Science.gov

Sample records for processive carbohydrate polymerization

  1. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  2. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  3. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  4. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  5. Processing polymeric powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of uniformly and continuously depositing and sinter-fusing nominal 0.1 to 40 microns dimensioned electrostatically charged polymer powder particles onto essentially uniformly spread 5 to 20 micron grounded continuous fiber tow to produce a respoolable thermoplastic composite two-preg was formulated at NASA Langley. The process was reduced to practice under a NASA grant at the University of Akron this spring. The production of tow-preg is called phase 1. The production of ultrafine polymer powders from 5 to 10 percent (wt) polymer solids in solvent is considered. This is phase 0 and is discussed. The production of unitape from multi tow-pregs was also considered. This is phase 2 and is also discussed. And another approach to phase 1, also proposed last summer, was scoped. This is phase 1A and is also discussed.

  6. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  7. The kinetics of periodate oxidation of carbohydrates 2. Polymeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Tiziani, Stefano; Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2003-05-01

    A study of the kinetics of periodate oxidation on a series of dextran oligomers and polymers is carried out by isothermal microcalorimetry. In addition to these substrates, some dimeric carbohydrates and hyaluronan were studied. Rate constants were calculated from the calorimetric decay curves, which, properly corrected for calorimetric response, are proportional to the rate of periodate conversion. The dependence of the kinetic rates on the molecular weight of dextran samples and on the substrate concentration, is described in terms of the much higher rates of terminal reducing units. The presence of two sites with comparable reaction rates makes the analysis of the calorimetric curves difficult, even in the simple overall pseudo-first-order condition. The suitability of a phenomenological treatment of kinetic data is explored.

  8. The role of carbohydrate in the assembly and function of polymeric IgG.

    PubMed

    Coloma, M J; Clift, A; Wims, L; Morrison, S L

    2000-12-01

    The carbohydrate present on glycoprotein can influence their biologic and functional properties. In the present paper we have assessed the role of oligosaccharides in the polymerization and effector functions of IgG with the 18 amino acid extension of IgM added to its carboxy terminus (IgGmutp). We found that IgG1mutp and IgG3mutp lacking the carbohydrate addition site in C(H)2, in the tail-piece or both assembled into polymers as well as the glycosylated versions. Aglycosylated polymers retained the ability to activate complement as assayed by C1q binding and hemolysis, although they were not as effective as their wild type polymer counterparts. Although IgGmutp lacking the carbohydrate in the tail-piece was able to bind to FcgammaRII, completely aglycosylated polymers lost the ability to bind to both FcgammaRI and FcgammaRII, suggesting a critical role for the C(H)2 sugar in FcR binding. Absence of the mutp carbohydrate increased the half life of polymeric IgG1, whereas absence of the carbohydrate in C(H)2 accelerated the clearance rate.

  9. Monitoring processivity and length control of a carbohydrate polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate polymerases are abundant in nature. Although they play vital physiological roles, the molecular mechanisms that they use for the controlled assembly of polymers are largely unknown. One fundamental issue is whether an enzyme utilizes a processive or distributive mechanism for chain elongation. The shortage of mechanistic information on polysaccharide-generating glycosyltransferases became apparent when we sought to carry out investigations of GlfT2, a glycosyltransferase essential for cell wall biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of the cell wall galactan, which is a linear polysaccharide consisting of 20-40 repeating D-galactofuranose (Galf) residues. Recombinant GlfT2 can act on synthetic acceptors to produce polymers with lengths similar to those of endogenous galactan, indicating that GlfT2 has an intrinsic ability to control polymer length. To address whether GlfT2 utilizes a processive or distributive mechanism, we developed a mass spectrometry assay. Our approach, which relies on acceptors labeled with stable isotopes, provides direct evidence that GlfT2 is a processive polymerase that maintains contact with the glycan substrate through successive monomer additions. Given this finding, we probed further the catalytic mechanism of GlfT2 to address the basis of an observed kinetic lag phase. These studies suggest that GlfT2 possesses subsites for Galf residue binding and that substrates that can fill these subsites undergo efficient processive polymerization. The presence of these subsites and the kinetic lag phase are common features of processive enzymes. We anticipate that the strategies described herein can be applied to mechanistic studies of other carbohydrate polymerization reactions. PMID:21739979

  10. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  11. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  12. Chemical Changes in Carbohydrates Produced by Thermal Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoseney, R. Carl

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical changes that occur in the carbohydrates found in food products when these products are subjected to thermal processing. Topics considered include browning reactions, starch found in food systems, hydrolysis of carbohydrates, extrusion cooking, processing of cookies and candies, and alterations in gums. (JN)

  13. Processing difficulties and instability of carbohydrate microneedle arrays

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Morrow, Desmond I.J.; Singh, Thakur R.R.; Migalska, Katarzyna; McCarron, Paul A.; O’Mahony, Conor; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of reports have suggested that many of the problems currently associated with the use of microneedle (MN) arrays for transdermal drug delivery could be addressed by using drug-loaded MN arrays prepared by moulding hot melts of carbohydrate materials. Methods In this study, we explored the processing, handling, and storage of MN arrays prepared from galactose with a view to clinical application. Results Galactose required a high processing temperature (160°C), and molten galactose was difficult to work with. Substantial losses of the model drugs 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and bovine serum albumin were incurred during processing. While relatively small forces caused significant reductions in MN height when applied to an aluminium block, this was not observed during their relatively facile insertion into heat-stripped epidermis. Drug release experiments using ALA-loaded MN arrays revealed that less than 0.05% of the total drug loading was released across a model silicone membrane. Similarly, only low amounts of ALA (approximately 0.13%) and undetectable amounts of bovine serum albumin were delivered when galactose arrays were combined with aqueous vehicles. Microscopic inspection of the membrane following release studies revealed that no holes could be observed in the membrane, indicating that the partially dissolved galactose sealed the MN-induced holes, thus limiting drug delivery. Indeed, depth penetration studies into excised porcine skin revealed that there was no significant increase in ALA delivery using galactose MN arrays, compared to control (P value < 0.05). Galactose MNs were unstable at ambient relative humidities and became adhesive. Conclusion The processing difficulties and instability encountered in this study are likely to preclude successful clinical application of carbohydrate MNs. The findings of this study are of particular importance to those in the pharmaceutical industry involved in the design and formulation of

  14. Intake of indigestible carbohydrates influences IgA response and polymeric Ig receptor expression in the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuko; To, Masahiro; Hayashi, Takashi; Shimizu, Tomoko; Kamata, Yohei; Saruta, Juri; Takahashi, Toru; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2015-06-28

    Secretory IgA in the saliva is essential for protection from mucosally transmitted pathogens and maintaining homeostasis at mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity. Expression of submandibular gland polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) is essential for IgA secretion. In the present study, we investigated the influence of indigestible carbohydrates on IgA production in the salivary gland and saliva. Five-week-old rats were fed a fibre-free diet (control), or a diet with 5 % (w/w) fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) or a combination of 2·5 % (w/w) polydextrose (PDX) and 2·5 % (w/w) lactitol for 21-d. IgA concentrations in the caecal digesta, submandibular gland tissue, and saliva in the FOS and PDX+lactitol diet groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P< 0·05). The increase in IgA in the submandibular gland tissue was confirmed using immunohistochemical analysis. However, the IgA concentrations of serum did not differ between the FOS or PDX+lactitol groups and the control group (P= 0·5). In the FOS and PDX+lactitol groups, the pIgR mRNA (pIgR/β-actin) expression level in the submandibular gland tissue was significantly higher than that in the control group (P< 0·05). The present study suggests that indigestible carbohydrates play an important role in the increase in IgA concentrations in the submandibular gland tissue, saliva, and caecal digesta.

  15. Microencapsulation of lipophilic bioactive compounds using prebiotic carbohydrates: Effect of the degree of inulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Keven; Zabot, Giovani L; Bargas, Matheus A; Meireles, M Angela A

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents novel outcomes about the effect of degree of inulin polymerization (DP) on the technological properties of annatto seed oil powder obtained by freeze-drying. Inulins with two DP's were evaluated: GR-inulin (DP≥10) and HP-inulin (DP≥23). Micrographs obtained by confocal microscopy were analyzed to confirm the encapsulation of bioactive compounds using both inulins, especially the encapsulation of the natural fluorescent substance δ-tocotrienol. Microparticles formed with both inulins presented the same capacity for geranylgeraniol retention (77%). Glass transitions of microparticles formed with GR-inulin and HP-inulin succeeded at 144°C and 169°C, respectively. Regarding water adsorption isotherms, microparticles formed with HP-inulin and GR-inulin presented behaviors of Types II (sigmoidal) and III (non-sigmoidal), respectively. Reduction of water adsorption capacity in the matrix at high relative moistures (>70%) was presented when HP-inulin was used. At low relative moistures (<30%), the opposite behavior was observed. PMID:27516329

  16. Microencapsulation of lipophilic bioactive compounds using prebiotic carbohydrates: Effect of the degree of inulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Keven; Zabot, Giovani L; Bargas, Matheus A; Meireles, M Angela A

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents novel outcomes about the effect of degree of inulin polymerization (DP) on the technological properties of annatto seed oil powder obtained by freeze-drying. Inulins with two DP's were evaluated: GR-inulin (DP≥10) and HP-inulin (DP≥23). Micrographs obtained by confocal microscopy were analyzed to confirm the encapsulation of bioactive compounds using both inulins, especially the encapsulation of the natural fluorescent substance δ-tocotrienol. Microparticles formed with both inulins presented the same capacity for geranylgeraniol retention (77%). Glass transitions of microparticles formed with GR-inulin and HP-inulin succeeded at 144°C and 169°C, respectively. Regarding water adsorption isotherms, microparticles formed with HP-inulin and GR-inulin presented behaviors of Types II (sigmoidal) and III (non-sigmoidal), respectively. Reduction of water adsorption capacity in the matrix at high relative moistures (>70%) was presented when HP-inulin was used. At low relative moistures (<30%), the opposite behavior was observed.

  17. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    PubMed

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV. PMID:26056782

  18. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    PubMed

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV.

  19. Heterogeneous Initiators for Sustainable Polymerization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew D.

    One of the main challenges facing the twenty-first century is the need to produce chemicals from renewable resources. The dwindling supplies of fossil fuels coupled with instability in supply mean that technologies that were once deemed too expensive are now becoming more economically viable options. The majority of man-made polymers are derived from crude oil based monomers. However, in recent years a tremendous effort has been channeled into the preparation of polymers from sustainable chemicals. Two classic examples are polylactide (derived from corn starch) and polycarbonates (prepared directly from CO2). This chapter serves as an introduction into these two polymers and reviews the literature associated with heterogeneous catalyst for the polymerizations, concentrating on approaches describing the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts.

  20. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  1. Processes for microemulsion polymerization employing novel microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Beckman, Eric J.; Smith, Richard D.; Fulton, John L.

    1990-06-12

    This invention is directed to a microemulsion system comprising a first phase including a low-polarity fluid material which is a gas at standard temperature and pressure, and which has a cloud-point density. It also includes a second phase including a polar fluid, typically water, a monomer, preferably a monomer soluble in the polar fluid, and a microemulsion promoter for facilitating the formation of micelles including the monomer in the system. In the subject process, micelles including the monomer are formed in the first phase. A polymerization initiator is introduced into the micelles in the microemulsion system. The monomer is then polymerized in the micelles, preferably in the core of the micelle, to produce a polymeric material having a relatively high molecular weight.

  2. Micro-fluidic partitioning between polymeric sheets for chemical amplification and processing

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.

    2015-05-26

    A system for fluid partitioning for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations of a sample, comprising a first dispenser of a first polymeric sheet, wherein the first polymeric sheet contains chambers; a second dispenser of a second polymeric sheet wherein the first dispenser and the second dispenser are positioned so that the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet become parallel; a dispenser of the fluid positioned to dispense the fluid between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet; and a seal unit that seals the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet together thereby sealing the sample between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet and partitioning the fluid for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations.

  3. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these. PMID:26393573

  4. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-09-17

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these.

  5. Orchestration of carbohydrate processing for crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland, Anne M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2016-06-01

    The production of phosphoenolpyruvate as a substrate for nocturnal CO2 uptake represents a significant sink for carbohydrate in CAM plants which has to be balanced with the provisioning of carbohydrate for growth and maintenance. In starch-storing CAM species, diversification in chloroplast metabolite transporters, and the deployment of both phosphorolytic and hydrolytic routes of starch degradation accommodate a division of labour in directing C-skeletons towards nocturnal carboxylation or production of sucrose for growth. In soluble-sugar storing CAM plants, the vacuole plays a central role in managing carbon homeostasis. The molecular identities of various types of vacuolar sugar transporters have only been identified for C3 species within the last 10 years. The recent availability of CAM genomes enables the identification of putative orthologues of vacuolar sugar transporters which represent strategic targets for orchestrating the diel provisioning of substrate for nocturnal carboxylation and growth. PMID:27101569

  6. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1988-05-04

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  7. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.; Spence, Roger D.

    1989-01-01

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  8. Characterization of two-photon polymerization process using Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L. J.; Zhou, Y. S.; Xiong, W.; Gao, Y.; Baldacchini, T.; Silvain, J.-F.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a promising micro/nanofabrication technique, which is capable of fabricating 3D micro/nanostructures beyond the diffraction limit of light. However, the study of TPP process with a focus on the dependence of degree of conversion on TPP parameters using a non-destructive and efficient method is still lacking. We studied the quantitative relationships between the TPP parameters and the cross-linking of an acrylic-based IP-L 780 photoresist via systematic Raman characterization. The differences in the Raman spectra between the non-polymerized and the polymerized IP-L 780 photoresists were observed by probing the excitation of carbon-carbon double bond (C=C) vibrations. We obtained the relationship between the degree of conversion in TPP and the Raman spectra of the IP-L 780 resin, in which the intensity of the characteristic Raman peak of IP-L 780 at 1635 cm-1 decreases with the increase of the TPP laser dose. A mathematic model of the degree of conversion with respective to the TPP parameters, including laser average power and writing speed, has been established. The method provides a simple and effective way to characterize and optimize the TPP micro/nanofabrication processes. The established model for the degree of conversion as the function of TPP parameters will contribute to the advanced 3D TPP micro/nanofabrication by providing a guidance to optimize the laser doses, voxel sizes, and the mechanical strength of the polymers.

  9. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  10. Activity-based proteomics probes for carbohydrate-processing enzymes: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Keith A

    2014-05-22

    Carbohydrate-processing enzymes are gaining more attention due to their roles in health and disease as these enzymes are involved in the construction and deconstruction of vast arrays of glycan structures. As a result, the development of methods to identify these enzymes in complex biological systems is of increasing interest. Activity-based proteomics probes (ABPPs) are increasingly being used in glycobiology to detect and identify functionally related proteins (and homologues) within a biological system. This review will describe the design of activity-based proteomics probes, provide examples of compounds that have been used to profile activity in the area of carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and give some future perspectives.

  11. Polymeric Based Therapeutic Delivery Systems Prepared Using Electrohydrodynamic Processes.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, M; Nazari, K; Arshad, M S; Kucuk, I; Haj-Ahmad, R; Hussain, A; Morris, M A; Abbas, N; Chang, M-W; Li, X; Ahmad, Z

    2016-01-01

    The development of therapeutic dosage (e.g. pharmaceutical) systems is an ongoing process which, in recent times has incorporated several emerging disciplines and themes at timely intervals. While the concepts surrounding dosage forms have developed and evolved, many polymeric excipients remain as the preferred choice of materials over existing counterparts, serving functions as matrix materials, coatings and providing other specific functional properties (e.g. adhesion, controlled release and mechanical properties). There have been, however, developments in the deployment of synthetic polymeric materials (e.g. polycaprolactone, poly lactic co-glycolic acid) when compared to naturally occurring materials (e.g. lactose, gelatin). Advances in pharmaceutical process technologies have also provided novel engineering platforms to develop a host of exciting structure based materials ranging from the nanometer to the macro scales. Some of these structure enabling technologies include spray drying, super critical processing, microfluidics and even wet chemical methods. More recently electrohydrodynamic (EHDA) engineering methods have emerged as robust technologies offering potential to fabricate a plethora of generic structures (e.g. particles, fibres, bubbles and pre-determined patterns) on a broad scale range. This review focuses on key developments using various EHDA technologies for the pharmaceutical and biomaterial remits when selecting synthetic and/or naturally occurring polymers as pharmaceutical (and therapeutic) excipients. In addition, the underlying EHDA process principles are discussed along with key parameters and variables (both materials and engineering). EHDA technologies are operational at ambient conditions and recent developments have also demonstrated their viability for large scale production. These are promising technologies which have potential in established (e.g. films, dressings and microparticles) and emerging scientific themes (e

  12. Development of inhibitors as research tools for carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Tracey M

    2012-10-01

    Carbohydrates, which are present in all domains of life, play important roles in a host of cellular processes. These ubiquitous biomolecules form highly diverse and often complex glycan structures without the aid of a template. The carbohydrate structures are regulated solely by the location and specificity of the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation. These enzymes, glycosyltransferases and glycoside hydrolases, need to be functionally well characterized in order to investigate the structure and function of glycans. The use of enzyme inhibitors, which target a particular enzyme, can significantly aid this understanding, and may also provide insights into therapeutic applications. The present article describes some of the approaches used to design and develop enzyme inhibitors as tools for investigating carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

  13. Multiple Functions of Aromatic-Carbohydrate Interactions in a Processive Cellulase Examined with Molecular Simulation*

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christina M.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Taylor, Courtney B.; McCabe, Clare; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins employ aromatic residues for carbohydrate binding in a wide range of biological functions. Glycoside hydrolases, which are ubiquitous in nature, typically exhibit tunnels, clefts, or pockets lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrates. Mutation of these aromatic residues often results in significant activity differences on insoluble and soluble substrates. However, the thermodynamic basis and molecular level role of these aromatic residues remain unknown. Here, we calculate the relative ligand binding free energy by mutating tryptophans in the Trichoderma reesei family 6 cellulase (Cel6A) to alanine. Removal of aromatic residues near the catalytic site has little impact on the ligand binding free energy, suggesting that aromatic residues immediately upstream of the active site are not directly involved in binding, but play a role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for catalysis. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the Cel6A tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity, suggesting that these residues play a role in chain acquisition and product stabilization, respectively. The roles suggested from differences in binding affinity are confirmed by molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Surprisingly, our results illustrate that aromatic-carbohydrate interactions vary dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, these results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for biomass utilization. Generally, these results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide range of binding affinities for diverse functions. PMID:21965672

  14. Polymerization and processing of organic polymers in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, E.P.

    1995-05-01

    The use of magnetic fields to affect the structure and properties of polymeric materials remains an area of great promise. Liquid crystalline polymers have been actively studied over the past 20 years for use in high performance structural applications. In particular, highly oriented fibers can exhibit remarkable increases in strength to weight performance compared to conventional materials. For example, the fibers marketed by DuPont under the tradename Kevlar are 20 times stronger than steel on an equivalent weight basis. However, larger bulk parts do not exhibit the same increases in strength due to a lack of orientation of the polymer molecules. Magnetic field processing of polymers remains an attractive solution to this problem.

  15. Multivalent inhibitors for carbohydrate-processing enzymes: beyond the "lock-and-key" concept.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Sébastien G

    2014-09-01

    During the last decades, tremendous chemical efforts have been dedicated to design monovalent inhibitors of carbohydrate-processing enzymes, with comparatively few rewards in terms of marketed drugs. Recently, an alternative to the traditional "lock and key" approach has emerged. Multivalency, a widely used strategy for lectin inhibition, has been successfully applied to specific glycosidases and glycosyltransferases.

  16. Coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization process for production of polymeric composite microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Qin, Hao; Yin, Zhenyuan; Hua, Jinsong; Pack, Daniel W.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composite microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) shell layer were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) process. Process conditions, including nozzle voltage and polymer solution flow rates, as well as solution parameters, such as polymer concentrations, were investigated to ensure the formation of composite microspheres with a doxorubicin-loaded PLGA core surrounded by a relatively drug-free PDLLA shell layer. Various microsphere formulations were fabricated and characterized in terms of their drug distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release. Numerical simulation of CEHDA process was performed based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model in Fluent by employing the process conditions and fluid properties used in the experiments. The simulation results were compared with the experimental work to illustrate the capability of the CFD model to predict the production of consistent compound droplets, and hence, the expected core-shell structured microspheres. PMID:24347672

  17. Coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization process for production of polymeric composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingxing; Qin, Hao; Yin, Zhenyuan; Hua, Jinsong; Pack, Daniel W; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-12-18

    Polymeric composite microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) shell layer were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) process. Process conditions, including nozzle voltage and polymer solution flow rates, as well as solution parameters, such as polymer concentrations, were investigated to ensure the formation of composite microspheres with a doxorubicin-loaded PLGA core surrounded by a relatively drug-free PDLLA shell layer. Various microsphere formulations were fabricated and characterized in terms of their drug distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release. Numerical simulation of CEHDA process was performed based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model in Fluent by employing the process conditions and fluid properties used in the experiments. The simulation results were compared with the experimental work to illustrate the capability of the CFD model to predict the production of consistent compound droplets, and hence, the expected core-shell structured microspheres.

  18. Aromatic-Mediated Carbohydrate Recognition in Processive Serratia marcescens Chitinases.

    PubMed

    Jana, Suvamay; Hamre, Anne Grethe; Wildberger, Patricia; Holen, Matilde Mengkrog; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2016-02-25

    Microorganisms use a host of enzymes, including processive glycoside hydrolases, to deconstruct recalcitrant polysaccharides to sugars. Processive glycoside hydrolases closely associate with polymer chains and repeatedly cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating from the crystalline surface after each hydrolytic step; they are typically the most abundant enzymes in both natural secretomes and industrial cocktails by virtue of their significant hydrolytic potential. The ubiquity of aromatic residues lining the enzyme catalytic tunnels and clefts is a notable feature of processive glycoside hydrolases. We hypothesized that these aromatic residues have uniquely defined roles, such as substrate chain acquisition and binding in the catalytic tunnel, that are defined by their local environment and position relative to the substrate and the catalytic center. Here, we investigated this hypothesis with variants of Serratia marcescens family 18 processive chitinases ChiA and ChiB. We applied molecular simulation and free energy calculations to assess active site dynamics and ligand binding free energies. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided further insight into enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding free energy. Thus, the roles of six aromatic residues, Trp-167, Trp-275, and Phe-396 in ChiA, and Trp-97, Trp-220, and Phe-190 in ChiB, have been examined. We observed that point mutation of the tryptophan residues to alanine results in unfavorable changes in the free energy of binding relative to wild-type. The most drastic effects were observed for residues positioned at the "entrances" of the deep substrate-binding clefts and known to be important for processivity. Interestingly, phenylalanine mutations in ChiA and ChiB had little to no effect on chito-oligomer binding, in accordance with the limited effects of their removal on chitinase functionality.

  19. Aqueous processing of alumina and phase behavior of polymeric additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundlof, Brian Richard

    Microstructures observed when dextran sulfate and PEG were added to an aqueous alumina suspension resulted from polymeric phase separation. A suspension can be processed outside the phase separating region, followed by induced phase separation via changes in suspension pH, electrolyte level, and temperature. The processing method can be used to control pore size, shape and connectivity. The dispersion of aqueous suspensions of two alpha-aluminas was investigated. APA-0.5 was of high purity, and A-16 S.G. had MgO added as a sintering aid and contained other impurities (e.g., Na2O). The rheology of the alumina suspensions was manipulated via electrostatic (HCl H2SO 4, NaOH, and NH4OH) and electrosteric stabilization (Na- and NH4-PMAA, Na- and NH4-PAA, citric acid neutralized to a pH of ˜9.0, sodium silicate, sodium hexa-metaphosphate, and sodium carbonate). Rheological phenomena correlated with zeta-potential measurements, the dissociation behavior of the polyelectrolytes, and powder surface chemistry. A method was developed to measure the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of stabilized suspensions. A critical double layer thickness ( d = ˜0.96 run) was calculated as a function of the electrolyte concentration and valence of the counter-ion, using a capacitance model. CCC estimations using the critical d value agreed with experimental observations. Microstructure development was dependent upon the disperant used during processing. Bulk density, and linear shrinkage measurements were used to evaluate the densification process of pellets slip cast then fired to 1000°C, 1200°C, 1400°C, or 1600°C. SEM micrographs of pellets fired to 1400°C, polished, then thermally etched, display variations in morphology and grain size. The presence of sodium resulted in abnormal grain growth, organics inhibited grain growth, and the inorganic dispersants severely inhibited grain growth. Polymeric interactions were observed using microscopy and light scattering in aqueous

  20. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  1. Production and Characterization of the Intra- and Extracellular Carbohydrates and Polymeric Substances (EPS) of Three Sea-Ice Diatom Species, and Evidence for a Cryoprotective Role for EPS.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Shazia N; Cresswell-Maynard, Tania; Thomas, David N; Underwood, Graham J C

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms and their associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are major constituents of the microalgal assemblages present within sea ice. Yields and chemical composition of soluble and cell-associated polysaccharides produced by three sea-ice diatoms, Synedropsis sp., Fragilariopsis curta, and F. cylindrus, were compared. Colloidal carbohydrates (CC) contained heteropolysaccharides rich in mannose, xylose, galactose, and glucose. Synedropsis sp. CC consisted mainly of carbohydrates <8 kDa size, with relatively soluble EPS, compared to high proportions of less-soluble EPS produced by both Fragilariopsis spp. F. curta colloidal EPS contained high concentrations of amino sugars (AS). Both Fragilariopsis species had high yields of hot bicarbonate (HB) soluble EPS, rich in xylose, mannose, galactose, and fucose (and AS in F. cylindrus). All species had frustule-associated EPS rich in glucose-mannose. Nutrient limitation resulted in declines in EPS yields and in glucose content of all EPS fractions. Significant similarities between EPS fractions from cultures and different components of natural EPS from Antarctic sea ice were found. Increased salinity (52) reduced growth, but increased yields of EPS in Fragilariopsis cylindrus. Ice formation was inhibited byF. cylindrus, EPS, and by enhanced EPS content (additional xanthan gum) down to -12°C, with growth rate reduced in the presence of xanthan. Differences in the production and composition of EPS between Synedropsis sp. and Fragilariopsis spp., and the association between EPS, freezing and cell survival, supports the hypothesis that EPS production is a strategy to assist polar ice diatoms to survive the cold and saline conditions present in sea ice. PMID:27009999

  2. Influence of process variables on essential oil microcapsule properties by carbohydrate polymer-protein blends.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subham; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Ghosh, Animesh; Goyary, Danswrang; Karmakar, Sanjeev; Veer, Vijay

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrate polymer-protein blends Zanthoxylum limonella oil (ZLO) loaded microcapsules were prepared by multiple emulsion solvent evaporation technology and the influence of various processing variables on the properties of ZLO loaded microcapsules were examined systematically. It was found that the internal aqueous alginate phase volume, external aqueous gelatin phase volume and concentration of surfactant in external aqueous gelatin phase have a significant influence on microcapsules properties. The essential oil-loaded microcapsules were smooth and spherical in shape as revealed by scanning electron micrograph. Results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated stable character and showed the absence of chemical interaction between the microencapsulated oil and carbohydrate polymer-protein blends. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study revealed the antioxidant nature of ZLO in the microcapsules. The release rate of ZLO loaded microcapsules was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometer. 83.80% of oil encapsulation efficiency was obtained depending upon the processing variables. Thus, proper control of the processing variables involved in this technology could allow effective incorporation of essential oil into the core of the carbohydrate polymer-protein blends matrix.

  3. Application of control technology developed in the polyvinyl chloride industry to polymerization processes using acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Schoultz, K S; Gideon, J A; Bochinski, J H

    1979-02-01

    Polymerization processes for PVC are sufficiently similar to acrylonitrile polymerization processes to allow a significant transfer of control technology. This transfer should be of value to manufacturers of polyacrylonitrile, ABS/SAN resins, nitrile elastomer and latex who will need to install extensive additional controls to comply with the new permanent standard for acrylonitrile scheduled to be issued by OSHA in late 1978. Control strategies and individual controls developed to limit worker exposure in the PVC industry are described and evaluated relative to applicability to acrylonitrile polymerization processes. PMID:495444

  4. Interrelationship between structure-property-processings in injection molded polymeric products

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Seog; Lee, Jae Wook

    1996-12-31

    Injection molding process is one of the major polymer processings for the polymeric products. This process is extensively used in the net-shaped production of plastic parts due to its capability to meet requirements of stringent dimensional accuracy and short cycle time. Specially the injection molding process consists of large, fast deformation and phase changes, which has much of processing parameters. Therefore it is important to optimize the injection molding conditions from the point of view of both productivity and product quality. In this study, we have investigated in the injection molding process for polymeric systems focusing on the understanding of structure-property-processing interrelationship and its utilization in the processing.

  5. Studies in reactive extrusion processing of biodegradable polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Sunder

    Various reaction chemistries such as Polymerization, Polymer cross-linking and Reactive grafting were investigated in twin-screw extruders. Poly (1,4-dioxan-2-one) (PPDX) was manufactured in melt by the continuous polymerization of 1,4-dioxan-2-one (PDX) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using Aluminum tri-sec butoxide (ATSB) initiator. Good and accurate control over molecular weight was obtained by controlling the ratio of monomer to initiator. A screw configuration consisting of only conveying elements was used for the polymerization. The polymerization reaction was characterized by a monomer-polymer dynamic equilibrium, above the melting temperature of the polymer, limiting the equilibrium conversion to 78-percent. Near complete (˜100-percent) conversion was obtained on co-polymerizing PDX monomer with a few mol-percent (around 8-percent) Caprolactone (CL) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using ATSB initiator. The co-polymers exhibited improved thermal stability with reduction in glass transition temperature. The extruder was modeled as an Axial Dispersed Plug Flow Reactor for the polymerization of CL monomer using Residence Time Distribution (RTD) Analysis. The model provided a good fit to the experimental RTD and conversion data. Aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters, namely Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Poly butylenes (adipate-co-terephthalate) (Ecoflex) were cross-linked in a twin-screw extruder using radical initiator to form micro-gel reinforced biodegradable polyesters. Cross-linked Ecoflex was further extrusion blended with talc to form blends suitable to be blown into films. A screw configuration consisting of conveying and kneading elements was found to be effective in dispersion of the talc particles (5--10 microns) in the polyester matrix. While the rates of crystallization increased for the talc filled polyester blends, overall crystallinity reduced. Mechanical, tear and puncture properties of films made using the talc filled polyester blends

  6. Towards a molecular-level theory of carbohydrate processivity in glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Beckham, Gregg T; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Knott, Brandon C; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F; Sandgren, Mats; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2014-06-01

    Polysaccharide depolymerization in nature is primarily accomplished by processive glycoside hydrolases (GHs), which abstract single carbohydrate chains from polymer crystals and cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating after each catalytic event. Understanding the molecular-level features and structural aspects of processivity is of importance due to the prevalence of processive GHs in biomass-degrading enzyme cocktails. Here, we describe recent advances towards the development of a molecular-level theory of processivity for cellulolytic and chitinolytic enzymes, including the development of novel methods for measuring rates of key steps in processive action and insights gained from structural and computational studies. Overall, we present a framework for developing structure-function relationships in processive GHs and outline additional progress towards developing a fundamental understanding of these industrially important enzymes. PMID:24863902

  7. Influence of dehydration process in Castellano chickpea: changes in bioactive carbohydrates and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Benítez, Vanesa; Mollá, Esperanza; Esteban, Rosa M; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2011-11-01

    Changes in bioactive carbohydrates, functional, and microstructural characteristics that occurred in chickpea under soaking, cooking, and industrial dehydration processing were evaluated. Raw chickpea exhibited important levels of raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs), resistant starch (RS) and total dietary fibre (TDF), being insoluble dietary fibre (IDF) the main fraction (94%). The dehydration process increased RFOs (43%), RS (47%) and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) (59%) levels significantly. In addition, a noticeable increase in both fibre fractions was observed, being higher in soluble fibre in (SDF) (59%). The minimum nitrogen solubility of raw flours was at pH 4, and a high degree of protein insolubilization (80%) was observed in dehydrated flours. The raw and processed flours exhibited low oil-holding capacities (1.10 mg/ml), and did not show any change by thermal processing, whereas water-holding capacities rose to 5.50 mg/ml of sample. Cooking and industrial dehydration process reduced emulsifying activity and foaming capacity of chickpea flour. The microstructural observations were consistent with the chemical results. Thus, the significant occurrence of these bioactive carbohydrate compounds along with the interesting functional properties of the dehydrated flours could be considered useful as functional ingredients for food formulation.

  8. Preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in space - Polymerization kinetics and process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.; Kornfeld, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Monodisperse polystyrene latexes are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization; however, sizes larger than 2 microns are difficult to prepare because of the creaming and settling of the particles and their sensitivity to mechanical shear. Preparation in space would obviate the creaming and settling, and allow agitation just sufficient for good heat transfer and mixing. Three polymerizations yielding 3-5 micron size particles were carried out successfully on the third flight of the 'Columbia' launched Mar. 22, 1982; however, four polymerizations yielding sizes up to 10 microns on the fourth flight launched June 27, 1982 were incomplete owing to apparatus malfunction. The results of these polymerizations and the prospects of developing a preparative space process are reviewed.

  9. Organic plasma process for simple and substrate-independent surface modification of polymeric BioMEMS devices.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Atsunori; Muguruma, Hitoshi; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Karube, Isao

    2004-07-15

    A polymeric bio micro electromechanical systems (BioMEMS) device was fabricated using organic plasma polymerization, by which the surface of a polymeric substrate could easily be modified through vapor-phase deposition of organic thin films. This technique, capable of polymeric deposition of any kind of monomer, can serve the purpose of anti-fouling coating, wettability control, or layer-to-layer interface creation, on the surface of any given chemically-inert polymeric substrate without involving cumbersome surface organic reactions. A prototype device was fabricated to have an array of electrochemical glucose biosensors with the three electrode configuration, each of which has a microfluidic channel (500 microm x 800 microm) for capillary-action-driven sample delivery and the concerned enzymatic reaction. Stressing the advantages of the plasma polymerization process using a polymeric substrate together with some additional features accomplished in our device fabrication, new possibilities in the field of polymeric BioMEMS are discussed.

  10. Engineering a Carbohydrate-processing Transglycosidase into Glycosyltransferase for Natural Product Glycodiversification

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chaoning; Zhang, Yi; Jia, Yan; Wenzhao Wang; Li, Youhai; Lu, Shikun; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Glycodiversification broadens the scope of natural product-derived drug discovery. The acceptor substrate promiscuity of glucosyltransferase-D (GTF-D), a carbohydrate-processing enzyme from Streptococcus mutans, was expanded by protein engineering. Mutants in a site-saturation mutagenesis library were screened on the fluorescent substrate 4-methylumbelliferone to identify derivatives with improved transglycosylation efficiency. In comparison to the wild-type GTF-D enzyme, mutant M4 exhibited increased transglycosylation capabilities on flavonoid substrates including catechin, genistein, daidzein and silybin, using the glucosyl donor sucrose. This study demonstrated the feasibility of developing natural product glycosyltransferases by engineering transglycosidases that use donor substrates cheaper than NDP-sugars, and gave rise to a series of α-glucosylated natural products that are novel to the natural product reservoir. The solubility of the α-glucoside of genistein and the anti-oxidant capability of the α-glucoside of catechin were also studied. PMID:26869143

  11. In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C.; Omatete, O.O.

    1996-08-01

    Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  12. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  13. Improving carbohydrate production of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168 through semi-continuous process coupled with mixotrophic cultivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Liu, Zhuo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Ting-Ting; Chang, Kuan-Fu; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-08-01

    Biofuels from microalgae is now a hot issue of great potential. However, achieving high starch productivity with photoautotrophic microalgae is still challenging. A feasible approach to enhance the growth and target product of microalgae is to conduct mixotrophic cultivation. The appropriate acetate addition combined with CO2 supply as dual carbon sources (i.e., mixotrophic cultivation) could enhance the cell growth of some microalgae species, but the effect of acetate-mediated mixotrophic culture mode on carbohydrate accumulation in microalgae remains unclear. Moreover, there is still lack of the information concerning how to increase the productivity of carbohydrates from microalgae under acetate-amended mixotrophic cultivation and how to optimize the engineering strategies to achieve the goal. This study was undertaken to develop an optimal acetate-contained mixotrophic cultivation system coupled with effective operation strategies to markedly improve the carbohydrate productivity of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168. The optimal carbohydrate productivity of 695 mg/L/d was obtained, which is the highest value ever reported. The monosaccharide in the accumulated carbohydrates is mainly glucose (i.e., 85-90%), which is very suitable for bio-alcohols fermentation. Hence, by applying the optimal process developed in this study, C. sorokiniana NIES-2168 has a high potential to serve as a feedstock for subsequent biofuels conversion. PMID:27312599

  14. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  15. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  16. Supercritical fluid drying of carbohydrates: selection of suitable excipients and process conditions.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Andréanne; Jovanović, Natasa; Hofland, Gerard W; Jiskoot, Wim; Mendes, Eduardo; Crommelin, Daan J A; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2008-03-01

    The processibility of 15 carbohydrates, more or less commonly used, was investigated as excipients in supercritical fluid drying. The focus was on the ability to produce amorphous powder, the stability of the powders towards crystallisation, and the residual water and ethanol content. The aqueous solutions were sprayed into a pressurised carbon dioxide-ethanol mixture flowing cocurrently through a coaxial two-fluid nozzle. The powder characteristics appeared to be influenced by the supersaturation level reached during the SCF-drying process and by the properties of the sugar species, such as water solubility and glass transition temperature, or the solution viscosities. The stability and the residual solvent content of a selected set of sugars and some mixtures were further analysed. The stability of amorphous powders was investigated at 4 degrees C, room temperature, 40 and 50 degrees C. Lactose, maltose, trehalose, raffinose, cyclodextrin, low-molecular-weight dextran and inulin could form free-flowing powders that remained amorphous during the 3-month stability study. Sucrose had to be mixed with other sugars to form a stable amorphous powder. Ethanol could be entrapped in supercritical fluid dried low-molecular-weight sugars, whereas polysaccharide powders were free of ethanol. Measures to prevent or overcome the presence of ethanol are discussed. PMID:17702554

  17. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organics which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials.

  18. An emulsion polymerization process for soluble and electrically conductive polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Ding, Y.; Graham, C.R.; Liu, J.; Remsen, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new emulsion process has been developed for the direct synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline (PANI) that is soluble in organic solvents. The process entails forming an emulsion composed of water, a water soluble organic solvent (e.g., 2-butoxyethanol), a water insoluble organic acid (e.g., dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid) and aniline. Aniline is protonated by the organic acid to form a salt which partitions into the organic phase. As oxidant (ammonium peroxydisulfate) is added, PANI salt forms in the organic phase and remains soluble. As the reaction proceeds, the reaction mixture changes from an emulsion to a two phase system, the soluble PANI remaining in the organic phase. With dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) as the organic acid, the resulting product is truly soluble in organic solvents such as xylene and toluene (not a dispersion), of high molecular weight (M{sub w} > 22,000), film forming and miscible with many polymers such as polyurethanes, epoxies and phenoxy resins. As cast, the polyaniline film is only moderately conductive, (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm), however treatment of the film with surfactants such as benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) or low molecular weight alcohols and ketones such as methanol and acetone increases the conductivity 2--3 orders of magnitude.

  19. Effect of the processing method on the treeing resistance of polymeric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gefle, O. S.; Lebedev, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Results of investigation into the effect of the processing method on the treeing resistance of polystyrene, polymethylmethacrilate, and polycarbonate are presented. It is demonstrated that in the presence of residual internal strain arising at the stage of processing, the highest treeing resistance possess polymers with a higher tensile yield strength. The tree propagation rate can be decreased and the time to breakdown of polymeric dielectrics can be increased by decreasing the thermal diffusivity of the base polymers.

  20. Polymeric membrane and process for separating aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed stream containing. It comprises: contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane consisting essentially of a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, and a metal or metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, the metal or metal ion is distributed homogeneously in the hydrophilic polymer; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream; whereby the membrane provides high permeability and selectivity for unsaturated hydrocarbons and substantially increases the rate at which the permeate is withdrawn.

  1. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  2. Gold manno-glyconanoparticles for intervening in HIV gp120 carbohydrate-mediated processes.

    PubMed

    Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2012-01-01

    After nearly three decades since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (1983), no effective vaccine or microbicide is available, and the virus continues to infect millions of people worldwide each year. HIV antiretroviral drugs reduce the death rate and improve the quality of life in infected patients, but they are not able to completely remove HIV from the body. The glycoprotein gp120, part of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) of HIV, is responsible for virus entry and infection of host cells. High-mannose type glycans that decorate gp120 are involved in different carbohydrate-mediated HIV binding. We have demonstrated that oligomannoside-coated gold nanoparticles (manno-GNPs) are able to interfere with HIV high-mannose glycan-mediated processes. In this chapter, we describe the methods for the preparation and characterization of manno-GNPs and the experiments performed by means of SPR and STD-NMR techniques to evaluate the ability of manno-GNPs to inhibit 2G12 antibody binding to gp120. The antibody 2G12-mediated HIV neutralization and the lectin DC-SIGN-mediated HIV trans-infection in cellular systems are also described.

  3. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  4. Polymeric membrane and process for separation of aliphatically unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.W.

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a process for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon feed steam containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises contacting the feed stream against a first side of a solid, homogeneous membrane comprising a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal; and withdrawing at a second side of the membrane a permeate comprising the unsaturated hydrocarbon in higher concentration than in the feed stream. This patent also describes a solid, homogeneous membrane for separating at least one unsaturated hydrocarbon from a hydrocarbon stream containing the unsaturated hydrocarbon. It comprises a hydrophilic polymer selected from the group consisting of polyvinylalcohol, polyvinylacetate, sulfonyl-containing polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyethylene oxide, polyacrylamide, copolymers thereof, and blends thereof, a transition metal or transition metal ion capable of reversibly complexing with the unsaturated hydrocarbon, and a hydrophilic salt of a Group I metal.

  5. Polymerization and processing of polymers in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Smith, M.E.; Douglas, E.P.

    1997-04-01

    Liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT`s) have become recognized over the past few years as an important class of materials. Numerous reports from the authors laboratory and others have described their synthesis and phase behavior. In particular, the authors have described important effects due to the orientation of the rodlike molecules in a liquid crystalline phase. They have found that curing rates are enhanced compared to reaction in an isotropic phase, and that the glass transition of the fully cured material can be significantly higher than the final cure temperature. For structural applications, orientation of LCT`s will allow maximum improvement in mechanical properties. A few studies have described use of magnetic fields to orient LCT`s. However, no measurements were made of the tensile properties of materials processed in magnetic fields. The authors have conducted experiments which describe the tensile modulus dependence of an LCT over the complete range of magnetic field strengths from 0 to 18 Tesla. Their work has focused on the system composed of the diglycidyl ether of dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene (DGE-DHAMS) cured with sulfanilamide (SAA).

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic evaluation of the polymerization process of epoxidized biodiesel with dicarboxylic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Roza, Miriam B.; Nicolau, Aline; Angeloni, Luiz M.; Sidou, Pedro N.; Samios, Dimitrios

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on a polymerization study of the epoxidized methyl esters (EME) obtained from soybean oil, with phthalic anhydride (PA) and 2-methyl-imidazole in the presence of soybean oil biodiesel (BD) as solvent. The gelation region for the system EME/PA/2MI without BD was determined using the Flory's theory occurring between X EME = 0.33 to 0.54. The evaluation of the polymerization enthalpy (ΔH) indicates that the experimental stoichiometric composition of the system EME/PA/2MI without solvent is near to X EME = X PA = 0.5. ΔH values higher than 76 J/g were observed for samples located in the theoretical gelation region. Different polymers were produced using the stoichiometric composition and varying only the amount of BD. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the polymerization reaction, using solvent, were evaluated by DSC technique. The results show that BD acts as solvent in the polymerization reaction and a compensation effect between activation energy and logarithm of pre-exponential factor was observed. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the degradations of the products include two well-defined processes. The compensation effect was observed in the thermal degradation kinetics too.

  7. Changes in molecular characteristics of cereal carbohydrates after processing and digestion.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Mirosław Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2012-12-10

    Different extraction, purification and digestion methods were used to investigate the molecular properties of carbohydrates in arabinoxylan and β-glucan concentrates, dietary fiber (DF) rich breads and ileum content of bread fed pigs. The breads studied were: a low DF wheat bread (WF), whole meal rye bread (GR), rye bread with kernels (RK), wheat bread supplemented with wheat arabinoxylan concentrate (AX) and wheat bread supplemented with oat β-glucan concentrate (BG). The weight average molecular weight (M(w)) of extractable carbohydrates in β-glucan concentrate decreased eight-fold after inclusion in the BG bread when exposed to in vitro digestion, while the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in AX bread was reduced two-fold, and remained almost unaffected until reaching the terminal ileum of pigs. Similarly, the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in GR and RK bread was not significantly changed in the ileum. The AX bread resulted in the highest concentration of dissolved arabinoxylan in the ileum among all the breads that caused a substantial increased in ileal AX viscosity. Nevertheless, for none of the breads, the M(w) of extractable carbohydrates was related neither to the bread extract nor ileal viscosity.

  8. A supported polymeric liquid membrane process for removal of carboxylic acids from a waste stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1999-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. The authors have developed a new class of membrane called supported polymeric liquid membranes that are capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid. The process has shown treatment feasibility for several types of aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the laboratory development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids and nitric acid.

  9. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  10. Modified resin--intermediate processing of perovskite powders:Part I. Optimization of polymeric precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, L. ); Lessing, P.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The formation of a polyester between citric acid (CA) and ethylene glycol (EG) was found to be a decisive factor for the foaming of resin intermediates in a Pechini-type powder process. This process was modified by changing the organic mass ratio of CA/EG which results in ceramic powders with different morphologies. The most porous resin intermediate (with or without chelated cations) was prepared using a polymeric gel made of equimolar citric acid and ethylene glycol. It was also found that a premixing of organic components, prior to adding constituent nitrate solutions, makes the whole process more controllable.

  11. An optimal polymerization process for low mean molecular weight HBOC with lower dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wentao; Li, Shen; Hao, Shasha; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chengmin

    2015-06-01

    The new research tried to improve the distribution of molecular weight of Hb-based oxygen carriers (HBOC), a bottleneck of glutaraldehyde (GDA)-polymerization process. The orthogonal experiments were done on the basis of the early study of human placenta Hemoglobin (Hb)-crosslinked-GDA and three factors were selected including the molar ratio of GDA and Hb, Hb concentration, and the rate of the feeding GDA. The optimal match condition of polymerization process prepared for the purpose of lower mean molecular weight, content of super-weight molecule, and the content of dimer. The results showed that the molar ratio of GDA and Hb was the greatest influencing factor on the molecular weight distribution of polymerized-Hb, followed by the Hb concentration, and the last is the rate of feeding GDA. The optimum matching conditions had reached the objective that the mean molecular weight with 155.54 ± 5.79, the content of dimer with 17.23 ± 3.71, and content of super-weight molecule with 0.17 ± 0.09, and the results can be repeated in the 30 times expansion experiments.

  12. Multi input single output model predictive control of non-linear bio-polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugasamy, Senthil Kumar; Ahmad, Z.

    2015-05-15

    This paper focuses on Multi Input Single Output (MISO) Model Predictive Control of bio-polymerization process in which mechanistic model is developed and linked with the feedforward neural network model to obtain a hybrid model (Mechanistic-FANN) of lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) for Poly (ε-caprolactone) production. In this research, state space model was used, in which the input to the model were the reactor temperatures and reactor impeller speeds and the output were the molecular weight of polymer (M{sub n}) and polymer polydispersity index. State space model for MISO created using System identification tool box of Matlab™. This state space model is used in MISO MPC. Model predictive control (MPC) has been applied to predict the molecular weight of the biopolymer and consequently control the molecular weight of biopolymer. The result shows that MPC is able to track reference trajectory and give optimum movement of manipulated variable.

  13. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  14. Natural and synthetic iminosugars as carbohydrate processing enzyme inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wrodnigg, Tanja M; Steiner, Andreas J; Ueberbacher, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Iminosugars, featuring a basic nitrogen at the hetero atom position in carbohydrate rings, gain increasing interest in the search for novel approaches towards cancer drug development. This compound class is known as competitive inhibitors of carbohydrate manipulation enzymes, such as glycosidases, which are involved in tumor cell invasion and migration. Such enzymes are also responsible for the attachment of oligosaccharides to the cell surface of tumor cells, displayed as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans, which play an important role in malignant phenotype and tumor growth. Furthermore, cancer cells show an extremely active lysosomal system which is reflected by enhancement of glycoprotein turnover. Iminosugars were found to interact with glycosyl hydrolases responsible for this kind of action in cancer cells and thus open a new compound class in the research field of finding new anti-cancer activities. This review will focus on the role of iminosugars in cancer therapy and will give an overview of their properties.

  15. Prevention of Pu(IV) polymerization in a PUREX-based process

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Senentz, Gerald

    2007-07-01

    The US Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is being designed to produce MOX fuel assemblies for use in domestic, commercial nuclear power reactors, as part of the U.S. DOE efforts to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The feed material is plutonium dioxide from surplus weapon grade plutonium. PuO{sub 2}, issued from a pit disassembly and conversion facility (PDCF), will be processed using a flowsheet derived from the La Hague reprocessing plant to remove impurities. The purified PuO{sub 2} will be blended with UO{sub 2} to form mixed oxide pellets, and loaded into fuel rods, to create MOX fuel assemblies based on the process and technology of the MELOX plant in France,. Safety studies are necessary to support the development of the design basis per regulation 10 CFR Part 70 to complete an integrated safety analysis for the MFFF facility. The formation of tetravalent plutonium polymers in certain process vessels of the aqueous polishing (AP) process has been identified as a potential hazard. Based on scientific literature, the following paper demonstrates that within the AP process units, the polymerization of Pu(IV) will not occur and/or will not create a criticality issue even where the acidity may drop below 0.5 N HNO{sub 3}. We will identify and control the conditions under which plutonium (IV) will not polymerize. (authors)

  16. Immobilizing Cr3+ with SO3H-functionalized solid polymeric ionic liquids as efficient and reusable catalysts for selective transformation of carbohydrates into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Zhang, Qiuyun; Liu, Xiaofang; Chang, Fei; Zhang, Yuping; Xue, Wei; Yang, Song

    2013-09-01

    A series of functional polymeric ionic liquids (FPILs) were prepared by coupling of SO3H-functionalized polymeric ionic liquids with different counterpart anions containing or excluding CrCl3·6H2O, and characterized by SEM, FT-IR, XRD, NH3-TPD, TG, melting point, ICP-AES, and TEM. The catalytic activity of the prepared solid FPILs was investigated for the conversion of biomass including fructose, glucose and cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) with the presence of DMSO-mediated solvents, successively producing moderate to excellent yields of HMF under atmospheric pressure. The FPILs catalysts developed in this study present improved performance on fructose-to-HMF conversion over other solid catalysts, such as functional ionic liquids supported by silica, metal oxides and strong acid ion exchange resin catalysts, and can be very easily recycled at least five times without significant loss of activity. In addition, a kinetic analysis was carried out to illustrate the formation of HMF. PMID:23850822

  17. Crystal structure of polymeric carbon nitride and the determination of its process-temperature-induced modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyborski, T.; Merschjann, C.; Orthmann, S.; Yang, F.; Lux-Steiner, M.-Ch; Schedel-Niedrig, Th

    2013-10-01

    Based on the arrangement of two-dimensional ‘melon’, we construct a unit cell for polymeric carbon nitride (PCN) synthesized via thermal polycondensation, whose theoretical diffraction powder pattern includes all major features measured in x-ray diffraction. With the help of this unit cell, we describe the process-temperature-induced crystallographic changes in PCN that occur within a temperature interval between 510 and 610 °C. We also discuss further potential modifications of the unit cell for PCN. It is found that both triazine- and heptazine-based g-C3N4 can only account for minor phases within the investigated synthesis products.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Felipe; da Rocha, Caique O. C.; Medeiros, Gabriela S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased.

  19. Using recombinant cyanobacterium (Synechococcus elongatus) with increased carbohydrate productivity as feedstock for bioethanol production via separate hydrolysis and fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Chow, Te-Jin; Su, Hsiang-Yen; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Chou, Hsiang-Hui; Lee, Tse-Min; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a recombinant cyanobacterium strain with increased photosynthesis rate, cell growth and carbohydrate production efficiency was genetically engineered by co-expressing ictB, ecaA, and acsAB (encoded for bacterial cellulose) in Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The resulting cyanobacterial biomass could be effectively hydrolyzed with dilute acid (2% sulfuric acid), achieving a nearly 90% glucose recovery at a biomass concentration of 80 g/L. Bioethanol can be produced from fermenting the acidic hydrolysate of S. elongatus PCC7942 via separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) process at a concentration of 7.2 g/L and with a 91% theoretical yield.

  20. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    PubMed Central

    BURAL, Canan; AKTAŞ, Esin; DENIZ, Günnur; ÜNLÜÇERÇI, Yeşim; BAYRAKTAR, Gülsen

    2011-01-01

    polymerization process for at least 30 min and water storage of the heat-polymerized denture bases for at least 1 to 2 days before denture delivery is clinically recommended for minimizing the residual MMA and possible cytotoxic effects. PMID:21956586

  1. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  2. Extracellular polymeric substances mediate bioleaching/biocorrosion via interfacial processes involving iron(III) ions and acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sand, Wolfgang; Gehrke, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances seem to play a pivotal role in biocorrosion of metals and bioleaching, biocorrosion of metal sulfides for the winning of precious metals as well as acid rock drainage. For better control of both processes, the structure and function of extracellular polymeric substances of corrosion-causing or leaching bacteria are of crucial importance. Our research focused on the extremophilic bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, because of the "simplicity" and knowledge about the interactions of these bacteria with their substrate/substratum and their environment. For this purpose, the composition of the corresponding extracellular polymeric substances and their functions were analyzed. The extracellular polymeric substances of both species consist mainly of neutral sugars and lipids. The functions of the exopolymers seem to be: (i) to mediate attachment to a (metal) sulfide surface, and (ii) to concentrate iron(III) ions by complexation through uronic acids or other residues at the mineral surface, thus, allowing an oxidative attack on the sulfide. Consequently, dissolution of the metal sulfide is enhanced, which may result in an acceleration of 20- to 100-fold of the bioleaching process over chemical leaching. Experiments were performed to elucidate the importance of the iron(III) ions complexed by extracellular polymeric substances for strain-specific differences in oxidative activity for pyrite. Strains of A. ferrooxidans with a high amount of iron(III) ions in their extracellular polymeric substances possess greater oxidation activity than those with fewer iron(III) ions. These data provide insight into the function of and consequently the advantages that extracellular polymeric substances provide to bacteria. The role of extracellular polymeric substances for attachment under the conditions of a space station and resulting effects like biofouling, biocorrosion, malodorous gases, etc. will be discussed.

  3. Extracellular polymeric substances for Zn (II) binding during its sorption process onto aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Li, Mengting; Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Fei; Li, Lusheng; Guo, Jie; Ai, Lijie; Fang, Lulu; Liu, Ling; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Zn (II) during the sorption process of Zn (II) onto aerobic granular sludge. Batch results showed that the adsorption rate of Zn (II) onto aerobic granular sludge was better fitted with pseudo-second order kinetics model, and the adsorption isotherm data agreed well with Freundlich equation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) for Zn (II) binding during sorption process was investigated by using a combination of three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM), synchronous fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results implied that the main composes of EPS, including polysaccharide (PS) and protein (PN), decreased from 5.92±0.13 and 23.55±0.76 mg/g SS to 4.11±0.09 and 9.55±0.68 mg/g SS after the addition of different doses of Zn (II). 3D-EEM showed that the intensities of PN-like substances and humic-like substances were obviously decreased during the sorption process. According to synchronous fluorescence spectra, the quenching mechanism between PN-like substances and Zn (II) was mainly caused by a static quenching process. Additionally, 2D-COS indicated that PN-like substances were more susceptible to Zn (II) binding than humic-like substances. It was also found that the main functional groups for complexation of Zn (II) and EPS were OH groups, N-H groups and C=O stretching vibration. The findings of this study are significant to reveal the fate of heavy metal during its sorption process onto aerobic granular sludge through EPS binding, and provide useful information on the interaction between EPS and heavy metal.

  4. Nanostructure of electrically conducting polyaniline prepared by a novel emulsion polymerization process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Kinlen, P.J.; Graham, C.R.

    1998-07-01

    A soluble polyaniline (PANI) salt with moderate conductivity was synthesized by a novel emulsion polymerization process. The conductivity of the processed PANI films can be substantially increased by treating the polymer films with surfactants or with low molecular weight alcohols. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of thin polymer films revealed the existence of small islands of conducting PANI embedded in a non-conducting, dopant matrix. The conductivity of the PANI films is affected by the spatial distribution and the connectivity of these small islands. The conductivity enhancement observed upon treatment with surfactants is due to self-assembly of conducting PANI molecules into an interconnected network morphology. In the case of alcohol treatment the film conductivity is enhanced due to extraction of excess dopant phase and the subsequent densification of PANI islands to form highly conducting pathways.

  5. Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boboia, S.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-13

    The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

  6. Non-deterministic analysis of a liquid polymeric-film drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Cairncross, R.A.

    1997-04-01

    In this study the authors employed the Monte Carlo/Latin Hypercube sampling technique to generate input parameters for a liquid polymeric-film drying model with prescribed uncertainty distributions. The one-dimensional drying model employed in this study was that developed by Cairncross et al. They found that the non-deterministic analysis with Monte Carlo/Latin Hypercube sampling provides a useful tool for characterizing the two responses (residual solvent volume and the maximum solvent partial vapor pressure) of a liquid polymeric-film drying process. More precisely, they found that the non-deterministic analysis via Monte Carlo/Latin Hypercube sampling not only provides estimates of statistical variations of the response variables but also yields more realistic estimates of mean values, which can differ significantly from those calculated using deterministic simulation. For input-parameter uncertainties in the range from 2 to 10% of their respective means, variations of response variables were found to be comparable to the mean values.

  7. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  8. New green polymeric composites based on hemp and natural rubber processed by electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Stelescu, Maria-Daniela; Manaila, Elena; Craciun, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A new polymeric composite based on natural rubber reinforced with hemp has been processed by electron beam irradiation and characterized by several methods. The mechanical characteristics: gel fraction, crosslink density, water uptake, swelling parameters, and FTIR of natural rubber/hemp fiber composites have been investigated as a function of the hemp content and absorbed dose. Physical and mechanical properties present a significant improvement as a result of adding hemp fibres in blends. Our experiments showed that the hemp fibers have a reinforcing effect on natural rubber similar to mineral fillers (chalk, carbon black, silica). The crosslinking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation, increase as a result of the amount of hemp in blends and the electron beam irradiation dose increasing. The swelling parameters of samples significantly depend on the amount of hemp in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics.

  9. New Green Polymeric Composites Based on Hemp and Natural Rubber Processed by Electron Beam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Stelescu, Maria-Daniela; Craciun, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A new polymeric composite based on natural rubber reinforced with hemp has been processed by electron beam irradiation and characterized by several methods. The mechanical characteristics: gel fraction, crosslink density, water uptake, swelling parameters, and FTIR of natural rubber/hemp fiber composites have been investigated as a function of the hemp content and absorbed dose. Physical and mechanical properties present a significant improvement as a result of adding hemp fibres in blends. Our experiments showed that the hemp fibers have a reinforcing effect on natural rubber similar to mineral fillers (chalk, carbon black, silica). The crosslinking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation, increase as a result of the amount of hemp in blends and the electron beam irradiation dose increasing. The swelling parameters of samples significantly depend on the amount of hemp in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics. PMID:24688419

  10. [Carbohydrates in clinical nutrition].

    PubMed

    Lysikov, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The article presents data on role of carbohydrate in clinical nutrition. The review described carbohydrate metabolism, hormonal regulation of carbohydrate, carbohydrate energy source role, carbohydrate requirements in critical study.

  11. Influence of thermally processed carbohydrate/amino acid mixtures on the fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Andreas; Elss, Sandra; Frischmann, Matthias; Tellez, Patricia; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2004-04-01

    The production of alcoholic beverages such as Tequila, Mezcal, whiskey, or beer includes the fermentation of a mash containing Maillard reaction products. Because excessive heating of the mash can lead to complications during the following fermentation step, the impact of Maillard products on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. For this purpose, fermentation was carried out in a model system in the presence and absence of Maillard reaction products and formation of ethanol served as a marker for the progression of fermentation. We found that increasing amounts of Maillard products reduced the formation of ethanol up to 80%. This effect was dependent on the pH value during the Maillard reaction, reaction time, as well as the carbohydrate and amino acid component used for the generation of Maillard reaction products. Another important factor is the pH value during fermentation: The inhibitory effect of Maillard products was not detectable at a pH of 4 and increased with higher pH-values. These findings might be of relevance for the production of above-mentioned beverages.

  12. Influence of thermally processed carbohydrate/amino acid mixtures on the fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Andreas; Elss, Sandra; Frischmann, Matthias; Tellez, Patricia; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2004-04-01

    The production of alcoholic beverages such as Tequila, Mezcal, whiskey, or beer includes the fermentation of a mash containing Maillard reaction products. Because excessive heating of the mash can lead to complications during the following fermentation step, the impact of Maillard products on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. For this purpose, fermentation was carried out in a model system in the presence and absence of Maillard reaction products and formation of ethanol served as a marker for the progression of fermentation. We found that increasing amounts of Maillard products reduced the formation of ethanol up to 80%. This effect was dependent on the pH value during the Maillard reaction, reaction time, as well as the carbohydrate and amino acid component used for the generation of Maillard reaction products. Another important factor is the pH value during fermentation: The inhibitory effect of Maillard products was not detectable at a pH of 4 and increased with higher pH-values. These findings might be of relevance for the production of above-mentioned beverages. PMID:15053549

  13. A review on the processing accuracy of two-photon polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hou, Yihong; Lin, Jieqiong

    2015-03-15

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a powerful and potential technology to fabricate true three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanostructures of various materials with subdiffraction-limit resolution. And it has been applied to microoptics, electronics, communications, biomedicine, microfluidic devices, MEMS and metamaterials. These applications, such as microoptics and photon crystals, put forward rigorous requirements on the processing accuracy of TPP, including the dimensional accuracy, shape accuracy and surface roughness and the processing accuracy influences their performance, even invalidate them. In order to fabricate precise 3D micro/nanostructures, the factors influencing the processing accuracy need to be considered comprehensively and systematically. In this paper, we review the basis of TPP micro/nanofabrication, including mechanism of TPP, experimental set-up for TPP and scaling laws of resolution of TPP. Then, we discuss the factors influencing the processing accuracy. Finally, we summarize the methods reported lately to improve the processing accuracy from improving the resolution and changing spatial arrangement of voxels.

  14. A review on the processing accuracy of two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hou, Yihong; Lin, Jieqiong

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is a powerful and potential technology to fabricate true three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanostructures of various materials with subdiffraction-limit resolution. And it has been applied to microoptics, electronics, communications, biomedicine, microfluidic devices, MEMS and metamaterials. These applications, such as microoptics and photon crystals, put forward rigorous requirements on the processing accuracy of TPP, including the dimensional accuracy, shape accuracy and surface roughness and the processing accuracy influences their performance, even invalidate them. In order to fabricate precise 3D micro/nanostructures, the factors influencing the processing accuracy need to be considered comprehensively and systematically. In this paper, we review the basis of TPP micro/nanofabrication, including mechanism of TPP, experimental set-up for TPP and scaling laws of resolution of TPP. Then, we discuss the factors influencing the processing accuracy. Finally, we summarize the methods reported lately to improve the processing accuracy from improving the resolution and changing spatial arrangement of voxels.

  15. Mimicking the Nanostructure of Bone: Comparison of Polymeric Process-Directing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thula, Taili T.; Svedlund, Felicia; Rodriguez, Douglas E.; Podschun, Jacob; Pendi, Laura; Gower, Laurie B.

    2012-01-01

    The nanostructure of bone has been replicated using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. This polymer-mediated crystallization process yields intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen with uniaxially-oriented hydroxyapatite crystals. The process-directing agent, an anionic polymer which we propose mimics the acidic non-collagenous proteins associated with bone formation, sequesters calcium and phosphate ions to form amorphous precursor droplets that can infiltrate the interstices of collagen fibrils. In search of a polymeric agent that produces the highest mineral content in the shortest time, we have studied the influence of various acidic polymers on the in vitro mineralization of collagen scaffolds via the PILP process. Among the polymers investigated were poly-L aspartic acid (PASP), poly-L-glutamic acid (PGLU), polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), and polyacrylic acid (PAA). Our data indicate that PASP and the combination of PGLU/PASP formed stable mineralization solutions, and yielded nano-structured composites with the highest mineral content. Such studies contribute to our goal of preparing biomimetic bone graft substitutes with composition and structure that mimic bone. PMID:22328971

  16. Mimicking the Nanostructure of Bone: Comparison of Polymeric Process-Directing Agents.

    PubMed

    Thula, Taili T; Svedlund, Felicia; Rodriguez, Douglas E; Podschun, Jacob; Pendi, Laura; Gower, Laurie B

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructure of bone has been replicated using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. This polymer-mediated crystallization process yields intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen with uniaxially-oriented hydroxyapatite crystals. The process-directing agent, an anionic polymer which we propose mimics the acidic non-collagenous proteins associated with bone formation, sequesters calcium and phosphate ions to form amorphous precursor droplets that can infiltrate the interstices of collagen fibrils. In search of a polymeric agent that produces the highest mineral content in the shortest time, we have studied the influence of various acidic polymers on the in vitro mineralization of collagen scaffolds via the PILP process. Among the polymers investigated were poly-L aspartic acid (PASP), poly-L-glutamic acid (PGLU), polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), and polyacrylic acid (PAA). Our data indicate that PASP and the combination of PGLU/PASP formed stable mineralization solutions, and yielded nano-structured composites with the highest mineral content. Such studies contribute to our goal of preparing biomimetic bone graft substitutes with composition and structure that mimic bone.

  17. Dual-responsive gold nanoparticles for colorimetric recognition and testing of carbohydrates with a dispersion-dominated chromogenic process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxi; Qing, Guangyan; Xiong, Chenling; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Sun, Taolei

    2013-02-01

    A dispersion-dominated colorimetric approach for the recognition of carbohydrates based on biomolecule-responsive AuNPs is presented. Taking advantage of the unique dual-responsiveness of smart copolymers, the aggregation and dispersion of AuNPs can be modulated by both temperature and different kinds of carbohydrates, giving rise to a novel chromogenic mechanism for the recognition and testing of carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  18. New carbohydrate-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  19. Phosphorus removal in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process: roles of extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Zeng, Raymond J; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-10-15

    Phosphorus-accumulating organisms are considered to be the key microorganisms in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. A large amount of phosphorus is found in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix of these microorganisms. However, the roles of EPS in phosphorus removal have not been fully understood. In this study, the phosphorus in the EBPR sludge was fractionated and further analyzed using quantitative (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The amounts and forms of phosphorus in EPS as well as their changes in an anaerobic-aerobic process were also investigated. EPS could act as a reservoir for phosphorus in the anaerobic-aerobic process. About 5-9% of phosphorus in sludge was reserved in the EPS at the end of the aerobic phase and might further contribute to the phosphorus removal. The chain length of the intracellular long-chain polyphosphate (polyP) decreased in the anaerobic phase and then recovered under aerobic conditions. However, the polyP in the EPS had a much shorter chain length than the intracellular polyP in the whole cycle. The migration and transformation of various forms of phosphorus among microbial cells, EPS, and bulk liquid were also explored. On the basis of these results, a model with a consideration of the roles of EPS was proposed, which is beneficial to elucidate the mechanism of phosphorus removal in the EBPR system.

  20. Rapid-processing procedure for heat polymerization of polymethyl methacrylate in a pressure cooker with automatic controls.

    PubMed

    Xia, C M; Shi, C; He, W

    1996-10-01

    This study introduces a new rapid-processing procedure for curing polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin in an automatically controlled pressure cooker. The cooker filled with water was inflated with 6 kgf/cm2 air pressure and heated to 120 degrees C (248 degrees F) and maintained for 10 minutes. No significant differences were found between the new pressure cooker method and the conventional method for surface hardness and porosity (p > 0.05). The pressure cooker significantly shortened polymerization time, and the polymerization is controlled automatically.

  1. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures. PMID:27091668

  2. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  3. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is known to mainly rely on the ability of phosphorus-accumulating organisms to take up, transform and store excess amount of phosphorus (P) inside the cells. However, recent studies have revealed considerable accumulation of P also in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge, implying a non-negligible role of EPS in P removal by EBPR sludge. However, the contribution of EPS to P uptake and the forms of accumulated extracellular P vary substantially in different studies, and the underlying mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EPS remains poorly understood. This review provides a new recognition into the P removal process in EBPR system by incorporating the role of EPS. It overviews on the characteristics of P accumulation in EPS, explores the mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EBPR sludge and EPS, summarizes the main influential factors for the P-accumulation properties of EPS, and discusses the remaining knowledge gaps and needed future efforts that may lead to better understanding and use of such an EPS role for maximizing P recovery from wastewater. PMID:26143588

  4. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is known to mainly rely on the ability of phosphorus-accumulating organisms to take up, transform and store excess amount of phosphorus (P) inside the cells. However, recent studies have revealed considerable accumulation of P also in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge, implying a non-negligible role of EPS in P removal by EBPR sludge. However, the contribution of EPS to P uptake and the forms of accumulated extracellular P vary substantially in different studies, and the underlying mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EPS remains poorly understood. This review provides a new recognition into the P removal process in EBPR system by incorporating the role of EPS. It overviews on the characteristics of P accumulation in EPS, explores the mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EBPR sludge and EPS, summarizes the main influential factors for the P-accumulation properties of EPS, and discusses the remaining knowledge gaps and needed future efforts that may lead to better understanding and use of such an EPS role for maximizing P recovery from wastewater.

  5. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  6. Food processing methods influence the glycaemic indices of some commonly eaten West Indian carbohydrate-rich foods.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, P S; Wheatley, A O; Ahmad, M H; Morrison, E Y St A; Asemota, H N

    2006-09-01

    Glycaemic index (GI) values for fourteen commonly eaten carbohydrate-rich foods processed by various methods were determined using ten healthy subjects. The foods studied were round leaf yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis), negro and lucea yams (Dioscorea rotundata), white and sweet yams (Dioscorea alata), sweet potato (Solanum tuberosum), Irish potato (Ipomoea batatas), coco yam (Xanthosoma spp.), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), green banana (Musa sapientum), and green and ripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca). The foods were processed by boiling, frying, baking and roasting where applicable. Pure glucose was used as the standard with a GI value of 100. The results revealed marked differences in GI among the different foods studied ranging from 35 (se 3) to 94 (se 8). The area under the glucose response curve and GI value of some of the roasted and baked foods were significantly higher than foods boiled or fried (P<0.05). The results indicate that foods processed by roasting or baking may result in higher GI. Conversely, boiling of foods may contribute to a lower GI diet.

  7. Food processing methods influence the glycaemic indices of some commonly eaten West Indian carbohydrate-rich foods.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, P S; Wheatley, A O; Ahmad, M H; Morrison, E Y St A; Asemota, H N

    2006-09-01

    Glycaemic index (GI) values for fourteen commonly eaten carbohydrate-rich foods processed by various methods were determined using ten healthy subjects. The foods studied were round leaf yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis), negro and lucea yams (Dioscorea rotundata), white and sweet yams (Dioscorea alata), sweet potato (Solanum tuberosum), Irish potato (Ipomoea batatas), coco yam (Xanthosoma spp.), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), green banana (Musa sapientum), and green and ripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca). The foods were processed by boiling, frying, baking and roasting where applicable. Pure glucose was used as the standard with a GI value of 100. The results revealed marked differences in GI among the different foods studied ranging from 35 (se 3) to 94 (se 8). The area under the glucose response curve and GI value of some of the roasted and baked foods were significantly higher than foods boiled or fried (P<0.05). The results indicate that foods processed by roasting or baking may result in higher GI. Conversely, boiling of foods may contribute to a lower GI diet. PMID:16925852

  8. Thermal plasma process for recovering monomers and high value carbons from polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Richard; Grossmann, Elihu D.; Guddeti, Ravikishan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of recycling polymeric waste products into monomers and high value forms of carbon by pyrolytic conversion using an induction coupled RF plasma heated reactor.

  9. Processing and formulation of inkjet printable conducting polyaniline based ink for low cost, flexible humidity sensors using untreated polymeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Milind V.; Apte, Sanjay K.; Naik, Sonali D.; Ambekar, Jalindar D.; Kale, Bharat B.

    2012-03-01

    Conducting polymer, polyaniline based aqueous inkjet printable ink has been synthesized by a single-step chemical polymerization technique. Sulfonic acids were used as a dopant during the in situ polymerization process. This is a single-step polymerization process for the direct synthesis of conducting emeraldine salt phase of the polymer as an ink formulation. Ammonium persulfate was used as an oxidizing agent to initiate the polymerization. The synthesized polyaniline ink formulation was characterized by UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The presence of a very sharp peak at 800 nm represents the presence of the conducting emeraldine salt phase of the polymer. This is further supported by FT-IR spectroscopic characterization. The viscosity of the ink was measured by using a Brookfield viscometer. Successive trials were performed for the printing of interdigitated patterns on the flexible untreated polymer substrate using an HP inkjet printer. The printed sensor was subjected to humidity sensing measurements. The change in the resistance with change in the % relative humidity (RH) was observed. The synthesized polyaniline based ink can be considered as a good candidate for a variety of inkjet printed low cost electronics devices.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of polyacrylonitrile nanoparticles by dispersion/emulsion polymerization process.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Lior; Baruch, Sigal; Margel, Shlomo

    2005-09-01

    Polyacrylonitrile nanoparticles in sizes ranging from approximately 35 to 270 nm were prepared by dispersion/emulsion polymerization of acrylonitrile in a continuous aqueous phase in the presence of potassium persulfate as initiator and various alkyl-sulfate and sulfonate surfactants. The influence of various polymerization parameters (e.g., concentration of monomer and initiator, type and concentration of surfactant, temperature and time of polymerization, ionic strength, pH and co-solvent concentration) on the properties (e.g., size and size distribution, yield, stability, etc.) of the particles has been investigated. The polymerization of acrylonitrile may occur in two major locations: in the aqueous continuous phase (dispersion polymerization) and/or within the surfactant micelles (emulsion polymerization). A discussion concerning the role of these two mechanisms under different conditions, including comparison with previous literature, is also presented. Surface and bulk characterizations of the particles were performed by methods such as transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential, and gravimetric measurements. PMID:16009219

  11. Photothermal heating as a methodology for post processing of polymeric nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorga, Russell; Clarke, Laura; Bochinski, Jason; Viswanath, Vidya; Maity, Somsubhra; Dong, Ju; Firestone, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles embedded within polymeric systems can be made to act as localized heat sources thereby aiding in-situ polymer processing. This is made possible by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mediated photothermal effect of metal (in this case gold) nanoparticles, wherein incident light absorbed by the nanoparticle generates a non-equilibrium electron distribution which subsequently transfers this energy into the surrounding medium, resulting in a temperature increase in the immediate region around the particle. Here we demonstrate this effect in polymer nanocomposite systems, specifically electrospun polyethylene oxide nanofibrous mats, which have been annealed at temperatures above the glass transition. A non-contact temperature measurement technique utilizing embedded fluorophores (perylene) has been used to monitor the average temperature within samples. The effect of annealing methods (conventional and photothermal) and annealing conditions (temperature and time) on the fiber morphology, overall crystallinity, and mechanical properties is discussed. This methodology is further utilized in core-sheath nanofibers to crosslink the core material, which is a pre-cured epoxy thermoset. NSF Grant CMMI-1069108.

  12. Fabrication of robust micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhong, Yawen; Gong, Jianliang; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Ma, Zhi

    2011-02-15

    Here, we present the preparation of thermally stable and solvent resistant micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and sequent vulcanization, with a commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-polystyrene (SIS). The vulcanized honeycomb structured SIS films became self-supported and resistant to a wide range of organic solvents and thermally stable up to 350°C for 2h, an increase of more than 300K as compared to the uncross-linked films. This superior robustness could be attributed to the high degree of polyisoprene cross-linking. The versatility of the methodology was demonstrated by applying to another commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene (SBS). Particularly, hydroxy groups were introduced into SBS by hydroboration. The functionalized two-dimensional micro-patterns feasible for site-directed grafting were created by the hydroxyl-containing polymers. In addition, the fixed microporous structures could be replicated to fabricate textured positive PDMS stamps. This simple technique offers new prospects in the field of micro-patterns, soft lithography and templates. PMID:21168143

  13. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  14. Fabrication of robust micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhong, Yawen; Gong, Jianliang; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Ma, Zhi

    2011-02-15

    Here, we present the preparation of thermally stable and solvent resistant micro-patterned polymeric films via static breath-figure process and sequent vulcanization, with a commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-polystyrene (SIS). The vulcanized honeycomb structured SIS films became self-supported and resistant to a wide range of organic solvents and thermally stable up to 350°C for 2h, an increase of more than 300K as compared to the uncross-linked films. This superior robustness could be attributed to the high degree of polyisoprene cross-linking. The versatility of the methodology was demonstrated by applying to another commercially available triblock polymer, polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene (SBS). Particularly, hydroxy groups were introduced into SBS by hydroboration. The functionalized two-dimensional micro-patterns feasible for site-directed grafting were created by the hydroxyl-containing polymers. In addition, the fixed microporous structures could be replicated to fabricate textured positive PDMS stamps. This simple technique offers new prospects in the field of micro-patterns, soft lithography and templates.

  15. Real-time measurements of crystallization processes in viscoelastic polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoswell, David R. E.; Finlayson, Chris E.; Zhao, Qibin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the dynamic shear ordering of viscoelastic photonic crystals, based on core-shell polymeric composite particles. Using an adapted shear-cell arrangement, the crystalline ordering of the material under conditions of oscillatory shear is interrogated in real time, through both video imaging and from the optical transmission spectra of the cell. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the macroscopic influences of shear on the crystallization process in this solvent-free system, the development of bulk ordering is studied as a function of the key parameters including duty cycle and shear-strain magnitude. In particular, optimal ordering is observed from a prerandomized sample at shear strains of around 160%, for 1-Hz oscillations. This ordering reaches completion over time scales of order 10 s. These observations suggest significant local strains are needed to drive nanoparticles through energy barriers, and that local creep is needed to break temporal symmetry in such high-viscosity nanoassemblies. Crystal shear-melting effects are also characterized under conditions of constant shear rate. These quantitative experiments aim to stimulate the development of theoretical models which can deal with the strong local particle interactions in this system.

  16. Impact of polymeric membrane filtration of oil sands process water on organic compounds quantification.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Kim, Eun-Sik; Alpatova, Alla; Sun, Nian; Smith, Scott; Kang, Seoktae; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between organic fractions in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) and three polymeric membranes with varying hydrophilicity (nylon, polyvinylidene fluoride and polytetrafluoroethylene) at different pHs was studied to evaluate the impact of filtration on the quantification of acid-extractable fraction (AEF) and naphthenic acids (NAs). Four functional groups predominated in OSPW (amine, phosphoryl, carboxyl and hydroxyl) as indicated by the linear programming method. The nylon membranes were the most hydrophilic and exhibited the lowest AEF removal at pH of 8.7. However, the adsorption of AEF on the membranes increased as the pH of OSPW decreased due to hydrophobic interactions between the membrane surfaces and the protonated molecules. The use of ultra pressure liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC/HRMS) showed insignificant adsorption of NAs on the tested membranes at pH 8.7. However, 26±2.4% adsorption of NAs was observed at pH 5.3 following the protonation of NAs species. For the nylon membrane, excessive carboxylic acids in the commercial NAs caused the formation of negatively charged assisted hydrogen bonds, resulting in increased adsorption at pH 8.2 (25%) as compared to OSPW (0%). The use of membranes for filtration of soluble compounds from complex oily wastewaters before quantification analysis of AEF and NAs should be examined prior to application.

  17. Process development for waveguide chemical sensors with integrated polymeric sensitive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberkar, Raghu; Gao, Zhan; Park, Jongwon; Henthorn, David B.; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2008-02-01

    Due to the proper optical property and flexibility in the process development, an epoxy-based, high-aspect ratio photoresist SU-8 is now attracting attention in optical sensing applications. Manipulation of the surface properties of SU-8 waveguides is critical to attach functional films such as chemically-sensitive layers. We describe a new integration process to immobilize fluorescence molecules on SU-8 waveguide surface for application to intensity-based optical chemical sensors. We use two polymers for this application. Spin-on, hydrophobic, photopatternable silicone is a convenient material to contain fluorophore molecules and to pattern a photolithographically defined thin layer on the surface of SU-8. We use fumed silica powders as an additive to uniformly disperse the fluorophores in the silicone precursor. In general, additional processes are not critically required to promote the adhesion between the SU-8 and silicone. The other material is polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). Recently we demonstrated a novel photografting method to modify the surface of SU-8 using a surface bound initiator to control its wettability. The activated surface is then coated with a monomer precursor solution. Polymerization follows when the sample is exposed to UV irradiation, resulting in a grafted PEGDA layer incorporating fluorophores within the hydrogel matrix. Since this method is based the UV-based photografting reaction, it is possible to grow off photolithographically defined hydrogel patterns on the waveguide structures. The resulting films will be viable integrated components in optical bioanalytical sensors. This is a promising technique for integrated chemical sensors both for planar type waveguide and vertical type waveguide chemical sensors.

  18. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  19. Role of impurity molecules in radiation-initiated processes in solid carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kavetskii, V.G.; Yudin, I.V.

    1992-09-01

    Extension of the use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medicinal preparations is stimulating the study of radiation-initiated processes in solid polyhydroxyl matrixes containing impurities of various organic substances. Such investigations make it possible to establish common characteristics of the effect of impurity molecules on the radiolysis of organic crystals. The materials of the investigation were lactose and rhamnose, precipitated by slow evaporation of the solvent from saturated aqueous solutions with different dihydroxyacetone contents. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  1. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  2. A Spatially Continuous Model of Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport Processes in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Arun S; Brooks, Stephen P J; Kalmokoff, Martin; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-01-01

    A spatially continuous mathematical model of transport processes, anaerobic digestion and microbial complexity as would be expected in the human colon is presented. The model is a system of first-order partial differential equations with context determined number of dependent variables, and stiff, non-linear source terms. Numerical simulation of the model is used to elucidate information about the colon-microbiota complex. It is found that the composition of materials on outflow of the model does not well-describe the composition of material in other model locations, and inferences using outflow data varies according to model reactor representation. Additionally, increased microbial complexity allows the total microbial community to withstand major system perturbations in diet and community structure. However, distribution of strains and functional groups within the microbial community can be modified depending on perturbation length and microbial kinetic parameters. Preliminary model extensions and potential investigative opportunities using the computational model are discussed. PMID:26680208

  3. A Spatially Continuous Model of Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport Processes in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Arun S.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Kalmokoff, Martin; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    A spatially continuous mathematical model of transport processes, anaerobic digestion and microbial complexity as would be expected in the human colon is presented. The model is a system of first-order partial differential equations with context determined number of dependent variables, and stiff, non-linear source terms. Numerical simulation of the model is used to elucidate information about the colon-microbiota complex. It is found that the composition of materials on outflow of the model does not well-describe the composition of material in other model locations, and inferences using outflow data varies according to model reactor representation. Additionally, increased microbial complexity allows the total microbial community to withstand major system perturbations in diet and community structure. However, distribution of strains and functional groups within the microbial community can be modified depending on perturbation length and microbial kinetic parameters. Preliminary model extensions and potential investigative opportunities using the computational model are discussed. PMID:26680208

  4. The Effects of Ground and Space Processing on the Properties of Organic, Polymeric, and Colloidal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossain A.; Witherow, W. K.; Smith, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and phototonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic materials which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials as thin film wave-guides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualifies by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organic-based materials have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices, such as high second-and third-order nonlinearity, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. We discuss the potential role of microgravity processing of a few organic and polymeric materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second-and third-order NLO behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics. The goal of minimizing optical loss obviously depends on processing methods. For solution-based processes, such as solution crystal growth and solution photopolymerization, it is well known that thermal and solutal density gradients can initiate buoyancy-driven convection. Resultant fluid flows can affect transport of material to and from growth interfaces and become manifest in the morphology and homogeneity of the growing film or crystal. Likewise

  5. Probing carbohydrate product expulsion from a processive cellulase with multiple absolute binding free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T; Shirts, Michael R; Nimlos, Mark R; Adney, William S; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2011-05-20

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, -14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and -11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are -13.1, -6.0, -11.5, -7.5, and -8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  6. Probing Carbohydrate Product Expulsion from a Processive Cellulase with Multiple Absolute Binding Free Energy Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shirts, Michael R.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, −14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and −11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are −13.1, −6.0, −11.5, −7.5, and −8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  7. Functionalized ormosil scaffolds processed by direct laser polymerization for application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Schou, J.; Canulescu, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Albu, C.; Mitu, B.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Mustaciosu, C.; Petcu, I.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Synthesized N,N'-(methacryloyloxyethyl triehtoxy silyl propyl carbamoyl-oxyhexyl)-urea hybrid methacrylate was polymerized by direct laser polymerization using femtosecond laser pulses with the aim of using it for subsequent applications in tissue engineering. The as-obtained scaffolds were modified either by low pressure argon plasma treatment or by covering the structures with two different proteins (lysozyme, fibrinogen). For improved adhesion, the proteins were deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique. The functionalized structures were tested in mouse fibroblasts culture and the cells morphology, proliferation, and attachment were analyzed.

  8. Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Menezes, Marlon E.; Birnbaum, Howard K.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2002-01-29

    A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

  9. Improving conducting polymer electrochromic speeds and depositing aligned polymeric nanofibers by electrospinning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemota, Chris I.

    The effects of film thickness and porosity on electrochromic switching time of conducting polymers was pursued to determine the morphology influence on ions transport during oxidation step of the redox process, affording sub-second or seconds switching times. Electrospinning technique provided non-woven nanofiber mats, while spin coating and electropolymerization of monomer (N3T) provided films. Porosity decreased as depositing method changed from electrospinning to spin coating. In electrochemical oxidation, the electrons leave the polymer at the metal electrode-polymer film interface, and counter ions arrive at the polaron-bipolaron sites left in the polymer, through polymer-electrolyte interface. Counter ion diffusion in conducting polymers are film thickness limited at increasing thickness and inability of ions to reach holes sites on the oxidizing polymer accounts for long switching speeds, introducing extensive and micro pores and high surface areas should lead to decreasing electrochromic switching speed to single digit time in seconds (for display and vision applications), while increasing the maximum optical switching contrast due to increased fiber mat thicknesses. Photolithographic patterning of nanofiber mats of the conducting polymer precursor having photo cross-linking unit was also explored. The photo-crosslinkable polymer was prepared by including norborene methacrylate (NMA) units to the polymer backbone during precursor polymerization, yielding a terpolymer poly(N3T-NA-NMA). The influence of photo crosslinking on electrochemical switching in conducting polymer nanofibers, and effect of developing parameters (solvent and time) on pattern transfer to the nanofiber mat was investigated and showed no influence on the electrochemical redox of the polymer. Solvents suitable for dissolving the polymer were investigated as developers with results showing non-differentiable pattern transfer for all suitable solvents, and no net preference to solvent choice

  10. Observation of an exothermic process associated with the in vitro polymerization of brain tubulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, S A; Velicelebi, G; Sutherland, J W; Sturtevant, J M

    1980-01-01

    The polymerization of tubulin has been studied with a high-sensitivity differential scanning microcalorimeter, with results which indicate that microtubule assembly can proceed via one or possibly two exothermic reactions. The amount of heat evolution has been found to be far in excess of GTP hydrolysis. The heat liberated has been observed to depend strongly upon the exact experimental conditions, varying from many hundreds of kilocalories per mole of tubulin dimer when dilute tubulin solutions are heated rapidly to a few kilocalories per mole of tubulin dimer when concentrated tubulin solutions are heated slowly. The results are tentatively interpreted in terms of the existence of at least two pathways for the formation of energetically distinct polymers. These findings indicate the importance of kinetic factors in studying tubulin polymerization. PMID:6933494

  11. Structure modification and extracellular polymeric substances conversion during sewage sludge biodrying process.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Krafft, Thomas; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Wang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Biodrying, an economical and energy-saving biomass waste treatment, removes water from waste using the biological heat generated by organic matter degradation. Technical limitations associated with dewatering complicate the biodrying of sewage sludge. This study investigated the sludge alteration associated with its water removal, focusing on sludge form, extracellular polymeric substances, and free water release. An auto-feedback control technology was used for the biodrying; a scanning electron microscope was used to record the morphological change; three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to analyze extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) variation, and time domain reflectometry was used to assess the free water release. Over the 20-day biodrying, there was a 62% water removal rate during the first thermophilic phase. Biodrying created a hollow and stratified sludge structure. Aromatic proteins and soluble microbial byproducts in the EPS were significantly degraded. The thermophilic phase was the phase resulting in the greatest free water release. PMID:27262096

  12. Stilbene-like molecules as fluorescent probes applied for monitoring of polymerization process.

    PubMed

    Kabatc, Janina; Jedrzejewska, Beata; Bajorek, Agnieszka; Paczkowski, Jerzy

    2006-07-01

    2-(p-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)benzoxazole (OS), 2-(p-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)-benzothiazole (SS) and 2-(p-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)naphtiazole (PS) were prepared and their absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured in various solvents at room temperature. On the basis of the solvatochromic behavior the ground state (mu(g)) and excited state (mu(e)) dipole moments of these pN,N-dimethylaminostyryl derivatives were evaluated. The dipole moments (mu(g) and mu(e)) were estimated from solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra as function of the dielectric constant (epsilon) and refractive index (n) of applied solvents. The absorption spectra only slightly are affected by the solvent polarity in contrast to the fluorescence spectra that are highly solvatochromic and display a large Stokes shift. The analysis of the solvatochromic behavior of the fluorescence spectra as function of Deltaf (epsilon, n) revealed that the emission occurs from a high polarity excited state. The large dipole moment change along with the strongly red-shifted fluorescence, as the solvent polarity is increased, demonstrate the formation of an intramolecular charge transfer state (ICT). Compounds under the study were used as fluorescence probes for monitoring the kinetics of polymerization. The study on the changes in fluorescence intensity and spectroscopic shifts of studied compounds were carried out during thermally initiated polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and during photoinitiated polymerization of 2-ethyl-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol triacrylate (TMPTA).

  13. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  14. A one-stage cultivation process for lipid- and carbohydrate-rich biomass of Scenedesmus obtusiusculus based on artificial and natural water sources.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christian; Reinhardt, Jakob; Wurster, Martina; Ortiz-Tena, José Guillermo; Sieber, Volker; Mundt, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    A one-stage cultivation process of the microalgae Scenedesmus obtusiusculus with medium based on natural water sources was developed to enhance lipids and carbohydrates. A medium based on artificial sea water, Baltic Sea water and river water with optimized nutrient concentrations compared to the standard BG-11 for nitrate (-75%), phosphate and iron (-90%) was used for cultivation. Although nitrate exhaustion over cultivation resulted in nitrate limitation, growth of the microalgae was not reduced. The lipid content increased from 6.0% to 19.9%, an increase in oleic and stearic acid was observed. The unsaponifiable matter of the lipid fraction was reduced from 19.5% to 11.4%. The carbohydrate yield rose from 45% to 50% and the protein content decreased from 32.4% to 15.9%. Using natural water sources with optimized nutrient concentrations could open the opportunity to modulate biomass composition and to reduce the cultivation costs. PMID:27394996

  15. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Liepins, Leila Z.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO.sub.3 +RCHO.fwdarw.AG.sup.0 +RCOOH and R.sub.3 M.fwdarw.M.sup.0 3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R.sub.3 M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone.

  16. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1993-12-21

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers are described. The in situ reactions: AgNO[sub 3] + RCHO [yields] Ag + RCOOH and R[sub 3]M [yields] M + 3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R[sub 3]M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrone.

  17. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Liepins, Leila Z.

    1993-01-01

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO.sub.3 +RCHO.fwdarw.Ag.degree.+RCOOH and R.sub.3 M.fwdarw.M.degree.+3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R.sub.3 M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone.

  18. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1987-08-27

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO/sub 3/ + RCHO ..-->.. Ag/sup 0/ + RCOOH and R/sub 3/M ..-->.. M/sup 0/ + 3R, where M = Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high- temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R/sub 3/M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone. 3 tabs.

  19. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  20. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  1. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  2. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  3. Impact of polymerization process on OOB on lithographic performance of a EUV resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vipul; Coley, Suzanne M.; Lee, Jung June; Christianson, Matthew D.; Arriola, Daniel J.; LaBeaume, Paul; Danis, Maria E.; Ortiz, Nicolas; Kang, Su-Jin; Wagner, Michael D.; Kwok, Amy; Valeri, David A.; Thackeray, James W.

    2011-04-01

    Several approaches have been used to minimize LWR in advanced resists. Various polymer and matrix properties, such as polymer molecular volume and free volume fraction, polymer dissolution, impact of activation energy of the deprotection reaction and distribution of small molecules in the polymer matrix have been shown to influence the functional behavior of the resist. We have developed polymerization methods to improve the incorporation and homogeneity of monomers, including PAG monomer, in an EUV resist polymer. Further, we report on use of a new cation which imparts reduced OOB character and a 30% improvement in LWR for a 28nm L/S feature with sensitivity of 10mJ/cm2 versus a control containing the TPS cation. Additionally this new material is capable of 21nm resolution. We also tested the new cation for outgassing by RGA and observed a 60% reduction in outgassing versus a TPS control.

  4. Influence of polymerization method, curing process, and length of time of storage in water on the residual methyl methacrylate content in dental acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Gulsen; Guvener, Bora; Bural, Canan; Uresin, Yagiz

    2006-02-01

    This study compared the influence of different polymerization methods (heat, auto-, and microwave energy), different curing processes (in the case of heat- and autopolymerized specimens), and length of storage of the polymerized specimens in distilled water at 37 degrees C on the residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) content in dental acrylic resin specimens. Residual MMA of 120 resin specimens were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. For the heat-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were given a long-term terminal boil and then stored in the distilled water for at least 1 day. For the autopolymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were additionally cured in water at 60 degrees C and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. For the microwave-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were stored in the distilled water at least 1 month. The lowest overall residual MMA content was obtained from heat-polymerized specimens that were given a long-term terminal boil cure and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. Different polymerization methods and curing processes have different effects on residual MMA content. It is thus shown that storing a dental acrylic resin specimen in distilled water at 37 degrees C is a simple but effective method of reducing its residual MMA content.

  5. On the effect of tetraborate ions in the generation of colored products in thermally processed glycine-carbohydrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, George P

    2007-03-01

    The effect of tetraborate ions on Maillard browning was investigated in a series of monosaccharide-glycine reactions in aqueous bis-tris buffer at pH 7.2. Addition of borax (sodium tetraborate) in catalytic amounts led to enhanced browning measured by absorbance at 420 nm in the order xylose > arabinose > galactose approximately = fructose > ribose > mannose > rhamnose, and the degree of browning with borax was uniformly greater than that produced by phosphate on an equimolar basis. A mechanism is proposed for borax catalysis in which monosaccharide-borate complexation shifts carbohydrate equilibria to favor open-chain (carbonyl) forms, thereby enhancing the rate of the Maillard reaction. PMID:17288450

  6. Carbohydrate markers of organism purity and growth environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Fox, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Recent experience with Bacillus spore characterization has demonstrated that carbohydrate content can provide potentially vital bioforensic information. Like other metabolites, the carbohydrate profiles of samples reflect variations in cellular structures as well as presence of residual carbohydrates from the medium found as trace components. The presence and characteristics of residual carbohydrates, such as agar, represent strong indicators of culturing method. The methods to detect residual carbohydrates can be extended to other compounds used in processing and preservation of microbes in a dry form.

  7. Synthetic carbohydrate: An aid to nutrition in the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, G. A. (Editor); Murashige, K. H. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The synthetic production of carbohydrate on a large scale is discussed. Three possible nonagricultural methods of making starch are presented in detail and discussed. The simplest of these, the hydrolysis of cellulose wastes to glucose followed by polymerization to starch, appears a reasonable and economic supplement to agriculture at the present time. The conversion of fossil fuels to starch was found to be not competitive with agriculture at the present time, but tractable enough to allow a reasonable plant design to be made. A reconstruction of the photosynthetic process using isolated enzyme systems proved technically much more difficult than either of the other two processes. Particular difficulties relate to the replacement of expensive energy carrying compounds, separation of similar materials, and processing of large reactant volumes. Problem areas were pinpointed, and technological progress necessary to permit such a system to become practical is described.

  8. Sub-10 ns single-shot dynamic recording in holographic polymeric medium by nonlinear absorption using excited state absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kenji; Satoh, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshito

    2016-09-01

    Optical recording by a single shot of an 8 ns laser pulse in a dye-doped holographic polymeric medium was demonstrated with a peak power as low as 71 W at a wavelength of 402 nm. Nonlinear absorption triggered by two-photon absorption and enhanced by the succeeding process allows high-speed recording corresponding to 125 Mbps (3.4 times the recording speed of a Blu-ray Disc). The preformed holographic grating in the medium enhanced the readout signal through diffraction, resulting in a signal-to-noise ratio of about 15 dB. The recording capacity was estimated at ca. 80 GB/side for 100 µm/side by recording 20 layers, but that of over TB/side class would be possible for optical optimization. Theoretically, it can be improved to 10 TB/side for 800 µm/side by recording 400 layers.

  9. Content of short-chain fatty acids in the hindgut of rats fed processed bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) flours varying in distribution and content of indigestible carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, A M; Nyman, E M; Björck, I M

    2001-09-01

    Red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) processed to differ in distribution and content of indigestible carbohydrates were used to study hindgut fermentability and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). Bean flours with low or high content of resistant starch (RS), mainly raw and physically-inaccessible starch, were obtained by milling the beans before or after boiling. Flours containing retrograded starch and with a high or low content of oligosaccharides were prepared by autoclaving followed by freeze-drying with or without the boiling water. Six diets were prepared from these flours yielding a total concentration of indigestible carbohydrates of 90 or 120 g/kg (dry weight basis). The total fermentability of the indigestible carbohydrates was high with all diets (80-87 %). Raw and physically-inaccessible starch was more readily fermented than retrograded starch (97-99 % v. 86-95 %; ). Non-starch glucans were fermented to a lesser extent than RS, but the fermentability was higher in the case of autoclaved (50-54 %) than boiled beans (37-41 %). The distribution between acetic, propionic and butyric acid in the caecum was similar for all diets, with a comparatively high percentage of butyric acid (approximately 18). However, with diets containing the high amounts of RS, the butyric acid concentration was significantly higher in the distal colon than in the proximal colon ( and for the high- and low-level diets respectively), whereas it remained constant, or decreased along the colon in the case of the other diets. Furthermore, the two diets richest in RS also promoted the highest percentages of butyric acid in the distal colon (24 and 17 v. 12 and 12-16 for the high- and low-level diets respectively). PMID:11570990

  10. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... later. Complex carbohydrate foods provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber that are important to the health of an ... which do not have the vitamins, minerals, and fiber found in complex and natural carbohydrates. Refined sugars ...

  11. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid- and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E.; Laurens, L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-01

    Beginning in 2013, NREL began transitioning from the singular focus on ethanol to a broad slate of products and conversion pathways, ultimately to establish similar benchmarking and targeting efforts. One of these pathways is the conversion of algal biomass to fuels via extraction of lipids (and potentially other components), termed the 'algal lipid upgrading' or ALU pathway. This report describes in detail one potential ALU approach based on a biochemical processing strategy to selectively recover and convert select algal biomass components to fuels, namely carbohydrates to ethanol and lipids to a renewable diesel blendstock (RDB) product. The overarching process design converts algal biomass delivered from upstream cultivation and dewatering (outside the present scope) to ethanol, RDB, and minor coproducts, using dilute-acid pretreatment, fermentation, lipid extraction, and hydrotreating.

  12. Concise polymeric materials encyclopedia

    SciTech Connect

    Salamone, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This comprehensive, accessible resource abridges the ``Polymeric Materials Encyclopedia'', presenting more than 1,100 articles and featuring contributions from more than 1,800 scientists from all over the world. The text discusses a vast array of subjects related to the: (1) synthesis, properties, and applications of polymeric materials; (2) development of modern catalysts in preparing new or modified polymers; (3) modification of existing polymers by chemical and physical processes; and (4) biologically oriented polymers.

  13. Polymeric microspheres with N-methyl-D-glucamine ligands for boron removal from water solution by adsorption-membrane filtration process.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Joanna; Bryjak, Marek; Kabay, Nalan

    2010-08-01

    Polymeric microspheres with N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) ligands have been tested in the adsorption-membrane filtration process for boron removal from aqueous solutions. The chelating resins were synthesized by reacting NMDG with the vinylbenzyl chloride-styrene-1,4-divinylbenzene (VBC/S/DVB) copolymer at the reflux temperature and in the microwave reactor. VBC/S/DVB spheres with a gel structure that contained 6 wt% DVB were obtained by membrane emulsification followed by suspension polymerization. By selecting the optimal emulsification and polymerization parameters, it was possible to obtain 25-microm-diameter particles with a narrow size distribution. Resins obtained by microwave modification showed the higher boron adsorption capacity.

  14. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  15. Property changes of powdery polyacrylonitrile synthesized by aqueous suspension polymerization during heat-treatment process under air atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-qi; Wang, Cheng-guo; Bai, Yu-jun; Chen, Guo-wen; Jing, Min; Zhu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    High molecular weight powdery polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymers were prepared by aqueous suspension polymerization employing itaconic acid (IA) as comonomer and alpha,alpha(')-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator at 60 degrees C. PAN polymers obtained with different monomer ratios were characterized by EA, DSC, FTIR and XRD. It is investigated that the oxygen element content in PAN polymers increased with the increase of required IA amounts in the feed and heat-treatment temperatures. DSC curves of PAN copolymers exhibited the triplet character, owing to the exothermic cyclization and oxidative reactions during heat-treatment process. Introduction of IA in the feed relaxed exothermic reactions of PAN polymers under air atmosphere. Structure and crystallinity changes were affected by required IA amounts in the feed and enhancement of heat-treatment temperatures. The characteristic functional groups (including C[triple bond]N, C=O, CH(2)) presented in FTIR spectra of PAN polymers indicated copolymerization reaction of AN and IA. Existence of some organic groups (C-O, C=C and/or C=N) indicated formation of ladderlike structure during heat-treatment process. PAN homopolymer had the better crystallinity (mainly peak intensity and peak area around 2theta = 17 degrees) than most RT-PAN copolymers. When heat-treatment temperature is around 210 degrees C, peak intensity, peak area, L(c) and CI of HT-PAN polymers corresponding to samples 1# and 2# got maxima, while crystallinity became weak at higher heat-treatment temperatures. PMID:18922543

  16. ZIF-8 Membranes via Interfacial Microfluidic Processing in Polymeric Hollow Fibers: Efficient Propylene Separation at Elevated Pressures.

    PubMed

    Eum, Kiwon; Ma, Chen; Rownaghi, Ali; Jones, Christopher W; Nair, Sankar

    2016-09-28

    Propylene/propane (C3H6/C3H8) separations are performed on a large scale by energy-intensive distillation processes. Membranes based on metal-organic framework (MOF) molecular sieves, such as zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8), offer the potential to perform these separations at considerably lower cost. However, the fabrication of scalable ZIF-8 membranes with high performance at elevated pressures and temperatures is challenging. We report the fabrication of high-quality ZIF-8 hollow fiber membranes in engineered polymeric hollow fibers via the interfacial microfluidic membrane processing (IMMP) technique. Control of fiber microstructure, as well as optimization of IMMP conditions, allow us to achieve a C3H6/C3H8 separation factor of 180 (at 1 bar and 25 °C), which remains high (60) at 120 °C. Furthermore, high-pressure operation of these membranes was investigated. Detailed permeation measurements indicate excellent suppression of defects at higher pressures up to 9.5 bar, allowing a C3H6/C3H8 separation factor of 90 at 9.5 bar. The membranes also display a 4-fold increase in flux at 9.5 bar as compared to operation at 1 bar. The long-term stability of the ZIF-8 hollow fiber membranes is demonstrated by continuous operation over a month without loss of C3H6 permeance or selectivity. PMID:27602800

  17. Highly effective antibiofilm coating of silver-polymer nanocomposite on polymeric medical devices deposited by one step plasma process.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Munin; Barman, Tapan; Gogoi, Dolly; Choudhury, Bula; Pal, Arup R; Yadav, R N S

    2014-08-01

    Foley's catheters were coated with Silver (Ag), plasma polymerized aniline (PPAni) and Ag-PPAni composite by plasma based deposition processes which were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, and FT-IR spectroscopy and bioassays were performed to validate their efficacies to kill planktonic cells as well as to remove biofilm. The analyses confirmed the formation of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs), PPAni and Ag-PPAni composite and also corroborated their successful deposition over the catheters. Antibacterial assays showed that coated catheters were capable of killing planktonic cells of most commonly encountered uropathogens and equally capable of eradicating biofilm formation by the uropathogens as evident from the reduced cfu/ml. UV-vis spectroscopy results showed that the nanoparticle coated catheters were capable of gradual release of AgNPs, killing all planktonic cells in solution over the time. Foley's catheters coated with AgNPs and their composites by one step plasma process were non-toxic devices capable of killing planktonic cells and proficient in eradicating biofilm formation which could be used to cutback the likelihood of the catheter related complications.

  18. Simple process for building large homogeneous adaptable retarders made from polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Delplancke, F; Sendrowicz, H; Bernaerd, R; Ebbeni, J

    1995-06-01

    A process for building large, homogeneous, adaptable retarders easily and at low cost is proposed and analyzed. This method is based on the properties of high polymers to present variable birefringence as a function of applied stresses and on the possibility of freezing these stresses inside the material by a thermal process. Various geometries for the applied forces make obtaining a large range of birefringence profiles possible. In the process that we describe composed bending leads to a linear birefringence profile. The superimposition of two pieces with identical profiles with opposite directions gives homogeneous constant retardation. This retardation can be adjusted by a relative displacement between the pieces. A precision of better than 1% over large areas (more than 3 cm in diameter) for a quarter-wave value has been obtained. The correct choice of material makes many applications possible with a large range of wavelengths.

  19. Viscoelastic processing and characterization of high-performance polymeric composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Frederic Ulysse

    2000-10-01

    Fiber reinforced composites, a combination of reinforcing fiber and resin matrix, offer many advantages over traditional materials, and have therefore found wide application in the aerospace and sporting goods industry. Among the advantages that composite materials offer, the most often cited are weight saving, high modulus, high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance. As much as their attributes are desirable, composites are difficult to process due to their heterogeneous, anisotropic, and viscoelastic nature. It is therefore not surprising that the interrelationship between structure, property, and process is not fully understood. Consequently, the major purpose of this research work was to investigate this interrelationship, and ways to scale it to utilization. First, four prepreg materials, which performed differently in the manufacturing of composite parts, but were supposedly identical, were characterized. The property variations that were found among these prepregs in terms of tack and frictional resistance assessed the need for improved understanding of the prepregging process. Therefore, the influence of the processing parameters on final prepreg quality were investigated, and led to the definition of more adequate process descriptors. Additionally, one of the characterization techniques used in this work, temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, was examined in depth with the development of a mathematical model. This model, which enabled the exploration of the relationship between user parameters, sample thermophysical properties, and final results, was then compared to literature data. Collectively, this work explored and identified the key connectors between process, structure, and property as they relate to the manufacturing, design, and performance of composite materials.

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  1. Surface effects at polymeric interfaces in capillary driving process (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Ilenia; Zocco, Anna; Fischetti, Alessandra; Foglieni, Barbara; Cremonesi, Laura; Ferrari, Maurizio; Cingolani, Roberto; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2005-07-01

    The growing interest in biological micro-array and Lab-on-Chip (LOC) is justified by the possibility of reducing the sample volume, processing time and costs. By means microfluidics seems to be the prevalent tool for the integration of manifold processes in miniaturized devices. Anyway at a sub-millimeter scale the liquid behavior is affected by geometric confinement and wetting properties. In order to confine the liquid sample inside the LOC buried channels we have performed the sealing by poly(dimethylsiloxane)~(PDMS), a silicon-based bi-component elastomer. The filling dynamics changes at changing of the polymer mixing ratio of the pre-polymer and the curing agent. In fact, a different concentration of cross-linker modifies the elastic, adhesion and wettability properties of the cover-slip

  2. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  3. Determination of Total Carbohydrates in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure uses two-step sulfuric acid hydrolysis to hydrolyze the polymeric forms of carbohydrates in algal biomass into monomeric subunits. The monomers are then quantified by either HPLC or a suitable spectrophotometric method.

  4. alpha-Dicarbonyl compounds--key intermediates for the formation of carbohydrate-based melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Kroh, Lothar W; Fiedler, Thorsten; Wagner, Janine

    2008-04-01

    The Maillard reaction of carbohydrates and amino acids is the chemical basis for flavor and color formation in many processed foods. Dicarbonyl compounds, such as 1-, 3-deoxyosones and 1,4-dideoxyosones, as well as short-chain dicarbonyls, such as methylgyoxal or glyoxal, are key compounds of the Maillard browning reaction. The alpha-dicarbonyls are also starting materials for polymerization reactions which lead to formation of carbohydrate-based melanoidins. With regard to the dicarbonyl compound, different possible chemical structures of melanoidins will be discussed. The analysis by size-exclusion chromatography revealed that those colored compounds differ in their molecular size and are directly associated with reactions having specific alpha-dicarbonyl compounds. PMID:18448818

  5. Sustained-release microsphere formulation containing an agrochemical by polyurethane polymerization during an agitation granulation process.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takatoshi; Tagami, Manabu; Ohtsubo, Toshiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-07-25

    In this report, a new solventless microencapsulation method by synthesizing polyurethane (PU) from polyol and isocyanate during an agglomeration process in a high-speed mixing apparatus was developed. Clothianidin (CTD), which is a neonicotinoid insecticide and highly effective against a wide variety of insect pests, was used as the model compound. The microencapsulated samples covered with PU (CTD microspheres) had a median diameter of <75μm and sustained-release properties. The CTD microspheres were analyzed by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography measurements. Multiple cores of CTD and other solid excipient were dispersed in PU. Although voids appeared in the CTD microspheres after CTD release, the spherical shape of the microspheres remained stable and no change in its framework was observed. The experimental release data were highly consistent with the Baker-Lonsdale model derived from drug release of spherical monolithic dispersions and consistent with the computed tomography measurements. PMID:27246815

  6. Quantification and inhibition of the gas polymerization process in timingRPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramacho, Silvia; Lopes, Luis; Rocha Gonsalves, Alexandra; Pineiro, Marta; Fonte, Paulo; Rocha Gonsalves, António M. D.'A.

    2012-01-01

    Ageing of glass RPCs has been extensively studied over the past years. Accompanying the ageing process, two different phenomena were observed: appearance of deposits over the electrode surfaces and structural modification of the glass. In our previous work, using physical-chemical methods and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, the nature and composition of the surfaces and the structural modification of the glass were established as a mixture of oligomers of Freons. Recently, we performed a direct analysis of glass by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), avoiding the physical-chemical extraction; the results confirm the nature of the deposit and consequently we focused our investigation on the search for experimental conditions to operate the RPCs to minimize or eliminate the formation of the deposit. The results show that O2 is an efficient inhibitor of the formation of the deposit and prevents the structural modification of theglass.

  7. Effect of swainsonine on the processing of the asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains of alpha 1-antitrypsin in rat hepatocytes. Evidence for the formation of hybrid oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Gross, V; Tran-Thi, T A; Vosbeck, K; Heinrich, P C

    1983-03-25

    The biosynthesis of the proteinase inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin has been studied in rat hepatocyte primary cultures. Newly synthesized alpha 1-antitrypsin was found in hepatocytes as a glycoprotein of an apparent molecular weight of 49,000 carrying oligosaccharide side chains of the high mannose type. In the hepatocyte medium a secreted alpha 1-antitrypsin of an apparent molecular weight of 54,000 could be identified as a glycoprotein with carbohydrate chains of the complex type. Pulse-chase experiments revealed a precursor-product relationship for the two forms of alpha 1-antitrypsin. When the hepatocytes were treated with swainsonine, an intracellular form of alpha 1-antitrypsin with an apparent molecular weight of 49,000 indistinguishable from that of control cells was found. However, the alpha 1-antitrypsin secreted from swainsonine-treated hepatocytes was different from that present in control media. It was characterized by a lower apparent molecular weight (51,000), a higher amount of [3H]mannose incorporation, half as much incorporation of [3H]galactose, and the same amount of [3H]fucose incorporation compared to alpha 1-antitrypsin of control media. In contrast to the 54,000 complex type alpha 1-antitrypsin from control media the 51,000 alpha 1-antitrypsin from the medium of swainsonine-treated cells was found to be susceptible to the action of endoglucosaminidase H, even when fucose was attached to the proximal GlcNAc residue. alpha 1-Antitrypsin secreted from swainsonine-treated cells combines features usually associated with either high mannose or complex type oligosaccharides and therefore represents a hybrid structure. In spite of its effect on the carbohydrate part of alpha 1-antitrypsin swainsonine did not impair the secretion of the incompletely processed glycoprotein. PMID:6403522

  8. Processing and Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Matrix Composites. Part 2; Processing Robustness of IM7/PETI Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1996-01-01

    The processability of a phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resin matrix composite was investigated. Unidirectional prepregs were made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7. Two batches of prepregs were used: one was made by NASA in-house, and the other was from an industrial source. The composite processing robustness was investigated with respect to the effect of B-staging conditions, the prepreg shelf life, and the optimal processing window. Rheological measurements indicated that PETI's processability was only slightly affected over a wide range of B-staging temperatures (from 250 C to 300 C). The open hole compression (OHC) strength values were statistically indistinguishable among specimens consolidated using various B-staging conditions. Prepreg rheology and OHC strengths were also found not to be affected by prolonged (i.e., up to 60 days) ambient storage. An optimal processing window was established using response surface methodology. It was found that IM7/PETI composite is more sensitive to the consolidation temperature than to the consolidation pressure. A good consolidation was achievable at 371 C/100 Psi, which yielded an OHC strength of 62 Ksi at room temperature. However, processability declined dramatically at temperatures below 350 C.

  9. Development and characterization of crosslinked hyaluronic acid polymeric films for use in coating processes.

    PubMed

    Sgorla, Débora; Almeida, Andreia; Azevedo, Claudia; Bunhak, Élcio Jose; Sarmento, Bruno; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2016-09-10

    The aim of this work was to develop and characterize new hyaluronic acid-based responsive materials for film coating of solid dosage forms. Crosslinking of hyaluronic acid with trisodium trimetaphosphate was performed under controlled alkaline aqueous environment. The films were produced through casting process by mixing crosslinked or bare biopolymer in aqueous dispersion of ethylcellulose, at different proportions. Films were further characterized regarding morphology by scanning electron microscopy, robustness by permeation to water vapor transmission, and ability to hydrate in simulated gastric and intestinal physiological fluids. The safety and biocompatibility of films were assessed against Caco-2 and HT29-MTX intestinal cells. The permeation to water vapor transmission was favored by increasing hyaluronic acid content in the final formulation. When in simulated gastric fluid, films exhibited lower hydration ability compared to more extensive hydration in simulated intestinal fluids. Simultaneously, in simulated intestinal fluids, films partially lost weight, revealing ability for preventing drug release at gastric pH, but tailoring the release at higher intestinal pH. The physiochemical characterization suggests thermal stability of films and physical interaction between compounds of formulation. Lastly, cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that films and individual components of the formulations, when incubated for 4h, were safe for intestinal cells Overall, these evidences suggest that hyaluronic acid-based responsive films, applied as coating material of oral solid dosage forms, can prevent the premature release of drugs in harsh stomach conditions, but control the release it in gastrointestinal tract distal portion, assuring safety to intestinal mucosa. PMID:27436707

  10. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  11. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  12. Sustainable polymerizations in recoverable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Yan, Feng; Qiu, Lihua; Lu, Jianmei; Zhou, Yinxia; Chen, Jiaxin; Tang, Yishan; Texter, John

    2010-03-16

    Free radical and atom-transfer radical polymerizations were conducted in monomer/ionic liquid microemulsions. After the polymerization and isolation of the resultant polymers, the mixture of the catalyst and ionic liquids (surfactant and continuous phase) can be recovered and reused, thereby dramatically improving the environmental sustainability of such chemical processing. The addition of monomer to recovered ionic liquid mixtures regenerates transparent, stable microemulsions that are ready for the next polymerization cycle upon addition of initiator. The method combines the advantages of IL recycling and microemulsion polymerization and minimizes environmental disposable effects from surfactants and heavy metal ions. PMID:20170175

  13. Mechanochemical solid-state polymerization. VIII. Novel composite polymeric prodrugs prepared by mechanochemical polymerization in the presence of pharmaceutical aids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hosaka, S; Kuzuya, M

    1998-04-01

    We carried out the mechanochemical polymerization of methacryloyl derivatives of acetoaminophen and 5-fluorouracil in the presence of lactose. The reaction proceeded readily and the polymeric prodrugs were quantitatively produced. This method produces powdered polymeric prodrugs in which fine particles of lactose are homogeneously dispersed, since the reaction proceeds quantitatively through a totally dry process. It is difficult to prepare such a powdered polymeric prodrug by conventional solution polymerization. The rate of drug release of polymeric prodrugs increases with increasing content of lactose, as is shown to be true of the specific surface of polymeric prodrugs. These results suggest that lactose is homogeneously dispersed in powdered polymeric prodrugs. The present method seems applicable to a wide variety of pharmaceutical aids. If one takes the physiochemical property of pharmaceutical aids into consideration, novel polymeric prodrugs with a variety of drug release rates can be synthesized simultaneously with mixing. PMID:9579043

  14. Flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: water bath, microwave energy and chemical polymerization

    PubMed Central

    ARIOLI FILHO, João Neudenir; BUTIGNON, Luís Eduardo; PEREIRA, Rodrigo de Paula; LUCAS, Matheus Guilherme; MOLLO JUNIOR, Francisco de Assis

    2011-01-01

    Denture fractures are common in daily practice, causing inconvenience to the patient and to the dentists. Denture repairs should have adequate strength, dimensional stability and color match, and should be easily and quickly performed as well as relatively inexpensive. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: warm water-bath, microwave energy, and chemical polymerization. Material and methods Sixty rectangular specimens (31x10x2.5 mm) were made with warm water-bath acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and grouped (15 specimens per group) according to the resin type used to make repair procedure: 1) specimens of warm water-bath resin (Lucitone 550) without repair (control group); 2) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with warm water-bath; 3) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with microwave resin (Acron MC); 4) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with autopolymerized acrylic resin (Simplex). Flexural strength was measured with the three-point bending in a universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) with load cell of 100 kgf under constant speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results The control group showed the best result (156.04±1.82 MPa). Significant differences were found among repaired specimens and the results were decreasing as follows: group 3 (43.02±2.25 MPa), group 2 (36.21±1.20 MPa) and group 4 (6.74±0.85 MPa). Conclusion All repaired specimens demonstrated lower flexural strength than the control group. Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin showed the lowest flexural strength. PMID:21625742

  15. Force fields and scoring functions for carbohydrate simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiuming; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Cossins, Benjamin P; Xu, Zhijian; Shao, Qiang; Ding, Kai; Zhu, Weiliang; Shi, Jiye

    2015-01-12

    Carbohydrate dynamics plays a vital role in many biological processes, but we are not currently able to probe this with experimental approaches. The highly flexible nature of carbohydrate structures differs in many aspects from other biomolecules, posing significant challenges for studies employing computational simulation. Over past decades, computational study of carbohydrates has been focused on the development of structure prediction methods, force field optimization, molecular dynamics simulation, and scoring functions for carbohydrate-protein interactions. Advances in carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions can be largely attributed to enhanced computational algorithms, application of quantum mechanics, and the increasing number of experimental structures determined by X-ray and NMR techniques. The conformational analysis of carbohydrates is challengeable and has gone into intensive study in elucidating the anomeric, the exo-anomeric, and the gauche effects. Here, we review the issues associated with carbohydrate force fields and scoring functions, which will have a broad application in the field of carbohydrate-based drug design.

  16. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  17. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  18. Synthesis of Bioinspired Carbohydrate Amphiphiles that Promote and Inhibit Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dane, Eric L; Ballok, Alicia E; O'Toole, George A; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new class of bioinspired carbohydrate amphiphiles that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation are reported. The carbohydrate head is an enantiopure poly-amido-saccharide (PAS) prepared by a controlled anionic polymerization of β-lactam monomers derived from either glucose or galactose. The supramolecular assemblies formed by PAS amphiphiles are investigated in solution using fluorescence assays and dynamic light scattering. Dried samples are investigated using X-ray, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, the amphiphiles are evaluated for their ability to modulate biofilm formation by the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Remarkably, from a library of eight amphiphiles, we identify a structure that promotes biofilm formation and two structures that inhibit biofilm formation. Using biological assays and electron microscopy, we relate the chemical structure of the amphiphiles to the observed activity. Materials that modulate the formation of biofilms by bacteria are important both as research tools for microbiologists to study the process of biofilm formation and for their potential to provide new drug candidates for treating biofilm-associated infections.

  19. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  20. Dietary carbohydrates for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Angela A; Giacco, Rosalba; Costabile, Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    The literature on the impact of dietary carbohydrates in the regulation of blood glucose levels and other metabolic abnormalities in diabetic patients over the last 3 years is reviewed. We try to differentiate the metabolic effects due to the amount of carbohydrates from those due to their different types. The review comprises a part dealing with the effects of diets having low or high carbohydrate content on body weight reduction, and a part in which the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are discussed in relation to isoenergetic diets. Overall, the data accumulated in the period considered seem to confirm that the decrease in energy intake is more important than the qualitative composition of the diet to reduce body weight, but that both the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are important in modulating blood glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in both the fasting and the postprandial phases in diabetic individuals. PMID:22847773

  1. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  2. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  3. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kasina, Sitaram Prasad; Ajaz, Tarannum; Attili, Sirisha; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Cherukuri, Muralikrishna; Srinath, H P

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the porosities in the mandibular acrylic denture bases processed by heat and microwave polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins. Materials & Methods: Two brands of heat activated denture base resins, DPI plain and Acralyn H cross linked denture base resins designed for conventional water bath polymerization, were used to prepare 48 test specimens of mandibular acrylic denture bases. The test specimens were processed using one cycle of conventional water bath polymerization and one cycle of microwave polymerization. The absolute density of acrylic resin was used to calculate the percent mean porosity of each mandibular acrylic denture base by use of various equations. Results: Anova analysis reveals highly significant difference between mean percent porosity values of whole denture bases of all groups. Statistics reveals that heat polymerized groups have lesser mean percent porosity values than microwave polymerized groups. It also reveals that denture bases processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin have lesser mean percent porosity values than denture bases processed with DPI Plain denture base resin. Conclusion: Specimens processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin by conventional heat polymerization technique has the least mean percent porosity and specimens processed with DPI Plain denture base resin by microwave polymerization technique has the highest mean percent porosity. How to cite the article: Kasina SP, Ajaz T, Attili S, Surapaneni H, Cherukuri M, Srinath HP. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):72-7. PMID:24653607

  4. Effective integrative supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Tian, He

    2014-09-26

    Exercise control: By taking advantage of self-sorting processes among host-guest components, a controlled supramolecular polymerization can be realized, as demonstrated recently with the preparation of a cucurbit[n]uril-based supramolecular polymer. This method may be used for the design of more ordered supramolecular polymers from complex and discrete components. PMID:25080388

  5. Possible use of the carbohydrates present in tomato pomace and in byproducts of the supercritical carbon dioxide lycopene extraction process as biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Lenucci, Marcello S; Durante, Miriana; Anna, Montefusco; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Piro, Gabriella

    2013-04-17

    This study provides information about the carbohydrate present in tomato pomace (skins, seeds, and vascular tissues) as well as in the byproducts of the lycopene supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SC-CO₂) such as tomato serum and exhausted matrix and reports their conversion into bioethanol. The pomace, constituting approximately 4% of the tomato fruit fresh weight, and the SC-CO₂-exhausted matrix were enzyme saccharified with 0.1% Driselase leading to sugar yields of ~383 and ~301 mg/g dw, respectively. Aliquots of the hydrolysates and of the serum (80% tomato sauce fw) were fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The bioethanol produced from each waste was usually >50% of the calculated theoretical amount, with the exception of the exhausted matrix hydolysate, where a sugar concentration >52.8 g/L inhibited the fermentation process. Furthermore, no differences in the chemical solubility of cell wall polysaccharides were evidenced between the SC-CO₂-lycopene extracted and unextracted matrices. The deduced glycosyl linkage composition and the calculated amount of cell wall polysaccharides remained similar in both matrices, indicating that the SC-CO₂ extraction technology does not affect their structure. Therefore, tomato wastes may well be considered as potential alternatives and low-cost feedstock for bioethanol production.

  6. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse.

  7. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  8. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, ... meet the body’s needs for energy, vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Experts suggest that carbohydrate intake for ...

  9. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  10. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  11. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolson, David A.; Battino, Rubin; Letcher, Trevor M.; Pegel, K. H.; Revaprasadu, N.

    1995-10-01

    The "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated H2SO4 is a demonstration of the dehydrating power of H2SO4. In this paper several sugars and supermarket carbohydrates are systematically studied with respect to size of particles, addition of water, and amount of H2SO4 added. The results are tabulated as to the amount of time to blackening and to the attainment of a particular volume of the charred material. Detailed safety precautions are included.

  12. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  13. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  14. Effects of starvation, refeeding, and insulin on energy-linked metabolic processes in catfish (Rhamdia hilarii) adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C.R.; Garofalo, M.A.; Roselino, J.E.; Kettelhut, I.C.; Migliorini, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of starvation and of a short period of refeeding on energy-linked metabolic processes, as well as the effects of insulin administration, were investigated in an omnivorous fish (catfish, Rhamdia hilarii) previously adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet. Following food deprivation blood sugar levels declined progressively to about 50% of fed values after 30 days. During the same period plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration increased twofold. Starvation resulted in reduced concentrations of lipid and glycogen in the liver and of glycogen, lipid, and protein in white muscle. However, taking into account the initial and final concentrations of tissue constituents, the liver weight, and the large fractions of body weight represented by muscle, it could be estimated that most of the energy utilized during starvation derived from the catabolism of muscle lipid and protein. Refeeding starved fishes for 48 hr induced several-fold increases in the rates of in vivo and in vitro incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver and muscle lipid and of (14C)glycine into liver and muscle protein. Incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver glycogen was also increased. However; refeeding did not affect the incorporation of labeled glucose into muscle glycogen, neither in vivo nor in vitro. Administration of pharmacological doses of insulin to normally fed catfishes resulted in marked increases in the in vivo incorporation of 14C from glucose into lipid and protein in both liver and muscle. In contrast, labeled glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen was not affected by insulin and label incorporation into liver glycogen was actually lower than that in noninjected controls.

  15. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    polymerization but also enable the simultaneous analysis of the binding events with orthogonal electrical, optical, or mass sensing label-free readouts. We established this approach using polyaniline and polythiophene as examples. Two general methods were demonstrated for glycosylated polymer fabrications (i.e., electropolymerization of monomer bearing α-mannoside residues or click chemistry based mannose conjugation to electrochemically preformed quinone fused polymer with potential to introduce different carbohydrate moieties and construct glycan arrays in a similar manner). Their conjugated π system extending over a large number of recurrent monomer units renders them sensitive optoelectronic materials. The carbohydrate-protein interactions on the side chain could disrupt the electrostatic, H-bonding, steric, or van der Waals interactions within or between polymers, leading to a change of conductivity or optical absorption of the conductive polymers. This will allow concurrent interrogation of these interactions with adjoining biological processes and mechanisms in multimodal fashion. Furthermore, the functionalized glycosylated conductive polymers can be designed and synthesized with controlled oxidation states, desired ionic dopants, and the imperative density and orientation of the sugar ligands that enable the assessment of differential receptor binding profiles of carbohydrate-protein interactions with much more detailed information and high accuracy. Finally, the glycosylated biosensing interfaces were successfully validated for their applications in Gram-negative bacterial detection, antibiotic resistance studies, and antimicrobial susceptibility assays, all based on inferring carbohydrate-protein interactions directly on cell surfaces, thus illustrating their potential uses in infectious disease research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring of harmful pathogens.

  16. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    polymerization but also enable the simultaneous analysis of the binding events with orthogonal electrical, optical, or mass sensing label-free readouts. We established this approach using polyaniline and polythiophene as examples. Two general methods were demonstrated for glycosylated polymer fabrications (i.e., electropolymerization of monomer bearing α-mannoside residues or click chemistry based mannose conjugation to electrochemically preformed quinone fused polymer with potential to introduce different carbohydrate moieties and construct glycan arrays in a similar manner). Their conjugated π system extending over a large number of recurrent monomer units renders them sensitive optoelectronic materials. The carbohydrate-protein interactions on the side chain could disrupt the electrostatic, H-bonding, steric, or van der Waals interactions within or between polymers, leading to a change of conductivity or optical absorption of the conductive polymers. This will allow concurrent interrogation of these interactions with adjoining biological processes and mechanisms in multimodal fashion. Furthermore, the functionalized glycosylated conductive polymers can be designed and synthesized with controlled oxidation states, desired ionic dopants, and the imperative density and orientation of the sugar ligands that enable the assessment of differential receptor binding profiles of carbohydrate-protein interactions with much more detailed information and high accuracy. Finally, the glycosylated biosensing interfaces were successfully validated for their applications in Gram-negative bacterial detection, antibiotic resistance studies, and antimicrobial susceptibility assays, all based on inferring carbohydrate-protein interactions directly on cell surfaces, thus illustrating their potential uses in infectious disease research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring of harmful pathogens. PMID:27524389

  17. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption.

  18. From interfacial ring-opening polymerization to melt processing of cellulose nanowhisker-filled polylactide-based nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Anne-Lise; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Duquesne, Emmanuel; Siqueira, Gilberto; Habibi, Youssef; Dufresne, Alain; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-07-11

    In the present work, cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs), extracted from ramie fibers, were incorporated in polylactide (PLA)-based composites. Prior to the blending, PLA chains were chemically grafted on the surface of CNW to enhance the compatibilization between CNW and the hydrophobic polyester matrix. Ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide was initiated from the hydroxyl groups available at the CNW surface to yield CNW-g-PLA nanohybrids. PLA-based nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending to ensure a green concept of the study thereby limiting the use of organic solvents. The influence of PLA-grafted cellulose nanoparticles on the mechanical and thermal properties of the ensuing nanocomposites was deeply investigated. The thermal behavior and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamical mechanical and thermal analysis (DMTA), respectively. It was clearly evidenced that the chemical grafting of CNW enhances their compatibility with the polymeric matrix and thus improves the final properties of the nanocomposites. Large modification of the crystalline properties such as the crystallization half-time was evidenced according to the nature of the PLA matrix and the content of nanofillers.

  19. Selectivity switch in the catalytic functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates: selective synthesis in the presence of anomeric and structurally similar carbohydrates under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Takemoto, Yuki

    2013-03-15

    A catalytic process for the chemo- and regioselective functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates has been developed. This novel process allows selective thiocarbonylation, acylation, and sulfonylation of a particular hydroxy group in a particular carbohydrate in the simultaneous presence of structurally similar carbohydrates such as anomers. In addition, the chemoselectivity can be switched by regulating only the length of the alkyl chain in the organotin catalyst.

  20. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  1. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  2. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations.

  3. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  4. Development of an in situ controllable polymerization tool and process for hydrogel used to replace nucleus pulposus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Moser, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    Currently implants or tissue replacements are inserted either as a whole implant or by injecting a liquid which polymerizes to form a solid implant at the appropriate location. This is either highly invasive or not controllable. We developed a tool to perform such surgeries in a minimally invasive and controllable way. It combines photopolymerization and fluorescence spectroscopy in a surgical apparatus. However, to successfully replace tissue such as cartilage or an intervertebral disc, photopolymerizable materials do not only need to be photoactive. They should also be able to withstand the environmental loading conditions after implantation. Therefore we developed a set of in situ and in vitro tests adapted to the evaluation of photopolymerized tissue replacements and implants. In particular in this article, we report on a method, which combines photopolymerization and photorheology to track the current state of polymer during photopolymerization.

  5. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented.

  6. Microelectrode array biosensor for studying carbohydrate-mediated interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey W.; Maurer, Karl; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda J.; Danley, David L.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate-mediated host-pathogen interactions are essential to bacterial and viral pathogenesis, and represent an attractive target for the development of antiadhesives to prevent infection. We present a versatile microelectrode array-based platform to investigate carbohydrate-mediated protein and bacterial binding, with the objective of developing a generalizable method for screening inhibitors of host-microbe interactions. Microelectrode arrays are well suited for interrogating biological binding events, including proteins and whole-cells, and are amenable to electrochemical derivitization, facilitating rapid deposition of biomolecules. In this study, we achieve microelectrode functionalization with carbohydrates via controlled polymerization of pyrrole to individual microelectrodes, followed by physisorption of neoglycoconjugates to the polypyrrole-coated electrodes. Bioactivity of the immobilized carbohydrates was confirmed with carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) detected by both fluorescent and electrochemical means. The platform’s ability to analyze whole-cell binding was demonstrated using strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, and the dose-dependent inhibition of S. enterica by a soluble carbohydrate antiadhesive. PMID:22405843

  7. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif†

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qingzhou; Muscatello, Michelle M. Ward; Asher, Sanford A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols. PMID:19381378

  8. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingzhou; Ward Muscatello, Michelle M; Asher, Sanford A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols.

  9. Carbohydrate nanotechnology: hierarchical assembly using nature's other information carrying biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Zheng, Yeting; Munro, Catherine J; Ji, Yiwen; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2015-08-01

    Despite their central role in directing some of the most complex biological processes, carbohydrates--nature's other information carrying biopolymer--have been largely ignored as building blocks for synthetic hierarchical assemblies. The non-stoichiometric binding and astronomical diversity characteristic of carbohydrates could lead to tantalizingly complex assembly algorithms, but these attributes simultaneously increase the difficulty of preparing carbohydrate assemblies and anticipating their behavior. Convergences in biotechnology, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, surface science, and supramolecular chemistry have led to many recent important breakthroughs in glycan microarrays and synthetic carbohydrate receptors, where the idiosyncrasies of carbohydrate structure and binding are increasingly considered. We hope to inspire more researchers to consider carbohydrate structure, diversity, and binding as attractive tools for constructing synthetic hierarchical assemblies.

  10. Heterogeneously-Catalyzed Conversion of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Karine De Oliveira; Jérôme, François

    Polyfunctionality of carbohydrates and their low solubility in conventional organic solvents make rather complex their conversion to higher value added chemicals. Therefore, innovative processes are now strongly needed in order to increase the selectivity of these reactions. Here, we report an overview of the different heterogeneously-catalyzed processes described in the literature. In particular, hydrolysis, dehydration, oxidation, esterification, and etherification of carbohydrates are presented. We shall discuss the main structural parameters that need to be controlled and that permit the conversion of carbohydrates to bioproducts with good selectivity. The conversion of monosaccharides and disaccharides over solid catalysts, as well as recent advances in the heterogeneously-catalyzed conversion of cellulose, will be presented.

  11. Carbohydrate Analysis: Can We Control the Ripening of Bananas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, S. Todd; Farmer, Catherine E.; Cerpovicz, Paul F.

    2002-04-01

    We have developed an experiment for nutritional/introductory biochemistry courses that focuses on carbohydrate analysis--specifically, the carbohydrates found in bananas and the change in carbohydrate composition as the banana ripens. Pairs of students analyze the starch and reducing sugar content of green, ripe, and overripe bananas. Using the techniques and knowledge gained from these analyses, they then investigate the influence of various storage methods on the ripening process. While this experiment was developed for an introductory-level biochemistry lab, it can easily be adapted for use in other laboratory programs that seek to teach the fundamentals of carbohydrate analysis.

  12. Specific Carbohydrate Diet: Does It Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Go Back The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Email Print + Share There is no ... diet that has received attention is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This diet limits poorly digestible carbohydrates to ...

  13. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide-protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi's model (t(1/2)). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  14. In-situ polymerized cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)-poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) nanomaterials and applications in nanocomposite processing.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chuanwei; Hamad, Wadood Y

    2016-11-20

    CNC-PLLA nanomaterials were synthesized via in-situ ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide in the presence of CNC, resulting in hydrophobic, homogeneous mixture of PLLA-grafted-CNC and free PLLA homopolymer. The free PLLA serves two useful functions: as barrier to further prevent PLLA-g-CNC from forming aggregates, and in creating improved interfacial properties when these nanomaterials are blended with other polymers, hence enhancing their performance. CNC-PLLA nanomaterials can be used for medical or engineering applications as-they-are or by compounding with suitable biopolymers using versatile techniques, such as solution casting, co-extrusion or injection molding, to form hybrid nanocomposites of tunable mechanical properties. When compounded with commercial-grade PLA, the resulting CNC-PLA nanocomposites appear transparent and have tailored (dynamic and static) mechanical and barrier properties, approaching those of poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET. The effect of reaction conditions on the properties of CNC-PLLA nanomaterials have been carefully studied and detailed throughout the paper. PMID:27561528

  15. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  16. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  17. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neil P. J.

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The position of glycosidic linkages in the starting carbohydrate are apparent from the mass spectra as determined by the location of acetyl residues. The completeness of permethylation is dependent upon the choice of base catalyst and is readily confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass spectrometry. For the permethylation of β-cyclodextrin, Hakomori dimsyl base is shown to be superior to the NaOH-dimethyl sulfoxide system, and the use of the latter resulted in selective under-methylation of the 3-hydroxy groups. These techniques are highly applicable to residual carbohydrates from biofuel processes.

  18. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  19. Kinetics and thermodynamics of reversible polymerization in closed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sourabh; Wang, Yang; Esposito, Massimiliano; Lacoste, David

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by a recent study on the metabolism of carbohydrates in bacteria, we study the kinetics and thermodynamics of two classic models for reversible polymerization, one preserving the total polymer concentration and the other one not. The chemical kinetics is described by rate equations following the mass-action law. We consider a closed system and nonequilibrium initial conditions and show that the system dynamically evolves towards equilibrium where a detailed balance is satisfied. The entropy production during this process can be expressed as the time derivative of a Lyapunov function. When the solvent is not included in the description and the dynamics conserves the total concentration of polymer, the Lyapunov function can be expressed as a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium polymer length distribution. The same result holds true when the solvent is explicitly included in the description and the solution is assumed dilute, whether or not the total polymer concentration is conserved. Furthermore, in this case a consistent nonequilibrium thermodynamic formulation can be established and the out-of-equilibrium thermodynamic enthalpy, entropy and free energy can be identified. Such a framework is useful in complementing standard kinetics studies with the dynamical evolution of thermodynamic quantities during polymerization.

  20. Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Hudson, Jared L.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material.

  1. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented. PMID:15483380

  2. Preparation of water-soluble glycoconjugated poly(acrylamide) for NMR analyses of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Trinh Anh; Trung, Phan Nghia; Dinh, Bui Long; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kato, Koichi

    2014-05-01

    Oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates are important biopolymers not only as carriers of information in cell-cell interactions but also as markers of cellular differentiation, aging, and malignant alteration. Molecular interactions where carbohydrates are involved are usually considered as weak interactions, so the study and evaluation of these interactions is still in its infancy. The evidences and studies of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCI) will be confirming the importance of this mechanism for specific cell adhesion and communication. Their development will go hand in hand with the development of new and more sensitive techniques to study weak interactions. Recently, synthetic glycopolymers with functions similar to those of such natural carbohydrates and with specific pendant saccharide moieties were used as a solution for enhancement CCI when forming polyvalent interactions. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous components of cell wall membranes and occur as glycolipids, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and capsular polysaccharides. As such they can participate in forefront intramolecular and intracellular events. Apart from their recognized roles in the physicochemical properties of glycolipids and glycoproteins. In this study, we designed trisaccharide monomers for free radical polymerization. Subsequently, the trisaccharide unit for chemical conjugation was synthesized from galactosamine in good yield. For further NMR analyses of CCI, glycopolymers composed of these sugar derivatives will be provided.

  3. Polymerization of perfluorobutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J.; Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Diisopropyl peroxydicarbonate dissolved in liquid perfluorobutadiene is conducted in a sealed vessel at the autogenous pressure of polymerization. Reaction temperature, ratio of catalyst to monomer, and amount of agitation determine degree of polymerization and product yield.

  4. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide–protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi’s model (t1/2). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  5. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  6. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  7. The long underestimated carbonyl function of carbohydrates – an organocatalyzed shot into carbohydrate chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mahrwald, R

    2015-09-21

    The aggressive and strong development of organocatalysis provides several protocols for the convenient utilization of the carbonyl function of unprotected carbohydrates in C-C-bond formation processes. These amine-catalyzed mechanisms enable multiple cascade-protocols for the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate-derived compound classes. Several, only slightly different protocols, have been developed for the application of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in the stereoselective chain-elongation of unprotected carbohydrates and the synthesis of highly functionalized C-glycosides of defined configuration. In addition, C-glycosides can also be accessed by amine-catalyzed reactions with methyl ketones. By a one-pot cascade reaction of isocyanides with unprotected aldoses and amino acids access to defined configured glycopeptide mimetics is achieved. Depending on the reaction conditions different origins to control the installation of configuration during the bond-formation process were observed.

  8. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, J; Hahm, H S; Seeberger, P H; Pagel, K

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  9. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  10. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  11. [Computation techniques in the conformational analysis of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Gebst, A G; Grachev, A A; Shashkov, A S; Nifant'ev, N E

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of modern studies of carbohydrates is devoted to spatial mechanisms of their participation in the cell recognition processes and directed design of inhibitors of these processes. Any progress in this field is impossible without the development of theoretical conformational analysis of carbohydrates. In this review, we generalize literature data on the potentialities of using of different molecular-mechanic force fields, the methods of quantum mechanics, and molecular dynamics to study the conformation of glycoside bond. A possibility of analyzing the reactivity of carbohydrates with the computation techniques is also discussed in brief.

  12. Development of processes and techniques for molding thermally stable, fire-retardant, low-smoke-emitting polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    All available newly developed nonmetallic thermally stable polymers were examined for the development of processes and techniques by compression molding, injection molding, or thermoforming cabin interior parts. Efforts were directed toward developing molding techniques of new polymers to economically produce usable nonmetallic molded parts. Data on the flame resistant characteristics of the materials were generated from pilot plant batches. Preliminary information on the molding characteristics of the various thermoplastic materials was obtained by producing actual parts.

  13. DNA polymerase from temperate phage Bam35 is endowed with processive polymerization and abasic sites translesion synthesis capacity

    PubMed Central

    Berjón-Otero, Mónica; Villar, Laurentino; de Vega, Miguel; Salas, Margarita; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases (DNAPs) responsible for genome replication are highly faithful enzymes that nonetheless cannot deal with damaged DNA. In contrast, translesion synthesis (TLS) DNAPs are suitable for replicating modified template bases, although resulting in very low-fidelity products. Here we report the biochemical characterization of the temperate bacteriophage Bam35 DNA polymerase (B35DNAP), which belongs to the protein-primed subgroup of family B DNAPs, along with phage Φ29 and other viral and mobile element polymerases. B35DNAP is a highly faithful DNAP that can couple strand displacement to processive DNA synthesis. These properties allow it to perform multiple displacement amplification of plasmid DNA with a very low error rate. Despite its fidelity and proofreading activity, B35DNAP was able to successfully perform abasic site TLS without template realignment and inserting preferably an A opposite the abasic site (A rule). Moreover, deletion of the TPR2 subdomain, required for processivity, impaired primer extension beyond the abasic site. Taken together, these findings suggest that B35DNAP may perform faithful and processive genome replication in vivo and, when required, TLS of abasic sites. PMID:26100910

  14. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-08-01

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  15. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  16. CO2-assisted high pressure homogenization: a solvent-free process for polymeric microspheres and drug-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Johannes; Mazzotti, Marco

    2012-10-15

    The study explores the enabling role of near-critical CO(2) as a reversible plasticizer in the high pressure homogenization of polymer particles, aiming at their comminution as well as at the formation of drug-polymer composites. First, the effect of near-critical CO(2) on the homogenization of aqueous suspensions of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) was investigated. Applying a pressure drop of 900 bar and up to 150 passes across the homogenizer, it was found that particles processed in the presence of CO(2) were generally of microspherical morphology and at all times significantly smaller than those obtained in the absence of a plasticizer. The smallest particles, exhibiting a median x(50) of 1.3 μm, were obtained by adding a small quantity of ethyl acetate, which exerts on PLGA an additional plasticizing effect during the homogenization step. Further, the study concerns the possibility of forming drug-polymer composites through simultaneous high pressure homogenization of the two relevant solids, and particularly the effect of near-critical CO(2) on this process. Therefore, PLGA was homogenized together with crystalline S-ketoprofen (S-KET), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, at a drug to polymer ratio of 1:10, a pressure drop of 900 bar and up to 150 passes across the homogenizer. When the process was carried out in the presence of CO(2), an impregnation efficiency of 91% has been reached, corresponding to 8.3 wt.% of S-KET in PLGA; moreover, composite particles were of microspherical morphology and significantly smaller than those obtained in the absence of CO(2). The formation of drug-polymer composites through simultaneous homogenization of the two materials is thus greatly enhanced by the presence of CO(2), which increases the efficiency for both homogenization and impregnation.

  17. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. The highest conductivities reported (approximately 4/Scm) were achieved with polythiophene in a polystyrene host polymer. The best films using a polyamide as base polymer were four orders of magnitude less conductive than the polystyrene films. The authors suggested that this was because polyimides were unable to swell sufficiently for infiltration of monomer as in the polystyrene. It was not clear, however, if the different conductivities obtained were merely the result of differing oxidation conditions. Oxidation time, temperature and oxidant concentration varied widely among the studies.

  18. Influence of polymeric electron injection layers on the electrical properties of solution-processed multilayered polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Eiji; Kurami, Kazuhiko

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we fabricated multilayered polymer-based light-emitting diodes (pLEDs) with various solution-processed electron-injection layers (EILs), and investigated the influence of the EILs on the electrical properties of pLEDs in indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-(1,4-phenylene((4-sec-butylphenyl)amino)-1,4-phenylene))] (TFB) (HTL)/poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-1,4-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) (EML)/EIL/Al structures. We have used the quaternized ammonium π-conjugated polyelectrolyte derivative (poly[(9,9-di(3,3‧-N,N‧-trimethylammonium)propylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-phenylene)]diiodide salt) (PF-PDTA), a mixture of PF-PDTA and CS2CO3, and the aliphatic-amine-based polymer poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) as solution-processed EILs, and compared them with LiF as a solvent-free EIL. The EILs enhanced the electron injection and improve the pLED performance. High external quantum efficiencies of nearly 4% were obtained in the pLEDs with the combination of a multilayered structure fabricated by a transfer printing technique and EILs of a PF-PDTA:CS2CO3 mixture and PEI. On the other hand, the device with PF-PDTA exhibited lower efficiency, higher driving voltage, and larger leakage current at lower voltage. The migration of ionic charges was suggested from the abnormal dielectric behaviors, and serious damage on the electrode material occurred when both an acid hole-injection layer (PEDOT:PSS) and PF-PDTA were used. On the other hand, the pLEDs with ultrathin PEI showed high performance and stable device operation in terms of the influence of ionic charges.

  19. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  20. Oral carbohydrate loading with 18% carbohydrate beverage alleviates insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takahiko; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Koichi; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative 12.6% oral carbohydrate loading is an element of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol aimed at alleviating postoperative insulin resistance; however, in Japan, beverages with 18% carbohydrate content are generally used for preoperative carbohydrate loading. We investigated the effect of 18% carbohydrate loading on alleviating insulin resistance. Six healthy volunteers participated in this crossover-randomized study and were segregated into 2 groups: volunteers in the carbohydrate-loading group (group A) who fasted from after 9 pm and ingested 375 mL of a beverage containing 18% carbohydrate (ArginaidWaterTM; Nestle, Tokyo, Japan) between 9 pm and 12 pm, and 250 mL of the same liquid at 6:30 am. Volunteers in control group (group B) drank only water. At 8:30 am, a hyperinsulinemic normoglycemic clamp was initiated. Glucose infusion rate (GIR) and levels of ketone bodies and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) before clamping were evaluated. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Levels of blood glucose, insulin, and cytokines at the start of the clamp were similar in both the groups. The GIR in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (11.5±2.4 vs 6.2±2.2 mg/kg/min, p=0.005), while blood ketone body levels were significantly lower in group A (22±4 vs 124±119 μmol/L, p=0.04). Preoperative 18% carbohydrate loading could prevent the decrease in insulin sensitivity and suppress catabolism in healthy volunteers. Thus, carbohydrate loading with a beverage with 18% carbohydrate content might contribute to improvements in perioperative management. PMID:23353610

  1. PDMS-glass bonding using grafted polymeric adhesive--alternative process flow for compatibility with patterned biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Beh, Cyrus Weijie; Zhou, Weizhuang; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2012-10-21

    We report a novel modification of silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a polymer graft that allows interfacial bonding between an elastomer and glass substrate to be performed without exposure of the substrate to harsh treatment conditions, such as oxygen plasma. Organic molecules can thus be patterned within microfluidic channels and still remain functional post-bonding. In addition, after polymer grafting the PDMS can be stored in a desiccator for at least 40 days, and activated upon exposure to acidic buffer for bonding. The bonded devices remain fully bonded in excess of 80 psi driving pressure, with no signs of compromise to the bond integrity. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of our method with biological molecules using a proof-of-concept DNA sensing device, in which fluorescently-labelled DNA targets are successfully captured by a patterned probe in a device sealed using our method, while the pattern on a plasma-treated device was completely destroyed. Therefore, this method provides a much-needed alternative bonding process for incorporation of biological molecules in microfluidic devices.

  2. PDMS-Glass bonding using grafted polymeric adhesive - Alternative process flow for compatibility with patterned biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Cyrus Weijie; Zhou, Weizhuang

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel modification of silicone elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a polymer graft that allows interfacial bonding between elastomer and glass substrate to be performed without exposure of said substrate to harsh treatment conditions like oxygen plasma. Organic molecules can thus be patterned within microfluidic channels and still remain functional post-bonding. In addition, after polymer grafting the PDMS can be stored in a desiccator for at least 40 days, and activated upon exposure to acidic buffer for bonding. The bonded devices remain fully bonded in excess of 80 psi driving pressure, with no signs of compromise to the bond integrity. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of our method with biological molecules using a proof-of-concept DNA sensing device, in which fluorescently-labelled DNA targets are successfully captured by a patterned probe in a device sealed using our method, while the pattern on a plasma-treated device was completely destroyed. Therefore, this method provides a much-needed alternative bonding process for incorporation of biological molecules in microfluidic devices. PMID:22858861

  3. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw < 1 kDa and mw > 100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw ˜1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  4. Photoacoustic analysis of dental resin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloiano, E. C. R.; Rocha, R.; Martin, A. A.; da Silva, M. D.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we use the photoacoustic technique to monitor the curing process of diverse dental materials, as the resins chemically activated (RCA). The results obtained reveal that the composition of a determined RCA significantly alters its activation kinetics. Photoacoustic data also show that temperature is a significant parameter in the activation kinetics of resins. The photoacoustic technique was also applied to evaluate the polymerization kinetics of photoactivated resins. Such resins are photoactivated by incidence of continuous light from a photodiode. This leads to the polymerization of the resin, modifying its thermal properties and, consequently, the level of the photoacoustic signal. Measurements show that the polymerization of the resin changes the photoacoustic signal amplitude, indicating that photoacoustic measurements can be utilized to monitor the polymerization kinetic and the degree of polymerization of photoactivated dental resins.

  5. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  6. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  7. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  8. Recent advances in computational predictions of NMR parameters for the structure elucidation of carbohydrates: methods and limitations.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2013-11-01

    All living systems are comprised of four fundamental classes of macromolecules--nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates (glycans). Glycans play a unique role of joining three principal hierarchical levels of the living world: (1) the molecular level (pathogenic agents and vaccine recognition by the immune system, metabolic pathways involving saccharides that provide cells with energy, and energy accumulation via photosynthesis); (2) the nanoscale level (cell membrane mechanics, structural support of biomolecules, and the glycosylation of macromolecules); (3) the microscale and macroscale levels (polymeric materials, such as cellulose, starch, glycogen, and biomass). NMR spectroscopy is the most powerful research approach for getting insight into the solution structure and function of carbohydrates at all hierarchical levels, from monosaccharides to oligo- and polysaccharides. Recent progress in computational procedures has opened up novel opportunities to reveal the structural information available in the NMR spectra of saccharides and to advance our understanding of the corresponding biochemical processes. The ability to predict the molecular geometry and NMR parameters is crucial for the elucidation of carbohydrate structures. In the present paper, we review the major NMR spectrum simulation techniques with regard to chemical shifts, coupling constants, relaxation rates and nuclear Overhauser effect prediction applied to the three levels of glycomics. Outstanding development in the related fields of genomics and proteomics has clearly shown that it is the advancement of research tools (automated spectrum analysis, structure elucidation, synthesis, sequencing and amplification) that drives the large challenges in modern science. Combining NMR spectroscopy and the computational analysis of structural information encoded in the NMR spectra reveals a way to the automated elucidation of the structure of carbohydrates.

  9. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  10. Method for improving separation of carbohydrates from wood pulping and wood or biomass hydrolysis liquors

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, William Louis; Compere, Alicia Lucille; Leitten, Jr., Carl Frederick

    2010-04-20

    A method for separating carbohydrates from pulping liquors includes the steps of providing a wood pulping or wood or biomass hydrolysis pulping liquor having lignin therein, and mixing the liquor with an acid or a gas which forms an acid upon contact with water to initiate precipitation of carbohydrate to begin formation of a precipitate. During precipitation, at least one long chain carboxylated carbohydrate and at least one cationic polymer, such as a polyamine or polyimine are added, wherein the precipitate aggregates into larger precipitate structures. Carbohydrate gel precipitates are then selectively removed from the larger precipitate structures. The method process yields both a carbohydrate precipitate and a high purity lignin.

  11. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  12. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed. PMID:27272929

  13. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed. PMID:27272929

  14. The Influence of Processing Variables on Performance of O/W Emulsion Gels Based on Polymeric Emulsifier (Pemulen (R)TR-2NF).

    PubMed

    Simovic, S; Milic-Askrabic, J; Vuleta, G; Ibric, S; Stupar, M

    1999-04-01

    Pemulens(R) (BF Goodrich) are hydrophobically-modified copolymers of acrylic acid (Acrylates/C10-C30 alkyl acrylates) that could act both as primary emulsifiers for o/w emulsions and viscosity enhancing agents. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different processing conditions (mixing equipment, speed and time of agitation) on the aesthetic characteristics, viscosity and physical stability of o/w emulsion gels based on the polymeric emulsifier (Pemulen TR-2 NF). This objective was achieved by applying a two-factor three-level experimental design at two sets: using a laboratory mixer and a disperser. Independent variables were mixing speed and time and dependant variables i.e. responses, were millimetres of oil phase separated after centrifugation at 3500 rpm in a laboratory centrifuge, and viscosity at shear rate 180 l/s. The responses were fitted into a second order model by means of a multiple regression analysis. For the samples prepared on the laboratory mixer it was shown that mixing time and speed produce a statistically important influence on viscosity, but not on physical stability: with increasing mixing speed and time the viscosity linearly increases. If we assume that greater energy input obtained by increasing the mixing speed and time produces a decrease in drop size and polydispersity and better developed gel network, then the optimal processing conditions will be at the point where maximal viscosity is attained. This result was in accordance with the centrifugation test - the best stability appeared when maximal mixing speed and time were applied, although this effect appeared not to be statistically significant. For samples prepared using dispersers no statistically important influence of processing variables on viscosity and physical stability was found. Additionally, emulsion samples prepared using the laboratory mixer appeared homogenous, while in samples prepared using the disperser, undispersed polymer lumps appeared. Based on

  15. In situ synthesis and characterization of silver/polymer nanocomposites by thermal cationic polymerization processes at room temperature: initiating systems based on organosilanes and starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tehfe, Mohamad-Ali; Jamois, Romain; Cousin, Patrice; Elkoun, Saïd; Robert, Mathieu

    2015-04-14

    New methods for the preparation of silver nanoparticles/polymer nanocomposite materials by thermal cationic polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) or α-pinene oxide (α-PO) at room temperature (RT) and under air were developed. The new initiating systems were based on silanes (Si), starch nanocrystals (StN) and metal salts. Excellent polymerization profiles were revealed. It was shown that silver nanoparticles (Ag(0) NPs) were in situ formed and that the addition of StN improves the polymerization efficiency. The as-synthesized nanocomposite materials contained spherical nanoparticles homogeneously dispersed in the polymer matrices. Polymers and nanoparticles were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis spectroscopy. A coherent picture of the involved chemical mechanisms is presented. PMID:25793620

  16. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  17. Hydrocracking of carbohydrates making glycerol, glycols and other polyols

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A homogeneous process for hydrocracking of carbohydrates in the presence of soluble transition metal hydrogenation catalyst with the production of lower polyhydric alcohols. A carbohydrate is contacted with hydrogen in the presence of a soluble transition metal catalyst and a strong base at a temperature of from about 25.degree. C. to about 200.degree. C. and a pressure of from about 15 to about 3000 psi.

  18. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  19. Controlled synthesis and microwave absorption properties of Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI composite via an in-situ polymerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Yang, Yi; Du, Youwei

    2015-03-01

    The binary composites of conducting polyaniline (PANI) and nickle zinc ferrite were synthesized by an in-situ polymerization process, and the electromagnetic absorption properties of the composites were also investigated. The FT-IR spectra present the peaks of PANI (1562, 1481, 1301, 1109, and 799 cm-1) and the bonds of NiZn ferrite (579 and 390 cm-1), indicating the existence of both NiZn ferrite particles and PANI in the composites. With the increasing ratio of nickle zinc ferrite, the composites distributes in irregular compared with pure PANI and Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4. The TG curves of the pure PANI and PANI/Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4 composites with different molar ratios clearly show the increase percentage of the ferrite in the composites. Furthermore, we found that the excellent electromagnetic absorption properties and wide absorption bandwidth can be achieved by adjusting proper molar ratios Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4 to PANI. The maximum reflection loss of Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI can reach to -41 dB at 12.8 GHz and the bandwidth exceeding -10 dB can reach to 5 GHz with the absorber thickness of 2.6 mm at the molar ratio of 1:2. This can be attributed to the enhancing magnetic loss and the better impedance matching. Therefore, Ni0.6Zn0.4Fe2O4/PANI ferrite composites can become a new kind of candidate in the field of the microwave absorbing.

  20. Biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Dias, David M; Furtado, Joana; Wasielewski, Emeric; Cruz, Rui; Costello, Bernard; Cole, Lindsay; Faria, Tiago Q; Baaske, Philipp; Brito, Rui M M; Ciulli, Alessio; Simões, Isaura; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Faro, Carlos; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Castanheira, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Laforin is a human dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) involved in glycogen metabolism regulation containing a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). Mutations in the gene coding for laforin are responsible for the development of Lafora disease, a progressive fatal myoclonus epilepsy with early onset, characterized by the intracellular deposition of abnormally branched, hyperphosphorylated insoluble glycogen-like polymers, called Lafora bodies. Despite the known importance of the CBM domain of laforin in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycogen interaction is still poorly understood. Recently, the structure of laforin with bound maltohexaose was determined and despite the importance of such breakthrough, some molecular interaction details remained missing. We herein report a thorough biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction using soluble glycans. We demonstrated an increased preference of laforin for the interaction with glycans with higher order of polymerization and confirmed the importance of tryptophan residues for glycan interaction. Moreover, and in line with what has been described for other CBMs and lectins, our results confirmed that laforin-glycan interactions occur with a favourable enthalpic contribution counter-balanced by an unfavourable entropic contribution. The analysis of laforin-glycan interaction through the glycan side by saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR has shown that the CBM-binding site can accommodate between 5 and 6 sugar units, which is in line with the recently obtained crystal structure of laforin. Overall, the work in the present study complements the structural characterization of laforin and sheds light on the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycan interaction, which is a pivotal requisite to understand the physiological and pathological roles of laforin.

  1. Polymerized nanotips via two-photon photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fengjie; Li, Yan; Tan, Dengfeng; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2007-02-01

    We present new methods to produce polymerized nanotips via two-photon photopolymerization. By gradually changing the laser power, we fabricate a single polymerized tip with the size of 120nm. When two rectangle anchors with protuberances are close enough, lines with the slimmest part of about 20-30nm and tips with the widths of about 35nm are produced between anchors, which are the best resolution obtained with the resin SCR-500 to our knowledge. As the tips are adhered to larger polymerized structures, they can survive post processing in spite of their small sizes.

  2. Polymeric MST - high precision at low cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elderstig, Håkan; Larsson, Olle

    1997-09-01

    A low-cost production process for fabrication of polymeric microstructures from micromachined silicon is demonstrated in a splice for the splicing of optical fibers and an optical motherboard. Measurements on splices showed less than 0.5 dB insertion losses. The prototype polymeric motherboard concisted of an optical receiver module. The detector that was mounted on the polymeric optical motherboard detected about 70% of the transferred light. Measurements with modulated light indicates an optical bandwidth of 5 GHz at 2 V reverse current on the pin-diode.

  3. Colloidal and micro-carbon spheres derived from low-temperature polymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Carbon spheres (CSs) have recently attracted major interest due to their new applications, mainly in energy storage and conversion but also in hard-templating, sorption/catalysis processes, and drug delivery systems. This is attributable to their physico-chemical properties, including their tunable morphology (solid, hollow and core-shell), size, surface area/porosity, good electrical conductivity, low external surface-to-volume ratio, high packing density, enhanced mass transport, robust mechanical stability, low cytotoxicity, and excellent biocompatibility. They can be obtained from a wide variety of carbon precursors and methods. This review covers their production by carbonization of polymer spheres from low-temperature polymerization reactions, considered here as below 250°C. This is a very important method because it allows the synthesis of CSs with different morphologies and doped with other elements or chemical compounds. The preparation of polymer spheres by this technique is well documented in the literature, and the objective of this review is to summarize and give an overview of the most significant publications, proposing a novel classification based on the formation mechanism of the polymer spheres. This classification includes the following polymerization processes: emulsion polymerization and its derivatives, seeded emulsion and inverse emulsion polymerization; precipitation polymerization and its derivative, dispersion polymerization; hard-templating; spray-drying; and hydrothermal or solvothermal treatment of carbohydrates and biomass in general. This review also reports on the morphology and surface characteristics of the CSs obtained by different synthetic approaches. The final section of the review describes the current applications of these CSs, notably in energy storage (supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries) and energy conversion (fuel cells and dye-sensitized solar cells). Besides the numerous applications listed above, they are

  4. Colloidal and micro-carbon spheres derived from low-temperature polymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Carbon spheres (CSs) have recently attracted major interest due to their new applications, mainly in energy storage and conversion but also in hard-templating, sorption/catalysis processes, and drug delivery systems. This is attributable to their physico-chemical properties, including their tunable morphology (solid, hollow and core-shell), size, surface area/porosity, good electrical conductivity, low external surface-to-volume ratio, high packing density, enhanced mass transport, robust mechanical stability, low cytotoxicity, and excellent biocompatibility. They can be obtained from a wide variety of carbon precursors and methods. This review covers their production by carbonization of polymer spheres from low-temperature polymerization reactions, considered here as below 250°C. This is a very important method because it allows the synthesis of CSs with different morphologies and doped with other elements or chemical compounds. The preparation of polymer spheres by this technique is well documented in the literature, and the objective of this review is to summarize and give an overview of the most significant publications, proposing a novel classification based on the formation mechanism of the polymer spheres. This classification includes the following polymerization processes: emulsion polymerization and its derivatives, seeded emulsion and inverse emulsion polymerization; precipitation polymerization and its derivative, dispersion polymerization; hard-templating; spray-drying; and hydrothermal or solvothermal treatment of carbohydrates and biomass in general. This review also reports on the morphology and surface characteristics of the CSs obtained by different synthetic approaches. The final section of the review describes the current applications of these CSs, notably in energy storage (supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries) and energy conversion (fuel cells and dye-sensitized solar cells). Besides the numerous applications listed above, they are

  5. Halley's polymeric organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.; Korth, A.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of polymeric organic compounds in the mass spectrum of Comet Halley obtained with the Positive Ion Cluster Composition analyzer on Giotto are examined. It is found that, in addition to polyoxymethylene, other polymers and complex molecules may exist in the comet. It is suggested that polymerized hydrogen cyanide may be a source for the observed CN and NH2 jets.

  6. Focus on Nutrition: Cats and carbohydrates: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Laflammme, Dottie

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that high-carbohydrate diets contribute to the development of feline diabetes and obesity. The evidence does not support this. Healthy cats efficiently digest and metabolize properly processed starches and complex carbohydrates. Dietary carbohydrate can efficiently meet cats' cellular requirement for carbohydrate (glucose), sparing protein that would otherwise be needed for gluconeogenesis. Excess calories, regardless of source, contribute to obesity and obesity-related problems, but low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets pose a greater risk for obesity. The increasing prevalence of feline diabetes appears to be due to obesity and aging rather than to dietary carbohydrates. However, once cats become diabetic, consumption of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet may be beneficial. PMID:20473847

  7. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  8. Two Photon Polymerization of Ormosils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Jipa, F.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, 3D structures of hybrid polymers—ORMOSILS (organically modified silicates) were produced via Two Photon Polymerization (2PP) of hybrid methacrylates based on silane derivates. Synthetic routes have been used to obtain series of hybrid monomers, their structure and purity being checked by NMR Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Two photon polymerization method (a relatively new technology which allows fast micro and nano processing of three-dimensional structures with application in medical devices, tissue scaffolds, photonic crystals etc) was used for monomers processing. As laser a Ti: Sapphire laser was used, with 200 fs pulse duration and 2 kHz repetition rate, emitting at 775 nm. A parametric study on the influence of the processing parameters (laser fluence, laser scanning velocity, photo initiator) on the written structures was carried out. The as prepared polymeric scaffolds were tested in mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts cell cultures, with the aim of further obtaining bone and dermal grafts. Cells morphology, proliferation, adhesion and alignment were analyzed for different experimental conditions.

  9. Pre-operative nutrition and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Kratzing, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    An optimal nutritional state is an important consideration in providing successful operative outcomes. Unfortunately, many aspects of surgery are not constructive to providing this. In addition, the metabolic and immune response to injury induces a catabolic state and insulin resistance, a known risk factor of post-operative complications. Aggressive insulin therapy post-operatively has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality but similar results can be achieved when insulin resistance is lessened by the use of pre-operative carbohydrate loading. Consuming carbohydrate-containing drinks up to 2 h before surgery has been found to be an effective way to attenuate insulin resistance, minimise protein losses, reduce hospital stays and improve patient comfort without adversely affecting gastric emptying. Enhanced recovery programmes have employed carbohydrate loading as one of several strategies aimed at reducing post-operative stress and improving the recovery process. Studies examining the benefits of these programmes have demonstrated significantly shorter post-operative hospital stays, faster return to normal functions and lower occurrences of surgical complications. As a consequence of the favourable evidence they are now being implemented in many surgical units. Further benefit to post-operative recovery may be found with the use of immune-enhancing diets, i.e. supplementation with n-3 fatty acids, arginine, glutamine and/or nucleotides. These have the potential to boost the immune system, improve wound healing and reduce inflammatory markers. Research exploring the benefits of immunonutrition and solidifying the use of carbohydrate loading is ongoing; however, there is strong evidence to link good pre-operative nutrition and improved surgical outcomes.

  10. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  11. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  12. New carbohydrate-based materials. Progress report, September 25, 1991--November 24, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  13. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER83817 Integrated Reactor Design for Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Sourced Reactants Streams Using the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Randy D. Cortright

    2005-05-04

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation research project Virent Energy Systems (Virent) attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of generating high yields of hydrogen by developing the appropriate reactor system for the novel liquid-phase reforming of aqueous-phase carbohydrate streams derived from biomass. In this project platinum-based catalysts were initially utilized to establish the technical feasibility of reactor design for reforming carbohydrates found in biomass to hydrogen.

  14. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  15. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngs, Wiley J.

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. Many aerospace applications require a combination of properties. Thus, hybrid films made from polyimides or other engineering resins are of primary interest, but only if conductivities on the same order as those obtained with a polystyrene base could be obtained. Hence, a series of experiments was performed to optimize the conductivity of polyimide-based composite films. The polyimide base chosen for this study was Kapton. 3-MethylThiophene (3MT) was used for the conductive phase. Three processing variables were identified for producing these composite films, namely time, temperature, and oxidant concentration for the in situ oxidation. Statistically designed experiments were used to examine the effects of these variables and synergistic/interactive effects among variables on the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of the films. Multiple linear regression analysis of the tensile data revealed that temperature and time have the greatest effect on maximum stress. The response surface of maximum stress vs. temperature and time (for oxidant concentration at 1.2 M) is shown. Conductivity of the composite films was measured for

  16. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens. PMID:25859152

  17. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  18. Catalytic living ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Amit A.; Kilbinger, Andreas F. M.

    2015-09-01

    In living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), a transition-metal-carbene complex polymerizes ring-strained olefins with very good control of the molecular weight of the resulting polymers. Because one molecule of the initiator is required for each polymer chain, however, this type of polymerization is expensive for widespread use. We have now designed a chain-transfer agent (CTA) capable of reducing the required amount of metal complex while still maintaining full control over the living polymerization process. This new method introduces a degenerative transfer process to ROMP. We demonstrate that substituted cyclohexene rings are good CTAs, and thereby preserve the ‘living’ character of the polymerization using catalytic quantities of the metal complex. The resulting polymers show characteristics of a living polymerization, namely narrow molecular-weight distribution, controlled molecular weights and block copolymer formation. This new technique provides access to well-defined polymers for industrial, biomedical and academic use at a fraction of the current costs and significantly reduced levels of residual ruthenium catalyst.

  19. Lanthanide-IMAC enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Rainer, Matthias; Messner, Christoph B; Rode, Bernd M; Bonn, Günther K

    2014-03-01

    In this study a new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography resin for the enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols was synthesized by radical polymerization reaction of vinyl phosphonic acid and 1,4-butandiole dimethacrylate using azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as radical initiator. Interaction between the chelated trivalent lanthanide ions and negatively charged hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates and polyols was observed by applying high pH values. The new method was evaluated by single standard solutions, mixtures of standards, honey and a more complex extract of Cynara scolymus. The washing step was accomplished by acetonitrile in excess volumes. Elution of enriched carbohydrates was successfully performed with deionized water. The subsequent analysis was carried out with matrix-free laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry involving a TiO2 -coated steel target, especially suitable for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances. Quantitative analysis of the sugar alcohol xylitol as well as the determination of the maximal loading capacity was performed by gas chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometric detection after chemical derivatization. In a parallel approach quantum mechanical geometry optimizations were performed in order to compare the coordination behavior of various trivalent lanthanide ions. PMID:24097333

  20. Lanthanide-IMAC enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Rainer, Matthias; Messner, Christoph B; Rode, Bernd M; Bonn, Günther K

    2014-03-01

    In this study a new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography resin for the enrichment of carbohydrates and polyols was synthesized by radical polymerization reaction of vinyl phosphonic acid and 1,4-butandiole dimethacrylate using azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as radical initiator. Interaction between the chelated trivalent lanthanide ions and negatively charged hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates and polyols was observed by applying high pH values. The new method was evaluated by single standard solutions, mixtures of standards, honey and a more complex extract of Cynara scolymus. The washing step was accomplished by acetonitrile in excess volumes. Elution of enriched carbohydrates was successfully performed with deionized water. The subsequent analysis was carried out with matrix-free laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry involving a TiO2 -coated steel target, especially suitable for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances. Quantitative analysis of the sugar alcohol xylitol as well as the determination of the maximal loading capacity was performed by gas chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometric detection after chemical derivatization. In a parallel approach quantum mechanical geometry optimizations were performed in order to compare the coordination behavior of various trivalent lanthanide ions.

  1. A novel approach for the quantitation of carbohydrates in mash, wort, and beer with RP-HPLC using 1-naphthylamine for precolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Rakete, Stefan; Glomb, Marcus A

    2013-04-24

    A novel universal method for the determination of reducing mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides in complex matrices on RP-HPLC using 1-naphthylamine for precolumn derivatization with sodium cyanoborhydride was established to study changes in the carbohydrate profile during beer brewing. Fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection enabled very sensitive analyses of beer-relevant carbohydrates. Mass spectrometry additionally allowed the identification of the molecular weight and thereby the degree of polymerization of unknown carbohydrates. Thus, carbohydrates with up to 16 glucose units were detected. Comparison demonstrated that the novel method was superior to fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). The results proved the HPLC method clearly to be more powerful in regard to sensitivity and resolution. Analogous to FACE, this method was designated fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate HPLC (FAC-HPLC).

  2. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  3. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  4. Beverages and body weight: challenges in the evidence-based review process of the Carbohydrate Subcommittee from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    Concern about the role of beverages, especially those containing sugar, in the obesity epidemic continues to escalate. Bans on sugar-sweetened beverages and chocolate milk have expanded from the school cafeteria to the ballpark and convenience store. This review describes the experience of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) in conducting an evidence-based review of dietary exposure and health outcomes. The following four topics relevant to fluids and body weight were reviewed: added sugar, noncaloric sweeteners, food form and body weight, and macronutrients and satiety. There were limited and conflicting data on how liquids and solids affect energy intake and body weight. Fluid intake is typically not tracked in prospective, cohort longitudinal studies; thus, data are not available on fluid intake and health status from studies using the strongest epidemiologic designs. Despite public perception that beverages are linked to increased body weight compared with whole foods, evidence-based reviews of this topic do not support that liquid calories are processed differently in the body. The practical recommendation to replace caloric beverages with water as an aid to control weight is based on calorie reduction, rather than a link between added-sugar intake and obesity.

  5. Multi-wall carbon nanotube-polyaniline biosensor based on lectin-carbohydrate affinity for ultrasensitive detection of Con A.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fangxin; Chen, Shihong; Wang, Chengyan; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun; Wang, Cun

    2012-04-15

    In this paper, a novel method for detecting concanavalin A (Con A) was developed based on lectin-carbohydrate biospecific interactions. Multi-wall carbon nanotube-polyaniline (MWNT-PANI) nanocomposites, synthesized by in situ polymerization, were chosen to immobilize d-glucose through the Schiff-base reaction. The immobilized D-glucose showed high binding sensitivity and excellent selectivity to its target lectin, Con A. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were applied to characterize the assembly process of the modified electrode. Due to the high affinity of Con A for D-glucose and high stability of the propounded sensing platform, the fabricated biosensor achieved ultrasensitive detection of Con A with good sensitivity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. The changes of response current were proportional to the Con A concentrations from 3.3 pM to 9.3 nM, with a detection limit of 1.0 pM. Therefore, the combination of MWNT-PANI nanocomposites and the special binding force between lectin and carbohydrate provides an efficient and promising platform for the fabrication of bioelectrochemical devices.

  6. Microspatial Variation in Carbohydrate Concentrations with Depth in the Upper Millimetres of Intertidal Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, I. S.; Paterson, D. M.

    1998-03-01

    The carbohydrates present in surface sediments represent a readily available carbon source and their polymeric components increase sediment stability. Information regarding the occurrence of these carbohydrates is therefore important in the consideration of biogeochemical cycling, heterotrophic metabolism and sediment transport. The distributions of carbohydrates within the surface sediments of three intertidal mud flats were examined on a microscale (200 μm). The carbohydrates were operationally separated into two fractions and these differed in their distribution with depth. Dry mass concentration increased significantly with depth in the upper 2 mm and the structure of surface sediment changed visibly within a short distance of the surface. The upper 300 μm of the sediment was highly porous but became compact by 4 mm. Epipelic diatoms and cyanobacteria were observed at high densities in the upper 300 μm. In addition, the concentration of colloidal carbohydrates increased significantly in a landwards direction along a short transect. Furthermore, the distribution of sediment carbohydrates was apparently influenced by sediment bed morphology and these findings are discussed.

  7. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  8. Equilibrium polymerization of cyclic carbonate oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballone, P.; Jones, R. O.

    2001-08-01

    A model of the polymerization of ring oligomers of bisphenol A polycarbonate (BPA-PC) is used to investigate the influence of dimensionality (2D or 3D), density and temperature on the size distribution of the polymer chains. The polymerization step is catalyzed by a single active particle, conserves the number and type of the chemical bonds, and occurs without a significant gain in either potential energy or configurational entropy. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations show that polymerization of cyclic oligomers occurs readily at high density and is driven by the entropy associated with the distribution of interparticle bonds. Polymerization competes at lower densities with long range diffusion, which favors small molecular species, and is prevented if the system is sufficiently dilute. Polymerization occurs in 2D via a weakly first order transition as a function of density and is characterized by low hysteresis and large fluctuations in the size of polymer chains. Polymerization occurs more readily in 3D than in 2D, and is favored by increasing temperature, as expected for an entropy-driven process.

  9. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  10. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  11. Carbohydrates as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate derivatives are readily available chiral molecules, yet they are infrequently employed as enantioinduction components in stereoselective catalysis. In this review, synthetic approaches to carbohydrate-based ligands and catalysts are outlined, along with example applications in enantioselective catalysis. A wide range of carbohydrate-based functionality is covered, and key trends and future opportunities are identified. PMID:27064817

  12. Influence of diblock copolymer PCL-mPEG and of various iodinated oils on the formulation by the emulsion-solvent diffusion process of radiopaque polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hallouard, François; Briançon, Stéphanie; Anton, Nicolas; Li, Xiang; Vandamme, Thierry; Fessi, Hatem

    2013-11-01

    This pioneer study in the domain of blood pool contrast media formulation presents the influence of poly-ɛ-caprolactone-monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-mPEG) and oils on the formulation of polymeric nanoparticles by emulsion-solvent diffusion. The nature of the oil used had no influence on the encapsulation rate, even if particles were formulated with a mix of PCL/PCL-mPEG. It did, however, influence the particle size and polydispersity, with macroglycerides appearing to be the lipid structure best suited to obtain the smallest monodisperse particles. When we used PCL-mPEG to form a PEG-hydrated layer to surround the nanoparticles, its tension active property had a favorable effect on particle size and polydispersity. We also showed the strong deleterious effect on particle size and polydispersity when the polymer proportion was increased to over 1% (w/v) in the pre-emulsion organic phase. Conversely, increasing the oil proportion in this organic phase simply resulted in a slight to insignificant deleterious effect on size and polydispersity, enabling the oil proportion to be enhanced up to 3% (w/v). Finally, we showed the favorable combined effect of oil iodination and the presence of PCL-mPEG on particles formulated by emulsion-solvent diffusion leading to the preparation of smaller polymeric iodine-containing particles.

  13. Chain-growth click polymerization of AB2 monomers for the formation of hyperbranched polymers with low polydispersities in a one-pot process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Graff, Robert W; Cao, Xiaosong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gao, Haifeng

    2015-06-22

    Hyperbranched polymers are important soft nanomaterials but robust synthetic methods with which the polymer structures can be easily controlled have rarely been reported. For the first time, we present a one-pot one-batch synthesis of polytriazole-based hyperbranched polymers with both low polydispersity and a high degree of branching (DB) using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) polymerization. The use of a trifunctional AB2 monomer that contains one alkyne and two azide groups ensures that all Cu catalysts are bound to polytriazole polymers at low monomer conversion. Subsequent CuAAC polymerization displayed the features of a "living" chain-growth mechanism with a linear increase in molecular weight with conversion and clean chain extension for repeated monomer additions. Furthermore, the triazole group in a linear (L) monomer unit complexed Cu(I) , which catalyzed a faster reaction of the second azide group to quickly convert the L unit into a dendritic unit, producing hyperbranched polymers with DB=0.83.

  14. Possible mediators of the ``living'' radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyakin, M. V.; Wasserman, A. M.; Stott, P. E.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2006-03-01

    The stable radicals derived from different compounds were detected in process of styrene autopolymerization. The nitroxide radicals are produced from nitrosocompound, hindered hydroxylamine, nitrophenols and nitroanisoles. The phenoxyl radicals are formed from quinine methides, and naphtoxyl radicals are generated from 2-nitro-1-naphtol. The radicals are identified, the kinetics of their formation and follow-up evolution are studied. These radicals can participate in process of living radical polymerization as the mediators and can effect significantly on kinetics of polymerization and structure of the resulting polymer.

  15. Polymerization Initiated by Organic Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Julie; Rollet, Marion; Clément, Jean-Louis; Canard, Gabriel; Terme, Thierry; Gigmes, Didier; Vanelle, Patrice

    2016-05-10

    Polymerization reactions with organic electron donors (OED) as initiators are presented herein. The metal-free polymerization of various activated alkene and cyclic ester monomers was performed in short reaction times, under mild conditions, with small amounts of organic reducing agents, and without the need for co-initiators or activation by photochemical, electrochemical, or other methods. Hence, OED initiators enabled the development of an efficient, rapid, room-temperature process that meets the technical standards expected for industrial processes, such as energy savings, cost-effectiveness and safety. Mechanistic investigations support an electron-transfer initiation pathway that leads to the reduction of the monomer. PMID:27061743

  16. Organocatalyzed Group Transfer Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yougen; Kakuchi, Toyoji

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to the conventional group transfer polymerization (GTP) using a catalyst of either an anionic nucleophile or a transition-metal compound, the organocatalyzed GTP has to a great extent improved the living characteristics of the polymerization from the viewpoints of synthesizing structurally well-defined acrylic polymers and constructing defect-free polymer architectures. In this article, we describe the organocatalyzed GTP from a relatively personal perspective to provide our colleagues with a perspicuous and systematic overview on its recent progress as well as a reply to the curiosity of how excellently the organocatalysts have performed in this field. The stated perspectives of this review mainly cover five aspects, in terms of the assessment of the livingness of the polymerization, limit and scope of applicable monomers, mechanistic studies, control of the polymer structure, and a new GTP methodology involving the use of tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and hydrosilane. PMID:27427399

  17. Polymerization of vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Korus, R.A.; Mousetis, T.L.; Lloyd, L.

    1982-01-01

    The addition of antioxidants and dispersants is not sufficient to eliminate gum formation in vegetable oils. Even with relatively unsaturated oils like rapeseed the extent of unsaturation overwhelms these additives. Fuel deterioration during storage will be minimized in an anaerobic storage environment and, to a lesser extent, with a lower degree of oil unsaturation. Gum formation and carbon coking can also occur immediately preceding and during combustion. Thermal polymerization may be the dominant gum forming reaction under combustion conditions since thermal polymerization has a higher activation energy than oxidative polymerization and anaerobic conditions can occur within atomized fuel droplets. Carbon coking can be reduced with a lower degree of oil unsaturation and with better atomization of the fuel. 4 figures, 1 table.

  18. Marketing NASA Langley Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    A marketing tool was created to expand the knowledge of LaRC developed polymeric materials, in order to facilitate the technology transfer process and increase technology commercialization awareness among a non-technical audience. The created brochure features four materials, LaRC-CP, LaRC-RP46, LaRC-SI, and LaRC-IA, and highlights their competitive strengths in potential commercial applications. Excellent opportunities exist in the $40 million per year microelectronics market and the $6 billion adhesives market. It is hoped that the created brochure will generate inquiries regarding the use of the above materials in markets such as these.

  19. Chemical biology based on target-selective degradation of proteins and carbohydrates using light-activatable organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-05-01

    Proteins and carbohydrates play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes, including serious diseases. The development of novel and innovative methods for selective control of specific proteins and carbohydrates functions has attracted much attention in the field of chemical biology. In this account article, the development of novel chemical tools, which can degrade target proteins and carbohydrates by irradiation with a specific wavelength of light under mild conditions without any additives, is introduced. This novel class of photochemical agents promise bright prospects for finding not only molecular-targeted bioprobes for understanding of the structure-activity relationships of proteins and carbohydrates but also novel therapeutic drugs targeting proteins and carbohydrates.

  20. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  1. Polymeric materials in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurat, Vladimir

    Paper of short review type. It is the continuation of and addition to previous review papers "V. E. Skurat. Polymers in Space. In: Encyclopedia of aerospace engineering, vol. 4, Wiley and sons, 2010; Ibid., 2012 (on line)". Following topics are considered: (1) Destruction of polymers by solar radiation with various wavelengths in different spectral regions (visible-UV, vacuum UV (VUV), deep UV, soft and hard X-rays) are discussed. In difference with common polymer photochemistry induced by UV radiation, directions of various routs of polymer phototransformations and their relative yields are greatly dependent on wavelength of light (photon energy) during illuminations in VUV, deep UV and X-ray regions. During last twenty years, intensive spacecraft investigations of solar spectrum show great periodic and spontaneous variations of radiation intensities in short-wavelengths regions - up to one - two decimal orders of magnitude for X-rays. As a result, during solar flares the absorbed dose on the polymer surfaces from X-rays can be compared with absorbed dose from VUV radiation. (2) Some new approaches to predictions of reaction efficiencies of fast orbital atomic oxygen in their interaction with polymeric materials are considered. (3) Some aspects of photocatalitic destruction of polymers in vacuum conditions by full-spectrum solar radiation are discussed. This process can take place in enamels containing semiconducting particles (TiO2, ZnO) as pigments. (4) Contamination of spacecraft surfaces from intrinsic outer atmosphere play important role not only from the point of view of deterioration of optical and thermophysical properties. Layers of SiO2 contaminations with nanometer thicknesses can greatly diminish mass losses from perfluorinated polymers under VUV irradiation.

  2. Self-Healing of biocompatible polymeric nanocomposities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina

    2014-03-01

    Polymers are vulnerable to damage in form of cracks deep within the structure, where detection is difficult and repair is near to impossible. These cracks lead to mechanical degradation of the polymer. A method has been created to solve this problem named polymeric self healing. Self healing capabilities implies the dispersion within the polymeric matrix of microcapsules filled with a monomer and of catalyst. Poly urea-formaldehyde microcapsules used in this method are filled with dicyclopentadiene that is liberated after being ruptured by the crack propagation in the material. Polymerization is assisted by a catalyst FGGC that ignites the self healing process. Nanocomposites, such as titanium oxide, will be used as an integration of these polymers that will be tested by rupturing mechanically slowly. In order to prove the self healing process, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, and SEM are used.

  3. Synthesis and emulsifying properties of carbohydrate fatty acid esters produced from Agave tequilana fructans by enzymatic acylation.

    PubMed

    Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Arrizon, Javier; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Plou, Francisco J; Sandoval, Georgina

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate fatty acid esters are non-ionic surfactants with a broad spectrum of applications. These molecules are generally synthesized using short carbohydrates or linear fructans; however in this research carbohydrate fatty acid esters were produced for the first time with branched fructans from Agave tequilana. Using immobilized lipases we successfully acylated A. tequilana fructans with vinyl laurate, obtaining products with different degrees of polymerization (DP). Lipozyme 435 was the most efficient lipase to catalyze the transesterification reaction. HPLC and ESI-MS analysis proved the presence of a mixture of acylated products as a result of the chemical complexity of fructans in the A. tequilana. The ESI-MS spectra showed a molecular mass shift between 183 and 366g/mol for fructooligosaccharides with a DP lower than 6, which indicated the presence of Agave fructans that had been mono- and diacylated with lauric acid. The carbohydrate fatty acid esters (CFAE) obtained showed good emulsifying properties in W/O emulsions.

  4. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27678176

  5. Pharmaceutical, cosmeceutical, and traditional applications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdul Bakrudeen Ali; Adel, Mohaddeseh; Karimi, Pegah; Peidayesh, Mahvash

    2014-01-01

    Marine carbohydrates are most important organic molecules made by photosynthetic organisms. It is very essential for humankind: the role in being an energy source for the organism and they are considered as an important dissolve organic compound (DOC) in marine environment's sediments. Carbohydrates found in different marine environments in different concentrations. Polysaccharides of carbohydrates play an important role in various fields such as pharmaceutical, food production, cosmeceutical, and so on. Marine organisms are good resources of nutrients, and they are rich carbohydrate in sulfated polysaccharide. Seaweeds (marine microalgae) are used in different pharmaceutical industries, especially in pharmaceutical compound production. Seaweeds have a significant amount of sulfated polysaccharides, which are used in cosmeceutical industry, besides based on the biological applications. Since then, traditional people, cosmetics products, and pharmaceutical applications consider many types of seaweed as an important organism used in food process. Sulfated polysaccharides containing seaweed have potential uses in the blood coagulation system, antiviral activity, antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, immunomodulating activity, antilipidepic activity, etc. Some species of marine organisms are rich in polysaccharides such as sulfated galactans. Various polysaccharides such as agar and alginates, which are extracted from marine organisms, have several applications in food production and cosmeceutical industries. Due to their high health benefits, compound-derived extracts of marine polysaccharides have various applications and traditional people were using them since long time ago. In the future, much attention is supposed to be paid to unraveling the structural, compositional, and sequential properties of marine carbohydrate as well. PMID:25300548

  6. Pharmaceutical, cosmeceutical, and traditional applications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdul Bakrudeen Ali; Adel, Mohaddeseh; Karimi, Pegah; Peidayesh, Mahvash

    2014-01-01

    Marine carbohydrates are most important organic molecules made by photosynthetic organisms. It is very essential for humankind: the role in being an energy source for the organism and they are considered as an important dissolve organic compound (DOC) in marine environment's sediments. Carbohydrates found in different marine environments in different concentrations. Polysaccharides of carbohydrates play an important role in various fields such as pharmaceutical, food production, cosmeceutical, and so on. Marine organisms are good resources of nutrients, and they are rich carbohydrate in sulfated polysaccharide. Seaweeds (marine microalgae) are used in different pharmaceutical industries, especially in pharmaceutical compound production. Seaweeds have a significant amount of sulfated polysaccharides, which are used in cosmeceutical industry, besides based on the biological applications. Since then, traditional people, cosmetics products, and pharmaceutical applications consider many types of seaweed as an important organism used in food process. Sulfated polysaccharides containing seaweed have potential uses in the blood coagulation system, antiviral activity, antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, immunomodulating activity, antilipidepic activity, etc. Some species of marine organisms are rich in polysaccharides such as sulfated galactans. Various polysaccharides such as agar and alginates, which are extracted from marine organisms, have several applications in food production and cosmeceutical industries. Due to their high health benefits, compound-derived extracts of marine polysaccharides have various applications and traditional people were using them since long time ago. In the future, much attention is supposed to be paid to unraveling the structural, compositional, and sequential properties of marine carbohydrate as well.

  7. Synthesis of carbohydrate-scaffolded thymine glycoconjugates to organize multivalency

    PubMed Central

    Ciuk, Anna K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multivalency effects are essential in carbohydrate recognition processes as occurring on the cell surface. Thus many synthetic multivalent glycoconjugates have been developed as important tools for glycobiological research. We are expanding this collection of molecules by the introduction of carbohydrate-scaffolded divalent glycothymine derivatives that can be intramolecularily dimerized by [2 + 2] photocycloaddition. Thus, thymine functions as a control element that allows to restrict the conformational flexibility of the scaffolded sugar ligands and thus to “organize” multivalency. With this work we add a parameter to multivalency studies additional to valency. PMID:26124869

  8. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  9. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  10. Programmable Supramolecular Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Daan; de Greef, Tom F A; Meijer, E W

    2015-07-13

    Living large: Rational design of self-assembly pathways has been demonstrated in supramolecular polymers. By controlling the concentration of an aggregation-competent monomer through intramolecular interactions, living supramolecular polymerization conditions were achieved. This universal approach can be used to obtain aggregates of well-defined length and narrow dispersity, and allows access to new supramolecular polymer architectures. PMID:26095705

  11. Polymerized and functionalized triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a new method for polymerizing epoxidized triglycerides with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the ...

  12. Computational studies of polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.

    Polymeric systems involving polyelectrolytes in surfaces and interfaces, semiflexible polyelectrolytes and biopolymers in solution, complex polymeric systems that had applications in nanotechnology were modeled using coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation. In the area of polyelectrolytes in surfaces and interfaces, the phenomena of polyelectrolyte adsorption at oppositely charge surface was investigated. Simulations found that short range van der Waals interaction was a major factor in determining morphology and thickness of the adsorbed layer. Hydrophobic polyelectrolytes adsorbed in hydrophobic surfaces tend to be the most effective in forming multi-layers because short range attraction enhances the adsorption process. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes could move freely along the surface which was in contrast to polyelectrolyte brushes. The morphologies of hydrophobic polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated and simulations found that brushes had different morphologies depending on the strength of the short range monomer-monomer attraction, electrostatic interaction and counterion condensation. Planar polyelectrolyte brushes formed: (1) vertically oriented cylindrical aggregates, (2) maze-like aggregate structures, or (3) thin polymeric layer covering a substrate. While, the spherical polyelectrolyte brushes could be in any of the previous morphologies or be in a micelle-like conformation with a dense core and charged corona. In the area of biopolymers and semiflexible polyelectrolytes in solution, simulations demonstrated that the bending rigidity of these polymers was scale-dependent. The bond-bond correlation function describing a chain's orientational memory could be approximated by a sum of two exponential functions manifesting the existence of the two characteristic length scales. The existence of the two length scales challenged the current practice of describing chain stretching experiments using a single length scale. In the field of nanotechnology

  13. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G; Huang, Johnny X; Butler, Mark S; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F; Roper, David I; Lloyd, Adrian J; Dowson, Christopher G; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  14. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G.; Huang, Johnny X.; Butler, Mark S.; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Lloyd, Adrian J.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  15. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  16. Carbohydrate composition of compost during composting and mycelium growth of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2014-01-30

    Changes of plant cell wall carbohydrate structures occurring during the process to make suitable compost for growth of Agaricus bisporus are unknown. In this paper, composition and carbohydrate structures in compost samples collected during composting and mycelium growth were analyzed. Furthermore, different extracts of compost samples were prepared with water, 1M and 4M alkali and analyzed. At the beginning of composting, 34% and after 16 days of mycelium growth 27% of dry matter was carbohydrates. Carbohydrate composition analysis showed that mainly cellulose and poorly substituted xylan chains with similar amounts and ratios of xylan building blocks were present in all phases studied. Nevertheless, xylan solubility increased 20% over the period of mycelium growth indicating partial degradation of xylan backbone. Apparently, degradation of carbohydrates occurred over the process studied by both bacteria and fungi, mainly having an effect on xylan-chain length and solubility.

  17. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  18. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  19. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... in fiber: Canned and dried beans, such as kidney beans, black beans, pinto beans, black-eyed peas, split ... crackers Beans and legumes, such as black beans, kidney beans, and garbanzo beans Vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels ...

  20. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Look for terms such as: Corn sweetener Corn syrup High-fructose corn syrup Dextrose Fructose Glucose Lactose Maltose Sucrose Honey Sugar Brown sugar Invert sugar Molasses Malt syrup Syrup You also should limit the amount of ...

  1. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... syrup If you are thinking about using a sugar substitute, you may wonder if they are safe. The ... with nutrients, such as fruits and vegetables. Some sugar substitutes you can buy include: Aspartame (say: ASS-per- ...

  2. Producing ORMOSIL scaffolds by femtosecond laser polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radu, C.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Mustaciosu, C.; Petcu, I.; Radu, M.; Dinescu, M.

    2012-07-01

    Structures with different geometries and sizes were built via direct femtosecond laser writing, starting from new organic/inorganic hybrid monomers based on hybrid methacrylate containing triethoxysilane, in addition to urethane and urea groups. Multifunctional oligomer of urethane dimethacrylate type was chosen as comonomer in polymerization experiments because dimethacrylates give rise to the formation of a polymer network, having a number of favorable properties including biocompatibility and surface nanostructuring. Free standing polymeric structures were designed and created in order to be tested in fibroblast cells culture. Investigations of the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and viability of L929 mouse fibroblasts on free-standing laser processed scaffolds were performed for different scaffold designs.

  3. Polymeric materials science in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents some interesting possibilities for the study of polymer science. Properties of polymeric materials depend heavily on their processing history and environment. Thus, there seem to be some potentially interesting and useful new materials that could be developed. The requirements for studying polymeric materials are in general much less rigorous than those developed for studying metals, for example. Many of the techniques developed for working with other materials, including heat sources, thermal control hardware and noncontact temperature measurement schemes should meet the needs of the polymer scientist.

  4. Polymerization of rod-like macromolecular monomers studied by stopped-flow, multiangle light scattering: set-up, data processing, and application to fibrin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bernocco, S; Ferri, F; Profumo, A; Cuniberti, C; Rocco, M

    2000-01-01

    Many biological supramolecular structures are formed by polymerization of macromolecular monomers. Light scattering techniques can provide structural information from such systems, if suitable procedures are used to collect the data and then to extract the relevant parameters. We present an experimental set-up in which a commercial multiangle laser light scattering photometer is linked to a stopped-flow mixer, allowing, in principle, the time-resolved extrapolation of the weight-average molecular weight M(w) and of the z-average square radius of gyration (z) of the polymers from Zimm-like plots. However, if elongated structures are formed as the polymerization proceeds, curved plots rapidly arise, from which M(w) and (z) cannot be recovered by linear fitting. To verify the correctness of a polynomial fitting procedure, polydisperse collections of rod-like or worm-like particles of different lengths, generated at various stages during bifunctional polycondensations of rod-like macromolecular monomers, were considered. Then, the angular dependence of their time-averaged scattered intensity was calculated in the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation, with random and systematic noise also added to the data. For relatively narrow size distributions, a third-degree polynomial fitting gave satisfactory results across a broad range of conversion degrees, yielding M(w) and (z) values within 2% and no greater than 10-20%, respectively, of the calculated values. When more broad size distributions were analyzed, the procedure still performed well for semiflexible polymers, but started to seriously underestimate both M(w) and (z) when rigid rod-like particles were analyzed, even at relatively low conversion degrees. The data were also analyzed in the framework of the Casassa approximation, from which the mass per unit length of the polymers can be derived. These procedures were applied to a set of data taken on the early stages of the thrombin

  5. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-01

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed. PMID:15853323

  6. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-01

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed.

  7. Characterization of carbohydrate-protein matrices for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yankun; Roos, Yrjö H

    2011-05-01

    Amorphous carbohydrates may show glass transition and crystallization as a result of thermal or water plasticization. Proteins often affect the state transitions of carbohydrates in carbohydrate-protein systems. Water sorption behavior and effects of water on glass transition and crystallization in freeze-dried lactose, trehalose, lactose-casein (3: 1), lactose-soy protein isolate (3:1), trehalose-casein (3:1), and trehalose-soy protein isolate (3:1) systems were studied. Water sorption was determined gravimetrically as a function of time, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) models were fitted to the experimental data. Glass transition temperature (T(g)) and instant crystallization temperature (T(ic)) in anhydrous and water plasticized systems were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The Gordon-Taylor equation was used to model water content dependence of the T(g) values. The critical water content and water activity (a(w)) at 24 °C were calculated and crystallization of lactose and trehalose in the systems was followed at and above 0.54 a(w). Carbohydrate-protein systems showed higher amounts of sorbed water and less rapid sugar crystallization than pure sugars. A greater sugar crystallization delay was found in carbohydrate-casein systems than in carbohydrate-soy protein isolate systems. The T(g) and T(ic) values decreased with increasing water content and a(w). However, higher T(ic) values for lactose-protein systems were found than for lactose at the same a(w). Trehalose showed lower T(ic) value than lactose at 0.44 a(w) but no instant crystallization was measured below 0.44 a(w). State diagrams for each system are useful in selecting processing parameters and storage conditions in nutrient delivery applications. PMID:22417357

  8. Polymerized nano-curcumin attenuates neurological symptoms in EAE model of multiple sclerosis through down regulation of inflammatory and oxidative processes and enhancing neuroprotection and myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, Maryam; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood; Javan, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of central nervous system (CNS). Polyphenol curcumin has been used in traditional medicine as an effective drug for a variety of diseases. Different formulations of curcumin are introduced to increase its stability and effectiveness. Here we have examined the effect of polymerized form of nano-curcumin (PNC) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as an animal model of MS. EAE was induced in female Lewis rats and PNC or curcumin was daily administrated intraperitonealy from day 12-29 post immunization. When the prophylactic effect of PNC was under investigation, rats received PNC from the first day of immunization. Treatment with PNC resulted in decreased scores of disease in therapeutic and prophylactic administration when compared with control group. Staining by luxol fast blue and H&E and immuno-staining of lumbar spinal cord cross sections, confirmed a significant decrease in the amounts of demyelination, inflammation and BBB breaking down. Gene expression studies in lumbar spinal cord showed a corrected balance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes expression, decreased oxidative stress, improved remyelination and increased progenitor cell markers after treatment with PNC. Our results demonstrated an efficient therapeutic effect of PNC as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress agent, with significant effects on the EAE scores and myelin repair mechanisms.

  9. Rapid start-up of the anammox process: Effects of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances on the activity of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Sihui; Lian, Jing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yunman; Song, Yuanyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the rapid start-up of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) strategy by inoculating different biomass ratios of denitrifying granular sludge and anammox bacteria. The results demonstrated that two reactors (R1 and R2) were rapidly and successfully started-up on days 25 and 28, respectively, with nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) of 0.70kg/(m(3)·d) and 0.72kg/(m(3)·d) at biomass ratios of 10:1 (R1) and 50:1 (R2). The explanation for rapid start-up was found by examining the effect of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the activity of anammox bacteria in the batch experiments. Batch experiments results first demonstrated that the denitrification sludge EPS (DS-EPS) enhanced the anammox bacteria activity the most, and NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N removal rates were 1.88- and 1.53-fold higher than the control with optimal DS-EPS volume of 10mL. The rapid start-up strategy makes possible the application of anammox to practical engineering. PMID:27612401

  10. Preoperative Oral Carbohydrate Loading in Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kum-Hee; Kim, So-Young; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Overnight fasting before elective surgery has been the routine to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. Recently, several international guidelines for preoperative fasting recommend to intake carbohydrate-containing fluids up to 2 to 3 hours before the induction of anesthesia to improve postoperative recovery. Based on the recommendations, we developed a "preoperative carbohydrate diet" provided for the preoperative patients. The purpose of this case report is to share our experience of applying preoperative carbohydrate loading prior to surgery. PMID:27482525

  11. [Molecular/polymeric magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    New materials were synthesized to test the generality of magnetism in molecular/polymeric systems. The first room temperature molecular based magnet V(TCNE)[sub x][center dot]y(solvent) (1) is disclosed. The ferromagnetic and related transitions were studied in decamethylferrocenium tetracyanoethanide (TCNE), (1), and related materials. Our and others' models were tested for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange between local sites; models for control of [Tc] were also tested.

  12. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  13. Polymeric Bicontinuous Microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Frank S.; Maurer, Wayne W.; Lipic, Paul M.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Mortensen, Kell; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Lodge, Timothy P.

    1997-08-01

    High molecular weight block copolymers can be viewed as macromolecular surfactants when blended with thermodynamically incompatible homopolymers. This Letter describes the formation of polymeric bicontinuous microemulsions in mixtures containing a model diblock copolymer and two homopolymers. Although we attribute development of this equilibrium morphology to the effects of fluctuations, mean-field theory provides a quantitative strategy for preparing the bicontinuous state at blend compositions near an isotropic Lifshitz point.

  14. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Knoch, Eva; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/) involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development. PMID:24966860

  15. Carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta.

    PubMed

    Hespell, R B; Canale-Parola, E

    1970-07-01

    The pathways of carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta, a free-living, strictly anaerobic spirochete, were studied. The organism fermented glucose to ethyl alcohol, acetate, lactate, CO(2), and H(2). Assays of enzymatic activities in cell extracts, and determinations of radioactivity distribution in products formed from (14)C-labeled glucose indicated that S. stenostrepta degraded glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The spirochete utilized a clostridial-type clastic reaction to metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, CO(2), and H(2), without production of formate. Acetyl-coenzyme A was converted to ethyl alcohol by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-coenzyme A. Hydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were detected in cell extracts. A rubredoxin was isolated from cell extracts of S. stenostrepta. Preparations of this rubredoxin stimulated acetyl phosphate formation from pyruvate by diethylaminoethyl cellulose-treated extracts of S. stenostrepta, an indication that rubredoxin may participate in pyruvate cleavage by this spirochete. Nutritional studies showed that S. stenostrepta fermented a variety of carbohydrates, but did not ferment amino acids or other organic acids. An unidentified growth factor present in yeast extract was required by the organism. Exogenous supplements of biotin, riboflavin, and vitamin B(12) were either stimulatory or required for growth. PMID:5423371

  16. Thrombin interaction with fibrin polymerization sites.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, K

    1997-05-15

    Thrombin is central to hemostasis, and postclotting fibrinolysis and wound healing. During clotting, thrombin transforms plasma fibrinogen into polymerizing fibrin, which selectively adsorbs the enzyme into the clot. This protects thrombin from heparin-antithrombin inactivation, thus preserving the enzyme for postclotting events. To determine how the fibrin N-terminal polymerization sites of A alpha 17-23 (GPRVVER) and B beta 15-25 (GHRPLDKKREE) and their analogs may interact with thrombin, amidolysis vs. plasma- and fibrinogen-clotting assays were used to differentiate blockade of catalytic site vs. other thrombin domains. Amidolysis studies suggest GPRVVER inhibition of thrombin catalytic site through hydrophobic interaction, and GPRVVER inhibited clotting. Neither GPRP nor VVER nor the B beta 15-25 homologs inhibited amidolysis. Contrary to heparin, acyl-DKKREE promoted plasma-clotting, but inhibited fibrinogen-clotting. In addition, acyl-DKKREE reversed the anticoagulant effect of heparin (0.1 U/ml) in plasma. The results suggest fibrin B beta 15-25 interaction with thrombin, possibly by blocking the heparin-binding site. Together with the reported fibrin A alpha 27-50 binding to thrombin, polymerizing fibrin appears to initially bind to thrombin catalytic site and exosite-1 through A alpha 17-50, and to another thrombin site through B beta 15-25. As these fibrin sites are also involved in polymerization, competition of the polymerization process with thrombin-binding could subsequently dislodge thrombin from fibrin alpha-chain. This may re-expose the catalytic site and exosite-1, thus explaining the thrombogenicity of clot-bound thrombin. The implications of these findings in polymerization mechanism and anticoagulant design are discussed.

  17. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  18. Catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents for Stetter reaction with enones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin; Xing, Chong; Tiwari, Bhoopendra; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2013-06-01

    We disclose the first catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents to generate acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophilic units for a Stetter reaction. The activation involves N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage of carbohydrates via a retro-benzoin-type process to generate the acyl anion intermediates. This Stetter reaction constitutes the first success in generating formal formaldehyde-derived acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophiles for non-self-benzoin processes. The renewable nature of carbohydrates, accessible from biomass, further highlights the practical potential of this fundamentally interesting catalytic activation.

  19. Towards complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates by enzyme mixtures for protein enrichment: A modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Loman, Abdullah Al; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    Soy protein is a well-known nutritional supplement in proteinaceous food and animal feed. However, soybeans contain complex carbohydrate. Selective carbohydrate removal by enzymes could increase the protein content and remove the indigestibility of soy products for inclusion in animal feed. Complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates is challenging due to the presence of proteins and different types of non-structural polysaccharides. This study is designed to guide complex enzyme mixture required for hydrolysis of all types of soy flour carbohydrates. Enzyme broths from Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus aculeatus and Trichoderma reesei fermentations were evaluated in this study for soy carbohydrate hydrolysis. The resultant hydrolysate was measured for solubilized carbohydrate by both total carbohydrate and reducing sugar analyses. Conversion data attained after 48h hydrolysis were first fitted with models to determine the maximum fractions of carbohydrate hydrolyzable by each enzyme group, i.e., cellulase, xylanase, pectinase and α-galactosidase. Kinetic models were then developed to describe the increasing conversions over time under different enzyme activities and process conditions. The models showed high fidelity in predicting soy carbohydrate hydrolysis over broad ranges of soy flour loading (5-25%) and enzyme activities: per g soy flour, cellulase, 0.04-30 FPU; xylanase, 3.5-618U; pectinase, 0.03-120U; and α-galactosidase, 0.01-60U. The models are valuable in guiding the development and production of optimal enzyme mixtures toward hydrolysis of all types of carbohydrates present in soy flour and in optimizing the design and operation of hydrolysis reactor and process.

  20. Hot-embossed polymeric optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Choon-Gi; Kim, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Pil; Ahn, Seung-Ho

    2004-10-01

    Polymer waveguides have attracted a great deal of attention for their potential applications as optical components in optical communications, optical interconnections and optical sensors because they are easy to manufacture at a low temperature, and they have a low processing cost. Hot embossing is powerful and effective tools to produce a large volume of waveguides and structure high-precision micro/nano patterns of thin polymer films using a stamp for optical applications. In this work, fabrication techniques of hot embossed polymeric optical waveguides for parallel optical interconnection module, multi-channel variable optical attenuator and optical printed circuit boards are demonstrated. The single- and multi-mode waveguides are produced by core filling and UV curing processes. New approaches to fabricating single-mode polymeric waveguides with the high thermal stability in thermosetting polymers and two-dimensional multi-mode polymeric waveguides for high-density parallel optical interconnections as well as a simultaneous fabrication of single-mode polymeric waveguides with micro pedestals for passive fiber alignment are also reported.

  1. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates and Method Relating Thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Claire, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared, This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches. adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrates; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  2. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  3. Mechanistic insights into the distribution of carbohydrate clusters on cell membranes revealed by dSTORM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e., galectins) cross-linking their specific carbohydrate ligands. Our results clarify the organizational mechanism of carbohydrates on cell surfaces from their formation, stable existence and size-restriction, which promotes a better understanding of the relationship between the function and distribution of carbohydrates, as well as the structure of cell membranes.Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results. PMID:25669546

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  7. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  8. Determining a carbohydrate profile for Hansenula polymorpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of the levels of carbohydrates in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha required the development of new analytical procedures. Existing fractionation and analytical methods were adapted to deal with the problems involved with the lysis of whole cells. Using these new procedures, the complete carbohydrate profiles of H. polymorpha and selected mutant strains were determined and shown to correlate favourably with previously published results.

  9. Industrial applications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Prasad N; Aisverya, S; Nithya, R; Vijayalakshmi, K

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used increasingly in various fields, such as drug delivery, imaging, and tissue engineering. The main reason justifying the widespread use of biomaterials relies on its valuable and low-cost source of new drugs. Current research goals are focused on identifying more potent and specific compounds with antitumor, immunomodulatory, antihyperlipidemic, anticoagulant, and antiviral activities. The increasing knowledge of structural analysis and chemical modifications enables the use of these marine carbohydrates in a newer way for the human welfare. This chapter focuses on the recent developments related to industrial and biomedical applications using chitin, chitosan, alginate, agar, and carrageenan derivatives and reports the main advances published over the last 10-15 years.

  10. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  11. Polymerization Evaluation by Spectrophotometric Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunach, Jaume

    1985-01-01

    Discusses polymerization evaluation by spectrophotometric measurements by considering: (1) association degrees and molar absorptivities; (2) association degrees and equilibrium constants; and (3) absorbance and equilibrium constants. (JN)

  12. A functional carbohydrate chip platform for analysis of carbohydrate-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    A carbohydrate chip based on glass or other transparent surfaces has been suggested as a potential tool for high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we proposed a facile, efficient, and cost-effective method whereby diverse carbohydrate types are modified in a single step and directly immobilized onto a glass surface, with retention of functional orientation. We modified various types of carbohydrates by reductive amination, in which reducing sugar groups were coupled with 4-(2-aminoethyl)aniline, which has di-amine groups at both ends. The modified carbohydrates were covalently attached to an amino-reactive NHS-activated glass surface by formation of stable amide bonds. This proposed method was applied for efficient construction of a carbohydrate microarray to analyze carbohydrate-protein interactions. The carbohydrate chip prepared using our method can be successfully used in diverse biomimetic studies of carbohydrates, including carbohydrate-biomolecule interactions, and carbohydrate sensor chip or microarray development for diagnosis and screening.

  13. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  14. Different allocation of carbohydrates and phenolics in dehydrated leaves of triticale.

    PubMed

    Hura, Tomasz; Dziurka, Michał; Hura, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Kinga

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrates are used in plant growth processes, osmotic regulation and secondary metabolism. A study of the allocation of carbohydrates to a target set of metabolites during triticale acclimation to soil drought was performed. The study included a semi-dwarf cultivar 'Woltario' and a long-stemmed cultivar 'Moderato', differing in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus under optimum growth conditions. Differences were found in the quantitative and qualitative composition of individual carbohydrates and phenolic compounds, depending on the developmental stage and water availability. Soluble carbohydrates in the semi-dwarf 'Woltario' cv. under soil drought were utilized for synthesis of starch, soluble phenolic compounds and an accumulation of cell wall carbohydrates. In the typical 'Moderato' cv., soluble carbohydrates were primarily used for the synthesis of phenolic compounds that were then incorporated into cell wall structures. Increased content of cell wall-bound phenolics in 'Moderato' cv. improved the cell wall tightness and reduced the rate of leaf water loss. In 'Woltario' cv., the increase in cell osmotic potential due to an enhanced concentration of carbohydrates and proline was insufficient to slow down the rate of leaf water loss. The mechanism of cell wall tightening in response to leaf desiccation may be the main key in the process of triticale acclimation to soil drought. PMID:27450489

  15. Different allocation of carbohydrates and phenolics in dehydrated leaves of triticale.

    PubMed

    Hura, Tomasz; Dziurka, Michał; Hura, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Kinga

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrates are used in plant growth processes, osmotic regulation and secondary metabolism. A study of the allocation of carbohydrates to a target set of metabolites during triticale acclimation to soil drought was performed. The study included a semi-dwarf cultivar 'Woltario' and a long-stemmed cultivar 'Moderato', differing in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus under optimum growth conditions. Differences were found in the quantitative and qualitative composition of individual carbohydrates and phenolic compounds, depending on the developmental stage and water availability. Soluble carbohydrates in the semi-dwarf 'Woltario' cv. under soil drought were utilized for synthesis of starch, soluble phenolic compounds and an accumulation of cell wall carbohydrates. In the typical 'Moderato' cv., soluble carbohydrates were primarily used for the synthesis of phenolic compounds that were then incorporated into cell wall structures. Increased content of cell wall-bound phenolics in 'Moderato' cv. improved the cell wall tightness and reduced the rate of leaf water loss. In 'Woltario' cv., the increase in cell osmotic potential due to an enhanced concentration of carbohydrates and proline was insufficient to slow down the rate of leaf water loss. The mechanism of cell wall tightening in response to leaf desiccation may be the main key in the process of triticale acclimation to soil drought.

  16. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  17. Broad-scale predictability of carbohydrates and exopolymers in Antarctic and Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Graham J C; Aslam, Shazia N; Michel, Christine; Niemi, Andrea; Norman, Louiza; Meiners, Klaus M; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Paterson, Harriet; Thomas, David N

    2013-09-24

    Sea ice can contain high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), much of which is carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microalgae and bacteria inhabiting the ice. Here we report the concentrations of dissolved carbohydrates (dCHO) and dissolved EPS (dEPS) in relation to algal standing stock [estimated by chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations] in sea ice from six locations in the Southern and Arctic Oceans. Concentrations varied substantially within and between sampling sites, reflecting local ice conditions and biological content. However, combining all data revealed robust statistical relationships between dCHO concentrations and the concentrations of different dEPS fractions, Chl a, and DOC. These relationships were true for whole ice cores, bottom ice (biomass rich) sections, and colder surface ice. The distribution of dEPS was strongly correlated to algal biomass, with the highest concentrations of both dEPS and non-EPS carbohydrates in the bottom horizons of the ice. Complex EPS was more prevalent in colder surface sea ice horizons. Predictive models (validated against independent data) were derived to enable the estimation of dCHO concentrations from data on ice thickness, salinity, and vertical position in core. When Chl a data were included a higher level of prediction was obtained. The consistent patterns reflected in these relationships provide a strong basis for including estimates of regional and seasonal carbohydrate and dEPS carbon budgets in coupled physical-biogeochemical models, across different types of sea ice from both polar regions.

  18. Photothermal determination of thermal diffusivity and polymerization depth profiles of polymerized dental resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The degree and depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin have been studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consisted of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic gold layer was deposited, thus guaranteeing full opacity. Purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles were used. Thermal depth profiles were obtained by heating the gold coating with a modulated laser beam and by performing a frequency scan. Prior to each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue light emitted diode (LED). Due to the highly light dispersive nature of dental resins, the polymerization process depends strongly on optical absorption of the blue light, thereby inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusivity profile in the sample. A robust depth profilometric method for reconstructing the thermal diffusivity depth dependence on degree and depth of polymerization has been developed. The thermal diffusivity depth profile was linked to the polymerization kinetics.

  19. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  20. Intrinsic Embedded Sensors for Polymeric Mechatronics: Flexure and Force Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jentoft, Leif P.; Dollar, Aaron M.; Wagner, Christopher R.; Howe, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    While polymeric fabrication processes, including recent advances in additive manufacturing, have revolutionized manufacturing, little work has been done on effective sensing elements compatible with and embedded within polymeric structures. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of two important sensing modalities for embedding in polymeric mechatronic and robotic mechanisms: multi-axis flexure joint angle sensing utilizing IR phototransistors, and a small (12 mm), three-axis force sensing via embedded silicon strain gages with similar performance characteristics as an equally sized metal element based sensor. PMID:24573310

  1. Thermally and photoinduced polymerization of ultrathin sexithiophene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Anke; Hammer, Rene; Duncker, Klaus; Förster, Stefan; Widdra, Wolf

    2014-09-14

    The thermally-induced polymerization of α-sexithiophene (6T) molecules on Ag(001) and Au(001) gives rise to long unbranched polymer chains or branched polymer networks depending on the annealing parameters. There, the onset temperature for polymerization depends on the strength of interaction with the underlying substrate. Similar polymerization processes are also induced by ultraviolet radiation with photon energies between 3.0 and 4.2 eV. Radical formation by an electronic excitation in the 6T molecule is proposed as the driving mechanism that necessitates the interplay with the metallic substrate.

  2. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

  3. Intrinsic embedded sensors for polymeric mechatronics: flexure and force sensing.

    PubMed

    Jentoft, Leif P; Dollar, Aaron M; Wagner, Christopher R; Howe, Robert D

    2014-02-25

    While polymeric fabrication processes, including recent advances in additive manufacturing, have revolutionized manufacturing, little work has been done on effective sensing elements compatible with and embedded within polymeric structures. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of two important sensing modalities for embedding in polymeric mechatronic and robotic mechanisms: multi-axis flexure joint angle sensing utilizing IR phototransistors, and a small (12 mm), three-axis force sensing via embedded silicon strain gages with similar performance characteristics as an equally sized metal element based sensor.

  4. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  5. Gold-promoted styrene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Juan; Hormigo, A Jesús; de Frémont, Pierre; Nolan, Steven P; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Pérez, Pedro J

    2008-02-14

    Styrene can be polymerized at room temperature in the presence of equimolar mixtures of the gold(III) complexes (NHC)AuBr3 (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene ligand) and NaBAr'4, in the first example of a gold-induced olefin polymerization reaction.

  6. Cooperative polymerization of one-patch colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Munaò, Gianmarco; Preisler, Zdeněk; Sciortino, Francesco

    2014-04-14

    We numerically investigate cooperative polymerization in an off-lattice model based on a pairwise additive potential using particles with a single attractive patch that covers 30% of the colloid surface. Upon cooling, these particles self-assemble into small clusters which, below a density-dependent temperature, spontaneously reorganize into long straight tubes. We evaluate the partition functions of clusters of all sizes to provide an accurate description of the chemical reaction constants governing this process. Our calculations show that, for intermediate sizes, the partition functions retain contributions from two different structures, differing in both energy and entropy. We illustrate the microscopic mechanism behind the complex polymerization process in this system and provide a detailed evaluation of its thermodynamics.

  7. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies. PMID:20585681

  8. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  9. Complex carbohydrates: the science and the label.

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    This conference resulted in a foundation upon which consensus will be built in the future. Further, it provided a forum for the articulation of the critical need for carbohydrates in human nutrition. We have come a long way in the past 25 years in the food and nutrition sciences and this conference well illustrated that point. At the White House Conference on Nutrition in 1969, macronutrients were never even mentioned as being necessary to nutrition; only micronutrients were emphasized. In 1977 the term complex carbohydrate was used without definition in the Dietary Goals for the United States. This conference encapsulated the tremendous strides that have been made concerning the chemical, nutritional, biologic, and physiologic importance of carbohydrates in health and disease. It is fascinating to review the recommendations concerning complex carbohydrate from 1977 on. Recommendations were made by the Senate Select Committee in 1977; the Dietary Guidelines of 1980, 1985, and 1990; the Surgeon General's report of 1979 and 1988; the 10th edition of Recommended Dietary Allowances; the 1989 National Academy of Sciences Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk; the 1991 FDA proposal for labeling; and the 1992 Food Guide Pyramid. Indeed, as Dr. Joanne Slavin pointed out, "there is a wide range of consensus that increased complex carbohydrate is consistent with good health," and certainly as Dr. Gary Henderson said, "the term complex carbohydrate has equity with consumers." With this level of apparent clarity it is difficult at first to identify a problem for the food label. After all, if consumer health would benefit, why not simply do it? However, a problem does exist in that carbohydrates may be classified chemically in groups that are difficult to analyze and to define as to their physiologic function in the body. Indeed, complex carbohydrates defined by chain length may have molecular structures less complex than those of smaller units and may

  10. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies.

  11. Elimination of oxidative degradation during the per-O-methylation of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ciucanu, Ionel; Costello, Catherine E

    2003-12-31

    The possible oxidative degradation mechanism occurring during the per-O-methylation of carbohydrates in dimethyl sulfoxide with methyl iodide in the presence of base is described. Evidence is presented that this process occurs only under anhydrous conditions when there is a long reaction time between the carbohydrate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and methyl iodide, followed by reaction with the base. Under these specific conditions, the oxidative degradation of alditols, and cyclic carbohydrates, with and without a free hemiacetal group, is observed. The reaction between carbohydrate and methyl iodide in dimethyl sulfoxide can result in a complete oxidative degradation depending on the type of carbohydrate and the time of reaction. The oxidative degradation can be accelerated by replacing methyl iodide with dimethyl sulfate. Mass spectrometric identification of the degradation products of d-glucitol indicates simultaneous oxidation processes at all the hydroxyl groups, with site dependent rates of their reactivity. This oxidative process is not a characteristic of the methylation of carbohydrates in dimethyl sulfoxide with methyl iodide in the presence of solid sodium hydroxide and can be totally avoided by treating the carbohydrate with powdered sodium hydroxide before introduction of methyl iodide under nonanhydrous conditions, or by adding a trace of water in dimethyl sulfoxide before methyl iodide, or by using N,N-dimethylacetamide as the solvent. The degradation of the per-O-methylated carbohydrates in the liquid-liquid extraction process is also taken into account, and it is found that the degradation process can be avoid by neutralization of the base before extraction, by using benzene or tetrachloromethane as extraction solvent, and by drying the final organic extract.

  12. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzuarregui, Ana Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Rodríguez, Jorge; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  13. Carbohydrate feeding and exercise: effect of beverage carbohydrate content.

    PubMed

    Murray, R; Seifert, J G; Eddy, D E; Paul, G L; Halaby, G A

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ingesting fluids of varying carbohydrate content upon sensory response, physiologic function, and exercise performance during 1.25 h of intermittent cycling in a warm environment (Tdb = 33.4 degrees C). Twelve subjects (7 male, 5 female) completed four separate exercise sessions; each session consisted of three 20 min bouts of cycling at 65% VO2max, with each bout followed by 5 min rest. A timed cycling task (1200 pedal revolutions) completed each exercise session. Immediately prior to the first 20 min cycling bout and during each rest period, subjects consumed 2.5 ml.kg BW-1 of water placebo (WP), or solutions of 6%, 8%, or 10% sucrose with electrolytes (20 mmol.l-1 Na+, 3.2 mmol.l-1 K+). Beverages were administered in double blind, counterbalanced order. Mean (+/- SE) times for the 1200 cycling task differed significantly: WP = 13.62 +/- 0.33 min, *6% = 13.03 +/- 0.24 min, 8% = 13.30 +/- 0.25 min, 10% = 13.57 +/- 0.22 min (* = different from WP and 10%, P less than 0.05). Compared to WP, ingestion of the CHO beverages resulted in higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and higher RER values during the final 20 min of exercise (P less than 0.05). Markers of physiologic function and sensory perception changed similarly throughout exercise; no differences were observed among subjects in response to beverage treatments for changes in plasma concentrations of lactate, sodium, potassium, for changes in plasma volume, plasma osmolality, rectal temperature, heart rate, oxygen uptake, rating of perceived exertion, or for indices of gastrointestinal distress, perceived thirst, and overall beverage acceptance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Ruthenium Olefin Metathesis Catalysts Bearing Carbohydrate-Based N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

    PubMed Central

    Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts containing carbohydrate-derived NHCs from glucose and galactose were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. 2D-NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ru-C (benzylidene) rotamers at RT and the rate of rotation was measured using magnetization transfer and VT-NMR spectroscopy. The catalysts were found to be effective at ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), ring closing metathesis (RCM), cross metathesis (CM), and asymmetric ring opening cross metathesis (AROCM) and showed surprising selectivity in both CM and AROCM. PMID:21603126

  15. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  16. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  17. Stereoselective synthesis of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide-conjugated carbohydrates for glycoarray fabrication and evaluation of structural effects on protein binding by SPR imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingquan; Norberg, Oscar; Uppalapati, Suji; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2014-01-01

    A series of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide (PFPA)-conjugated carbohydrate structures have been synthesized and applied to glycoarray fabrication. The glycoconjugates were structurally varied with respect to anomeric attachment, S-, and O-linked carbohydrates, respectively, as well as linker structure and length. Efficient stereoselective synthetic routes were developed, leading to the formation of the PFPA-conjugated structures in good yields over few steps. The use of glycosyl thiols as donors proved especially efficient and provided the final compounds in up to 70% total yield with high anomeric purities. PFPA-based photochemistry was subsequently used to generate carbohydrate arrays on a polymeric surface, and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was applied for evaluation of carbohydrate-protein interactions using the plant lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) as a probe. The results indicate better performance and equal efficiency of S- and O-linked structures with intermediate linker length. PMID:21423935

  18. Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-based micro scale materials are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study produced carbohydrate-based micro scale tubular materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The isolated carbohydrates wer...

  19. Micro-scale prediction method for API-solubility in polymeric matrices and process model for forming amorphous solid dispersion by hot-melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Bochmann, Esther S; Neumann, Dirk; Gryczke, Andreas; Wagner, Karl G

    2016-10-01

    A new predictive micro-scale solubility and process model for amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) by hot-melt extrusion (HME) is presented. It is based on DSC measurements consisting of an annealing step and a subsequent analysis of the glass transition temperature (Tg). The application of a complex mathematical model (BCKV-equation) to describe the dependency of Tg on the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)/polymer ratio, enables the prediction of API solubility at ambient conditions (25°C). Furthermore, estimation of the minimal processing temperature for forming ASDs during HME trials could be defined and was additionally confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction data. The suitability of the DSC method was confirmed with melt rheological trials (small amplitude oscillatory system). As an example, ball milled physical mixtures of dipyridamole, indomethacin, itraconazole and nifedipine in poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinylacetate) (copovidone) and polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer (Soluplus®) were used.

  20. Nucleated polymerization with secondary pathways II. Determination of self-consistent solutions to growth processes described by non-linear master equations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Samuel I. A.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleated polymerisation processes are involved in many growth phenomena in nature, including the formation of cytoskeletal filaments and the assembly of sickle hemoglobin and amyloid fibrils. Closed form rate equations have, however, been challenging to derive for these growth phenomena in cases where secondary nucleation processes are active, a difficulty exemplified by the highly non-linear nature of the equation systems that describe monomer dependent secondary nucleation pathways. We explore here the use of fixed point analysis to provide self-consistent solutions to such growth problems. We present iterative solutions and discuss their convergence behaviour. We establish a range of closed form results for linear growth processes, including the scaling behaviours of the maximum growth rate and of the reaction end-point. We further show that a self-consistent approach applied to the master equation of filamentous growth allows the determination of the evolution of the shape of the length distribution including the mean, the standard deviation and the mode. Our results demonstrate the power of fixed-point approaches in finding closed form self-consistent solutions to growth problems characterised by highly non-linear master equations. PMID:21842955

  1. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  2. Final Technical Report - Commercially Important Carbohydrate Diacids - Building Blocks from Renewable Carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kiely, Donald E.

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of this project was to develop oxidation methods appropriate for the conversion of agriculturally derived simple sugars to their corresponding diacids (aldaric acids) for use as biobased chemical building blocks for new biodegradable polymers and other materials. Principal target diacids were D-glucaric, meso-xylaric, D-mannaric and L-arabinaric acid, each to be prepared by nitric acid oxidation of the naturally occurring precursor carbohydrates (monosaccharides) D-glucose, D-xylose, D-mannose and L-arabinose, respectively, all from hydrolysis of naturally abundant plant polysaccharides. These conversions were to be designed for scale up to a level suitable for transfer first to a pilot plant scale, and then to an industrial plant scale. The core of the project involved a comprehensive study of the title oxidation employing a computer controlled reactor. The plan of action involved defining experimental parameters to allow for control of the oxidations with considerable precision and reproducibility. The prototype oxidations were typically run using ca. 0.75 molar amounts of carbohydrate, with a goal of eventually doubling the reaction size when appropriate reaction parameters were established. During the course of the funding period for this grant, the fundamentals of reaction control were established for oxidation of D-glucose, a critical component of the project given the exothermic character of the reaction. The reactions were monitored using a reliable GC/MS protocol. The glucose to glucaric acid conversion represented the most important and potentially highest value conversion. During the grant period we were able to establish one workable system to carry out the glucose to glucaric acid conversion, but were not able to optimize the process or establish a protocol that was satisfactory for a scale up to a pilot plant scale. However, the work carried out showed the possibility that with appropriate innovation and continued effort, a

  3. Template free synthesis of natural carbohydrates functionalised fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Berenjian, Aydin; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Template-assisted synthesis is one of the most recognised techniques for fabrication of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). However, this process is time consuming, toxic and expensive. In this study, the authors report a completely novel approach for the green and facile synthesis of AgNCs using Matricaria chamomilla, without any additional template. Fluorescent and colloidally stable AgNCs with average particle size of 2.4 nm were successfully produced. They found that carbohydrates from Matricaria chamomilla act as an ideal template to generate fluorescent AgNCs. Moreover, oxygen-bearing functional groups were validated to be the active groups for anchoring and reducing of Ag(+) ions. The novel carbohydrate coating method makes the prepared nanoclusters completely hydrophilic and stable in aqueous matrices. PMID:27256890

  4. Template free synthesis of natural carbohydrates functionalised fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Berenjian, Aydin; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Template-assisted synthesis is one of the most recognised techniques for fabrication of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). However, this process is time consuming, toxic and expensive. In this study, the authors report a completely novel approach for the green and facile synthesis of AgNCs using Matricaria chamomilla, without any additional template. Fluorescent and colloidally stable AgNCs with average particle size of 2.4 nm were successfully produced. They found that carbohydrates from Matricaria chamomilla act as an ideal template to generate fluorescent AgNCs. Moreover, oxygen-bearing functional groups were validated to be the active groups for anchoring and reducing of Ag(+) ions. The novel carbohydrate coating method makes the prepared nanoclusters completely hydrophilic and stable in aqueous matrices.

  5. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores.

  6. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores. PMID:26553494

  7. Dietary Carbohydrates and Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) affect a large number of children throughout the world. Carbohydrates (which provide the majority of calories consumed in the Western diet) have been implicated both as culprits for the etiology of symptoms and as potential therapeutic agents (e.g., fiber) in childhood FGIDs. In this review, we detail how carbohydrate malabsorption may cause gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., bloating) via the physiologic effects of both increased osmotic activity and increased gas production from bacterial fermentation. Several factors may play a role, including: (1) the amount of carbohydrate ingested; (2) whether ingestion is accompanied by a meal or other food; (3) the rate of gastric emptying (how quickly the meal enters the small intestine); (4) small intestinal transit time (the time it takes for a meal to enter the large intestine after first entering the small intestine); (5) whether the meal contains bacteria with enzymes capable of breaking down the carbohydrate; (6) colonic bacterial adaptation to one's diet, and (7) host factors such as the presence or absence of visceral hypersensitivity. By detailing controlled and uncontrolled trials, we describe how there is a general lack of strong evidence supporting restriction of individual carbohydrates (e.g., lactose, fructose) for childhood FGIDs. We review emerging evidence suggesting that a more comprehensive restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) may be effective. Finally, we review how soluble fiber (a complex carbohydrate) supplementation via randomized controlled intervention trials in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders has demonstrated efficacy. PMID:27355647

  8. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhhammer, J.; Zens, M.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Seifert, A.; Woias, P.

    2015-02-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations.

  9. Carbohydrate drinks and cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Bacharach, D W; von Duvillard, S P; Rundell, K W; Meng, J; Cring, M R; Szmedra, L; Castle, J M

    1994-06-01

    We compared the effects of similarly tasting orange flavored drinks containing 0% (P), 6.4% (E1), and 10% (E2) carbohydrate (CHO) using 12 well-trained cyclists (VO2max = 5.0 l/min-1) on metabolic responses to exercise (EX) and a sprint type performance ride (PR). Each subject completed 3 separate 2 h EX bouts at 65% VO2max followed by a PR identified as the time in sec to complete 500 revolutions at a constant belt resistance of 29.4 N (ANOVA*). The CHO feedings or placebo of 3 ml/kg body weight were given double blind and counter-balanced at 0 min and every 20 min thereafter during EX. Blood samples were drawn and core temperature (Tr) was recorded at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of EX and 1 min post PR. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose (G) and lactate [LA-]. Blood G at 0 min were similar; however, at 120 min, G was 3.96 mM for P*, 4.57 mM for E1, and 4.77 mM for E2. Blood [LA-] remained similar throughout EX averaging (P, 2.6 mM; E1, 2.9 mM; E2, 2.5 mM). Tr at 120 min was also similar (P, 38.5 degrees C; E1, 38.6 degrees C; E2, 38.3 degrees C). Mean PR times for P(264.4 s)**, E1 (255.3 s)*, E2 (252.4 s)* indicate consumption of a CHO drink during EX improves PR. Furthermore, a 10% CHO drink improves PR more than a 6.4% CHO drink.

  10. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  11. Poly-amido-saccharides: synthesis via anionic polymerization of a β-lactam sugar monomer.

    PubMed

    Dane, Eric L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    Enantiopure poly-amido-saccharides (PASs) with a defined molecular weight and narrow dispersity are synthesized using an anionic ring-opening polymerization of a β-lactam sugar monomer. The PASs have a previously unreported main chain structure that is composed of pyranose rings linked through the 1- and 2-positions by an amide with α-stereochemistry. The monomer is synthesized in one-step from benzyl-protected D-glucal and polymerized using mild reaction conditions to give degrees of polymerization ranging from 25 to >120 in high yield. Computational modeling reveals how the monomer's structure and steric bulk affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of polymerization. Protected and deprotected polymers and model compounds are characterized using a variety of methods (NMR, GPC, IR, DLS, etc.). On the basis of circular dichroism, the deprotected polymer possesses a regular secondary structure in aqueous solution, which agrees favorably with the prediction of a helical structure using molecular modeling. Furthermore, we provide evidence suggesting that the polymers bind the lectin concanavalin A at the same site as natural carbohydrates, showing the potential of these polymers to mimic natural polysaccharides. PASs offer the advantages associated with synthetic polymers, such as greater control over structure and derivitization. At the same time, they preserve many of the structural features of natural polysaccharides, such as a stereochemically regular, rigid pyranose backbone, that make natural carbohydrate polymers important materials both for their unique properties and useful applications.

  12. Effects of aeration intensity on formation of phenol-fed aerobic granules and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Lee, Duu-Jong; Lai, J Y

    2007-11-01

    Effect of air aeration intensities on granule formation and extracellular polymeric substances content in three identical sequential batch reactors were investigated. The excitation-emission-matrix spectra and multiple staining and confocal laser scanning microscope revealed proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, and humic substances in the sludge and granule samples. Seed sludge flocs were compacted at low aeration rate, with produced extracellular polymeric substances of 50.2-76.7 mg g(-1) of proteins, 50.2-77.3 mg g(-1) carbohydrates and 74 mg g(-1) humic substances. High aeration rate accelerated formation of 1.0-1.5 mm granules with smooth outer surface. The corresponding quantities of extracellular polymeric substances were 309-537 mg g(-1) of proteins, 61-109 mg g(-1) carbohydrates, 49-92 mg g(-1) humic substances, and 49-68 mg g(-1) lipids. Intermediate aeration rate produced 3.0-3.5 mm granules with surface filaments. Reactor failure occurred with overgrowth of filaments, probably owing to the deficiency of nutrient in liquid phase. No correlation was noted between extracellular polymeric substances composition and the proliferation of filamentous microorganisms on granule surface.

  13. Production of monodisperse, polymeric microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Rhim, Won-Kyu (Inventor); Hyson, Michael T. (Inventor); Chang, Manchium (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Very small, individual polymeric microspheres with very precise size and a wide variation in monomer type and properties are produced by deploying a precisely formed liquid monomer droplet, suitably an acrylic compound such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate into a containerless environment. The droplet which assumes a spheroid shape is subjected to polymerizing radiation such as ultraviolet or gamma radiation as it travels through the environment. Polymeric microspheres having precise diameters varying no more than plus or minus 5 percent from an average size are recovered. Many types of fillers including magnetic fillers may be dispersed in the liquid droplet.

  14. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-07-01

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 1010. The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and

  15. Hierarchical Nanowires Synthesized by Supramolecular Stepwise Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zeliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Jiaping; Gao, Liang; Yang, Chaoying; Wang, Liquan; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-09-26

    The self-organization of pre-assembled aggregates is an efficient stepwise strategy for fabricating nanostructures with a second level of hierarchy. Herein, we report that anisotropic spindle-like micelles, self-assembled from polypeptide graft copolymers with rigid backbones, can serve as ideal pre-assembled subunits for constructing one-dimensional materials with hierarchical structures. By adding organic solvents and dialyzing against water, reactive points can be generated at the ends of the spindle-like micelles, which subsequently drive the anisotropic micelles to grow as rods in a chain and eventually self-assemble into hierarchical nanowires in a stepwise manner. The second self-assembly step is a hierarchical process that resembles step polymerization. Hierarchical structures can be precisely synthesized by this new type of polymerization. These nanostructures can be tailored by the activity of the reactive points, which depends on the nature of the solvent and the molecular architecture. PMID:27604499

  16. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide.

  17. Simultaneous covalent and noncovalent hybrid polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Yu, Tao; Palmer, Liam C.; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent and supramolecular polymers are two distinct forms of soft matter, composed of long chains of covalently and noncovalently linked structural units, respectively. We report a hybrid system formed by simultaneous covalent and supramolecular polymerizations of monomers. The process yields cylindrical fibers of uniform diameter that contain covalent and supramolecular compartments, a morphology not observed when the two polymers are formed independently. The covalent polymer has a rigid aromatic imine backbone with helicoidal conformation, and its alkylated peptide side chains are structurally identical to the monomer molecules of supramolecular polymers. In the hybrid system, covalent chains grow to higher average molar mass relative to chains formed via the same polymerization in the absence of a supramolecular compartment. The supramolecular compartments can be reversibly removed and re-formed to reconstitute the hybrid structure, suggesting soft materials with novel delivery or repair functions.

  18. Simultaneous covalent and noncovalent hybrid polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Yu, Tao; Palmer, Liam C; Schatz, George C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-01-29

    Covalent and supramolecular polymers are two distinct forms of soft matter, composed of long chains of covalently and noncovalently linked structural units, respectively. We report a hybrid system formed by simultaneous covalent and supramolecular polymerizations of monomers. The process yields cylindrical fibers of uniform diameter that contain covalent and supramolecular compartments, a morphology not observed when the two polymers are formed independently. The covalent polymer has a rigid aromatic imine backbone with helicoidal conformation, and its alkylated peptide side chains are structurally identical to the monomer molecules of supramolecular polymers. In the hybrid system, covalent chains grow to higher average molar mass relative to chains formed via the same polymerization in the absence of a supramolecular compartment. The supramolecular compartments can be reversibly removed and re-formed to reconstitute the hybrid structure, suggesting soft materials with novel delivery or repair functions. PMID:26823427

  19. Probing the Energy Level Alignment and the Correlation with Open-Circuit Voltage in Solution-Processed Polymeric Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Dan; Li, Ho-Wa; Cheng, Yuanhang; Guan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Taili; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2016-03-23

    Energy level alignment at the organic donor and acceptor interface is a key to determine the photovoltaic performance in organic solar cells, but direct probing of such energy alignment is still challenging especially for solution-processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin films. Here we report a systematic investigation on probing the energy level alignment with different approaches in five commonly used polymer:[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) BHJ systems. We find that by tuning the weight ratio of polymer to PCBM the electronic features from both polymer and PCBM can be obtained by photoemission spectroscopy. Using this approach, we find that some of the BHJ blends simply follow vacuum level alignment, but others show strong energy level shifting as a result of Fermi level pinning. Independently, by measuring the temperature-dependent open-circuit voltage (VOC), we find that the effective energy gap (Eeff), the energy difference between the highest occupied molecular orbital of the polymer donor (EHOMO-D) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the PCBM acceptor (ELUMO-A), obtained by photoemission spectroscopy in all polymer:PCBM blends has an excellent agreement with the extrapolated VOC at 0 K. Consequently, the photovoltage loss of various organic BHJ photovoltaic devices at room temperature is in a range of 0.3-0.6 V. It is believed that the demonstrated direct measurement approach of the energy level alignment in solution-processed organic BHJ will bring deeper insight into the origin of the VOC and the corresponding photovoltage loss mechanism in organic photovoltaic cells. PMID:26926667

  20. Probing the Energy Level Alignment and the Correlation with Open-Circuit Voltage in Solution-Processed Polymeric Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Dan; Li, Ho-Wa; Cheng, Yuanhang; Guan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Taili; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2016-03-23

    Energy level alignment at the organic donor and acceptor interface is a key to determine the photovoltaic performance in organic solar cells, but direct probing of such energy alignment is still challenging especially for solution-processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin films. Here we report a systematic investigation on probing the energy level alignment with different approaches in five commonly used polymer:[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) BHJ systems. We find that by tuning the weight ratio of polymer to PCBM the electronic features from both polymer and PCBM can be obtained by photoemission spectroscopy. Using this approach, we find that some of the BHJ blends simply follow vacuum level alignment, but others show strong energy level shifting as a result of Fermi level pinning. Independently, by measuring the temperature-dependent open-circuit voltage (VOC), we find that the effective energy gap (Eeff), the energy difference between the highest occupied molecular orbital of the polymer donor (EHOMO-D) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the PCBM acceptor (ELUMO-A), obtained by photoemission spectroscopy in all polymer:PCBM blends has an excellent agreement with the extrapolated VOC at 0 K. Consequently, the photovoltage loss of various organic BHJ photovoltaic devices at room temperature is in a range of 0.3-0.6 V. It is believed that the demonstrated direct measurement approach of the energy level alignment in solution-processed organic BHJ will bring deeper insight into the origin of the VOC and the corresponding photovoltage loss mechanism in organic photovoltaic cells.

  1. Carbohydrate degrading polypeptide and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Roubos, Johannes Andries; Los, Alrik Pieter

    2015-10-20

    The invention relates to a polypeptide having carbohydrate material degrading activity which comprises the amino acid sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or an amino acid sequence encoded by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1 or SEQ ID NO: 4, or a variant polypeptide or variant polynucleotide thereof, wherein the variant polypeptide has at least 96% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the variant polynucleotide encodes a polypeptide that has at least 96% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2. The invention features the full length coding sequence of the novel gene as well as the amino acid sequence of the full-length functional protein and functional equivalents of the gene or the amino acid sequence. The invention also relates to methods for using the polypeptide in industrial processes. Also included in the invention are cells transformed with a polynucleotide according to the invention suitable for producing these proteins.

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  3. Supported polymeric liquid membranes for wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. A class of membrane has been developed called supported polymeric liquid membranes capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. These membranes are prepared by filling the pores of microfiltration or ultrafiltration membranes with polymeric (oligomeric) liquids having affinity for the organic compounds of interest. With this approach, membrane`s separation characteristics are decoupled from its mechanical stability and depend primarily on the chemical properties of the liquid polymer used. As a result, membranes of diverse separation capabilities can be conveniently prepared using liquid polymers possessing the appropriate functional groups. Physical properties typical of polymeric liquids such as high viscosity, extremely low volatility and insolubility in water contribute to the observed stability of the membranes under broad operating conditions. This membrane process has been successfully applied to several aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the early development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids. Feasibility testings were initially carried out with flat sheet membranes in a small stirred cell. Scaleup was then conducted using hollow fiber membranes, first with small modules prepared in the laboratory, then with a much larger commercial module. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid.

  4. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-08-21

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 10(10). The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of protein binding to a sialoside-based carbohydrate microarray.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring multiple biological interactions in a multiplexed array format has numerous advantages. However, converting well-developed surface chemistry for spectroscopic measurements to array-based, high-throughput screening is not a trivial process and often proves to be the bottleneck in method development. This chapter reports the fabrication and characterization of a new carbohydrate microarray with synthetic sialosides for surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Contact printing of functional sialosides on neutravidin-coated surfaces was carried out and the properties of the resulting elements were characterized by fluorescence microscopy. Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) was used for testing on four different carbohydrate-functionalized surfaces and differential binding was analyzed. Multiplexed detection of SNA/biotinylated sialoside interactions on arrays up to 400 elements has been performed with good data correlation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the biotin-neutravidin-based biointerface to control probe orientation for reproducible and efficient protein binding to carbohydrates.

  6. Carbohydrate Cluster Microarrays Fabricated on 3-Dimensional Dendrimeric Platforms for Functional Glycomics Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xichun; Turchi, Craig; Wang, Denong

    2009-01-01

    We reported here a novel, ready-to-use bioarray platform and methodology for construction of sensitive carbohydrate cluster microarrays. This technology utilizes a 3-dimensional (3-D) poly(amidoamine) starburst dendrimer monolayer assembled on glass surface, which is functionalized with terminal aminooxy and hydrazide groups for site-specific coupling of carbohydrates. A wide range of saccharides, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides of diverse structures, are applicable for the 3-D bioarray platform without prior chemical derivatization. The process of carbohydrate coupling is effectively accelerated by microwave radiation energy. The carbohydrate concentration required for microarray fabrication is substantially reduced using this technology. Importantly, this bioarray platform presents sugar chains in defined orientation and cluster configurations. It is, thus, uniquely useful for exploration of the structural and conformational diversities of glyco-epitope and their functional properties. PMID:19791771

  7. Recent Developments in Synthetic Carbohydrate-Based Diagnostics, Vaccines, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-07-20

    Glycans are everywhere in biological systems, being involved in many cellular events with important implications for medical purposes. Building upon a detailed understanding of the functional roles of carbohydrates in molecular recognition processes and disease states, glycans are increasingly being considered as key players in pharmacological research. On the basis of the important progress recently made in glycochemistry, glycobiology, and glycomedicine, we provide a complete overview of successful applications and future perspectives of carbohydrates in the biopharmaceutical and medical fields. This review highlights the development of carbohydrate-based diagnostics, exemplified by glycan imaging techniques and microarray platforms, synthetic oligosaccharide vaccines against infectious diseases (e.g., HIV) and cancer, and finally carbohydrate-derived therapeutics, including glycomimetic drugs and glycoproteins.

  8. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples.

  9. In vivo release kinetics of octreotide acetate from experimental polymeric microsphere formulations using oil/water and oil/oil processes.

    PubMed

    Murty, Santos B; Wei, Qui; Thanoo, B C; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize the in vivo release kinetics of octreotide acetate from microsphere formulations designed to minimize peptide acylation and improve drug stability. Microspheres were prepared by a conventional oil/water (o/w) method or an experimental oil/oil (o/o) dispersion technique. The dosage forms were administered subcutaneously to a rat animal model, and serum samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay over a 2-month period. An averaged kinetic profile from each treatment group, as a result, was treated with fractional differential equations. The results indicated that poly(l-lactide) microspheres prepared by the o/o dispersion technique provided lower area under the curve (AUC) values during the initial diffusion-controlled release phase, 7.79 ngxd/mL, versus 75.8 ngxd/mL for the o/w batch. During the subsequent erosion-controlled release phase, on the other hand, the o/o technique yielded higher AUC values, 123 ngxd/mL, versus 42.2 ngxd/mL for the o/w batch. The differences observed between the 2 techniques were attributed to the site of drug incorporation during the manufacturing process, given that microspheres contain both porous hydrophilic channels and dense hydrophobic matrix regions. An o/o dispersion technique was therefore expected to produce microspheres with lower incorporation in the aqueous channels, which are responsible for diffusion-mediated drug release.

  10. The effects of moderate exercise on secretory IgA production in mice depends on dietary carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Takumi; Kaburagi, Tomoko; Nagai, Ryoji; Oshiro, Satoru

    2015-07-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) is produced from intestinal mucosa and is essential in preventing infection. We analyzed the influence of moderate exercise on intestinal sIgA production and antioxidative function under different carbohydrate nutritional conditions. Thirty-six mice were fed an experimental diet for 10 weeks-a high-carbohydrate (HC) diet, a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet, or a control (C) diet. After 1 week on the experimental diets, mice were divided into sedentary and exercise groups (n = 6/group), where the exercise consisted of treadmill running for 30 min/day at 11 m/min for 6 days/week in 9 consecutive weeks. Intestinal sIgA levels in the exercise groups fed C or LC diets were significantly lower compared with the parallel sedentary groups, or exercise-group mice fed HC diet. Expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in the small intestine was significantly higher in the exercise group fed a HC diet. Superoxide dismutase activity in the small intestine was higher in the exercise group than in the sedentary group, with no effects resulting from intake carbohydrate levels. Our results indicated that moderate exercise reduced the levels of intestinal sIgA depending on decreasing of carbohydrate intake, which is connected with the expression of pIgR. PMID:26236100

  11. Some novel polymeric nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mark, James E

    2006-12-01

    The nanocomposites described here all involve polymers and were chosen because they are already of commercial importance, show some promise of becoming so, or simply seem interesting. The field is so broad that some topics are mentioned only very briefly, and there is considerable emphasis on the polysiloxane nanocomposites studied by the author's research group. Some are typically prepared using techniques very similar to those used in the new sol-gel approach to ceramics, with either the polymer or the ceramic being the continuous phase. Other dispersed phases include particles responsive to an applied magnetic field, intercalated or exfoliated platelets obtained from clays, mica, or graphite, silsesquioxane nanocages, nanotubes, dual fillers, porous particles, spherical and ellipsoidal polymeric particles, and nanocatalysts. Also described are some typical studies involving theory or simulations on such particle reinforcement. Experiments on ceramics modified by dispersed polymers are equally interesting, but there is less relevant theory. Many of the fields mentioned have become so vast that the approach taken here is simply to describe general approaches and characteristics of the composites, list some specific examples, and provide leading references (with some emphasis on studies that are relatively recent or in the nature of reviews).

  12. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  13. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles. PMID:16430253

  14. Carbohydrate Level and Growth of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gent, Martin P. N.

    1984-01-01

    To what extent can the influence of environment on greenhouse tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) be explained by a linear response of the growth rate to carbohydrate level? To answer this question, young tomato plants were transplanted in January and March and grown for one-month periods under natural light either with or without CO2 enrichment to 1000 microliters per liter and either under a constant minimum temperature of 15°C or a minimum temperature that fluctuated between 20°C for 12 hours including the photoperiod and 10°C for the remaining 12 hours. The carbohydrate levels were measured for plants under all growth conditions at several times in the diurnal cycle. At the average irradiance in January, 2.3 megajoules per square meter per day, plants under CO2 enrichment grew 15% faster and had, on average, total nonstructural carbohydrate levels 27 milligrams per gram greater and soluble carbohydrates 3 milligrams per gram greater at all hours of the day than did plants grown under ambient CO2. Plants grown under fluctuating diurnal temperature grew slightly faster and had total nonstructural carbohydrate levels on average 8 milligrams per gram greater than plants grown under a more constant temperature. At the average irradiance in March-April, 4.3 megajoules per square meter per day, growth and carbohydrate level increased with CO2 enrichment under the control temperature regime but not under fluctuating temperatures. Plants in all growth regimens grew faster than in January. Over all plantings and growth regimens, relative growth rates were more highly correlated to total nonstructural carbohydrate levels than they were to irradiance, CO2, or temperature. PMID:16663908

  15. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  16. Characterization of bovine kappa-casein fractions and the kinetics of chymosin-induced macropeptide release from carbohydrate-free and carbohydrate-containing fractions determined by high-performance gel-permeation chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, H J; Visser, S; Slangen, C J; Van Riel, J A

    1986-01-01

    Bovine kappa-casein was fractionated at pH 8.0 on DEAE-Sepharose with an NaCl gradient, followed by DEAE-cellulose chromatography using a decreasing pH gradient from pH 6.0 to 4.5. At least ten components could be identified, each differing in N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and/or phosphorus content. Two components appeared to be multiply-phosphorylated, but did not contain NeuAc. The possible significance of this finding in relation to the mode of phosphorylation and glycosylation in vivo is discussed. A carbohydrate-free fraction as well as two NeuAc-containing fractions were compared in their substrate behaviour towards the action of the milk-clotting enzyme chymosin at pH 6.6 and 30 degrees C. To this end the trichloroacetic acid-soluble reaction products were analysed by high-performance gel-permeation chromatography. In order of increasing carbohydrate content the kcat. values found ranged from 40 to 25 s-1 and the Km values from 9 to 3 microM; the overall substrate properties of these components as reflected by the kinetic parameter kcat./Km ranged from 5 to 8 microM-1 X S-1. Irreversible polymerization of the carbohydrate-free fraction brought about a more-than-2-fold increase in Km, the kcat. value remaining virtually constant. The kcat./Km found for the cleavage of whole kappa-casein at pH 6.6 was of the same magnitude as the kcat./Km found for the polymerized carbohydrate-free fraction (i.e. about 3 microM-1 X S-1). No indication of substrate inhibition was found for the carbohydrate-free fraction. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3103611

  17. Interfacial polymerization of conductive polymers: Generation of polymeric nanostructures in a 2-D space.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Panagiotis; Georgakilas, Vasilios

    2015-10-01

    In the recent advances in the field of conductive polymers, the fibrillar or needle shaped nanostructures of polyaniline and polypyrrole have attracted significant attention due to the potential advantages of organic conductors that exhibit low-dimensionality, uniform size distribution, high crystallinity and improved physical properties compared to their bulk or spherically shaped counterparts. Carrying the polymerization reaction in a restricted two dimensional space, instead of the three dimensional space of the one phase solution is an efficient method for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures with narrow size distribution and small diameter. Ultra-thin nanowires and nanofibers, single crystal nanoneedles, nanocomposites with noble metals or carbon nanotubes and layered materials can be efficiently synthesized with high yield and display superior performance in sensors and energy storage applications. In this critical review we will focus not only on the interfacial polymerization methods that leads to polymeric nanostructures and composites and their properties, but also on the mechanism and the physico-chemical processes that govern the diffusion and reactivity of molecules and nanomaterials at an interface. Recent advances for the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with an interfacial method for energy storage applications and future perspectives are presented. PMID:26272721

  18. Interfacial polymerization of conductive polymers: Generation of polymeric nanostructures in a 2-D space.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Panagiotis; Georgakilas, Vasilios

    2015-10-01

    In the recent advances in the field of conductive polymers, the fibrillar or needle shaped nanostructures of polyaniline and polypyrrole have attracted significant attention due to the potential advantages of organic conductors that exhibit low-dimensionality, uniform size distribution, high crystallinity and improved physical properties compared to their bulk or spherically shaped counterparts. Carrying the polymerization reaction in a restricted two dimensional space, instead of the three dimensional space of the one phase solution is an efficient method for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures with narrow size distribution and small diameter. Ultra-thin nanowires and nanofibers, single crystal nanoneedles, nanocomposites with noble metals or carbon nanotubes and layered materials can be efficiently synthesized with high yield and display superior performance in sensors and energy storage applications. In this critical review we will focus not only on the interfacial polymerization methods that leads to polymeric nanostructures and composites and their properties, but also on the mechanism and the physico-chemical processes that govern the diffusion and reactivity of molecules and nanomaterials at an interface. Recent advances for the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with an interfacial method for energy storage applications and future perspectives are presented.

  19. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process.

  20. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process. PMID:25684634

  1. Low-carbohydrate diets and performance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad M; Haub, Mark D

    2007-07-01

    Athletes are continually searching for means to optimize their performance. Within the past 20 years, athletes and scientists have reported or observed that consuming a carbohydrate-restricted diet may improve performance. The original theories explaining the purported benefits centered on the fact that fat oxidation increases, thereby "sparing" muscle glycogen. More recent concepts that explain the plausibility of the ergogenicity of low-carbohydrate, or high-fat, diets on exercise performance pertain to an effect similar to altitude training. We and others have observed that although fat oxidation may be increased, the ability to maintain high-intensity exercise (above the lactate threshold) seems to be compromised or at least indifferent when compared with consumption of more carbohydrate. That said, clinical studies clearly demonstrate that ad libitum low-carbohydrate diets elicit greater decreases in body weight and fat than energy-equivalent low-fat diets, especially over a short duration. Thus, although low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets appear detrimental or indifferent relative to performance, they may be a faster means to achieve a more competitive body composition.

  2. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  3. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000.

  4. Extracellular polymeric substances of bacteria and their potential environmental applications.

    PubMed

    More, T T; Yadav, J S S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-11-01

    Biopolymers are considered a potential alternative to conventional chemical polymers because of their ease of biodegradability, high efficiency, non-toxicity and non-secondary pollution. Recently, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, biopolymers produced by the microorganisms) have been recognised by many researchers as a potential flocculent for their applications in various water, wastewater and sludge treatment processes. In this context, literature information on EPS is widely dispersed and is very scarce. Thus, this review marginalizes various studies conducted so far about EPS nature-production-recovery, properties, environmental applications and moreover, critically examines future research needs and advanced application prospective of the EPS. One of the most important aspect of chemical composition and structural details of different moieties of EPS in terms of carbohydrates, proteins, extracellular DNA, lipid and surfactants and humic substances are described. These chemical characteristics of EPS in relation to formation and properties of microbial aggregates as well as degradation of EPS in the matrix (biomass, flocs etc) are analyzed. The important engineering properties (based on structural characteristics) such as adsorption, biodegradability, hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of EPS matrix are also discussed in details. Different aspects of EPS production process such as bacterial strain maintenance; inoculum and factors affecting EPS production were presented. The important factors affecting EPS production include growth phase, carbon and nitrogen sources and their ratio, role of other nutrients (phosphorus, micronutrients/trace elements, and vitamins), impact of pH, temperature, metals, aerobic versus anaerobic conditions and pure and mixed culture. The production of EPS in high concentration with high productivity is essential due to economic reasons. Therefore, the knowledge about all the aspects of EPS production (listed above) is highly

  5. Extracellular polymeric substances of bacteria and their potential environmental applications.

    PubMed

    More, T T; Yadav, J S S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-11-01

    Biopolymers are considered a potential alternative to conventional chemical polymers because of their ease of biodegradability, high efficiency, non-toxicity and non-secondary pollution. Recently, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, biopolymers produced by the microorganisms) have been recognised by many researchers as a potential flocculent for their applications in various water, wastewater and sludge treatment processes. In this context, literature information on EPS is widely dispersed and is very scarce. Thus, this review marginalizes various studies conducted so far about EPS nature-production-recovery, properties, environmental applications and moreover, critically examines future research needs and advanced application prospective of the EPS. One of the most important aspect of chemical composition and structural details of different moieties of EPS in terms of carbohydrates, proteins, extracellular DNA, lipid and surfactants and humic substances are described. These chemical characteristics of EPS in relation to formation and properties of microbial aggregates as well as degradation of EPS in the matrix (biomass, flocs etc) are analyzed. The important engineering properties (based on structural characteristics) such as adsorption, biodegradability, hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of EPS matrix are also discussed in details. Different aspects of EPS production process such as bacterial strain maintenance; inoculum and factors affecting EPS production were presented. The important factors affecting EPS production include growth phase, carbon and nitrogen sources and their ratio, role of other nutrients (phosphorus, micronutrients/trace elements, and vitamins), impact of pH, temperature, metals, aerobic versus anaerobic conditions and pure and mixed culture. The production of EPS in high concentration with high productivity is essential due to economic reasons. Therefore, the knowledge about all the aspects of EPS production (listed above) is highly

  6. Polymeric materials for neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVolder, Ross John

    Revascularization therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to treat various acute and chronic wounds, cardiovascular diseases, and tissue defects. It is common to either administer proangiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or transplant cells that endogenously express multiple proangiogenic factors. Additionally, these strategies utilize a wide variety of polymeric systems, including hydrogels and biodegradable plastics, to deliver proangiogenic factors in a sophisticated manner to maintain a sustained proangiogenic environment. Despite some impressive results in rebuilding vascular networks, it is still a challenging task to engineer mature and functional neovessels in target tissues, because of the increasing complexities involved with neovascularization applications. To resolve these challenges, this work aims to design a wide variety of proangiogenic biomaterial systems with tunable properties used for neovascularization therapies. This thesis describes the design of several biomaterial systems used for the delivery of proangiogenic factors in neovascularization therapies, including: an electrospun/electrosprayed biodegradable plastic patch used for directional blood vessel growth (Chapter 2), an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system that biochemically stimulates cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 3), an enzyme-catalyzed alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system for VEGF delivery (Chapter 4), an enzyme-activated alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system with systematically controllable electrical and mechanical properties (Chapter 5), and an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel that enables the decoupled control of electrical conductivity and mechanical rigidity and is use to electrically stimulate cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 6). Overall, the biomaterial systems developed in this thesis will be broadly useful for improving the quality of a wide array of molecular and cellular based

  7. Effect of polymerization techniques on vertical dimension and tooth position in complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Slaviero, Thiago V S; Simon, Gabriel H P; Tagliari, Ivânio; Busato, Priscila M R; Sinhoreti, Mario A C; Camilotti, Veridiana; Mendonça, Marcio J

    2011-01-01

    Due to the changes in the composition and processing of acrylic resins, it seems appropriate to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods about the alteration of occlusal vertical dimension and the horizontal positioning of artificial teeth of total dentures. For this, 64 specimens were made, simulating a maxillary total denture waxed from a standard maxillary denture. The experimental samples were divided into two groups: Group 1 - The resins were submitted to polymerization in a hot water bath, Group 2 - The same resins were submitted to poly-merization by microwave energy. The samples were measured horizontally and vertically before and after the polymerization process. Based on the results, it can be concluded that there was no statistically significant difference between the conventional polymerization method and the polymerization method by microwave, related to the stability of occlusal vertical dimension and horizontal positioning of artificial teeth on the specimens evaluated.

  8. Self-Propagating Frontal Polymerization in Water at Ambient Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olten, Nesrin; Kraigsley, Alison; Ronney, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in polymer chemistry have led to the development of monomers and initiation agents that enable propagating free-radical polymerization fronts to exist. These fronts are driven by the exothermicity of the polymerization reaction and the transport of heat from the polymerized product to the reactant monomer/solvent/initiator solution. The thermal energy transported to the reactant solution causes the initiator to decompose, yielding free radicals, which start the free radical polymerization process as discussed in recent reviews. The use of polymerization processes based on propagating fronts has numerous applications. Perhaps the most important of these is that it enables rapid curing of polymers without external heating since the polymerization process itself provides the high temperatures necessary to initiate and sustain polymerization. This process also enables more uniform curing of arbitrarily thick samples since it does not rely on heat transfer from an external source, which will necessarily cause the temperature history of the sample to vary with distance from the surface according to a diffusion-like process. Frontal polymerization also enables filling and sealing of structures having cavities of arbitrary shape without having to externally heat the structure. Water at atmospheric pressure is most convenient solvent to employ and the most important for practical applications (because of the cost and environmental issues associated with DMSO and other solvents). Nevertheless, to our knowledge, steady, self-propagating polymerization fronts have not been reported in water at atmospheric pressure. Currently, polymerization fronts require a high boiling point solvent (either water at high pressures or an alternative solvent such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (boiling point 189 C at atmospheric pressure.) Early work on frontal polymerization, employed pressures up to 5000 atm in order to avoid boiling of the monomer/solvent/initiator solution. High

  9. Bouncing scalar field cosmology in the polymeric minisuperspace picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, B.; Nozari, K.; Hosseinzadeh, V.; Gorji, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study a cosmological setup consisting of a FRW metric as the background geometry with a massless scalar field in the framework of classical polymerization of a given dynamical system. To do this, we first introduce the polymeric representation of the quantum operators. We then extend the corresponding process to reach a transformation which maps any classical variable to its polymeric counterpart. It is shown that such a formalism has also an analogue in terms of the symplectic structure, i.e. instead of applying polymerization to the classical Hamiltonian to arrive its polymeric form, one can use a new set of variables in terms of which Hamiltonian retains its form but now the corresponding symplectic structure gets a new deformed functional form. We show that these two methods are equivalent and by applying them to the scalar field FRW cosmology see that the resulting scale factor exhibits a bouncing behavior from a contraction phase to an expanding era. Since the replacing of the big bang singularity by a bouncing behavior is one of the most important predictions of the quantum cosmological theories, we may claim that our polymerized classical model brings with itself some signals from quantum theory.

  10. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  11. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years. PMID:25927900

  12. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:25300547

  13. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We reviewmore » the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.« less

  14. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  15. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  16. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  17. One-Pot Conversion of Carbohydrates into Furan Derivatives via Furfural and 5-Hydroxylmethylfurfural as Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Zehui

    2016-08-23

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the transformation of renewable biomass into value-added fuels and chemicals. The catalytic conversion of naturally abundant carbohydrates can generate two-important furan chemicals: 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from C6 carbohydrates and furfural from C5 carbohydrates. Both HMF and furfural have received great interest as precursors in the synthesis of commodity chemicals and liquid fuels. In recent years, a trend has emerged to integrate sequential catalytic processes involving multistep reactions for the direct one-pot transformation of carbohydrates into the aimed fuels and chemicals. One-pot reactions have remarkably unique and environmentally friendly benefits, including the fact that isolation and purification of intermediate compounds can be avoided. Herein, the present article aims to review recent advances in the one-pot conversion of carbohydrates into furan derivatives via furfural and HMF as intermediates. Special attention will be paid to the catalytic systems, mechanistic insight, reaction pathways, and catalyst stability. It is expected that this review will guide researchers to develop effective catalytic systems for the one-pot transformation of carbohydrates into furan derivatives. PMID:27396713

  18. Influence of carbohydrates on the interaction of procyanidin B3 with trypsin.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rui; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2011-11-01

    The biological properties of procyanidins, in particular their inhibition of digestive enzymes, have received much attention in the past few years. Dietary carbohydrates are an environmental factor that is known to affect the interaction of procyanidins with proteins. This work aimed at understanding the effect of ionic food carbohydrates (polygalacturonic acid, arabic gum, pectin, and xanthan gum) on the interaction between procyanidins and trypsin. Physical-chemical techniques such as saturation transfer difference-NMR (STD-NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching, and nephelometry were used to evaluate the interaction process. Using STD-NMR, it was possible to identify the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin. The tested carbohydrates prevented the association of procyanidin B3 and trypsin by a competition mechanism in which the ionic character of carbohydrates and their ability to encapsulate procyanidins seem crucial leading to a reduction in STD signal and light scattering and to a recovery of the proteins intrinsic fluorescence. On the basis of these results, it was possible to grade the carbohydrates in their aggregation inhibition ability: XG > PA > AG ≫ PC. These effects may be relevant since the coingestion of procyanidins and ionic carbohydrates are frequent and furthermore since these might negatively affect the antinutritional properties ascribed to procyanidins in the past.

  19. One-Pot Conversion of Carbohydrates into Furan Derivatives via Furfural and 5-Hydroxylmethylfurfural as Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Zehui

    2016-08-23

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the transformation of renewable biomass into value-added fuels and chemicals. The catalytic conversion of naturally abundant carbohydrates can generate two-important furan chemicals: 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from C6 carbohydrates and furfural from C5 carbohydrates. Both HMF and furfural have received great interest as precursors in the synthesis of commodity chemicals and liquid fuels. In recent years, a trend has emerged to integrate sequential catalytic processes involving multistep reactions for the direct one-pot transformation of carbohydrates into the aimed fuels and chemicals. One-pot reactions have remarkably unique and environmentally friendly benefits, including the fact that isolation and purification of intermediate compounds can be avoided. Herein, the present article aims to review recent advances in the one-pot conversion of carbohydrates into furan derivatives via furfural and HMF as intermediates. Special attention will be paid to the catalytic systems, mechanistic insight, reaction pathways, and catalyst stability. It is expected that this review will guide researchers to develop effective catalytic systems for the one-pot transformation of carbohydrates into furan derivatives.

  20. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  1. Oxygen solubility and permeability of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Whitcombe, Michael J; Parker, Roger; Ring, Stephen G

    2005-06-13

    The saturated oxygen concentration in a series of aqueous solutions of sorbitol (up to 35% w/w) and maltitol (up to 50% w/w) was measured using colorimetric reagent vials based on Rhodazine D. The results indicate that the solubility of oxygen in low-water carbohydrates is considerably lower than its solubility in pure water. It was concluded that the low-oxygen solubility is a major factor contributing to the barrier properties of low-water content carbohydrates used in the encapsulation of flavours, lipids, peptides and other oxidisable species.

  2. Synthesis of chiral dopants based on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Toru; Koyama, Tetsuo; Yasutake, Mikio; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Chiral dopants based on carbohydrates for nematic liquid crystals were synthesized from D-glucose, and their helical twisting power (HTP) values were evaluated. The chiral dopants induced helices in the host nematic liquid crystals. An acetyl derivative having an ether-type glycosidic linkage between carbohydrate and a mesogenic moiety showed the highest HTP value of 10.4 μm(-1), while an acetyl derivative having an anomeric ester-type linkage did not show any HTP. It was surprising that this molecule had no HTP despite the presence of chirality in the molecule. A relationship between HTP and specific rotation was not observed in this study.

  3. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  4. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  5. Polymeric bicontinuous microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Kasiraman

    Rheology of complex fluids has been a topic of considerable interest recently. Bicontinuous microemulsions (BmuE), made by mixing appropriate amounts of oil, water and a surfactant, form a unique class of complex fluids. They possess a characteristic nanostructure consisting of undulating surfaces with vanishingly small interfacial curvature. BmuEs can also be generated in polymers by mixing appropriate amounts of two homopolymers and their corresponding diblock copolymer. The main objective of the present research is to study effects of shear on a model polymeric BmuE. Scattering is used as a predominant tool with in situ flow devices, along with optical microscopy and rheology. The model BmuE consists of a ternary blend of poly(ethyl ethylene) (PEE), poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and a PEE-PDMS diblock copolymer. Steady shear experiments reveal four regimes as a function of shear rate. At low shear rates (regime I), Newtonian behavior is observed; there is onset of shear thinning at higher rates (regime II). In regime III, the stress is independent of shear rate, whereas it increases with shear rate once again in regime IV. Morphological characterization was carried out for each of these four regimes using scattering and microscopy, the key result being the evidence for flow-induced phase separation in regime III. Transient rheological measurements were conducted for startup and step changes in shear rate, and the BmuE exhibits features similar to worm-like micellar colloidal systems. Time-resolved light scattering and microscopy also reveal interesting characteristics. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy indicates similarities with neat block copolymers near the order-disorder transition. The equilibrium rheological behavior is intriguing and detailed comparisons are made with Landau-Ginzburg theoretical models. Other areas of research as a part of this thesis include study of structural dynamics of BmuEs with dynamic light scattering, and the rheological

  6. Seasonal dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in bulbs and shoots of the geophyte Galanthus nivalis.

    PubMed

    Orthen, Birgit; Wehrmeyer, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    Seasonal dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates were studied in Galanthus nivalis L. over a 2-year period. The plants were collected in the field and separated into above- and below-ground biomass. The polysaccharide fraction of the bulbs consisted of fructans and starch. Seasonal variations suggest that the polysaccharides were utilized for carbon and energy supply for re-growth and flower development. With the re-sprouting of the bulbs in autumn the fructans within the bulbs were depolymerized and an increase of low degree of polymerization fructans as well as sucrose was observable. Within shoots the major polysaccharides were fructans, the starch content was much lower. Gas liquid chromatography and high-performance, anion-exchange chromatographyanalysis of the fructan fraction revealed that the fructans within the shoots were predominantly those with a low degree of polymerization. In addition to the two polysaccharides the other dominant sugar in shoots was sucrose. During the period of slow re-growth and flowering, fructan and starch pools were depleted to different degrees. Calculation of the difference between the carbohydrate content at the start of visible growth and at the time of lowest content revealed that the starch pool showed a higher depletion than the fructan pool. During the re-growth periods in 1996/97 and 1997/98 fructans were catabolized by 39 and 32% only, whereas the starch pool was depleted by 92% (1996/97) and 79% (1997/98), respectively. During rapid shoot growth and fruiting, the bulbs and above-ground organs appeared to be competing sinks for the photosynthetically fixed carbon. Refilling of the bulbs carbohydrate reserve started in February/March In shoots, the period of refilling the bulbs was characterized by a low content of oligosaccarides and a high content of hexoses.

  7. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  8. Membrane surface modification via polymer grafting and interfacial polymerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Membrane separation is an important technology for separating food ingredients and fractionating high-value substances from food processing by-products. Long-term uses of polymeric membranes in food protein processing are impeded by formation of fouled layers on the membrane surface. Surface modif...

  9. Stimulation of actin polymerization by vacuoles via Cdc42p-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Isgandarova, Sabina; Jones, Lynden; Forsberg, Daniel; Loncar, Ana; Dawson, John; Tedrick, Kelly; Eitzen, Gary

    2007-10-19

    We have previously shown that actin ligands inhibit the fusion of yeast vacuoles in vitro, which suggests that actin remodeling is a subreaction of membrane fusion. Here, we demonstrate the presence of vacuole-associated actin polymerization activity, and its dependence on Cdc42p and Vrp1p. Using a sensitive in vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assay, we found that vacuole membranes stimulated polymerization, and this activity increased when vacuoles were preincubated under conditions that support membrane fusion. Vacuoles purified from a VRP1-gene deletion strain showed reduced polymerization activity, which could be recovered when reconstituted with excess Vrp1p. Cdc42p regulates this activity because overexpression of dominant-negative Cdc42p significantly reduced vacuole-associated polymerization activity, while dominant-active Cdc42p increased activity. We also used size-exclusion chromatography to directly examine changes in yeast actin induced by vacuole fusion. This assay confirmed that actin undergoes polymerization in a process requiring ATP. To further confirm the need for actin polymerization during vacuole fusion, an actin polymerization-deficient mutant strain was examined. This strain showed in vivo defects in vacuole fusion, and actin purified from this strain inhibited in vitro vacuole fusion. Affinity isolation of vacuole-associated actin and in vitro binding assays revealed a polymerization-dependent interaction between actin and the SNARE Ykt6p. Our results suggest that actin polymerization is a subreaction of vacuole membrane fusion governed by Cdc42p signal transduction.

  10. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle. PMID:26035740

  11. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle.

  12. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    of the 3'-end VH families. This process will lead to the formation of the primitive immune idiotype network system directed to the embryonic carbohydrate auto-antigens in the embryo, which is rarely exposed to the external antigens.

  13. Molecular reactions at the film surface in plasma polymerization. [Plasma Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    During the plasma polymerization process, the surface of the depositing material is continuously bombarded by a multitude of plasma generated species: ions, photons, radicals and other neutral molecules. In understanding the chemistry of the plasma polymerization process it is desirable to know the way in which these species interact with the film during deposition. Any individual molecule/surface collision may result in growth of the film by an attachment reaction, or in ablation by chemical or physical removal of previously attached atoms. Reported here are results of experiments designed to probe the reaction of molecules undergoing single collisions with the surface of a plasma-polymerized film during the deposition process. The method employed was a molecular beam sampling of all the plasma species and deposition of polymer from the beam onto a substrate. Control of the charged particle fluxes to the surface was used to study the role of ion bombardment. A beam of a probe molecule, incident on the film surface throughout the deposition, was used to investigate the interaction of the probe molecule with the surface. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Synthesis of γ-Valerolactone from Carbohydrates and its Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehui

    2016-01-01

    γ-Valerolactone (GVL) is a valuable chemical intermediate that can be obtained by catalytic reduction of levulinic acid (LA) or alkyl levulinates (AL). There are many reports on the synthesis of GVL from LA or AL. However, the demand for the large-scale synthesis of GVL requires more environmentally friendly and cost-effective production processes. This article focuses on the recent advance in the synthesis of GVL from carbohydrates or lignocellulosic biomass. In addition, application of GVL as the reaction solvents, fuel additives, and as precursor for the synthesis of jet fuel and polymer monomers is also discussed.

  15. Carbohydrate Structure Database: tools for statistical analysis of bacterial, plant and fungal glycomes.

    PubMed

    Egorova, K S; Kondakova, A N; Toukach, Ph V

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are biological blocks participating in diverse and crucial processes both at cellular and organism levels. They protect individual cells, establish intracellular interactions, take part in the immune reaction and participate in many other processes. Glycosylation is considered as one of the most important modifications of proteins and other biologically active molecules. Still, the data on the enzymatic machinery involved in the carbohydrate synthesis and processing are scattered, and the advance on its study is hindered by the vast bulk of accumulated genetic information not supported by any experimental evidences for functions of proteins that are encoded by these genes. In this article, we present novel instruments for statistical analysis of glycomes in taxa. These tools may be helpful for investigating carbohydrate-related enzymatic activities in various groups of organisms and for comparison of their carbohydrate content. The instruments are developed on the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) platform and are available freely on the CSDB web-site at http://csdb.glycoscience.ru. Database URL: http://csdb.glycoscience.ru. PMID:26337239

  16. Carbohydrate Structure Database: tools for statistical analysis of bacterial, plant and fungal glycomes

    PubMed Central

    Egorova, K.S.; Kondakova, A.N.; Toukach, Ph.V.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are biological blocks participating in diverse and crucial processes both at cellular and organism levels. They protect individual cells, establish intracellular interactions, take part in the immune reaction and participate in many other processes. Glycosylation is considered as one of the most important modifications of proteins and other biologically active molecules. Still, the data on the enzymatic machinery involved in the carbohydrate synthesis and processing are scattered, and the advance on its study is hindered by the vast bulk of accumulated genetic information not supported by any experimental evidences for functions of proteins that are encoded by these genes. In this article, we present novel instruments for statistical analysis of glycomes in taxa. These tools may be helpful for investigating carbohydrate-related enzymatic activities in various groups of organisms and for comparison of their carbohydrate content. The instruments are developed on the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) platform and are available freely on the CSDB web-site at http://csdb.glycoscience.ru. Database URL: http://csdb.glycoscience.ru PMID:26337239

  17. Low-temperature carbonization and more effective degradation of carbohydrates induced by ferric trichloride.

    PubMed

    Xia, Juan; Song, Le Xin; Dang, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    The present work is devoted to an attempt to understand the effect of an inorganic salt such as ferric trichloride (FeCl(3)) on the carbonization and degradation of carbohydrates such as β-cyclodextrin (CD), amylose, and cellulose. Our data revealed two important observations. First, the presence of FeCl(3) led to the occurrence of a low carbonization temperature of 373 K. This is a rare phenomenon, in which carbonization improvement is present even if a small amount of FeCl(3) was added. Experimental results had provided evidence for the fact that a redox process was started during the low-temperature carbonization of β-CD, causing the reduction of FeCl(3) to ferrous chloride (FeCl(2)) by carbon materials formed in the carbonization process in air. However, the reduction process of FeCl(3) produced the in situ composite nanomaterial of Fe-FeCl(2) combination in nitrogen. Second, a molecule-ion interaction emerged between FeCl(3) and the carbohydrates in aqueous solution, resulting in a more effective degradation of the carbohydrates. Moreover, our results demonstrated that FeCl(3) played the role of a catalyst during the degradation of the carbohydrates in solution. We believe that the current work not only has a significant potential application in disposal of waste carbohydrates but also could be helpful in many fields such as environmental protection, biomass energy development, and inorganic composite nanomaterials.

  18. Studies of molecular properties of polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace environment effects (high energy electrons, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen, and aircraft fluids) on polymeric and composite materials considered for structural use in spacecraft and advanced aircraft are examined. These materials include Mylar, Ultem, and Kapton. In addition to providing information on the behavior of the materials, attempts are made to relate the measurements to the molecular processes occurring in the material. A summary and overview of the technical aspects are given along with a list of the papers that resulted from the studies. The actual papers are included in the appendices and a glossary of technical terms and definitions is included in the front matter.

  19. Polymeric precursors for fibers and matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1992-01-01

    Candidate polymeric precursors for ceramic fiber and matrix processing are discussed, with a view to the advantages and disadvantages of this approach relative to existing alternatives. The properties of ceramic products thus derived are noted to strongly depend on the molecular weight and structure of the starting polymer; in particular, the ceramic's composition and morphology are dependent on the character and extent of crosslinking, as well as on the path of pyrolysis. While large and complex structural ceramic components may ultimately be obtainable by these means, the polymer-precursor method is still in its developmental infancy.

  20. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  1. Kiwifruit, carbohydrate availability, and the glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    An appreciable proportion, about 10%, of the dry weight of kiwifruit consists of primary cell walls. About 80% of dry matter is available carbohydrate consisting of glucose, fructose, and sucrose, and about 10% is digestible protein. The cell wall component, being nonstarch polysaccharide, is undigested in the stomach and small intestine, so the component increases in relative concentration in the gut lumen where its physicochemical properties may be important in modulating carbohydrate digestion and absorption. Released from the constraint of fruit structure, the dietary fiber swells to four times its original volume during in vitro digestion. When the digested remnants are allowed to settle into a packed but uncompressed state, as in the gut, they reduce the rate of glucose diffusion by about 40% and profoundly reduce digesta mixing, especially in the presence of a low background of soluble viscous polysaccharide. An in vitro estimation of the glycemic index (GI) of carbohydrate in kiwifruit, and in vivo estimates show the carbohydrate to be of low GI. On a whole fruit basis because of the high water content of kiwifruit, a 100g kiwifruit would be equivalent to about 5g (1 teaspoon) of glucose in its effect on blood glucose; thus, kiwifruit have low glycemic impact and are suitable for those with diabetes.

  2. General Properties, Occurrence, and Preparation of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    D-Glucose and its derivatives and analogues, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-muramic acid, D-glucopyranosyl uronic acid, and D-glucitol represent 99.9% of the carbohydrates on the earth. D-Glucose is found in the free state in human blood and in the combined state in disaccharides, sucrose, lactose, and α,α-trehalose, in cyclic dextrins, and in polysaccharides, starch, glycogen, cellulose, dextrans; N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and an analogue N-acetyl-D-muramic acid are found in bacterial cell wall polysaccharide, murein, along with teichoic acids made up of poly-glycerol or -ribitol phosphodiesters. Other carbohydrates, D-mannose, D-mannuronic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galacturonic acid, D-iduronic acid, L-guluronic acid, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-xylose, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid are found in glycoproteins, hemicelluloses, glycosaminoglycans, and polysaccharides of plant exudates, bacterial capsules, alginates, and heparin. D-Ribofuranose-5-phosphate is found in many coenzymes and is the backbone of RNAs (ribonucleic acid), and 2-deoxy-D-ribofuranose-5-phosphate is the backbone of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). D-Fructofuranose is found in sucrose, inulin, and levan. The general properties and occurrence of these carbohydrates and general methods of isolation and preparation of carbohydrates are presented.

  3. Carbohydrate Metabolism During Ascospore Development in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Sherwin M.; Roth, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism, under sporulation conditions, was compared in sporulating and non-sporulating diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Total carbohydrate was fractionated into trehalose, glycogen, mannan, and an alkali-insoluble fraction composed of glucan and insoluble glycogen. The behavior of three fractions was essentially the same in both sporulating and non-sporulating strains; trehalose, mannan, and the insoluble fraction were all synthesized to about the same extent regardless of a strain's ability to undergo meiosis or sporulation. In contrast, aspects of soluble glycogen metabolism depended on sporulation. Although glycogen synthesis took place in both sporulating and non-sporulating strains, only sporulating strains exhibited a period of glycogen degradation, which coincided with the final maturation of ascospores. We also determined the carbohydrate composition of spores isolated from mature asci. Spores contained all components present in vegetative cells, but in different proportions. In cells, the most abundant carbohydrate was mannan, followed by glycogen, then trehalose, and finally the alkali-insoluble fraction; in spores, trehalose was most abundant, followed by the alkali-insoluble fraction, glycogen, and mannan in that order. PMID:4595206

  4. Indicators of normal carbohydrate digestion in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More research is needed to determine the nutritional and clinical significance of the intermediate values of low but not deficient duodenal disaccharidase activities, but the Dahlqvist-method biopsy assay of activity serves as a gnomon of carbohydrate digestion, in the sense that Anaximander used a ...

  5. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2013-12-10

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  6. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-13

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  7. Soluble Sugars as the Carbohydrate Reserve for CAM in Pineapple Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Carnal, Nancy Wieland; Black, Clanton C.

    1989-01-01

    Neutral ethanol-soluble sugar pools serve as carbohydrate reserves for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) leaves. Levels of neutral soluble sugars and glucans fluctuated reciprocally with concentrations of malic acid. Hexose loss from neutral soluble-sugar pools was sufficient to account for malic acid accumulation with about 95% of the required hexose accounted for by turnover of fructose and glucose pools. Hexose loss from starch or starch plus lower molecular weight glucan pools was insufficient to account for nocturnal accumulation of malic acid. The apparent maximum catalytic capacity of pyrophosphate:6-phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) at 15°C was about 16 times higher than the mean maximum rate of glycolysis that occurred to support malic acid accumulation in pineapple leaves at night and 12 times higher than the mean maximum rate of hexose turnover from all carbohydrate pools. The apparent maximum catalytic capacity of ATP-PFK at 15°C was about 70% of the activity required to account for the mean maximal rate of hexose turnover from all carbohydrate pools if turnover were completely via glycolysis, and marginally sufficient to account for mean maximal rates of acidification. Therefore, at low night temperatures conducive to CAM and under subsaturating substrate concentrations, PPi-PFK activity, but not ATP-PFK activity, would be sufficient to support the rate of glycolytic carbohydrate processing required for acid accumulation. These data for pineapple establish that there are at least two types of CAM plants with respect to the nature of the carbohydrate reserve utilized to support nighttime CO2 accumulation. The data further indicate that the glycolytic carbohydrate processing that supports acidification proceeds in different subcellular compartments in plants utilizing different carbohydrate reserves. PMID:16666775

  8. High Carbohydrate-Fiber Nutrition for Running and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battinelli, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    The roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and fiber in producing energy for health and exercise are discussed. Long-distance runners should have a high intake of complex carbohydrates and fiber. (PP)

  9. Engineering topochemical polymerizations using block copolymer templates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangliang; Tran, Helen; Beyer, Frederick L; Walck, Scott D; Li, Xin; Agren, Hans; Killops, Kato L; Campos, Luis M

    2014-09-24

    With the aim to achieve rapid and efficient topochemical polymerizations in the solid state, via solution-based processing of thin films, we report the integration of a diphenyldiacetylene monomer and a poly(styrene-b-acrylic acid) block copolymer template for the generation of supramolecular architectural photopolymerizable materials. This strategy takes advantage of non-covalent interactions to template a topochemical photopolymerization that yields a polydiphenyldiacetylene (PDPDA) derivative. In thin films, it was found that hierarchical self-assembly of the diacetylene monomers by microphase segregation of the block copolymer template enhances the topochemical photopolymerization, which is complete within a 20 s exposure to UV light. Moreover, UV-active cross-linkable groups were incorporated within the block copolymer template to create micropatterns of PDPDA by photolithography, in the same step as the polymerization reaction. The materials design and processing may find potential uses in the microfabrication of sensors and other important areas that benefit from solution-based processing of flexible conjugated materials. PMID:25208609

  10. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, K.

    1998-09-29

    A method of making polymeric particulates is described wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatible agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product. 29 figs.

  11. Reconstituted Polymeric Materials Derived From Post-Consumer Waste, Industrial Scrap And Virgin Resins Made By Solid State Shear Pulverizat

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    2005-02-01

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  12. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state shear pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    2001-01-30

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  13. Reconstituted polymeric materials derived from post-consumer waste, industrial scrap and virgin resins made by solid state pulverization

    DOEpatents

    Khait, Klementina

    1998-09-29

    A method of making polymeric particulates wherein polymeric scrap material, virgin polymeric material and mixtures thereof are supplied to intermeshing extruder screws which are rotated to transport the polymeric material along their length and subject the polymeric material to solid state shear pulverization and in-situ polymer compatibilization, if two or more incompatible polymers are present. Uniform pulverized particulates are produced without addition of a compatibilizing agent. The pulverized particulates are directly melt processable (as powder feedstock) and surprisingly yield a substantially homogeneous light color product.

  14. Exercise and Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; Stanford, Kristin I; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are the preferred substrate for contracting skeletal muscles during high-intensity exercise and are also readily utilized during moderate intensity exercise. This use of carbohydrates during physical activity likely played an important role during the survival of early Homo sapiens, and genes and traits regulating physical activity, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy storage have undoubtedly been selected throughout evolution. In contrast to the life of early H. sapiens, modern lifestyles are predominantly sedentary. As a result, intake of excessive amounts of carbohydrates due to the easy and continuous accessibility to modern high-energy food and drinks has not only become unnecessary but also led to metabolic diseases in the face of physical inactivity. A resulting metabolic disease is type 2 diabetes, a complex endocrine disorder characterized by abnormally high concentrations of circulating glucose. This disease now affects millions of people worldwide. Exercise has beneficial effects to help control impaired glucose homeostasis with metabolic disease, and is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. This chapter focuses on the effects of exercise on carbohydrate metabolism in skeletal muscle and systemic glucose homeostasis. We will also focus on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is now well established that there are different proximal signaling pathways that mediate the effects of exercise and insulin on glucose uptake, and these distinct mechanisms are consistent with the ability of exercise to increase glucose uptake in the face of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Ongoing research in this area is aimed at defining the precise mechanism by which exercise increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity and the types of exercise necessary for these important health benefits.

  15. Exercise and Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Joram D.; Stanford, Kristin I.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are the preferred substrate for contracting skeletal muscles during high-intensity exercise and are also readily utilized during moderate intensity exercise. This use of carbohydrates during physical activity likely played an important role during the survival of early Homo sapiens, and genes and traits regulating physical activity, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy storage have undoubtedly been selected throughout evolution. In contrast to the life of early H. sapiens, modern lifestyles are predominantly sedentary. As a result, intake of excessive amounts of carbohydrates due to the easy and continuous accessibility to modern high-energy food and drinks has not only become unnecessary but also led to metabolic diseases in the face of physical inactivity. A resulting metabolic disease is type 2 diabetes, a complex endocrine disorder characterized by abnormally high concentrations of circulating glucose. This disease now affects millions of people worldwide. Exercise has beneficial effects to help control impaired glucose homeostasis with metabolic disease, and is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. This chapter focuses on the effects of exercise on carbohydrate metabolism in skeletal muscle and systemic glucose homeostasis. We will also focus on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is now well established that there are different proximal signaling pathways that mediate the effects of exercise and insulin on glucose uptake, and these distinct mechanisms are consistent with the ability of exercise to increase glucose uptake in the face of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Ongoing research in this area is aimed at defining the precise mechanism by which exercise increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity and the types of exercise necessary for these important health benefits. PMID:26477909

  16. Energy and carbohydrate for training and recovery.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Loucks, Anne B; Broad, Nick

    2006-07-01

    Soccer players should achieve an energy intake that provides sufficient carbohydrate to fuel the training and competition programme, supplies all nutrient requirements, and allows manipulation of energy or nutrient balance to achieve changes in lean body mass, body fat or growth. Although the traditional culture of soccer has focused on carbohydrate intake for immediate match preparation, top players should adapt their carbohydrate intake on a daily basis to ensure adequate fuel for training and recovery between matches. For players with a mobile playing style, there is sound evidence that dietary programmes that restore and even super-compensate muscle glycogen levels can enhance activity patterns during matches. This will presumably also benefit intensive training, such as twice daily practices. As well as achieving a total intake of carbohydrate commensurate with fuel needs, the everyday diet should promote strategic intake of carbohydrate and protein before and after key training sessions to optimize the adaptations and enhance recovery. The achievement of the ideal physique for soccer is a long-term goal that should be undertaken over successive years, and particularly during the off-season and pre-season. An increase in lean body mass or a decrease in body fat is the product of a targeted training and eating programme. Consultation with a sports nutrition expert can assist soccer players to manipulate energy and nutrient intake to meet such goals. Players should be warned against the accidental or deliberate mismatch of energy intake and energy expenditure, such that energy availability (intake minus the cost of exercise) falls below 125 kJ (30 kcal) per kilogram of fat-free mass per day. Such low energy availability causes disturbances to hormonal, metabolic, and immune function. PMID:16766497

  17. Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates in contrasting marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdige, D. J.; Skoog, A.; Gardner, K.

    2000-03-01

    Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates were examined in contrasting Chesapeake Bay (estuarine) and mid-Atlantic shelf/slope break (continental margin) sediments. Particulate carbohydrates (PCHOs) represented ˜5-9% of the total sediment particulate organic carbon (POC), and PCHO remineralization appeared to be a similar fraction of total sediment carbon oxidation (or C ox). When these results are compared with results from other coastal sediments and a pelagic turbidite, PCHO remineralization (as a percentage of C ox) did not vary by more than a factor of ˜2-3 over a 3-4 order of magnitude range in C ox values. The causes of this are not well understood, but may be related to specific effects associated with the remineralization of highly altered organic matter mixtures under aerobic conditions. Dissolved carbohydrates (DCHOs) in these sediment pore waters ranged from ˜30 to 400 μM, increased with depth in a manner similar to total DOC, and represented ˜10 to 55% of pore water DOC. In Chesapeake Bay sediments this percentage decreased with sediment depth, while in these continental margin sediments it was constant (upper 30 cm). Of the DCHOs in these pore waters ˜30 to 50% could be identified as individual aldoses (monomeric neutral sugars), and total aldose yields (individual aldoses as a percentage of total DOC) were higher in these continental margin sediment pore waters (>9%) than they were in the estuarine sediment pore waters (<5%). A comparison of DCHO and PCHO concentrations in these sediments indicates that their concentrations are uncoupled, and that pore water DCHO concentrations are primarily controlled by sediment remineralization processes. Pore water DCHOs appeared to be preferentially found in the high molecular weight (HMW) DOC pool, and likely occur as some of the initial HMW intermediates produced and consumed during sediment POC remineralization. These results also support past suggestions about the differing controls on carbon

  18. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes.

  19. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes. PMID:12707764

  20. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  2. Extracellular polymeric substances production kinetics of 13 sludge isolates using wastewater sludge as raw material and its flocculation potential.

    PubMed

    More, Tanaji; Mahmoudi, Amine; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of batch fermentation of 13 extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains (9 Bacillus, 2 Serratia and 2 Yersinia) were carried out using sterilized sludge as a raw material. The most of Bacillus (µ(max): 0.11-0.27 h⁻¹), Serratia (µ(max): 0.23-0.27 h⁻¹) and Yersinia (µ(max): 0.18-0.19 h⁻¹) strains had capability to grow and produce EPS (1.36-2.12 g/L) in the sterilized sludge. In general, EPS production was mixed growth associated for all the bacterial strains cultivated independently. Bacillus sp. 7, Serratia sp. 2 and Yersinia sp. 2 produced higher concentration (1.95-2.12 g/L) of EPS than the other remaining bacterial strains. Protein and carbohydrate contents of EPS remained constant during fermentation. Broth EPS (B-EPS) exhibited high kaolin flocculation activity (≥ 75%) in most of the cases except Bacillus sp. 1, Bacillus sp. 5 and Bacillus sp. 9, respectively. In general, high flocculation activities (FAs) (≥ 75%), were attained using 1.31-1.70 mg B-EPS/g kaolin, 0.45-0.97 mg protein/g kaolin and 0.11-0.21 mg carbohydrates/g kaolin. The study suggests that further systematic exploration is required for optimizing the process of EPS production. EPS produced in the sludge can potentially be used for different water and wastewater treatments.

  3. Aliphatic, Cyclic, and Aromatic Organic Acids, Vitamins, and Carbohydrates in Soil: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research. PMID:24319374

  4. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil: a review.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-11-10

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  5. Polymerization method for formation of thermally exfoliated graphite oxide containing polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Adamson, Douglas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for polymerization of at least one monomer including polymerizing the at least one monomer in the presence of a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m(esp 2)/g to 2600 m(esp 2/g.

  6. Mathematical description of polymerization using an organolithium catalyst in the presence of a donor

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, A.V.; Perlin, B.A.; Shpakov, P.P.; Drozdov, B.T.; Erenburg, E.G.; Ermakova, I.I.; Ryakhovskii, V.S.

    1986-10-20

    The authors present a mathematical representation of the polymerization of butadiene to rubber via a complex of lithium in the presence of the donor diethylene glycol dimethyl ether toward the end of increasing the efficiency of the process as well as the quality of the final product. The model demonstrates the dependence of the properties and composition of the polybutadiene on polymerization conditions.

  7. Novel polymeric materials from triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triglycerides are good platforms for new polymeric products that can substitute for petroleum-based materials. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a number of reactions in efforts to produce a wide range of value-added products. In this ...

  8. Supramolecular polymerization: Living it up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würthner, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Protein fibril formation is involved in many human diseases and thus has been mechanistically elucidated in the context of understanding -- and in turn treating -- them. This biological phenomenon has now also inspired the design of a supramolecular system that undergoes living polymerization.

  9. Buckling of polymerized monomolecular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, L.; Daillant, J.; Chatenay, D.; Braslau, A.; Colson, D.

    1994-03-01

    The buckling of a two-dimensional polymer network at the air-water interface has been evidenced by grazing incidence x-ray scattering. A comprehensive description of the inhomogeneous octadecyltrichlorosilane polymerized film was obtained by atomic force microscopy and x-ray scattering measurements. The buckling occurs with a characteristic wavelength ~=10 μm.

  10. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  11. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  12. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  13. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Pang, Y.

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6]/hv.

  14. Synthesis and emulsifying properties of carbohydrate fatty acid esters produced from Agave tequilana fructans by enzymatic acylation.

    PubMed

    Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Arrizon, Javier; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Plou, Francisco J; Sandoval, Georgina

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate fatty acid esters are non-ionic surfactants with a broad spectrum of applications. These molecules are generally synthesized using short carbohydrates or linear fructans; however in this research carbohydrate fatty acid esters were produced for the first time with branched fructans from Agave tequilana. Using immobilized lipases we successfully acylated A. tequilana fructans with vinyl laurate, obtaining products with different degrees of polymerization (DP). Lipozyme 435 was the most efficient lipase to catalyze the transesterification reaction. HPLC and ESI-MS analysis proved the presence of a mixture of acylated products as a result of the chemical complexity of fructans in the A. tequilana. The ESI-MS spectra showed a molecular mass shift between 183 and 366g/mol for fructooligosaccharides with a DP lower than 6, which indicated the presence of Agave fructans that had been mono- and diacylated with lauric acid. The carbohydrate fatty acid esters (CFAE) obtained showed good emulsifying properties in W/O emulsions. PMID:26988522

  15. Metallized polymeric foam material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  16. Pressure polymerization of polyester

    DOEpatents

    Maurer, Charles J.; Shaw, Gordon; Smith, Vicky S.; Buelow, Steven J.; Tumas, William; Contreras, Veronica; Martinez, Ronald J.

    2000-08-29

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of a polyester polymer or polyester copolymer under superatmospheric pressure conditions in a pipe or tubular reaction under turbannular flow conditions. Reaction material having a glycol equivalents to carboxylic acid equivalents mole ratio of from 1.0:1 to 1.2:1, together with a superatmospheric dense gaseous medium are fed co-currently to the reactor. Dicarboxylic acid and/or diol raw materials may be injected into any of the reaction zones in the process during operation to achieve the overall desired mole ratio balance. The process operates at temperatures of from about 220.degree. C. to about 320.degree. C., with turbannular flow achieved before the polymer product and gas exit the reactor process. The pressure in the reaction zones can be in the range from 15 psia to 2500 psia. A polymer product having a DP of a greater than 40, more preferably at least about 70, is achieved by the transfer of water from the reacting material polymer melt to the gaseous medium in the reactor.

  17. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  18. Impact of Carbon Nanomaterials on Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Li, Xin; Zhao, Lina

    2016-03-01

    Many nanomaterials have entered people's daily lives and impact the normal process of biological entities consequently. As one kind of the important nanomaterials, carbon based nanomaterials have invoked a lot of concerns from scientific researches because of their unique physicochemical properties. In eukaryotes, actin is the most abundantly distributed protein in both cytoplasm and cell nucleus, and closely controls the cell proliferation and mobility. Recently, many investigations have found some carbon based nanomaterials can affect actin cytoskeleton remarkably, including fullerenes derivatives, carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives. However, these interaction processes are complicated and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood clearly. In this review, we discussed the different mechanisms of carbon nanomaterials impact on actin polymerization into three pathways, as triggering the signaling pathways from carbon nanomaterials outside of cells, increasing the production of reactive oxygen species from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells and direct interaction from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells. As a result, the dimension and size of carbon nanomaterials play a key role in regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we forecasted the possible investigation strategy for meeting the challenges of the future study on this topic. We hope the findings are helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism in carbon nanomaterials regulating actin polymerization, and provide new insight in novel nanomedicine development for inhibition tumor cell migration. PMID:27455649

  19. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  20. The active transport of carbohydrates by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Henderson, P J; Kornberg, H L

    1975-01-01

    The active transport of carbohydrates by Escherichia coli is discussed with particular reference to (1) identification of an uptake process as 'active transport', (2) nature and control of transport proteins, and (3) mechanisms of energy transduction. (1) The use of substrate analogues, of mutants blocked in metabolism and of subcellular vesicles in the isolation of the transport process from interference by subsequent metabolic reactions is described. Criteria are outlined for establishing that the solute is taken up against a concentration gradient and that this is energy-dependent. Three types of poisons for energy systems that act primarily on respiration, on ATP formation and as uncoupling ('proton conducting') agents are considered. (2) Methods are described for the selection of mutants impaired in the active uptake of specific carbohydrates. (3) Results show that the uptake of galactose, D-fucose and arabinose by appropriate strains of E. coli is inducible, specific and accompanied by proton uptake. Such and other data support a model based on a chemiosmotic theory of active transport.