4.1 units/3000. Variation in the ratio disaccharide unit/monosaccharide unit was also observed, the ratio being 1.2 in intercostal cartilage collagen and 4.1 in submucosal collagen. The proportion of the total hydroxylysine that was substituted by carbohydrate also varied from tissue to tissue. PMID:5002672

  19. Fractionation of proteins and carbohydrates of extracellular polymeric substances in a membrane bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Malamis, Simos; Andreadakis, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    The major operational problem associated with membrane bioreactors (MBR) is membrane fouling, for which extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are primarily responsible. In this work both the soluble and bound EPS (i.e. SMP and EPS) produced in an MBR system operating under sludge retention times (SRT) of 10, 15, 20 and 33 days were fractionized by means of membranes having variable molecular weight cutoffs (300 kDa, 100 kDa, 10 kDa & 1 kDa). The results show that increasing the SRT leads to a reduction of SMP and EPS and that these reductions are more pronounced for the SRTs in the range 10-20 days. This reduction is more significant for carbohydrates than for proteins. The decrease of SMP and EPS with increasing SRT from 10 to 20 days led to a significant decrease of the level of fouling. The further increase of SRT to 33 days did not significantly impact on the level of fouling as the SMP and EPS concentrations did not change much. Under the examined operating conditions, EPS were found to be composed mainly of large macromolecules having a size of 0.45 microm-300 kDa and to a lower extent of very small molecules (<1 kDa) that are not easily decomposed by the biomass activity. The majority of SMP is composed of very small molecules (<1 kDa), while some macromolecules in the range of 0.45 microm-300 kDa are present. Consequently, both EPS and SMP were found to have a bimodal character.

  20. Lignocentric analysis of a carbohydrate-producing lignocellulosic biorefinery process.

    PubMed

    Narron, Robert H; Han, Qiang; Park, Sunkyu; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan

    2017-10-01

    A biologically-based lignocellulosic biorefinery process for obtaining carbohydrates from raw biomass was investigated across six diverse biomasses (three hardwoods & three nonwoods) for the purpose of decoding lignin's influence on sugar production. Acknowledging that lignin could positively alter the economics of an entire process if valorized appropriately, we sought to correlate the chemical properties of lignin within the process to the traditional metrics associated with carbohydrate production-cellulolytic digestibility and total sugar recovery. Based on raw carbohydrate, enzymatic recovery ranged from 40 to 64% w/w and total recovery ranged from 70 to 87% w/w. Using nitrobenzene oxidation to quantify non-condensed lignin structures, it was found that raw hardwoods bearing increasing non-condensed S/V ratios (2.5-5.1) render increasing total carbohydrate recovery from hardwood biomasses. This finding indicates that the chemical structure of hardwood lignin influences the investigated biorefinery process' ability to generate carbohydrates from a given raw hardwood feedstock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Catalytic process for the polymerization of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, K.C.; Weinert, R.J. Jr.; Desmond, M.J.

    1986-07-29

    A process is described for the polymerization of 1-alkynes comprising contacting the alkynes at a temperature and pressure between about - 70/sup 0/C to about 150/sup 0/C and between about 0.10 to 0.90 atmospheres, respectively, with a catalyst system comprising: (a) at least one transition metal complex of at least one binucleating ligand, which attaches to at least one nucleus containing at least one transition metal element of Groups 1b through 7b and Group 8 of the Periodic Table of Elements, and (b) an organometallic compound containing at least one element of Group 1a, Group 2a, or Group 3a of the Periodic Table of Elements.

  2. Inhibitors of carbohydrate processing: A new class of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Goss, P E; Baker, M A; Carver, J P; Dennis, J W

    1995-09-01

    There is a need for anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Recently identified molecular targets for new anticancer agents include inducers of cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis, as well as signaling pathways for growth factors and cytokines. Another unexplored opportunity is presented by the ubiquitous intracellular glycoprotein glycosylation pathway. This complex process, concerned with the addition of sugars onto newly synthesized proteins, occurs in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and in the Golgi. There are estimates of over 200 glycosyltransferase enzymes in this pathway, which results in considerable structural diversity of carbohydrates found on secreted and transmembrane glycoproteins. The specificity of glycosyltransferases for acceptors and sugar-nucleotide donors dictates linkage positions between sugars, anomeric configuration of linkages, and monosaccharide composition. Specific carbohydrate structures participate in cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions affecting processes such as lymphocyte trafficking, immune cell stimulation, embryogenesis, and cancer metastasis. Of the carbohydrate-processing inhibitors presently available, the alkaloid swainsonine, a Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitor, is the first to have been selected for clinical testing based on its anticancer activity, p.o. availability, and low toxicity in mice. Herein, we review the rationale for targeting Golgi carbohydrate processing pathways in the treatment of cancer, and summarize the preclinical and clinical results with swainsonine. Prospects for the development of second generation inhibitors with improved specificity for Golgi-processing enzymes are discussed. Potential clinical applications of this new class of anticancer agents are emphasized.

  3. Polymeric spheres on substrates from a spin-coating process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Ling; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Ko-Shung

    2009-02-01

    Formation of polymeric spheres in nanometer to sub-micrometer is achieved through a spin-coating process with polyamide (from 4,4(')-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)dianiline and 4,4(')-dicarboxydiphenylether) solutions in N,N-dimethylformamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide. The formation of polymeric spheres and their sizes are dependent on the polymer solution concentrations and the rates in spin-coating. The polymeric spheres could be obtained on various substrates including silicon, mica, and glass.

  4. Cyclopropenimine superbases: Competitive initiation processes in lactide polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Stukenbroeker, Tyler S.; Bandar, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Xiangyi; Lambert, Tristan H.; Waymouth, Robert M.

    2015-07-30

    Cyclopropenimine superbases were employed in this study to catalyze the ring-opening polymerization of lactide. Polymerization occurred readily in the presence and absence of alcohol initiators. Polymerizations in the absence of alcohol initiators revealed a competitive initiation mechanism involving deprotonation of lactide by the cyclopropenimine to generate an enolate. NMR and MALDI-TOF analysis of the poly(lactides) generated from cyclopropenimines in the absence of alcohol initiators showed acylated lactide and hydroxyl end groups. Finally, model studies and comparative experiments with guanidine and phosphazene catalysts revealed the subtle influence of the nature of the superbase on competitive initiation processes.

  5. Heterogeneous Initiators for Sustainable Polymerization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew D.

    One of the main challenges facing the twenty-first century is the need to produce chemicals from renewable resources. The dwindling supplies of fossil fuels coupled with instability in supply mean that technologies that were once deemed too expensive are now becoming more economically viable options. The majority of man-made polymers are derived from crude oil based monomers. However, in recent years a tremendous effort has been channeled into the preparation of polymers from sustainable chemicals. Two classic examples are polylactide (derived from corn starch) and polycarbonates (prepared directly from CO2). This chapter serves as an introduction into these two polymers and reviews the literature associated with heterogeneous catalyst for the polymerizations, concentrating on approaches describing the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts.

  6. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  7. Processing difficulties and instability of carbohydrate microneedle arrays

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Morrow, Desmond I.J.; Singh, Thakur R.R.; Migalska, Katarzyna; McCarron, Paul A.; O’Mahony, Conor; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of reports have suggested that many of the problems currently associated with the use of microneedle (MN) arrays for transdermal drug delivery could be addressed by using drug-loaded MN arrays prepared by moulding hot melts of carbohydrate materials. Methods In this study, we explored the processing, handling, and storage of MN arrays prepared from galactose with a view to clinical application. Results Galactose required a high processing temperature (160°C), and molten galactose was difficult to work with. Substantial losses of the model drugs 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and bovine serum albumin were incurred during processing. While relatively small forces caused significant reductions in MN height when applied to an aluminium block, this was not observed during their relatively facile insertion into heat-stripped epidermis. Drug release experiments using ALA-loaded MN arrays revealed that less than 0.05% of the total drug loading was released across a model silicone membrane. Similarly, only low amounts of ALA (approximately 0.13%) and undetectable amounts of bovine serum albumin were delivered when galactose arrays were combined with aqueous vehicles. Microscopic inspection of the membrane following release studies revealed that no holes could be observed in the membrane, indicating that the partially dissolved galactose sealed the MN-induced holes, thus limiting drug delivery. Indeed, depth penetration studies into excised porcine skin revealed that there was no significant increase in ALA delivery using galactose MN arrays, compared to control (P value < 0.05). Galactose MNs were unstable at ambient relative humidities and became adhesive. Conclusion The processing difficulties and instability encountered in this study are likely to preclude successful clinical application of carbohydrate MNs. The findings of this study are of particular importance to those in the pharmaceutical industry involved in the design and formulation of

  8. Intake of indigestible carbohydrates influences IgA response and polymeric Ig receptor expression in the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuko; To, Masahiro; Hayashi, Takashi; Shimizu, Tomoko; Kamata, Yohei; Saruta, Juri; Takahashi, Toru; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2015-06-28

    Secretory IgA in the saliva is essential for protection from mucosally transmitted pathogens and maintaining homeostasis at mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity. Expression of submandibular gland polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) is essential for IgA secretion. In the present study, we investigated the influence of indigestible carbohydrates on IgA production in the salivary gland and saliva. Five-week-old rats were fed a fibre-free diet (control), or a diet with 5 % (w/w) fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) or a combination of 2·5 % (w/w) polydextrose (PDX) and 2·5 % (w/w) lactitol for 21-d. IgA concentrations in the caecal digesta, submandibular gland tissue, and saliva in the FOS and PDX+lactitol diet groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P< 0·05). The increase in IgA in the submandibular gland tissue was confirmed using immunohistochemical analysis. However, the IgA concentrations of serum did not differ between the FOS or PDX+lactitol groups and the control group (P= 0·5). In the FOS and PDX+lactitol groups, the pIgR mRNA (pIgR/β-actin) expression level in the submandibular gland tissue was significantly higher than that in the control group (P< 0·05). The present study suggests that indigestible carbohydrates play an important role in the increase in IgA concentrations in the submandibular gland tissue, saliva, and caecal digesta.

  9. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    PubMed

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV.

  10. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  11. Processes for microemulsion polymerization employing novel microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Beckman, Eric J.; Smith, Richard D.; Fulton, John L.

    1990-06-12

    This invention is directed to a microemulsion system comprising a first phase including a low-polarity fluid material which is a gas at standard temperature and pressure, and which has a cloud-point density. It also includes a second phase including a polar fluid, typically water, a monomer, preferably a monomer soluble in the polar fluid, and a microemulsion promoter for facilitating the formation of micelles including the monomer in the system. In the subject process, micelles including the monomer are formed in the first phase. A polymerization initiator is introduced into the micelles in the microemulsion system. The monomer is then polymerized in the micelles, preferably in the core of the micelle, to produce a polymeric material having a relatively high molecular weight.

  12. Micro-fluidic partitioning between polymeric sheets for chemical amplification and processing

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.

    2017-01-24

    A system for fluid partitioning for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations of a sample, comprising a first dispenser of a first polymeric sheet, wherein the first polymeric sheet contains chambers; a second dispenser of a second polymeric sheet wherein the first dispenser and the second dispenser are positioned so that the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet become parallel; a dispenser of the fluid positioned to dispense the fluid between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet; and a seal unit that seals the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet together thereby sealing the sample between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet and partitioning the fluid for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations.

  13. Micro-fluidic partitioning between polymeric sheets for chemical amplification and processing

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.

    2015-05-26

    A system for fluid partitioning for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations of a sample, comprising a first dispenser of a first polymeric sheet, wherein the first polymeric sheet contains chambers; a second dispenser of a second polymeric sheet wherein the first dispenser and the second dispenser are positioned so that the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet become parallel; a dispenser of the fluid positioned to dispense the fluid between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet; and a seal unit that seals the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet together thereby sealing the sample between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet and partitioning the fluid for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations.

  14. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1988-05-04

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  15. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.; Spence, Roger D.

    1989-01-01

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  16. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-09-17

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these.

  17. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these. PMID:26393573

  18. Formation of extracellular polymeric substances from acidogenic sludge in H2-producing process.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-02-01

    In this study, the formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and surface characteristics of an acidogenic sludge in anaerobic H(2)-producing process was investigated. Results show that carbohydrates, proteins, and humic substances were the dominant components in bound EPS (BEPS), while in soluble EPS (SEPS), carbohydrates were the main component. The total content of BEPS initially increased but then kept almost unchanged during fermentation from 25 to 35 h; after that, it slightly decreased. The total content of SEPS increased to 172.5 +/- 0.05 mg C g(-1) volatile suspended solid with the time that increased to 23.5 h, and then rapidly decreased until 43 h; thereafter, it kept almost unchanged. The SEPS had good correlations with the specific H(2) production rate, substrate degradation rate, and specific aqueous products formation rate, but the BEPS seemed to have no such correlations with these specific rates. Results also confirm that part of EPS could be utilized by the H(2)-producing sludge. As the substrate was in short supply, the EPS would be hydrolyzed to sever as carbon and energy source.

  19. Studies on the runaway reaction of ABS polymerization process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kwan-Hua; Kao, Chen-Shan; Duh, Yih-Shing

    2008-11-15

    Taiwan has the largest acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymer production in the world. Preventing on unexpected exothermic reactions and related emergency relief hazard is essential in the safety control of ABS emulsion polymerization. A VSP2 (Vent Sizing Package 2) apparatus is capable of studying both normal and abnormal conditions (e.g., cooling failure, mischarge, etc.) of industrial process. In this study, the scenarios were verified from the following abnormal conditions: loss of cooling, double charge of initiator, overcharge of monomer, without charge of solvent, and external fire. An external fire with constant heating will promote higher self-heat rate and this is recommended as the worst case scenario of emulsion polymerization on butadiene. Cooling failure coupled with bulk system of reactant was determined to be the credible worst case in ABS emulsion polymerization. Finally, the emergency vent sizing based on thermokinetics from VSP associated with DIERS methodology were used for evaluating the vent sizing and compared to that of the industrial plants.

  20. Polymerization processes in a chloro-p-xylene discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada Raygoza, Isabel Cristina

    The following work is aimed to understand the effect of plasma chemistry on the film growth of plasma chemical vapor deposited Parylene C. Our data suggests that the film growth/polymerization of plasma deposited Parylene C is a process where both the adsorption of the monomer in the surface and the generation of precursors for polymerization by the plasma are very important. Ions are very likely to be the main precursors promoting polymerization of the films, but we cannot discard some small radical contribution. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and an electron beam OES diagnostic tools to study the dissociation, excitation and ionization fragments produced in the plasma discharge. The main products of the monomer breakup are HCl, CH4, C2H2, H, H2, Cl, Cl2, CH, HCl+ and a mix of aromatic ions/radicals. By using a novel OES e-beam diagnostic we could track real time changes in the OES intensities of the excited species being produced and consumed in the plasma. Benzyl ions are likely to be produced by primary processes while the ion radicals by secondary/tertiary processes. Film deposition occurred mostly in areas exposed to ion bombardment. We characterized the plasma parylene C films and compare their properties with those of the conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) parylene C. Plasma parylene C properties are close to those of the films produced with the CVD method. We are reporting the first example of a plasma polymer that presents a degree of crystallinity.

  1. A traffic flow model for bio-polymerization processes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Thorenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Bio-polymerization processes like transcription and translation are central to proper function of a cell. The speed at which the bio-polymer grows is affected both by the number of pauses of elongation machinery, as well the number of bio-polymers due to crowding effects. In order to quantify these effects in fast transcribing ribosome genes, we rigorously show that a classical traffic flow model is the limit of a mean occupancy ODE model. We compare the simulation of this model to a stochastic model and evaluate the combined effect of the polymerase density and the existence of pauses on the instantaneous transcription rate of ribosomal genes. PMID:23404039

  2. A traffic flow model for bio-polymerization processes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Tomáš; Gedeon, Jakub; Thorenson, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    Bio-polymerization processes like transcription and translation are central to proper function of a cell. The speed at which the bio-polymer grows is affected both by the number of pauses of elongation machinery, as well the number of bio-polymers due to crowding effects. In order to quantify these effects in fast transcribing ribosome genes, we rigorously show that a classical traffic flow model is the limit of a mean occupancy ODE model. We compare the simulation of this model to a stochastic model and evaluate the combined effect of the polymerase density and the existence of pauses on the instantaneous transcription rate of ribosomal genes.

  3. Orchestration of carbohydrate processing for crassulacean acid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    Borland, Anne M.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Yang, Xiaohan; ...

    2016-04-19

    The production of phosphoenolpyruvate as a substrate for nocturnal CO2 uptake represents a significant sink for carbohydrate in CAM plants which has to be balanced with the provisioning of carbohydrate for growth and maintenance. In starch-storing CAM species, diversification in chloroplast metabolite transporters, and the deployment of both phosphorolytic and hydrolytic routes of starch degradation accommodate a division of labour in directing C-skeletons towards nocturnal carboxylation or production of sucrose for growth. In soluble-sugar storing CAM plants, the vacuole plays a central role in managing carbon homeostasis. The molecular identities of various types of vacuolar sugar transporters have only beenmore » identified for C3 species within the last 10 years. In conclusion, the recent availability of CAM genomes enables the identification of putative orthologues of vacuolar sugar transporters which represent strategic targets for orchestrating the diel provisioning of substrate for nocturnal carboxylation and growth.« less

  4. Orchestration of carbohydrate processing for crassulacean acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, Anne M.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.

    2016-04-19

    The production of phosphoenolpyruvate as a substrate for nocturnal CO2 uptake represents a significant sink for carbohydrate in CAM plants which has to be balanced with the provisioning of carbohydrate for growth and maintenance. In starch-storing CAM species, diversification in chloroplast metabolite transporters, and the deployment of both phosphorolytic and hydrolytic routes of starch degradation accommodate a division of labour in directing C-skeletons towards nocturnal carboxylation or production of sucrose for growth. In soluble-sugar storing CAM plants, the vacuole plays a central role in managing carbon homeostasis. The molecular identities of various types of vacuolar sugar transporters have only been identified for C3 species within the last 10 years. In conclusion, the recent availability of CAM genomes enables the identification of putative orthologues of vacuolar sugar transporters which represent strategic targets for orchestrating the diel provisioning of substrate for nocturnal carboxylation and growth.

  5. Polymerization and processing of organic polymers in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, E.P.

    1995-05-01

    The use of magnetic fields to affect the structure and properties of polymeric materials remains an area of great promise. Liquid crystalline polymers have been actively studied over the past 20 years for use in high performance structural applications. In particular, highly oriented fibers can exhibit remarkable increases in strength to weight performance compared to conventional materials. For example, the fibers marketed by DuPont under the tradename Kevlar are 20 times stronger than steel on an equivalent weight basis. However, larger bulk parts do not exhibit the same increases in strength due to a lack of orientation of the polymer molecules. Magnetic field processing of polymers remains an attractive solution to this problem.

  6. Fiber-coupled THz spectroscopy for monitoring polymeric compounding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, N.; Krumbholz, N.; Hasek, T.; Wilk, R.; Bartels, V.; Keseberg, C.; Pethukhov, V.; Mikulics, M.; Wetenkamp, L.; Koch, M.

    2007-06-01

    We present a compact, robust, and transportable fiber-coupled THz system for inline monitoring of polymeric compounding processes in an industrial environment. The system is built on a 90cm x 90cm large shock absorbing optical bench. A sealed metal box protects the system against dust and mechanical disturbances. A closed loop controller unit is used to ensure optimum coupling of the laser beam into the fiber. In order to build efficient and stable fiber-coupled antennas we glue the fibers directly onto photoconductive switches. Thus, the antenna performance is very stable and it is secured from dust or misalignment by vibrations. We discuss fabrication details and antenna performance. First spectroscopic data obtained with this system is presented.

  7. Coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization process for production of polymeric composite microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Qin, Hao; Yin, Zhenyuan; Hua, Jinsong; Pack, Daniel W.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composite microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) shell layer were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) process. Process conditions, including nozzle voltage and polymer solution flow rates, as well as solution parameters, such as polymer concentrations, were investigated to ensure the formation of composite microspheres with a doxorubicin-loaded PLGA core surrounded by a relatively drug-free PDLLA shell layer. Various microsphere formulations were fabricated and characterized in terms of their drug distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release. Numerical simulation of CEHDA process was performed based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model in Fluent by employing the process conditions and fluid properties used in the experiments. The simulation results were compared with the experimental work to illustrate the capability of the CFD model to predict the production of consistent compound droplets, and hence, the expected core-shell structured microspheres. PMID:24347672

  8. Biodegradable and radically polymerized elastomers with enhanced processing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Padera, Robert F; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-09-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with elastomeric properties is beneficial for a variety of applications, including for use in the engineering of soft tissues. Although others have developed biodegradable elastomers, they are restricted by their processing at high temperatures and under vacuum, which limits their fabrication into complex scaffolds. To overcome this, we have modified precursors to a tough biodegradable elastomer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) with acrylates to impart control over the crosslinking process and allow for more processing options. The acrylated-PGS (Acr-PGS) macromers are capable of crosslinking through free radical initiation mechanisms (e.g., redox and photo-initiated polymerizations). Alterations in the molecular weight and % acrylation of the Acr-PGS led to changes in formed network mechanical properties. In general, Young's modulus increased with % acrylation and the % strain at break increased with molecular weight when the % acrylation was held constant. Based on the mechanical properties, one macromer was further investigated for in vitro and in vivo degradation and biocompatibility. A mild to moderate inflammatory response typical of implantable biodegradable polymers was observed, even when formed as an injectable system with redox initiation. Moreover, fibrous scaffolds of Acr-PGS and a carrier polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), were prepared via an electrospinning and photopolymerization technique and the fiber morphology was dependent on the ratio of these components. This system provides biodegradable polymers with tunable properties and enhanced processing capabilities towards the advancement of approaches in engineering soft tissues.

  9. Coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization process for production of polymeric composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingxing; Qin, Hao; Yin, Zhenyuan; Hua, Jinsong; Pack, Daniel W; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-12-18

    Polymeric composite microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) shell layer were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) process. Process conditions, including nozzle voltage and polymer solution flow rates, as well as solution parameters, such as polymer concentrations, were investigated to ensure the formation of composite microspheres with a doxorubicin-loaded PLGA core surrounded by a relatively drug-free PDLLA shell layer. Various microsphere formulations were fabricated and characterized in terms of their drug distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release. Numerical simulation of CEHDA process was performed based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model in Fluent by employing the process conditions and fluid properties used in the experiments. The simulation results were compared with the experimental work to illustrate the capability of the CFD model to predict the production of consistent compound droplets, and hence, the expected core-shell structured microspheres.

  10. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  11. Development of inhibitors as research tools for carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Tracey M

    2012-10-01

    Carbohydrates, which are present in all domains of life, play important roles in a host of cellular processes. These ubiquitous biomolecules form highly diverse and often complex glycan structures without the aid of a template. The carbohydrate structures are regulated solely by the location and specificity of the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation. These enzymes, glycosyltransferases and glycoside hydrolases, need to be functionally well characterized in order to investigate the structure and function of glycans. The use of enzyme inhibitors, which target a particular enzyme, can significantly aid this understanding, and may also provide insights into therapeutic applications. The present article describes some of the approaches used to design and develop enzyme inhibitors as tools for investigating carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

  12. Multiple Functions of Aromatic-Carbohydrate Interactions in a Processive Cellulase Examined with Molecular Simulation*

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christina M.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Taylor, Courtney B.; McCabe, Clare; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins employ aromatic residues for carbohydrate binding in a wide range of biological functions. Glycoside hydrolases, which are ubiquitous in nature, typically exhibit tunnels, clefts, or pockets lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrates. Mutation of these aromatic residues often results in significant activity differences on insoluble and soluble substrates. However, the thermodynamic basis and molecular level role of these aromatic residues remain unknown. Here, we calculate the relative ligand binding free energy by mutating tryptophans in the Trichoderma reesei family 6 cellulase (Cel6A) to alanine. Removal of aromatic residues near the catalytic site has little impact on the ligand binding free energy, suggesting that aromatic residues immediately upstream of the active site are not directly involved in binding, but play a role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for catalysis. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the Cel6A tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity, suggesting that these residues play a role in chain acquisition and product stabilization, respectively. The roles suggested from differences in binding affinity are confirmed by molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Surprisingly, our results illustrate that aromatic-carbohydrate interactions vary dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, these results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for biomass utilization. Generally, these results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide range of binding affinities for diverse functions. PMID:21965672

  13. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  14. Carbohydrate-protein interactions that drive processive polysaccharide translocation in enzymes revealed from a computational study of cellobiohydrolase processivity.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Beckham, Gregg T

    2014-06-18

    Translocation of carbohydrate polymers through protein tunnels and clefts is a ubiquitous biochemical phenomenon in proteins such as polysaccharide synthases, glycoside hydrolases, and carbohydrate-binding modules. Although static snapshots of carbohydrate polymer binding in proteins have long been studied via crystallography and spectroscopy, the molecular details of polysaccharide chain processivity have not been elucidated. Here, we employ simulation to examine how a cellulose chain translocates by a disaccharide unit during the processive cycle of a glycoside hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolase. Our results demonstrate that these biologically and industrially important enzymes employ a two-step mechanism for chain threading to form a Michaelis complex and that the free energy barrier to chain threading is significantly lower than the hydrolysis barrier. Taken with previous studies, our findings suggest that the rate-limiting step in enzymatic cellulose degradation is the glycosylation reaction, not chain processivity. Based on the simulations, we find that strong electrostatic interactions with polar residues that are conserved in GH7 cellobiohydrolases, but not in GH7 endoglucanases, at the leading glucosyl ring provide the thermodynamic driving force for polysaccharide chain translocation. Also, we consider the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions, which are widespread in carbohydrate-active enzymes and have long been associated with processivity. Our analysis suggests that the primary role for these aromatic residues is to provide tunnel shape and guide the carbohydrate chain to the active site. More broadly, this work elucidates the role of common protein motifs found in carbohydrate-active enzymes that synthesize or depolymerize polysaccharides by chain translocation mechanisms coupled to catalysis.

  15. Multivalent inhibitors for carbohydrate-processing enzymes: beyond the "lock-and-key" concept.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Sébastien G

    2014-09-08

    During the last decades, tremendous chemical efforts have been dedicated to design monovalent inhibitors of carbohydrate-processing enzymes, with comparatively few rewards in terms of marketed drugs. Recently, an alternative to the traditional "lock and key" approach has emerged. Multivalency, a widely used strategy for lectin inhibition, has been successfully applied to specific glycosidases and glycosyltransferases.

  16. Improved analyses for soil carbohydrates, amino acids, and phenols: Tools for understanding soil processes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A process-level understanding of soil carbon(C) and nitrogen (N) cycling will be facilitated by precise measurement of biochemical compounds in soil organic matter. This review summarizes some recent developments in analyses for soil carbohydrates, amino compounds (amino acids and amino sugars), and...

  17. Carbohydrate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Klaus N; Englyst, Hans N

    2005-07-01

    There is consensus that carbohydrate foods, in the form of fruit, vegetables and whole-grain products, are beneficial to health. However, there are strong indications that highly processed, fibre-depleted, and consequently rapidly digestible, energy-dense carbohydrate food products can lead to over-consumption and obesity-related diseases. Greater attention needs to be given to carbohydrate bioavailability, which is determined by the chemical identity and physical form of food. The objective of the present concept article is to provide a rational basis for the nutritional characterisation of dietary carbohydrates. Based on the properties of carbohydrate foods identified to be of specific relevance to health, we propose a classification and measurement scheme that divides dietary carbohydrates into glycaemic carbohydrates (digested and absorbed in the small intestine) and non-glycaemic carbohydrates (enter the large intestine). The glycaemic carbohydrates are characterised by sugar type, and by the likely rate of digestion described by in vitro measurements for rapidly available glucose and slowly available glucose. The main type of non-glycaemic carbohydrates is the plant cell-wall NSP, which is a marker of the natural fibre-rich diet recognised as beneficial to health. Other non-glycaemic carbohydrates include resistant starch and the resistant short-chain carbohydrates (non-digestible oligosaccharides), which should be measured and researched in their own right. The proposed classification and measurement scheme is complementary to the dietary fibre and glycaemic index concepts in the promotion of healthy diets with low energy density required for combating obesity-related diseases.

  18. Production and Characterization of the Intra- and Extracellular Carbohydrates and Polymeric Substances (EPS) of Three Sea-Ice Diatom Species, and Evidence for a Cryoprotective Role for EPS.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Shazia N; Cresswell-Maynard, Tania; Thomas, David N; Underwood, Graham J C

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms and their associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are major constituents of the microalgal assemblages present within sea ice. Yields and chemical composition of soluble and cell-associated polysaccharides produced by three sea-ice diatoms, Synedropsis sp., Fragilariopsis curta, and F. cylindrus, were compared. Colloidal carbohydrates (CC) contained heteropolysaccharides rich in mannose, xylose, galactose, and glucose. Synedropsis sp. CC consisted mainly of carbohydrates <8 kDa size, with relatively soluble EPS, compared to high proportions of less-soluble EPS produced by both Fragilariopsis spp. F. curta colloidal EPS contained high concentrations of amino sugars (AS). Both Fragilariopsis species had high yields of hot bicarbonate (HB) soluble EPS, rich in xylose, mannose, galactose, and fucose (and AS in F. cylindrus). All species had frustule-associated EPS rich in glucose-mannose. Nutrient limitation resulted in declines in EPS yields and in glucose content of all EPS fractions. Significant similarities between EPS fractions from cultures and different components of natural EPS from Antarctic sea ice were found. Increased salinity (52) reduced growth, but increased yields of EPS in Fragilariopsis cylindrus. Ice formation was inhibited byF. cylindrus, EPS, and by enhanced EPS content (additional xanthan gum) down to -12°C, with growth rate reduced in the presence of xanthan. Differences in the production and composition of EPS between Synedropsis sp. and Fragilariopsis spp., and the association between EPS, freezing and cell survival, supports the hypothesis that EPS production is a strategy to assist polar ice diatoms to survive the cold and saline conditions present in sea ice.

  19. Use of Monte-Carlo Simulations in Polyurethane Polymerization Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    to the algorithm will enable the simulation of more complex An+Bn systems. REsuME La mise en oeuvre de polymeres energetiques thermodurcissables...polymer, as with rocket propellant mixing. In such a case, it may be useful to describe the transition between the Newtonian regime to the shear

  20. Characterization of polymeric binders for Metal Injection Molding (MIM) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adames, Juan M.

    The Metal Injection Molding (MIM) process is an economically attractive method of producing large amounts of small and complex metallic parts. This is achieved by combining the productivity of injection molding with the versatility of sintering of metal particulates. In MIM, the powdered metal is blended with a plastic binder to obtain the feedstock. The binder imparts flowability to the blend at injection molding conditions and strength at ambient conditions. After molding, the binder is removed in a sequence of steps that usually involves solvent-extraction and polymer burn-out. Once the binder is removed, the metal particles are sintered. In this research several topics of the MIM process were studied to understand how the polymeric binder, similar to the one used in the sponsoring company, works. This was done by examining the compounding and water debinding processes, the rheological and thermal properties, and the microstructure of the binder/metal composite at different processing stages. The factors studied included the metal contents, the composition of the binder and the processing conditions. The three binders prepared during the course of this research were blends of a polyolefin, polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM) and a water-soluble polymer (WSP). The polyolefin resins included polypropylene (PP), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE). The powdered metal in the feedstocks was 316 L stainless steel. The compounding studies were completed in an internal mixer under different conditions of temperature, rotational speed and feedstock composition. It was found that the metal concentration was the most important factor in determining the torque evolution curves. The observation of microstructure with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at different stages during compounding revealed that the metal particles neither agglomerate nor touch each other. The liquid extraction of the water-soluble polymer (WSP) from the molded

  1. Studies in reactive extrusion processing of biodegradable polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Sunder

    Various reaction chemistries such as Polymerization, Polymer cross-linking and Reactive grafting were investigated in twin-screw extruders. Poly (1,4-dioxan-2-one) (PPDX) was manufactured in melt by the continuous polymerization of 1,4-dioxan-2-one (PDX) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using Aluminum tri-sec butoxide (ATSB) initiator. Good and accurate control over molecular weight was obtained by controlling the ratio of monomer to initiator. A screw configuration consisting of only conveying elements was used for the polymerization. The polymerization reaction was characterized by a monomer-polymer dynamic equilibrium, above the melting temperature of the polymer, limiting the equilibrium conversion to 78-percent. Near complete (˜100-percent) conversion was obtained on co-polymerizing PDX monomer with a few mol-percent (around 8-percent) Caprolactone (CL) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using ATSB initiator. The co-polymers exhibited improved thermal stability with reduction in glass transition temperature. The extruder was modeled as an Axial Dispersed Plug Flow Reactor for the polymerization of CL monomer using Residence Time Distribution (RTD) Analysis. The model provided a good fit to the experimental RTD and conversion data. Aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters, namely Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Poly butylenes (adipate-co-terephthalate) (Ecoflex) were cross-linked in a twin-screw extruder using radical initiator to form micro-gel reinforced biodegradable polyesters. Cross-linked Ecoflex was further extrusion blended with talc to form blends suitable to be blown into films. A screw configuration consisting of conveying and kneading elements was found to be effective in dispersion of the talc particles (5--10 microns) in the polyester matrix. While the rates of crystallization increased for the talc filled polyester blends, overall crystallinity reduced. Mechanical, tear and puncture properties of films made using the talc filled polyester blends

  2. Reflectometric monitoring of the dissolution process of thin polymeric films.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Riikka; Räty, Jukka; Korhonen, Kristiina; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2017-05-15

    Pharmaceutical thin films are versatile drug-delivery platforms i.e. allowing transdermal, oral, sublingual and buccal administration. However, dissolution testing of thin films is challenging since the commonly used dissolution tests for conventional dosage forms correspond rather poorly to the physiological conditions at the site of administration. Here we introduce a traditional optical reflection method for monitoring the dissolution behavior of thin polymeric films. The substances, e.g. drug molecules, released from the film generate an increase in the refractive index in the liquid medium which can be detected by reflectance monitoring. Thin EUDRAGIT(®) RL PO poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate-co trimethylammonioethyl methacrylate chloride) (RLPO) films containing the model drug perphenazine (PPZ) were prepared by spraying on a glass substrate. The glass substrates were placed inside the flow cell in the reflectometer which was then filled with phosphate buffer solution. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the reflectance of the buffer liquid. The method was able to detect the distinctive dissolution characteristics of different film formulations and measured relatively small drug concentrations. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that a traditional optical reflection method can provide valuable information about the dissolution characteristics of thin polymeric films in low liquid volume surroundings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space - Polymerization kinetics and process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Monodisperse polystyrene latexes are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization; however, sizes larger than 2 microns are difficult to prepare because of the creaming and settling of the particles and their sensitivity to mechanical shear. Preparation in space would obviate the creaming and settling, and allow agitation just sufficient for good heat transfer and mixing. Three polymerizations yielding 3-5 micron size particles were carried out successfully on the third flight of the 'Columbia' launched Mar. 22, 1982; however, four polymerizations yielding sizes up to 10 microns on the fourth flight launched June 27, 1982 were incomplete owing to apparatus malfunction. The results of these polymerizations and the prospects of developing a preparative space process are reviewed.

  4. Influence of dehydration process in Castellano chickpea: changes in bioactive carbohydrates and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Benítez, Vanesa; Mollá, Esperanza; Esteban, Rosa M; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2011-11-01

    Changes in bioactive carbohydrates, functional, and microstructural characteristics that occurred in chickpea under soaking, cooking, and industrial dehydration processing were evaluated. Raw chickpea exhibited important levels of raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs), resistant starch (RS) and total dietary fibre (TDF), being insoluble dietary fibre (IDF) the main fraction (94%). The dehydration process increased RFOs (43%), RS (47%) and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) (59%) levels significantly. In addition, a noticeable increase in both fibre fractions was observed, being higher in soluble fibre in (SDF) (59%). The minimum nitrogen solubility of raw flours was at pH 4, and a high degree of protein insolubilization (80%) was observed in dehydrated flours. The raw and processed flours exhibited low oil-holding capacities (1.10 mg/ml), and did not show any change by thermal processing, whereas water-holding capacities rose to 5.50 mg/ml of sample. Cooking and industrial dehydration process reduced emulsifying activity and foaming capacity of chickpea flour. The microstructural observations were consistent with the chemical results. Thus, the significant occurrence of these bioactive carbohydrate compounds along with the interesting functional properties of the dehydrated flours could be considered useful as functional ingredients for food formulation.

  5. The role of the substrate lipid in processive glycan polymerization by the peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Deborah L; Wang, Tsung-Shing Andrew; Doud, Emma H; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2010-01-13

    The peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (PGTs) catalyze the processive polymerization of a C55 lipid-linked disaccharide (Lipid II) to form peptidoglycan, the main component of the bacterial cell wall. Our ability to understand this reaction has been limited due to challenges identifying the appropriate substrate analogues to selectively interrogate the donor (the elongating strand) and acceptor (Lipid II) sites. To address this problem, we have developed an assay using synthetic substrates that can discriminate between the donor and acceptor sites of the PGTs. We have shown that each site has a distinct lipid length preference. We have also established that processive polymerization depends on the length of the lipid attached to the donor.

  6. In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C.; Omatete, O.O.

    1996-08-01

    Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  7. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  8. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  9. Molecular Optics Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    LAr 9B L Appr 1~ forjIbi1893 2 8 I I IE2 Molecular Optics: Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films i Professor A. F...frequency dependent local field factors. While there are various prevalent models (Lorentz- Lorenz, Onsager ) all of them give the field factors in terms of

  10. Mathematical modeling of processes occurring during deposition of sprayed particles of polymeric powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyaev, V. L.; Galimov, E. R.; Galimova, N. Ya; Takhaviev, M. S.; Siraev, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of polymeric powder particles on a surface of a treated body and a layer of particles deposited previously is considered using mathematical modeling. Basic provisions of the impact theory are used. The relationships to evaluate the characteristic parameters of the processes under study are given, the results of their analysis and recommendations to improve the deposition efficiency are presented.

  11. Platinum nanoparticles from size adjusted functional colloidal particles generated by a seeded emulsion polymerization process

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Nicolas; Ziener, Ulrich; Manzke, Achim; Plettl, Alfred; Ziemann, Paul; Biskupek, Johannes; Weiss, Clemens K

    2011-01-01

    Summary The benefits of miniemulsion and emulsion polymerization are combined in a seeded emulsion polymerization process with functional seed particles synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization. A systematic study on the influence of different reaction parameters on the reaction pathway is conducted, including variations of the amount of monomer fed, the ratio of initiator to monomer and the choice of surfactant and composition of the continuous phase. Critical parameters affecting the control of the reaction are determined. If carefully controlled, the seeded emulsion polymerization with functional seed particles yields monodisperse particles with adjustable size and functionalities. Size-adjusted platinum-acetylacetonate containing latex particles with identical seed particles and varied shell thicknesses are used to produce arrays of highly ordered platinum nanoparticles with different interparticle distances but identical particle sizes. For that, a self-assembled monolayer of functional colloids is prepared on a solid substrate and subsequently treated by oxygen plasma processing in order to remove the organic constituents. This step, however, leads to a saturated state of a residual mix of materials. In order to determine parameters influencing this saturation state, the type of surfactant, the amount of precursor loading and the size of the colloids are varied. By short annealing at high temperatures platinum nanoparticles are generated from the saturated state particles. Typically, the present fabrication method delivers a maximum interparticle distance of about 260 nm for well-defined crystalline platinum nanoparticles limited by deformation processes due to softening of the organic material during the plasma applications. PMID:22003452

  12. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  13. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  14. Engineering a Carbohydrate-processing Transglycosidase into Glycosyltransferase for Natural Product Glycodiversification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chaoning; Zhang, Yi; Jia, Yan; Wenzhao Wang; Li, Youhai; Lu, Shikun; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-02-12

    Glycodiversification broadens the scope of natural product-derived drug discovery. The acceptor substrate promiscuity of glucosyltransferase-D (GTF-D), a carbohydrate-processing enzyme from Streptococcus mutans, was expanded by protein engineering. Mutants in a site-saturation mutagenesis library were screened on the fluorescent substrate 4-methylumbelliferone to identify derivatives with improved transglycosylation efficiency. In comparison to the wild-type GTF-D enzyme, mutant M4 exhibited increased transglycosylation capabilities on flavonoid substrates including catechin, genistein, daidzein and silybin, using the glucosyl donor sucrose. This study demonstrated the feasibility of developing natural product glycosyltransferases by engineering transglycosidases that use donor substrates cheaper than NDP-sugars, and gave rise to a series of α-glucosylated natural products that are novel to the natural product reservoir. The solubility of the α-glucoside of genistein and the anti-oxidant capability of the α-glucoside of catechin were also studied.

  15. Engineering a Carbohydrate-processing Transglycosidase into Glycosyltransferase for Natural Product Glycodiversification

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chaoning; Zhang, Yi; Jia, Yan; Wenzhao Wang; Li, Youhai; Lu, Shikun; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Glycodiversification broadens the scope of natural product-derived drug discovery. The acceptor substrate promiscuity of glucosyltransferase-D (GTF-D), a carbohydrate-processing enzyme from Streptococcus mutans, was expanded by protein engineering. Mutants in a site-saturation mutagenesis library were screened on the fluorescent substrate 4-methylumbelliferone to identify derivatives with improved transglycosylation efficiency. In comparison to the wild-type GTF-D enzyme, mutant M4 exhibited increased transglycosylation capabilities on flavonoid substrates including catechin, genistein, daidzein and silybin, using the glucosyl donor sucrose. This study demonstrated the feasibility of developing natural product glycosyltransferases by engineering transglycosidases that use donor substrates cheaper than NDP-sugars, and gave rise to a series of α-glucosylated natural products that are novel to the natural product reservoir. The solubility of the α-glucoside of genistein and the anti-oxidant capability of the α-glucoside of catechin were also studied. PMID:26869143

  16. An emulsion polymerization process for soluble and electrically conductive polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Ding, Y.; Graham, C.R.; Liu, J.; Remsen, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new emulsion process has been developed for the direct synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline (PANI) that is soluble in organic solvents. The process entails forming an emulsion composed of water, a water soluble organic solvent (e.g., 2-butoxyethanol), a water insoluble organic acid (e.g., dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid) and aniline. Aniline is protonated by the organic acid to form a salt which partitions into the organic phase. As oxidant (ammonium peroxydisulfate) is added, PANI salt forms in the organic phase and remains soluble. As the reaction proceeds, the reaction mixture changes from an emulsion to a two phase system, the soluble PANI remaining in the organic phase. With dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) as the organic acid, the resulting product is truly soluble in organic solvents such as xylene and toluene (not a dispersion), of high molecular weight (M{sub w} > 22,000), film forming and miscible with many polymers such as polyurethanes, epoxies and phenoxy resins. As cast, the polyaniline film is only moderately conductive, (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm), however treatment of the film with surfactants such as benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) or low molecular weight alcohols and ketones such as methanol and acetone increases the conductivity 2--3 orders of magnitude.

  17. Microwave heating and the acceleration of polymerization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Fabrizio

    1999-12-01

    Microwave power irradiation of dielectrics is nowadays well recognized and extensively used as an exceptionally efficient and versatile heating technique. Besides this, it revealed since the early 1980s an unexpected, and still far from being elucidated, capacity of causing reaction and yield enhancements in a great variety of chemical processes. These phenomena are currently referred to as specific or nonthermal effects of microwaves. An overview of them and their interpretations given to date in achievements in the microwave processing of slow-curing thermosetting resins is also given. Tailored, quaternary cyanoalkoxyalkyl ammonium halide catalysts, further emphasizing the microwave enhancements of curing kinetics of isocyanate/epoxy and epoxy/anhydride resin systems, are here presented. Their catalytic efficiency under microwave irradiation, microwave heatability, and dielectric properties are discussed and interpreted by the aid of the result of semi-empirical quantum mechanics calculations and molecule dynamics simulations in vacuo. An ion-hopping conduction mechanism has been recognized as the dominant source of the microwave absorption capacities of these catalysts. Dipolar relaxation losses by their strongly dipolar cations, viceversa, would preferably be responsible for the peculiar catalytic effects displayed under microwave heating. This would occur through a well-focused, molecular microwave overheating of intermediate reactive anionic groupings, they could indirectly cause as the nearest neighbors of such negatively-charged molecular sites.

  18. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organics which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials.

  19. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Tot...

  20. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  1. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  2. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  3. Polymerization and processing of polymers in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Smith, M.E.; Douglas, E.P.

    1997-04-01

    Liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT`s) have become recognized over the past few years as an important class of materials. Numerous reports from the authors laboratory and others have described their synthesis and phase behavior. In particular, the authors have described important effects due to the orientation of the rodlike molecules in a liquid crystalline phase. They have found that curing rates are enhanced compared to reaction in an isotropic phase, and that the glass transition of the fully cured material can be significantly higher than the final cure temperature. For structural applications, orientation of LCT`s will allow maximum improvement in mechanical properties. A few studies have described use of magnetic fields to orient LCT`s. However, no measurements were made of the tensile properties of materials processed in magnetic fields. The authors have conducted experiments which describe the tensile modulus dependence of an LCT over the complete range of magnetic field strengths from 0 to 18 Tesla. Their work has focused on the system composed of the diglycidyl ether of dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene (DGE-DHAMS) cured with sulfanilamide (SAA).

  4. Residual carbohydrates from in vitro digested processed rapeseed ( Brassica napus ) meal.

    PubMed

    Pustjens, Annemieke M; de Vries, Sonja; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kabel, Mirjam A; Schols, Henk A; Gruppen, Harry

    2012-08-29

    Rapeseed meal (RSM) was subjected to different physical or chemical pretreatments to decrease residual, hard to degrade carbohydrates and to improve fermentability of RSM polysaccharides. Next, these pretreated samples were in vitro digested and fermented, with or without the addition of commercial pectinolytic enzymes. Remaining carbohydrates were quantified, and two physical characteristics were analyzed: (1) water-binding capacity (WBC) of the insoluble residue and (2) viscosity of the soluble fraction. Mild acid pretreatment in combination with commercial pectinolytic enzyme mixtures showed best digestion of RSM carbohydrates; only 32% of the total carbohydrate content remained. For most pretreatments, addition of commercial pectinolytic enzymes had the strongest effect on lowering the WBC of the in vitro incubated RSM. In the cases that less carbohydrate remained after in vitro digestion, the WBC of the residue decreased, and less gas seems to be produced during fermentation.

  5. Improving carbohydrate production of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168 through semi-continuous process coupled with mixotrophic cultivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Liu, Zhuo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Ting-Ting; Chang, Kuan-Fu; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-08-01

    Biofuels from microalgae is now a hot issue of great potential. However, achieving high starch productivity with photoautotrophic microalgae is still challenging. A feasible approach to enhance the growth and target product of microalgae is to conduct mixotrophic cultivation. The appropriate acetate addition combined with CO2 supply as dual carbon sources (i.e., mixotrophic cultivation) could enhance the cell growth of some microalgae species, but the effect of acetate-mediated mixotrophic culture mode on carbohydrate accumulation in microalgae remains unclear. Moreover, there is still lack of the information concerning how to increase the productivity of carbohydrates from microalgae under acetate-amended mixotrophic cultivation and how to optimize the engineering strategies to achieve the goal. This study was undertaken to develop an optimal acetate-contained mixotrophic cultivation system coupled with effective operation strategies to markedly improve the carbohydrate productivity of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168. The optimal carbohydrate productivity of 695 mg/L/d was obtained, which is the highest value ever reported. The monosaccharide in the accumulated carbohydrates is mainly glucose (i.e., 85-90%), which is very suitable for bio-alcohols fermentation. Hence, by applying the optimal process developed in this study, C. sorokiniana NIES-2168 has a high potential to serve as a feedstock for subsequent biofuels conversion.

  6. A supported polymeric liquid membrane process for removal of carboxylic acids from a waste stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1999-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. The authors have developed a new class of membrane called supported polymeric liquid membranes that are capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid. The process has shown treatment feasibility for several types of aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the laboratory development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids and nitric acid.

  7. Method of Relaxation Moments for Studying Nonlinear Locally Nonequilibrium Processes of Transfer of Polymeric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    A method for simulating the processes of transfer of thermodynamic systems with polymeric microstructure is considered. The method is based on the classical locally equilibrium medium-state entropy concept expanded by the introduction of a structural tensor parameter whose evolution characterizes the nonlinear anisotropic relaxation properties of a thermodynamic system and the associated transfer phenomena. The dynamic, thermal, and mass transfer characteristics of macrotransfer are determined by corresponding integrals of relaxation moments.

  8. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed blackberry products.

    PubMed

    Hager, Tiffany J; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2008-02-13

    Blackberries are a rich source of polyphenolics, particularly anthocyanins, that may contribute to the reduced risk of chronic disease; however, as with most berries, the fresh fruit are only seasonally available. With most of the blackberries consumed as frozen or in thermally processed forms after long-term storage, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing and 6 months of storage on the anthocyanins and antioxidant capacity of blackberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC FL) and photochemiluminescence (PCL) were determined postprocessing (1 day) and after 1, 3, and 6 months of storage. Processing resulted in increases in polymeric color values (up to 7%) and losses in monomeric anthocyanins (up to 65%). For most products, processing also resulted in losses in antioxidant capacity (by ORAC FL and PCL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all processed products resulted in dramatic losses in monomeric anthocyanins with as much as 75% losses of anthocyanins throughout storage, which coincided with marked increases of percent polymeric color values of these products over 6 months of storage. There were no changes in ORAC FL or PCL for processed products throughout long-term storage. No significant changes in antioxidant capacity or anthocyanin content were observed in IQF fruit during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  9. Understanding Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Understanding Carbohydrates How much and what type of carbohydrate foods ... glucose levels in your target range. Explore: Understanding Carbohydrates Glycemic Index and Diabetes Learn about the glycemic ...

  10. Modified resin--intermediate processing of perovskite powders:Part I. Optimization of polymeric precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, L. ); Lessing, P.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The formation of a polyester between citric acid (CA) and ethylene glycol (EG) was found to be a decisive factor for the foaming of resin intermediates in a Pechini-type powder process. This process was modified by changing the organic mass ratio of CA/EG which results in ceramic powders with different morphologies. The most porous resin intermediate (with or without chelated cations) was prepared using a polymeric gel made of equimolar citric acid and ethylene glycol. It was also found that a premixing of organic components, prior to adding constituent nitrate solutions, makes the whole process more controllable.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Controlled Solid Phase Forming Process of Polymeric Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haipeng; Hu, Ping; Fu, Zhengchun; Yan, Yue; Zhang, Guanli

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, a new forming process of polymeric plate called stretch-forming was simulated by adopting the thermo-elasto-visco-plastic large deformation finite element formulation based on Updated Lagrangian method. Some details of this forming process were also studied. It was shown that temperature has important effect on the forming process. Slide contact was assumed in the simulation. Friction force was ignored due to good lubrication. The adopted algorithm is verified by analyzing a thermoforming problem provided in a NUMIFORM'98 paper and comparing simulation results with experimental measures in that paper.

  12. An optimal polymerization process for low mean molecular weight HBOC with lower dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wentao; Li, Shen; Hao, Shasha; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chengmin

    2015-06-01

    The new research tried to improve the distribution of molecular weight of Hb-based oxygen carriers (HBOC), a bottleneck of glutaraldehyde (GDA)-polymerization process. The orthogonal experiments were done on the basis of the early study of human placenta Hemoglobin (Hb)-crosslinked-GDA and three factors were selected including the molar ratio of GDA and Hb, Hb concentration, and the rate of the feeding GDA. The optimal match condition of polymerization process prepared for the purpose of lower mean molecular weight, content of super-weight molecule, and the content of dimer. The results showed that the molar ratio of GDA and Hb was the greatest influencing factor on the molecular weight distribution of polymerized-Hb, followed by the Hb concentration, and the last is the rate of feeding GDA. The optimum matching conditions had reached the objective that the mean molecular weight with 155.54 ± 5.79, the content of dimer with 17.23 ± 3.71, and content of super-weight molecule with 0.17 ± 0.09, and the results can be repeated in the 30 times expansion experiments.

  13. Multi input single output model predictive control of non-linear bio-polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugasamy, Senthil Kumar; Ahmad, Z.

    2015-05-15

    This paper focuses on Multi Input Single Output (MISO) Model Predictive Control of bio-polymerization process in which mechanistic model is developed and linked with the feedforward neural network model to obtain a hybrid model (Mechanistic-FANN) of lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) for Poly (ε-caprolactone) production. In this research, state space model was used, in which the input to the model were the reactor temperatures and reactor impeller speeds and the output were the molecular weight of polymer (M{sub n}) and polymer polydispersity index. State space model for MISO created using System identification tool box of Matlab™. This state space model is used in MISO MPC. Model predictive control (MPC) has been applied to predict the molecular weight of the biopolymer and consequently control the molecular weight of biopolymer. The result shows that MPC is able to track reference trajectory and give optimum movement of manipulated variable.

  14. Multi input single output model predictive control of non-linear bio-polymerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugasamy, Senthil Kumar; Ahmad, Z.

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on Multi Input Single Output (MISO) Model Predictive Control of bio-polymerization process in which mechanistic model is developed and linked with the feedforward neural network model to obtain a hybrid model (Mechanistic-FANN) of lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) for Poly (ɛ-caprolactone) production. In this research, state space model was used, in which the input to the model were the reactor temperatures and reactor impeller speeds and the output were the molecular weight of polymer (Mn) and polymer polydispersity index. State space model for MISO created using System identification tool box of Matlab™. This state space model is used in MISO MPC. Model predictive control (MPC) has been applied to predict the molecular weight of the biopolymer and consequently control the molecular weight of biopolymer. The result shows that MPC is able to track reference trajectory and give optimum movement of manipulated variable.

  15. Acrylamide in thermal-processed carbohydrate-rich foods from Chinese market.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fan; Jin, Shao Qiang; Zhu, Bing Qi; Chen, Wan Qin; Wang, Xin Yi; Liu, Zhu; Luo, Jin Wen

    2017-09-01

    Acrylamide content in food market in China was determined with the goal to evaluate related health concern. In this survey, products of rice, potato corn, wheat as well as dried fruit slices and instant foods were analysed. All these types of thermal-processed carbohydrate-rich foods were frequently consumed in China. They were purchased from markets in Zhejiang province and analysed using a liquid chromatography tandem/mass spectrometry method. Acrylamide was detected in 94.3% of 105 investigated samples, ranging from 10 to 3649 μg/kg with an average value of 231 μg/kg and a median of 114 μg/kg. In this study, high levels were found in potato products (564 ± 285 μg/kg), corn products (524 ± 187 μg/kg) and instant foods (180 ± 35 μg/kg) while low levels were measured in rice products (82 ± 17 μg/kg), wheat products (96 ± 29 μg/kg) and dried fruit slices (83 ± 13 μg/kg).

  16. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products.

    PubMed

    Hager, A; Howard, L R; Prior, R L; Brownmiller, C

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORAC(FL) were determined 1 d postprocessing and after 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 37% in puree to 69% to 73% in nonclarified and clarified juices, respectively, but only the juices showed substantial losses (38% to 41%) in ORAC(FL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all thermally processed products resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 49% in canned-in-syrup to 75% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Total anthocyanins and ORACFL of IQF berries were well retained during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  17. Carbohydrates for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Biomass accumulated by the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide is the only renewable carbon source, and hence, the only renewable raw material for the chemical industry. Carbohydrates are the main constituents of biomass and occur as cell wall and storage carbohydrates, transportation carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. Cellulose, hemicelluloses and starch in particular as well as pectin, inulin and saccharose to a smaller extent are the most abundant carbohydrates. Glucose is the most important monosaccharide and monomer of polysaccharides in natural carbohydrates. Thus, it is the most abundant organic compound on earth. Production of pulp from wood cellulose, applications of starch for paper making as well as uses of glucose and saccharose for fermentation are the most important chemical and technical uses of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates used as fermentation feedstock are essential for the chemical industry. Their importance is steadily growing due to the increasing implementation of biotechnological processes.

  18. Using artificial neural networks to model extrusion processes for the manufacturing of polymeric micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekras, N.; Artemakis, I.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper a methodology and an application example are presented aiming to show how Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) can be used to model manufacturing processes when mathematical models are missing or are not applicable e.g. due to the micro- & nano-scaling, due to non-conventional processes, etc. Besides the ANNs methodology, the results of a Software System developed will be presented, which was used to create ANNs models for micro & nano manufacturing processes. More specifically results of a specific application example will be presented, concerning the modeling of extrusion processes for polymeric micro-tubes. ANNs models are capable for modeling manufacturing processes as far as adequate experimental and/or historical data of processes' inputs & outputs are available for their training. The POLYTUBES ANNs models have been trained and tested with experimental data records of process' inputs and outputs concerning a micro-extrusion process of polymeric micro-tubes for several materials such as: COC, PC, PET, PETG, PP and PVDF. The main ANN model of the extrusion application example has 3 inputs and 9 outputs. The inputs are: tube's inner & outer diameters, and the material density. The model outputs are 9 process parameters, which correspond to the specific inputs e.g. process temperature, die inner & outer diameters, extrusion pressure, draw speed etc. The training of the ANN model was completed, when the errors for the model's outputs, which expressed the difference between the training target values and the ANNs outputs, were minimized to acceptable levels. After the training, the micro-extrusion ANN is capable to simulate the process and can be used to calculate model's outputs, which are the process parameters for any new set of inputs. By this way a satisfactory functional approximation of the whole process is achieved. This research work has been supported by the EU FP7 NMP project POLYTUBES.

  19. Deposition of polymeric perfluored thin films in proton ionic membranes by plasma processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Peter Lubomir; Mousinho, Ana Paula; Ordonez, Nelson; da Silva Zambom, Luis; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues

    2007-10-01

    In this work the surfaces of polymeric membranes based on Nafion (proton conducting material), used in proton exchange membranes fuel cells (PEMFC) had been modified by plasma deposition of perfluored polymers, in order to improve its functioning in systems of energy generation (fuel cells). The deposition increases the chemical resistance of the proton ionic polymers without losing the electrical properties. The processing of the membranes also reduces the permeability of the membranes to the alcohols (methanol and ethanol), thus preventing poisoning of the fuel cell. The processing of the membranes of Nafion was carried through in a system of plasma deposition using a mixture of CF 4 and H 2 gases. The plasma processing was made mainly to increase the chemical resistance and result in hydrophobic surfaces. The Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) technique supplies a spectrum with information about the CF n bond formation. Through the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) technique it was possible to verify the deposition rate of the polymeric layer. The plasma process with composition of 60% of CF 4 and 40% of H 2 presented the best deposition rate. By the spectrum analysis for the optimized configuration, it was possible to verify that the film deposition occurred with a thickness of 90 nm, and fluorine concentration was nearly 30%. Voltammetry made possible to verify that the fluorination increases the membranes chemical resistance, improving the stability of Nafion, becoming an attractive process for construction of fuel cells.

  20. Prevention of Pu(IV) polymerization in a PUREX-based process

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Senentz, Gerald

    2007-07-01

    The US Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is being designed to produce MOX fuel assemblies for use in domestic, commercial nuclear power reactors, as part of the U.S. DOE efforts to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The feed material is plutonium dioxide from surplus weapon grade plutonium. PuO{sub 2}, issued from a pit disassembly and conversion facility (PDCF), will be processed using a flowsheet derived from the La Hague reprocessing plant to remove impurities. The purified PuO{sub 2} will be blended with UO{sub 2} to form mixed oxide pellets, and loaded into fuel rods, to create MOX fuel assemblies based on the process and technology of the MELOX plant in France,. Safety studies are necessary to support the development of the design basis per regulation 10 CFR Part 70 to complete an integrated safety analysis for the MFFF facility. The formation of tetravalent plutonium polymers in certain process vessels of the aqueous polishing (AP) process has been identified as a potential hazard. Based on scientific literature, the following paper demonstrates that within the AP process units, the polymerization of Pu(IV) will not occur and/or will not create a criticality issue even where the acidity may drop below 0.5 N HNO{sub 3}. We will identify and control the conditions under which plutonium (IV) will not polymerize. (authors)

  1. Changes in molecular characteristics of cereal carbohydrates after processing and digestion.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Mirosław Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2012-12-10

    Different extraction, purification and digestion methods were used to investigate the molecular properties of carbohydrates in arabinoxylan and β-glucan concentrates, dietary fiber (DF) rich breads and ileum content of bread fed pigs. The breads studied were: a low DF wheat bread (WF), whole meal rye bread (GR), rye bread with kernels (RK), wheat bread supplemented with wheat arabinoxylan concentrate (AX) and wheat bread supplemented with oat β-glucan concentrate (BG). The weight average molecular weight (M(w)) of extractable carbohydrates in β-glucan concentrate decreased eight-fold after inclusion in the BG bread when exposed to in vitro digestion, while the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in AX bread was reduced two-fold, and remained almost unaffected until reaching the terminal ileum of pigs. Similarly, the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in GR and RK bread was not significantly changed in the ileum. The AX bread resulted in the highest concentration of dissolved arabinoxylan in the ileum among all the breads that caused a substantial increased in ileal AX viscosity. Nevertheless, for none of the breads, the M(w) of extractable carbohydrates was related neither to the bread extract nor ileal viscosity.

  2. Changes in Molecular Characteristics of Cereal Carbohydrates after Processing and Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Mirosław Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2012-01-01

    Different extraction, purification and digestion methods were used to investigate the molecular properties of carbohydrates in arabinoxylan and β-glucan concentrates, dietary fiber (DF) rich breads and ileum content of bread fed pigs. The breads studied were: a low DF wheat bread (WF), whole meal rye bread (GR), rye bread with kernels (RK), wheat bread supplemented with wheat arabinoxylan concentrate (AX) and wheat bread supplemented with oat β-glucan concentrate (BG). The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of extractable carbohydrates in β-glucan concentrate decreased eight-fold after inclusion in the BG bread when exposed to in vitro digestion, while the Mw of purified extractable carbohydrates in AX bread was reduced two-fold, and remained almost unaffected until reaching the terminal ileum of pigs. Similarly, the Mw of purified extractable carbohydrates in GR and RK bread was not significantly changed in the ileum. The AX bread resulted in the highest concentration of dissolved arabinoxylan in the ileum among all the breads that caused a substantial increased in ileal AX viscosity. Nevertheless, for none of the breads, the Mw of extractable carbohydrates was related neither to the bread extract nor ileal viscosity. PMID:23222731

  3. Synthesis of glycopolymers by controlled radical polymerization techniques and their applications.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Dorbatt, Vimary; Lee, Juneyoung; Lin, En-Wei; Maynard, Heather D

    2012-11-26

    Natural saccharides are involved in numerous biological processes. It has been shown that these carbohydrates play a role in cell adhesion and proliferation, as well as protein stabilization, organization, and recognition. Certain carbohydrates also serve as receptors for viruses and bacteria. They are over expressed in diseases such as cancer. Hence, a lot of effort has been focused on mimicking these sugars. Polymers with pendent saccharide groups, also known as glycopolymers, are studied as oligo- and polysaccharide mimics. Controlled radical polymerization (CRP) techniques such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP), as well as cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization have allowed chemists to synthesize well-defined glycopolymers that, in some cases, have particular end-group functionalities. This review focuses on the synthesis of glycopolymers by these methods and the applications of glycopolymers as natural saccharide mimics.

  4. Melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms for immediate drug release.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2015-12-28

    The present immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, comprise granular matrices. While effective in releasing the drug rapidly, they are fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. By contrast, liquid-based processes would be far more predictable; but the standard cast microstructures are unsuited for immediate-release because they resist fluid percolation and penetration. In this article, we introduce cellular dosage forms that can be readily prepared from polymeric melts by incorporating the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of microscopic gas bubbles in a molding process. We show that the cell topology and formulation of such cellular structures can be engineered to reduce the length-scale of the mass-transfer step, which determines the time of drug release, from as large as the dosage form itself to as small as the thickness of the cell wall. This allows the cellular dosage forms to achieve drug release rates over an order of magnitude faster compared with those of cast matrices, spanning the entire spectrum of immediate-release and beyond. The melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms enable predictive design of immediate-release solid dosage forms by tailoring microstructures, and could be manufactured efficiently in a single step.

  5. Polymeric Nanocomposite Membranes for Next Generation Pervaporation Process: Strategies, Challenges and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Nayan Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    Pervaporation (PV) has been considered as one of the most active and promising areas in membrane technologies in separating close boiling or azeotropic liquid mixtures, heat sensitive biomaterials, water or organics from its mixtures that are indispensable constituents for various important chemical and bio-separations. In the PV process, the membrane plays the most pivotal role and is of paramount importance in governing the overall efficiency. This article evaluates and collaborates the current research towards the development of next generation nanomaterials (NMs) and embedded polymeric membranes with regard to its synthesis, fabrication and application strategies, challenges and future prospects. PMID:28885591

  6. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Felipe; da Rocha, Caique O. C.; Medeiros, Gabriela S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased.

  7. Emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate: safe optimization of a hazardous complex process.

    PubMed

    Copelli, S; Derudi, M; Sempere, J; Serra, E; Lunghi, A; Pasturenzi, C; Rota, R

    2011-08-15

    Fast and exothermic discontinuous emulsion polymerization processes are particularly difficult to optimize from both safety and productivity point of view because of the occurrence of side undesired reactions (e.g. chain transfer to monomer, backbiting, propagation of tertiary radicals, termination by disproportion, etc.) and the hazards of boiling phenomena and stable foam formation under atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the relevant number of loading, heating and cooling steps, required before starting the monomer addition (that is, the desired reaction), makes a strict product quality reproducibility very difficult to obtain. Under these operating conditions, it is necessary to employ a suitable combined theoretical and experimental procedure able to detect the optimum process dosing time at both the laboratory and the industrial scale. In this work, it is shown how to use the topological criterion theory together with proper adiabatic calorimeter and RC1 experimental data to safely optimize the synthesis of polyvinyl acetate through the radical emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate by the means of an indirectly cooled isoperibolic semibatch reactor.

  8. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    PubMed Central

    BURAL, Canan; AKTAŞ, Esin; DENIZ, Günnur; ÜNLÜÇERÇI, Yeşim; BAYRAKTAR, Gülsen

    2011-01-01

    polymerization process for at least 30 min and water storage of the heat-polymerized denture bases for at least 1 to 2 days before denture delivery is clinically recommended for minimizing the residual MMA and possible cytotoxic effects. PMID:21956586

  9. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  10. Extracellular polymeric substances mediate bioleaching/biocorrosion via interfacial processes involving iron(III) ions and acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sand, Wolfgang; Gehrke, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances seem to play a pivotal role in biocorrosion of metals and bioleaching, biocorrosion of metal sulfides for the winning of precious metals as well as acid rock drainage. For better control of both processes, the structure and function of extracellular polymeric substances of corrosion-causing or leaching bacteria are of crucial importance. Our research focused on the extremophilic bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, because of the "simplicity" and knowledge about the interactions of these bacteria with their substrate/substratum and their environment. For this purpose, the composition of the corresponding extracellular polymeric substances and their functions were analyzed. The extracellular polymeric substances of both species consist mainly of neutral sugars and lipids. The functions of the exopolymers seem to be: (i) to mediate attachment to a (metal) sulfide surface, and (ii) to concentrate iron(III) ions by complexation through uronic acids or other residues at the mineral surface, thus, allowing an oxidative attack on the sulfide. Consequently, dissolution of the metal sulfide is enhanced, which may result in an acceleration of 20- to 100-fold of the bioleaching process over chemical leaching. Experiments were performed to elucidate the importance of the iron(III) ions complexed by extracellular polymeric substances for strain-specific differences in oxidative activity for pyrite. Strains of A. ferrooxidans with a high amount of iron(III) ions in their extracellular polymeric substances possess greater oxidation activity than those with fewer iron(III) ions. These data provide insight into the function of and consequently the advantages that extracellular polymeric substances provide to bacteria. The role of extracellular polymeric substances for attachment under the conditions of a space station and resulting effects like biofouling, biocorrosion, malodorous gases, etc. will be discussed.

  11. Nanostructure of electrically conducting polyaniline prepared by a novel emulsion polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Kinlen, P.J.; Graham, C.R.

    1998-07-01

    A soluble polyaniline (PANI) salt with moderate conductivity was synthesized by a novel emulsion polymerization process. The conductivity of the processed PANI films can be substantially increased by treating the polymer films with surfactants or with low molecular weight alcohols. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of thin polymer films revealed the existence of small islands of conducting PANI embedded in a non-conducting, dopant matrix. The conductivity of the PANI films is affected by the spatial distribution and the connectivity of these small islands. The conductivity enhancement observed upon treatment with surfactants is due to self-assembly of conducting PANI molecules into an interconnected network morphology. In the case of alcohol treatment the film conductivity is enhanced due to extraction of excess dopant phase and the subsequent densification of PANI islands to form highly conducting pathways.

  12. Bacteriophage-encoded virion-associated enzymes to overcome the carbohydrate barriers during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Briers, Yves; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-04-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that infect the host after successful receptor recognition and adsorption to the cell surface. The irreversible adherence followed by genome material ejection into host cell cytoplasm must be preceded by the passage of diverse carbohydrate barriers such as capsule polysaccharides (CPSs), O-polysaccharide chains of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules, extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) forming biofilm matrix, and peptidoglycan (PG) layers. For that purpose, bacteriophages are equipped with various virion-associated carbohydrate active enzymes, termed polysaccharide depolymerases and lysins, that recognize, bind, and degrade the polysaccharide compounds. We discuss the existing diversity in structural locations, variable architectures, enzymatic specificities, and evolutionary aspects of polysaccharide depolymerases and virion-associated lysins (VALs) and illustrate how these aspects can correlate with the host spectrum. In addition, we present methods that can be used for activity determination and the application potential of these enzymes as antibacterials, antivirulence agents, and diagnostic tools.

  13. Production of Liquid Alkanes by Aqueous-Phase Processing of Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, George W.; Chheda, Juben N.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Dumesic, James A.

    2005-06-01

    Liquid alkanes with the number of carbon atoms ranging from C7 to C15 were selectively produced from biomass-derived carbohydrates by acid-catalyzed dehydration, which was followed by aldol condensation over solid base catalysts to form large organic compounds. These molecules were then converted into alkanes by dehydration/hydrogenation over bifunctional catalysts that contained acid and metal sites in a four-phase reactor, in which the aqueous organic reactant becomes more hydrophobic and a hexadecane alkane stream removes hydrophobic species from the catalyst before they go on further to form coke. These liquid alkanes are of the appropriate molecular weight to be used as transportation fuel components, and they contain 90% of the energy of the carbohydrate and H2 feeds.

  14. Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boboia, S.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-13

    The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

  15. Effect of Barley β-Glucan on the Gluten Polymerization Process in Dough during Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ze-Hua; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Ke-Xue; Guo, Xiao-Na; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Hui-Ming

    2017-07-26

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) β-glucan (BBG) is of interest as a result of its health benefits, but BBG presents significant disruptions on the gluten network, with a negative impact on food texture. To clarify the interaction between BBG and gluten in dough, the dynamic rheological, thermochemical process of gluten and microstructure of dough with BBG during heating were detected. The results showed that BBG delayed the gluten thermopolymerization reaction during heating and affected polymerization of specific molecular weight protein subunits. These impacts depended upon the heating temperature and time. When heating under 25-65 °C, tan δ of the dough reached the highest level at the BBG concentration of 1%. However, under the temperature of 65-95 °C, tan δ was positively correlated with the BBG content (0-3%). The differential scanning calorimetry curves revealed that the peak temperature (TP) of the two endothermic peaks increased by 3.86 and 3.10 °C. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that BBG mainly affected the peak area of gliadin and glutenin. Furthermore, after 3% BBG was added, the bands of 59.8 and 64.9 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns delayed, vanishing for 120 s when heating at 95 °C. Therefore, BBG delayed the polymerization reaction of specific molecular weight protein subunits rather than all of the proteins.

  16. Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboia, S.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-01

    The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

  17. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  18. New green polymeric composites based on hemp and natural rubber processed by electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Stelescu, Maria-Daniela; Manaila, Elena; Craciun, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A new polymeric composite based on natural rubber reinforced with hemp has been processed by electron beam irradiation and characterized by several methods. The mechanical characteristics: gel fraction, crosslink density, water uptake, swelling parameters, and FTIR of natural rubber/hemp fiber composites have been investigated as a function of the hemp content and absorbed dose. Physical and mechanical properties present a significant improvement as a result of adding hemp fibres in blends. Our experiments showed that the hemp fibers have a reinforcing effect on natural rubber similar to mineral fillers (chalk, carbon black, silica). The crosslinking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation, increase as a result of the amount of hemp in blends and the electron beam irradiation dose increasing. The swelling parameters of samples significantly depend on the amount of hemp in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics.

  19. New Green Polymeric Composites Based on Hemp and Natural Rubber Processed by Electron Beam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Stelescu, Maria-Daniela; Craciun, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A new polymeric composite based on natural rubber reinforced with hemp has been processed by electron beam irradiation and characterized by several methods. The mechanical characteristics: gel fraction, crosslink density, water uptake, swelling parameters, and FTIR of natural rubber/hemp fiber composites have been investigated as a function of the hemp content and absorbed dose. Physical and mechanical properties present a significant improvement as a result of adding hemp fibres in blends. Our experiments showed that the hemp fibers have a reinforcing effect on natural rubber similar to mineral fillers (chalk, carbon black, silica). The crosslinking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation, increase as a result of the amount of hemp in blends and the electron beam irradiation dose increasing. The swelling parameters of samples significantly depend on the amount of hemp in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics. PMID:24688419

  20. A review on the processing accuracy of two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hou, Yihong; Lin, Jieqiong

    2015-03-15

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a powerful and potential technology to fabricate true three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanostructures of various materials with subdiffraction-limit resolution. And it has been applied to microoptics, electronics, communications, biomedicine, microfluidic devices, MEMS and metamaterials. These applications, such as microoptics and photon crystals, put forward rigorous requirements on the processing accuracy of TPP, including the dimensional accuracy, shape accuracy and surface roughness and the processing accuracy influences their performance, even invalidate them. In order to fabricate precise 3D micro/nanostructures, the factors influencing the processing accuracy need to be considered comprehensively and systematically. In this paper, we review the basis of TPP micro/nanofabrication, including mechanism of TPP, experimental set-up for TPP and scaling laws of resolution of TPP. Then, we discuss the factors influencing the processing accuracy. Finally, we summarize the methods reported lately to improve the processing accuracy from improving the resolution and changing spatial arrangement of voxels.

  1. A review on the processing accuracy of two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hou, Yihong; Lin, Jieqiong

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a powerful and potential technology to fabricate true three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanostructures of various materials with subdiffraction-limit resolution. And it has been applied to microoptics, electronics, communications, biomedicine, microfluidic devices, MEMS and metamaterials. These applications, such as microoptics and photon crystals, put forward rigorous requirements on the processing accuracy of TPP, including the dimensional accuracy, shape accuracy and surface roughness and the processing accuracy influences their performance, even invalidate them. In order to fabricate precise 3D micro/nanostructures, the factors influencing the processing accuracy need to be considered comprehensively and systematically. In this paper, we review the basis of TPP micro/nanofabrication, including mechanism of TPP, experimental set-up for TPP and scaling laws of resolution of TPP. Then, we discuss the factors influencing the processing accuracy. Finally, we summarize the methods reported lately to improve the processing accuracy from improving the resolution and changing spatial arrangement of voxels.

  2. Response of extracellular polymeric substances to thermal treatment in sludge dewatering process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-Fei; Qian, Chen; Jiang, Jian-Kai; Ye, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-09-11

    Sludge dewatering is an important process in municipal wastewater treatment and critically influences the subsequent transportation and disposal. Thermal treatment coupled with other chemical processes has been widely used to improve sludge dewaterability. However, information about the response of sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to thermal treatment and its role in sludge dewatering is still limited. In this work, the effects of thermal treatment on anaerobic and aerobic sludges were investigated with an emphasis on the colloid properties of released EPS in sludge dewatering process. The results indicate that sludge dewaterability became deteriorated with the increased temperature in the range of 30-170 °C, which was ascribed to the disintegration of sludge flocs and change of EPS characteristics. Disintegrated sludge induced the release of the negatively charged EPS, resulting in the weakened bridging interaction and lower compactness. After thermal treatment, the EPS with a higher average molecular weight and stretched coil configuration retained more water. In addition, difference in dewaterability between anaerobic and aerobic sludges was found to be attributed to their different contents and structures of EPS components. These results provide an insight into thermal-dependent sludge dewatering process and are useful to facilitate water-sludge separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2010-07-01

    Carbohydrate feeding has been shown to be ergogenic, but recently substantial advances have been made in optimizing the guidelines for carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise. It was found that limitations to carbohydrate oxidation were in the absorptive process most likely because of a saturation of carbohydrate transporters. By using a combination of carbohydrates that use different intestinal transporters for absorption it was shown that carbohydrate delivery and oxidation could be increased. Studies demonstrated increases in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates of up to 65% of glucose: fructose compared with glucose only. Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates reach values of 1.75 g/min whereas previously it was thought that 1 g/min was the absolute maximum. The increased carbohydrate oxidation with multiple transportable carbohydrates was accompanied by increased fluid delivery and improved oxidation efficiency, and thus the likelihood of gastrointestinal distress may be diminished. Studies also demonstrated reduced fatigue and improved exercise performance with multiple transportable carbohydrates compared with a single carbohydrate. Multiple transportable carbohydrates, ingested at high rates, can be beneficial during endurance sports in which the duration of exercise is 3 h or more.

  4. Modeling and monitoring of a high pressure polymerization process using multivariate statistical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharmin, Rumana

    This thesis explores the use of multivariate statistical techniques in developing tools for property modeling and monitoring of a high pressure ethylene polymerization process. In polymer industry, many researchers have shown, mainly in simulation studies, the potential of multivariate statistical methods in identification and control of polymerization process. However, very few, if any, of these strategies have been implemented. This work was done using data collected from a commercial high pressure LDPE/EVA reactor located at AT Plastics, Edmonton. The models or methods developed in the course of this research have been validated with real data and in most cases, implemented in real time. One main objective of this PhD project was to develop and implement a data based inferential sensor to estimate the melt flow index of LDPE and EVA resins using regularly measured process variables. Steady state PLS method was used to develop the soft sensor model. A detailed description of the data preprocessing steps are given that should be followed in the analysis of industrial data. Models developed for two of the most frequently produced polymer grades at AT Plastics have been implemented. The models were tested for many sets of data and showed acceptable performance when applied with an online bias updating scheme. One observation from many validation exercises was that the model prediction becomes poorer with time as operators use new process conditions in the plant to produce the same resin with the same specification. During the implementation of the soft sensors, we suggested a simple bias update scheme as a remedy to this problem. An alternative and more rigorous approach is to recursively update the model with new data, which is also more suitable to handle grade transition. Two existing recursive PLS methods, one based on NIPALS algorithm and the other based on kernel algorithm were reviewed. In addition, we proposed a novel RPLS algorithm which is based on the

  5. Phosphorus removal in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process: roles of extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Zeng, Raymond J; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-10-15

    Phosphorus-accumulating organisms are considered to be the key microorganisms in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. A large amount of phosphorus is found in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix of these microorganisms. However, the roles of EPS in phosphorus removal have not been fully understood. In this study, the phosphorus in the EBPR sludge was fractionated and further analyzed using quantitative (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The amounts and forms of phosphorus in EPS as well as their changes in an anaerobic-aerobic process were also investigated. EPS could act as a reservoir for phosphorus in the anaerobic-aerobic process. About 5-9% of phosphorus in sludge was reserved in the EPS at the end of the aerobic phase and might further contribute to the phosphorus removal. The chain length of the intracellular long-chain polyphosphate (polyP) decreased in the anaerobic phase and then recovered under aerobic conditions. However, the polyP in the EPS had a much shorter chain length than the intracellular polyP in the whole cycle. The migration and transformation of various forms of phosphorus among microbial cells, EPS, and bulk liquid were also explored. On the basis of these results, a model with a consideration of the roles of EPS was proposed, which is beneficial to elucidate the mechanism of phosphorus removal in the EBPR system.

  6. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures.

  7. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  8. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  9. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is known to mainly rely on the ability of phosphorus-accumulating organisms to take up, transform and store excess amount of phosphorus (P) inside the cells. However, recent studies have revealed considerable accumulation of P also in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge, implying a non-negligible role of EPS in P removal by EBPR sludge. However, the contribution of EPS to P uptake and the forms of accumulated extracellular P vary substantially in different studies, and the underlying mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EPS remains poorly understood. This review provides a new recognition into the P removal process in EBPR system by incorporating the role of EPS. It overviews on the characteristics of P accumulation in EPS, explores the mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EBPR sludge and EPS, summarizes the main influential factors for the P-accumulation properties of EPS, and discusses the remaining knowledge gaps and needed future efforts that may lead to better understanding and use of such an EPS role for maximizing P recovery from wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and micowave characterization of conductive polyaniline prepared by continous polymerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaf, A.; Bimantoro, A.; Hafizah, M. AE; Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Results of synthesized polyaniline (PANi) prepared by a continuous polymerization process is reported. The purpose of this research is to obtain material absorber which maximum absorption. FTIR spectrum for synthesized PANi showed no double bond absorption peak at 3442 cm-1 which indicates the polymer chain was formed through repetition of single bonds. The results of the electrical conductivity measurement showed the value 17.5 μS/cm for synthesized PANI. The value increased dramatically to 3600, 1520 and 920 μS/cm after the addition of photonic acids of HClO4, H2SO4 and HCl respectively. Those values were obtained through sequences process. Results of particle size distribution confirmed that all synthesized PANi have nanoparticles. In addition, all synthesized PANi have shown electromagnetic wave absorbing properties in the frequency range 12-18 GHz. The best peak Reflection Loss (RL) values -10 dB (˜ 68 % absorption) and -25 dB (˜ 84 %) at 13 and 16.5 GHz respectively obtained on the PANi Emeraldine base (PANi-EB).

  11. The microbial fermentation characteristics depend on both carbohydrate source and heat processing: a model experiment with ileo-cannulated pigs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Jørgensen, Henry; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2017-11-01

    The effects of carbohydrate (CHO) source and processing (extrusion cooking) on large intestinal fermentation products were studied in ileo-cannulated pigs as a model for humans. Pigs were fed diets containing barley, pea or a mixture of potato starch:wheat bran (PSWB) either raw or extrusion cooked. Extrusion cooking reduced the amount of starch fermented in the large intestine by 52-96% depending on the CHO source and the total pool of butyrate in the distal small intestine + large intestine by on average 60% across diets. Overall, extrusion cooking caused a shift in the composition of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced towards more acetate and less propionate and butyrate. The CHO source and processing highly affected the fermentation characteristics and extrusion cooking generally reduced large intestinal fermentation and resulted in a less desirable composition of the fermentation products. The latter outcome is non-conducive to a healthy large intestinal environment and its resulting metabolic health.

  12. Carbohydrates: functionality in foods.

    PubMed

    Chinachoti, P

    1995-04-01

    Many functional requirements are met by the use of simple and complex carbohydrates in food. Carbohydrates offer a wide range of rheological and other properties, including solubility, cryoprotection, sweetening effect, hygroscopicity, crystallization inhibition, flavor encapsulation, and coating ability. These properties are based on chemical structure and interactions with other molecules through hydrogen bonding, ionic effect, and the formation of complexes with lipids and proteins. The ability to understand these properties directly affects the development of food products and processes. Thus, the functionality of carbohydrates in foods integrates precise knowledge of chemical structure and behavior with practical applications in the development and preparation of foods.

  13. Silicoaluminates as “Support Activator” Systems in Olefin Polymerization Processes

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Vanessa; Camejo, Claudimar; Terreros, Pilar; Alba, María Dolores; Cuenca, Tomás

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report the polymerization behaviour of natural clays (montmorillonites, MMT) as activating supports. These materials have been modified by treatment with different aluminium compounds in order to obtain enriched aluminium clays and to modify the global Brönsted/Lewis acidity. As a consequence, the intrinsic structural properties of the starting materials have been changed. These changes were studied and these new materials used for ethylene polymerization using a zirconocene complex as catalyst. All the systems were shown to be active in ethylene polymerization. The catalyst activity and the dependence on acid strength and textural properties have been also studied. The behaviour of an artificial silica (SBA 15) modified with an aluminium compound to obtain a silicoaluminate has been studied, but no ethylene polymerization activity has been found yet.

  14. Thermal plasma process for recovering monomers and high value carbons from polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Richard; Grossmann, Elihu D.; Guddeti, Ravikishan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of recycling polymeric waste products into monomers and high value forms of carbon by pyrolytic conversion using an induction coupled RF plasma heated reactor.

  15. Defense University Research Initiative on Nanotechnology: Microstructure, Processing and Mechanical Performance of Polymeric Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-31

    and macroscopic properties of polymeric based nanocomposites . Blending of 0-, 1-, and 2- dimensional inorganic fillers such as POSS, carbon nanotubes...properties of polymeric based nanocomposites . Blending of 0-, 1-, and 2- dimensional inorganic fillers such as POSS, carbon nanotubes, and nano-clay... based nanocomposites at the molecular level has been performed by Capaldi, Boyce and Rutledge. By comparison of experimental and computed crystal

  16. Influence of thermally processed carbohydrate/amino acid mixtures on the fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Andreas; Elss, Sandra; Frischmann, Matthias; Tellez, Patricia; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2004-04-07

    The production of alcoholic beverages such as Tequila, Mezcal, whiskey, or beer includes the fermentation of a mash containing Maillard reaction products. Because excessive heating of the mash can lead to complications during the following fermentation step, the impact of Maillard products on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. For this purpose, fermentation was carried out in a model system in the presence and absence of Maillard reaction products and formation of ethanol served as a marker for the progression of fermentation. We found that increasing amounts of Maillard products reduced the formation of ethanol up to 80%. This effect was dependent on the pH value during the Maillard reaction, reaction time, as well as the carbohydrate and amino acid component used for the generation of Maillard reaction products. Another important factor is the pH value during fermentation: The inhibitory effect of Maillard products was not detectable at a pH of 4 and increased with higher pH-values. These findings might be of relevance for the production of above-mentioned beverages.

  17. Photothermal heating as a methodology for post processing of polymeric nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorga, Russell; Clarke, Laura; Bochinski, Jason; Viswanath, Vidya; Maity, Somsubhra; Dong, Ju; Firestone, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles embedded within polymeric systems can be made to act as localized heat sources thereby aiding in-situ polymer processing. This is made possible by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mediated photothermal effect of metal (in this case gold) nanoparticles, wherein incident light absorbed by the nanoparticle generates a non-equilibrium electron distribution which subsequently transfers this energy into the surrounding medium, resulting in a temperature increase in the immediate region around the particle. Here we demonstrate this effect in polymer nanocomposite systems, specifically electrospun polyethylene oxide nanofibrous mats, which have been annealed at temperatures above the glass transition. A non-contact temperature measurement technique utilizing embedded fluorophores (perylene) has been used to monitor the average temperature within samples. The effect of annealing methods (conventional and photothermal) and annealing conditions (temperature and time) on the fiber morphology, overall crystallinity, and mechanical properties is discussed. This methodology is further utilized in core-sheath nanofibers to crosslink the core material, which is a pre-cured epoxy thermoset. NSF Grant CMMI-1069108.

  18. Fabrication of robust micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhong, Yawen; Gong, Jianliang; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Ma, Zhi

    2011-02-15

    Here, we present the preparation of thermally stable and solvent resistant micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and sequent vulcanization, with a commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-polystyrene (SIS). The vulcanized honeycomb structured SIS films became self-supported and resistant to a wide range of organic solvents and thermally stable up to 350°C for 2h, an increase of more than 300K as compared to the uncross-linked films. This superior robustness could be attributed to the high degree of polyisoprene cross-linking. The versatility of the methodology was demonstrated by applying to another commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene (SBS). Particularly, hydroxy groups were introduced into SBS by hydroboration. The functionalized two-dimensional micro-patterns feasible for site-directed grafting were created by the hydroxyl-containing polymers. In addition, the fixed microporous structures could be replicated to fabricate textured positive PDMS stamps. This simple technique offers new prospects in the field of micro-patterns, soft lithography and templates.

  19. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  20. Impact of polymeric membrane filtration of oil sands process water on organic compounds quantification.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Kim, Eun-Sik; Alpatova, Alla; Sun, Nian; Smith, Scott; Kang, Seoktae; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between organic fractions in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) and three polymeric membranes with varying hydrophilicity (nylon, polyvinylidene fluoride and polytetrafluoroethylene) at different pHs was studied to evaluate the impact of filtration on the quantification of acid-extractable fraction (AEF) and naphthenic acids (NAs). Four functional groups predominated in OSPW (amine, phosphoryl, carboxyl and hydroxyl) as indicated by the linear programming method. The nylon membranes were the most hydrophilic and exhibited the lowest AEF removal at pH of 8.7. However, the adsorption of AEF on the membranes increased as the pH of OSPW decreased due to hydrophobic interactions between the membrane surfaces and the protonated molecules. The use of ultra pressure liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC/HRMS) showed insignificant adsorption of NAs on the tested membranes at pH 8.7. However, 26±2.4% adsorption of NAs was observed at pH 5.3 following the protonation of NAs species. For the nylon membrane, excessive carboxylic acids in the commercial NAs caused the formation of negatively charged assisted hydrogen bonds, resulting in increased adsorption at pH 8.2 (25%) as compared to OSPW (0%). The use of membranes for filtration of soluble compounds from complex oily wastewaters before quantification analysis of AEF and NAs should be examined prior to application.

  1. Removal of dye by carboxymethyl cellulose, acrylamide and graphene oxide via a free radical polymerization process.

    PubMed

    Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Sadiku, Emmanuel Rotimi

    2017-05-15

    Carboxymethyl cellulose has been used for the design of novel engineered hydrogels in order to obtain effective three-dimensional structures for industrial applications. In this work, dye removal carboxymethyl cellulose-acrylamide-graphene oxide (CMC-AM-GO) hydrogels were prepared by a free-radical polymerization method. The GO was developed by the modified Hummers method. The CMC-AM-GO and GO were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling and swelling kinetics were calculated using gravimetric process. The kinetic parameter, swelling exponent values [n=0.59-0.7507] explained the fact that the CMC-AM-GO hydrogles have super Case II diffusion transport mechanism. CMCx-AM-GO (x=1-4) and CMC-AM hydrogels were used for removal of Acid Blue-133. The result explains that composite hydrogels significantly removed the acid blue when compared to the neat hydrogel. The maximum AB absorption (185.45mg/g) capacity was found in the case of CMC2-AM-GO hydrogel. Therefore, cellulose-based GO hydrogels can be termed as smart systems for the abstraction of dye in water purification applications.

  2. Real-time measurements of crystallization processes in viscoelastic polymeric photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Snoswell, David R E; Finlayson, Chris E; Zhao, Qibin; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the dynamic shear ordering of viscoelastic photonic crystals, based on core-shell polymeric composite particles. Using an adapted shear-cell arrangement, the crystalline ordering of the material under conditions of oscillatory shear is interrogated in real time, through both video imaging and from the optical transmission spectra of the cell. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the macroscopic influences of shear on the crystallization process in this solvent-free system, the development of bulk ordering is studied as a function of the key parameters including duty cycle and shear-strain magnitude. In particular, optimal ordering is observed from a prerandomized sample at shear strains of around 160%, for 1-Hz oscillations. This ordering reaches completion over time scales of order 10 s. These observations suggest significant local strains are needed to drive nanoparticles through energy barriers, and that local creep is needed to break temporal symmetry in such high-viscosity nanoassemblies. Crystal shear-melting effects are also characterized under conditions of constant shear rate. These quantitative experiments aim to stimulate the development of theoretical models which can deal with the strong local particle interactions in this system.

  3. Development of silver nanoparticle loaded antibacterial polymer mesh using plasma polymerization process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Jolivalt, Claude; Pulpytel, Jerome; Jafari, Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2013-04-01

    Plasma polymerized polyacrylic acid (PPAA) was deposited on a polymer substrate, namely polyethylene terephthalate (PET) mesh, for entrapment of silver nanoparticle (Ag-NP) in order to achieve antibacterial property to the material. Carboxylic groups of PPAA act as anchor as well as capping and stabilizing agents for Ag-NPs synthesized by chemical reduction method using NaBH(4) as a reducing agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and water contact angle analysis were used to characterize the PPAA coatings. The Ag-NPs loaded polymer samples were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and XPS techniques. XPS analysis showed ~1.0 at.% loading of Ag-NPs on to the PPAA-PET-mesh, which was composed of 79% zero-valent (Ag°) and 21% oxidized nano-Ag (Ag(+) ). The plasma processed PET meshes samples were tested for antibacterial activity against two bacterial strains, namely Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram negative). Qualitative and quantitative tests showed that silver containing PPAA-PET meshes exhibit excellent antibacterial property against the tested bacteria with percent reduction of bacterial concentration >99%, compared to the untreated PET mesh.

  4. Real-time measurements of crystallization processes in viscoelastic polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoswell, David R. E.; Finlayson, Chris E.; Zhao, Qibin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the dynamic shear ordering of viscoelastic photonic crystals, based on core-shell polymeric composite particles. Using an adapted shear-cell arrangement, the crystalline ordering of the material under conditions of oscillatory shear is interrogated in real time, through both video imaging and from the optical transmission spectra of the cell. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the macroscopic influences of shear on the crystallization process in this solvent-free system, the development of bulk ordering is studied as a function of the key parameters including duty cycle and shear-strain magnitude. In particular, optimal ordering is observed from a prerandomized sample at shear strains of around 160%, for 1-Hz oscillations. This ordering reaches completion over time scales of order 10 s. These observations suggest significant local strains are needed to drive nanoparticles through energy barriers, and that local creep is needed to break temporal symmetry in such high-viscosity nanoassemblies. Crystal shear-melting effects are also characterized under conditions of constant shear rate. These quantitative experiments aim to stimulate the development of theoretical models which can deal with the strong local particle interactions in this system.

  5. Cellulases without carbohydrate-binding modules in high consistency ethanol production process.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Annukka; Haven, Mai Ostergaard; Djajadi, Demi Tristan; Várnai, Anikó; Puranen, Terhi; Viikari, Liisa

    2014-02-21

    Enzymes still comprise a major part of ethanol production costs from lignocellulose raw materials. Irreversible binding of enzymes to the residual substrate prevents their reuse and no efficient methods for recycling of enzymes have so far been presented. Cellulases without a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) have been found to act efficiently at high substrate consistencies and to remain non-bound after the hydrolysis. High hydrolysis yields could be obtained with thermostable enzymes of Thermoascus aurantiacus containing only two main cellulases: cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I), Cel7A and endoglucanase II (EG II), Cel5A. The yields were decreased by only about 10% when using these cellulases without CBM. A major part of enzymes lacking CBM was non-bound during the most active stage of hydrolysis and in spite of this, produced high sugar yields. Complementation of the two cellulases lacking CBM with CBH II (CtCel6A) improved the hydrolysis. Cellulases without CBM were more sensitive during exposure to high ethanol concentration than the enzymes containing CBM. Enzymes lacking CBM could be efficiently reused leading to a sugar yield of 90% of that with fresh enzymes. The applicability of cellulases without CBM was confirmed under industrial ethanol production conditions at high (25% dry matter (DM)) consistency. The results clearly show that cellulases without CBM can be successfully used in the hydrolysis of lignocellulose at high consistency, and that this approach could provide new means for better recyclability of enzymes. This paper provides new insight into the efficient action of CBM-lacking cellulases. The relationship of binding and action of cellulases without CBM at high DM consistency should, however, be studied in more detail.

  6. Cellulases without carbohydrate-binding modules in high consistency ethanol production process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Enzymes still comprise a major part of ethanol production costs from lignocellulose raw materials. Irreversible binding of enzymes to the residual substrate prevents their reuse and no efficient methods for recycling of enzymes have so far been presented. Cellulases without a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) have been found to act efficiently at high substrate consistencies and to remain non-bound after the hydrolysis. Results High hydrolysis yields could be obtained with thermostable enzymes of Thermoascus aurantiacus containing only two main cellulases: cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I), Cel7A and endoglucanase II (EG II), Cel5A. The yields were decreased by only about 10% when using these cellulases without CBM. A major part of enzymes lacking CBM was non-bound during the most active stage of hydrolysis and in spite of this, produced high sugar yields. Complementation of the two cellulases lacking CBM with CBH II (CtCel6A) improved the hydrolysis. Cellulases without CBM were more sensitive during exposure to high ethanol concentration than the enzymes containing CBM. Enzymes lacking CBM could be efficiently reused leading to a sugar yield of 90% of that with fresh enzymes. The applicability of cellulases without CBM was confirmed under industrial ethanol production conditions at high (25% dry matter (DM)) consistency. Conclusions The results clearly show that cellulases without CBM can be successfully used in the hydrolysis of lignocellulose at high consistency, and that this approach could provide new means for better recyclability of enzymes. This paper provides new insight into the efficient action of CBM-lacking cellulases. The relationship of binding and action of cellulases without CBM at high DM consistency should, however, be studied in more detail. PMID:24559384

  7. Distribution and processing of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in the rat hepatocyte: morphological and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions.

    PubMed

    Solari, R; Racine, L; Tallichet, C; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1986-01-01

    The transepithelial transport of polymeric immunoglobulins is an essential process in the mucosal immune system. Transport across the epithelial cells of mucous or exocrine glands is affected by an integral membrane glycoprotein receptor known as membrane secretory component (SCm) or as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). This receptor binds polymeric immunoglobulins at the basolateral cell surface and mediates their transcellular translocation and their release from the apical plasma membrane into external secretions. Release depends on cleavage of the membrane-anchoring domain of the receptor, resulting in liberation of polymeric immunoglobulin bound to the ectoplasmic domain of the receptor (secreted SC or SCs) into extracellular secretions. Using a monoclonal antibody directed against the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor and a polyclonal antibody directed against the secreted ectoplasmic domain, we have combined cell fractionation and Western blotting techniques to examine the fate of these receptor domains in the hepatocyte. In this study, we characterize biochemically and morphologically the various subcellular components separated by our fractionation scheme, and correlate this with biochemical analysis of the receptor in each fraction.

  8. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are 3 major types of carbohydrates: Sugars Starches Fiber Sugars are found naturally in some foods ... syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Starches are found naturally in foods. Your body breaks ...

  9. The Effects of Ground and Space Processing on the Properties of Organic, Polymeric, and Colloidal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossain A.; Witherow, W. K.; Smith, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and phototonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic materials which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials as thin film wave-guides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualifies by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organic-based materials have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices, such as high second-and third-order nonlinearity, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. We discuss the potential role of microgravity processing of a few organic and polymeric materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second-and third-order NLO behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics. The goal of minimizing optical loss obviously depends on processing methods. For solution-based processes, such as solution crystal growth and solution photopolymerization, it is well known that thermal and solutal density gradients can initiate buoyancy-driven convection. Resultant fluid flows can affect transport of material to and from growth interfaces and become manifest in the morphology and homogeneity of the growing film or crystal. Likewise

  10. Modeling protein recognition of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Laederach, Alain; Reilly, Peter J

    2005-09-01

    We have a limited understanding of the details of molecular recognition of carbohydrates by proteins, which is critical to a multitude of biological processes. Furthermore, carbohydrate-modifying proteins such as glycosyl hydrolases and phosphorylases are of growing importance as potential drug targets. Interactions between proteins and carbohydrates have complex thermodynamics, and in general the specific positioning of only a few hydroxyl groups determines their binding affinities. A thorough understanding of both carbohydrate and protein structures is thus essential to predict these interactions. An atomic-level view of carbohydrate recognition through structures of carbohydrate-active enzymes complexed with transition-state inhibitors reveals some of the distinctive molecular features unique to protein-carbohydrate complexes. However, the inherent flexibility of carbohydrates and their often water-mediated hydrogen bonding to proteins makes simulation of their complexes difficult. Nonetheless, recent developments such as the parameterization of specific force fields and docking scoring functions have greatly improved our ability to predict protein-carbohydrate interactions. We review protein-carbohydrate complexes having defined molecular requirements for specific carbohydrate recognition by proteins, providing an overview of the different computational techniques available to model them. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. New carbohydrate-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  12. Functionalized ormosil scaffolds processed by direct laser polymerization for application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Schou, J.; Canulescu, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Albu, C.; Mitu, B.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Mustaciosu, C.; Petcu, I.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Synthesized N,N'-(methacryloyloxyethyl triehtoxy silyl propyl carbamoyl-oxyhexyl)-urea hybrid methacrylate was polymerized by direct laser polymerization using femtosecond laser pulses with the aim of using it for subsequent applications in tissue engineering. The as-obtained scaffolds were modified either by low pressure argon plasma treatment or by covering the structures with two different proteins (lysozyme, fibrinogen). For improved adhesion, the proteins were deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique. The functionalized structures were tested in mouse fibroblasts culture and the cells morphology, proliferation, and attachment were analyzed.

  13. Marked counteranion effects on single-site olefin polymerization processes. Correlations of ion pair structure and dynamics with polymerization activity, chain transfer, and syndioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chou; Roberts, John A S; Marks, Tobin J

    2004-04-14

    Counteranion effects on the rate and stereochemistry of syndiotactic propylene enchainment by the archetypal C(s)-symmetric precatalyst [Me(2)C(Cp)(Flu)]ZrMe(2) (1; Cp = C(5)H(4); Flu = C(13)H(8), fluorenyl) are probed using the cocatalysts MAO (2), B(C(6)F(5))(3) (3)(,) B(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3) (4)(,) Ph(3)C(+)B(C(6)F(5))(4)(-) (5), and Ph(3)C(+)FAl(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3)(-) (6), offering greatly different structural and ion pairing characteristics. Reaction of 1 with 3 affords [Me(2)C(Cp)(Flu)]ZrMe(+) MeB(C(6)F(5))(3)(-) (7). In the case of 4, this reaction leads to formation the micro-methyl dinuclear diastereomers [([Me(2)C(Cp)(Flu)]ZrMe)(2)(micro-Me)](+) MeB(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3)(-) (8). A similar reaction with 6 results in diastereomeric [Me(2)C(Cp)(Flu)]ZrMe(+) FAl(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3)(-) (10) ion pairs. The molecular structures of 7 and 10 have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Reorganization pathways available to these species have been examined using EXSY and dynamic NMR, revealing that the cation-MeB(C(6)F(5))(3)(-) interaction is considerably weaker/more mobile than in the FAl(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3)(-)-derived analogue. Polymerizations mediated by 1 in toluene over the temperature range of -10 degrees to +60 degrees C and at 1.0-5.0 atm propylene pressure (at 60 degrees C) reveal that activity, product syndiotacticity, m and mm stereodefect generation, and chain transfer processes are highly sensitive to the nature of the ion pairing. Thus, the complexes activated with 4 and 5, having the weakest ion pairing, yield the highest estimated propagation rates, while with 6, having the strongest pairing, yields the lowest. The strongly coordinating, immobile FAl(2-C(6)F(5)C(6)F(4))(3)(-) anion produces the highest/least temperature-dependent product syndiotacticity, lowest/least temperature-dependent m stereodefect abundance, and highest product molecular weight. These polypropylene microstructural parameters, and also M(w), are least

  14. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  15. Antioxidant and Carbohydrate-Hydrolysing Enzymes Potential of Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz (Cucurbitaceae) Peel, Leaves and Pulp Fresh and Processed.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Bonesi, Marco; Menichini, Francesco; Tenuta, Maria Concetta; Leporini, Mariarosaria; Tundis, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Sechum edule peel, leaves and pulp were investigated for their chemical composition (total phenol, flavonoid, carotenoid and vitamin C content), and for antioxidant activity and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzymes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) inhibition. In order to evaluate the incidence of cooking process on retention of healthy phytochemicals, the pulp was subjected to different treatments (grill roasting, domestic oven baking, microwave cooking, blanching and steaming). Cooking processes reduced the total phenol content (58.5 mg/g extract for fresh pulp vs 26.3 and 29.3 mg/g extract for roasted and steamed samples, respectively). Pulp was found to be the most active in 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) (IC50 of 0.1 mg/mL), whereas peel showed the highest activity in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test (IC50 of 0.4 mg/mL). Moreover, peel exhibited the highest inhibitory activity against α-amylase with an IC50 of 0.2 mg/mL, except for steamed cooking process, which drastically influenced the bioactivity against both enzymes.

  16. Food processing methods influence the glycaemic indices of some commonly eaten West Indian carbohydrate-rich foods.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, P S; Wheatley, A O; Ahmad, M H; Morrison, E Y St A; Asemota, H N

    2006-09-01

    Glycaemic index (GI) values for fourteen commonly eaten carbohydrate-rich foods processed by various methods were determined using ten healthy subjects. The foods studied were round leaf yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis), negro and lucea yams (Dioscorea rotundata), white and sweet yams (Dioscorea alata), sweet potato (Solanum tuberosum), Irish potato (Ipomoea batatas), coco yam (Xanthosoma spp.), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), green banana (Musa sapientum), and green and ripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca). The foods were processed by boiling, frying, baking and roasting where applicable. Pure glucose was used as the standard with a GI value of 100. The results revealed marked differences in GI among the different foods studied ranging from 35 (se 3) to 94 (se 8). The area under the glucose response curve and GI value of some of the roasted and baked foods were significantly higher than foods boiled or fried (P<0.05). The results indicate that foods processed by roasting or baking may result in higher GI. Conversely, boiling of foods may contribute to a lower GI diet.

  17. Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Menezes, Marlon E.; Birnbaum, Howard K.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2002-01-29

    A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

  18. Organic Polymeric Electro-Optic Materials: Synthesis, Processing and Device Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    A number of polymeric second and third order nonlinear optical materials were designed and synthesized. The materials were characterized for their...performed.... Electro-Optic Effects, Guided Wave Devices, Organic Polymers, Nonlinear Optical Materials , Langmuir-Blodgett Films, Second Harmonic Generation

  19. Enhancement of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production in Spirulina (Arthrospira sp.) by two-step cultivation process and partial characterization of their polysaccharidic moiety.

    PubMed

    Chentir, Imene; Hamdi, Marwa; Doumandji, Amel; HadjSadok, Abelkader; Ouada, Hatem Ben; Nasri, Moncef; Jridi, Mourad

    2017-07-05

    The interactive effects of light intensity and NaCl concentration were investigated for Spirulina two-step cultivation process using Full Factorial Design. In the experiment interval, light intensity had no effect while the NaCl concentration had significant effect on the enhancement of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production. Interestingly, results revealed a significant negative interaction between light and NaCl concentration indicating that high NaCl concentration (40gL(-1)) and low light intensity (10μmol photons m(-2)s(-1)) enhanced the EPS production. Under these conditions, EPS production reached a maximum of 1.02gg(-1) of biomass (dry weight), which is 1.67-folds greater than EPS content under optimal growth conditions (10μmol photons m(-2)s(-1), 1gL(-1), 30°C). Desalting and deproteinezation steps of EPS were efficient to obtain polysaccharides (PS) with high carbohydrate (67.3±1.1%), low soluble proteins (5.14±0.32%), ash (5.85±0.71%) and sulfate (2.42±0.12%) contents. Rheological studies of PS at different concentrations (1%, 2.5% and 5%) revealed that the viscosity of the solution increased with the increase of PS concentration. In addition, PS exhibited a non Newtonian shear-thinning nature, a predominant gel-like behavior and a good resistance to consecutive heating-cooling cycles. The adopted process could be, then, a promising and economic strategy to enhance EPS production and extract polysaccharides with interesting rheological properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving conducting polymer electrochromic speeds and depositing aligned polymeric nanofibers by electrospinning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemota, Chris I.

    The effects of film thickness and porosity on electrochromic switching time of conducting polymers was pursued to determine the morphology influence on ions transport during oxidation step of the redox process, affording sub-second or seconds switching times. Electrospinning technique provided non-woven nanofiber mats, while spin coating and electropolymerization of monomer (N3T) provided films. Porosity decreased as depositing method changed from electrospinning to spin coating. In electrochemical oxidation, the electrons leave the polymer at the metal electrode-polymer film interface, and counter ions arrive at the polaron-bipolaron sites left in the polymer, through polymer-electrolyte interface. Counter ion diffusion in conducting polymers are film thickness limited at increasing thickness and inability of ions to reach holes sites on the oxidizing polymer accounts for long switching speeds, introducing extensive and micro pores and high surface areas should lead to decreasing electrochromic switching speed to single digit time in seconds (for display and vision applications), while increasing the maximum optical switching contrast due to increased fiber mat thicknesses. Photolithographic patterning of nanofiber mats of the conducting polymer precursor having photo cross-linking unit was also explored. The photo-crosslinkable polymer was prepared by including norborene methacrylate (NMA) units to the polymer backbone during precursor polymerization, yielding a terpolymer poly(N3T-NA-NMA). The influence of photo crosslinking on electrochemical switching in conducting polymer nanofibers, and effect of developing parameters (solvent and time) on pattern transfer to the nanofiber mat was investigated and showed no influence on the electrochemical redox of the polymer. Solvents suitable for dissolving the polymer were investigated as developers with results showing non-differentiable pattern transfer for all suitable solvents, and no net preference to solvent choice

  1. Role of impurity molecules in radiation-initiated processes in solid carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kavetskii, V.G.; Yudin, I.V.

    1992-09-01

    Extension of the use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medicinal preparations is stimulating the study of radiation-initiated processes in solid polyhydroxyl matrixes containing impurities of various organic substances. Such investigations make it possible to establish common characteristics of the effect of impurity molecules on the radiolysis of organic crystals. The materials of the investigation were lactose and rhamnose, precipitated by slow evaporation of the solvent from saturated aqueous solutions with different dihydroxyacetone contents. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Observation of an exothermic process associated with the in vitro polymerization of brain tubulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, S A; Velicelebi, G; Sutherland, J W; Sturtevant, J M

    1980-01-01

    The polymerization of tubulin has been studied with a high-sensitivity differential scanning microcalorimeter, with results which indicate that microtubule assembly can proceed via one or possibly two exothermic reactions. The amount of heat evolution has been found to be far in excess of GTP hydrolysis. The heat liberated has been observed to depend strongly upon the exact experimental conditions, varying from many hundreds of kilocalories per mole of tubulin dimer when dilute tubulin solutions are heated rapidly to a few kilocalories per mole of tubulin dimer when concentrated tubulin solutions are heated slowly. The results are tentatively interpreted in terms of the existence of at least two pathways for the formation of energetically distinct polymers. These findings indicate the importance of kinetic factors in studying tubulin polymerization. PMID:6933494

  3. Dispersion polymerization of methyl acrylate in nonpolar solvent stabilized by block copolymers formed in situ via the RAFT process.

    PubMed

    Houillot, Lisa; Bui, Chuong; Farcet, Céline; Moire, Claudine; Raust, Jacques-Antoine; Pasch, Harald; Save, Maud; Charleux, Bernadette

    2010-02-01

    The free-radical dispersion polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) in isododecane was carried out in the presence of a poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) macromolecular RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) agent bearing a trithiocarbonate reactive group in the middle of the chain (P2EHA-TTC). The presence of the trithiocarbonate function was crucial for the synthesis of monodisperse colloidal poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) particles stabilized by the P2EHA segments. The hydrodynamic diameters ranged from 100 to 300 nm, using particularly low amounts of the macro(RAFT agent) (1-6 wt % vs. MA) in dispersion polymerizations carried out at 20 wt % solids content. As shown by 2D liquid chromatography, P2EHA-b-PMA or P2EHA-b-PMA-b-P2EHA block copolymers formed in situ at the early stage of the dispersion polymerization due to the reversible transfer process and played the role of particle stabilizer. The glass-transition temperature of the derived polymer films was not affected by the low amount of the chosen macromolecular stabilizer and the mechanical properties were mainly those of PMA, which makes the technique very attractive for coating applications.

  4. Healthy carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  5. Clustered Carbohydrates in Synthetic Vaccines†

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Are there general rules to achieve efficient immunization against carbohydrate antigens? Thanks to technological advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry we entered in a new era in which the rational design of carbohydrate vaccines has become an achievable goal. Aim of this Tutorial Review is to present the most recent achievements in the field of semi and fully synthetic carbohydrate vaccines against viruses, bacteria and cancer. It is also pointed out that the understanding of the chemical and biochemical processes related to immunization allows the modern chemist to rationally design carbohydrate vaccines with improved efficiency. PMID:23250562

  6. A Spatially Continuous Model of Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport Processes in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Arun S; Brooks, Stephen P J; Kalmokoff, Martin; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-01-01

    A spatially continuous mathematical model of transport processes, anaerobic digestion and microbial complexity as would be expected in the human colon is presented. The model is a system of first-order partial differential equations with context determined number of dependent variables, and stiff, non-linear source terms. Numerical simulation of the model is used to elucidate information about the colon-microbiota complex. It is found that the composition of materials on outflow of the model does not well-describe the composition of material in other model locations, and inferences using outflow data varies according to model reactor representation. Additionally, increased microbial complexity allows the total microbial community to withstand major system perturbations in diet and community structure. However, distribution of strains and functional groups within the microbial community can be modified depending on perturbation length and microbial kinetic parameters. Preliminary model extensions and potential investigative opportunities using the computational model are discussed.

  7. A Spatially Continuous Model of Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport Processes in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Arun S.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Kalmokoff, Martin; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    A spatially continuous mathematical model of transport processes, anaerobic digestion and microbial complexity as would be expected in the human colon is presented. The model is a system of first-order partial differential equations with context determined number of dependent variables, and stiff, non-linear source terms. Numerical simulation of the model is used to elucidate information about the colon-microbiota complex. It is found that the composition of materials on outflow of the model does not well-describe the composition of material in other model locations, and inferences using outflow data varies according to model reactor representation. Additionally, increased microbial complexity allows the total microbial community to withstand major system perturbations in diet and community structure. However, distribution of strains and functional groups within the microbial community can be modified depending on perturbation length and microbial kinetic parameters. Preliminary model extensions and potential investigative opportunities using the computational model are discussed. PMID:26680208

  8. Is the biocompatibility of copper with polymerized natural coating dependent on the potential selected for the electropolymerization process?

    PubMed

    Bertuola, M; Grillo, C A; Pissinis, D E; Prieto, E D; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M

    2017-08-24

    With the intention of taking care of the environment and human health, the development of alternative eco-friendly methods to inhibit metal corrosion is intensively encouraged. In previous works we showed that some phytocompounds components of essential oils such as carvacrol (Carv) and thymol (TOH) are able to be electropolymerized on metals and they seem to be promissory for this purpose. The aim this paper is to investigate if the biocompatibility of copper covered by coatings formed by electropolymerization of Carv and TOH (polyCarv and polyTOH) is related with the potential selected for the electropolymerization process. Potentiostatic perturbations at different potentials, AFM images, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and measurements of copper ions release provided suitable information to make a detailed analysis of different stages of the electropolymerization process that leads to polyCarv and polyTOH layers on copper surface. The change of the characteristics of the coatings over time was evaluated after several polymerization periods and current transients were interpreted by using nucleation and growth models. Results showed interesting changes in the polymerization process with the electrochemical perturbation, nature of the isomer, and time of the treatment. The treatment that provides the most protective, transparent and homogeneous layer, that strongly increased the biocompatibility of Cu could be selected: electropolymerization of Carv at 0.4V. Results highlight the importance of the detailed study of the evolution of the electropolymerization processes to select the best ecofriendly condition due the high impact of potential perturbation and polarization time on the biocompatibility of the resulting polymeric layer-copper system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Probing Carbohydrate Product Expulsion from a Processive Cellulase with Multiple Absolute Binding Free Energy Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shirts, Michael R.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, −14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and −11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are −13.1, −6.0, −11.5, −7.5, and −8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  10. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates A A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  11. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... source of energy for the body. What Are Carbohydrates? There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  12. Heat capacity changes in carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Chavelas, Eneas A; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2009-05-13

    Carbohydrates are crucial for living cells, playing myriads of functional roles that range from being structural or energy-storage devices to molecular labels that, through non-covalent interaction with proteins, impart exquisite selectivity in processes such as molecular trafficking and cellular recognition. The molecular bases that govern the recognition between carbohydrates and proteins have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, we have obtained a surface-area-based model for the formation heat capacity of protein-carbohydrate complexes, which includes separate terms for the contributions of the two molecular types. The carbohydrate model, which was calibrated using carbohydrate dissolution data, indicates that the heat capacity contribution of a given group surface depends on its position in the saccharide molecule, a picture that is consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies showing that the high abundance of hydroxy groups in carbohydrates yields particular solvation properties. This model was used to estimate the carbohydrate's contribution in the formation of a protein-carbohydrate complex, which in turn was used to obtain the heat capacity change associated with the protein's binding site. The model is able to account for protein-carbohydrate complexes that cannot be explained using a previous model that only considered the overall contribution of polar and apolar groups, while allowing a more detailed dissection of the elementary contributions that give rise to the formation heat capacity effects of these adducts.

  13. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  14. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  15. Recovery of cadmium from waste of scallop processing with amidoxime adsorbent synthesized by graft-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Tomoyuki; Tamada, Masao; Saito, Kyouichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2003-01-01

    Fabric adsorbent having amidoxime function was synthesized by radiation-induced graft-polymerization. This adsorbent was applied to the removal of Cd from the scallop waste. The scallop waste was homogenized as a pre-treatment. The obtained top layer was used for the Cd absorption experiment at various pH conditions. At pH 6, the adsorbent showed the highest performance in Cd adsorption. The concentration factor was thousand for Cd. Preliminary column experiment was also carried out. The amidoxime adsorbent recovered 96.1% of Cd in the waste solution.

  16. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Liepins, Leila Z.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO.sub.3 +RCHO.fwdarw.AG.sup.0 +RCOOH and R.sub.3 M.fwdarw.M.sup.0 3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R.sub.3 M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone.

  17. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Liepins, Leila Z.

    1993-01-01

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO.sub.3 +RCHO.fwdarw.Ag.degree.+RCOOH and R.sub.3 M.fwdarw.M.degree.+3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R.sub.3 M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone.

  18. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1993-12-21

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers are described. The in situ reactions: AgNO[sub 3] + RCHO [yields] Ag + RCOOH and R[sub 3]M [yields] M + 3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R[sub 3]M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrone.

  19. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1987-08-27

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO/sub 3/ + RCHO ..-->.. Ag/sup 0/ + RCOOH and R/sub 3/M ..-->.. M/sup 0/ + 3R, where M = Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high- temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R/sub 3/M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone. 3 tabs.

  20. Using in-situ polymerization of conductive polymers to enhance the electrical properties of solution-processed carbon nanotube films and fibers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ranulfo; Pan, Lijia; Fuller, Gerald G; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-07-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites typically have limited conductivity due to a low concentration of nanotubes and the insulating nature of the polymers used. Here we combined a method to align carbon nanotubes with in-situ polymerization of conductive polymer to form composite films and fibers. Use of the conducting polymer raised the conductivity of the films by 2 orders of magnitude. On the other hand, CNT fiber formation was made possible with in-situ polymerization to provide more mechanical support to the CNTs from the formed conducting polymer. The carbon nanotube/conductive polymer composite films and fibers had conductivities of 3300 and 170 S/cm, respectively. The relatively high conductivities were attributed to the polymerization process, which doped both the SWNTs and the polymer. In-situ polymerization can be a promising solution-processable method to enhance the conductivity of carbon nanotube films and fibers.

  1. Organocatalytic synthesis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Jacek; Gut, Bartosz

    2012-01-21

    The key role of carbohydrates in biological processes and their visible existence in our everyday life have stimulated the interest of leading research groups on the smart and simple synthesis of common and rare sugar molecules. Now, more than 120 years after Fischer's first synthesis of (D)-glucose (1890), we are witnessing important development in this field of total synthesis. Using modern methods of direct activation of carbonyl compounds chemists can prepare sugars in an elegant and efficient way similar to that of Nature. This tutorial review presents recent impressive progress in the area of de novo synthesis of carbohydrates by using organocatalytic direct aldol reaction as a key step.

  2. Analysis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: An update for 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J

    2009-01-01

    This review is the third update of the original review, published in 1999, on the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry to the analysis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates and brings the topic to the end of 2004. Both fundamental studies and applications are covered. The main topics include methodological developments, matrices, fragmentation of carbohydrates and applications to large polymeric carbohydrates from plants, glycans from glycoproteins and those from various glycolipids. Other topics include the use of MALDI MS to study enzymes related to carbohydrate biosynthesis and degradation, its use in industrial processes, particularly biopharmaceuticals and its use to monitor products of chemical synthesis where glycodendrimers and carbohydrate-protein complexes are highlighted.

  3. Development of Polymeric Waste Forms for the Encapsulation of Toxic Wastes Using an Emulsion-Encapsulation Based Process

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Quach, A.; Birnie, D. P.; Saez, A. E.; Ela, W. P.; Zeliniski, B. J. J.; Xia, G.; Smith, H.

    2003-01-01

    Developed technologies in vitrification, cement, and polymeric materials manufactured using flammable organic solvents have been used to encapsulate solid wastes, including low-level radioactive materials, but are impractical for high salt-content waste streams (Maio, 1998). In this work, we investigate an emulsification process for producing an aqueous-based polymeric waste form as a preliminary step towards fabricating hybrid organic/inorganic polyceram matrices. The material developed incorporates epoxy resin and polystyrene-butadiene (PSB) latex to produce a waste form that is non-flammable, light weight, of relatively low cost, and that can be loaded to a relatively high weight content of waste materials. Sodium nitrate was used as a model for the salt waste. Small-scale samples were manufactured and analyzed using leach tests designed to measure the diffusion coefficient and leachability index for the fastest diffusing species in the waste form, the salt ions. The microstructure and composition of the samples were probed using SEM/EDS techniques. The results show that some portion of the salt migrates towards the exterior surfaces of the waste forms during the curing process. A portion of the salt in the interior of the sample is contained in polymer corpuscles or sacs. These sacs are embedded in a polymer matrix phase that contains fine, well-dispersed salt crystals. The diffusion behavior observed in sections of the waste forms indicates that samples prepared using this emulsion process meet or exceed the leachability criteria suggested for low level radioactivity waste forms.

  4. Fluidic Processing of High-Performance ZIF-8 Membranes on Polymeric Hollow Fibers: Mechanistic Insights and Microstructure Control

    DOE PAGES

    Eum, Kiwon; Rownaghi, Ali; Choi, Dalsu; ...

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a methodology for fabricating polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) membranes has been introduced – referred to as interfacial microfluidic membrane processing – which allows parallelizable fabrication of MOF membranes inside polymeric hollow fibers of microscopic diameter. Such hollow fiber membranes, when bundled together into modules, are an attractive way to scale molecular sieving membranes. The understanding and engineering of fluidic processing techniques for MOF membrane fabrication are in their infancy. Here in this work, a detailed mechanistic understanding of MOF (ZIF-8) membrane growth under microfluidic conditions in polyamide-imide hollow fibers is reported, without any intermediate steps (such as seeding ormore » surface modification) or post-synthesis treatments. A key finding is that interfacial membrane formation in the hollow fiber occurs via an initial formation of two distinct layers and the subsequent rearrangement into a single layer. This understanding is used to show how nonisothermal processing allows fabrication of thinner (5 μm) ZIF-8 films for higher throughput, and furthermore how engineering the polymeric hollow fiber support microstructure allows control of defects in the ZIF-8 membranes. Finally, the performance of these engineered ZIF-8 membranes is then characterized, which have H2/C3H8 and C3H6/C3H8 mixture separation factors as high as 2018 and 65, respectively, and C3H6 permeances as high as 66 GPU.« less

  5. Investigating the Use of Polymeric Binders in Twin Screw Melt Granulation Process for Improving Compactibility of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Batra, Amol; Desai, Dipen; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, the melt granulation for pharmaceutical products was performed at low temperature (<90°C) with high-shear granulators using low-melting waxy binders, and tablets produced using such granules were not amenable to large-scale manufacturing. The situation has changed in recent years by the use of twin screw extruder where the processing temperature could be increased to as high as 180°C and polymers with high Tg could be used as binders. In this study, different polymeric binders were screened for their suitability in improving compactibility of 2 drugs, metformin hydrochloride and acetaminophen, by twin screw melt granulation. Processing temperatures for the 2 drugs were set at 180°C and 130°C, respectively. Screw configuration, screw speed, and feed rate were optimized such that all polymeric binders used produced granules. Several hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and methacrylate-based polymers, including Klucel(®) EXF, Eudragit(®) EPO, and Soluplus(®), demonstrated good tablet tensile strength (>2 MPa) when granules were produced using only 10% wt/wt polymer concentration. Certain polymers provided acceptable compactibility even at 5% wt/wt. Thus, twin screw melt granulation process may be used with different polymers at a wide range of temperature. Due to low excipient concentration, this granulation method is especially suitable for high-dose tablets.

  6. Structure modification and extracellular polymeric substances conversion during sewage sludge biodrying process.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Krafft, Thomas; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Wang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Biodrying, an economical and energy-saving biomass waste treatment, removes water from waste using the biological heat generated by organic matter degradation. Technical limitations associated with dewatering complicate the biodrying of sewage sludge. This study investigated the sludge alteration associated with its water removal, focusing on sludge form, extracellular polymeric substances, and free water release. An auto-feedback control technology was used for the biodrying; a scanning electron microscope was used to record the morphological change; three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to analyze extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) variation, and time domain reflectometry was used to assess the free water release. Over the 20-day biodrying, there was a 62% water removal rate during the first thermophilic phase. Biodrying created a hollow and stratified sludge structure. Aromatic proteins and soluble microbial byproducts in the EPS were significantly degraded. The thermophilic phase was the phase resulting in the greatest free water release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of the polymerization process on composite resistance to chemical degradation by food-simulating liquids.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Wattanapayungkul, P; Chung, S M

    2003-01-01

    This study determined the influence of curing lights and modes on composite resistance to chemical degradation by various food-simulating liquids. Two different types of curing light (Halogen [H]-Elipar Trilight, 3M-ESPE; LED [L]-Freelight, 3M-ESPE) and two curing modes (standard [S]; exponential [E) were evaluated in the study. Forty-five composite (Z100 [3M-ESPE]) specimens were made for each light-curing mode combination (HS, HE, LS and LE). The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of nine and exposed to the following food-simulating liquids (FSL) for one week at 37 degrees C: distilled water, 50% aqueous ethanol solution, heptane and citric acid. Specimens stored in air were used as control. After the one week conditioning period, hardness testing was conducted with a digital microhardness tester (load = 500 gf; dwell time = 15 seconds). Mean hardness (HK)/hardness deterioration (deltaHK) were subsequently computed and data was subjected to analysis using ANOVA/Scheffe's test (p < 0.05). The resistance of composite to chemical degradation by FSL was light/curing mode dependent. Significant differences in HK and deltaHK were observed among the four curing techniques after conditioning in some FSL and air. After conditioning in water and citric acid, specimens polymerized with HE underwent significantly more softening compared to specimens polymerized with HS, LS and LE.

  8. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  9. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  10. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  11. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  12. Preparation of Transparent Bulk TiO2/PMMA Hybrids with Improved Refractive Indices via an in Situ Polymerization Process Using TiO2 Nanoparticles Bearing PMMA Chains Grown by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Fujita, Masato; Idota, Naokazu; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Sugahara, Yoshiyuki

    2016-12-21

    Transparent TiO2/PMMA hybrids with a thickness of 5 mm and improved refractive indices were prepared by in situ polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles bearing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains grown using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and the effect of the chain length of modified PMMA on the dispersibility of modified TiO2 nanoparticles in the bulk hybrids was investigated. The surfaces of TiO2 nanoparticles were modified with both m-(chloromethyl)phenylmethanoyloxymethylphosphonic acid bearing a terminal ATRP initiator and isodecyl phosphate with a high affinity for common organic solvents, leading to sufficient dispersibility of the surface-modified particles in toluene. Subsequently, SI-ATRP of MMA was achieved from the modified surfaces of the TiO2 nanoparticles without aggregation of the nanoparticles in toluene. The molecular weights of the PMMA chains cleaved from the modified TiO2 nanoparticles increased with increases in the prolonging of the polymerization period, and these exhibited a narrow distribution, indicating chain growth controlled by SI-ATRP. The nanoparticles bearing PMMA chains were well-dispersed in MMA regardless of the polymerization period. Bulk PMMA hybrids containing modified TiO2 nanoparticles with a thickness of 5 mm were prepared by in situ polymerization of the MMA dispersion. The transparency of the hybrids depended significantly on the chain length of the modified PMMA on the nanoparticles, because the modified PMMA of low molecular weight induced aggregation of the TiO2 nanoparticles during the in situ polymerization process. The refractive indices of the bulk hybrids could be controlled by adjusting the TiO2 content and could be increased up to 1.566 for 6.3 vol % TiO2 content (1.492 for pristine PMMA).

  13. A Model-based B2B (Batch to Batch) Control for An Industrial Batch Polymerization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Morimasa

    This paper describes overview of a model-based B2B (batch to batch) control for an industrial batch polymerization process. In order to control the reaction temperature precisely, several methods based on the rigorous process dynamics model are employed at all design stage of the B2B control, such as modeling and parameter estimation of the reaction kinetics which is one of the important part of the process dynamics model. The designed B2B control consists of the gain scheduled I-PD/II2-PD control (I-PD with double integral control), the feed-forward compensation at the batch start time, and the model adaptation utilizing the results of the last batch operation. Throughout the actual batch operations, the B2B control provides superior control performance compared with that of conventional control methods.

  14. Influence of polymerization method, curing process, and length of time of storage in water on the residual methyl methacrylate content in dental acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Gulsen; Guvener, Bora; Bural, Canan; Uresin, Yagiz

    2006-02-01

    This study compared the influence of different polymerization methods (heat, auto-, and microwave energy), different curing processes (in the case of heat- and autopolymerized specimens), and length of storage of the polymerized specimens in distilled water at 37 degrees C on the residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) content in dental acrylic resin specimens. Residual MMA of 120 resin specimens were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. For the heat-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were given a long-term terminal boil and then stored in the distilled water for at least 1 day. For the autopolymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were additionally cured in water at 60 degrees C and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. For the microwave-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were stored in the distilled water at least 1 month. The lowest overall residual MMA content was obtained from heat-polymerized specimens that were given a long-term terminal boil cure and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. Different polymerization methods and curing processes have different effects on residual MMA content. It is thus shown that storing a dental acrylic resin specimen in distilled water at 37 degrees C is a simple but effective method of reducing its residual MMA content.

  15. Synthesis of prebiotic carbohydrates derived from cheese whey permeate by a combined process of isomerisation and transgalactosylation.

    PubMed

    Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Copoví, Paula; Olano, Agustín; Moreno, F Javier; Montilla, Antonia

    2013-05-01

    Lactose from cheese whey permeate (WP) was efficiently isomerised to lactulose using egg shell, a food-grade catalyst, and the subsequent transgalactosylation reaction of this mixture with β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans gave rise to a wide array of prebiotic carbohydrates derived from lactose and lactulose. Lactulose obtained by efficient isomerisation of WP (16.1% by weight with respect to the initial amount of lactose) showed great resistance to the hydrolytic action of β-galactosidase from B. circulans, which preferentially hydrolysed lactose, acting as a galactosyl donor and acceptor. Lactulose had capacity as an acceptor, leading to the formation of lactulose-derived oligosaccharides. The enzymatic synthesis was optimised by studying reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, time, enzyme concentration and carbohydrate concentration. The maximum formation of galactooligosaccharides with degrees of polymerisation from 2 to 4 was achieved after 5 h of reaction at pH 6.5 and 50 °C with 300 g kg(-1) carbohydrates and 3 U mL(-1) β-galactosidase. These findings indicate that the transgalactosylation of isomerised WP with β-galactosidase from B. circulans could be a new and efficient method to obtain a mixture with 50% of potentially prebiotic carbohydrates composed of lactulose, and galactooligosaccharides derived from lactose and lactulose. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. An impression of coffee carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Arya, Meenakshi; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2007-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world. It is consumed for its refreshing and stimulating properties. Carbohydrates are the major constituents of coffee beans and serve various functions like binding of aroma, stabilization of foam, formation of sedimentation, and increased viscosity of the extract. The principal low molecular weight carbohydrate is sucrose and no evidence of other simple oligosaccharides has been found. Polysaccharide fraction from green coffee is dominated by arabinogalactan, galactomannan, and cellulose. The polysaccharide content is reduced during roasting due to degradation to low molecular weight carbohydrates (viz., mono and oligosaccharide) and become more extractable. Various methods that can be employed to extract the carbohydrate from roasted coffee are sequential extraction, acid hydroloysis, hot water extraction, enzymatic extraction etc. Carbohydrates from coffee can be quantitatively determined by liquid chromatography, high performance anion exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. Besides improving the organoleptic quality of the coffee beverage, carbohydrates also possess various biological activities such as lowering colon cancer risk. Besides their sheer mass, a variety of evidences testify to the important contribution that the polysaccharide content makes to the character of the final brew. Although a number of chemical and enzymatic methods have been devised to isolate and quantify the carbohydrates of R&G coffee, till date hot water extraction is the only method which can be accepted as a most feasible process and hence, there is wide scope of further research for the efficient and economically viable technology for extraction of carbohydrates from coffee.

  17. Low-digestible carbohydrates in practice.

    PubMed

    Grabitske, Hollie A; Slavin, Joanne L

    2008-10-01

    Low-digestible carbohydrates are carbohydrates that are incompletely or not absorbed in the small intestine but are at least partly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. Fiber, resistant starch, and sugar alcohols are types of low-digestible carbohydrates. Given potential health benefits (including a reduced caloric content, reduced or no effect on blood glucose levels, non-cariogenic effect), the prevalence of low-digestible carbohydrates in processed foods is increasing. Low-digestible carbohydrate fermentation in the gut causes gastrointestinal effects, especially at higher intakes. We review the wide range of low-digestible carbohydrates in food products, offer advice on identifying low-digestible carbohydrates in foods and beverages, and make suggestions for intakes of low-digestible carbohydrates.

  18. Fluidic Processing of High-Performance ZIF-8 Membranes on Polymeric Hollow Fibers: Mechanistic Insights and Microstructure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Kiwon; Rownaghi, Ali; Choi, Dalsu; Bhave, Ramesh R.; Jones, Christopher W.; Nair, Sankar

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a methodology for fabricating polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) membranes has been introduced – referred to as interfacial microfluidic membrane processing – which allows parallelizable fabrication of MOF membranes inside polymeric hollow fibers of microscopic diameter. Such hollow fiber membranes, when bundled together into modules, are an attractive way to scale molecular sieving membranes. The understanding and engineering of fluidic processing techniques for MOF membrane fabrication are in their infancy. Here in this work, a detailed mechanistic understanding of MOF (ZIF-8) membrane growth under microfluidic conditions in polyamide-imide hollow fibers is reported, without any intermediate steps (such as seeding or surface modification) or post-synthesis treatments. A key finding is that interfacial membrane formation in the hollow fiber occurs via an initial formation of two distinct layers and the subsequent rearrangement into a single layer. This understanding is used to show how nonisothermal processing allows fabrication of thinner (5 μm) ZIF-8 films for higher throughput, and furthermore how engineering the polymeric hollow fiber support microstructure allows control of defects in the ZIF-8 membranes. Finally, the performance of these engineered ZIF-8 membranes is then characterized, which have H2/C3H8 and C3H6/C3H8 mixture separation factors as high as 2018 and 65, respectively, and C3H6 permeances as high as 66 GPU.

  19. A novel integrated approach to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Harada, Hideki

    2012-12-01

    A novel integrated approach is developed to quantitatively evaluate the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction efficiency after taking into account EPS yield, EPS damage, and cell lysis. This approach incorporates grey relational analysis and fuzzy logic analysis, in which the evaluation procedure is established on the basis of grey relational coefficients generation, membership functions construction, and fuzzy rules description. The flocculation activity and DNA content of EPS are chosen as the two evaluation responses. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this integrated approach, EPS from Bacillus megaterium TF10 are extracted using five different extraction methods, and their extraction efficiencies are evaluated as one real case study. Based on the evaluation results, the maximal extraction grades and corresponding optimal extraction times of the five extraction methods are ordered as EDTA, 10 h > formaldehyde + NaOH, 60 min > heating, 120 min > ultrasonication, 30 min > H₂SO₄, 30 min > control. The proposed approach here offers an effective tool to select appropriate EPS extraction methods and determine the optimal extraction conditions.

  20. Construction of a comb-like glycosylated membrane surface by a combination of UV-induced graft polymerization and surface-initiated ATRP.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Tian, Jing; Hu, Meng-Xin; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2007-06-05

    Carbohydrate residues are found on the extracellular side of the cell membrane. They form a protective coating on the outer surface of the cell and are involved in intercellular recognition. Synthetic carbohydrate-based polymers, so-called glycopolymers, are emerging as important well-defined tools for investigating carbohydrate-based biological processes and for simulating various functions of carbohydrates. In this work, the surface of a polypropylene microporous membrane (PPMM) was modified with comb-like glycopolymer brushes by a combination of UV-induced graft polymerization and surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) was first grafted to the PPMM surface under UV irradiation in the presence of benzophenone and ferric chloride. ATRP initiator was then coupled to the hydroxyl groups of poly(HEMA) brushes. Surface-initiated ATRP of a glycomonomer, D-gluconamidoethyl methacrylate, was followed at ambient temperature in aqueous solvent. Water had a significant acceleration effect on the ATRP process; however, loss of control over the polymerization process was also observed. The addition of CuBr2 to the ATRP system largely increased the controllability at the cost of the polymerization rate. The grafting of HEMA, the coupling of ATRP initiator to the hydroxyl groups, and the surface-initiated ATRP were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Sub-10 ns single-shot dynamic recording in holographic polymeric medium by nonlinear absorption using excited state absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kenji; Satoh, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshito

    2016-09-01

    Optical recording by a single shot of an 8 ns laser pulse in a dye-doped holographic polymeric medium was demonstrated with a peak power as low as 71 W at a wavelength of 402 nm. Nonlinear absorption triggered by two-photon absorption and enhanced by the succeeding process allows high-speed recording corresponding to 125 Mbps (3.4 times the recording speed of a Blu-ray Disc). The preformed holographic grating in the medium enhanced the readout signal through diffraction, resulting in a signal-to-noise ratio of about 15 dB. The recording capacity was estimated at ca. 80 GB/side for 100 µm/side by recording 20 layers, but that of over TB/side class would be possible for optical optimization. Theoretically, it can be improved to 10 TB/side for 800 µm/side by recording 400 layers.

  2. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... targets, you will need to balance your carbohydrate intake with physical activity and diabetes medicines or insulin shots. How much carbohydrate do I need each day? The daily amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat for people with diabetes has not ...

  3. Spatiotemporal characterization of hydration process of asymmetric polymeric wound dressings for decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed

    Górska, Anna; Dorożyński, Przemyslaw; Węglarz, Władysław P; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Kurek, Mateusz; Jachowicz, Renata; Klaja, Jolanta; Kulinowski, Piotr

    2017-04-13

    Pressure ulcers belong to the most chalenging clinical problems. As hydration level of such wounds is important for optimal healing, preparation of new wound dressing (WD) materials for pressure ulcers requires thorough in vitro evaluation as prerequisite to final in vivo testing. The aims of the study were to: (a) develop a simple method of preparation of asymmetric polymeric membrane, (b) to propose a set of in vitro methods for membrane characterization during hydration. A polyvinyl alcohol asymmetric membrane with homogeneous skin layer and porous spongy layer was developed with nonadhesive properties and ability to absorb and retain the water. Complementary methods, including magnetic resonance imaging, allowed quantitative assessment of spatiotemporal aspects of membrane hydration, that is, global water uptake; swelling; local hydration in terms of proton density mapping; spatial distribution of T2 relaxation time; Young's modulus; piercing resistance. The proposed method of initial wound dressing evaluation seems to be promising to compare various WD formulations, to assess the time required to prepare WD membrane to be applied to the wound and to assess how long WD retains desired working properties. The developed asymmetric membrane seems to be a good candidate for further evaluation. It was found that: Young's modulus of hydrated membrane was comparable to those of human skin; asymmetrical structure was retained during the entire hydration period; each layer had its own distinct, hydration related, properties and their spatiotemporal evolution; relatively slow changes of membrane properties during the potential WD application time-span of several hours was observed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. FRET-based luminescence sensors for carbohydrates and glycoproteins analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Zeev; Rosenzweig, Nitsa; Blagoi, Gabriela

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the development of novel particle-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors. It describes the fundamentals of FRET in heterogeneous systems and the application of the new sensors in monitoring the binding affinity of carbohydrates and glycoproteins to lectins, which are carbohydrate binding proteins. The sensing approach is based on FRET between fluorescein (donor) labeled lectin molecules, adsorbed on the surface of micrometric polymeric beads, and polymeric dextran molecules labeled with Texas Red (acceptor). The FRET signal of the sensor decreases in the presence of carbohydrates or glycoproteins that inhibit the binding of Texas Red-labeled dextran molecules to the lectinic binding sites. The new FRET sensors could discriminate between carbohydrates and glycoproteins based on their binding affinity to the FRET sensing particles. Thery were also used for quantitative analysis of carbohydrates and glycoproteins in aqueous samples.

  5. Partial replacement of sodium chloride with potassium chloride in dry fermented sausages: Influence on carbohydrate fermentation and the nitrosation process.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, C; Quintanilla, L; Irigoyen, A; Garcia-Jalón, I; Cid, C; Astiasarán, I; Bello, J

    1995-01-01

    Two types of dry fermented sausages were manufactured: type A with traditional formulation and type B with reduced sodium content. pH and a(w) values and the counts of aerobic mesophiles, Enterobacteriaceae and lactobacilli micro-organisms during the ripening of both fermented sausages were similar. Final lactic acid contents were also similar, but carbohydrate content was significantly lower in type B sausage. Content of acetic, propionic and butyric acids were significantly higher in type B, suggesting a higher heterofermentative activity. Also type B sausage showed lower nitrate level and higher chemical conversion percentage, suggesting a higher nitrosation intensity.

  6. Process innovation in high-performance systems: From polymeric composites R&D to design and build of airplane showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Jui

    In the aerospace industry reducing aircraft weight is key because it increases flight performance and drives down operating costs. With fierce competition in the commercial aircraft industry, companies that focused primarily on exterior aircraft performance design issues are turning more attention to the design of aircraft interior. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of new amenities offered to passengers especially in first class travel and executive jets. These new amenities present novel and challenging design parameters that include integration into existing aircraft systems without sacrificing flight performance. The objective of this study was to design a re-circulating shower system for an aircraft that weighs significantly less than pre-existing shower designs. This was accomplished by integrating processes from polymeric composite materials, water filtration, and project management. Carbon/epoxy laminates exposed to hygrothermal cycling conditions were evaluated and compared to model calculations. Novel materials and a variety of fabrication processes were developed to create new types of paper for honeycomb applications. Experiments were then performed on the properties and honeycomb processability of these new papers. Standard water quality tests were performed on samples taken from the re-circulating system to see if current regulatory standards were being met. These studies were executed and integrated with tools from project management to design a better shower system for commercial aircraft applications.

  7. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-05-18

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  8. Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome: not an N-linked oligosaccharide processing defect, but an abnormality in lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Powell, L D; Paneerselvam, K; Vij, R; Diaz, S; Manzi, A; Buist, N; Freeze, H; Varki, A

    1994-01-01

    The carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome (CDGS) is a developmental disease associated with an abnormally high isoelectric point of serum transferrin. Carbohydrate analyses of this glycoprotein initially suggested a defect in N-linked oligosaccharide processing, although more recent studies indicate a defect in the attachment of these sugar chains to the protein. We studied both serum glycoproteins and fibroblast-derived [2-3H]mannose-labeled oligosaccharides from CDGS patients and normal controls. While there was a decrease in the glycosylation of serum glycoproteins of affected individuals, differences were not seen in either monosaccharide composition or oligosaccharide structures. The lectin-binding profiles of glycopeptides from [2-3H]-mannose-labeled fibroblasts were likewise indistinguishable. However, the incorporation of [2-3H]mannose into both glycoproteins and the dolichol-linked oligosaccharide precursor was significantly reduced. Thus, at least in some patients, CDGS is not due to a defect in processing of N-linked oligosaccharides, but rather to defective synthesis and transfer of nascent dolichol-linked oligosaccharide precursors. This abnormality could result in both a failure to glycosylate some sites on some proteins, as well as secondary abnormalities in overall glycoprotein processing and/or function. PMID:7962535

  9. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  10. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  11. Process Condition Considered Preparation and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Methyl Methacrylate Thin Films for Organic Thin Film Transistor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Se-Hyun; Lee, Boong-Joo; Lim, Young-Taek; Lim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sunwoo; Ochiai, Shizuyasu; Yi, Jun-Sin; Shin, Paik-Kyun

    2012-02-01

    Plasma polymerized methyl methaclylate (ppMMA) thin films were prepared with various process conditions such as inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power, substrate bias power, working pressure, substrate heating temperature, substrate position, and monomer flow rate. Thickness, surface morphology, dielectric constant, and leakage current of the ppMMA thin films were investigated for application to organic thin film transistor as gate dielectric. Deposition rate of over 8.6 nm/min, dielectric constant of 3.4, and leakage current density of 8.9 ×10-9 A/cm-2 at electric field of 1 MV/cm were achieved for the ppMMA thin film prepared at the optimized process condition: plasma power of RF 100 W; Ar flow rate of 20 sccm; working pressure of 5 mTorr; substrate temperature of 100 °C substrate position of 100 mm. The ppMMA thin film was then applied to pentacene based organic thin film transistor (OTFT) device fabrication. The OTFT device with 80 nm thick pentacene semiconductor layer showed field effect mobility of 0.144 cm2 V-1 s-1 and threshold voltage of -1.72 V.

  12. ZIF-8 Membranes via Interfacial Microfluidic Processing in Polymeric Hollow Fibers: Efficient Propylene Separation at Elevated Pressures.

    PubMed

    Eum, Kiwon; Ma, Chen; Rownaghi, Ali; Jones, Christopher W; Nair, Sankar

    2016-09-28

    Propylene/propane (C3H6/C3H8) separations are performed on a large scale by energy-intensive distillation processes. Membranes based on metal-organic framework (MOF) molecular sieves, such as zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8), offer the potential to perform these separations at considerably lower cost. However, the fabrication of scalable ZIF-8 membranes with high performance at elevated pressures and temperatures is challenging. We report the fabrication of high-quality ZIF-8 hollow fiber membranes in engineered polymeric hollow fibers via the interfacial microfluidic membrane processing (IMMP) technique. Control of fiber microstructure, as well as optimization of IMMP conditions, allow us to achieve a C3H6/C3H8 separation factor of 180 (at 1 bar and 25 °C), which remains high (60) at 120 °C. Furthermore, high-pressure operation of these membranes was investigated. Detailed permeation measurements indicate excellent suppression of defects at higher pressures up to 9.5 bar, allowing a C3H6/C3H8 separation factor of 90 at 9.5 bar. The membranes also display a 4-fold increase in flux at 9.5 bar as compared to operation at 1 bar. The long-term stability of the ZIF-8 hollow fiber membranes is demonstrated by continuous operation over a month without loss of C3H6 permeance or selectivity.

  13. Viscoelastic processing and characterization of high-performance polymeric composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Frederic Ulysse

    2000-10-01

    Fiber reinforced composites, a combination of reinforcing fiber and resin matrix, offer many advantages over traditional materials, and have therefore found wide application in the aerospace and sporting goods industry. Among the advantages that composite materials offer, the most often cited are weight saving, high modulus, high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance. As much as their attributes are desirable, composites are difficult to process due to their heterogeneous, anisotropic, and viscoelastic nature. It is therefore not surprising that the interrelationship between structure, property, and process is not fully understood. Consequently, the major purpose of this research work was to investigate this interrelationship, and ways to scale it to utilization. First, four prepreg materials, which performed differently in the manufacturing of composite parts, but were supposedly identical, were characterized. The property variations that were found among these prepregs in terms of tack and frictional resistance assessed the need for improved understanding of the prepregging process. Therefore, the influence of the processing parameters on final prepreg quality were investigated, and led to the definition of more adequate process descriptors. Additionally, one of the characterization techniques used in this work, temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, was examined in depth with the development of a mathematical model. This model, which enabled the exploration of the relationship between user parameters, sample thermophysical properties, and final results, was then compared to literature data. Collectively, this work explored and identified the key connectors between process, structure, and property as they relate to the manufacturing, design, and performance of composite materials.

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  15. Synthetic carbohydrate: An aid to nutrition in the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, G. A. (Editor); Murashige, K. H. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The synthetic production of carbohydrate on a large scale is discussed. Three possible nonagricultural methods of making starch are presented in detail and discussed. The simplest of these, the hydrolysis of cellulose wastes to glucose followed by polymerization to starch, appears a reasonable and economic supplement to agriculture at the present time. The conversion of fossil fuels to starch was found to be not competitive with agriculture at the present time, but tractable enough to allow a reasonable plant design to be made. A reconstruction of the photosynthetic process using isolated enzyme systems proved technically much more difficult than either of the other two processes. Particular difficulties relate to the replacement of expensive energy carrying compounds, separation of similar materials, and processing of large reactant volumes. Problem areas were pinpointed, and technological progress necessary to permit such a system to become practical is described.

  16. Carbohydrate markers of organism purity and growth environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Fox, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Recent experience with Bacillus spore characterization has demonstrated that carbohydrate content can provide potentially vital bioforensic information. Like other metabolites, the carbohydrate profiles of samples reflect variations in cellular structures as well as presence of residual carbohydrates from the medium found as trace components. The presence and characteristics of residual carbohydrates, such as agar, represent strong indicators of culturing method. The methods to detect residual carbohydrates can be extended to other compounds used in processing and preservation of microbes in a dry form.

  17. Lignin-carbohydrate complexes from sisal (Agave sisalana) and abaca (Musa textilis): chemical composition and structural modifications during the isolation process.

    PubMed

    Del Río, José C; Prinsen, Pepijn; Cadena, Edith M; Martínez, Ángel T; Gutiérrez, Ana; Rencoret, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Two types of lignins occurred in different lignin-carbohydrate fractions, a lignin enriched in syringyl units, less condensed, preferentially associated with xylans, and a lignin with more guaiacyl units, more condensed, associated with glucans. Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC) were isolated from the fibers of sisal (Agave sisalana) and abaca (Musa textilis) according to a plant biomass fractionation procedure recently developed and which was termed as "universally" applicable to any type of lignocellulosic material. Two LCC fractions, namely glucan-lignin (GL) and xylan-lignin (XL), were isolated and differed in the content and composition of carbohydrates and lignin. In both cases, GL fractions were enriched in glucans and comparatively depleted in lignin, whereas XL fractions were depleted in glucans, but enriched in xylans and lignin. Analysis by two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (2D-NMR) and Derivatization Followed by Reductive Cleavage (DFRC) indicated that the XL fractions were enriched in syringyl (S)-lignin units and β-O-4' alkyl-aryl ether linkages, whereas GL fractions have more guaiacyl (G)-lignin units and less β-O-4' alkyl-aryl ether linkages per lignin unit. The data suggest that the structural characteristics of the lignin polymers are not homogeneously distributed within the same plant and that two different lignin polymers with different composition and structure might be present. The analyses also suggested that acetates from hemicelluloses and the acyl groups (acetates and p-coumarates) attached to the γ-OH of the lignin side chains were extensively hydrolyzed and removed during the LCC fractionation process. Therefore, caution must be paid when using this fractionation approach for the structural characterization of plants with acylated hemicelluloses and lignins. Finally, several chemical linkages (phenylglycosides and benzyl ethers) could be observed to occur between lignin and xylans in these plants.

  18. Challenges in the characterization of plasma-processed three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ellen R

    2013-10-09

    Low-temperature plasmas offer a versatile method for delivering tailored functionality to a range of materials. Despite the vast array of choices offered by plasma processing techniques, there remain a significant number of hurdles that must be overcome to allow this methodology to realize its full potential in the area of biocompatible materials. Challenges include issues associated with analytical characterization, material structure, plasma processing, and uniform composition following treatment. Specific examples and solutions are presented utilizing results from analyses of three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds treated with different plasma surface modification strategies that illustrate these challenges well. Notably, many of these strategies result in 3D scaffolds that are extremely hydrophilic and that enhance human Saos-2 osteoblast cell growth and proliferation, which are promising results for applications including tissue engineering and advanced biomedical devices.

  19. Sensor-property-NDE relationships of polymeric composites processed through resin infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, U. K.; Mohamed, H.; Fotedar, K.; Haque, A.; Mahfuz, H.; Jeelani, S.

    1998-04-01

    Liquid molding manufacturing techniques including vacuum assisted resin infusion molding (VARIM) and resin transfer molding (RTM) offer low cost alternatives for producing composites. The cure characteristics of these composites are monitored by dielectric tool mount sensors in an RTM process, however embedded inter-digitated electrode sensors (IDEX) are becoming popular in the VARIM process. The IDEX sensors remain an integral part of the composite after cure. In this paper, first the response of the dielectric IDEX sensors to various resin systems in neat resin stage as well as in the resin matrix composite is presented. The paper then investigates the mechanical performance of the composites containing IDEX sensors for various loading situations involving interlaminar shear strength, low velocity impact and high strain rate testing. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation conducted is also presented.

  20. Molecular Optics Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films. Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    susceptibility gamma ijkl(-omega 4; omega 1, omega 2, omega 3 ) demonstrate that the microscopic origin of the nonresonant third order nonlinear optical...interaction calculations of gamma jkl(-omega 4; omega 1, omega 2, omega 3 ) for the archetypal class of quasi-one dimensional conjugated structures...largest of the two dominant, competing virtual excitation processes that determine gamma ijkl(- omega 4; omega 1, omega 2, omega 3 ). It is also found in

  1. Optimization of continuous triboelectrification process for polymeric materials in dry contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawatya, Y. E.; Neagoe, M. B.; Zeghloul, T.; Dascalescu, L.

    2017-02-01

    Triboelectrification (i.e., generation of electric charge by friction between two materials) is a complex process. Besides the nature and condition of the surfaces in contact, several factors can have an influence on charge generation: pressure load and relative velocity between the two bodies, number of friction cycles, ambient temperature and humidity, condition and type of material surface. This paper aims at demonstrating that associating the experimental response surface methodology and genetic algorithms is an effective technique for the optimisation of triboelectrification process. The quadratic model derived from the experiments is used in a genetic algorithm program to find the optimal combination of factor values (10 sliding cycles; normal force: 10 N; sliding speed: 55 mm/s) that maximize the average potential at the surface of the tribocharged materials: -1633 V. A final experiment confirmed the prediction of the genetic algorithm. The conclusions of this experimental study can be applied to the optimisation of industrial triboelectrification processes, and contribute to the reduction of the related maintenance, energy and raw-material costs.

  2. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  3. Axisymmetric Simulation of Bulging Process in Polymeric Materials during Projectile Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyung-Hun; Kim, See-Jo; Shin, Hyung-Seop; Choi, Joon-Hong; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    Combination of different materials used both in the projectile and the sandwich panel is getting more important in designing for maximization of energy absorption during impact. In the present study, we have simulated the bulging process during projectile impact for axisymmetric impact problems. We have discussed the bulging velocity tendency depending on some important geometrical and material parameters such as the yield strength, and tensile limit of the core for several different core thickness and different elapsed time after impact by using the AUTODYN commercial software. From our simulation, we have found that material properties have more dominant effects than the geometric properties on the bulging velocity.

  4. Paraffin processing of stented arteries using a postfixation dissolution of metallic and polymeric stents.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Welch, Tre; Guerrero, David T; Alferiev, Ivan S; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Gupte, Rohit K; Tang, Yanqing; Levy, Robert J

    Studying the morphology of the arterial response to endovascular stent implantation requires embedding the explanted stented artery in rigid materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) to enable sectioning through both the in situ stent and the arterial wall, thus maintaining the proper anatomic relationships. This is a laborious, time-consuming process. Moreover, the technical quality of stained plastic sections is typically suboptimal and, in some cases, precludes immunohistochemical analysis. Here we describe a novel technique for dissolution of metallic and plastic stents that is compatible with subsequent embedding of "destented" arteries in paraffin, fine sectioning, major staining protocols, and immunohistochemistry.

  5. Modulation of drug release kinetics of shellac-based matrix tablets by in-situ polymerization through annealing process.

    PubMed

    Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Limmatvapirat, Chutima; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Luangtana-anan, Manee; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2008-08-01

    A new oral-controlled release matrix tablet based on shellac polymer was designed and developed, using metronidazole (MZ) as a model drug. The shellac-based matrix tablets were prepared by wet granulation using different amounts of shellac and lactose. The effect of annealing temperature and pH of medium on drug release from matrix tablets was investigated. The increased amount of shellac and increased annealing temperature significantly affected the physical properties (i.e., tablet hardness and tablet disintegration) and MZ release from the matrix tablets. The in-situ polymerization played a major role on the changes in shellac properties during annealing process. Though the shellac did not dissolve in acid medium, the MZ release in 0.1N HCl was faster than in pH 7.3 buffer, resulting from a higher solubility of MZ in acid medium. The modulation of MZ release kinetics from shellac-based matrix tablets could be accomplished by varying the amount of shellac or annealing temperature. The release kinetics was shifted from relaxation-controlled release to diffusion-controlled release when the amount of shellac or the annealing temperature was increased.

  6. Improving the layer morphology of solution-processed perylene diimide organic solar cells with the use of a polymeric interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranbir; Mróz, Marta M.; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Cabanillas-Gonzalez, Juan; Marchi, Enrico; Bergamini, Giacomo; Müllen, Klaus; Jacob, Josemon; Keivanidis, Panagiotis E.

    2013-10-01

    Herein we demonstrate a method to improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) parameter of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on the electron acceptor N,N'-bis(1- ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) blended with the electron donor poly(indenofluorene)-aryloctyl (PIF-Aryl). The device parameters of the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and fill factor are found increased after the insertion of a thin poly [9, 9-dioctylfluorene-co-N- [4-(3-methylpropyl)]-diphenylamine] (TFB) photoactive interlayer between the hole-collecting electrode and the photoactive layer of the device. Unlike to most of the cases where interlayers serve as charge extractors, in our system the polymeric interlayer serves as a morphology modifying agent that drives the PDI component to segregate better at the interface with the device cathode; that is at the carrier-collecting electrode interface, which is not in physical contact with the interlayer. The processes of energy/charge transfer of the TFB excitons to/with the PIF-Aryl:PDI top-layer are also addressed. Charge transfer reactions dominate at the TFB/PIF-Aryl:PDI interface but no significant contribution in the photocurrent generation is seen in the photoaction spectra of the bilayer device.

  7. Carbohydrate digestibility and metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julia M W; Jenkins, David J A

    2007-11-01

    There is a history of interest in the metabolic effects of alterations in small intestinal digestion and colonic fermentation of carbohydrate. It is believed that the rate of digestion of carbohydrate determines the place and form in which carbohydrate is absorbed. Slowly absorbed or lente carbohydrate sources may reduce postprandial glucose surges and the need for insulin with important implications for lowering coronary heart disease risk and reducing diabetes incidence. Carbohydrates that are not digested in the small intestine will enter the colon, and those that are fermentable will be salvaged as short-chain fatty acids in the colon and at the same time may stimulate colonic microflora, such as bifidobacteria. This process may have metabolic effects in the gut and throughout the host, possibly related to short-chain fatty acid products, although these effects are less well documented. One important aspect of colonic fermentation is the stimulation of certain populations of the colonic microflora, which may assist in the biotransformation of bioactive food components including the cleaving of plant phenolics from their glycone to produce the more rapidly absorbed aglycone. However, human studies have been limited. Therefore, further studies are required to explore these important aspects of metabolism related to the rate of carbohydrate absorption and fermentation and their implications in health and disease.

  8. A numerical approach to drying process of hygroscopic polymeric granulates with different drying configurations and parameter comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahbub, A. M. Ishtiaque; Mawa, Zannatul

    2017-06-01

    Some polymers tend to possess affinity with water and eventually, absorb significant moisture content from the surrounding air, causing difficulties during their industrial processing. Drying of these hygroscopic polymers, therefore, plays a vital role in their usability in industrial applications. In this work, the drying kinetics of the polymeric granulates is numerically formulated and the influence of different parameters pertaining to the drying procedure has been investigated. Backward Euler or implicit algorithm has been considered for solving the second order partial differential heat and mass transfer equations for simulating the drying kinetics of Polyamide 6 (PA-6). At first, the conduction of heat from the granulate surface towards the core was formulated using one dimensional transient heat conduction law and corresponding diffusion coefficients were determined using Arrhenius diffusion model. Afterwards, the migration of moisture from the granulate core towards the surface has been calculated using Fick's second law of diffusion. The data obtained from the single polymer granulate was then used to calculate the amount of moisture removed and the drying rate. The numerical results showed similitude with the experimental data obtained from the literature, although deviated quantitatively. To investigate the influence of different parameters on the drying process, different cases with varying drying air temperature, granulate radius and initial moisture content were compared. The numerical analysis qualitatively predicted all the dependencies to be expected. With higher drying air temperature, drying rate was observed to be faster and with higher granulate radius, drying rate was slower. With better approximations of the applied parameters and algorithms, the accuracy of the developed numerical model could be improved and used as a prediction tool for the drying process of polymer samples with reasonable tolerance.

  9. Sustained-release microsphere formulation containing an agrochemical by polyurethane polymerization during an agitation granulation process.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takatoshi; Tagami, Manabu; Ohtsubo, Toshiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-07-25

    In this report, a new solventless microencapsulation method by synthesizing polyurethane (PU) from polyol and isocyanate during an agglomeration process in a high-speed mixing apparatus was developed. Clothianidin (CTD), which is a neonicotinoid insecticide and highly effective against a wide variety of insect pests, was used as the model compound. The microencapsulated samples covered with PU (CTD microspheres) had a median diameter of <75μm and sustained-release properties. The CTD microspheres were analyzed by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography measurements. Multiple cores of CTD and other solid excipient were dispersed in PU. Although voids appeared in the CTD microspheres after CTD release, the spherical shape of the microspheres remained stable and no change in its framework was observed. The experimental release data were highly consistent with the Baker-Lonsdale model derived from drug release of spherical monolithic dispersions and consistent with the computed tomography measurements.

  10. Quantification and inhibition of the gas polymerization process in timingRPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramacho, Silvia; Lopes, Luis; Rocha Gonsalves, Alexandra; Pineiro, Marta; Fonte, Paulo; Rocha Gonsalves, António M. D.'A.

    2012-01-01

    Ageing of glass RPCs has been extensively studied over the past years. Accompanying the ageing process, two different phenomena were observed: appearance of deposits over the electrode surfaces and structural modification of the glass. In our previous work, using physical-chemical methods and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, the nature and composition of the surfaces and the structural modification of the glass were established as a mixture of oligomers of Freons. Recently, we performed a direct analysis of glass by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), avoiding the physical-chemical extraction; the results confirm the nature of the deposit and consequently we focused our investigation on the search for experimental conditions to operate the RPCs to minimize or eliminate the formation of the deposit. The results show that O2 is an efficient inhibitor of the formation of the deposit and prevents the structural modification of theglass.

  11. Processing and Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Matrix Composites. Part 2; Processing Robustness of IM7/PETI Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1996-01-01

    The processability of a phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resin matrix composite was investigated. Unidirectional prepregs were made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7. Two batches of prepregs were used: one was made by NASA in-house, and the other was from an industrial source. The composite processing robustness was investigated with respect to the effect of B-staging conditions, the prepreg shelf life, and the optimal processing window. Rheological measurements indicated that PETI's processability was only slightly affected over a wide range of B-staging temperatures (from 250 C to 300 C). The open hole compression (OHC) strength values were statistically indistinguishable among specimens consolidated using various B-staging conditions. Prepreg rheology and OHC strengths were also found not to be affected by prolonged (i.e., up to 60 days) ambient storage. An optimal processing window was established using response surface methodology. It was found that IM7/PETI composite is more sensitive to the consolidation temperature than to the consolidation pressure. A good consolidation was achievable at 371 C/100 Psi, which yielded an OHC strength of 62 Ksi at room temperature. However, processability declined dramatically at temperatures below 350 C.

  12. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Ivanova, Galya; Coelho, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 ± 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 μm), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 °C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  13. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid- and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E.; Laurens, L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-01

    Beginning in 2013, NREL began transitioning from the singular focus on ethanol to a broad slate of products and conversion pathways, ultimately to establish similar benchmarking and targeting efforts. One of these pathways is the conversion of algal biomass to fuels via extraction of lipids (and potentially other components), termed the 'algal lipid upgrading' or ALU pathway. This report describes in detail one potential ALU approach based on a biochemical processing strategy to selectively recover and convert select algal biomass components to fuels, namely carbohydrates to ethanol and lipids to a renewable diesel blendstock (RDB) product. The overarching process design converts algal biomass delivered from upstream cultivation and dewatering (outside the present scope) to ethanol, RDB, and minor coproducts, using dilute-acid pretreatment, fermentation, lipid extraction, and hydrotreating.

  14. Dielectric properties and fluctuating relaxation processes of poly(methyl methacrylate) based polymeric nanocomposite electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2014-06-01

    Solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes (SPNEs) consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) of molar ratio C=O:Li+=4:1 with varying concentration of montmorillonite (MMT) clay as nanofiller have been prepared by classical solution casting and high intensity ultrasonic assisted solution casting methods. The dielectric/electrical dispersion behaviour of these electrolytes was studied by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy at ambient temperature. The dielectric loss tangent and electric modulus spectra have been analyzed for relaxation processes corresponding to the side groups rotation and the segmental motion of PMMA chain, which confirm their fluctuating behaviour with the sample preparation methods and also with change of MMT concentration. The feasibility of these relaxation fluctuations has been explained using a transient complex structural model based on Lewis acid-base interactions. The low permittivity and moderate dc ionic conductivity at ambient temperature suggest the suitability of these electrolytes in fabrication of ion conducting electrochromic devices and lithium ion batteries. The amorphous behaviour and the exfoliated/intercalated MMT structures of these nanocomposite electrolytes were confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements.

  15. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... Los carbohidratos y la diabetes Carbs and Blood Sugar Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means ...

  16. Polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Javanzad, Shabnam; Saleh, Tayebeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers with various compositions and biological properties have been extensively applied for in vitro/in vivo drug and gene delivery. The family of nanocarriers includes polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based carriers (liposomes/micelles), dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and gold nanoparticles (nanoshells/nanocages). Among different delivery systems, polymeric carriers have several properties such as: easy to synthesize, inexpensive, biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, non-toxic, and water soluble. In addition, cationic polymers seem to produce more stable complexes led to a more protection during cellular trafficking than cationic lipids. Nanoparticles often show significant adjuvant effects in vaccine delivery since they may be easily taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Natural polymers such as polysaccharides and synthetic polymers have demonstrated great potential to form vaccine nanoparticles. The development of new adjuvants or delivery systems for DNA and protein immunization is an expanding research field. This review describes polymeric carriers especially PLGA, chitosan, and PEI as vaccine delivery systems. PMID:24128651

  17. Sustainable polymerizations in recoverable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Yan, Feng; Qiu, Lihua; Lu, Jianmei; Zhou, Yinxia; Chen, Jiaxin; Tang, Yishan; Texter, John

    2010-03-16

    Free radical and atom-transfer radical polymerizations were conducted in monomer/ionic liquid microemulsions. After the polymerization and isolation of the resultant polymers, the mixture of the catalyst and ionic liquids (surfactant and continuous phase) can be recovered and reused, thereby dramatically improving the environmental sustainability of such chemical processing. The addition of monomer to recovered ionic liquid mixtures regenerates transparent, stable microemulsions that are ready for the next polymerization cycle upon addition of initiator. The method combines the advantages of IL recycling and microemulsion polymerization and minimizes environmental disposable effects from surfactants and heavy metal ions.

  18. Flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: water bath, microwave energy and chemical polymerization

    PubMed Central

    ARIOLI FILHO, João Neudenir; BUTIGNON, Luís Eduardo; PEREIRA, Rodrigo de Paula; LUCAS, Matheus Guilherme; MOLLO JUNIOR, Francisco de Assis

    2011-01-01

    Denture fractures are common in daily practice, causing inconvenience to the patient and to the dentists. Denture repairs should have adequate strength, dimensional stability and color match, and should be easily and quickly performed as well as relatively inexpensive. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: warm water-bath, microwave energy, and chemical polymerization. Material and methods Sixty rectangular specimens (31x10x2.5 mm) were made with warm water-bath acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and grouped (15 specimens per group) according to the resin type used to make repair procedure: 1) specimens of warm water-bath resin (Lucitone 550) without repair (control group); 2) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with warm water-bath; 3) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with microwave resin (Acron MC); 4) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with autopolymerized acrylic resin (Simplex). Flexural strength was measured with the three-point bending in a universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) with load cell of 100 kgf under constant speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results The control group showed the best result (156.04±1.82 MPa). Significant differences were found among repaired specimens and the results were decreasing as follows: group 3 (43.02±2.25 MPa), group 2 (36.21±1.20 MPa) and group 4 (6.74±0.85 MPa). Conclusion All repaired specimens demonstrated lower flexural strength than the control group. Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin showed the lowest flexural strength. PMID:21625742

  19. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  20. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  1. Determination of Total Carbohydrates in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wychen, Stefanie; Laurens, Lieve M. L.

    2016-01-13

    This procedure uses two-step sulfuric acid hydrolysis to hydrolyze the polymeric forms of carbohydrates in algal biomass into monomeric subunits. The monomers are then quantified by either HPLC or a suitable spectrophotometric method.

  2. Kunststoffe (Polymere)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißbach, Wolfgang

    Polymere bestehen aus Riesen- oder Makromolekülen, die durch chemische Reaktionen aus einfachen, niedermolekularen Verbindungen entstehen, den Monomeren. Ausgangsstoffe sind überwiegend Kohlenwasserstoffe (KW), die größte Gruppe der C-Verbindungen. Sie müssen reaktionsfähige Stellen besitzen, das sind OH-Gruppen oder Dopppelbindungen.

  3. Carbohydrate chemistry in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Galan, M Carmen; Benito-Alifonso, David; Watt, Gregory M

    2011-05-21

    The multitude of roles that carbohydrates and their glyco-conjugates play in biological processes has stimulated great interest in determining the nature of their interactions in both normal and diseased states. Manipulating such interactions will provide leads for drug discovery. Of the major classes of biomolecule, carbohydrates are the most structurally diverse. This hetereogeneity makes isolation of pure samples, and in sufficient amounts, from biological sources extremely difficult. Chemical synthesis offers the advantage of producing pure and structurally defined oligosaccharides for biological investigations. Although the complex nature of carbohydrates means that this is challenging, recent advances in the field have facilitated access to these molecules. The synthesis and isolation of oligosaccharides combined with progress in glycoarray technology have aided the identification of new carbohydrate-binding drug targets. This review aims to provide an overview of the latest advancements in carbohydrate chemistry and the role of these complex molecules in drug discovery, focusing particularly on synthetic methodologies, glycosaminoglycans, glycoprotein synthesis and vaccine development over the last few years.

  4. Aminooxylated Carbohydrates: Synthesis and Applications.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Carlo; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Fiore, Michele; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Renaudet, Olivier

    2017-08-09

    Among other classes of biomolecules, carbohydrates and glycoconjugates are widely involved in numerous biological functions. In addition to addressing the related synthetic challenges, glycochemists have invested intense efforts in providing access to structures that can be used to study, activate, or inhibit these biological processes. Over the past few decades, aminooxylated carbohydrates have been found to be key building blocks for achieving these goals. This review provides the first in-depth overview covering several aspects related to the syntheses and applications of aminooxylated carbohydrates. After a brief introduction to oxime bonds and their relative stabilities compared to related C═N functions, synthetic aspects of oxime ligation and methodologies for introducing the aminooxy functionality onto both glycofuranosyls and glycopyranosyls are described. The subsequent section focuses on biological applications involving aminooxylated carbohydrates as components for the construcion of diverse architectures. Mimetics of natural structures represent useful tools for better understanding the features that drive carbohydrate-receptor interaction, their biological output and they also represent interesting structures with improved stability and tunable properties. In the next section, multivalent structures such as glycoclusters and glycodendrimers obtained through oxime ligation are described in terms of synthetic design and their biological applications such as immunomodulators. The second-to-last section discusses miscellaneous applications of oxime-based glycoconjugates, such as enantioselective catalysis and glycosylated oligonucleotides, and conclusions and perspectives are provided in the last section.

  5. Influence of Ionic Inorganic Solutes on Self-Assembly and Polymerization Processes Related to Early Forms of Life: Implications for a Prebiotic Aqueous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Apel, Charles L.; Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Deamer, David W.

    2002-06-01

    A commonly accepted view is that life began in a marine environment, which would imply the presence of inorganic ions such as Na+, Cl-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Fe2+. We have investigated two processes relevant to the origin of life - membrane self-assembly and RNA polymerization - and established that both are adversely affected by ionic solute concentrations much lower than those of contemporary oceans. In particular, monocarboxylic acid vesicles, which are plausible models of primitive membrane systems, are completely disrupted by low concentrations of divalent cations, such as magnesium and calcium, and by high sodium chloride concentrations as well. Similarly, a nonenzymatic, nontemplated polymerization of activated RNA monomers in ice/eutectic phases (in a solution of low initial ionic strength) yields oligomers with >80% of the original monomers incorporated, but polymerization in initially higher ionic strength aqueous solutions is markedly inhibited. These observations suggest that cellular life may not have begun in a marine environment because the abundance of ionic inorganic solutes would have significantly inhibited the chemical and physical processes that lead to self-assembly of more complex molecular systems.

  6. Control of carbohydrate processing: increased beta-1,6 branching in N-linked carbohydrates of Lec9 CHO mutants appears to arise from a defect in oligosaccharide-dolichol biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, A G; Stanley, P; Krag, S S

    1989-01-01

    A correlation between increased beta-1,6 branching of N-linked carbohydrates and the ability of a cell to metastasize or to form a tumor has been observed in several experimental models. Lec9 Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants exhibit a drastic reduction in tumorigenicity in nude mice, and this phenotype directly correlates with their ability to attach an increased proportion of beta-1,6-branched carbohydrates to the G glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (J. Ripka, S. Shin, and P. Stanley, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:1268-1275, 1986). In this paper we provide evidence that cellular carbohydrates from Lec9 cells also contain an increased proportion of beta-1,6-branched carbohydrates, although they do not possess significantly increased activity of the beta-1,6 branching enzyme (GlcNAc-transferase V). Biosynthetic labeling experiments show that a substantial degree of underglycosylation occurs in Lec9 cells and that this affects several classes of glycoproteins. Lec9 cells synthesize ca. 40-fold less Glc3Man9GlcNAc2-P-P-lipid and ca. 2-fold less Man5GlcNAc2-P-P-lipid than parental cells do. In addition, Lec9 cells possess ca. fivefold less protein-bound oligosaccharide intermediates, and one major species is resistant to release by endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H (endo H). Membranes of Lec9 cells exhibit normal mannosylphosphoryldolichol synthase, glucosylphosphoryldolichol synthase, and N-acetylglucosaminylphosphate transferase activities in the presence of exogenous dolichyl phosphate. However, in the absence of exogenous dolichyl phosphate, mannosylphosphoryldolichol synthase and glucosylphosphoryldolichol synthase activities are reduced in membranes of Lec9 cells, indicating that membranes of Lec9 cells are deficient in lipid phosphate. This was confirmed by analysis of lipids labeled by [3H]mevalonate, which showed that Lec9 cells have less lipid phosphate than parental CHO cells. Mechanisms by which a defect in the synthesis of dolichol

  7. Effect of nitrogen-starvation, light intensity and iron on triacylglyceride/carbohydrate production and fatty acid profile of Neochloris oleoabundans HK-129 by a two-stage process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian; Cao, Yu; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yan; Sun, Jianrui; Qiao, Dairong; Cao, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Triacylglyceride (TAG) and carbohydrate are potential feedstock for biofuels production. In this study, a two-stage process was applied for enhancing TAG/carbohydrate production in the selected microalgae - Neochloris oleoabundans HK-129. In stage I, effects of nitrogen, light intensity and iron on cell growth were investigated, and the highest biomass productivity of 292.83±5.83mg/L/d was achieved. In stage II, different nitrogen-starvation periods, light intensities and iron concentrations were employed to trigger accumulation of TAG and carbohydrate. The culture under 2-day N-starvation, 200μmol/m(2)/s light intensity and 0.037mM Fe(3+) concentration produced the maximum TAG and carbohydrate productivity of 51.58mg/L/d and 90.70mg/L/d, respectively. Nitrogen starvation period and light intensity had marked effects on TAG/carbohydrate accumulation and fatty acids profile, compared to iron concentration. The microalgal lipid was mainly composed of C16/C18 fatty acids (90.02%), saturated fatty acids (29.82%), and monounsaturated fatty acids (32.67%), which is suitable for biodiesel synthesis.

  8. Simultaneous Au(III) Extraction and In Situ Formation of Polymeric Membrane-Supported Au Nanoparticles: A Sustainable Process with Application in Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mora-Tamez, Lucía; Esquivel-Peña, Vicente; Ocampo, Ana L; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; Grande, Daniel; de Gyves, Josefina

    2017-04-10

    A polymeric membrane-supported catalyst with immobilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared through the extraction and in situ reduction of Au(III) salts in a one-step strategy. Polymeric inclusion membranes (PIMs) and polymeric nanoporous membranes (PNMs) were tested as different membrane-support systems. Transport experiments indicated that PIMs composed of cellulose triacetate, 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether, and an aliphatic tertiary amine (Adogen 364 or Alamine 336) were the most efficient supports for Au(III) extraction. The simultaneous extraction and reduction processes were proven to be the result of a synergic phenomenon in which all the membrane components were involved. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of cross-sectional samples suggested a distribution of AuNPs throughout the membrane. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the AuNPs indicated average particle sizes of 36.7 and 2.9 nm for the PIMs and PNMs, respectively. AuNPs supported on PIMs allowed for >95.4 % reduction of a 0.05 mmol L(-1) 4-nitrophenol aqueous solution with 10 mmol L(-1) NaBH4 solution within 25 min. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Continuous Flow Processing of ZIF-8 Membranes on Polymeric Porous Hollow Fiber Supports for CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Marti, Anne M; Wickramanayake, Wasala; Dahe, Ganpat; Sekizkardes, Ali; Bank, Tracy L; Hopkinson, David P; Venna, Surendar R

    2017-02-22

    We have utilized an environmentally friendly synthesis approach for the accelerated growth of a selective inorganic membrane on a polymeric hollow fiber support for postcombustion carbon capture. Specifically, continuous defect-free ZIF-8 thin films were grown and anchored using continuous flow synthesis on the outer surface of porous supports using water as solvent. These membranes demonstrated CO2 permeance of 22 GPU and the highest reported CO2/N2 selectivity of 52 for a continuous flow synthesized ZIF-8 membrane.

  10. Carbohydrates and fat for training and recovery.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Kiens, Bente; Ivy, John L

    2004-01-01

    An important goal of the athlete's everyday diet is to provide the muscle with substrates to fuel the training programme that will achieve optimal adaptation for performance enhancements. In reviewing the scientific literature on post-exercise glycogen storage since 1991, the following guidelines for the training diet are proposed. Athletes should aim to achieve carbohydrate intakes to meet the fuel requirements of their training programme and to optimize restoration of muscle glycogen stores between workouts. General recommendations can be provided, preferably in terms of grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of the athlete's body mass, but should be fine-tuned with individual consideration of total energy needs, specific training needs and feedback from training performance. It is valuable to choose nutrient-rich carbohydrate foods and to add other foods to recovery meals and snacks to provide a good source of protein and other nutrients. These nutrients may assist in other recovery processes and, in the case of protein, may promote additional glycogen recovery when carbohydrate intake is suboptimal or when frequent snacking is not possible. When the period between exercise sessions is < 8 h, the athlete should begin carbohydrate intake as soon as practical after the first workout to maximize the effective recovery time between sessions. There may be some advantages in meeting carbohydrate intake targets as a series of snacks during the early recovery phase, but during longer recovery periods (24 h) the athlete should organize the pattern and timing of carbohydrate-rich meals and snacks according to what is practical and comfortable for their individual situation. Carbohydrate-rich foods with a moderate to high glycaemic index provide a readily available source of carbohydrate for muscle glycogen synthesis, and should be the major carbohydrate choices in recovery meals. Although there is new interest in the recovery of intramuscular triglyceride stores between

  11. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  12. Contents and digestibility of carbohydrates of mung beans (Vigna radiata L.) as affected by domestic processing and cooking.

    PubMed

    Kataria, A; Chauhan, B M

    1988-01-01

    Effects of common processing and cooking methods on sugar and starch contents and starch digestibility (in vitro) of mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) were investigated. Soaking reduced the level of total soluble sugars, reducing sugars, non-reducing sugars and starch and improved starch digestibility, significantly. Cooking (both ordinary and pressure cooking) increased the concentrations of the sugars and digestibility of starch of soaked as well a unsoaked seeds. Starch contents, however, were decreased. Germination decreased starch thereby raising the level of the soluble sugars. Starch digestibility was increased appreciably.

  13. Synthesis of sub-micronic and nanometric PMMA particles via emulsion polymerization assisted by ultrasound: Process flow sheet and characterization.

    PubMed

    Baissac, L; Buron, C C; Hallez, L; Berçot, P; Hihn, J-Y; Chantegrel, L; Gosse, G

    2017-03-14

    PMMA particle synthesis was performed from MMA (methyl methacrylate) and water mixtures, exposed to different ultrasonic systems and frequencies. The sonication sequence was 20kHz→580kHz→858kHz→1138kHz, and the solution was sampled after each irradiation step for polymerization. Effects of sonication parameters (time, power), polymerization method (thermo-initiated or photo-initiated), use of small amounts of surfactant (Triton X-100™ or Tween® 20) and initial MMA quantity were investigated on particle size and synthesis yields. Particle size and size distribution were measured by DLS (Dynamic Light Scattering), and confirmed via SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images. Synthesis yield was calculated using the dry weight method. Particle composition was estimated using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red) spectroscopy. PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) monodispersed particles were successfully synthesized, with a possibility of control in the 78-310nm size range. These sized-controlled particles were synthesized with a 7.5-85% synthesis yield (corresponding to 7.5-40g/L particle solid content), depending on operational parameters. Furthermore, a trade-off between particle size and synthesis yield can be proposed: 20kHz→10min waiting time→580kHz→858kHz leading to 90nm particles diameter with 72% yield in less than 40min for the whole sequence. Thus, the synthesis under ultrasound can be found easy to implement and time efficient, ensuring the success of the scale-up approach and opening up industrial applications for this type of polymeric particles.

  14. Possible use of the carbohydrates present in tomato pomace and in byproducts of the supercritical carbon dioxide lycopene extraction process as biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Lenucci, Marcello S; Durante, Miriana; Anna, Montefusco; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Piro, Gabriella

    2013-04-17

    This study provides information about the carbohydrate present in tomato pomace (skins, seeds, and vascular tissues) as well as in the byproducts of the lycopene supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SC-CO₂) such as tomato serum and exhausted matrix and reports their conversion into bioethanol. The pomace, constituting approximately 4% of the tomato fruit fresh weight, and the SC-CO₂-exhausted matrix were enzyme saccharified with 0.1% Driselase leading to sugar yields of ~383 and ~301 mg/g dw, respectively. Aliquots of the hydrolysates and of the serum (80% tomato sauce fw) were fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The bioethanol produced from each waste was usually >50% of the calculated theoretical amount, with the exception of the exhausted matrix hydolysate, where a sugar concentration >52.8 g/L inhibited the fermentation process. Furthermore, no differences in the chemical solubility of cell wall polysaccharides were evidenced between the SC-CO₂-lycopene extracted and unextracted matrices. The deduced glycosyl linkage composition and the calculated amount of cell wall polysaccharides remained similar in both matrices, indicating that the SC-CO₂ extraction technology does not affect their structure. Therefore, tomato wastes may well be considered as potential alternatives and low-cost feedstock for bioethanol production.

  15. Facile preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid polymeric ionic liquid monolithic column with a one-pot process for protein separation in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuicui; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Feng, Xue; Qian, Hailong; Wang, Shuo

    2014-11-01

    An organic-inorganic hybrid monolithic column based on 1-vinyl-3-dodecylimidazolium bromide (VC12Im(+)Br(-)) has been prepared in a single step by combining radical copolymerization with a non-hydrolytic sol-gel (NHSG) process. The NHSG process was significantly shortened to 6 h by using formic acid as catalyst. For comparison, we also prepared polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) monolithic columns by hydrolytic sol-gel and organic polymeric process, respectively. The resulting monolithic columns were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. Under the capillary electrochromatography mode, these columns were applied to separate alkylbenzenes, anilines, and proteins, respectively. The results indicated that the NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column exhibited the highest column efficiency among the three types of columns; organic solvent, commonly required by the traditional columns to achieve satisfactory separation efficiency for proteins, was absent in the NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column because of the biocompatibility of the VC12Im(+)Br(-), which was beneficial to analysis of protein containing samples. In order to demonstrate its application potential, the developed NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column was also employed to separate egg white sample.

  16. Parasite Carbohydrate Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jaurigue, Jonnel A.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an efficient means of combating infectious disease burden globally. However, routine vaccines for the world's major human parasitic diseases do not yet exist. Vaccines based on carbohydrate antigens are a viable option for parasite vaccine development, given the proven success of carbohydrate vaccines to combat bacterial infections. We will review the key components of carbohydrate vaccines that have remained largely consistent since their inception, and the success of bacterial carbohydrate vaccines. We will then explore the latest developments for both traditional and non-traditional carbohydrate vaccine approaches for three of the world's major protozoan parasitic diseases—malaria, toxoplasmosis, and leishmaniasis. The traditional prophylactic carbohydrate vaccine strategy is being explored for malaria. However, given that parasite disease biology is complex and often arises from host immune responses to parasite antigens, carbohydrate vaccines against deleterious immune responses in host-parasite interactions are also being explored. In particular, the highly abundant glycosylphosphatidylinositol molecules specific for Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania spp. are considered exploitable antigens for this non-traditional vaccine approach. Discussion will revolve around the application of these protozoan carbohydrate antigens for vaccines currently in preclinical development. PMID:28660174

  17. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  18. Biokompatible Polymere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Suk-Woo; Wintermantel, Erich; Maier, Gerhard

    Der klinische Einsatz von synthetischen Polymeren begann in den 60-er Jahren in Form von Einwegartikeln, wie beispielsweise Spritzen und Kathetern, vor allem aufgrund der Tatsache, dass Infektionen infolge nicht ausreichender Sterilität der wiederverwendbaren Artikel aus Glas und metallischen Werkstoffen durch den Einsatz von sterilen Einwegartikeln signifikant reduziert werden konnten [1]. Die Einführung der medizinischen Einwegartikel aus Polymeren erfolgte somit nicht nur aus ökonomischen, sondern auch aus hygienischen Gründen. Wegen der steigenden Anzahl synthetischer Polymere und dem zunehmenden Bedarf an ärztlicher Versorgung reicht die Anwendung von Polymeren in der Medizin von preisgünstigen Einwegartikeln, die nur kurzzeitig intrakorporal eingesetzt werden, bis hin zu Implantaten, welche über eine längere Zeit grossen Beanspruchungen im menschlichen Körper ausgesetzt sind. Die steigende Verbreitung von klinisch eingesetzten Polymeren ist auf ihre einfache und preisgünstige Verarbeitbarkeit in eine Vielzahl von Formen und Geometrien sowie auf ihr breites Eigenschaftsspektrum zurückzuführen. Polymere werden daher in fast allen medizinischen Bereichen eingesetzt.

  19. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  20. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  1. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  2. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse.

  3. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  4. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  5. A novel mechanism of bisphenol A removal during electro-enzymatic oxidative process: chain reactions from self-polymerization to cross-coupling oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Zhao, He; Liu, Chenming; Li, Yuping; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi

    2013-08-01

    The catalyzed removal of bisphenol A (BPA) by a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) cathode in the presence of humic acid (HA) was investigated. At an optimal condition, the removal of BPA achieved 100% within 2min reaction. In the electro-enzymatic process, products were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). HPLC-DAD results showed that BPA was oxidized into self-polymers and then self-polymers as important intermediate products decreased and disappeared. HPSEC results showed the order of molecular weight (MW): HA+BPA cross-coupling products>HA self-coupling products>initial HA. According to above results, a novel mechanism of BPA transformation in the presence of HA was proposed in electro-enzymatic process. In summary, under oxidation of in situ hydrogen peroxide on HRP electrode, the BPA first are polymerized into self-polymers, and then, the polymers may be incorporated into HA matrix and finally larger MW of BPAn-HA might be formed. The presence of HA can provide chain reactions from BPA self-polymerization to cross-coupling oxidation. Therefore, in the presence of HA, the electro-enzymatic oxidation is an effective way to improve BPA removal.

  6. Process development and monitoring in stripping of a highly transparent polymeric paint with ns-pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasim, Halah A.; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Taha, Ziad A.

    2017-08-01

    Laser paint removal was studied with ns-pulsed fiber laser on the combination of 20 μm-thick, white polymeric paint and Al alloy substrate. The response of paint to single pulse ablation was evaluated to measure the ablated zone dimensions. With this information, the effect of overlap, number of passes and pulse repetition rate was evaluated to investigate machining depth. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the machining behaviour as well as to propose monitoring strategies. The results showed that despite the high transparency of the paint, complete paint removal can be achieved with reduced substrate damage (Sa = 1.3 μm). The emission spectroscopy can be used to identify removal completion as well as the reach of substrate material. The observations were also used to explain a paint removal mechanism based on thermal expansion of the paint and mechanical action provided by the plasma expansion from the substrate material.

  7. Development of an in situ controllable polymerization tool and process for hydrogel used to replace nucleus pulposus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Moser, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    Currently implants or tissue replacements are inserted either as a whole implant or by injecting a liquid which polymerizes to form a solid implant at the appropriate location. This is either highly invasive or not controllable. We developed a tool to perform such surgeries in a minimally invasive and controllable way. It combines photopolymerization and fluorescence spectroscopy in a surgical apparatus. However, to successfully replace tissue such as cartilage or an intervertebral disc, photopolymerizable materials do not only need to be photoactive. They should also be able to withstand the environmental loading conditions after implantation. Therefore we developed a set of in situ and in vitro tests adapted to the evaluation of photopolymerized tissue replacements and implants. In particular in this article, we report on a method, which combines photopolymerization and photorheology to track the current state of polymer during photopolymerization.

  8. Psychobiological effects of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Spring, B; Chiodo, J; Harden, M; Bourgeois, M J; Mason, J D; Lutherer, L

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied whether the fatiguing effects of eating lunch are greater for carbohydrate-rich meals than for other meals, and related the time course of behavioral change to plasma glucose, insulin, and amino acids. On different occasions, in counterbalanced order, normal women (N = 7) fasted overnight, ate a standard breakfast, and at lunch either continued to fast or ate a high-carbohydrate, low-protein meal; a hedonically similar meal containing both carbohydrate and protein; or a high-protein, low-carbohydrate meal. Meals were isocaloric and equated for fat content. Only the carbohydrate meal significantly increased fatigue, which could not be attributed to hypoglycemia because plasma glucose remained elevated. Fatigue began approximately, when the carbohydrate meal elevated the plasma tryptophan ratio but ended even though the ratio remained elevated. Fatigue after a high-carbohydrate lunch could not be explained by reactive hypoglycemia or sweet taste, and could partially be explained by the hypothesis that fatigue parallels an elevation of the tryptophan ratio.

  9. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  10. Carbohydrate counting of food.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Karin; Heiber, Stefanie; Brändle, Michael; Christ, Emanuel; Keller, Ulrich

    2011-07-07

    Carbohydrate counting is a principal strategy in nutritional management of type 1 diabetes. The Nutri-Learn buffet (NLB) is a new computer-based tool for patient instruction in carbohydrate counting. It is based on food dummies made of plastic equipped with a microchip containing relevant food content data. The tool enables the dietician to assess the patient's food counting abilities and the patient to learn in a hands-on interactive manner to estimate food contents such as carbohydrate content. Multicentre randomised controlled trial in 134 patients with type 1 diabetes comparing the use of the Nutri-Learn buffet in determining and improving ability to estimate the carbohydrate content of food with the use of conventional counselling tools (i.e. pictures and tables). The NLB group showed significantly better carbohydrate estimation values than the control group. In particular, there was a significant improvement in estimation of starches, fruits and sweets. The NLB was preferred by patients and dieticians in that rating of carbohydrate was closer to reality than the use of conventional tools, and since the tool has a play element, is interactive and adjustable, and can be used with only minimal knowledge of a specific language. Adjustment of preprandial insulin doses to the amounts of dietary carbohydrates ingested during the subsequent meal resulted in improved metabolic control in previous studies. The present study demonstrated that the new tool (Nutri-Learn buffet) improved teaching and learning of carbohydrate counting. In addition, it allowed an objective assessment of the carbohydrate counting skills of patients by the dietician. The findings therefore suggest that the tool is helpful in nutritional counselling of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  11. Effects of starvation, refeeding, and insulin on energy-linked metabolic processes in catfish (Rhamdia hilarii) adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C.R.; Garofalo, M.A.; Roselino, J.E.; Kettelhut, I.C.; Migliorini, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of starvation and of a short period of refeeding on energy-linked metabolic processes, as well as the effects of insulin administration, were investigated in an omnivorous fish (catfish, Rhamdia hilarii) previously adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet. Following food deprivation blood sugar levels declined progressively to about 50% of fed values after 30 days. During the same period plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration increased twofold. Starvation resulted in reduced concentrations of lipid and glycogen in the liver and of glycogen, lipid, and protein in white muscle. However, taking into account the initial and final concentrations of tissue constituents, the liver weight, and the large fractions of body weight represented by muscle, it could be estimated that most of the energy utilized during starvation derived from the catabolism of muscle lipid and protein. Refeeding starved fishes for 48 hr induced several-fold increases in the rates of in vivo and in vitro incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver and muscle lipid and of (14C)glycine into liver and muscle protein. Incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver glycogen was also increased. However; refeeding did not affect the incorporation of labeled glucose into muscle glycogen, neither in vivo nor in vitro. Administration of pharmacological doses of insulin to normally fed catfishes resulted in marked increases in the in vivo incorporation of 14C from glucose into lipid and protein in both liver and muscle. In contrast, labeled glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen was not affected by insulin and label incorporation into liver glycogen was actually lower than that in noninjected controls.

  12. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    polymerization but also enable the simultaneous analysis of the binding events with orthogonal electrical, optical, or mass sensing label-free readouts. We established this approach using polyaniline and polythiophene as examples. Two general methods were demonstrated for glycosylated polymer fabrications (i.e., electropolymerization of monomer bearing α-mannoside residues or click chemistry based mannose conjugation to electrochemically preformed quinone fused polymer with potential to introduce different carbohydrate moieties and construct glycan arrays in a similar manner). Their conjugated π system extending over a large number of recurrent monomer units renders them sensitive optoelectronic materials. The carbohydrate-protein interactions on the side chain could disrupt the electrostatic, H-bonding, steric, or van der Waals interactions within or between polymers, leading to a change of conductivity or optical absorption of the conductive polymers. This will allow concurrent interrogation of these interactions with adjoining biological processes and mechanisms in multimodal fashion. Furthermore, the functionalized glycosylated conductive polymers can be designed and synthesized with controlled oxidation states, desired ionic dopants, and the imperative density and orientation of the sugar ligands that enable the assessment of differential receptor binding profiles of carbohydrate-protein interactions with much more detailed information and high accuracy. Finally, the glycosylated biosensing interfaces were successfully validated for their applications in Gram-negative bacterial detection, antibiotic resistance studies, and antimicrobial susceptibility assays, all based on inferring carbohydrate-protein interactions directly on cell surfaces, thus illustrating their potential uses in infectious disease research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring of harmful pathogens.

  13. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  14. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... containing foods are long chains of simple sugar molecules. These longer molecules must also be broken down by the body. ... of carbohydrates. Glycogen is made of many glucose molecules linked together. The sugar glucose is the body’s ...

  15. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  16. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  17. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  18. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  19. Carbohydrate intake and obesity.

    PubMed

    van Dam, R M; Seidell, J C

    2007-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly worldwide and the importance of considering the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of obesity is widely acknowledged. This paper reviews data on the effects of dietary carbohydrates on body fatness. Does the composition of the diet as related to carbohydrates affect the likelihood of passive over-consumption and long-term weight change? In addition, methodological limitations of both observational and experimental studies of dietary composition and body weight are discussed. Carbohydrates are among the macronutrients that provide energy and can thus contribute to excess energy intake and subsequent weight gain. There is no clear evidence that altering the proportion of total carbohydrate in the diet is an important determinant of energy intake. However, there is evidence that sugar-sweetened beverages do not induce satiety to the same extent as solid forms of carbohydrate, and that increases in sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption are associated with weight gain. Findings from studies on the effect of the dietary glycemic index on body weight have not been consistent. Dietary fiber is associated with a lesser degree of weight gain in observational studies. Although it is difficult to establish with certainty that fiber rather than other dietary attributes are responsible, whole-grain cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits seem to be the most appropriate sources of dietary carbohydrate.

  20. Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrates are the major dietary sources of energy for humans. While most dietary carbohydrates are derived from multiple botanical sources, lactose and trehalose are the only animal-derived carbohydrates. Digestion of starch, the carbohydrate most abundantly consumed by humans, depends on the c...

  1. Superresolution Imaging Captures Carbohydrate Utilization Dynamics in Human Gut Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gut microbes play a key role in human health and nutrition by catabolizing a wide variety of glycans via enzymatic activities that are not encoded in the human genome. The ability to recognize and process carbohydrates strongly influences the structure of the gut microbial community. While the effects of diet on the microbiota are well documented, little is known about the molecular processes driving metabolism. To provide mechanistic insight into carbohydrate catabolism in gut symbionts, we studied starch processing in real time in the model Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) by single-molecule fluorescence. Although previous studies have explored Sus protein structure and function, the transient interactions, assembly, and collaboration of these outer membrane proteins have not yet been elucidated in live cells. Our live-cell superresolution imaging reveals that the polymeric starch substrate dynamically recruits Sus proteins, serving as an external scaffold for bacterial membrane assembly of the Sus complex, which may promote efficient capturing and degradation of starch. Furthermore, by simultaneously localizing multiple Sus outer membrane proteins on the B. thetaiotaomicron cell surface, we have characterized the dynamics and stoichiometry of starch-induced Sus complex assembly on the molecular scale. Finally, based on Sus protein knockout strains, we have discerned the mechanism of starch-induced Sus complex assembly in live anaerobic cells with nanometer-scale resolution. Our insights into the starch-induced outer membrane protein assembly central to this conserved nutrient uptake mechanism pave the way for the development of dietary or pharmaceutical therapies to control Bacteroidetes in the intestinal tract to enhance human health and treat disease. PMID:25389179

  2. The Microstructure Analysis of Barium M- Hexaferrite Particles Coated by Pani Conducting Material with In Situ Polymerization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuri, M.; Amalia, L.

    2017-05-01

    Barium M-Hexaferrite (BaM) was synthesized by coprecipitation method and doped with Zn. Polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemically and doped DBSA. The composite of PANI/BaM was synthesized by in situ polymerization method. The phase identification of the sample was performed by XRD, FTIR and SEM. Based on XRD data, the phase composition of BaM and hematite are 85.52 % and 14.48%. The characteristic peaks of PANI occur at 3435, 1637, 1473, 1298, 1127, 1009, and 799 cm-1. The characteristic metal oxide stretching peaks of BaM occurs at 575 and 437 cm-1. There is no phase changing in PANI/BaM composite. Based on SEM photography, the shape of BaM is hexagonal. The particle size of BaM powder ranges from 400-700 nm. The qualitative interfacial bonding between PANI and BaM particles are conducted very well and the both materials have good wettability.

  3. In-situ polymerized cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)-poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) nanomaterials and applications in nanocomposite processing.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chuanwei; Hamad, Wadood Y

    2016-11-20

    CNC-PLLA nanomaterials were synthesized via in-situ ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide in the presence of CNC, resulting in hydrophobic, homogeneous mixture of PLLA-grafted-CNC and free PLLA homopolymer. The free PLLA serves two useful functions: as barrier to further prevent PLLA-g-CNC from forming aggregates, and in creating improved interfacial properties when these nanomaterials are blended with other polymers, hence enhancing their performance. CNC-PLLA nanomaterials can be used for medical or engineering applications as-they-are or by compounding with suitable biopolymers using versatile techniques, such as solution casting, co-extrusion or injection molding, to form hybrid nanocomposites of tunable mechanical properties. When compounded with commercial-grade PLA, the resulting CNC-PLA nanocomposites appear transparent and have tailored (dynamic and static) mechanical and barrier properties, approaching those of poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET. The effect of reaction conditions on the properties of CNC-PLLA nanomaterials have been carefully studied and detailed throughout the paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microautoradiographic localization of phosphate and carbohydrates in mycorrhizal roots of Populus tremula x Populus alba and the implications for transfer processes in ectomycorrhizal associations.

    PubMed

    Bücking, H; Heyser, W

    2001-02-01

    Microautoradiographic studies were carried out to examine the distribution and exchange of phosphate and labeled carbohydrates in mycorrhizal roots of Populus tremula x Populus alba L. following application of 33P-orthophosphate (Pi) and 14CO2. Labeled Pi was not homogeneously distributed along the mycorrhizal longitudinal axis. The fungal sheath and the Hartig net contained more 33Pi in the median parts of the root than in the apical or basal root zones, indicating that uptake and transfer of Pi to the host plant was localized mainly in this area. The Pi was translocated by the Hartig net and the interfacial apoplast to the host plant. It was distributed by way of the stele within the plant. Young leaves and meristematic tissue in the shoot tip were the main sinks for Pi. In plants that were left in the dark for 5 days before 33Pi application, the reduced carbohydrate supply caused a decrease in Pi absorption by mycorrhizal roots. Microautoradiography of mycorrhizal roots after assimilation of 14CO2 revealed that: (1) the fungal partner had a high capacity to attract photosynthates; (2) the main transfer of carbohydrates was localized in the median zone of a mycorrhizal root; (3) carbohydrates that were absorbed by the mycorrhizal fungus were translocated to the fungal sheath and were homogeneously distributed; and (4) in the main exchange zone, cortical cell nuclei showed a high sink capacity, indicating increased metabolic activity in these cells. We postulate that (1) the phosphate demand of the host plant regulates absorption of Pi by the fungus, and (2) a bidirectional transfer of carbohydrates and Pi occurs across the same interface structure in ectomycorrhizal roots of Populus.

  5. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Polymeric systems for amorphous Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol produced by a hot-melt method. Part I: chemical and thermal stability during processing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, Manish; Stodghill, Steven P; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Repka, Michael A

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present research was to investigate the stability of an amorphous drug, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in polymer-based transmucosal systems. THC was incorporated in polyethylene oxide and hydroxypropylcellulose matrices by a hot-melt fabrication procedure, utilizing various processing aids. The chemical stability of the drug in the polymeric matrices was investigated with respect to processing temperature, processing time, formulation additives, and storage conditions. HPLC analysis of the THC-loaded systems indicated that the extent of drug degradation was influenced by all of the above mentioned variables. THC was particularly unstable in the vitamin E succinate-processed films, indicating a potential incompatibility. Thermal stability of the drug, polymers, and other ingredients at the elevated processing temperatures during the fabrication procedure, was evaluated using the isothermal mode of thermo-gravimetric analysis. When held at 160 and 200 degrees C, the weight percentage of THC decreased linearly as a function of time. Weight loss was controlled by blending the drug with polymers, PEO and HPC, of which PEO was determined to be more effective. Although higher temperatures lowered the polymer melt viscosity, THC and other materials were chemically and thermally unstable at such high temperatures. Due to this, matrix fabrication was found to be favorable at relatively lower temperatures, such as 120 degrees C.

  7. Selectivity switch in the catalytic functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates: selective synthesis in the presence of anomeric and structurally similar carbohydrates under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Takemoto, Yuki

    2013-03-15

    A catalytic process for the chemo- and regioselective functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates has been developed. This novel process allows selective thiocarbonylation, acylation, and sulfonylation of a particular hydroxy group in a particular carbohydrate in the simultaneous presence of structurally similar carbohydrates such as anomers. In addition, the chemoselectivity can be switched by regulating only the length of the alkyl chain in the organotin catalyst.

  8. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Abeylath, Sampath C.; Turos, Edward

    2007-01-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-mannofuranose, 6-O-acryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-galactopyranose, 2-N-acryloyl-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine, 5-O-acryloyl-2,3-isopropylidene-1-methoxy-β-D-ribofuranose and 4-N-acetyl-5’-O-acryloyl-2’,3’-O-isopropylidene cytidine. Scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and proton NMR analysis of the emulsions indicated essentially 100% incorporation of the carbohydrate acrylate monomer into the polymer with the exception of O-benzyl- and O-benzoyl-protected carbohydrate acrylates, which gave incomplete incorporation. Formation of larger glyconanoparticles of ~80nm with (unprotected) 3-O-acryloyl-D-glucose and 5-O-acryloyl-1-methoxy-β-D-ribofuranose revealed the influence of free hydroxyl groups in the monomer on the particle size during polymerization, a feature which is also apparently dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the matrix. This methodology allows for a new, simple route to the synthesis of polymeric glyconanoparticles with potential applications in targeted drug delivery and materials development. PMID:18677404

  9. Equilibrium polymerization on the equivalent-neighbor lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Miron

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium polymerization problem is solved exactly on the equivalent-neighbor lattice. The Flory-Huggins (Flory, 1986) entropy of mixing is exact for this lattice. The discrete version of the n-vector model is verified when n approaches 0 is equivalent to the equal reactivity polymerization process in the whole parameter space, including the polymerized phase. The polymerization processes for polymers satisfying the Schulz (1939) distribution exhibit nonuniversal critical behavior. A close analogy is found between the polymerization problem of index the Schulz r and the Bose-Einstein ideal gas in d = -2r dimensions, with the critical polymerization corresponding to the Bose-Einstein condensation.

  10. Thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polystyrene/boron nitride nanocomposites prepared by in situ reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingyi; Wang, Shen; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Pingkai; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-01-09

    Thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer/boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites are highly attractive for various applications in many thermal management fields. However, so far most of the preparation methods for polymer/BN nanocomposites have usually caused difficulties in the material post processing. Here, an in situ grafting approach is designed to fabricate thermally conductive, electrically insulating and post-melt processable polystyrene (PS)/BN nanosphere (BNNS) nanocomposites by initiating styrene (St) on the surface functionalized BNNSs via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced thermal conductivity. For example, at a St/BN feeding ratio of 5:1, an enhancement ratio of 1375% is achieved in comparison with pure PS. Moreover, the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites show a desirable weak dependence on frequency, and the dielectric loss tangent of the nanocomposites remains at a very low level. More importantly, the nanocomposites can be subjected to multiple melt processing to form different shapes. Our method can become a universal approach to prepare thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polymer nanocomposites with diverse monomers and nanofillers.

  11. Thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polystyrene/boron nitride nanocomposites prepared by in situ reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingyi; Wang, Shen; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Pingkai; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer/boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites are highly attractive for various applications in many thermal management fields. However, so far most of the preparation methods for polymer/BN nanocomposites have usually caused difficulties in the material post processing. Here, an in situ grafting approach is designed to fabricate thermally conductive, electrically insulating and post-melt processable polystyrene (PS)/BN nanosphere (BNNS) nanocomposites by initiating styrene (St) on the surface functionalized BNNSs via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced thermal conductivity. For example, at a St/BN feeding ratio of 5:1, an enhancement ratio of 1375% is achieved in comparison with pure PS. Moreover, the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites show a desirable weak dependence on frequency, and the dielectric loss tangent of the nanocomposites remains at a very low level. More importantly, the nanocomposites can be subjected to multiple melt processing to form different shapes. Our method can become a universal approach to prepare thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polymer nanocomposites with diverse monomers and nanofillers.

  12. Carbohydrates in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Joshi, Lokesh

    2007-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of carbohydrates in living systems and medicine is growing due to the increasing understanding of their biological and pharmacological relevance. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous and perform a wide array of biological roles. Carbohydrate-based or -modified therapeutics are used extensively in cardiovascular and hematological treatments ranging from inflammatory diseases and anti-thrombotic treatments to wound healing. Heparin is a well-known and widely used example of a carbohydrate-based drug but will not be discussed as it has been extensively reviewed. We will detail carbohydrate-based and -modified therapeutics, both those that are currently marketed or in various stages of clinical trials and those that are potential therapeutics based on promising preclinical investigations. Carbohydrate-based therapeutics include polysaccharide and oligosaccharide anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant and anti-thrombotic agents from natural and synthetic sources, some as an alternative to heparin and others which were designed based on known structure-functional relationships. Some of these compounds have multiple biological effects, showing anti-adhesive, anti-HIV and anti-arthrithic activities. Small molecules, derivatives or mimetics of complement inhibitors, are detailed for use in limiting ischemia/ reperfusion injuries. Monosaccharides, both natural and synthetic, have been investigated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties. Modification by glycosylation of natural products, or glycosylation-mimicking modification, has a significant effect on the parent molecule including increased plasma half-life and refining or increasing desired functions. It is hoped that this review will highlight the vast therapeutic potential of these natural bioactive molecules.

  13. Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Hudson, Jared L.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material.

  14. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations.

  15. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  16. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingzhou; Ward Muscatello, Michelle M; Asher, Sanford A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols.

  17. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif†

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qingzhou; Muscatello, Michelle M. Ward; Asher, Sanford A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols. PMID:19381378

  18. Gold glyconanoparticles for mimics and measurement of metal ion-mediated carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Angela J; Haines, Alan H; Russell, David A

    2006-01-31

    To mimic and measure calcium ion-mediated carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, four lactose derivatives have been synthesized for assembly on gold nanoparticles. The series of lactose derivatives varied by the length of the thiolated ethylene glycol anchor chain [O(CH2CH2O)(m)CH2CH2SH; where m = 0, 1, 2, and 3] used to self-assemble the carbohydrates to the preformed gold nanoparticles of ca. 16 nm diameter. Upon addition of calcium ions to the lactose-stabilized nanoparticles, rapid carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions were visualized and subsequently measured using UV-visible spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanoparticle aggregates formed via metal-mediated carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions could be readily redispersed through the addition of EDTA. Multiple reaggregation and redispersion cycles were achieved, confirming that the aggregation process was due to metal ion-mediated carbohydrate interactions rather than calcium chelation by residual citrate ions on the particle surface. The essential involvement of the lactose moiety in Ca2+ complexation was shown by control measurements on related D-glucose-derivatized nanoparticles, where a significantly reduced aggregation response was obtained only at high ion concentrations. Other group 2 metal ions with radii larger than that of calcium, viz., barium and strontium, were also shown to mediate the aggregation of the lactose-stabilized nanoparticles. The induced aggregation of the lactose nanoparticles was determined to be quantitatively dependent upon the calcium ion concentration. Furthermore, the analytical sensitivity of the calcium-induced aggregation and the linear dynamic range were dependent on the length of the ethylene glycol anchor chain. The shortest ethylene glycol chain (m = 0) gave the most sensitive response with the optimum limit of detection (0.8 mM Ca2+), whereas the longest ethylene glycol chain (m = 3) provides a measurement of calcium ion concentration

  19. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented.

  20. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide–protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi’s model (t1/2). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  1. Discovery and design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Araújo, Ana C; Bini, Davide; Gabrielli, Luca; Russo, Laura; Shaikh, Nasrin

    2010-08-01

    Till now, the importance of carbohydrates has been underscored, if compared with the two other major classes of biopolymers such as oligonucleotides and proteins. Recent advances in glycobiology and glycochemistry have imparted a strong interest in the study of this enormous family of biomolecules. Carbohydrates have been shown to be implicated in recognition processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and cell-intruder recognition phenomena. In addition, carbohydrates are recognized as differentiation markers and as antigenic determinants. Due to their relevant biological role, carbohydrates are promising candidates for drug design and disease treatment. However, the growing number of human disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation that are being identified as resulting from abnormalities in glycan structures and protein glycosylation strongly indicates that a fast development of glycobiology, glycochemistry and glycomedicine is highly desirable. The topics give an overview of different approaches that have been used to date for the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; this includes the use of native synthetic carbohydrates, the use of carbohydrate mimics designed on the basis of their native counterpart, the use of carbohydrates as scaffolds and finally the design of glyco-fused therapeutics, one of the most recent approaches. The review covers mainly literature that has appeared since 2000, except for a few papers cited for historical reasons. The reader will gain an overview of the current strategies applied to the design of carbohydrate-based therapeutics; in particular, the advantages/disadvantages of different approaches are highlighted. The topic is presented in a general, basic manner and will hopefully be a useful resource for all readers who are not familiar with it. In addition, in order to stress the potentialities of carbohydrates, several examples of carbohydrate-based marketed therapeutics are given

  2. Polymerization of perfluorobutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J.; Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Diisopropyl peroxydicarbonate dissolved in liquid perfluorobutadiene is conducted in a sealed vessel at the autogenous pressure of polymerization. Reaction temperature, ratio of catalyst to monomer, and amount of agitation determine degree of polymerization and product yield.

  3. Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Part of a Healthy Diet? en español Los carbohidratos, el azúcar y su hijo What Are Carbohydrates? ... a person's risk of developing health problems like diabetes. Some carbohydrate-dense foods are healthier than others. ...

  4. Carbohydrate nanotechnology: hierarchical assembly using nature's other information carrying biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Zheng, Yeting; Munro, Catherine J; Ji, Yiwen; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2015-08-01

    Despite their central role in directing some of the most complex biological processes, carbohydrates--nature's other information carrying biopolymer--have been largely ignored as building blocks for synthetic hierarchical assemblies. The non-stoichiometric binding and astronomical diversity characteristic of carbohydrates could lead to tantalizingly complex assembly algorithms, but these attributes simultaneously increase the difficulty of preparing carbohydrate assemblies and anticipating their behavior. Convergences in biotechnology, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, surface science, and supramolecular chemistry have led to many recent important breakthroughs in glycan microarrays and synthetic carbohydrate receptors, where the idiosyncrasies of carbohydrate structure and binding are increasingly considered. We hope to inspire more researchers to consider carbohydrate structure, diversity, and binding as attractive tools for constructing synthetic hierarchical assemblies.

  5. Chemical biology approaches to designing defined carbohydrate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anish, Chakkumkal; Schumann, Benjamin; Pereira, Claney Lebev; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-01-16

    Carbohydrate antigens have shown promise as important targets for developing effective vaccines and pathogen detection strategies. Modifying purified microbial glycans through synthetic routes or completely synthesizing antigenic motifs are attractive options to advance carbohydrate vaccine development. However, limited knowledge on structure-property correlates hampers the discovery of immunoprotective carbohydrate epitopes. Recent advancements in tools for glycan modification, high-throughput screening of biological samples, and 3D structural analysis may facilitate antigen discovery process. This review focuses on advances that accelerate carbohydrate-based vaccine development and various technologies that are driving these efforts. Herein we provide a critical overview of approaches and resources available for rational design of better carbohydrate antigens. Structurally defined and fully synthetic oligosaccharides, designed based on molecular understanding of antigen-antibody interactions, offer a promising alternative for developing future carbohydrate vaccines.

  6. Investigation of Solution Polymerizations in Microgravity and 1 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Alvin P.

    1998-01-01

    The in-situ dielectric spectra for the solution polymerization of polydiacetylene has been successfully measured. The results show a distinct difference between the response for the bulk solution and surface polymerization. It also shows a low frequency peak in the dissipation factor which is present in both the bulk and surface polymerizations. These features may prove to be significant indicators for important polymerization processes. Future studies will investigate the mechanisms responsible for these dielectric responses. This technique will eventually be used to monitor microgravity polymerizations and provide in-situ data on how microgravity affects solution polymerization.

  7. Carbohydrate Analysis: Can We Control the Ripening of Bananas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, S. Todd; Farmer, Catherine E.; Cerpovicz, Paul F.

    2002-04-01

    We have developed an experiment for nutritional/introductory biochemistry courses that focuses on carbohydrate analysis--specifically, the carbohydrates found in bananas and the change in carbohydrate composition as the banana ripens. Pairs of students analyze the starch and reducing sugar content of green, ripe, and overripe bananas. Using the techniques and knowledge gained from these analyses, they then investigate the influence of various storage methods on the ripening process. While this experiment was developed for an introductory-level biochemistry lab, it can easily be adapted for use in other laboratory programs that seek to teach the fundamentals of carbohydrate analysis.

  8. Self-assembling process of flash nanoprecipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer to produce drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Hong, Seungpyo; Prud'homme, Robert K.; Liu, Ying

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental study of self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles in the process of flash nanoprecipitation using a multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM). β-Carotene and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are used as a model drug and a macromolecule, respectively, and encapsulated in diblock copolymers. Flow patterns in the MIVM are microscopically visualized by mixing iron nitrate (Fe(NO3)3) and potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) to precipitate Fe(SCN) x (3- x)+ . Effects of physical parameters, including Reynolds number, supersaturation rate, interaction force, and drug-loading rate, on size distribution of the nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. It is critical for the nanoprecipitation process to have a short mixing time, so that the solvent replacement starts homogeneously in the reactor. The properties of the nanoparticles depend on the competitive kinetics of polymer aggregation and organic solute nucleation and growth. We report the existence of a threshold Reynolds number over which nanoparticle sizes become independent of mixing. A similar value of the threshold Reynolds number is confirmed by independent measurements of particle size, flow-pattern visualization, and our previous numerical simulation along with experimental study of competitive reactions in the MIVM.

  9. Processive action of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei is revealed as ‘burst’ kinetics on fluorescent polymeric model substrates

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Reaction conditions for the reducing-end-specific derivatization of cellulose substrates with the fluorogenic compound, anthranilic acid, have been established. Hydrolysis of fluorescence-labelled celluloses by cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei was consistent with the active-site titration kinetics (burst kinetics), which allowed the quantification of the processivity of the enzyme. The processivity values of 88±10, 42±10 and 34±2.0 cellobiose units were found for Cel7A acting on labelled bacterial cellulose, bacterial microcrystalline cellulose and endoglucanase-pretreated bacterial cellulose respectively. The anthranilic acid derivatization also provides an alternative means for estimating the average degree of polymerization of cellulose and, furthermore, allows the quantitative monitoring of the production of reducing end groups on solid cellulose on hydrolysis by cellulases. Hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose by cellulases from T. reesei revealed that, by contrast with endoglucanase Cel5A, neither cellobiohydrolases Cel7A nor Cel6A produced detectable amounts of new reducing end groups on residual cellulose. PMID:15362979

  10. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  11. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  12. Carbohydrates for training and competition.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A; Wong, Stephen H S; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2011-01-01

    An athlete's carbohydrate intake can be judged by whether total daily intake and the timing of consumption in relation to exercise maintain adequate carbohydrate substrate for the muscle and central nervous system ("high carbohydrate availability") or whether carbohydrate fuel sources are limiting for the daily exercise programme ("low carbohydrate availability"). Carbohydrate availability is increased by consuming carbohydrate in the hours or days prior to the session, intake during exercise, and refuelling during recovery between sessions. This is important for the competition setting or for high-intensity training where optimal performance is desired. Carbohydrate intake during exercise should be scaled according to the characteristics of the event. During sustained high-intensity sports lasting ~1 h, small amounts of carbohydrate, including even mouth-rinsing, enhance performance via central nervous system effects. While 30-60 g · h(-1) is an appropriate target for sports of longer duration, events >2.5 h may benefit from higher intakes of up to 90 g · h(-1). Products containing special blends of different carbohydrates may maximize absorption of carbohydrate at such high rates. In real life, athletes undertake training sessions with varying carbohydrate availability. Whether implementing additional "train-low" strategies to increase the training adaptation leads to enhanced performance in well-trained individuals is unclear.

  13. Compositional Analysis of Whole Grains, Processed Grains, Grain Co-Products, and Other Carbohydrate Sources with Applicability to Pet Animal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Beloshapka, Alison N.; Buff, Preston R.; Fahey, George C.; Swanson, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to measure the proximate, starch, amino acid, and mineral compositions of grains, grain co-products, and other carbohydrate sources with potential use in pet foods. Thirty-two samples from barley (barley flake, cut barley, ground pearled barley, malted barley, whole pearled barley, pearled barley flakes, and steamed rolled barley); oats (groats, ground oatmeal, ground steamed groats, instant oats, oat bran, oat fiber, oat flour, quick oats, regular rolled oats, steamed rolled oat groats, and steel cut groats); rice (brown rice, polished rice, defatted rice bran, and rice flour); and miscellaneous carbohydrate sources (canary grass seed, hulled millet, whole millet, quinoa, organic spelt hull pellets, potato flake, sorghum, whole wheat, and whole yellow corn) were analyzed. Crude protein, amino acid, fat, dietary fiber, resistant starch, and mineral concentrations were highly variable among the respective fractions (i.e., barley flake vs. malted barley vs. steamed rolled barley) as well as among the various grains (i.e., barley flake vs. brown rice vs. canary grass seed). These ingredients not only provide a readily available energy source, but also a source of dietary fiber, resistant starch, essential amino acids, and macrominerals for pet diets. PMID:28231117

  14. Compositional Analysis of Whole Grains, Processed Grains, Grain Co-Products, and Other Carbohydrate Sources with Applicability to Pet Animal Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Beloshapka, Alison N; Buff, Preston R; Fahey, George C; Swanson, Kelly S

    2016-03-25

    Our objective was to measure the proximate, starch, amino acid, and mineral compositions of grains, grain co-products, and other carbohydrate sources with potential use in pet foods. Thirty-two samples from barley (barley flake, cut barley, ground pearled barley, malted barley, whole pearled barley, pearled barley flakes, and steamed rolled barley); oats (groats, ground oatmeal, ground steamed groats, instant oats, oat bran, oat fiber, oat flour, quick oats, regular rolled oats, steamed rolled oat groats, and steel cut groats); rice (brown rice, polished rice, defatted rice bran, and rice flour); and miscellaneous carbohydrate sources (canary grass seed, hulled millet, whole millet, quinoa, organic spelt hull pellets, potato flake, sorghum, whole wheat, and whole yellow corn) were analyzed. Crude protein, amino acid, fat, dietary fiber, resistant starch, and mineral concentrations were highly variable among the respective fractions (i.e., barley flake vs. malted barley vs. steamed rolled barley) as well as among the various grains (i.e., barley flake vs. brown rice vs. canary grass seed). These ingredients not only provide a readily available energy source, but also a source of dietary fiber, resistant starch, essential amino acids, and macrominerals for pet diets.

  15. Carbohydrate and carbohydrate + protein for cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, Kristin L; Zachwieja, Jeffrey J; Smith, Johneric W

    2008-02-01

    Carbohydrate intake during endurance exercise delays the onset of fatigue and improves performance. Two recent cycling studies have reported increased time to exhaustion when protein is ingested together with carbohydrate. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that ingestion of a carbohydrate + protein beverage will lead to significant improvements in cycling time-trial performance relative to placebo and carbohydrate alone. Thirteen cyclists completed 120 min of constant-load ergometer cycling. Thereafter, participants performed a time-trial in which they completed a set amount of work (7 kJ kg(-1)) as quickly as possible. Participants completed four experimental trials, the first for familiarization and then three randomized, double-blind treatments consisting of a placebo, carbohydrate, and carbohydrate + protein. Participants received 250 ml of beverage every 15 min during the constant-load ride. Time-trial performance for carbohydrate (37.1 min, s = 3.8) was significantly (P < 0.05) faster than placebo (39.7 min, s = 4.6). Time-trial performance for carbohydrate + protein (38.8 min, s = 5.5) was not significantly different from either placebo or carbohydrate. Ingestion of a carbohydrate beverage during two hours of constant-load cycling significantly enhanced subsequent time-trial performance compared with placebo. The carbohydrate + protein beverage provided no additional performance benefit.

  16. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  17. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  18. Development of processes and techniques for molding thermally stable, fire-retardant, low-smoke-emitting polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    All available newly developed nonmetallic thermally stable polymers were examined for the development of processes and techniques by compression molding, injection molding, or thermoforming cabin interior parts. Efforts were directed toward developing molding techniques of new polymers to economically produce usable nonmetallic molded parts. Data on the flame resistant characteristics of the materials were generated from pilot plant batches. Preliminary information on the molding characteristics of the various thermoplastic materials was obtained by producing actual parts.

  19. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F; Garrison, Barbara J

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  20. Formulation and process considerations for the design of sildenafil-loaded polymeric microparticles by vibrational spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Bohr, Adam; Aragão-Santiago, Leticia; Klingl, Andreas; Kissel, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The current study reports the preparation and characterization of sildenafil-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microparticles (MPs) by means of vibrational spray-drying. Emphasis was placed on relevant formulation and process parameters with influence on the properties of obtained powders. Materials and methods, results and discussion: The solid state solubility of sildenafil in spray-dried PLGA-MPs amounted to 17 wt.%. Thus, a drug loading below and above the determined solubility limit resulted in solid solutions and phase separation (i.e. solid dispersions), respectively. Furthermore, interactions between sildenafil and the PLGA matrix were observed for the spray-dried MPs. Optimization of spray-drying conditions allowed for a fabrication of defined MPs (size range of ∼4-8 μm) displaying a high sildenafil encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and sustained sildenafil release (from ∼4 to >12 h). The individual drug release rates from the spray-dried formulations were mainly a function of the drug loading, applied polymer and MP size. Finally, a scale-up of the preparation process did not result in a relevant change of the physicochemical and in vitro drug release properties of the prepared powders. Identification of relevant formulation and spray-drying parameters enabled the fabrication of tailored sildenafil-loaded PLGA-based MPs, which meet the needs of the individual application (e.g. controlled drug delivery to the lungs).

  1. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  2. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Hearon, II, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-01-10

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  3. Investigation of the Evolution of Crystal Size and Shape during Temperature Cycling and in the Presence of a Polymeric Additive Using Combined Process Analytical Technologies.

    PubMed

    Simone, Elena; Klapwijk, Anneke R; Wilson, Chick C; Nagy, Zoltan K

    2017-04-05

    Crystal size and shape can be manipulated to enhance the qualities of the final product. In this work the steady-state shape and size of succinic acid crystals, with and without a polymeric additive (Pluronic P123) at 350 mL, scale is reported. The effect of the amplitude of cycles as well as the heating/cooling rates is described, and convergent cycling (direct nucleation control) is compared to static cycling. The results show that the shape of succinic acid crystals changes from plate- to diamond-like after multiple cycling steps, and that the time required for this morphology change to occur is strongly related to the type of cycling. Addition of the polymer is shown to affect both the final shape of the crystals and the time needed to reach size and shape steady-state conditions. It is shown how this phenomenon can be used to improve the design of the crystallization step in order to achieve more efficient downstream operations and, in general, to help optimize the whole manufacturing process.

  4. Investigation of the Evolution of Crystal Size and Shape during Temperature Cycling and in the Presence of a Polymeric Additive Using Combined Process Analytical Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Crystal size and shape can be manipulated to enhance the qualities of the final product. In this work the steady-state shape and size of succinic acid crystals, with and without a polymeric additive (Pluronic P123) at 350 mL, scale is reported. The effect of the amplitude of cycles as well as the heating/cooling rates is described, and convergent cycling (direct nucleation control) is compared to static cycling. The results show that the shape of succinic acid crystals changes from plate- to diamond-like after multiple cycling steps, and that the time required for this morphology change to occur is strongly related to the type of cycling. Addition of the polymer is shown to affect both the final shape of the crystals and the time needed to reach size and shape steady-state conditions. It is shown how this phenomenon can be used to improve the design of the crystallization step in order to achieve more efficient downstream operations and, in general, to help optimize the whole manufacturing process. PMID:28867966

  5. Coming of age: carbohydrates and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Brian A; Kasper, Dennis L

    2005-02-01

    Adaptive immune responses have long been considered the "territory" of antigenic proteins, whereas carbohydrates are characterized as T-cell-independent antigens that are not typically recognized by the complete adaptive machinery. The current modus operandi when searching for dominant epitopes is the use of synthetic peptides designed from the primary structure of interesting target proteins; however, there is growing evidence that sugars can also play a critical role in immune recognition. Findings reported in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology begin to shed light on the differences in protein glycosylation that can occur in association with disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and the effect these changes have on collagen recognition by the immune system. Other recent studies have shown that immunodominant glycopeptide "remnant" epitopes as well as glycosylation changes on self-proteins can generate autoimmunity. Finally, some types of carbohydrates are now known to be processed and presented to T cells by class II MHC. Taken together, these advances illustrate a clear importance for carbohydrate recognition in foreign and self antigens by the adaptive immune system. With the common presence of carbohydrate molecules on eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral surfaces, the impact of carbohydrates on adaptive immunity is now indisputable.

  6. Carbohydrates as Fat Replacers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingyun; Yao, Yuan

    2017-02-28

    The overconsumption of dietary fat contributes to various chronic diseases, which encourages attempts to develop and consume low-fat foods. Simple fat reduction causes quality losses that impede the acceptance of foods. Fat replacers are utilized to minimize the quality deterioration after fat reduction or removal to achieve low-calorie, low-fat claims. In this review, the forms of fats and their functions in contributing to food textural and sensory qualities are discussed in various food systems. The connections between fat reduction and quality loss are described in order to clarify the rationales of fat replacement. Carbohydrate fat replacers usually have low calorie density and provide gelling, thickening, stabilizing, and other texture-modifying properties. In this review, carbohydrates, including starches, maltodextrins, polydextrose, gums, and fibers, are discussed with regard to their interactions with other components in foods as well as their performances as fat replacers in various systems.

  7. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  8. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  9. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. The highest conductivities reported (approximately 4/Scm) were achieved with polythiophene in a polystyrene host polymer. The best films using a polyamide as base polymer were four orders of magnitude less conductive than the polystyrene films. The authors suggested that this was because polyimides were unable to swell sufficiently for infiltration of monomer as in the polystyrene. It was not clear, however, if the different conductivities obtained were merely the result of differing oxidation conditions. Oxidation time, temperature and oxidant concentration varied widely among the studies.

  10. Influence of polymeric electron injection layers on the electrical properties of solution-processed multilayered polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Eiji; Kurami, Kazuhiko

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we fabricated multilayered polymer-based light-emitting diodes (pLEDs) with various solution-processed electron-injection layers (EILs), and investigated the influence of the EILs on the electrical properties of pLEDs in indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-(1,4-phenylene((4-sec-butylphenyl)amino)-1,4-phenylene))] (TFB) (HTL)/poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-1,4-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) (EML)/EIL/Al structures. We have used the quaternized ammonium π-conjugated polyelectrolyte derivative (poly[(9,9-di(3,3‧-N,N‧-trimethylammonium)propylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-phenylene)]diiodide salt) (PF-PDTA), a mixture of PF-PDTA and CS2CO3, and the aliphatic-amine-based polymer poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) as solution-processed EILs, and compared them with LiF as a solvent-free EIL. The EILs enhanced the electron injection and improve the pLED performance. High external quantum efficiencies of nearly 4% were obtained in the pLEDs with the combination of a multilayered structure fabricated by a transfer printing technique and EILs of a PF-PDTA:CS2CO3 mixture and PEI. On the other hand, the device with PF-PDTA exhibited lower efficiency, higher driving voltage, and larger leakage current at lower voltage. The migration of ionic charges was suggested from the abnormal dielectric behaviors, and serious damage on the electrode material occurred when both an acid hole-injection layer (PEDOT:PSS) and PF-PDTA were used. On the other hand, the pLEDs with ultrathin PEI showed high performance and stable device operation in terms of the influence of ionic charges.

  11. Carbohydrates in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2005-08-01

    The success of allotransplantation has led to an increasing shortage of human organs from deceased donors. This crisis could be resolved by the use of organs from an anatomically suitable animal, such as the pig. The pig and human have, however, been evolving differently for approximately 80 million years, and numerous immunological and physiological barriers have developed that need to be overcome. Differences in carbohydrate epitopes on pig and human cells have been found to play a major role in some of the immunological barriers that have been identified to date. The rejection caused by the presence of galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (Gal) on the pig vascular endothelium and of natural anti-Gal antibodies in humans has recently been prevented by the breeding of pigs that do not express Gal, achieved by knocking out the gene for the enzyme alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase, which was made possible by the introduction of nuclear transfer/embryo transfer techniques. N-glycolylneuraminic acid (the so-called Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) has been identified as another carbohydrate antigen present in pigs that may need to be deleted if xenotransplantation is to be successful, although some doubt remains regarding its importance. There remain other antipig antibodies against hitherto unidentified antigenic targets that may well be involved in graft destruction; their possible carbohydrate target epitopes are discussed.

  12. PDMS-glass bonding using grafted polymeric adhesive--alternative process flow for compatibility with patterned biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Beh, Cyrus Weijie; Zhou, Weizhuang; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2012-10-21

    We report a novel modification of silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a polymer graft that allows interfacial bonding between an elastomer and glass substrate to be performed without exposure of the substrate to harsh treatment conditions, such as oxygen plasma. Organic molecules can thus be patterned within microfluidic channels and still remain functional post-bonding. In addition, after polymer grafting the PDMS can be stored in a desiccator for at least 40 days, and activated upon exposure to acidic buffer for bonding. The bonded devices remain fully bonded in excess of 80 psi driving pressure, with no signs of compromise to the bond integrity. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of our method with biological molecules using a proof-of-concept DNA sensing device, in which fluorescently-labelled DNA targets are successfully captured by a patterned probe in a device sealed using our method, while the pattern on a plasma-treated device was completely destroyed. Therefore, this method provides a much-needed alternative bonding process for incorporation of biological molecules in microfluidic devices.

  13. PDMS-Glass bonding using grafted polymeric adhesive - Alternative process flow for compatibility with patterned biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Cyrus Weijie; Zhou, Weizhuang

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel modification of silicone elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a polymer graft that allows interfacial bonding between elastomer and glass substrate to be performed without exposure of said substrate to harsh treatment conditions like oxygen plasma. Organic molecules can thus be patterned within microfluidic channels and still remain functional post-bonding. In addition, after polymer grafting the PDMS can be stored in a desiccator for at least 40 days, and activated upon exposure to acidic buffer for bonding. The bonded devices remain fully bonded in excess of 80 psi driving pressure, with no signs of compromise to the bond integrity. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of our method with biological molecules using a proof-of-concept DNA sensing device, in which fluorescently-labelled DNA targets are successfully captured by a patterned probe in a device sealed using our method, while the pattern on a plasma-treated device was completely destroyed. Therefore, this method provides a much-needed alternative bonding process for incorporation of biological molecules in microfluidic devices. PMID:22858861

  14. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  15. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J [Livermore, CA; Hatch, Anson V [Tracy, CA; Wang, Ying-Chih [Pleasanton, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA; Renzi, Ronald F [Tracy, CA; Claudnic, Mark R [Livermore, CA

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  16. Hydrocarbon polymeric binder for advanced solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. E. (Editor); Ashcraft, A. C., Jr.; Wise, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Various experimental factors were examined to determine the source of difficulty in an isoprene polymerization in the 5-gallon reactor which gave a non-uniform product of low functionality. It was concluded that process improvements relating to initiator and monomer purity were desirable, but that the main difficulty was in the initiator feed system. A new pumping system was installed and an analog simulation of the reactor, feed system and initiator decomposition kinetics was devised which permits the selection of initial initiator concentrations and feed rates to use to give a nearly uniform initiator concentration throughout a polymerization run. An isoprene polymerization was run in which the process improvements were implemented.

  17. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  18. Preparation of water-soluble glycoconjugated poly(acrylamide) for NMR analyses of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Trinh Anh; Trung, Phan Nghia; Dinh, Bui Long; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kato, Koichi

    2014-05-01

    Oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates are important biopolymers not only as carriers of information in cell-cell interactions but also as markers of cellular differentiation, aging, and malignant alteration. Molecular interactions where carbohydrates are involved are usually considered as weak interactions, so the study and evaluation of these interactions is still in its infancy. The evidences and studies of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCI) will be confirming the importance of this mechanism for specific cell adhesion and communication. Their development will go hand in hand with the development of new and more sensitive techniques to study weak interactions. Recently, synthetic glycopolymers with functions similar to those of such natural carbohydrates and with specific pendant saccharide moieties were used as a solution for enhancement CCI when forming polyvalent interactions. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous components of cell wall membranes and occur as glycolipids, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and capsular polysaccharides. As such they can participate in forefront intramolecular and intracellular events. Apart from their recognized roles in the physicochemical properties of glycolipids and glycoproteins. In this study, we designed trisaccharide monomers for free radical polymerization. Subsequently, the trisaccharide unit for chemical conjugation was synthesized from galactosamine in good yield. For further NMR analyses of CCI, glycopolymers composed of these sugar derivatives will be provided.

  19. Superresolution imaging captures carbohydrate utilization dynamics in human gut symbionts.

    PubMed

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S; Cameron, Elizabeth A; Martens, Eric C; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Biteen, Julie S

    2014-11-11

    Gut microbes play a key role in human health and nutrition by catabolizing a wide variety of glycans via enzymatic activities that are not encoded in the human genome. The ability to recognize and process carbohydrates strongly influences the structure of the gut microbial community. While the effects of diet on the microbiota are well documented, little is known about the molecular processes driving metabolism. To provide mechanistic insight into carbohydrate catabolism in gut symbionts, we studied starch processing in real time in the model Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) by single-molecule fluorescence. Although previous studies have explored Sus protein structure and function, the transient interactions, assembly, and collaboration of these outer membrane proteins have not yet been elucidated in live cells. Our live-cell superresolution imaging reveals that the polymeric starch substrate dynamically recruits Sus proteins, serving as an external scaffold for bacterial membrane assembly of the Sus complex, which may promote efficient capturing and degradation of starch. Furthermore, by simultaneously localizing multiple Sus outer membrane proteins on the B. thetaiotaomicron cell surface, we have characterized the dynamics and stoichiometry of starch-induced Sus complex assembly on the molecular scale. Finally, based on Sus protein knockout strains, we have discerned the mechanism of starch-induced Sus complex assembly in live anaerobic cells with nanometer-scale resolution. Our insights into the starch-induced outer membrane protein assembly central to this conserved nutrient uptake mechanism pave the way for the development of dietary or pharmaceutical therapies to control Bacteroidetes in the intestinal tract to enhance human health and treat disease. In this study, we used nanometer-scale superresolution imaging to reveal dynamic interactions between the proteins involved in starch processing by the prominent human gut symbiont

  20. In situ synthesis and characterization of silver/polymer nanocomposites by thermal cationic polymerization processes at room temperature: initiating systems based on organosilanes and starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tehfe, Mohamad-Ali; Jamois, Romain; Cousin, Patrice; Elkoun, Saïd; Robert, Mathieu

    2015-04-14

    New methods for the preparation of silver nanoparticles/polymer nanocomposite materials by thermal cationic polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) or α-pinene oxide (α-PO) at room temperature (RT) and under air were developed. The new initiating systems were based on silanes (Si), starch nanocrystals (StN) and metal salts. Excellent polymerization profiles were revealed. It was shown that silver nanoparticles (Ag(0) NPs) were in situ formed and that the addition of StN improves the polymerization efficiency. The as-synthesized nanocomposite materials contained spherical nanoparticles homogeneously dispersed in the polymer matrices. Polymers and nanoparticles were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis spectroscopy. A coherent picture of the involved chemical mechanisms is presented.

  1. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 2 carbon atoms of mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by sequentially treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a vanadium compound, and (iv) a Group IIIa metal halide. The process as above is described wherein the inert solid support material is an inorganic oxide or mixtures of inorganic oxides.

  2. Noncaloric Benefits of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    Noncaloric benefits of carbohydrates are due to the presence of dietary fibers, which are a heterogeneous group of natural food sources and form an important component of a healthy diet. They differ in physiochemical properties such as solubility, fermentability and viscosity. They have a wide range of physiological effects resulting in gastrointestinal and systemic benefits. These include appetite, satiety, bowel transit time and function, production of short-chain fatty acids and certain vitamins, and effects on gut microbiota, immunity and inflammation, as well as mineral absorption. They also help to control the glycemic status and serum lipid levels, resulting in reduced incidence rates of atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke and cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Microwave Processing of Polymeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    on the polymer structure. In simple liquids, the relationship of dielectric constant and dipole moment has been successfully expressed by the Onsager ...of the chain will vary continuously in time. However, the Onsager theory is not sufficient to describe the dielectric properties of polymer molecules...to be determined. Fr;hlich (4) modified the Onsager theory by incorporating the Kirkwood reduction factor into the Onsager equation which resulted in

  4. Heterogeneous oxidative and polymerization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tumas, W.; Ott, K.; Baker, R.T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We performed experiments directed at understanding novel catalysts and the use of supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction medium for catalytic reactions. We participated in program development activities with individual companies and with trade organizations to develop research and funding strategies for catalysis on a national level. This work has helped to identify scientific and technological opportunities for catalysis research in industry and for large national initiatives such as global climate change. Our work has poised the Laboratory to participate in a spectrum of activities where catalysis science and technology will play a role.

  5. Controlled synthesis and microwave absorption properties of Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI composite via an in-situ polymerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Yang, Yi; Du, Youwei

    2015-03-01

    The binary composites of conducting polyaniline (PANI) and nickle zinc ferrite were synthesized by an in-situ polymerization process, and the electromagnetic absorption properties of the composites were also investigated. The FT-IR spectra present the peaks of PANI (1562, 1481, 1301, 1109, and 799 cm-1) and the bonds of NiZn ferrite (579 and 390 cm-1), indicating the existence of both NiZn ferrite particles and PANI in the composites. With the increasing ratio of nickle zinc ferrite, the composites distributes in irregular compared with pure PANI and Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4. The TG curves of the pure PANI and PANI/Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4 composites with different molar ratios clearly show the increase percentage of the ferrite in the composites. Furthermore, we found that the excellent electromagnetic absorption properties and wide absorption bandwidth can be achieved by adjusting proper molar ratios Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4 to PANI. The maximum reflection loss of Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI can reach to -41 dB at 12.8 GHz and the bandwidth exceeding -10 dB can reach to 5 GHz with the absorber thickness of 2.6 mm at the molar ratio of 1:2. This can be attributed to the enhancing magnetic loss and the better impedance matching. Therefore, Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI ferrite composites can become a new kind of candidate in the field of the microwave absorbing.

  6. Effects of particle size and binding affinity for small interfering RNA on the cellular processing, intestinal permeation and anti-inflammatory efficacy of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenyue; Tang, Cui; Yin, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Silencing of excessive secreted tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α from macrophages might be an effective therapy of ulcerative colitis (UC), which acquires improvements on small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery vectors. Thus, in the present study, the effects of particle size and binding affinity of four polymeric nanoparticles on siRNA delivery for the treatment of UC were evaluated. Galactosylated trimethyl chitosan-cysteine (GTC) nanoparticles of varying particle size and binding affinity for siRNA were prepared and TNF-α siRNA was encapsulated. Their cellular transport was investigated in murine macrophages and Caco-2 cell monolayers were utilized to analysis the intestinal permeation. Finally, in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in a mouse model of UC. Although marginal effects of particle size on the in vitro gene silencing efficiency were detected, GTC nanoparticles with a particle size of 450 nm and stronger binding affinity for siRNA showed reduced intestinal epithelial permeability and enhanced in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy compared to those with a particle size of 200 nm. By contrast, the delivery processes were significantly affected by the binding affinity for siRNA, where smaller GTC nanoparticles (200 nm) with moderate siRNA binding strength exhibited remarkable cytoplasmic distribution and sufficient intracellular release of siRNA, as well as a sustained in vitro and in vivo gene silencing effect. Nanoparticles with a particle size of 450 nm or balanced binding affinity for siRNA might be preferable for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  8. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  9. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  10. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbo­hydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures. PMID:19171971

  11. ESR studies of semicontinuous emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Westmoreland, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in the detection and quantification of propagating radicals during a semicontinuous emulsion polymerization. The propagating radical concentration is crucial for the determination of kinetic parameters of the emulsion polymerization process. A flow reactor was built which involves a closed-loop flow system that circulates latex from the polymerization reactor through the ESR cavity for free-radical measurements and back to the reactor. With the continuous measurement of the radical concentrations during a polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), {bar n} (average number of radicals per particle) and k{sub p} (propagating rate constant), are measured throughout the entire polymerization. For the polymerization of the MMA system studied, the authors observed a gradual increased in n and decrease in k{sub p} during the run, suggesting a diffusionally controlled process and that the polymerization is not occurring homogeneously throughout the polymer particles. In the glassy pMMA matrix, radicals can be {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} within a minimum volume and remain unterminated.

  12. The long underestimated carbonyl function of carbohydrates – an organocatalyzed shot into carbohydrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mahrwald, R

    2015-09-21

    The aggressive and strong development of organocatalysis provides several protocols for the convenient utilization of the carbonyl function of unprotected carbohydrates in C-C-bond formation processes. These amine-catalyzed mechanisms enable multiple cascade-protocols for the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate-derived compound classes. Several, only slightly different protocols, have been developed for the application of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in the stereoselective chain-elongation of unprotected carbohydrates and the synthesis of highly functionalized C-glycosides of defined configuration. In addition, C-glycosides can also be accessed by amine-catalyzed reactions with methyl ketones. By a one-pot cascade reaction of isocyanides with unprotected aldoses and amino acids access to defined configured glycopeptide mimetics is achieved. Depending on the reaction conditions different origins to control the installation of configuration during the bond-formation process were observed.

  13. Issues in Nutrition: Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Barth

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and dietary fibers. Resistant starches resemble fiber in their behavior in the intestinal tract, and may have positive effects on blood glucose levels and the gut microbiome. Fibers are classified as soluble and insoluble, but most fiber-containing foods contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Many artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes are available. Most natural sources of sweeteners also are energy sources. Many artificial sweeteners contain no kilocalories in the amounts typically used. Sugar alcohols may have a laxative effect when consumed in large amounts. Glycemic index and glycemic load are measurements that help quantify serum glucose response after ingestion of particular foods. These measurements may be affected by the combination of foods consumed in a given meal, and the glycemic index may vary among individuals eating the same meal. Eating foods with a low glycemic index may help prevent development of type 2 diabetes. There is no definitive evidence to recommend low-carbohydrate diets over low-fat diets for long-term weight loss; they are equally effective. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  14. [Computation techniques in the conformational analysis of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Gebst, A G; Grachev, A A; Shashkov, A S; Nifant'ev, N E

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of modern studies of carbohydrates is devoted to spatial mechanisms of their participation in the cell recognition processes and directed design of inhibitors of these processes. Any progress in this field is impossible without the development of theoretical conformational analysis of carbohydrates. In this review, we generalize literature data on the potentialities of using of different molecular-mechanic force fields, the methods of quantum mechanics, and molecular dynamics to study the conformation of glycoside bond. A possibility of analyzing the reactivity of carbohydrates with the computation techniques is also discussed in brief.

  15. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  16. Structural and Functional Studies of Peptide-Carbohydrate Mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    Certain peptides act as molecular mimics of carbohydrates in that they are specifically recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins. Peptides that bind to anti-carbohydrate antibodies, carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and lectins have been identified. These peptides are potentially useful as vaccines and therapeutics; for example, immunologically functional peptide molecular mimics (mimotopes) can strengthen or modify immune responses induced by carbohydrate antigens. However, peptides that bind specifically to carbohydrate-binding proteins may not necessarily show the corresponding biological activity, and further selection based on biochemical studies is always required. The degree of structural mimicry required to generate the desired biological activity is therefore an interesting question. This review will discuss recent structural studies of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry employing NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling, as well as relevant biochemical data. These studies provide insights into the basis of mimicry at the molecular level. Comparisons with other carbohydrate-mimetic compounds, namely proteins and glycopeptides, will be drawn. Finally, implications for the design of new therapeutic compounds will also be presented.

  17. Force fields and scoring functions for carbohydrate simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiuming; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Cossins, Benjamin P; Xu, Zhijian; Shao, Qiang; Ding, Kai; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jiye

    2015-01-12

    Carbohydrate dynamics plays a vital role in many biological processes, but we are not currently able to probe this with experimental approaches. The highly flexible nature of carbohydrate structures differs in many aspects from other biomolecules, posing significant challenges for studies employing computational simulation. Over past decades, computational study of carbohydrates has been focused on the development of structure prediction methods, force field optimization, molecular dynamics simulation, and scoring functions for carbohydrate-protein interactions. Advances in carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions can be largely attributed to enhanced computational algorithms, application of quantum mechanics, and the increasing number of experimental structures determined by X-ray and NMR techniques. The conformational analysis of carbohydrates is challengeable and has gone into intensive study in elucidating the anomeric, the exo-anomeric, and the gauche effects. Here, we review the issues associated with carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions, which will have a broad application in the field of carbohydrate-based drug design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution of extracellular carbohydrates in three intertidal mudflats in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brouwer, J. F. C.; de Deckere, E. M. G. T.; Stal, L. J.

    2003-02-01

    In this study, the spatial distribution of two operationally defined extracellular carbohydrate fractions (water- and EDTA-extractable carbohydrates) were examined in three intertidal mudflats in Western Europe (Dollard, the Netherlands; Marennes, France; Humber, UK). The three mudflats were sampled along cross-shore transects and sediment cores were sliced to a depth of 5 cm. In these mudflats, diatoms were the dominant component of the microphytobenthos. Carbohydrate content showed little variation with depth, but it varied along transects within each mudflat. Carbohydrate contents were also significantly different between the mudflats, and the carbohydrate contents of the stations within a mudflat grouped together resulting in separate clusters. This was also observed when the Marennes mudflat was investigated on a temporal scale. These results suggest that processes that act on the scale of whole mudflats determine the variations in extracellular carbohydrate contents. In the surface 0.5 cm of the sediment, water-extractable carbohydrates showed a correlation with both chlorophyll a content and median grain size, while EDTA-extractable carbohydrates were only correlated with median grain size. Incubation experiments also showed the importance of microphytobenthos as a source of extracellular carbohydrate, especially when subjected to the light. Analyses of the monosaccharide distribution of the carbohydrate fractions revealed that the carbohydrate composition was largely similar between the areas investigated. Structurally, the carbohydrates found in these sediments seem to represent a biorefractory part of the freshly produced carbohydrates that remained after rapid degradation of the more labile component.

  19. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  20. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  1. Autoacceleration and kinetics of electrochemical polymerization of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yen; Sun, Yan; Tang, Xun )

    1989-06-15

    A convenient method is presented for determining the rate of polyaniline formation in the electrochemical polymerization of aniline in aqueous HCl solution utilizing cyclic potential sweep techniques. In this method, the mass of polyaniline deposited on a platinum electrode is correlated with the polymer anodic peak current that is recorded during the polymerization. The rates of polymer deposition were therefore monitored by the increases in the anodic peak current at various concentrations of aniline. A kinetic expression obtained for the polymerization accounts well for the autoacceleration process in the electrochemical polymerization of aniline and supports the mechanism of polymerization in which monomeric aniline is incorporated in the growing polymer.

  2. Polymeric MST - high precision at low cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elderstig, Håkan; Larsson, Olle

    1997-09-01

    A low-cost production process for fabrication of polymeric microstructures from micromachined silicon is demonstrated in a splice for the splicing of optical fibers and an optical motherboard. Measurements on splices showed less than 0.5 dB insertion losses. The prototype polymeric motherboard concisted of an optical receiver module. The detector that was mounted on the polymeric optical motherboard detected about 70% of the transferred light. Measurements with modulated light indicates an optical bandwidth of 5 GHz at 2 V reverse current on the pin-diode.

  3. Polymeric nanoparticles: the future of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Banik, Brittany L; Fattahi, Pouria; Brown, Justin L

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most studied organic strategies for nanomedicine. Intense interest lies in the potential of polymeric NPs to revolutionize modern medicine. To determine the ideal nanosystem for more effective and distinctly targeted delivery of therapeutic applications, particle size, morphology, material choice, and processing techniques are all research areas of interest. Utilizations of polymeric NPs include drug delivery techniques such as conjugation and entrapment of drugs, prodrugs, stimuli-responsive systems, imaging modalities, and theranostics. Cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases are fields impacted by NP technologies that push scientific boundaries to the leading edge of transformative advances for nanomedicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-04-14

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alphaolefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by treating an inert support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound or a complex or mixture of an organic dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound and an aluminum compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a Group IIIa metal halide, (iv) at least one vanadium compound, and as the last step a second treatment with a Group IIIa metal halide.

  5. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  6. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw<1 kDa and mw>100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw approximately 1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw < 1 kDa and mw > 100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw ˜1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Capillary electrophoresis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Oefner, P J; Chiesa, C

    1994-08-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has emerged as a highly promising technique for the analysis of mono- and oligosaccharides. The approaches developed for overcoming the lack of chromophoric and fluorophoric functions in most carbohydrates involve the use of indirect photometric detection, amperometry, mass spectrometry, and precolumn derivatization with various tags. The merits and drawbacks of the derivatizing agents, including 2-aminopyridine, 4-amino-benzoic acid and its analogues, which for the first time permitted the reproducible determination of aldoses, uronic acids and even ketoses in the low femtomole range by means of readily available UV detection, and other agents such as 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)-2-quinoline-carboxaldehyde, are discussed in detail. Means to secure electromigration of the usually neutral carbohydrates are: (i) ionization of hydroxyl groups at high pH; (ii) complexation of vicinal or alternate hydroxyl groups with borate or other charged compounds such as alkaline earth metal ions; (iii) derivatization with a reagent possessing ionizable functions; and (iv) partitioning into a pseudostationary phase such as sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles. Each alternative has its own analytical rewards, and combinations of the above mechanisms allow the two-dimensional and perhaps even three-dimensional mapping of oligosaccharides. Pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, for instance, have been separated both according to size by exploiting differences in the charge-to-mass ratio, with the charge being identical for each oligomer under acidic conditions due to protonation of the imino group incorporated by precolumn derivatization, as well as on the basis of structural differences, as a consequence of differences in the ease of borate complexation of the peripheral monosaccharide residues. It is also shown that the 4-aminobenzonitrile derivatives of mono- and disaccharides can be separated

  9. Hydrogel polymerization in microgravity for contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Oksana; Kostarev, Konstantin; Kondyurin, Alexey

    Contact lenses become widely used for vision correction. The modern contact lenses made of polymer materials have to satisfy a number of requirements: biocompatibility and non-toxicity, low elastic module, high oxygen permeability, good wettability, mechanical strength and stable shape. To following all these requirements, special polymer compositions and polymerization techniques are in development. One of the unique technology is based on polymerization process in microgravity. The synthesis of the polymer structures proceeds in low concentration solution and Earth gravity has a great influence on the polymerization kinetics and final properties of the gel. The microgravity conditions give a possibility to get a regular polymer network with specific macromolecular structure. The experiments on board of space station and theoretical models of the polymerization processes are considered for contact lenses application.

  10. The importance of dietary carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castillo, Claudia P; Hudson, Geoffrey J; Englyst, Hans N; Dewey, Peter; James, W Philip T

    2002-12-01

    Forty years ago carbohydrates (CHO) were regarded as a simple energy source whereas they are now recognized as important food components. The human diet contains a wide range of CHO, the vast majority of which are of plant origin. Modern techniques based on chemical classification of dietary CHO replaced the traditional "by difference" measurement. They provide a logical basis for grouping into categories of specific nutritional importance. The physiological effects of dietary CHO are highly dependent on the rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine and fermentation in the large intestine, interactions which promote human health. Current knowledge of the fate of dietary CHO means that the potentially undesirable properties of many modern foods could be altered by using processing techniques that yield foods with more intact plant cell wall structures. Such products would more closely resemble the foods in the pre-agriculture diet with respect to the rate of digestion and absorption of CHO in the small intestine. The potentially detrimental physiological consequences of eating sugars and starch that are rapidly digested and absorbed in the small intestine suggest that, as fibre, the form, as well as the amount of starch should be considered. Increasing consumer awareness of the relationship between diet and health has led to demands for more widespread nutrition labelling. The entry "carbohydrate" is required in most countries, and the value is usually obtained "by difference" and used in the calculation of energy content. However, the value provides no nutritional information per se. Food labels should provide values that aid consumers in selecting a healthy diet.

  11. Water-soluble carbohydrates and fructan structure patterns from Agave and Dasylirion species.

    PubMed

    Mancilla-Margalli, N Alejandra; López, Mercedes G

    2006-10-04

    Fructans, storage carbohydrates with beta-fructofuranosyl linkages, are found in approximately 15% of higher plants. The metabolic flexibility of those molecules allows them easily to polymerize and depolymerize to soluble carbohydrates according to plant development stage and environmental conditions. In this work, water-soluble carbohydrates, including fructan structure patterns, were compared among Agave and Dasylirion species grown in different environmental regions in Mexico. Fructans were the main storage carbohydrate present in Agave stems, in addition to other carbohydrates related to its metabolism, whereas Dasylirion spp. presented a different carbohydrate distribution. A good correlation of water-soluble carbohydrate content with climatic conditions was observed. Fructans in Agave and Dasylirion genera were found in the form of polydisperse molecules, where structural heterogeneity in the same plant was evidenced by methylation linkage analysis and chromatographic methods. Fructans from the studied species were classified into three groups depending on DP and linkage-type abundance. These storage carbohydrates share structural characteristics with fructans in plants that belong to the Asparagales members. Agave and Dasylirion fructans can be categorized as graminans and branched neo-fructans, which we have termed agavins.

  12. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES IN CARBOHYDRATE ANALYSIS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and ferm...

  13. The new carbohydrate intake recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, Asker

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate intake during prolonged exercise has been shown to increase endurance capacity and improve performance. Until recently, the advice was to ingest 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour. The upper limit was based on studies that demonstrated that intakes greater than 60-70 g/h would not result in greater exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates. The lower limit was an estimated guess of the minimum amount of carbohydrate required for ergogenic effects. In addition, the advice was independent of the type, the duration or the intensity of the activity as well as the level of athlete. Since 2004, significant advances in the understanding of the effects of carbohydrate intake during exercise have made it possible to be much more prescriptive and individual with the advice. Studies revealed that oxidation rates can reach much higher values (up to 105 g/h) when multiple transportable carbohydrates are ingested (i.e. glucose:fructose). It has also been observed that carbohydrate ingested during shorter higher intensity exercise (1 h, 80%VO2max) can improve performance, although mechanisms are distinctly different. These findings resulted in new recommendations that are dependent on the duration and intensity of exercise and not only specify the quantity of carbohydrate to be ingested but also the type. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. New Polybenzimidazole Architectures by Diels Alder Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    REPORT New Polybenzimidazole Architectures By Diels Alder Polymerization. Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Due to their high...substituents to improve processability, are desirable. This project was a proof of principle study to determine if Diels - Alder polymerization of monomers...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Polybenzimidazole, Diels Alder

  15. Recent advances in computational predictions of NMR parameters for the structure elucidation of carbohydrates: methods and limitations.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2013-11-07

    All living systems are comprised of four fundamental classes of macromolecules--nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates (glycans). Glycans play a unique role of joining three principal hierarchical levels of the living world: (1) the molecular level (pathogenic agents and vaccine recognition by the immune system, metabolic pathways involving saccharides that provide cells with energy, and energy accumulation via photosynthesis); (2) the nanoscale level (cell membrane mechanics, structural support of biomolecules, and the glycosylation of macromolecules); (3) the microscale and macroscale levels (polymeric materials, such as cellulose, starch, glycogen, and biomass). NMR spectroscopy is the most powerful research approach for getting insight into the solution structure and function of carbohydrates at all hierarchical levels, from monosaccharides to oligo- and polysaccharides. Recent progress in computational procedures has opened up novel opportunities to reveal the structural information available in the NMR spectra of saccharides and to advance our understanding of the corresponding biochemical processes. The ability to predict the molecular geometry and NMR parameters is crucial for the elucidation of carbohydrate structures. In the present paper, we review the major NMR spectrum simulation techniques with regard to chemical shifts, coupling constants, relaxation rates and nuclear Overhauser effect prediction applied to the three levels of glycomics. Outstanding development in the related fields of genomics and proteomics has clearly shown that it is the advancement of research tools (automated spectrum analysis, structure elucidation, synthesis, sequencing and amplification) that drives the large challenges in modern science. Combining NMR spectroscopy and the computational analysis of structural information encoded in the NMR spectra reveals a way to the automated elucidation of the structure of carbohydrates.

  16. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  17. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  18. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  19. An efficient synthesis of N-allylglycosylamides from unprotected carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Spevak, W.; Hobbs, C.J.; Nagy, J.O.

    1996-05-17

    Synthetic, multivalent, carbohydrate assemblies are important tools in studying the avidity of many naturally occuring lectins for their ligands. This report details a simple, high-yielding three-step procedure to convert unprotected carbohydrates into N-allylglycosides. This method compliments the reductive amination procedure but allows the reducing-end pyranose ring to remain intact. No carbohydrate protecting groups are needed, and the resulting N-allylglycosylamide can be easily linked to other molecules. Two examples of analogs of silyl Lewis{sup x} and sulfo Lewis{sup x} have been derivatized by this process. 1 tab.

  20. Assessing carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by NMR spectroscopy: the trisaccharide epitope from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera.

    PubMed

    Santos, J Ignacio; Carvalho de Souza, Adriana; Cañada, F Javier; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Kamerling, Johannis P; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2009-02-13

    WEAK RECOGNITION PROCESSES: Weak calcium-mediated carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions have been detected by DOSY and TRNOESY NMR methods by employing a gold glyconanoparticle as a multivalent system. In addition, 3D models of trisaccharide-Ca(II)-trisaccharide complexes based on results from molecular dynamics simulations are proposed. Diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR) and TR-NOESY-NMR experiments are used to detect ligand binding to macromolecular receptors. These techniques have been applied to detect weak carbohydrate-carbohydrate self-recognition in solution, making use of sugar-decorated gold nanoparticles as the "macromolecule" and the same carbohydrate as the ligand. Changes in the diffusion coefficient of the free carbohydrate in the presence of the glyconanoparticle (only with Ca(II) ions in the sample solution), as well as changes in the sign of the sugar NOE peaks--positive for the free sugar (in the presence or absence of Ca(II)) and negative for the sugar only in the simultaneous presence of the glyconanoparticle and Ca(II) ions--have been taken as proof of weak Ca(II)-mediated carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions in solution. Although different methods such as SPR, TEM, and AFM have been used in the past to detect carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions with the aid of gold nanoparticles and gold selfassembled monolayers, they are restricted to high-affinity ranges. The methods used in this study allow expansion of the number of techniques to tackle this relevant biological problem, also for approaching ligand-receptor interactions below the high-affinity range. Additionally, 3D models of trisaccharide-Ca(II)-trisaccharide complexes based on results from molecular dynamics simulations are proposed.

  1. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  2. Polymeric coatings for biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Chang, B.-J.; Prucker, O.; Dahm, M.; Rühe, J.

    2004-10-01

    To improve the properties of materials in biomedical applications and to allow a better interaction of the medical device with the biological system surrounding it, frequently polymeric coatings are applied. However, the adhesion of the coating to the substrate usually poses a problem as the materials involved have either rather inert surfaces or strongly varying surface chemistries. We describe a new approach which allows to attach a wide variety of polymer films to organic substrates either of polymeric or biological origin. The technique is based on photochemical processes occurring in benzophenone group containing polymers, which lead to simultaneous crosslinking of the polymer in the coating and surface-attachment of the forming polymer network. The synthesis and characterization of monolayers and surface-attached polymer networks through this route are described and possible applications of this approach in the biomedical area are discussed.

  3. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  4. Two-photon polymerization of polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Olga; Berman, Amir; Golan, Yuval; Horovitz, Baruch; Zeiri, Leila

    2009-02-05

    We show that visible light can polymerize diacetylene monomers into polydiacetylene (PDA) in a two-photon process. We monitor the process by measuring Raman intensities of PDA using a Raman laser at 633 nm with variable intensity I and show that the Raman cross section at short times increases as I3, corresponding to a two-photon process. The process generates a relatively stable blue phase PDA, in contrast with UV polymerization that leads to a fast blue to red phase transformation.

  5. Functionalized C-Glycoside Ketohydrazones: Carbohydrate Derivatization that Retains the Ring Integrity of the Terminal Reducing Sugar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycosylation often mediates important biological processes through the interaction of carbohydrates with complementary proteins. Most chemical tools for the functional analysis of glycans are highly dependent upon various linkage chemistries that involve the reducing-terminus of carbohydrates. Ho...

  6. Sensing carbohydrate-protein interactions at picomolar concentrations using cantilever arrays.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Kathrin; Hermann, Bianca A; Seeberger, Peter H

    2011-09-05

    Carbohydrates are important mediators of many biological processes that underlie cellular communication and disease mechanisms. Therapeutic agents include carbohydrate-based vaccines and the potent anti-viral protein Cyanovirin-N (CV-N). CV-N acts by specifically binding the carbohydrate structures decorating the cell surface of deadly viruses including human immunodeficiency virus (HI-V) or Ebola. In search for new carbohydrate-binding proteins and the development of sensors that exploit carbohydrate-protein interactions the label-free cantilever array technique can provides a fast, parallel and low-cost approach.

  7. Method for improving separation of carbohydrates from wood pulping and wood or biomass hydrolysis liquors

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, William Louis; Compere, Alicia Lucille; Leitten, Jr., Carl Frederick

    2010-04-20

    A method for separating carbohydrates from pulping liquors includes the steps of providing a wood pulping or wood or biomass hydrolysis pulping liquor having lignin therein, and mixing the liquor with an acid or a gas which forms an acid upon contact with water to initiate precipitation of carbohydrate to begin formation of a precipitate. During precipitation, at least one long chain carboxylated carbohydrate and at least one cationic polymer, such as a polyamine or polyimine are added, wherein the precipitate aggregates into larger precipitate structures. Carbohydrate gel precipitates are then selectively removed from the larger precipitate structures. The method process yields both a carbohydrate precipitate and a high purity lignin.

  8. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngs, Wiley J.

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. Many aerospace applications require a combination of properties. Thus, hybrid films made from polyimides or other engineering resins are of primary interest, but only if conductivities on the same order as those obtained with a polystyrene base could be obtained. Hence, a series of experiments was performed to optimize the conductivity of polyimide-based composite films. The polyimide base chosen for this study was Kapton. 3-MethylThiophene (3MT) was used for the conductive phase. Three processing variables were identified for producing these composite films, namely time, temperature, and oxidant concentration for the in situ oxidation. Statistically designed experiments were used to examine the effects of these variables and synergistic/interactive effects among variables on the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of the films. Multiple linear regression analysis of the tensile data revealed that temperature and time have the greatest effect on maximum stress. The response surface of maximum stress vs. temperature and time (for oxidant concentration at 1.2 M) is shown. Conductivity of the composite films was measured for

  9. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  10. Catalytic living ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Amit A.; Kilbinger, Andreas F. M.

    2015-09-01

    In living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), a transition-metal-carbene complex polymerizes ring-strained olefins with very good control of the molecular weight of the resulting polymers. Because one molecule of the initiator is required for each polymer chain, however, this type of polymerization is expensive for widespread use. We have now designed a chain-transfer agent (CTA) capable of reducing the required amount of metal complex while still maintaining full control over the living polymerization process. This new method introduces a degenerative transfer process to ROMP. We demonstrate that substituted cyclohexene rings are good CTAs, and thereby preserve the ‘living’ character of the polymerization using catalytic quantities of the metal complex. The resulting polymers show characteristics of a living polymerization, namely narrow molecular-weight distribution, controlled molecular weights and block copolymer formation. This new technique provides access to well-defined polymers for industrial, biomedical and academic use at a fraction of the current costs and significantly reduced levels of residual ruthenium catalyst.

  11. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  12. Monitoring lectin interactions with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    de Bentzmann, Sophie; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are often involved in the first step of infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces several proteins that are able to bind specifically to glycan epitopes present on host epithelia. The experimental approaches for studying protein-carbohydrate interaction have been inspired, with some adaptations, from those commonly used for protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions. A range of methods are described herein for detecting lectin activity, screening for monosaccharide or oligosaccharide specificity, determining the affinity of binding together with thermodynamics and kinetics parameters, and producing crystal of lectin-carbohydrate complexes for further structural studies.

  13. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  14. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed. PMID:27272929

  15. Hydrocracking of carbohydrates making glycerol, glycols and other polyols

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A homogeneous process for hydrocracking of carbohydrates in the presence of soluble transition metal hydrogenation catalyst with the production of lower polyhydric alcohols. A carbohydrate is contacted with hydrogen in the presence of a soluble transition metal catalyst and a strong base at a temperature of from about 25.degree. C. to about 200.degree. C. and a pressure of from about 15 to about 3000 psi.

  16. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  17. Biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Dias, David M; Furtado, Joana; Wasielewski, Emeric; Cruz, Rui; Costello, Bernard; Cole, Lindsay; Faria, Tiago Q; Baaske, Philipp; Brito, Rui M M; Ciulli, Alessio; Simões, Isaura; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Faro, Carlos; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Castanheira, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Laforin is a human dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) involved in glycogen metabolism regulation containing a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). Mutations in the gene coding for laforin are responsible for the development of Lafora disease, a progressive fatal myoclonus epilepsy with early onset, characterized by the intracellular deposition of abnormally branched, hyperphosphorylated insoluble glycogen-like polymers, called Lafora bodies. Despite the known importance of the CBM domain of laforin in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycogen interaction is still poorly understood. Recently, the structure of laforin with bound maltohexaose was determined and despite the importance of such breakthrough, some molecular interaction details remained missing. We herein report a thorough biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction using soluble glycans. We demonstrated an increased preference of laforin for the interaction with glycans with higher order of polymerization and confirmed the importance of tryptophan residues for glycan interaction. Moreover, and in line with what has been described for other CBMs and lectins, our results confirmed that laforin-glycan interactions occur with a favourable enthalpic contribution counter-balanced by an unfavourable entropic contribution. The analysis of laforin-glycan interaction through the glycan side by saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR has shown that the CBM-binding site can accommodate between 5 and 6 sugar units, which is in line with the recently obtained crystal structure of laforin. Overall, the work in the present study complements the structural characterization of laforin and sheds light on the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycan interaction, which is a pivotal requisite to understand the physiological and pathological roles of laforin. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. Polymeric nanocomposites: compounding and performance.

    PubMed

    Utracki, L A

    2008-04-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites (PNC) are binary mixtures of strongly interacting, inorganic platelets dispersed in a polymeric matrix. For full exfoliation, the thermodynamic miscibility is required. There are three basic methods of organically-modified clay dispersion that might result in PNC: (1) in polymer solution (followed by solvent removal), (2) in a monomer (followed by polymerization), and (3) in molten polymer (compounding). Most commercial PNC are produced by the second method, but it is the third one that has the greatest promise for the plastics industry. Similarly as during the manufacture of polymer blends, the layered silicates must be compatibilized by intercalation with organic salts and/or addition of functionalized macromolecules. Compounding affects the kinetics of dispersion process, but rarely the miscibility. Melt compounding is carried out either in a single-screw (SSE) or a twin-screw extruder (TSE). Furthermore, an extensional flow mixer (EFM) might be attached to an extruder. Two versions of EFM were evaluated: (1) designed for polymer homogenization and blending, and (2) designed for dispersing nano-particles. In this review, the dispersion of organoclay in polystyrene (PS), polyamide-6 (PA-6) or in polypropylene (PP) is discussed. The PNC based on PS or PA-6 contained two components (polymer and organoclay), whereas those based on PP in addition had a compatibilizer mixture of two maleated polypropylenes. Better dispersion was found compounding PNC's in a SSE + EFM than in TSE with or without EFM. The mechanical performance (tensile, flexural and impact) was examined.

  19. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... two main forms of carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in ... sugar found in milk and yogurt). Types of starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, ...

  20. Carbohydrate composition of candy bars.

    PubMed

    Hurst, W J; Martin, R A; Zoumas, B L

    1983-07-01

    The data in Table 1 show a wide variation among products and when added to other available data provide a more complete picture of the carbohydrate composition of candy bars. Interestingly, the sucrose content of the bars in Table 1 ranges from a low of 19.12% to a high of 56.06%. Extensive use of corn syrup is clearly evident in ingrediated bar types (categories e and f). Although the higher saccharides of corn syrup were not quantitated, we think that this article adds to the knowledge of the carbohydrate composition of the best-selling candy bars, since previously only a carbohydrate by difference value was available. This report provides the health professional with an update on carbohydrate composition of a large number of candy bars.

  1. A quick look at biochemistry: carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dashty, Monireh

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, there are different metabolic pathways in cells that break down fuel molecules to transfer their energy into high energy compounds such as adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2), reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH2). This process is called cellular respiration. In carbohydrate metabolism, the breakdown starts from digestion of food in the gastrointestinal tract and is followed by absorption of carbohydrate components by the enterocytes in the form of monosaccharides. Monosaccharides are transferred to cells for aerobic and anaerobic respiration via glycolysis, citric acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway to be used in the starvation state. In the normal state, the skeletal muscle and liver cells store monosaccharides in the form of glycogen. In the obesity state, the extra glucose is converted to triglycerides via lipogenesis and is stored in the lipid droplets of adipocytes. In the lipotoxicity state, the lipid droplets of other tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle and pancreatic beta cells also accumulate triacylglycerol. This event is the axis of the pathogenesis of metabolic dysregulation in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In this paper a summary of the metabolism of carbohydrates is presented in a way that researchers can follow the biochemical processes easily. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protecting Groups in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétursson, Sigthór

    1997-11-01

    The most important protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry are reviewed. The paper is aimed at those beginning to specialize in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and at teachers with other specialties who wish to go beyond the content of general organic chemistry textbooks. Acetals and ketals are of fundamental importance in carbohydrate chemistry and their chemistry is presented first. In contrast to the base stability of the acetals, are the base labile esters. The complimentary use of these two protecting methods is illustrated. Methyl and benzyl ethers have a long history both in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and in the structural studies of polysaccharides. In synthetic work benzyl ethers are the most useful. Silyl ethers are also well established in carbohydrate chemistry and the use of these protecting methods is illustrated. Phase transfer reactions and the use of cyclic stannylene derivatives to enhance the regioselectivity in the introduction of protecting groups, especially ethers, is discussed as well as some results optained with stannous chloride catalyzed reactions of diaryldiphenylmethanes with vicinal diols which gave unexpected results. The paper ends with illustrative examples of the use of protecting groups in modern synthetic carbohydrate chemistry, namely the synthesis of nitrogen containing compounds belonging to an important class of polyhydroxylated cyclic amines. Compounds of this class are potent inhibitors of glycosidase enzymes.

  3. Determination of carbohydrate- and lignin-derived components in complex effluents from cellulose processing by capillary electrophoresis with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bogolitsyna, Anna; Becker, Manuel; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Borgards, Andrea; Rosenau, Thomas; Potthast, Antje

    2011-11-25

    Degradation products from lignocellulosic materials receive increasing attention due to the continuously growing interest in their utilization. The inherent structural variance of lignocellulosics combined with the intricacy of lignocellulosic processing (e.g. pulping of wood and bleaching of cellulosic pulps) and the complexity of degradation processes occurring therein result in rather complex mixtures in the process streams and effluents that contain a large quantity of structurally different degradation products. This is true for most processing steps, but also for degradation reactions occurring during aging of lignocellulosic materials, such as paper, cellulosic tissue or textiles. In order to render such mixtures better analytically accessible than hitherto possible a CE-ESI-MS method was established for the simultaneous determination of aliphatic carboxylic acids from the degradation of (hemi)celluloses and aromatic compounds from lignin degradation. CE and ESI-MS parameters have been optimized towards sensitivity and good reproducibility. The method was tested in two real-world scenarios: the determination of major components in effluents from bleaching stages in the pulp and paper industry, and the analysis of degradation products in extracts of naturally aged papers. The advantages and drawbacks of this approach are critically discussed.

  4. Overall carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA).

    PubMed

    Nomura, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hirose, Masaaki; Nakamura, Sachiko; Yagi, Fumio

    2005-09-05

    The carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA) were investigated by an enzyme-linked lectin absorbent assay. The binding ability of each carbohydrate was compared using IC(50) values. CCA exhibited mannose/glucose specificity, as observed with many mannose-binding jacalin-related lectins. For oligosaccharides containing glucose, it has been shown that the degree of polymerization and the linkage mode of glucose residues have no effect on CCA-carbohydrate interaction; thus, only the non-reducing end glucose unit in glucooligosaccharides may be involved in the interaction with CCA. Among mannooligosaccharides, CCA strongly recognized alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man, which is a core in N-linked carbohydrate chains. By considering the results with glycoproteins, it is likely that CCA binds preferentially to mono- or non-sialylated biantennary carbohydrate chains. We also obtained K(d) values by analysis of the dependency of the IC(50) on CCA concentration, based on the hypothesis that CCA has a single binding site or two equivalent binding sites. The estimated K(d) values for mannose, glucose and alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man were 2.39, 7.19 and 0.483 mM, respectively. The relative binding abilities showed good agreement with the relative inhibition intensities. Isothermal calorimetric titration was carried out to directly estimate the dissociation constants of CCA for mannose and for alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. The values were 2.34 mM for mannose and 0.507 mM alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. These results suggest that the relative inhibition intensity represents the ratio of K(d) values and that CCA has a single or two equivalent binding sites.

  5. Recent Progress in Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Summary The important roles that carbohydrates play in biological processes and their potential application in diagnosis, therapeutics, and vaccine development have made them attractive synthetic targets. Despite ongoing challenges, tremendous progresses have been made in recent years for the synthesis of carbohydrates. The chemical glycosylation methods have become more sophisticated and the synthesis of oligosaccharides has become more predictable. Simplified one-pot glycosylation strategy and automated synthesis are increasingly used to obtain biologically important glycans. On the other hand, chemoenzymatic synthesis continues to be a powerful alternative for obtaining complex carbohydrates. This review highlights recent progress in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates with a particular focus on the methods developed for the synthesis of oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, glycolipids, and glycosylated natural products. PMID:19833544

  6. Chain-growth click polymerization of AB2 monomers for the formation of hyperbranched polymers with low polydispersities in a one-pot process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Graff, Robert W; Cao, Xiaosong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gao, Haifeng

    2015-06-22

    Hyperbranched polymers are important soft nanomaterials but robust synthetic methods with which the polymer structures can be easily controlled have rarely been reported. For the first time, we present a one-pot one-batch synthesis of polytriazole-based hyperbranched polymers with both low polydispersity and a high degree of branching (DB) using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) polymerization. The use of a trifunctional AB2 monomer that contains one alkyne and two azide groups ensures that all Cu catalysts are bound to polytriazole polymers at low monomer conversion. Subsequent CuAAC polymerization displayed the features of a "living" chain-growth mechanism with a linear increase in molecular weight with conversion and clean chain extension for repeated monomer additions. Furthermore, the triazole group in a linear (L) monomer unit complexed Cu(I) , which catalyzed a faster reaction of the second azide group to quickly convert the L unit into a dendritic unit, producing hyperbranched polymers with DB=0.83.

  7. Atom-transfer cyclization with CuSO4/KBH4: a formal "activators generated by electron transfer" process also applicable to atom-transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Collis, Alana E C; Fox, David J; Halliwell, Lauren L; James, Natalie; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Parekh, Hemal; Ross, Andrew; Sellars, Andrew B; Willcock, Helen; Wilson, Paul

    2012-08-17

    The 4-exo and 5-exo-trig atom-transfer cyclizations of 1, 8a-e, 9, 12, and 13 can be mediated with as little as 0.05 mol % of Cu(TPMA)SO(4)·5H(2)O in the presence of 2.5 mol % of borohydride salts in 10 min at room temperature in air. This formal "activators generated by electron transfer" (AGET) procedure utilizes a cheap and oxidatively stable copper source (CuSO(4)·5H(2)O) and can be carried out in environmentally benign solvents (EtOH). It is possible to alter the product distribution in the 5-endo radical-polar crossover reactions of 10a,b and 11 by tailoring the amount of borohydride. Cyclization onto alkynes 14 and 15 is also possible in only 20 min. Controlled radical polymerization of styrene, with increased rates over conventional atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), can be carried out in a controlled fashion (Mn, PDI) using either CuBr or CuSO(4)·5H(2)O and Bu(4)NBH(4).

  8. Influence of diblock copolymer PCL-mPEG and of various iodinated oils on the formulation by the emulsion-solvent diffusion process of radiopaque polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hallouard, François; Briançon, Stéphanie; Anton, Nicolas; Li, Xiang; Vandamme, Thierry; Fessi, Hatem

    2013-11-01

    This pioneer study in the domain of blood pool contrast media formulation presents the influence of poly-ɛ-caprolactone-monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-mPEG) and oils on the formulation of polymeric nanoparticles by emulsion-solvent diffusion. The nature of the oil used had no influence on the encapsulation rate, even if particles were formulated with a mix of PCL/PCL-mPEG. It did, however, influence the particle size and polydispersity, with macroglycerides appearing to be the lipid structure best suited to obtain the smallest monodisperse particles. When we used PCL-mPEG to form a PEG-hydrated layer to surround the nanoparticles, its tension active property had a favorable effect on particle size and polydispersity. We also showed the strong deleterious effect on particle size and polydispersity when the polymer proportion was increased to over 1% (w/v) in the pre-emulsion organic phase. Conversely, increasing the oil proportion in this organic phase simply resulted in a slight to insignificant deleterious effect on size and polydispersity, enabling the oil proportion to be enhanced up to 3% (w/v). Finally, we showed the favorable combined effect of oil iodination and the presence of PCL-mPEG on particles formulated by emulsion-solvent diffusion leading to the preparation of smaller polymeric iodine-containing particles. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Photo-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-09-07

    Photo-responsive polymeric micelles have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields due to their efficient photo-sensitive nature and unique nanostructure. In view of the photo-reaction mechanism, photo-responsive polymeric micelles can be divided into five major types: (1) photoisomerization polymeric micelles, (2) photo-induced rearrangement polymeric micelles, (3) photocleavage polymeric micelles, (4) photo-induced crosslinkable polymeric micelles, and (5) photo-induced energy conversion polymeric micelles. This review highlights the recent advances of photo-responsive polymeric micelles, including the design, synthesis and applications in various biomedical fields. Especially, the influence of different photo-reaction mechanisms on the morphology, structure and properties of the polymeric micelles is emphasized. Finally, the possible future directions and perspectives in this emerging area are briefly discussed.

  10. New carbohydrate-based materials. Progress report, September 25, 1991--November 24, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  11. The inter-relationship between processing-induced molecular structure features and metabolic and digestive characteristics in hulled and hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains with altered carbohydrate traits.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Fangyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to determine the microwave irradiation (MIR)-induced changes in protein molecular structures in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains in relation to the truly absorbable protein nutrient supply to ruminant livestock systems. Samples from hulled and hulless cultivars of barley, harvested in consecutive years from four replicate plots, were evaluated. The samples were either kept raw or were irradiated with microwaves for 3 min (MIR3) or 5 min (MIR5). The truly absorbable protein nutrient supply to ruminant livestock systems was evaluated using the DVE/OEB system (DVE, truly absorbed protein in the small intestine; OEB, degraded protein balance). Molecular structure changes as a result of processing were revealed by vibrational molecular spectroscopy in the mid-infrared electromagnetic radiation region. Compared to the raw samples, MIR processing decreased (P < 0.05) the truly absorbable microbial crude protein and increased (P < 0.05) the truly absorbable rumen undegraded protein and endogenous protein supply without affecting the total truly absorbed protein supply to the small intestine (DVE) and degraded protein balance (OEB) in ruminant livestock systems. Changes in protein molecular structure (spectral intensities) were highly correlated with the changes in the truly absorbed protein nutrient supply to ruminant livestock systems. The results of the present study show that the changes in protein molecular structure as a result of MIR feed processing were associated with the truly absorbed protein supply to ruminant livestock systems. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER83817 Integrated Reactor Design for Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Sourced Reactants Streams Using the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Randy D. Cortright

    2005-05-04

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation research project Virent Energy Systems (Virent) attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of generating high yields of hydrogen by developing the appropriate reactor system for the novel liquid-phase reforming of aqueous-phase carbohydrate streams derived from biomass. In this project platinum-based catalysts were initially utilized to establish the technical feasibility of reactor design for reforming carbohydrates found in biomass to hydrogen.

  13. Static adsorptive fouling of extracellular polymeric substances with different membrane materials.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinying; Tian, Yu; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Hui; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2014-03-01

    Adsorptive fouling of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) greatly influences the fouling behavior and membrane characteristics in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). In this study, adsorptive fouling of the EPS on different membrane materials was compared and adsorptive mechanism between membranes and EPS was investigated by thermodynamic analysis. The results suggested that both the absolute and relative changes of hydraulic resistances should be considered to evaluate fouling of membranes with different materials, and Sips isotherm was the most suitable model to describe the EPS carbohydrate and protein adsorptions on membranes. Thermodynamic analysis showed that both EPS carbohydrate and protein adsorptions were spontaneous (ΔrG(θ) < 0), endothermic (ΔrH(θ) > 0), and entropy driven (ΔrS(θ) > 0). Decreasing ΔrG(θ) values with temperature suggested that EPS adsorptive fouling can be limited by reducing temperature. In addition, physisorption processes and hydrogen bonding interactions between EPS and membranes might play a relatively major role in the adsorption mechanism of EPS on the membrane surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle analysis confirmed that the adsorptive fouling modified the membrane surface, making the membrane surface more heterogeneous and more hydrophobic.

  14. Extraction and analysis of soluble carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Maness, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Soluble sugars are a universal component of most living organisms and a fundamental building block in biosynthetic processes. It is no wonder that both qualitative and quantitative changes in carbohydrates often accompany plant's responses to stress. Depending on the speed of onset of stress, plant tissues can exhibit rapid and very site-specific shifts in their soluble carbohydrate pool - rapid and precise tissue collection and stabilization are necessary if analytical results are to truly represent the sugar composition at the instant of harvest. Since soluble carbohydrates are, by definition, soluble in the cell's aqueous environment, they may be analyzed directly from liquids obtained from plants or they may require extraction from the plant matrix. During extraction and prior to analysis, steps should be taken to avoid change in form or quantity of sugars by endogenous active enzyme conversion or by contaminating microbial growth. Many procedures for soluble sugar analysis exist; the choice of the most appropriate analytical protocol is ultimately dictated by the depth of information required to substantiate findings for a particular purpose.

  15. Gastrointestinal effects of low-digestible carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Grabitske, Hollie A; Slavin, Joanne L

    2009-04-01

    Low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) are carbohydrates that are incompletely or not absorbed in the small intestine but are at least partly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. Fiber, resistant starch, and sugar alcohols are types of LDCs. Given potential health benefits (including a reduced caloric content, reduced or no effect on blood glucose levels, non-cariogenic effect) the prevalence of LDCs in processed foods is increasing. Many of the benefits of LDCs are related to the inability of human digestive enzymes to break down completely the carbohydrates into absorbable saccharides and the subsequent fermentation of unabsorbed carbohydrates in the colon. As a result, LDCs may affect laxation and cause gastrointestinal effects, including abdominal discomfort, flatus, and diarrhea, especially at higher or excessive intakes. Such responses, though transient, affect the perception of the well-being of consumers and their acceptance of food products containing LDCs. Current recommendations for fiber intake do not consider total LDC consumption nor recommend an upper limit for LDC intake based on potential gastrointestinal effects. Therefore, a review of published studies reporting gastrointestinal effects of LDCs was conducted. We included only studies published in refereed journals in English. Additionally, we excluded studies of subjects with incomplete or abnormal functioning gastrointestinal tracts or where antibiotics, stimulant laxatives, or other drugs affecting motility were included. Only in studies with a control period, either placebo treatment or no LDC treatment, were included. Studies must have included an acceptable measure of gastrointestinal effect. Sixty-eight studies and six review articles were evaluated. This review describes definitions, classifications, and mechanisms of LDCs, evaluates published human feeding studies of fifteen LDCs for associations between gastrointestinal effects and levels of LDC intake, and presents recommendations

  16. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultraseal XT and Wave). Measurements for linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces were performed using custom made measuring devices. Polymerization of the test materials was carried out for 60 seconds by means of a light curing unit, and each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. A wide range of values was recorded for linear polymerization displacement (26.61 to 80.74 microns) and polymerization forces (3.23 to 7.48 kilograms). Statistically significant differences among materials were found for both properties studied. Very few materials (Freedom, Glacier, and Photo SC) presented low values of linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces (similar to hybrid resin composites), while the majority of materials presented very high values in both properties studied. Study of the shrinkage kinetics revealed the exponential growth process of both properties. The polymerization forces development exhibited a few seconds delay over linear polymerization displacement. Simple linear regression showed that the two polymerization shrinkage properties that were studied were not highly correlated (r2=0.59).

  17. Marketing NASA Langley Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    A marketing tool was created to expand the knowledge of LaRC developed polymeric materials, in order to facilitate the technology transfer process and increase technology commercialization awareness among a non-technical audience. The created brochure features four materials, LaRC-CP, LaRC-RP46, LaRC-SI, and LaRC-IA, and highlights their competitive strengths in potential commercial applications. Excellent opportunities exist in the $40 million per year microelectronics market and the $6 billion adhesives market. It is hoped that the created brochure will generate inquiries regarding the use of the above materials in markets such as these.

  18. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in fresh water sediments.

    PubMed

    Gerbersdorf, Sabine Ulrike; Westrich, Bernhard; Paterson, David M

    2009-08-01

    Microbially produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have been linked with many important ecological functions in natural sediments; yet, most information has been derived from marine systems. The present paper is the first comprehensive study on EPS (i.e., carbohydrates and proteins) dynamics in riverine sediments addressing spatial (six reservoirs and four groyne fields across three European rivers), temporal (all seasons in 2003-2005), and vertical (over a 50-cm sediment depth transect) pattern. The variation in hydrodynamic regime found in the reservoirs and groyne fields was reflected in the biomass and composition of the benthic microorganisms that produce EPS. The microphytobenthic communities consisted mainly of diatoms and a higher algal biomass (up to 248 microg g(-1) dry weight, DW) seemed to be indicative for higher amounts of secreted colloidal carbohydrates. Consequently, the model proposed by Underwood and Smith (1998) for the relation chlorophyll-colloidal carbohydrates was also applicable for upper riverine sediment layers. The close relation between algal biomass and bacterial cell counts (10(8)-10(9) cells g(-1) DW) supports the idea of bacterial use of the secreted EPS. However, the data also suggest a contribution to the EPS pool through bacterial secretion of proteins/extracellular enzymes and possibly carbohydrates. Over depth, the relationships between microorganisms and EPS became increasingly decoupled along with increasing ratios of bound (refractory) to colloidal (labile) EPS. These data suggest fresh production of polymeric substances in upper sediment layers and mainly accumulation of refractory, biodegraded material in deeper layers. The high contents of EPS colloidal and bound carbohydrates (0.1-1.8 and 1.3-6.7 mg g(-1) DW, respectively) and EPS proteins (0.4-12.9 mg g(-1) DW) at the freshwater study sites might indicate an important role in sediment ecology.

  19. Foreword: Carbohydrate Research: a half century of carbohydrate science.

    PubMed

    Horton, Derek

    2015-02-11

    The article traces the history of the journal Carbohydrate Research from its debut in 1964 and its subsequent evolution to the present day, viewed from the perspective of one of the founding editors who served as a receiving editor until 2005. The concept of an international journal focused on the broad aspects of carbohydrate science found ready acceptance in the research community, and its volumes now serve as a unified archive of a significant proportion of published research data on all molecular aspects of carbohydrates. Changes in the editor line-up over the years are noted, along with the transition to electronic publishing, and the role of key people in the Elsevier Company toward the success of the journal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Online observation of emulsion polymerization by fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudschuck, S.; Adams, J.; Fuhrmann, J.

    1999-05-01

    An online observation of local polarity via fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the formation and growth of polymer particles during an emulsifier-free heterogeneous polymerization. The reaction mixture consisted of styrene dispersed in water and the polymerization was initiated by a macro-initiator (hydrolyzed propene-maleic acid copolymer with t-butyl perester groups). Pyrenyl probes were attached to the backbone of the initiator to analyze the heterogeneous reaction. The experimental results allow a clear distinction of different time regions during the heterogeneous polymerization. Information about the heating period, the latex formation, the particle growth and the final stage of the polymerization process (gel point) were obtained.

  1. Polymeric materials in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurat, Vladimir

    Paper of short review type. It is the continuation of and addition to previous review papers "V. E. Skurat. Polymers in Space. In: Encyclopedia of aerospace engineering, vol. 4, Wiley and sons, 2010; Ibid., 2012 (on line)". Following topics are considered: (1) Destruction of polymers by solar radiation with various wavelengths in different spectral regions (visible-UV, vacuum UV (VUV), deep UV, soft and hard X-rays) are discussed. In difference with common polymer photochemistry induced by UV radiation, directions of various routs of polymer phototransformations and their relative yields are greatly dependent on wavelength of light (photon energy) during illuminations in VUV, deep UV and X-ray regions. During last twenty years, intensive spacecraft investigations of solar spectrum show great periodic and spontaneous variations of radiation intensities in short-wavelengths regions - up to one - two decimal orders of magnitude for X-rays. As a result, during solar flares the absorbed dose on the polymer surfaces from X-rays can be compared with absorbed dose from VUV radiation. (2) Some new approaches to predictions of reaction efficiencies of fast orbital atomic oxygen in their interaction with polymeric materials are considered. (3) Some aspects of photocatalitic destruction of polymers in vacuum conditions by full-spectrum solar radiation are discussed. This process can take place in enamels containing semiconducting particles (TiO2, ZnO) as pigments. (4) Contamination of spacecraft surfaces from intrinsic outer atmosphere play important role not only from the point of view of deterioration of optical and thermophysical properties. Layers of SiO2 contaminations with nanometer thicknesses can greatly diminish mass losses from perfluorinated polymers under VUV irradiation.

  2. Effect of simulated microwave disinfection on the linear dimensional change, hardness and impact strength of acrylic resins processed by different polymerization cycles.

    PubMed

    Xediek Consani, R L; Chorwat, V; Ferraz Mesquita, M; Fernandes Santos, M B; Bortolazzo Correr, A; Consani, S

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of simulated microwave disinfection (SMD) on the linear dimensional changes, hardness and impact strength of acrylic resins under different polymerization cycles. Metal dies with referential points were embedded in flasks with dental stone. Samples of Classico and Vipi acrylic resins were made following the manufacturers' recommendations. The assessed polymerization cycles were: A) water bath at 74 ºC for 9 h; B) water bath at 74 ºC for 8 h and temperature increased to 100 ºC for 1 h; C) water bath at 74 ºC for 2 h and temperature increased to 100 ºC for 1 h; and D) water bath at 120 ºC and pressure of 60 pounds. Linear dimensional distances in length and width were measured after SMD and water storage at 37 ºC for 7 and 30 days using an optical microscope. SMD was carried out with the samples immersed in 150 mL of water in an oven (650 W for 3 min). A load of 25 gf for 10 s was used in the hardness test. Charpy impact test was performed with 40 kpcm. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The Classico resin was dimensionally steady in length in the A and D cycles for all periods, while the Vipi resin was steady in the A, B and C cycles for all periods. The Classico resin was dimensionally steady in width in the C and D cycles for all periods, and the Vipi resin was steady in all cycles and periods. The hardness values for Classico resin were steady in all cycles and periods, while the Vipi resin was steady only in the C cycle for all periods. Impact strength values for Classico resin were steady in the A, C and D cycles for all periods, while Vipi resin was steady in all cycles and periods. SMD promoted different effects on the linear dimensional changes, hardness and impact strength of acrylic resins submitted to different polymerization cycles when after SMD and water storage were considered.

  3. Application of controlled radical polymerization (CRP) in the design of functional biomedical architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwart, Daniel John

    In this thesis, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization were utilized in the design of synthetic polymers to create tissue engineering scaffolds and drug delivery systems with improved control over structure and functionality. Thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogels based on poly(NIPAAm) with degradable ester units within the polymer backbone and at the cross-linking sites were prepared using ATRP and RAFT. Solvent induced morphologies of poly(methyl methacrylate-b-ethylene oxide-b-methyl methacrylate) triblock copolymers synthesized by ATRP were described. A micellar structure, composed of a hydrophobic PMMA core and a PEO shell was constructed for delivery of hydrophobic drugs. ATRP was carried out in inverse miniemulsion to prepare well defined functional nanogels that were capable of entrapping and releasing various molecules (Doxorubicin, carbohydrate-based drugs, fluorophores, and gold nanoparticles). The results demonstrated that nanogels prepared by ATRP in inverse miniemulsion could be internalized into cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Nanogels functionalized with integrin-binding peptides increased cellular uptake. A process called Atom Transfer Radical Coupling (ATRC) was also described, which illustrated the power of functionality in ATRP. Finally, linear polymers and cross-linked nanogels were synthesized by ATRP and functionalized with biotin, pyrene, and peptide sequences, tying together the overall themes of structural control and functionality.

  4. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  5. Beverages and body weight: challenges in the evidence-based review process of the Carbohydrate Subcommittee from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    Concern about the role of beverages, especially those containing sugar, in the obesity epidemic continues to escalate. Bans on sugar-sweetened beverages and chocolate milk have expanded from the school cafeteria to the ballpark and convenience store. This review describes the experience of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) in conducting an evidence-based review of dietary exposure and health outcomes. The following four topics relevant to fluids and body weight were reviewed: added sugar, noncaloric sweeteners, food form and body weight, and macronutrients and satiety. There were limited and conflicting data on how liquids and solids affect energy intake and body weight. Fluid intake is typically not tracked in prospective, cohort longitudinal studies; thus, data are not available on fluid intake and health status from studies using the strongest epidemiologic designs. Despite public perception that beverages are linked to increased body weight compared with whole foods, evidence-based reviews of this topic do not support that liquid calories are processed differently in the body. The practical recommendation to replace caloric beverages with water as an aid to control weight is based on calorie reduction, rather than a link between added-sugar intake and obesity. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  6. Self-Healing of biocompatible polymeric nanocomposities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina

    2014-03-01

    Polymers are vulnerable to damage in form of cracks deep within the structure, where detection is difficult and repair is near to impossible. These cracks lead to mechanical degradation of the polymer. A method has been created to solve this problem named polymeric self healing. Self healing capabilities implies the dispersion within the polymeric matrix of microcapsules filled with a monomer and of catalyst. Poly urea-formaldehyde microcapsules used in this method are filled with dicyclopentadiene that is liberated after being ruptured by the crack propagation in the material. Polymerization is assisted by a catalyst FGGC that ignites the self healing process. Nanocomposites, such as titanium oxide, will be used as an integration of these polymers that will be tested by rupturing mechanically slowly. In order to prove the self healing process, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, and SEM are used.

  7. Tetracycline removal and effect on the formation and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances and volatile fatty acids in the process of hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangying; Hao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jing; Liu, Rutao; Liu, Chunguang

    2016-07-01

    Many research indicate antibiotics show adverse effect on methane fermentation, while few research focus on their effect on hydrogen fermentation. The present study aimed to gain insight of the effect of antibiotics on hydrogen fermentation with waste sludge and corn straw as substrate. For this purpose, tetracycline, as a model, was investigated with regard to tetracycline removal, hydrogen production, interaction with extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) of substrate and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on concentration and composition. Results show that tetracycline could be removed efficiently by hydrogen fermentation, and relative low-dose tetracycline (200mg/l) exposure affects little on hydrogen production. While tetracycline exposure could change hydrogen fermentation from butyric acid-type to propionic acid-type depending on tetracycline level. Based upon three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis tetracycline changed the component and content of EPSs, and static quenching was the main mechanism between EPSs with tetracycline.

  8. Experimental and theoretical analysis of polymerization reaction process on the polydopamine membranes and its corrosion protection properties for 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Chen, Shougang; Chen, Yan; Li, Houmin; Yang, Lejiao; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yin, Yansheng

    2010-10-01

    Inspired by the bio-adhesion principle, polydopamine membrane was fabricated by dipping the 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS) substrate into an aqueous alkaline dopamine solution and its possible reaction mechanism and the temperature effect were studied. The membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), surface reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrum (SR-FTIR), UV-visible spectrum. The polymerization reactions of dopamine in solution were also analyzed by the LUMO energies, simulated infrared spectrum and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of selected structure models calculation, and the possible interfacial reaction mechanism was also discussed by the molecular orbital analysis of melanin clusters. Moreover, the corrosion behaviors of the polydopamine films prepared at different temperatures and dipping days were evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), as well as that of bare 304 SS, especially long stability in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  9. Critical assessment of extracellular polymeric substances extraction methods from mixed culture biomass.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Mutlu, A Gizem; Smets, Barth F

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have a presumed determinant role in the structure, architecture, strength, filterability, and settling behaviour of microbial solids in biological wastewater treatment processes. Consequently, numerous EPS extraction protocols have recently been published that aim to optimize the trade off between high EPS recovery and low cell lysis. Despite extensive efforts, the obtained results are often contradictory, even when analysing similar biomass samples and using similar experimental conditions, which greatly complicates the selection of an extraction protocol. This study presents a rigorous and critical assessment of existing physical and chemical EPS extraction methods applied to mixed-culture biomass samples (nitrifying, nitritation-anammox, and activated sludge biomass). A novel fluorescence-based method was developed and calibrated to quantify the lysis potential of different EPS extraction protocols. We concluded that commonly used methods to assess cell lysis (DNA concentrations or G6PDH activities in EPS extracts) do not correlate with cell viability. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of certain chemicals in EPS extracts results in severe underestimation of protein and carbohydrate concentrations by using standard analytical methods. Keeping both maximum EPS extraction yields and minimal biomass lysis as criteria, it was identified a sonication-based extraction method as the best to determine and compare tightly-bound EPS fractions in different biomass samples. Protein was consistently the main EPS component in all analysed samples. However, EPS from nitrifying enrichments was richer in DNA, the activated sludge EPS had a higher content in humic acids and carbohydrates, and the nitritation-anammox EPS, while similar in composition to the nitrifier EPS, had a lower fraction of hydrophobic biopolymers. In general, the easily-extractable EPS fraction was more abundant in carbohydrates and humic substances, while

  10. A novel approach for the quantitation of carbohydrates in mash, wort, and beer with RP-HPLC using 1-naphthylamine for precolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Rakete, Stefan; Glomb, Marcus A

    2013-04-24

    A novel universal method for the determination of reducing mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides in complex matrices on RP-HPLC using 1-naphthylamine for precolumn derivatization with sodium cyanoborhydride was established to study changes in the carbohydrate profile during beer brewing. Fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection enabled very sensitive analyses of beer-relevant carbohydrates. Mass spectrometry additionally allowed the identification of the molecular weight and thereby the degree of polymerization of unknown carbohydrates. Thus, carbohydrates with up to 16 glucose units were detected. Comparison demonstrated that the novel method was superior to fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). The results proved the HPLC method clearly to be more powerful in regard to sensitivity and resolution. Analogous to FACE, this method was designated fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate HPLC (FAC-HPLC).

  11. Lanthanide-IMAC enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Rainer, Matthias; Messner, Christoph B; Rode, Bernd M; Bonn, Günther K

    2014-03-01

    In this study a new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography resin for the enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols was synthesized by radical polymerization reaction of vinyl phosphonic acid and 1,4-butandiole dimethacrylate using azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as radical initiator. Interaction between the chelated trivalent lanthanide ions and negatively charged hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates and polyols was observed by applying high pH values. The new method was evaluated by single standard solutions, mixtures of standards, honey and a more complex extract of Cynara scolymus. The washing step was accomplished by acetonitrile in excess volumes. Elution of enriched carbohydrates was successfully performed with deionized water. The subsequent analysis was carried out with matrix-free laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry involving a TiO2 -coated steel target, especially suitable for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances. Quantitative analysis of the sugar alcohol xylitol as well as the determination of the maximal loading capacity was performed by gas chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometric detection after chemical derivatization. In a parallel approach quantum mechanical geometry optimizations were performed in order to compare the coordination behavior of various trivalent lanthanide ions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Reuteran and levan as carbohydrate sinks in transgenic sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rolene; Basson, Carin E; Bekker, Jan; Eduardo, Iban; Rohwer, Johann M; Uys, Lafras; van Wyk, Johannes H; Kossmann, Jens

    2012-12-01

    The present study reports the effect of high molecular weight bacterial fructan (levan) and glucan (reuteran) on growth and carbohydrate partitioning in transgenic sugarcane plants. These biopolymers are products of bacterial glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the polymerization of glucose or fructose residues from sucrose. Constructs, targeted to different subcellular compartments (cell wall and cytosol) and driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S: maize-ubiquitin promoter, were introduced into sugarcane by biolistic transformation. Polysaccharide accumulation severely affected growth of callus suspension cultures. Regeneration of embryonic callus tissue into plants proved problematic for cell wall-targeted lines. When targeted to the cytosol, only plants with relative low levels of biopolymer accumulation survived. In internodal stalk tissue that accumulate reuteran (max 0.03 mg/g FW), sucrose content (ca 60 mg/g FW) was not affected, while starch content (<0.4 mg/g FW) was increased up to four times. Total carbohydrate content was not significantly altered. On the other hand, starch and sucrose levels were significantly reduced in plants accumulating levan (max 0.01 mg/g FW). Heterologous expression resulted in a reduction in total carbohydrate assimilation rather than a simple diversion by competition for substrate.

  13. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens.

  14. Twin Polymerization--a New Principle for Hybrid Material Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Spange, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Twin polymerization is a novel modular approach for the synthesis of hybrid materials. Using this strategy two distinct polymers of either inorganic or organic nature are produced from a single source monomer in a mechanistically coupled process. Twin polymerization is an elegant way for producing nanostructured organic-inorganic hybrid materials of composition and morphology on demand. The main objective of this Review is the explanation of the principle of various twin polymerization processes and their appropriate terminologies. Different types of twin polymerization are classified with respect to the underlying processes as described in individual examples, demonstrating its potential in material synthesis. Prospects of the synthetic methodology of twin polymerization are demonstrated for different molecular structures of twin monomers and the resulting hybrid materials. A comparison with other scenarios for the synthesis of two different polymers within one procedure is included.

  15. Clickable Polymeric Coating for Glycan Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Caterina; Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Bernardi, Anna; Chiari, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of carbohydrates with a variety of biological targets, including antibodies, proteins, viruses, and cells are of utmost importance in many aspects of biology. Glycan microarrays are increasingly used to determine the binding specificity of glycan-binding proteins. In this study, a novel microarray support is reported for the fabrication of glycan arrays that combines the higher sensitivity of a layered Si-SiO2 surface with a novel polymeric coating easily modifiable by subsequent click reaction. The alkyne-containing copolymer, adsorbed from an aqueous solution, produces a coating by a single step procedure and serves as a soft, tridimensional support for the oriented immobilization of carbohydrates via azide/alkyne Cu (I) catalyzed "click" reaction. The advantages of a functional 3D polymer coating making use of a click chemistry immobilization are combined with the high fluorescence sensitivity and superior signal-to-noise ratio of a Si-SiO2 substrate. The proposed approach enables the attachment of complex sugars on a silicon oxide surface by a method that does not require skilled personnel and chemistry laboratories.

  16. Fluorosugar Chain Termination Agents as Probes of the Sequence Specificity of a Carbohydrate Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher D.; Rusek, Max S.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring carbohydrate polymers are ubiquitous. They are assembled by polymerizing glycosyltransferases, which can generate polysaccharide products with repeating sequence patterns. The fidelity of enzymes of this class is unknown. We report a method for testing the fidelity of carbohydrate polymerase pattern deposition: we synthesized fluorosugar donors and used them as chain termination agents. The requisite nucleotide fluorosugars could be produced from a single intermediate using the Jacobsen catalyst in a kinetically controlled separation of diastereomers. The resulting fluorosugar donors were used by galactofuranosyltransferase GlfT2 from Myco-bacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), and the data indicate that this enzyme mediates the cell wall galactan production through a sequence-specific polymerization. PMID:22458542

  17. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  18. Flame retardant polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.; Atlas, S.M.; Pearce, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The flame retardation of polyolefins is the focus of this volume. Methods for reduction of smoke and experimental evaluation of flammability parameters for polymeric materials are discussed. The flammability evaluation methods for textiles and the use of mass spectrometry for analysis of polymers and their degradation products are also presented.

  19. Polymerized and functionalized triglycerides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a new method for polymerizing epoxidized triglycerides with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the ...

  20. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  1. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  2. Challenges with nonfiber carbohydrate methods.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B

    2003-12-01

    Nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) encompass a compositionally and nutritionally diverse group exclusive of those carbohydrates found in NDF. Their content in feeds has often been described as a single value estimated by difference as 100% of dry matter minus the percentages of CP, NDF (adjusted for CP in NDF), ether extract, and ash. A calculated value was used because of difficulties with assays for individual NFC, but it does not differentiate among nutritionally distinct NFC. Errors in NFC estimation can arise from not accounting for CP in NDF and when multipliers other than 6.25 are appropriate to estimate CP. Analyses that begin to distinguish among NFC are those for starch, soluble fiber (non-NDF, nonstarch polysaccharides), and low molecular weight carbohydrates (mono- and oligosaccharides). Many starch analyses quantify alpha-glucans through specific hydrolysis of alpha-(1 --> 4) and alpha-(1 --> 6) linkages in the glucan, and measurement of released glucose. Incomplete gelatinization and hydrolysis will lead to underestimation of starch content. Starch values are inflated by enzyme preparations that hydrolyze carbohydrates other than alpha-glucan, measurement of all released monosaccharides without specificity for glucose, and failure to exclude free glucose present in the unhydrolyzed sample. Soluble fiber analyses err in a fashion similar to NFC if estimation of CP requires multipliers other than 6.25, or if contaminants such as CP and starch have not been properly accounted. Depolymerization and incomplete precipitation can also decrease soluble fiber estimates. The low molecular weight carbohydrates have been defined as carbohydrates soluble in 78 to 80% ethanol, which separates them from polysaccharides. They can be measured in extracts using broad-spectrum colorimetric assays (phenol-sulfuric acid assay or reducing sugar analysis of acid hydrolyzed samples) or chromatographic methods. Limitations of the colorimetric assays include lack of differentiation

  3. Characterization of changes in floc morphology, extracellular polymeric substances and heavy metals speciation of anaerobically digested biosolid under treatment with a novel chelated-Fe(2+) catalyzed Fenton process.

    PubMed

    He, Juanjuan; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Weijun; Cao, Bingdi; Xia, Hua; Luo, Xi; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-07-03

    A novel chelated-Fe(2+) catalyzed Fenton process (CCFP) was developed to enhance dewatering performance of anaerobically digested biosolid, and changes in floc morphology, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and heavy metals speciation were also investigated. The results showed that addition of chelating agents caused EPS solubilization by binding multivalent cations. Like traditional Fenton, CCFP performed well in improving anaerobically digested sludge dewatering property. The highly active radicals (OH, O2(-)) produced in classical Fenton and CCFP were responsible for sludge flocs destruction and consequently degradation of biopolymers into small molecules. Furthermore, more plentiful pores and channels were presented in cake after Fenton treatment, which was conducive to water drainage under mechanical compression. Additionally, a portion of active heavy metals in the form of oxidizable and reducible states were dissolved under CCFP. Therefore, CCFP could greatly simplify the operating procedure of Fenton conditioning and improve its process adaptability for harmless treatment of biological sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula ALR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compounds of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (C) an acyl halide, (D) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (E) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  5. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (B) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with, optionally (A) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof, (B) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (C) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (D) an acyl halide, (E) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, VB, VIb or VIII metal, and (F) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof.

  6. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compounds of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb, or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, optionally (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, siloxanes or mixtures thereof, (C) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (D) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  7. Microspatial Variation in Carbohydrate Concentrations with Depth in the Upper Millimetres of Intertidal Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, I. S.; Paterson, D. M.

    1998-03-01

    The carbohydrates present in surface sediments represent a readily available carbon source and their polymeric components increase sediment stability. Information regarding the occurrence of these carbohydrates is therefore important in the consideration of biogeochemical cycling, heterotrophic metabolism and sediment transport. The distributions of carbohydrates within the surface sediments of three intertidal mud flats were examined on a microscale (200 μm). The carbohydrates were operationally separated into two fractions and these differed in their distribution with depth. Dry mass concentration increased significantly with depth in the upper 2 mm and the structure of surface sediment changed visibly within a short distance of the surface. The upper 300 μm of the sediment was highly porous but became compact by 4 mm. Epipelic diatoms and cyanobacteria were observed at high densities in the upper 300 μm. In addition, the concentration of colloidal carbohydrates increased significantly in a landwards direction along a short transect. Furthermore, the distribution of sediment carbohydrates was apparently influenced by sediment bed morphology and these findings are discussed.

  8. Effect of abandonment and plant classification on carbohydrate reserves of meadow plants.

    PubMed

    Janeček, S; Lanta, V; Klimešová, J; Doležal, J

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effect of cessation of management on carbohydrate reserves of plants in meadows with different environmental characteristics and plant composition. We recorded storage carbohydrates and seasonal changes for 40 plant species. We asked whether there are differences in responses of carbohydrate reserves in forbs versus graminoids and in plants storing starch versus plants storing osmotically active carbohydrates. We analysed belowground organs before the meadows were mown and at the end of the vegetation season in mown versus recently abandoned plots. Whereas starch and fructans were widely distributed, raffinose family oligosaccharides were the main carbohydrate reserves of the Lamiaceae and Plantago lanceolata. Properties of carbohydrate reserves differed between forbs and graminoids but no difference was found between plants storing starch versus osmotically active carbohydrates. Graminoids had lower carbohydrate concentrations than forbs. We observed a positive effect of mowing on carbohydrate concentrations of graminoids in the dry, calcium-rich meadow and higher seasonal fluctuations of these values in the acid, wet meadow, suggesting that local factors and/or the species pool affect carbohydrate reserves. Despite local conditions, graminoids represent a distinct functional group in meadows from the point of view of their storage economy. We suggest that as well as growth, storage processes should also be considered for understanding the functioning of meadow plant communities.

  9. Polymerization of rod-like macromolecular monomers studied by stopped-flow, multiangle light scattering: set-up, data processing, and application to fibrin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bernocco, S; Ferri, F; Profumo, A; Cuniberti, C; Rocco, M

    2000-01-01

    Many biological supramolecular structures are formed by polymerization of macromolecular monomers. Light scattering techniques can provide structural information from such systems, if suitable procedures are used to collect the data and then to extract the relevant parameters. We present an experimental set-up in which a commercial multiangle laser light scattering photometer is linked to a stopped-flow mixer, allowing, in principle, the time-resolved extrapolation of the weight-average molecular weight M(w) and of the z-average square radius of gyration (z) of the polymers from Zimm-like plots. However, if elongated structures are formed as the polymerization proceeds, curved plots rapidly arise, from which M(w) and (z) cannot be recovered by linear fitting. To verify the correctness of a polynomial fitting procedure, polydisperse collections of rod-like or worm-like particles of different lengths, generated at various stages during bifunctional polycondensations of rod-like macromolecular monomers, were considered. Then, the angular dependence of their time-averaged scattered intensity was calculated in the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation, with random and systematic noise also added to the data. For relatively narrow size distributions, a third-degree polynomial fitting gave satisfactory results across a broad range of conversion degrees, yielding M(w) and (z) values within 2% and no greater than 10-20%, respectively, of the calculated values. When more broad size distributions were analyzed, the procedure still performed well for semiflexible polymers, but started to seriously underestimate both M(w) and (z) when rigid rod-like particles were analyzed, even at relatively low conversion degrees. The data were also analyzed in the framework of the Casassa approximation, from which the mass per unit length of the polymers can be derived. These procedures were applied to a set of data taken on the early stages of the thrombin

  10. Carbohydrate-Aromatic Interactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Kieran L; Bartlett, Gail J; Diehl, Roger C; Agirre, Jon; Gallagher, Timothy; Kiessling, Laura L; Woolfson, Derek N

    2015-12-09

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C-H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C-H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C-H bonds engage more often in CH-π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C-H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein-carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein-carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites.

  11. Producing ORMOSIL scaffolds by femtosecond laser polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radu, C.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Mustaciosu, C.; Petcu, I.; Radu, M.; Dinescu, M.

    2012-07-01

    Structures with different geometries and sizes were built via direct femtosecond laser writing, starting from new organic/inorganic hybrid monomers based on hybrid methacrylate containing triethoxysilane, in addition to urethane and urea groups. Multifunctional oligomer of urethane dimethacrylate type was chosen as comonomer in polymerization experiments because dimethacrylates give rise to the formation of a polymer network, having a number of favorable properties including biocompatibility and surface nanostructuring. Free standing polymeric structures were designed and created in order to be tested in fibroblast cells culture. Investigations of the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and viability of L929 mouse fibroblasts on free-standing laser processed scaffolds were performed for different scaffold designs.

  12. Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: Versatile Antimicrobial Materials.

    PubMed

    Zubris, Deanna L; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Wuest, William M

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (polyQACs) comprise a broad class of materials with applications in medical implants, food processing, and surface sanitizing, amongst many others. These polymeric substances are especially promising due to their potent antibacterial activity and limited hemolytic toxicity. In particular, many polyQACs have superior therapeutic indices and a lower likelihood of developing antibacterial resistance in comparison to their monomers, making them ideal materials for wound dressings, catheters, and other biomedical applications. This review outlines the history and development, previous successes, current state of the research, and future directions of polyQACs in society.

  13. Kinetics of crosslinking in emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghielmi, A.; Fiorentino, S.; Morbidelli, M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for evaluating the chain length distribution of nonlinear polymers produced in emulsions is presented. The heterogeneous emulsion polymerization process is described. The aim of the analysis is the distribution of active polymer chains and pairs of chains with a given growth time in latex particles in state.

  14. Ultrasound initiated miniemulsion polymerization of methacrylate monomers.

    PubMed

    Teo, Boon M; Prescott, Stuart W; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Grieser, Franz

    2008-01-01

    The ultrasound initiated emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (2EHMA) in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate as a stabiliser produced latex particles in the size range of 70 nm to 110 nm with molecular weights of the order of 2-6 x 10(6) g mol(-1). The experimental data obtained show significant differences in the rates of polymerization of the methacrylate monomers in the order 2EHMA>BMA>MMA. The rate trend is discussed with respect to the physicochemical properties of the monomers. It is suggested from the results obtained that the mechanism involved in sonochemical formation of the latex particles is very similar to that of a conventional miniemulsion polymerization process.

  15. Cooperative polymerization of α-helices induced by macromolecular architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Ryan; Fu, Hailin; Song, Ziyuan; Lin, Yao; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    Catalysis observed in enzymatic processes and protein polymerizations often relies on the use of supramolecular interactions and the organization of functional elements in order to gain control over the spatial and temporal elements of fundamental cellular processes. Harnessing these cooperative interactions to catalyse reactions in synthetic systems, however, remains challenging due to the difficulty in creating structurally controlled macromolecules. Here, we report a polypeptide-based macromolecule with spatially organized α-helices that can catalyse its own formation. The system consists of a linear polymeric scaffold containing a high density of initiating groups from which polypeptides are grown, forming a brush polymer. The folding of polypeptide side chains into α-helices dramatically enhances the polymerization rate due to cooperative interactions of macrodipoles between neighbouring α-helices. The parameters that affect the rate are elucidated by a two-stage kinetic model using principles from nucleation-controlled protein polymerizations; the key difference being the irreversible nature of this polymerization.

  16. Digestible and indigestible carbohydrates: interactions with postprandial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lairon, Denis; Play, Barbara; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique

    2007-04-01

    The balance between fats and carbohydrates in the human diet is still a matter of very active debate. Indeed, the processing of ordinary mixed meals involves complex processes within the lumen of the upper digestive tract for digestion, in the small intestine mucosa for absorption and resecretion, and in peripheral tissues and in the circulation for final handling. The purpose of this review is to focus on available knowledge on the interactions of digestible or indigestible carbohydrates with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in the postprandial state. The observations made in humans after test meals are reported and interpreted in the light of recent findings on the cellular and molecular levels regarding possible interplays between carbohydrates and lipid moieties in some metabolic pathways. Digestible carbohydrates, especially readily digestible starches or fructose, have been shown to exacerbate and/or delay postprandial lipemia, whereas some fiber sources can lower it. While interactions between dietary fibers and the process of lipid digestion and absorption have been studied mainly in the last decades, recent studies have shown that dietary carbohydrate moieties (e.g., glucose) can stimulate the intestinal uptake of cholesterol and lipid resecretion. In addition to the well-known glucose/fructose transporters, a number of transport proteins have recently been involved in intestinal lipid processing, whose implications in such interactions are discussed. The potential importance of postprandial insulinemia in these processes is also evaluated in the light of recent findings. The interactions of carbohydrates and lipid moieties in the postprandial state may result from both acute and chronic effects, both at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  17. Microstructure evolution and device performance in solution-processed polymeric field-effect transistors: the key role of the first monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suhao; Kiersnowski, Adam; Pisula, Wojciech; Müllen, Klaus

    2012-03-07

    Probing the role of the first monolayer in the evolution of the film polymer microstructure is essential for the fundamental understanding of the charge carrier transport in polymeric field-effect transistors (FETs). The monolayer and its subsequent microstructure of a conjugated polymer [poly(2,5-bis(3-alkylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene), PBTTT] film were fabricated via solution deposition by tuning the dip-coating speed and were then studied as accumulation and transporting layers in FETs. Investigation of the microstructure of the layers prepared at different coating velocities revealed that the monolayer serves as an important base for further development of the film. Significant improvement of the charge carrier transport occurs only at a critical multilayer network density that establishes the required percolation pathways for the charge carriers. Finally, at a low dip-coating speed, the polymer chains are uniaxially oriented, yielding pronounced structural anisotropy and high charge carrier mobilities of 1.3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in the alignment direction. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  18. Organocatalysts for the controlled "immortal" ring-opening polymerization of six-membered-ring cyclic carbonates: a metal-free, green process.

    PubMed

    Helou, Marion; Miserque, Olivier; Brusson, Jean-Michel; Carpentier, Jean-François; Guillaume, Sophie M

    2010-12-10

    Six-membered cyclic carbonates, namely trimethylene carbonate (TMC), 3,3-dimethoxytrimethylene carbonate (DMTMC) and 3-benzyloxytrimethylene carbonate (BTMC), undergo controlled "immortal" ring-opening polymerization (iROP) under mild conditions (bulk, 60-150 °C), by using organocatalysts, including an amine [4-N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP)], a guanidine [1,5,7-triazabicyclo-[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD)], or a phosphazene [2-tert-butylimino-2-diethylamino-1,3-dimethylperhydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphorine (BEMP)], in the presence of an alcohol [benzyl alcohol (BnOH), 1,3-propanediol (PPD), glycerol (GLY)] that acts as both a co-initiator and a chain-transfer agent. Remarkably, such organocatalysts remain highly active in the iROP of technical-grade, unpurified TMC. Under optimized conditions, as much as 100,000 equivalents of TMC were fully converted by as little as 10 ppm of BEMP with the simultaneous growth of as many as 200 polymer chains, allowing the preparation of high molar mass poly(trimethylene carbonate)s (up to 45,800 g mol(-1)). These catalyst systems enable among the highest activities (TOF=55,800 h(-1)) and productivities (TON=95,000) ever reported for the ROP of TMC.

  19. Rapid start-up of the anammox process: Effects of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances on the activity of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Sihui; Lian, Jing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yunman; Song, Yuanyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the rapid start-up of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) strategy by inoculating different biomass ratios of denitrifying granular sludge and anammox bacteria. The results demonstrated that two reactors (R1 and R2) were rapidly and successfully started-up on days 25 and 28, respectively, with nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) of 0.70kg/(m(3)·d) and 0.72kg/(m(3)·d) at biomass ratios of 10:1 (R1) and 50:1 (R2). The explanation for rapid start-up was found by examining the effect of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the activity of anammox bacteria in the batch experiments. Batch experiments results first demonstrated that the denitrification sludge EPS (DS-EPS) enhanced the anammox bacteria activity the most, and NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N removal rates were 1.88- and 1.53-fold higher than the control with optimal DS-EPS volume of 10mL. The rapid start-up strategy makes possible the application of anammox to practical engineering.

  20. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  1. Neurite outgrowth is driven by actin polymerization even in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jonathan X.; Efimova, Nadia; Svitkina, Tatyana M.

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerization is a universal mechanism to drive plasma membrane protrusion in motile cells. One apparent exception to this rule is continuing or even accelerated outgrowth of neuronal processes in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors. This fact, together with the key role of microtubule dynamics in neurite outgrowth, led to the concept that microtubules directly drive plasma membrane protrusion either in the course of polymerization or by motor-driven sliding. The possibility that unextinguished actin polymerization drives neurite outgrowth in the presence of actin drugs was not explored. We show that cultured hippocampal neurons treated with cytochalasin D or latrunculin B contained dense accumulations of branched actin filaments at ∼50% of neurite tips at all tested drug concentrations (1–10 μM). Actin polymerization is required for neurite outgrowth because only low concentrations of either inhibitor increased the length and/or number of neurites, whereas high concentrations inhibited neurite outgrowth. Of importance, neurites undergoing active elongation invariably contained a bright F-actin patch at the tip, whereas actin-depleted neurites never elongated, even though they still contained dynamic microtubules. Stabilization of microtubules by Taxol treatment did not stop elongation of cytochalasin–treated neurites. We conclude that actin polymerization is indispensable for neurite elongation. PMID:27682586

  2. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  3. Phosphorous Nutritional Level, Carbohydrate Reserves and Flower Quality in Olives

    PubMed Central

    Erel, Ran; Yermiyahu, Uri; Yasuor, Hagai; Cohen Chamus, Dan; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Gal, Alon; Dag, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    The olive tree is generally characterized by relatively low final fruit set consequential to a significant rate of undeveloped pistils, pistil abortion, and flower and fruitlet abscission. These processes are acknowledged to be governed by competition for resources between the developing vegetative and reproductive organs. To study the role of phosphorus (P) nutritional level on reproductive development, trees were grown under four levels of P for three years in large containers. Phosphorus nutritional level was positively related to rate of reproductive bud break, inflorescence weight, rate of hermaphrodite flowers, pistil weight, fruitlet persistence, fruit set and the consequential total number of fruits. The positive impact of P nutrition on the productivity parameters was not related to carbohydrate reserves or to carbohydrate transport to the developing inflorescence. Phosphorous deficient trees showed significant impairment of assimilation rate, and yet, carbohydrates were accumulated in inflorescences at levels comparable to or higher than trees receiving high P. In contrast to female reproductive organs, pollen viability was consistently higher in P deficient trees, possibly due to the enhanced carbohydrate availability. Overall, the positive effect of P on female reproductive development was found to be independent of the total carbohydrate availability. Hence, P is speculated to have a direct influence on reproductive processes. PMID:27907133

  4. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.; Etherton, B.P.; Kaus, M.J.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a polymerization process. It comprises polymerizing ethylene, alpha-olefins of 3 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene and the alpha-olefins in the presence of a catalyst system. The system comprising: an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR'''/sub eta/X'''/sub 3-eta/ wherein R''' is hydrogen, hydrocarbyl, or substituted hydrocarbyl having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X''' is a halogen and eta is a number from 1 to 3, and a transition metal-containing catalyst component. The component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with an organonmetallic compound represented by the formula R/sup 1/MgR/sup 2/ wherein R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/, which may be the same of different,contain 1 to 20 carbon atoms and are selected from alkyl group, aryl group, cycloalkyl group, aralkyl group, alkadienyl group of group; an alcohol; an acyl halide; a titanium halide; Cl/sub 2/, and prereducing the transition metal-containing product with an aluminum alkyl, with the proviso that the first two ingredients can be added to the inert solid simultaneously, as the reaction product of the first two steps or treatment with step two immediately precedes treatment with step one.

  5. Polymeric ion conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    There are several requirements for (polymeric) ion conductors in electrochromic window applications: (1) they have high ionic conductivity (desirably, > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Scm{sup {minus}1}); (2) they have high chemical and electrochemical stabilities with respect to the wide usable potential window and thermal and UV stabilities; (3) they are transparent in a specific wavelength region, which is, however, dependent of applications; and (4) they have enough adhesiveness to the substrates and have acceptable mechanical properties. Many kinds of polymeric ionic conductors have since been reported and some of them were applied to electrochromic uses. In this chapter, electrochemical and physicochemical properties of these materials are reviewed. However, certain aspects such as crystallographic studies and conduction models in detail have been omitted, which are still controversial.

  6. Organometallic polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Waymouth, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Well-defined transition metal catalysts have resulted in exciting new opportunities in polymer synthesis. The stereochemistry of vinyl polymers can be rationally controlled with choice of the appropriate catalysts. Studies with optically active catalyst precursors have revealed considerable information on the absolute stereochemistry of olefin polymerization and have led to the synthesis of novel chiral polyolefins. The development of homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts has also led to a variety of well-defined new polymer structures with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms and stereochemistry of homogeneous transition metal catalyzed polymerization will be discussed. The ability to control polymer structure through catalyst design presents exciting opportunities in the synthesis of {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} macromolecules.

  7. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  8. Polymeric Microcapsule Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-24

    support, microencapsulation and entrapment within a membrane/film or gel. The ideal enzyme immobilization method would (1) Employ mild chemical...yields hollow polymeric microcapsules of uniform diameter and length. These microcapsules are arranged in a high density array in which the...individual capsules protrude from a surface like the bristles of a brush. We have developed procedures for filling these microcapsules with high

  9. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Frontal polymerization systems, with their inherent large thermal and compositional gradients, are greatly affected by buoyancy-driven convection. Sounding rocket experiments allowed the preparation of benchmark materials and demonstrated that methods to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ground-based research did not significantly affect the molecular weight of the polymer. Experiments under weightlessness show clearly that bubbles produced during the reaction interact very differently than under 1 g.

  10. Developments in polymerization lamps.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Planas, Amparo; Martín, Juan; Abalos, Camilo; Llamas, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composite resins and the consequent stress generated at the composite-tooth interface continue to pose a serious clinical challenge. The development of high-intensity halogen lamps and the advent of curing units providing higher energy performance, such as laser lamps, plasma arc units, and, most recently, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units, have revolutionized polymerization lamp use and brought major changes in light-application techniques. A comprehensive review of the literature yielded the following conclusions: (1) the most reliable curing unit for any type of composite resin is the high-density halogen lamp, fitted with a programming device to enable both pulse-delay and soft-start techniques; (2) if any other type of curing unit is used, information must be available on the compatibility of the unit with the composite materials to be used; (3) polymerization lamp manufacturers need to focus on the ongoing development of LED technology; (4) further research is required to identify the most reliable light-application techniques.

  11. Chemical biology based on target-selective degradation of proteins and carbohydrates using light-activatable organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-05-01

    Proteins and carbohydrates play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes, including serious diseases. The development of novel and innovative methods for selective control of specific proteins and carbohydrates functions has attracted much attention in the field of chemical biology. In this account article, the development of novel chemical tools, which can degrade target proteins and carbohydrates by irradiation with a specific wavelength of light under mild conditions without any additives, is introduced. This novel class of photochemical agents promise bright prospects for finding not only molecular-targeted bioprobes for understanding of the structure-activity relationships of proteins and carbohydrates but also novel therapeutic drugs targeting proteins and carbohydrates.

  12. Synthesis and emulsifying properties of carbohydrate fatty acid esters produced from Agave tequilana fructans by enzymatic acylation.

    PubMed

    Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Arrizon, Javier; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Plou, Francisco J; Sandoval, Georgina

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate fatty acid esters are non-ionic surfactants with a broad spectrum of applications. These molecules are generally synthesized using short carbohydrates or linear fructans; however in this research carbohydrate fatty acid esters were produced for the first time with branched fructans from Agave tequilana. Using immobilized lipases we successfully acylated A. tequilana fructans with vinyl laurate, obtaining products with different degrees of polymerization (DP). Lipozyme 435 was the most efficient lipase to catalyze the transesterification reaction. HPLC and ESI-MS analysis proved the presence of a mixture of acylated products as a result of the chemical complexity of fructans in the A. tequilana. The ESI-MS spectra showed a molecular mass shift between 183 and 366g/mol for fructooligosaccharides with a DP lower than 6, which indicated the presence of Agave fructans that had been mono- and diacylated with lauric acid. The carbohydrate fatty acid esters (CFAE) obtained showed good emulsifying properties in W/O emulsions.

  13. Seasonal patterns of reserve and soluble carbohydrates in mature sugar maple (Acer saccharum)

    Treesearch

    B.L. Wong; K.L. Baggett; A.H. Rye

    2003-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees exhibit seasonal patterns of production, accumulation, and utilization of nonstructural carbohydrates that are closely correlated with phenological events and (or) physiological processes. The simultaneous seasonal patterns of both reserve and soluble carbohydrates in the leaves, twigs, branches, and trunks of healthy mature...

  14. Locked-ring C-Glycoside sugars. New carbohydrate products from plant cell walls.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Residual products from the fermentation of biomass for fuel ethanol production typically consist of complex carbohydrates, plus other products such as lignin. The analysis of these carbohydrate residues will be important for maximizing the fermentation process for optimal ethanol production. Techn...

  15. Disorders of carbohydrate digestion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Heitlinger, L A; Lebenthal, E

    1988-04-01

    The carbohydrate malabsorptive syndromes are frequently seen by pediatricians. The congenital deficiency states are quite rare, but adult type hypolactasia and lactose intolerance following rotavirus infection are recognized with increasing frequency by primary care physicians. Therapy for these disorders involves identification of the offending carbohydrate, removal of the carbohydrate from the diet, and exclusion of other entities that may result in carbohydrate malabsorption but not respond to its removal from the diet. Prognosis for both the primary and secondary carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes is excellent. Compliance with diets for those pediatric patients who will require lifelong therapy remains problematic.

  16. Introduction of Living Polymerization. Living and/or Controlled Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    separated into kinetic and synthetic. The intention of this paper is not to review existing and proclaimed living systems but to discuss the essence of a...o1 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH S4 CONTRACT N00014-94-1-0101 I R&T Code 31321075 Technical Report No. 10 INTRODUCTION TO LIVING POLYMERIZATION. LIVING ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Introduction to Living Polymerization. Living and/or Controlled Polymerization N00014-94-1-0101 6. AUTHOR(S

  17. The effect of structural differences in the reducing terminus of sugars on the binding affinity of carbohydrates and proteins analyzed using photoaffinity labeling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mari; Hada, Noriyasu; Hada, Junko; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Sakushima, Akiyo

    2011-01-15

    Because carbohydrates and proteins bind with such low affinity, the nature of their interactions is not clear. Photoaffinity labeling with diazirin groups is useful for elucidating the roles of carbohydrates in these binding processes. However, when carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to this conventional method, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Because greater elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions requires a closed-ring carbohydrate in addition to the photoreactive group, we synthesized new molecular tools. The carbohydrate ligands were synthesized in three steps (glycosylation with allyl alcohol, deprotection, and ozonolysis). Specific binding proteins for carbohydrate ligands were obtained by photoaffinity labeling. Closed ring-type carbohydrate ligands, in which the reducing sugar is closed, bound to lectins more strongly than open ring-type sugars. Carbohydrate to protein binding was observed using AFM.

  18. Pharmaceutical, cosmeceutical, and traditional applications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdul Bakrudeen Ali; Adel, Mohaddeseh; Karimi, Pegah; Peidayesh, Mahvash

    2014-01-01

    Marine carbohydrates are most important organic molecules made by photosynthetic organisms. It is very essential for humankind: the role in being an energy source for the organism and they are considered as an important dissolve organic compound (DOC) in marine environment's sediments. Carbohydrates found in different marine environments in different concentrations. Polysaccharides of carbohydrates play an important role in various fields such as pharmaceutical, food production, cosmeceutical, and so on. Marine organisms are good resources of nutrients, and they are rich carbohydrate in sulfated polysaccharide. Seaweeds (marine microalgae) are used in different pharmaceutical industries, especially in pharmaceutical compound production. Seaweeds have a significant amount of sulfated polysaccharides, which are used in cosmeceutical industry, besides based on the biological applications. Since then, traditional people, cosmetics products, and pharmaceutical applications consider many types of seaweed as an important organism used in food process. Sulfated polysaccharides containing seaweed have potential uses in the blood coagulation system, antiviral activity, antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, immunomodulating activity, antilipidepic activity, etc. Some species of marine organisms are rich in polysaccharides such as sulfated galactans. Various polysaccharides such as agar and alginates, which are extracted from marine organisms, have several applications in food production and cosmeceutical industries. Due to their high health benefits, compound-derived extracts of marine polysaccharides have various applications and traditional people were using them since long time ago. In the future, much attention is supposed to be paid to unraveling the structural, compositional, and sequential properties of marine carbohydrate as well.

  19. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  20. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates and Method Relating Thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Claire, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared, This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches. adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrates; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  1. Synthesis of carbohydrate-scaffolded thymine glycoconjugates to organize multivalency

    PubMed Central

    Ciuk, Anna K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multivalency effects are essential in carbohydrate recognition processes as occurring on the cell surface. Thus many synthetic multivalent glycoconjugates have been developed as important tools for glycobiological research. We are expanding this collection of molecules by the introduction of carbohydrate-scaffolded divalent glycothymine derivatives that can be intramolecularily dimerized by [2 + 2] photocycloaddition. Thus, thymine functions as a control element that allows to restrict the conformational flexibility of the scaffolded sugar ligands and thus to “organize” multivalency. With this work we add a parameter to multivalency studies additional to valency. PMID:26124869

  2. Solvent interactions determine carbohydrate conformation

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Karl N.; Woods, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the three-dimensional structures of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides and their biological properties has been the focus of many recent studies. The overall conformation of an oligosaccharide depends primarily on the orientation of the torsion angles (φ, ψ, and ω) between glycosyl residues. Numerous experimental studies have shown that in glucopyranosides the ω-torsion angle (O6-C6-C5-O5) displays a preference for gauche orientations, in disagreement with predictions based on gas-phase quantum mechanics calculations. In contrast, the ω-angle in galactopyranosides displays a high proportion of the anti-orientation. For oligosaccharides containing glycosidic linkages at the 6-position (1→6 linked), variations in rotamer population have a direct effect on the oligosaccharides' structure and function, and yet the physical origin of these conformational preferences remains unclear. Although it is generally recognized that the gauche effect in carbohydrates is a solvent-dependent phenomenon, the mechanism through which solvent induces the gauche preference is not understood. In the present work, quantum mechanics and solvated molecular dynamics calculations were performed on two representative carbohydrates, methyl α-d-glucopyranoside and methyl α-d-galactopyranoside. We show that correct reproduction of the experimental rotamer distributions about the ω-angles is obtained only after explicit water is included in the molecular dynamics simulations. The primary role of the water appears to be to disrupt the hydrogen bonding within the carbohydrate, thereby allowing the rotamer populations to be determined by internal electronic and steric repulsions between the oxygen atoms. The results reported here provide a quantitative explanation of the conformational behavior of (1→6)-linked carbohydrates. PMID:11526221

  3. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  4. Increased oxygen radical and high-dietary-carbohydrate pancreatic damage.

    PubMed

    Novelli, E L; Novelli Filho, J L; Rodrigues, N L; Ribas, B O

    1994-01-01

    These data suggest that an improved understanding of the relationship between high dietary carbohydrate and the rate of lipid peroxidation may give some insight into possible treatment modalities for pancreatic damages and may shed light on molecular mechanisms underlying certain pathological processes. High dietary carbohydrate lesions are age related and induced alterations on ceruloplasmin, phospholipids, total proteins, copper and zinc serum levels. Significantly increased serum and pancreatic amylase, and lipoperoxide determinations were observed in 20 month old rats. Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase was decreased in these animals. Daily injection of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase conjugated with polyethylene glycol (SOD-PEG) prevented the serum and pancreatic changes, indicating that superoxide radical is an important intermediate to high dietary carbohydrate lesion.

  5. RABBIT ANTIBODIES TO STREPTOCOCCAL CARBOHYDRATES

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Dietmar G.; Eichmann, Klaus; Krause, Richard M.

    1969-01-01

    In a search for possible genetic factors which may influence the immune response to the streptococcal carbohydrates, over 100 rabbits have been immunized with streptococcal vaccines, and representative examples of high and low response pairs mated. The concentration of precipitins to the group—specific carbohydrates has been measured in the antisera following primary intravenous immunization with heat-killed streptococcal vaccines, Group A, Group A-variant, and Group C. For the majority of rabbits, the concentration of precipitins varied between 1 and 10 mg/ml of antiserum; while in the minority, it was between 11 and 32 mg/ml. The offspring of rabbits with high antibody levels had a significantly higher concentration of antibody than was seen in the offspring of rabbits of low response parents. Such data suggest that the magnitude of the immune response to these carbohydrate antigens is under some form of genetic control. Not uncommonly in rabbits with hyper-γ-globulinemia following primary immunization, the group-specific precipitins are the predominant component of the γ-globulin. An unusual feature of such components is that they are electrophoretically monodisperse, and possess individual antigenic specificity. In this respect they resemble the myeloma proteins. When a response of this sort is not seen after primary immunization, it may occur after secondary immunization. Therefore, prior exposure to the same or closely related antigen may also have an influence on the occurrence of high concentrations of such uniform antibodies. PMID:5766948

  6. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Definition of immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Fabini, Gustáv; Schuster, David; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H

    2005-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known as sources of immunological cross-reactivity of allergenic significance. In celery and in cypress pollen, the major allergens Api g 5 and Cup a 1 are recognised by antisera raised against anti-horseradish peroxidase and by patients' IgE which apparently bind carbohydrate epitopes; mass spectrometric analysis of the tryptic peptides and of their N-glycans showed the presence of oligosaccharides carrying both xylose and core alpha1,3-fucose residues. Core alpha1,3-fucose residues are also a feature of invertebrates: genetic and biochemical studies on the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni and the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans indicate that these organisms possess core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferases. Various experiments have shown that fucosyltransferases from both fly and worm are responsible in vivo and in vitro for the synthesis of N-glycans which cross-react with anti-horseradish peroxidase; thus, we can consider these enzymes as useful tools in generating standard compounds for testing cross-reactive carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic interest.

  8. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G.; Huang, Johnny X.; Butler, Mark S.; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Lloyd, Adrian J.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  9. pdb-care (PDB carbohydrate residue check): a program to support annotation of complex carbohydrate structures in PDB files.

    PubMed

    Lütteke, Thomas; von der Lieth, Claus-W

    2004-06-04

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of fundamental biological processes and pathological situations. They therefore have a large pharmaceutical and diagnostic potential. Knowledge of the 3D structure of glycans is a prerequisite for a complete understanding of their biological functions. The largest source of biomolecular 3D structures is the Protein Data Bank. However, about 30% of all 1663 PDB entries (version September 2003) containing carbohydrates comprise errors in glycan description. Unfortunately, no software is currently available which aligns the 3D information with the reported assignments. It is the aim of this work to fill this gap. The pdb-care program http://www.glycosciences.de/tools/pdb-care/ is able to identify and assign carbohydrate structures using only atom types and their 3D atom coordinates given in PDB-files. Looking up a translation table where systematic names and the respective PDB residue codes are listed, both assignments are compared and inconsistencies are reported. Additionally, the reliability of reported and calculated connectivities for molecules listed within the HETATOM records is checked and unusual values are reported. Frequent use of pdb-care will help to improve the quality of carbohydrate data contained in the PDB. Automatic assignment of carbohydrate structures contained in PDB entries will enable the cross-linking of glycobiology resources with genomic and proteomic data collections.

  10. pdb-care (PDB CArbohydrate REsidue check): a program to support annotation of complex carbohydrate structures in PDB files

    PubMed Central

    Lütteke, Thomas; von der Lieth, Claus-W

    2004-01-01

    Background Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of fundamental biological processes and pathological situations. They therefore have a large pharmaceutical and diagnostic potential. Knowledge of the 3D structure of glycans is a prerequisite for a complete understanding of their biological functions. The largest source of biomolecular 3D structures is the Protein Data Bank. However, about 30% of all 1663 PDB entries (version September 2003) containing carbohydrates comprise errors in glycan description. Unfortunately, no software is currently available which aligns the 3D information with the reported assignments. It is the aim of this work to fill this gap. Results The pdb-care program is able to identify and assign carbohydrate structures using only atom types and their 3D atom coordinates given in PDB-files. Looking up a translation table where systematic names and the respective PDB residue codes are listed, both assignments are compared and inconsistencies are reported. Additionally, the reliability of reported and calculated connectivities for molecules listed within the HETATOM records is checked and unusual values are reported. Conclusion Frequent use of pdb-care will help to improve the quality of carbohydrate data contained in the PDB. Automatic assignment of carbohydrate structures contained in PDB entries will enable the cross-linking of glycobiology resources with genomic and proteomic data collections. PMID:15180909

  11. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  12. Solvent structure improves docking prediction in lectin-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Gauto, Diego F; Petruk, Ariel A; Modenutti, Carlos P; Blanco, Juan I; Di Lella, Santiago; Martí, Marcelo A

    2013-02-01

    Recognition and complex formation between proteins and carbohydrates is a key issue in many important biological processes. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of such complexes is thus most relevant, but particularly challenging because of their usually low binding affinity. In silico docking methods have a long-standing tradition in predicting protein-ligand complexes, and allow a potentially fast exploration of a number of possible protein-carbohydrate complex structures. However, determining which of these predicted complexes represents the correct structure is not always straightforward. In this work, we present a modification of the scoring function provided by AutoDock4, a widely used docking software, on the basis of analysis of the solvent structure adjacent to the protein surface, as derived from molecular dynamics simulations, that allows the definition and characterization of regions with higher water occupancy than the bulk solvent, called water sites. They mimic the interaction held between the carbohydrate -OH groups and the protein. We used this information for an improved docking method in relation to its capacity to correctly predict the protein-carbohydrate complexes for a number of tested proteins, whose ligands range in size from mono- to tetrasaccharide. Our results show that the presented method significantly improves the docking predictions. The resulting solvent-structure-biased docking protocol, therefore, appears as a powerful tool for the design and optimization of development of glycomimetic drugs, while providing new insights into protein-carbohydrate interactions. Moreover, the achieved improvement also underscores the relevance of the solvent structure to the protein carbohydrate recognition process.

  13. Hafnocene-Based Olefin Polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesner, T.; Troll, C.; Rieger, B.

    Zirconocenes have been used for a long time in the field of olefin polymerization using MAO as cocatalyst. The equivalent hafnocenes were seldom used due to a lack of productivity while using MAO activation. In the last few years borane and borate activation has come into the focus of research for olefin polymerization. A variety of different hafnocenes were used to investigate the polymerization mechanism and the different cocatalysts.

  14. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  15. Polymerization Evaluation by Spectrophotometric Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunach, Jaume

    1985-01-01

    Discusses polymerization evaluation by spectrophotometric measurements by considering: (1) association degrees and molar absorptivities; (2) association degrees and equilibrium constants; and (3) absorbance and equilibrium constants. (JN)

  16. Carbohydrate composition of compost during composting and mycelium growth of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2014-01-30

    Changes of plant cell wall carbohydrate structures occurring during the process to make suitable compost for growth of Agaricus bisporus are unknown. In this paper, composition and carbohydrate structures in compost samples collected during composting and mycelium growth were analyzed. Furthermore, different extracts of compost samples were prepared with water, 1M and 4M alkali and analyzed. At the beginning of composting, 34% and after 16 days of mycelium growth 27% of dry matter was carbohydrates. Carbohydrate composition analysis showed that mainly cellulose and poorly substituted xylan chains with similar amounts and ratios of xylan building blocks were present in all phases studied. Nevertheless, xylan solubility increased 20% over the period of mycelium growth indicating partial degradation of xylan backbone. Apparently, degradation of carbohydrates occurred over the process studied by both bacteria and fungi, mainly having an effect on xylan-chain length and solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protozoan indicators and extracellular polymeric substances alterations in an intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Remmas, Nikolaos; Melidis, Paraschos; Paschos, Georgios; Statiris, Evangelos; Ntougias, Spyridon

    2017-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor was operated under intermittent aeration and various organic loading rates (OLR: 0.070, 0.159 and 0.291 g COD L(-1) d(-1)) to remove carbon and nitrogen from mature landfill leachate, where external carbon source (glycerol) addition resulted in effective nitrate removal. A relative increase in soluble microbial product (SMP) over extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was observed at the highest OLR and glycerol addition, whereas no membrane biofouling occurred. SMP (proteins and carbohydrates) and carbohydrate EPS correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with suspended solids and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Moreover, proteinous SMP significantly correlated with carbon and nitrogen load. Principal component analysis also revealed the influence of leachate organic and nitrogen content on biomass production, TMP and sessile ciliate densities. Although filamentous index (FI) was sustained at high levels (3-4), with Haliscomenobacter hydrossis being the main filamentous bacterium identified, no bulking phenomena occurred. High glycerol addition resulted in a rapid increase in sessile ciliate population. Increased Epistylis and Vorticella microstoma population was detected by microscopic examination during high glycerol addition, while a remarkable Rhogostoma population (supergroup Rhizaria) was identified by molecular techniques. The contribution of Rhizaria in nitrogen processes may lead to the dominance of Rhogostoma during landfill leachate treatment.

  18. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  19. Enhanced fermentative capacity of yeasts engineered in storage carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Matallana, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    During yeast biomass production, cells are grown through several batch and fed-batch cultures on molasses. This industrial process produces several types of stresses along the process, including thermic, osmotic, starvation, and oxidative stress. It has been shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced stress resistance present enhanced fermentative capacity of yeast biomass produced. On the other hand, storage carbohydrates have been related to several types of stress resistance in S. cerevisiae. Here we have engineered industrial strains in storage carbohydrate metabolism by overexpressing the GSY2 gene, that encodes the glycogen synthase enzyme, and deleting NTH1 gene, that encodes the neutral trehalase enzyme. Industrial biomass production process simulations were performed with control and modified strains to measure cellular carbohydrates and fermentation capacity of the produced biomass. These modifications increased glycogen and trehalose levels respectively during bench-top trials of industrial biomass propagation. We finally show that these strains display an improved fermentative capacity than its parental strain after biomass production. Modification of storage carbohydrate content increases fermentation or metabolic capacity of yeast which can be an interesting application for the food industry.

  20. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-04

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed.