Science.gov

Sample records for professional corporations

  1. Necessary Competencies for Corporate Wellness Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Dean R.; And Others

    A research study attempted to identify necessary components of a strong corporate wellness training program and to establish a sound research base from which valid curricular decisions could be made concerning program design. Responses from a 52-item questionnaire were received from 248 corporate wellness professionals. Results indicated that the…

  2. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  3. Women's Medical Professional Corporation v. Taft.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Court Decision: 353 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 436; 2003 Dec 17 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed a lower court decision and held that Ohio's partial-birth abortion law was constitutional because the law permitted the procedure in the event of significant maternal health risk and did not prohibit dilation and evacuation (a lawful abortion procedure). Women's Medical Professional Corporation challenged the constitutionality of Ohio's ban on partial-birth abortion, claiming that the law did not contain an adequate exception for maternal health and that it unduly burdened a woman's right to abort a nonviable fetus by dilation and evacuation (D&E). The Sixth Circuit held that the law's maternal health exception was valid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it allowed partial-birth abortion when there is significant maternal health risk. The court rejected the plaintiff's assertion that partial-birth abortion should be allowed at any physician's discretion and noted that precedent allows states to "restrict an abortion procedure except when the procedure is necessary to prevent a significant health risk." The court also held that the law did not ban D&E, the most common second-trimester abortion procedure, because the law explicitly tracked the medical differences between D&E and partial-birth abortion, it provided an exception for D&E, and it focused on other distinctions between D&E and partial-birth abortion. For these reasons, Ohio's partial-birth abortion ban did not unduly burden a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy and was therefore constitutional. PMID:16477714

  4. Physician views on practicing professionalism in the corporate age.

    PubMed

    Castellani, B; Wear, D

    2000-07-01

    Arnold Relman argues that medical education does not prepare students and residents to practice their profession in today's corporate health care system. Corporate health care administrators agree: Physicians enter the workforce unskilled in contract negotiation, evidence-based medicine, navigating bureaucratic systems, and so forth. What about practicing physicians? Do they agree as well? According to this study, they do. Feeling like decentered double agents and unprepared, physicians find themselves professionally lost, struggling to balance issues of cost and care and expressing lots of negativity toward the cultures of medicine and managed care. However, physicians are resilient. A group of physicians, who may be called proactive, are meeting the professional demands of corporate health care by becoming sophisticated about its bureaucratic organization and the ways in which their professional and personal commitments fit within the system. Following the lead of proactive physicians, the authors support Relman's thesis and education for both students and physicians requires a major overhaul.

  5. 49 CFR 1103.35 - Partnership or professional corporation names and titles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partnership or professional corporation names and... Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public § 1103.35 Partnership or professional corporation names and titles. In the formation of a partnership...

  6. From professional monopoly to corporate oligopoly:the clinical laboratory industry in transition.

    PubMed

    Bailey, R M

    1977-02-01

    Until the mid-1960s the nonhospital clinical laboratory industry was dominated by pathologists. The ethics of medical professionalism protected the pathologists' market from price competition and from any serious threat from new entrants into the market. Immune from the competitive pressures of the marketplace, pathologists exerted monopoly control in local markets. That power was eroded by laboratories operated by technologists and bioanalysts and was finally overcome by the entry of large corporations into the industry. The market power of the largest corporate laboratories is now growing to a point where competition may again be thwarted. The professional ethics of pathologists allowed high prices, but there was little push toward higher volume. The commercial ethics of the corporate entrants brought lower prices but resulted in strong pressure for greater test quantities. In either case, the power wielded by the dominant producer would seem to go against the consumer's interests.

  7. Publication planning: an effective corporate strategy to influence health professionals.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies integrate scientific publications into the communication strategies they employ to influence the practices of health professionals. In their"publication plan", pharmaceutical companies, or the communication agencies they hire, develop key messages to promote their drugs and then plan in advance how, when and where to disseminate them in medical journals or at conferences. Although their true intent is promotional, these messages must appear to be purely scientific, and are therefore disseminated as research articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries. Publication planning involves the use of "ghost" authors who work directly for pharmaceutical companies, but whose contribution is rarely acknowledged in the final published article. Key opinion leaders are recruited as the honorary authors of these articles, to which they have made little, if any, contribution. The criteria for authorship set by journals that publish primary research articles do not provide adequate protection against the practice of ghost and honorary authorship. Certain journals publishing primary research derive a large proportion of their revenue from selling reprints used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their drugs, especially by their sales representatives. PMID:24600737

  8. Publication planning: an effective corporate strategy to influence health professionals.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies integrate scientific publications into the communication strategies they employ to influence the practices of health professionals. In their"publication plan", pharmaceutical companies, or the communication agencies they hire, develop key messages to promote their drugs and then plan in advance how, when and where to disseminate them in medical journals or at conferences. Although their true intent is promotional, these messages must appear to be purely scientific, and are therefore disseminated as research articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries. Publication planning involves the use of "ghost" authors who work directly for pharmaceutical companies, but whose contribution is rarely acknowledged in the final published article. Key opinion leaders are recruited as the honorary authors of these articles, to which they have made little, if any, contribution. The criteria for authorship set by journals that publish primary research articles do not provide adequate protection against the practice of ghost and honorary authorship. Certain journals publishing primary research derive a large proportion of their revenue from selling reprints used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their drugs, especially by their sales representatives.

  9. Parents' professional sources of advice regarding child discipline and their use of corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Catherine A; Moeller, William; Hamvas, Lauren; Rice, Janet C

    2013-02-01

    Parents (n = 500) were surveyed about which professional groups they were most likely to seek and follow advice from regarding child discipline as well as their use of corporal punishment (CP). Nearly half of the parents reported that they were most likely to seek child discipline advice from pediatricians (48%), followed by religious leaders (21%) and mental health professionals (18%). Parents who sought advice from religious leaders (vs pediatricians) had nearly 4 times the odds of reporting use of CP. Parents reported that they were more likely to follow the advice of pediatricians than any other professional; however, black parents were as likely to follow the advice of religious leaders as that of pediatricians. Pediatricians play a central role in advising parents about child discipline. Efforts to engage pediatricians in providing violence prevention counseling should continue. Increased efforts are needed to engage other professionals, especially religious leaders, in providing such advice to parents.

  10. Parents' professional sources of advice regarding child discipline and their use of corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Catherine A; Moeller, William; Hamvas, Lauren; Rice, Janet C

    2013-02-01

    Parents (n = 500) were surveyed about which professional groups they were most likely to seek and follow advice from regarding child discipline as well as their use of corporal punishment (CP). Nearly half of the parents reported that they were most likely to seek child discipline advice from pediatricians (48%), followed by religious leaders (21%) and mental health professionals (18%). Parents who sought advice from religious leaders (vs pediatricians) had nearly 4 times the odds of reporting use of CP. Parents reported that they were more likely to follow the advice of pediatricians than any other professional; however, black parents were as likely to follow the advice of religious leaders as that of pediatricians. Pediatricians play a central role in advising parents about child discipline. Efforts to engage pediatricians in providing violence prevention counseling should continue. Increased efforts are needed to engage other professionals, especially religious leaders, in providing such advice to parents. PMID:23185082

  11. The corporate organization of hospital work: balancing professional and administrative responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Stoeckle, J D; Reiser, S J

    1992-03-01

    The development of the hospital into a corporation has influenced the care of patients and the work of the professional staff. As a corporate enterprise, the modern hospital has a private agenda aimed at increasing growth and efficiency with an emphasis on technical services, professionals as employees, and patients as customers. These changes have resulted in a decrease in trustee and professional authority and an increase in administrative control. This shift in the control structure has continued in response to the need for accounting and regulation of services and in response to demands for increased growth and efficiency made by an increasingly competitive market environment. Strategies for the reorganization of hospital staff aimed at improving both inpatient and outpatient care are reviewed. The reorganization of the institution and staff, using either a staff group-practice corporation or an administrative staff model, is proposed. Clinicians have new responsibilities for developing collective arrangements for institutional governance, for allocating institutional resources, for providing public accountability regarding the use of these resources, and for defining the missions of care.

  12. Putting a Face on the Issue: Corporate Stakeholder Mobilization in Professional Grassroots Lobbying Campaigns.

    PubMed

    Walker, Edward T

    2012-12-01

    Business scholars pay increasing attention to the expanded influence of stakeholders on firm strategies, legitimacy, and competitiveness. At the same time, analysts have noted that the transformed regulatory and legislative environments of recent decades have encouraged firms to become much more politically active. Surprisingly, relatively little research has tied together these two trends. The present study integrates perspectives on stakeholder management with research on corporate political activity to develop an understanding of the structural sources of stakeholder mobilization in professional grassroots lobbying campaigns. This study employs a unique, original data source to consider how the adoption of grassroots lobbying by a firm relates to its industry, degree of inside lobbying, partisan PAC contributions, and more. This research shows that corporate grassroots lobbying is shaped most significantly by a firm's degree of inside lobbying, as highly active firms take a diversified strategy for gaining influence. Firms in industries with a heavy public presence as well as those concerned with taxation, government appropriations, and economic development also adopt these strategies readily. PAC contributions to Republican, but not Democratic, candidates also heighten firms' propensity to lobby the public. PMID:24707060

  13. Putting a Face on the Issue: Corporate Stakeholder Mobilization in Professional Grassroots Lobbying Campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Business scholars pay increasing attention to the expanded influence of stakeholders on firm strategies, legitimacy, and competitiveness. At the same time, analysts have noted that the transformed regulatory and legislative environments of recent decades have encouraged firms to become much more politically active. Surprisingly, relatively little research has tied together these two trends. The present study integrates perspectives on stakeholder management with research on corporate political activity to develop an understanding of the structural sources of stakeholder mobilization in professional grassroots lobbying campaigns. This study employs a unique, original data source to consider how the adoption of grassroots lobbying by a firm relates to its industry, degree of inside lobbying, partisan PAC contributions, and more. This research shows that corporate grassroots lobbying is shaped most significantly by a firm’s degree of inside lobbying, as highly active firms take a diversified strategy for gaining influence. Firms in industries with a heavy public presence as well as those concerned with taxation, government appropriations, and economic development also adopt these strategies readily. PAC contributions to Republican, but not Democratic, candidates also heighten firms’ propensity to lobby the public. PMID:24707060

  14. A Survey of Employment Opportunities for Graduates with a Master's in Corporate and Professional Communication: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Michael; Hall, Payson

    An employer survey was designed and conducted to assess the availability of employment opportunities for individuals holding a master's degree in Corporate and Professional Communication within the primary geographic area of Radford University, Virginia. Surveys were mailed to 5,004 companies and organizations categorized as follows: (1)…

  15. Medicine As a Corporate Enterprise, Patient Welfare Centered Profession, or Patient Welfare Centered Professional Enterprise?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Singh, Shakuntala

    2005-01-01

    corporate enterprise or remain a patient welfare centered profession. A third approach involves an eclectic resolution of the two. Such amount of patient welfare as also ensures profit, and such amount of profit as also ensures patient welfare is to be forwarded. For, profit, without patient welfare, is blind. And patient welfare, without profit, is lame. According to this approach, medicine becomes a patient welfare centered professional enterprise. The various ramifications of each of these approaches are discussed in this monograph. PMID:22679354

  16. Ethics, morality, and conflicting interests: how questionable professional integrity in some scientists supports global corporate influence in public health.

    PubMed

    Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia Therese; Ruff, Kathleen; Egilman, David S; Lemen, Richard A; Soskolne, Colin L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and public health research, education, and medical practice are vulnerable to influence by corporate interests driven by the for-profit motive. Developments over the last 10 years have shown that transparency and self-reporting of corporate ties do not always mitigate bias. In this article, we provide examples of how sound scientific reasoning and evidence-gathering are undermined through compromised scientific enquiry resulting in misleading science, decision-making, and policy intervention. Various medical disciplines provide reference literature essential for informing public, environmental, and occupational health policy. Published literature impacts clinical and laboratory methods, the validity of respective clinical guidelines, and the development and implementation of public health regulations. Said literature is also used in expert testimony related to resolving tort actions on work-related illnesses and environmental risks. We call for increased sensitivity, full transparency, and the implementation of effective ethical and professional praxis rules at all relevant regulatory levels to rout out inappropriate corporate influence in science. This is needed because influencing the integrity of scientists who engage in such activities cannot be depended upon. PMID:25730664

  17. Ethics, morality, and conflicting interests: how questionable professional integrity in some scientists supports global corporate influence in public health

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Xaver; Budnik, Lygia Therese; Ruff, Kathleen; Egilman, David S; Lemen, Richard A; Soskolne, Colin L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and public health research, education, and medical practice are vulnerable to influence by corporate interests driven by the for-profit motive. Developments over the last 10 years have shown that transparency and self-reporting of corporate ties do not always mitigate bias. In this article, we provide examples of how sound scientific reasoning and evidence-gathering are undermined through compromised scientific enquiry resulting in misleading science, decision-making, and policy intervention. Various medical disciplines provide reference literature essential for informing public, environmental, and occupational health policy. Published literature impacts clinical and laboratory methods, the validity of respective clinical guidelines, and the development and implementation of public health regulations. Said literature is also used in expert testimony related to resolving tort actions on work-related illnesses and environmental risks. We call for increased sensitivity, full transparency, and the implementation of effective ethical and professional praxis rules at all relevant regulatory levels to rout out inappropriate corporate influence in science. This is needed because influencing the integrity of scientists who engage in such activities cannot be depended upon. PMID:25730664

  18. The Informal Curriculum: A Case Study on Tutor Reflexivity, Corporate Agency and Medical Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Professionalism is a focus for student learning in many disciplines. It is known, furthermore, that interpersonal interactions between staff and students constitute an informal curriculum that has a significant influence on students. But the origins of this informal curriculum are not fully apparent. This article offers a multiple case study that…

  19. Educating European Corporate Communication Professionals for Senior Management Positions: A Collaboration between UCLA's Anderson School of Management and the University of Lugano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Janis

    2005-01-01

    UCLA's program in strategic management for European corporate communication professionals provides participants with a concentrated, yet selective, immersion in those management disciplines taught at U.S. business schools, topics that are essential to their work as senior advisors to CEOs and as leaders in the field. The choice of topics…

  20. Business Entity Selection: Why It Matters to Healthcare Practitioners. Part II--Corporations, Limited Liability Companies, and Professional Entities.

    PubMed

    Nithman, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The Bureau of Labor statistics indicates only a 50% four-year survivability rate among businesses classified as "education and health services." Gaining knowledge of IRS business entities can result in cost savings, operational efficiency, reduced liability, and enhanced sustainability. Each entity has unique disadvantages, depending on size, diversity of ownership, desire to expand, and profitability. Business structures should be compatible with organizational mission or vision statements, services and products, and professional codes of ethics. Healthcare reform will require greater business acumen. We have an ethical duty to disseminate and acquire the knowledge to properly establish and manage healthcare practices to ensure sustainable services that protect and serve the community.

  1. Save Money with a Corporate Style Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that corporate style guides create consistency in documents, promote a professional image, train new employees, and define document generation. Describes how to develop a corporate style guide. (SR)

  2. What contributes to professionalism?

    PubMed

    LaSala, Kathleen B; Nelson, Jenenne

    2005-02-01

    Appearance, behavior, dress, and communication skills play an important role in the image that a nurse projects. As the nurse interacts with patients, families, community members, corporate personnel, and policymakers, he or she must reflect a professional image.

  3. [Risk communication during health crises: results of a cross-sectional study to evaluate the effectiveness of adopted corporate communication strategies during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in Italy and on the training needs of health professionals].

    PubMed

    De Giusti, Maria; Mannocci, Alice; Miccoli, Silvia; Palazzo, Caterina; Di Thiene, Domitilla; Scalmato, Valeria; Ursillo, Paolo; Monteduro, Maria Antonietta; Turri, Alberto; Mazzoli, Pier Giovanni; Boccia, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of corporate communication activities carried out during the A(H1N1) pandemic influenza in Italy and to identify educational needs of health professionals with regards to crisis communication. The study compared two samples representing respectively the general population and health professionals, living in different regions of northern, central and southern Italy. A self-administered questionnaire was used, with questions on knowledge about preventive measures during a pandemic and on satisfaction with the adopted communication campaigns. Study results highlight that both samples had very little knowledge of appropriate preventive behaviors to be adopted during a pandemic. The sample of health professionals received a greater amount of information about the pandemic with respect to the general population and showed a strong interest toward the problem of receiving adequate training in risk communication. The degree of knowledge about preventive measures is directly proportional to the existence of institutional communication activities and to having consulted a health professional.

  4. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association.

  5. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide. PMID:25080670

  6. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide.

  7. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association. PMID:27138631

  8. What Corporate Training Professionals Think About e-Learning: Practitioners' Views on the Potential of e-Learning in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossett, Allison; Marshall, James

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study of 954 mostly veteran workplace learning professionals sought to determine why respondents adopt e-learning. The results indicated that they see e-learning was most valuable for delivering instruction governing familiar company tasks, such as providing information about products, fulfilling compliance requirements, and…

  9. Professional Skills Training for Social and Behavioral Competence: A Corporate Case Study in Using a Fictional Video Script for Interactive "Learning by Viewing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leleu-Merviel, Sylvie; Vieville, Nicolas; Labour, Michel

    Faced with a rapidly changing society, the need to develop versatile instructional materials to update the professional skills of experienced practitioners has become a major necessity. This paper outlines the framework of how the project called "Je peux vous aider? (Can I help you?)" was developed. It concerns the training of all the sales teams…

  10. Corporate Learning in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Anne; Berge, Zane L.

    2009-01-01

    Corporate training professionals led the explosion of e-learning solutions in the 1990s. Yet in 2008, as new generations of technology-savvy, computer games-oriented employees are entering the workforce, corporate training departments are far behind universities in exploring the use of virtual worlds like Second Life or Protosphere as platforms…

  11. Career Decision-Making and Corporate Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainty, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the extent of influence of corporate (or organisational) responsibility on university students' career decision-making. It reports on a pilot study conducted at the University of Sydney which aims to: explore students' ethical, professional and social understanding regarding corporate responsibility; determine the…

  12. Corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed.

  13. Corporate Communication: Building Confidence between the Academic and Business Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snavely, William B.; Sullivan, Dan

    1984-01-01

    Describes how business organizations view the purposes and results of communication and the role of the corporate communication professional. Suggests ways to bridge the gap between academic and business worlds. (PD)

  14. The Current State and Prospects of Corporate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorshkov, M. K.; Kliucharev, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Privately conducted corporate education in Russia is developing to meet the needs of business organizations. The growth in the number of those who are taking part in supplementary education, including corporate education, is linked to the requirements of professional work. In this area the level of competition for the adult trainee can be expected…

  15. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  16. Enhancing professionalism at GPU Nuclear

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island nuclear generating stations. The program was also to include its corporate headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions, including on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for senior reactor operators, and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crew. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly 2,000 people at both nuclear generating sites.

  17. Corporate psychopathy: Talking the walk.

    PubMed

    Babiak, Paul; Neumann, Craig S; Hare, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    There is a very large literature on the important role of psychopathy in the criminal justice system. We know much less about corporate psychopathy and its implications, in large part because of the difficulty in obtaining the active cooperation of business organizations. This has left us with only a few small-sample studies, anecdotes, and speculation. In this study, we had a unique opportunity to examine psychopathy and its correlates in a sample of 203 corporate professionals selected by their companies to participate in management development programs. The correlates included demographic and status variables, as well as in-house 360 degrees assessments and performance ratings. The prevalence of psychopathic traits-as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and a Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV) "equivalent"-was higher than that found in community samples. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that the underlying latent structure of psychopathy in our corporate sample was consistent with that model found in community and offender studies. Psychopathy was positively associated with in-house ratings of charisma/presentation style (creativity, good strategic thinking and communication skills) but negatively associated with ratings of responsibility/performance (being a team player, management skills, and overall accomplishments).

  18. Corporations and Library Fundraising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan S.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of corporate donations of cash, products, service, and expertise to libraries highlights industry contributions in 1980; why corporations give; examples of corporate donations to various libraries (Brooklyn Public, New York Public, Altoona Area Public, Boston Public); planning fund-raising compaigns; and seven strategic planning…

  19. Scaling the Corporate Heights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bebe Moore

    1983-01-01

    Reviews "Black Life in Corporate America" (Davis and Watson), "Women at Work: A Psychologist's Secrets to Getting Ahead in Business" (Senter), and "The Black Manager, Making It in the Corporate World" (Dickens and Dickens). All three books address general issues confronting Black/female managers, and two offer guidance to corporate newcomers. (CMG)

  20. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of corporate communications…

  1. Professional Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frowe, Ian

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of professional trust and argues that trust is an essential component of what it means to be a professional. The first part of the paper discusses the nature of trust in general and attempts to establish two main points: that we are all involved in relationships of trust and that all trust involves risk. The second…

  2. Uniforms, status and professional boundaries in hospital.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen; East, Linda

    2011-11-01

    Despite their comparative neglect analytically, uniforms play a key role in the delineation of occupational boundaries and the formation of professional identity in healthcare. This paper analyses a change to the system of uniforms in one UK hospital, where management have required all professions (with the exception of doctors) to wear the same 'corporate' uniform. Focus groups were conducted with the professionals and patients. We analyse this initiative as a kind of McDonaldisation, seeking to create a new 'corporate' worker whose allegiance is principally to the organisation, rather than a profession. Our findings show how important uniforms are to their wearers, both in terms of the defence of professional boundaries and status, as well as the construction of professional identity.

  3. Neural correlates of corporate camaraderie and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Levine, Catherine

    2007-11-01

    Corporate citizenship creates an ethical and professional accountability among the employee, the organization, and the outside market. Teamwork is an essential part of this corporate accountability because it increases communication and confidence within the organization and promotes camaraderie and goal completion. Cognitive neuroscience research has been able to localize socialization to various areas of the limbic system, which includes, among other structures, the hypothalamus and amygdala, and is associated with the prefrontal cortex. These neurocortical areas can be monitored while set tasks are performed experimentally or observed naturally. Within the framework of cognitive neuroscience, one can evaluate the neural architecture involved in various states of organizational behavior. One can then use this framework as an overlay in the corporate environment to track project completion and profitability.

  4. Neural correlates of corporate camaraderie and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Levine, Catherine

    2007-11-01

    Corporate citizenship creates an ethical and professional accountability among the employee, the organization, and the outside market. Teamwork is an essential part of this corporate accountability because it increases communication and confidence within the organization and promotes camaraderie and goal completion. Cognitive neuroscience research has been able to localize socialization to various areas of the limbic system, which includes, among other structures, the hypothalamus and amygdala, and is associated with the prefrontal cortex. These neurocortical areas can be monitored while set tasks are performed experimentally or observed naturally. Within the framework of cognitive neuroscience, one can evaluate the neural architecture involved in various states of organizational behavior. One can then use this framework as an overlay in the corporate environment to track project completion and profitability. PMID:17717098

  5. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  6. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  7. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency. 323.6 Section 323.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a)...

  8. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency. 323.6 Section 323.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a)...

  9. Public health advocacy to change corporate practices: implications for health education practice and research.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2005-06-01

    Corporate practices, such as advertising, public relations, lobbying, litigation, and sponsoring scientific research, have a significant impact on the health of the people in the United States. Recently, health professionals and advocates have created a new scope of practice that aims to modify corporate practices that harm health. This article describes how corporate policies influence health and reviews recent health campaigns aimed at changing corporate behavior in six industries selected for their central role in the U.S. economy and their influence on major causes of mortality and morbidity. These are the alcohol, automobile, food, gun, pharmaceutical, and tobacco industries. The article defines corporate disease promotion and illustrates the range of public health activities that have emerged to counter such corporate behaviors. It analyzes the role of health professionals, government, and advocacy groups in these campaigns and assesses the implications of this domain for health education practice and research.

  10. Corporal Punishment Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John

    2002-01-01

    Lists arguments for using corporal punishment in educational institutions and considers some advantages of its use. Asks when it should be used, who should be empowered to administer it, and why there are increasingly strong feelings against corporal punishment in some societies while others continue to use it. (BT)

  11. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  12. Making the Corporate Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornforth, Suzanne; Simpson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Corporate sponsorship is a marketing strategy by which companies communicate about their products or services by affiliating with events or institutions valued by targeted customer groups. Increasingly, campus communicators are seeking to establish corporate sponsorships but first must resolve legal and ethical concerns. Various types of…

  13. Entering the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenshields, Garry W.

    This seminar guide was designed for use with a series of slides in training administrators to market an educational program or service to corporations. The seminar explains the following eight stages in planning entry into the corporate market: identifying appropriate publics; researching the market (analyzing supply and demand, collecting data,…

  14. Professional support framework: improving access to professional support for professionals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Fiona; Bell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    From an organisational point of view, professional support is an important aspect of clinical governance and a tool for maximising service delivery quality. As a key factor in staff retention and recruitment, access to professional support is also regarded as an important tool for facilitating workforce growth in a competitive health workforce market. While some work units provide appropriate professional support such as in-service, professional supervision is a key challenge for a large organisation employing many health professionals to ensure equitable and relevant access to finite professional support resources. The goal of this paper is to describe the Professional Support Program designed and implemented by Queensland Health. This program seeks to support professionals who may not previously have had optimal engagement in professional support and to enhance the quality of professional support activities available. Evaluation indicates that the Professional Support Program has been successful in facilitating participation in, and quality of professional support activities. PMID:23680624

  15. Public Health Advocacy to Change Corporate Practices: Implications for Health Education Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Corporate practices, such as advertising, public relations, lobbying, litigation, and sponsoring scientific research, have a significant impact on the health of the people in the United States. Recently, health professionals and advocates have created a new scope of practice that aims to modify corporate practices that harm health. This article…

  16. Designing a Master's Program in Corporate Communication at an Urban University: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Margaret Jones

    To assess how an urban university can take advantage of its setting to design a master's program in corporate communication, a 1987 study of the master's program in corporate communication at Duquesne University of Pittsburgh was conducted. Data were obtained through a survey of 590 local communication professionals, of whom 270 responded (a…

  17. Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Chris, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This serial issue contains 12 articles on the theme of "Professional Development," specifically about how teachers in the Bread Loaf Rural Teacher Network (BLRTN) are fostering their own and each other's development as teachers. The BLRTN consists of approximately 260 rural teachers in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, New…

  18. Professional Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Counseling and Development, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Contains five personal accounts: (1) "From Intern to Senior Staff: Movement toward Self-Nurturance" (William Holahan); (2) "Toward the Emergence of Professional Identity" (Marya Barey Kyril); (3) "Selling My Private Practice: When Less is More" (Lynn Rew); (4) "Mid-Life Career Change: Taking the Plunge" (Richard Weigel); and (5) "A Chance…

  19. Professional Whining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Whining about not being treated as professionals buys teachers little respect. Teaching is hard work, but confers some plush benefits, while discouraging voluntary self-improvement efforts. The notion that pay should be commensurate with work is a noble delusion. Nannies and mothers are also underpaid. (MLH)

  20. Professional Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews four professional books: (1) "Changing Teaching, Changing Schools. Bringing Early Childhood Practice into Public Education: Case Studies from the Kindergarten" (O'Connell); (2) "Whole Language Plus: Essays on Literacy in the United States and New Zealand" (Cazden); (3) "Audacious Kids: Coming of Age in America's Classic Children's Books"…

  1. Discussing Terms: Professions, Professionals, Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bledstein, Burton J.

    Throughout history there have always been confusion and even contradictions concerning professionalism. An occupation can be considered a profession in one country and not another, and in one historical period and not another. One contribution to this confusion is the explanation of the social system by Talcott Parsons and others, which has framed…

  2. Integrated Communications at America's Leading Total Quality Management Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronstedt, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Examines how to create organizational processes that allow communication professionals with a variety of expertise to support each other through coordination and integration. Studies eight of America's leading total quality management corporations, including AT&T, Federal Express, Saturn, and Xerox. Explores how various total quality management…

  3. Reading Smoke and Mirrors: The Rhetoric of Corporate Annual Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Peter J.; Scheiber, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines fundamental rhetorical constructs that students and business professionals should consider when analyzing textual and financial information contained in corporations' annual reports. Discusses how students in business communication classes evaluate the rhetorical effectiveness of specific annual reports, as well as the ethics associated…

  4. Digital Equipment Corporation's CRDOM Software and Database Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Michael Q.

    1986-01-01

    Acquaints information professionals with Digital Equipment Corporation's compact optical disk read-only-memory (CDROM) search and retrieval software and growing library of CDROM database publications (COMPENDEX, Chemical Abstracts Services). Highlights include MicroBASIS, boolean operators, range operators, word and phrase searching, proximity…

  5. Functions and Positions of Corporate Occupational Health Managers in Company-Wide Occupational Health Management.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Nagata, Tomohisa; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Hino, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Masako

    2013-08-21

    Objectives: It has become necessary for Japanese corporations to manage occupational health (OH) programs consistently throughout their organizations. Corporations need to clarify their health policies, develop standardized programs, assign OH staff, and ensure that they communicate with each other. To realize such conditions, many occupational physicians (OPs), who have the skills to lead corporation-wide OH activities, are now being assigned to head offices of corporations and referred to as corporate OH managers. However, there has been no research to date in Japan on their actual situation and function. We conducted an interview study of corporate OH managers to clarify their functions and positions in corporations. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semi-structural interviews with 14 corporate OH managers in large corporations employing more than 5,000 workers and multiple OPs. Interview scripts were coded to identify their functions as corporate OH managers and the context of their positions within corporate-wide OH management systems. Results: Five contexts were suggested. 1) Corporate OH managers played central roles in developing corporate health policies, standards and plans. 2) Head office department managers who supervised the sites distributed the policies and standards, and corporate OH managers instructed site OPs and OH staff. 3) In some corporations, corporate OH managers participated in the evaluation process of OH programs as part of occupational safety and health management systems or business audits. 4) Corporate OH managers led communications among OPs and OH staff by facilitating corporate OH meetings, and provided technical training. 5) Corporate OH managers in positions that enabled them to report directly or indirectly to decision makers (i.e., directors in charge) on human resource issues. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that companies that promote consistent company-wide OH programs also utilized the professional knowledge

  6. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  7. Corporate Teaching Help Drops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, David E.

    1985-01-01

    Electronics, pharmaceuticals, and other industry programs to loan corporate employees to colleges and universities for short-term teaching assignments are discussed, including the advantages to both industry and the institutions and the conflicts in demand for specialists. (MSE)

  8. 1993 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Some of the companies in this year's Corporate Profiles section you know and use; some may seem familiar; but all of the companies are important to you as healthcare supply managers. This detailed overview of the history, sales and service, product lines, new technology and future plans of each corporation is brought to you as a service from JHMM, to be used as a review, an update and a resource throughout the year. PMID:10130626

  9. Professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  10. On hitting children: a review of corporal punishment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Knox, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Research has clearly demonstrated associations between corporal punishment of children and maladaptive behavior patterns such as aggression and delinquency. Hitting children is an act of violence and a clear violation of children's human rights. In this article, the position of the United States on corporal punishment of children is discussed. Professional and international progress on ending corporal punishment is explained, and the relationship between corporal punishment and child abuse is discussed. An appeal is made for prevention efforts such as parent education and removal of social sanctions for hitting children that may hold significant promise for preventing child maltreatment.

  11. Professional Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Joan S.; And Others

    Aspects of professional competence and professional socialization that are being emphasized in professional education programs are summarized. Of concern are generic outcomes of professional preparation, outcome-related issues and trends common to professional education in diverse fields, some problems that concern professional educators, and…

  12. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment. PMID:23073159

  13. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and... compliance with the corporation laws thereof. (b) Whenever deemed advisable the Superintendent may require...

  14. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation...

  15. A Qualitative Study on the Obstacles Preventing the Successful Implementation of Web 2.0 in Corporate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the obstacles to the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies as part of corporate learning solutions and strategies. The study followed a qualitative inquiry approach. The sample consisted of 20 corporate learning professionals who are members of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) social…

  16. Leveraging messages and corporations: the Philippine experience.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg

    1989-12-01

    A project using the entertainment media was developed to promote responsible sexual behavior of young people in the Philippines. Music videos by Lea Salonga and the group Menudo were used to sell the message of responsible sexual behavior and to encourage counseling for discussing and solving their problems. There were 2 parts: a commercial phase to make the songs hits with a social message, and an institutional phase to develop counseling centers and a telephone counseling service. The project was planned to use cost sharing with private corporations, and over $1.4 million was obtained from corporate sponsorship. Surveys after the project began showed that 92% of the young people heard the song and 90% like it. Over 51% stated that it had an impact on them, 44% talked to their parents about it, and 25% asked for contraceptive information. Of those surveyed, 83% said they were aware of the telephone counseling service offered. There were over 8,000 calls answered by the counselors. The lessons learned from this project were that the use of professionals and top materials can help gain corporate support and access to the media. By planning to use cost sharing and cost recovery methods, a challenge is presented to the staff to use creative approaches. The use of the right celebrities can aid visibility, credibility and excitement to the project. This approach can be a useful method to promote a social message and get the interest of the private sector.

  17. Professionalism for Medicine: Opportunities and Obligations*

    PubMed Central

    Cruess, Sylvia R; Cruess, Richard L; Johnston, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Physicians' dual roles-as healer and professional-are linked by codes of ethics governing behaviour and are empowered by science.Being part of a profession entails a societal contract. The profession is granted a monopoly over the use of a body of knowledge and the privilege of self-regulation and, in return, guarantees society professional competence, integrity and the provision of altruistic service.Societal attitudes to professionalism have changed from supportive to increasingly critical-with physicians being criticised for pursuing their own financial interests, and failing to self-regulate in a way that guarantees competence.Professional values are also threatened by many other factors. The most important are the changes in healthcare delivery in the developed world, with control shifting from the profession to the State and/or the corporate sector.For the ideal of professionalism to survive, physicians must understand it and its role in the social contract. They must meet the obligations necessary to sustain professionalism and ensure that healthcare systems support, rather than subvert, behaviour that is compatible with professionalism's values. PMID:15296199

  18. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott’s and Larson’s theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil. PMID:22520155

  19. Of Corporate Bondage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, James

    1975-01-01

    "While it is entirely possible that the university will continue to function as an essential arm of the giant agribusiness and energy corporations, there are, nevertheless, a wealth of opportunities for it to direct its energies to more useful purposes." The author traces universities' past involvement noting alternatives in energy and agriculture…

  20. The corporate trustee evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, B.A.; Ross, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    Trustees have an increasing role in the public debt market for project finance. With the responsibility comes the need for clearly defined guidelines. This article examines the need for public financing of power projects, and the role and responsibilities of corporate trustees in this environment.

  1. Lessons from Enlightened Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankstein, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    The formula for improving U.S. schools can be found in the philosophy that helped transform Japanese industry and in Deming's 14 principles, emulated by many corporations. Deming's arguments against appraising individual performance through quotas or numerical goals call into question schools' current grading and merit pay practices. (12…

  2. Corporate Boss, College President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Vernon R.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between the roles of a corporate administrator and a college president are reviewed and related to the role of an effective trustee. It is noted that accountability demands affect institutional autonomy and that trustees must become more involved in policy-making to protect the academic freedom of colleges and universities in the…

  3. Corporate Training in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  4. Corporate information management guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  5. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  6. 1991 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    We feel a very important part of the career development of any healthcare supply manager is knowing the companies you do business with. The following Corporate Profiles, which contain information about the mission, structure, background and products of leading companies in the healthcare field, are an excellent way to achieve this knowledge.

  7. The Corporate Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    In many states, schools use programs developed by industry to teach about environmental issues. Corporate-sponsored curricula appear to expose children to knowledge about nature, energy use, solid waste, and recycling, but they often actually display an incomplete and self-serving picture that is raising concern among environmentalists and…

  8. Corporal Punishment and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Gordon B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand and evaluate the continued prevalence of corporal punishment in school systems, this article reviews the following topics: (1) historical issues; (2) current demographics and correlates; (3) the effectiveness of corporal punishment in school settings; (4) myths; (5) alternatives to corporal punishment; and (6) social policy.…

  9. Constructive Engagement with the Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the gravest concerns that critics of corporate culture have about the consequences of academic-corporate relationships are built on little more than ill-informed speculation, fueled by a lack of direct engagement with corporations. The solution to knowledge gap--and the key to liberation from fears of "creeping corporatization"--may…

  10. Rethinking Professional Standards to Promote Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Christine; McMahon, Margery Anne; Hamilton, Gillian; Murray, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    This article explores some of the key issues that emerged in the revision of the professional standards in Scottish education. The revision of the professional standards was part of a wider project to build teacher professional learning in ways that had an impact on practice and on pupil learning. The article begins by examining the international…

  11. Counseling: Issues of Professionalism and Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Theresa J.

    Professionalism and professionalization are two issues important to the field of counseling. A basic definition of a profession is necessary in order to understand the role of counseling as a profession. One theory on the development of professions in the western world begins with the priest as the prototypical professional. Professions then…

  12. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  13. Professional Characteristics Communicated by Formal versus Casual Workplace Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Peter W.; Okoro, Ephraim A.

    2009-01-01

    Employees are frequently advised to dress for success to build their careers. From the corporate perspective, employees who are well dressed are believed to form better impressions with colleagues, clients, and customers. Many companies create dress codes in order to gain the benefits of a professionally appearing workforce. Developing effective…

  14. 22 CFR 712.205 - Professional and technical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 712.205 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 712.205 Professional and technical services. (a) The... reasonable compensation made to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal...

  15. 22 CFR 712.300 - Professional and technical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 712.300 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Activities by Other Than Own Employees § 712.300 Professional and technical services... any reasonable payment to a person, other than an officer or employee of a person requesting...

  16. Using Cases in Graduate-Level Professional Writing Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Heather Brodie

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the incorporation of cases to help students understand the issues inherent in corporate communication. Finds that the cases significantly improve the quality of education gained by the students. Concludes that cases provide a variety of contexts and examples for professional writing that enlighten students as to the range of documents,…

  17. Career Aspirations of Malaysian Research and Development Professionals in the Knowledge Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maimunah; Ramly, Efizah Sofiah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to compare the influence of self-efficacy, organizational socialization and continuous improvement (CI) practices on the career aspirations of research and development (R&D) professionals in government research institutes (GRIs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) in Malaysia. R&D professionals in this study refer to a…

  18. Professional Development of Instructional Designers: A Proposed Framework Based on a Singapore Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, Eleen; Wettasinghe, Marissa C.; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a professional development action plan or framework for instructional designers (IDs) working as external consultants for corporate companies. It also describes justifications why such an action plan is necessary for these professionals. The framework aims to help practising instructional designers to continuously and…

  19. Adult Learners' Perceptions of a Professional Development Program Comparing Live Distance Learning versus Live Local Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Eric; De Muth, James

    2012-01-01

    Reduced corporate training budgets require cost efficiencies in professional development. Distance learning, with its lower intrinsic costs, will likely become more prevalent. Therefore, the educational experience will change for many professionals. The objective of this study was to examine the perceptions of adult learners attending a drug…

  20. Study of International Mentoring and Coaching Practices and Their Constructive Application in the Russian System of Corporate Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Shaidullina, Almira R.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research stems from dissimilarities between domestic and foreign experiences of mentoring and coaching in corporate education and training related to the methods and techniques aimed not only at transmitting mentor's professional experience to young professionals but also at identifying and developing mentees' potential, and…

  1. Corporate compliance: framework and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, N

    1999-01-01

    The federal government has created numerous programs to combat fraud and abuse. The government now encourages healthcare facilities to have a corporate compliance program (CCP), a plan that reduces the chances that the facility will violate laws or regulations. A CCP is an organization-wide program comprised of a code of conduct and written policies, internal monitoring and auditing standards, employee training, feedback mechanisms and other features, all designed to prevent and detect violations of governmental laws, regulations and policies. It is a system or method ensuring that employees understand and will comply with laws that apply to what they do every day. Seven factors, based on federal sentencing guidelines, provide the framework for developing a CCP. First, a facility must establish rules that are reasonably capable of reducing criminal conduct. Second, high-level personnel must oversee the compliance effort. Third, a facility must use due care in delegating authority in the compliance initiative. Fourth, standards must be communicated effectively to employees, and fifth, a facility must take reasonable steps to achieve compliance. Sixth, standards must be enforced consistently across the organization and last, standards must be modified or changed for reported concerns, to ensure they are not repeated. PROMINA Health System, Inc. in Atlanta, Ga., designed a program to meet federal guidelines. It started with a self-assessment to define its areas or risk. Next, it created the internal structure and assigned organizational responsibility for running the CCP. PROMINA then developed standards of business and professional conduct, established vehicles of communication and trained employees on the standards. Finally, it continues to develop evidence of the program's effectiveness by monitoring and documenting its compliance activities. PMID:10346652

  2. Corporate compliance: framework and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, N

    1999-01-01

    The federal government has created numerous programs to combat fraud and abuse. The government now encourages healthcare facilities to have a corporate compliance program (CCP), a plan that reduces the chances that the facility will violate laws or regulations. A CCP is an organization-wide program comprised of a code of conduct and written policies, internal monitoring and auditing standards, employee training, feedback mechanisms and other features, all designed to prevent and detect violations of governmental laws, regulations and policies. It is a system or method ensuring that employees understand and will comply with laws that apply to what they do every day. Seven factors, based on federal sentencing guidelines, provide the framework for developing a CCP. First, a facility must establish rules that are reasonably capable of reducing criminal conduct. Second, high-level personnel must oversee the compliance effort. Third, a facility must use due care in delegating authority in the compliance initiative. Fourth, standards must be communicated effectively to employees, and fifth, a facility must take reasonable steps to achieve compliance. Sixth, standards must be enforced consistently across the organization and last, standards must be modified or changed for reported concerns, to ensure they are not repeated. PROMINA Health System, Inc. in Atlanta, Ga., designed a program to meet federal guidelines. It started with a self-assessment to define its areas or risk. Next, it created the internal structure and assigned organizational responsibility for running the CCP. PROMINA then developed standards of business and professional conduct, established vehicles of communication and trained employees on the standards. Finally, it continues to develop evidence of the program's effectiveness by monitoring and documenting its compliance activities.

  3. 'What is professional ethics?'.

    PubMed

    Brecher, Bob

    2014-03-01

    The very term 'professional ethics' is puzzling with respect to what both 'professional' and 'ethics' might mean. I argue (1) that professionalism is ambiguous as to whether or not it is implicitly committed to ethical practice; (2) that to be 'professionally' ethical is at best ambiguous, if not in fact bizarre; and (3) that, taken together, these considerations suggest that professional ethics is something to be avoided rather than lauded.

  4. A survey of parental opinions on corporal punishment in schools.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P C; Weir, M R; Fearnow, R G

    1985-06-01

    Forty-three states permit corporal punishment in schools. This practice continues despite the universal opposition of professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics. This study determines parental attitudes concerning the use of physical punishment in schools. The surveyed sample is drawn from parents of military dependents who brought their children to this clinic for routine physical examinations. One hundred and twenty-nine of 132 questionnaires were returned for a 98% response rate. Fifty-one percent of the parents supported the use of corporal punishment in schools, 37% disagreed (77% of these strongly), 11% had no opinion, and 1% did not respond to the question. Analysis of the responses displayed a relationship between parental attitudes on the use of corporal punishment and opinion of the positive effects of physical punishment on children's behavior (p less than 0.0001). No relationship was found between position on corporal punishment and the respondent (mother, father, or both), the age of parents, the military rank of the sponsor (the individual whose military service makes the child eligible for military medical care, i.e., father, mother, guardian, etc.), the sex of the children, the marital status of the parents, or the schools attended by the children (public or private). Thirty-four percent of parents believed corporal punishment would improve behavior, and 20% of parents felt that physical punishment would improve their child's academic performance.

  5. 27 CFR 41.234 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41... Processed Tobacco § 41.234 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as....231 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  6. 27 CFR 40.494 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40... Processed Tobacco § 40.494 Corporate documents. Every corporation that files an application for a permit as... § 40.492 a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of corporate existence or...

  7. 12 CFR 5.42 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 5.42 Section 5.42 Banks and... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Other Changes in Activities and Operations § 5.42 Corporate title. (a) Authority. 12 U... change its corporate title. (c) Standards. A national bank may change its corporate title provided...

  8. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  9. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context.

  10. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  11. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries. PMID:17208716

  12. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context. PMID:27595527

  13. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  14. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional…

  15. Corporate U. Takes the Job Training Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Discusses corporations such as Sears, Motorola, Saturn, and Intel that have created their own corporate universities to train and retrain their workers. Highlights Motorola, the largest of the corporate universities. (JOW)

  16. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  17. Corporal Punishment and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aucoin, Katherine J.; Frick, Paul J.; Bodin, S. Doug

    2006-01-01

    The association between corporal punishment and children's emotional and behavioral functioning was studied in a sample of 98 non-referred children with a mean age of 12.35 (SD=1.72) recruited from two school systems in the southeastern United States. Children were divided into those who had experienced no corporal punishment over approximately a…

  18. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  19. The Changing Shape of Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains two articles dealing with the changing shape of corporations. The article "Trends in Business Culture" argues that Wal-Mart's emergence as the largest corporation in the United States reflects the larger economic shift in the U.S. economy from production of goods to provision of abstract goods such as services and…

  20. Corporate Support of Education, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    This document was published by the Council for Aid to Education, the only national nonprofit organization that focuses on education and private giving, particularly corporate giving. The first part presents national estimates for corporate contributions made during 1993. Preliminary data for 1994 indicate little if any growth, though the outlook…

  1. Theory "W": The Corporate Warrior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes power structure of corporations functioning under Theory W in which single leaders, in partnership with trusted followers, achieve corporate success. Basis of this industrial structure is attributed to social and developmental structures of prehistoric man and city states. Dimensions of W, X, Y, and Z theories are discussed. (MBR)

  2. The Solar Development Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a proposed stand alone company, the Solar Development Corporation (SDC), to be a business development and financing entity for photovoltaic operations with the potential to be commercially sustainable. SDC will have a fully integrated policy advocacy link to the World Bank. SDC will define target countries where the potential exists for significant early market expansion. In those countries it will provide: market and business development services that will accelerate the growth of private firms and deepen the penetration of Solar Home Systems (SHS) and other rural PV applications in the market; and access to pre-commercial and parallel financing for private firms to (1) expand their capability in PV distribution businesses, and (2) strengthen their ability to provide credit to end users. SDC itself will not engage in direct financing of the final consumer. It is intended that as far as possible SDC`s finance will be provided in parallel with financing from Financial Intermediaries.

  3. Finding an Eye Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information > Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional PDF* The National Eye Institute does not provide referrals or recommend specific ...

  4. Professional Socialization in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, Geraldine E.

    Professional socialization is the process by which individuals acquire the specialized knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, norms, and interests needed to perform their professional roles acceptably. The following interacting domains of potential professional self-growth can be defined as outcomes of the socialization process: self-image, role…

  5. Planning Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Why does professional learning for educators have such a mixed history? Why is it so hard to find solid research evidence of professional development programs that actually improve student learning outcomes? Part of the answer, writes Thomas R. Guskey, is that professional learning experiences for educators are rarely well planned. Consequently,…

  6. Professionalism in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  7. Professional Diversity in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Paula T.

    1992-01-01

    Outlines issues of concern in the management of nonlibrarian professionals in research libraries, argued to be significantly different from the management of professional librarians. Differing professional value systems, conflicts and tension that can arise, and organizational teamwork are discussed with a focus on effective reward structures. (15…

  8. Competencies in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2004-01-01

    There has been a burgeoning interest in competency-based education and credentialing in professional psychology. This movement gained momentum at the Competencies Conference: Future Directions in Education and Credentialing in Professional Psychology. After defining professional competence, the author focuses on the identification and delineation…

  9. Using Baby Books to Change New Mothers' Attitudes about Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Stephanie M.; Penner, Emily K.; Duncan, Greg J.; Auger, Anamarie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Research has found corporal punishment to have limited effectiveness in altering child behavior and the potential to produce psychological and cognitive damage. Pediatric professionals have advocated reducing, if not eliminating its use. Despite this, it remains a common parenting practice in the US. Methods: Using a three-group…

  10. Innovation, Corporate Strategy, and Cultural Context: What Is the Mission for International Business Communication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulijn, Jan; O'Hair, Dan; Weggeman, Mathieu; Ledlow, Gerald; Hall, H. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Reviews relevant literature in the areas of communication and innovation and explores how efforts toward innovative practices are directly related to globalism and business strategy. Focuses on issues associated with national culture, corporate culture, and professional culture that are relevant to strategies for researching business communication…

  11. Carnegie Corporation of New York: Annual Report 1977 for the Fiscal Year Ended September 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.

    Carnegie Corporation of New York is a philanthropic foundation created by Andrew Carnegie in 1911 for the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding. It is primarliy interested in education and in certain aspects of governmental affairs. Grants for specific programs are made to colleges and universities, professional associations,…

  12. E-Mentoring: Technology, Trust, and Frequency in Corporate E-Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Shannon G.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic mentoring through asynchronous methods using technologies such as e-mail or the Internet is used in the education industry whereby undergraduate and graduate students can be matched with either university professors or career professionals. However, corporate organizations with mentoring initiatives predominantly use traditional…

  13. A Discourse on Ethics and the Corporate Workplace: Can Ethics Be Taught? Working Paper 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsons, Barbara, Ed.

    This working paper is one in a series of policy statements on the relationship between liberal education and careers in business; it covers a seminar discussing ethics and the teaching of morality. Papers given by seven professionals in the corporate and academic world are included. After an introduction to the seminar and a statement on corporate…

  14. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  15. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  16. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41..., AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Tobacco Products Importers § 41.193 Corporate documents. Every corporation... permit, required by § 41.191, a true copy of the corporate charter or a certificate of...

  17. 75 FR 64785 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... changes to the structure of the corporate credit union (corporate) system were warranted. 74 FR 6004 (Feb... related rule provisions. 74 FR 65210 (Dec. 9, 2009). The proposed revisions covered corporate capital... corporate's directors be representatives of NPCUs. +36 months. 704.15 Audit requirements..... No N/A....

  18. Corporal punishment in Tanzania's schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were interviewed. It was found that corporal punishment was the most common form of punishment in secondary schools. The majority of teachers supported its continued use, but believed in moderation. The majority of students and teachers were unaware of national laws to restrict corporal punishment. There was agreement between students and teachers that corporal punishment was used for major and minor student offences such as misbehaviour and tardiness. Students reported disliking the practice and believed it was ineffective and resulted in emotional, as well as physical, distress.

  19. Hot on the Corporate Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truelson, Judith A.

    1976-01-01

    The key sources for public company information are annual reports, company reports published by Moody's Investors Service and Standard and Poor's Corporation, industry surveys, and periodical indexes. (Author/PF)

  20. Computers, Networks and the Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas W.; Rockart, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The ways in which computer networks are forging new kinds of markets and new ways to manage organizations are described. Discussed are the results of these innovations, which include changes in corporate structure and management style. (KR)

  1. Successful Corporate ID Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun Chaucer; Schwen, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a literature review on project management related to corporate instructional design activities. Highlights include project integration, strategic planning, resource allocation, optimizing performance and quality, constructing a project team, generating a productive working climate, and implementation strategies. (LRW)

  2. Making corporate compliance programs work.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, M J; Colyer, C

    2000-05-01

    Healthcare organizations have created corporate compliance programs in an effort to adhere to Federal government recommendations, minimize the risk of wrongful behavior, and possibly reduce fines that may result from a government investigation. Compliance programs may have undetected weaknesses. Corporate compliance officers, executives, and board members need to be certain that their organization's program has sufficient infrastructure, oversight, and resources; effective education and training; an effective mechanism (hotline) to receive reports of compliance problems; and ongoing auditing and monitoring capabilities.

  3. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism.

  4. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  5. Professionalism, then and now.

    PubMed

    Newsome, P R H; Langley, P P

    2014-05-01

    For centuries only three professions were recognised as such: medicine, law and theology. Now that the word 'professional' is applied to all occupations it can be difficult to understand the meaning of professionalism within dentistry and healthcare. We simply cannot treat dentistry as a commodity or business when it is a highly specialised personal service. Now more than ever, dentistry is a team game and all dental professionals must maintain the values and codes that distinguish what we do from most other vocations.

  6. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  7. 77 FR 41808 - General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics... Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Sunrise, Florida. The determination was issued on...

  8. The making of a corporate athlete.

    PubMed

    Loehr, J; Schwartz, T

    2001-01-01

    Management theorists have long sought to identify precisely what makes some people flourish under pressure and others fold. But they have come up with only partial answers: rich material rewards, the right culture, management by objectives. The problem with most approaches is that they deal with people only from the neck up, connecting high performance primarily with cognitive capacity. Authors Loehr and Schwartz argue that a successful approach to sustained high performance must consider the person as a whole. Executives are, in effect, "corporate athletes." If they are to perform at high levels over the long haul, they must train in the systematic, multilevel way that athletes do. Rooted in two decades of work with world-class atheletes, the integrated theory of performance management addresses the body, the emotions, the mind, and the spirit through a model the authors call the performance pyramid. At its foundation is physical well-being. Above that rest emotional health, then mental acuity, and, finally, a spiritual purpose. Each level profoundly influences the others, and all must be addressed together to avoid compromising performance. Rigorous exercise, for instance, can produce a sense of emotional well-being, clearing the way for peak mental performance. Rituals that promote oscillation--the rhythmic expenditure and recovery of energy-link the levels of the pyramid and lead to the ideal performance state. The authors offer case studies of executives who have used the model to increase professional performance and improve the quality of their lives. In a corporate environment that is changing at warp speed, performing consistently at high levels is more necessary than ever. Companies can't afford to address employees' cognitive capacities while ignoring their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being.

  9. The Role of Physicians in State-Sponsored Corporal Punishment.

    PubMed

    Muaygil, Ruaim

    2016-07-01

    The question of whether there is justification for physicians to participate in state-sanctioned corporal punishment has prompted long and heated debates around the world. Several recent and high-profile sentences requiring physician assistance have brought the conversation to Saudi Arabia. Whether a physician is asked to participate actively or to assess prisoners' ability to withstand this form of punishment, can there be an ethical justification for medical training and skills being put toward these purposes? The aim of this article is to examine aspects of Islamic law along with the different professional and religious obligations of Saudi Arabian physicians, and how these elements may inform the debate.

  10. The Role of Physicians in State-Sponsored Corporal Punishment.

    PubMed

    Muaygil, Ruaim

    2016-07-01

    The question of whether there is justification for physicians to participate in state-sanctioned corporal punishment has prompted long and heated debates around the world. Several recent and high-profile sentences requiring physician assistance have brought the conversation to Saudi Arabia. Whether a physician is asked to participate actively or to assess prisoners' ability to withstand this form of punishment, can there be an ethical justification for medical training and skills being put toward these purposes? The aim of this article is to examine aspects of Islamic law along with the different professional and religious obligations of Saudi Arabian physicians, and how these elements may inform the debate. PMID:27348832

  11. Professional Obsolescence and Continuing Professional Development in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Discusses professional development in higher education; considers the work environment as the main site for professional development; and maintains that continuing professional development, in times of continuing professional obsolescence, is best served by attention to departmental cultures. Implications for staff development professionals are…

  12. Professional Values: Key to Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Darlene; Schank, Mary Jane

    2002-01-01

    Affective domain learning, including values formation, is an important part of humanistic nursing education. The American Nurses Association code of ethics articulates professional values. For full embodiment of these values to occur, educators and the profession must work together. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  13. Professional Academic Development through Professional Journal Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Damian; Naidoo, Kogi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the cooperative analysis by a lecturer and an academic development practitioner of a reflective journal dialogue over the 12 weeks of teaching a postgraduate course. Through a retrospective analysis of the journal the present paper explores the following issues: the framing of an inquiry; the personal-professional nexus; and…

  14. Tax Professional Internships and Subsequent Professional Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Philip H.; Blackwood, B. J.; Landy, Sharon D.

    2010-01-01

    How do internships influence the socialization and performance of accounting students employed in the tax department of a CPA firm? Previous research on accounting internships primarily focuses on auditing personnel. There is evidence in the literature that indicates audit and tax professionals have different work cultures. This paper examines the…

  15. Individual Professional Development Plans: Cultivating Professional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargens, Taryl M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last five years schools and districts have been under enormous pressure to improve student achievement scores on state accountability assessments. Educators agree that professional development plays a key role in providing the knowledge and skills needed to increase teacher effectiveness in the classroom. There is no reliable measure for…

  16. Certifying Enrollment Management Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Most current professionals who serve in an enrollment management leadership capacity likely were trained "on the job," or at professional development events, primarily because credit-bearing credentials, degrees, and other formal programs were nonexistent (Phair 2014). However, that landscape has since changed, and now there are multiple…

  17. Educators' Professional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Anitha, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive model of professional characteristics of an educator that will prepare them for high standards of professional achievements, as all professions demand standardization and formulation of guidelines in today's competitive environment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on essentials of an educator was sourced…

  18. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences. PMID:26030375

  19. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences.

  20. Professional Learning from within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korthagen, Fred A. J.

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary on the paper by the Bank Street Reading and Literacy Alumnae Group, Korthagen states that, while it provides an excellent example of how fruitful professional development can be when it is grounded in the needs and strengths of the people involved; regretfully, many traditional approaches to professional development are based on…

  1. NWEA Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive brochure presents how the Northwest Evaluation Association's professional development offerings--plus flexible delivery options designed for busy lives--can make it easier to utilize data. This brochure explores a range of workshops, coaching, online learning, and professional development packages to meet educators' needs and…

  2. Leading Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    If the goal is to fundamentally change the culture inside schools, people need to move beyond the superficiality of professional learning communities and focus on a system of learners. Professional learning communities are in fact about establishing lasting new collaborative cultures. Collaborative cultures are ones that focus on building the…

  3. HRD Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on professional development of human resource development (HRD) professionals. "Lifelong Learning and Performance: The Role of Key Qualifications in Human Resource Development" (Simone J. van Zolingen, Wim J. Nijhof) argues that, besides being of interest to employers, key qualifications are also…

  4. Professionalism in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Paula F.

    That the quest for a general theory of educational administration has been a misdirection of effort and that the advancement of professionalism within this field would represent a more sensible endeavor for the production of useful knowledge is the focus of this essay. The advancement of professionalism would entail a reorientation of research…

  5. Parents: Dilemmas for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Andrea

    1988-01-01

    A British educational psychologist critically examines her practices toward parents. Aspects of the power relationship are explored, including acting as a friend, the trappings of professionalism, privacy and confidentiality, interprofessional trust, and service provision. Professional survival is seen to be the underlying motive in these…

  6. Professional Development & Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeger, Marianne, Ed.; Blaser, Stephanie, Ed.; Raack, Lenaya, Ed.; Cooper, Cinder, Ed.; Kinder, Ann, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Professional development is viewed from several perspectives--time, funding, planning, and student outcomes--and includes both an urban and a rural story. This issue provides a special pullout section designed as a checklist to help guide professional development planning activities. The following articles are included: "Perspectives on Managing…

  7. [The insurance of professional responsibility of medical professionals in Russia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the characteristics of implementation of mandatory insurance of professional risk of medical professionals. The possible directions in resolving actual problems are proposed in the elaboration of normative legal act on insurance of their professional responsibility.

  8. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization. PMID:10144892

  9. Corporate compliance and voluntary disclosure.

    PubMed

    Schiff, A B

    1995-09-01

    In any event, the decision to institute a corporate compliance program is a relatively simple one. In view of the ambiguity surrounding certain fraud and abuse provisions, and the corporate "death sentence" that may result from program exclusion, a compliance program is always sound corporate policy. To be sure, if the compliance program is administered improperly, it can actually increase the likelihood of whistleblower actions and create a body of potentially hurtful documentation. But these dangers can be minimized by structuring the program to protect the self-evaluative process through relevant privileges. The risks also pale in comparison to the exposure to criminal or exclusionary sanctions when improper conduct goes undetected by an organization.

  10. Unmuzzling America's Corporations: Corporate Speech and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbeck, Wayne

    Under the "commercial speech doctrine," corporations were restricted for many years from speaking out on public issues or engaging in certain advertising practices. This "doctrine" was based on a case from the 1940s, in which the court ruled that purely commercial advertising had no constitutional protection from government restraint. Since 1975,…

  11. Teaching business ethics to professional engineers.

    PubMed

    Sauser, William I

    2004-04-01

    Without question "business ethics" is one of the hot topics of the day. Over the past months we have seen business after business charged with improper practices that violate commonly-accepted ethical norms. This has led to a loss of confidence in corporate management, and has had severe economic consequences. From many quarters business educators have heard the call to put more emphasis on ethical practices in their business courses and curricula. Engineering educators are also heeding this call, since the practice of engineering usually involves working for (or leading) a business and/or engaging in business transactions. In the summer of 2002, Auburn University's Engineering Professional Development program made the decision to produce--based on the author's Executive MBA course in Business Ethics--a distance-delivered continuing education program for professional engineers and surveyors. Participants across the USA now may use the course to satisfy continuing education requirements with respect to professional licensing and certification. This paper outlines the purpose and content of the course and describes its production, distribution, application, and evaluation.

  12. Perspectives on Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Learning Forward is fortunate to work with stakeholders in a range of roles and from all kinds of contexts, including schools and systems, higher education, teacher associations, foundations, government, and corporations. While the organization and the people it works with cover a lot of ground in and beyond education, they welcome the luxury of…

  13. Beyond Compliance: Integrating Nonproliferation into Corporate Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates nonproliferation as a potential corporate sustainability value. It reviews the history of corporate sustainability, builds the case for nonproliferation as a sustainability value, and develops recommendations for the integration of nonproliferation into the frameworks of sustainability.

  14. Quantifiable outcomes from corporate and higher education learning collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Thomas G.

    The study investigated the existence of measurable learning outcomes that emerged out of the shared strengths of collaborating sponsors. The study identified quantifiable learning outcomes that confirm corporate, academic and learner participation in learning collaborations. Each of the three hypotheses and the synergy indicator quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed learning outcomes benefiting participants. The academic-indicator quantitatively confirmed that learning outcomes attract learners to the institution. The corporate-indicator confirmed that learning outcomes include knowledge exchange and enhanced workforce talents for careers in the energy-utility industry. The learner-indicator confirmed that learning outcomes provide professional development opportunities for employment. The synergy-indicator confirmed that best learning practices in learning collaborations emanate out of the sponsors' shared strengths, and that partnerships can be elevated to strategic alliances, going beyond response to the desires of sponsors to create learner-centered cultures. The synergy-indicator confirmed the value of organizational processes that elevate sponsors' interactions to sharing strength, to create a learner-centered culture. The study's series of qualitative questions confirmed prior success factors, while verifying the hypothesis results and providing insight not available from quantitative data. The direct benefactors of the study are the energy-utility learning-collaboration participants of the study, and corporation, academic institutions, and learners of the collaboration. The indirect benefactors are the stakeholders of future learning collaborations, through improved knowledge of the existence or absence of quantifiable learning outcomes.

  15. Developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Janice A; Sullivan, Trent

    2002-09-01

    This article presents the process that a large urban tertiary care hospital engaged in when developing a corporate compliance program for nursing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how nurse executives can successfully implement a comprehensive and practical nursing corporate compliance program. This article describes in detail the 5 steps the hospital took to develop its nursing corporate compliance program and provides examples of tools to guide you in developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

  16. Corporal Punishment in Tanzania's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were…

  17. Corporation Schools: 1900-1930.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Colleen A.

    Because of the increased need for a trained labor force to work in growing industries and because the public schools had failed to provide such workers, many corporations conducted their own training programs during the period 1900-1930. Departing from the older methods of training foremen and having them train the workers, these schools provided…

  18. Power, ethics, and corporate dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Alec; Parker, M Alec

    2013-01-01

    The North Carolina Dental Association recently sought to place clear statutory limits on the influence of corporate, nondental interests over dentists practices' decision-making. This report describes the two-year legislative battle with well-funded and politically connected parties that ultimately resulted in laws that protect patients' rights to be treated by a dentist free of outside commercial interests.

  19. Canonical considerations in corporate restructuring.

    PubMed

    Holland, S

    1985-03-01

    Religious institutes sponsoring Catholic health facilities face competitive economic pressures that impel them to seek corporate restructuring and joint ventures to fulfill their mission to the poor. They especially must look to the Church's Code of Canon Law to protect ecclesiastical goods and maintain their Catholic identity when entering such ventures. The U.S. bishops directives also assist in guaranteeing patient expectations that the health facility will observe the Church's ethical principles. Institutes first must ensure that subsidiaries will operate according to Catholic mission and philosophy. The canons delineate proper protection of assets and identify ends toward which the religious must apply temporal goods, such as supporting clergy and performing charitable works. Alienation, or conveyance of goods, is a critical consideration in such financial transactions; canons specify the institute's administrative limits and require superiors' written permission along with their councils' consent. All involved must be "thoroughly informed concerning the economic situation," show "just cause" for the transaction, and obtain expert estimates of property values. Religious administrators retain certain faith and executive obligations, such as amending the charter, appointing the board, and merging or dissolving the corporation. With the canons they help to ensure that collaborative efforts preserve the institute's corporate mission and allow religious to carry out their responsibility for ecclesiastical goods. Though alternatives to corporate ventures may be limited, options regarding how to structure and with whom to affiliate do exist. Sponsoring bodies dedicated to providing high-quality care must explore these options

  20. Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, James F.; Maynard, William S.

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the possible implications of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for employee expectations and satisfactions. Specifically, interest centered on the question of how perceptions of an organization's involvement in the resolution of current societal problems might relate to members' expectations of equitable job rewards and…

  1. Corporal Punishment Foes Strike Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaar, Karen

    1977-01-01

    Discussion of U.S. Supreme Court decision (Ingrahm V. Wright) asserting that the Constitution's Eighth Amendment does not protect school children against cruel and unusual punishment and that the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment does not require notice and a hearing prior to the imposition of corporal punishment in the public…

  2. Black Managers in White Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, John P.

    The study examines the major determinants of the career patterns of black managers in white businesses and the effects of corporations on their black managers' identities and relationships to the black community. Analyzed were occupational mobility theories; white and black managers' career patterns, goals, and related factors; company employment…

  3. Business Web: Discovering Corporate Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshminarayanan, Sambhavi; Rain, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Business education requires students to have knowledge about corporations and the relationships between them. Sometimes students, in particular non-traditional ones, may not have either this knowledge or the skills required to obtain it. The Business Web guides students in acquiring information about businesses and understanding their…

  4. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs). 704.11 Section 704.11 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service...

  5. The New Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Lee

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from interviews with Black students and graduates from Harvard Law and Medical Schools reveal the concern of these minority professionals as representatives of the Black community. Their experiences in graduate school and later in their professions are described. (JMF)

  6. [Limits of professionalism].

    PubMed

    Blume, Angelika

    2006-05-01

    On the basis of a case study, the author looks for parallels in her own biography. To what extent are professional helpers helpless when it comes to the point of dealing with one's own relatives? PMID:16830238

  7. Professional thieves and drugs.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A; Russe, B R

    1977-12-01

    The "professional thief" is a highly specialized predatory offender with a history that dates back to Elizabethan England. Although this type of criminal is generally associated with narcotic addiction, his drug-taking typically involved the use of heroin, morphine, and cocaine on an intermittent basis. However, trafficking in drugs was common to the "professional" underworld, and as a result this deviant fraternity had a notable impact on the impressment of a criminal model of drug use on twentieth century conceptions of the addict. The concept of "professional" theft is reviewed, the use of drugs by professional thieves is discussed, and the interaction between this underworld group and the early Federal Bureau of Narcotics is examined.

  8. Communicating with Professionals

    MedlinePlus

    ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – over ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the time ...

  9. Graduate and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Proceedings of the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers which relate to graduate and professional education are summarized. Names and institutions of conference participants are included. (MSE)

  10. Graduate and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings of the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers which relate to graduate and professional education are summarized. Names and institutions of conference participants are included. (MSE)

  11. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123 Section 31.123 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to...

  12. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  13. 12 CFR 583.8 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporation. 583.8 Section 583.8 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.8 Corporation. The term Corporation means the Federal...

  14. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  15. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  16. 12 CFR 563.201 - Corporate opportunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-OPERATIONS Reporting and Bonding § 563.201 Corporate opportunity. (a) If you are a director or officer of a... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate opportunity. 563.201 Section 563.201... duty to a savings association, you must not take advantage of corporate opportunities belonging to...

  17. 76 FR 10209 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... recently finalized changes to its Corporate Credit Union Rule, 12 CFR part 704. 75 FR 64786 (October 20... requirements and process for chartering corporate Federal credit unions (FCUs). 75 FR 60651 (October 1, 2010... requisite skills--including leadership--to make the proposed corporate a success. One commenter...

  18. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  19. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  20. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  1. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies...

  2. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  3. 27 CFR 40.63 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 40.63... PROCESSED TOBACCO Qualification Requirements for Manufacturers of Tobacco Products § 40.63 Corporate... furnish with its application for permit, required by § 40.62, a true copy of the corporate charter or...

  4. 27 CFR 44.83 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 44.83... Proprietors § 44.83 Corporate documents. Every corporation, before commencing business as an export warehouse proprietor, shall furnish with its application for permit required by § 44.82, a true copy of the...

  5. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  6. 46 CFR 67.39 - Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.39 Corporation. (a) For the purpose of obtaining a registry or a recreational endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It is... purpose of obtaining a fishery endorsement, a corporation meets citizenship requirements if: (1) It...

  7. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Some of the results of the fourth Annual Survey of Corporate Contributions are presented in this report on corporate support of higher education for 1977. Usable questionnaires were returned by 816 companies. A discussion of national trends considers corporate support of higher education vs. college and university expenditures, increased student…

  8. Efficiency, Corporate Power, and the Bigness Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Walter; Brock, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Concludes that (1) the current infatuation with corporate bigness is void of credible empirical support; (2) disproportionate corporate size and industry concentration are incompatible with and destructive to good economic performance; and (3) structurally oriented antitrust policy must be revitalized to combat the burdens of corporate bigness.…

  9. Managing corporate knowledge can yield significant dividends.

    PubMed

    Sauer, S D

    1996-12-01

    Integrated delivery systems (IDSs) that track projects, initiatives, and task force undertakings system-wide are better able to effectively manage their corporate knowledge. IDS executives must understand how valuable corporate knowledge is, and should manage their organizations' corporate knowledge as carefully as their capital investments. PMID:10163001

  10. 22 CFR 96.31 - Corporate structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.31 Corporate structure. (a) The agency qualifies for... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate structure. 96.31 Section 96.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL...

  11. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  12. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  13. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  14. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  15. 12 CFR 619.9185 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 619.9185 Section 619.9185 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9185 Funding Corporation. The term Funding Corporation refers to the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding...

  16. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate information. 214.3 Section 214.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with...

  17. The Knowledge-Productive Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansink, Femke; Kwakman, Kitty; Streumer, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper the concept of knowledge production is used as a framework to study Dutch corporate universities. Knowledge production serves not simply as a desirable aim of corporate universities, as the concept also offers guidelines for the design of corporate universities. The purpose is to clarify the extent to which corporate…

  18. Professionalism in Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Alastair D.; Konstadopoulou, Anastasia

    The paper seeks to address the need to consider issues regarding professionalism in computer forensics in order to allow the discipline to develop and to ensure the credibility of the discipline from the differing perspectives of practitioners, the criminal justice system and in the eyes of the public. There is a need to examine and develop professionalism in computer forensics in order to promote the discipline and maintain the credibility of the discipline.

  19. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  20. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning". PMID:15605571

  1. Professional Ethics for Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.

    2005-05-01

    There is a growing recognition that professional ethics is an important topic for all professional scientists, especially physical scientists. Situations at the National Laboratories have dramatically proven this point. Professional ethics is usually only considered important for the health sciences and the legal and medical professions. However, certain aspects of the day to day work of professional astronomers can be impacted by ethical issues. Examples include refereeing scientific papers, serving on grant panels or telescope allocation committees, submitting grant proposals, providing proper references in publications, proposals or talks and even writing recommendation letters for job candidates or serving on search committees. This session will feature several speakers on a variety of topics and provide time for questions and answers from the audience. Confirmed speakers include: Kate Kirby, Director Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics - Professional Ethics in the Physical Sciences: An Overview Rob Kennicutt, Astrophysical Journal Editor - Ethical Issues for Publishing Astronomers Peggy Fischer, Office of the NSF Inspector General - Professional Ethics from the NSF Inspector General's Point of View

  2. Professional Development of Academic Library Professionals in Kerala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, K. Susan; Baby, M. D.; Pillai, S. Sreerekha

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims to bring out the problems and prospects of the professional development opportunities of academic library professionals in the Universities in Kerala. The study is a part of research undertaken to survey the professional development activities and educational needs of library professionals in the major Universities of Kerala in the…

  3. Professional Socialisation: An Influence on Professional Development and Role Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelissen, J. J.; van Wyk, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional socialisation such…

  4. Predictors of Professional Identity Development for Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Edward C.; Foubert, John D.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether professional involvement, supervision style, and mentoring predicted the professional identity of graduate students and new professionals in student affairs. Results of the study show that all three independent variables predicted the professional identity development of graduate students. Supervision style of a…

  5. Developing Professionalism through Reflective Practice and Ongoing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to the debate on early years professionalism. It explores the impact of a continuous professional development (CPD) programme, in particular a module on professional practice, on early childhood care and education (ECCE) practitioners' identity as early years professionals. Action research informed the development of…

  6. Academic Professionalism in the Managerialist Era: A Study of English Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolsaker, Ailsa

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between managerialism and academic professionalism in English universities. Managerialist ideology has introduced to higher education a range of discourses and practices originating in the corporate world. According to much of the existing literature this is leading to feelings of proletarianisation and…

  7. Higher Education's Effectiveness in Preparing Students for Professional Practice: Perspectives from the Aerospace and Banking Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Ronald E.

    The congruence of expectations of industrial managers concerning the preparation of college graduates and what university professional schools are attempting to provide was explored. The focus was the aerospace and banking industries. Interviews were conducted with 24 senior executives from 13 corporations to determine what industry requires of…

  8. The Art Association/Higher Education Partnership: Implementing Residential Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charland, William

    2006-01-01

    In-service professional development in education began informally in the early nineteenth-century as a means of disseminating classroom management techniques, specifically addressing ways in which corporal punishment could be delivered to a child without inflicting serious injury. This initial effort paralleled a concern regarding children's…

  9. American Business Meets American Gothic: Professional Development in the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Brendan; Morse, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in the art museum setting represents an opportunity for corporate and for-profit enterprises to enhance employees' skills in observation, creative thinking, teamwork, and sensitivity in diversity. Using original works of art as a point of departure for in-depth discussion of what appears as narrative content, participants…

  10. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals.

  11. More than Money: We Profile Three Corporate Foundations Bringing Technology-Based Programs Directly to Schools' Doorsteps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Philanthropy provides billions of dollars to schools and educational programs each year. Much of this cash comes from corporate America, who views contributing to education as an important way to give back to the community. While many companies support education directly via equipment, money grants, and professional development, other companies…

  12. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  13. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... second-tier corporation in the third-tier corporation. (ii) Fourth-, fifth-, or sixth-tier corporation. In the case of dividends paid to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-tier corporation by a foreign corporation in a taxable year beginning after August 5, 1997, the foreign corporation is a fourth-, fifth-,...

  14. Professionals and Paraprofessionals in Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freund, John C.

    Professionals in the fields of counseling and counseling psychology do not have a clearly defined role that helps them to form a professional identity. Many of the functions presently performed by professional counselors are within the capacity of trained, mental health paraprofessionals. However, research indicates that professional counselors…

  15. PDLE: Sustaining Professionalism. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Patricia, Ed.; Nelson, Gayle, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This third volume looks at ways that seasoned professionals continue to develop throughout their careers. The text includes descriptive accounts of professionals seeking to enhance their careers while remaining inspired to continue to develop professionally. This volume reveals how personal and professional lives are entwined. It proves that TESOL…

  16. How to Give Professional Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  17. Projecting a professional image: how to put your best foot forward.

    PubMed

    Fluke, C

    1988-01-01

    Projecting a professional image is important to those who value their careers. It is a major part of corporate image, and therefore important to the organization. Professional image can be enhanced by dressing and grooming appropriately, and by developing a positive self-image and strong group image. These activities will ultimately create a stronger organizational image, which is vital to its longevity. "If hospital 'A' presents a warm, friendly, and exquisitely polished ... image and hospital 'B' presents a frumpy, unkempt, and irritable ... image, and both are otherwise similar, which would you choose?" Given that professional image is self-controlled, can anyone afford not to build a more positive image?

  18. [What is professionalism?].

    PubMed

    Ohbu, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    What is a profession? According to Cruess, it is an occupation whose core element is work that is based on the mastery of a complex body of knowledge and skills. It is a vocation in which knowledge of some department of science or learning, or the practice of an art founded on it, is used in the service of others. Its members profess a commitment to competence, integrity, morality, altruism, and the promotion of the public good within their domain. These commitments form the basis of a social contract between a profession and society, which in return grants the profession autonomy in practice and the privilege of self-regulation. Although medical professionals share the role of healer, there are wide variations between individuals. Professionalism is the basis of medicine's contract with society. Public trust is essential to that contract, and public trust depends on the integrity of both individual professionals and the whole profession. The introduction to this important symposium includes definitions of professions and of medical professionalism. It also includes discussions of reciprocal altruism, conflicts of interest in medical societies, the theory of cognitive dissonance, and the moral foundations of professionalism.

  19. The manufacture of lifestyle: the role of corporations in unhealthy living.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    Recently, researchers have debated two views on the connection between lifestyle and health. In the first, health-related lifestyles including tobacco and alcohol use, diet, and physical activity are seen as primary influences on health. In the second, social stratification is the dominant influence with lifestyles simply markers of social status. Neither approach leads to interventions that can reverse the world's most serious health problems. This article proposes that corporate practices are a dominant influence on the lifestyles that shape patterns of health and disease. Modifying business practices that promote unhealthy lifestyles is a promising strategy for improving population health. Corporations shape lifestyles by producing and promoting healthy or unhealthy products, creating psychological desires and fears, providing health information, influencing social and physical environments, and advancing policies that favor their business goals. Public officials and health professionals can promote health by advocating policies to modify these corporate practices.

  20. Maximizing profit and endangering health: corporate strategies to avoid litigation and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Zorabedian, John; Egilman, David S

    2005-01-01

    Corporations and industries use various tactics to obscure the fact that their products are dangerous or deadly. Their aim is to secure the least restrictive possible regulatory environment and avert legal liability for deaths or injuries in order to maximize profit. They work with attorneys and public relations professionals, using scientists, science advisory boards; front groups, industry organizations, think tanks, and the media to influence scientific and popular opinion of the risks of their products or processes. The strategy, which depends on corrupt science, profits corporations at the expense of public health. Public health professionals can learn from this strategy how to effectively build scientific and public opinion that prioritizes both good science and the public health. PMID:16350467

  1. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture. PMID:10947465

  2. A look at Bodies Corporate.

    PubMed

    Chope, J

    1997-10-11

    One of the most exclusive clubs in the dental world comprises the 27 members who can call themselves Dental Bodies Corporate (DBCs). Among this elite are well-known names such as Dental World, Dencare, Whitecross, Benedent and also Oakley, which is owned by Denplan. In the UK only dentists and DBCs are permitted to carry on the business of dentistry. DBCs are simply companies whose directors (the majority of whom must be dentists) are protected by the laws of limited liability, with the purpose of encouraging investment by shareholders (who need not be dentists). This article outlines the story of how this select band of Corporate Bodies gained their exclusive status which goes back to the very earliest days of our profession.

  3. Effective health care corporate compliance.

    PubMed

    Saum, T B; Byassee, J

    2000-01-01

    The pace and intensity of oversight and investigation of health care organizations has greatly increased at all levels. Well run organizations with ethical management committed to following all laws and regulations are still at risk for compliance violations and punitive penalties. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, organizations with an "effective" corporate compliance program may receive reduced penalties. The seven components of an effective program as defined in the guidelines are: (1) Standards and procedures; (2) oversight responsibilities; (3) employee training; (4) monitoring and auditing; (5) reporting systems; (6) enforcement and discipline; and (7) response and prevention. Lack of a compliance program needlessly exposes the organization to an avoidable risk of damage from non-compliance--whether intentional or not. Moreover, an effective program can contribute to the efficient operation of the organization and be a key piece of its corporate culture.

  4. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies.

  5. Corporate environmentalism and environmental innovation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Hsing; Sam, Abdoul G

    2015-04-15

    Several papers have explored the effect of tighter environmental standards on environmental innovation. While mandatory regulation remains the central tenet of US environmental policy, the regulatory landscape has changed since the early 1990s with the increased recourse by federal and state agencies to corporate environmentalism--voluntary pollution prevention (P2) by firms--to achieve environmental improvements. We therefore estimate the effects of voluntary P2 activities on the patenting of environmental technologies by a sample of manufacturing firms. With our panel data of 352 firms over the 1991-2000 period, we adopt an instrumental variable Poisson framework to account for the count nature of patents and the endogeneity of the P2 adoption decision. Our results indicate that the adoption of voluntary P2 activities in the manufacturing sector has led to a statistically and economically significant increase in the number of environmental patents, suggesting that corporate environmentalism can act as a catalyst for investments in cleaner technologies. Our findings are internationally relevant given the increasing ubiquity of corporate environmentalism in both developed and developing economies. PMID:25687809

  6. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large. PMID:26075950

  7. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large.

  8. Corporately managed health care and the new role of physicians.

    PubMed

    Winkenwerder, W; Nash, D B

    1988-01-01

    The roles described are not all-inclusive, since a small proportion of physicians, as in times past, will continue to pursue diverse careers outside of an tangential to health care. Neither are the roles mutually exclusive, as physician-managers are also organizational employees, as independently contracting professionals may also be partly fee for service, as physician entrepreneurs may be fee for service practitioners or contracting professionals, and so forth. The point is, that as the delivery of health care becomes a more complex and formalized process, and as large organizations delivering and insuring health care become more predominant, the various roles of physicians are becoming more distinctly obvious. What are the implications of this trend toward greater internal segmentation of the medical profession? At this juncture, they are not entirely clear. It could mean that some groups of physicians will achieve higher status and more rewards than other groups, which might result in greater conflicts within the medical profession. Undoubtedly, the emergence of corporately managed health care and the development of new (and possibly divergent) roles for physicians confronts the medical profession and its members with the gnawing questions of who they really are and what do they really want to be? Ultimately, the greatest challenge may be in finding a common set of commitments and values which transcend our many different roles, and which provide physicians with a clear and continuing sense of ourselves as medical professionals. PMID:3288297

  9. Corporate moral responsibility in health care.

    PubMed

    Wilmot, S

    2000-01-01

    The question of corporate moral responsibility--of whether it makes sense to hold an organisation corporately morally responsible for its actions, rather than holding responsible the individuals who contributed to that action--has been debated over a number of years in the business ethics literature. However, it has had little attention in the world of health care ethics. Health care in the United Kingdom (UK) is becoming an increasingly corporate responsibility, so the issue is increasingly relevant in the health care context, and it is worth considering whether the specific nature of health care raises special questions around corporate moral responsibility. For instance, corporate responsibility has usually been considered in the context of private corporations, and the organisations of health care in the UK are mainly state bodies. However, there is enough similarity in relevant respects between state organisations and private corporations, for the question of corporate responsibility to be equally applicable. Also, health care is characterised by professions with their own systems of ethical regulation. However, this feature does not seriously diminish the importance of the corporate responsibility issue, and the importance of the latter is enhanced by recent developments. But there is one major area of difference. Health care, as an activity with an intrinsically moral goal, differs importantly from commercial activities that are essentially amoral, in that it narrows the range of opportunities for corporate wrongdoing, and also makes such organisations more difficult to punish.

  10. Professional Scientific Societies, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Robert E.; And Others

    Reported are the findings of a study of scientific societies in the United States. Some 449 professional organizations were considered of which 284 conformed to the validation criteria for inclusion. Data gathering was most successful on membership, current dues, society history, and purpose and less successful on topics related to society income…

  11. Storytelling and Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doecke, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    This essay explores the role that storytelling might play in the professional learning of English teachers. It begins by reflecting on the ways that stories shape our everyday lives, and then considers how the meaning-making potential of storytelling might enable us to gain insights into our work as educators. This is in contradistinction to the…

  12. Professional Scientific Blog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke, Tamás

    2009-01-01

    The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bears a resemblance to digital notice boards, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be…

  13. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  14. The Chimera of Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bonnie R.

    1980-01-01

    Much of what passes for professionalism is self-serving elitism and not relevant to librarianship. Librarians, most of whom are women, should continue to improve service to the public and strive by pragmatic means to overcome low pay and status. (RAA)

  15. Professionalism and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrall, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A foundation principle of professionalism is listening carefully to clients' needs. This paper reviews current studies that have sought to listen to the needs of people with aphasia and their families. The preliminary evidence to date suggests that people with aphasia have goals that cover the bio-psycho-social spectrum but place a lot of…

  16. Becoming a Professional Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K., Ed.

    This book is about teacher-leaders who work in schools, universities, district and county offices, and other educational institutions and who serve as consultants, mentors, principals, project leaders, and teacher educators. The professional model of teaching emphasizes the role of teachers as informed, responsible decision makers, grounded in the…

  17. Essentials of Professional Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.; Niles, Jerry A.

    1987-01-01

    The essentials needed for developing teaching novices into good teachers are autonomy, collaboration, and time. School improvement plans should include an understanding of the conditions that foster the professional growth of teachers. Provides a table and extensive list of references. (MD)

  18. Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Sissela

    1980-01-01

    Individuals who would blow the whistle by making public disclosure of impropriety in their own organizations face choices of public v private good. These dilemmas, along with institutional and professional standards that might ease the way of whistleblowers, are explored. (Author)

  19. Fixing Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Heather C.

    2009-01-01

    The professional development "system" for teachers is, by all accounts, broken. Despite evidence that specific programs can improve teacher knowledge and practice and student outcomes, these programs seldom reach real teachers on a large scale. Typically, reformers address such perceptions of failure by discovering and celebrating new formats and…

  20. Futuristics and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Dennis R.

    This paper explores the current and potential contributions that futuristics can make to professional education and to the professions in general. A brief description of how the School of Social Development (SSD) at the University of Minnesota Duluth has incorporated futuristic principles is presented as a basis for analyzing the relationship…

  1. Teaching professionalism: general principles.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R

    2006-05-01

    There are educational principles that apply to the teaching of professionalism during undergraduate education and postgraduate training. It is axiomatic that there is a single cognitive base that applies with increasing moral force as students enter medical school, progress to residency or registrar training, and enter practice. While parts of this body of knowledge are easier to teach and learn at different stages of an individual's career, it remains a definable whole at all times and should be taught as such. While the principle that self-reflection on theoretical and real issues encountered in the life of a student, resident or practitioner is essential to the acquisition of experiential learning and the incorporation of the values and behaviors of the professional, the opportunities to provide situations where this can take place will change as an individual progresses through the system, as will the sophistication of the level of learning. Teaching the cognitive base of professionalism and providing opportunities for the internalization of its values and behaviors are the cornerstones of the organization of the teaching of professionalism at all levels. Situated learning theory appears to provide practical guidance as to how this may be implemented. While the application of this theory will vary with the type of curriculum, the institutional culture and the resources available, the principles outlined should remain constant.

  2. Personal Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sumathi; Gledhill, Igle; Hartline, Beverly K.; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; MacLachlan, Anne J.; Mack, Kelly; Mehta, Anita; Wu, Ling-An; Zhang, Hong

    2009-04-01

    Three workshop sessions on personal professional development were held during the Third IUPAP Women in Physics Conference. These were designed to teach participants about planning for career success, "survival skills," negotiation, and ways to transition into scientific leadership positions in their own countries.

  3. Commodification of Teacher Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werler, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the hypothesis that teacher education in European welfare states is commodified due to its governance by neoliberal policy making. The starting point for the analysis is a discussion of the relationship between the welfare state and teacher professionalism. For this purpose, the concept of the ill-defined problem is…

  4. Definition of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Forward, 2015

    2015-01-01

    President Obama signed into law the Every Student Succeeds Act, the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, on December 10, 2015. "Learning Forward's focus in this new law is its improved definition of professional learning," said Stephanie Hirsh, executive director of Learning Forward. "We've long advocated…

  5. Searching for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    It's an empowering feeling to be in a room full of people who know the lingo of teaching, who understand the demands of teaching young children, and who want to learn more to be able to put best practices in place in their classrooms. Professional development (PD) can put you there and lead to new ways of teaching, deeper understanding of…

  6. Leadership through Professional Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeil, Jessica; Hirsch, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    Leaders in mathematics are responsible for implementing positive change within their school districts and motivating teachers of mathematics to improve their practices. One way mathematics leaders can achieve this goal is by establishing professional collaborations. We analyzed the research and summarized the common attributes found in successful…

  7. Storytelling and Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doecke, Brenton

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the role that storytelling might play in the professional learning of English teachers. It begins by reflecting on the ways that stories shape our everyday lives, and then considers how the meaning-making potential of storytelling might enable us to gain insights into our work as educators. This is in contradistinction to the…

  8. [Medical education and professionalism].

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers.

  9. Conceptualizing Teacher Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, V. Darleen; Pedder, David

    2011-01-01

    This article adopts a complexity theory framework to review the literature on teachers' professional development practices, the generative systems of these practices, and the impact that learning experiences have on their knowledge and changes in classroom practices. The review brings together multiple strands of literature on teacher professional…

  10. Improving Professional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskey, Owen L.

    This paper presents a sketch of the characteristics of a group of professionals whose work involves helping others. The author attempts to define individuals who are concerned primarily with the helping professions, and to outline some of the attributes unique to them. He tries to identify factors distinguishing those who are successful from those…

  11. Evaluating Teachers as Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    This document outlines a practical teacher evaluation system that avoids the fatal invalidities of present methods. The recommended approach treats teachers as responsible professionals undertaking to perform certain duties while retaining considerable autonomy in discharging them. While teachers acknowledge a need for accountability and…

  12. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ..., Business Information Services, Corporate Marketing, Credit Services, Data ] Management, Decision Analytics..., Global Corporate Systems, Legal & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and... & Regulatory, Risk Management, Strategic Business Development and Investor Relations), Credit Services,...

  13. 26 CFR 1.972-1 - Consolidation of group of export trade corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... owns 20 percent of the stock of C Corporation. Domestic corporations N and R own 30 percent and 10... indirectly owned (through F Corporation) interest in C Corporation. Either N Corporation or R Corporation, or..., neither N Corporation nor R Corporation may elect to consolidate the “A” chain unless M Corporation...

  14. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1991-01-01

    In the 1980s, competitive success came mostly from achieving cost and quality advantages over rivals in existing markets. In the 1990s, it will come from building and dominating fundamentally new markets. Core competencies are one prerequisite for creating new markets. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing are the keys that unlock them. McKinsey Award winners Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad argue that corporate imagination quickens when companies escape the tyranny of their served markets. (Motorola, for example, sees itself as a leader in wireless communications, not just as a maker of beepers and mobile phones). Think about needs and functionalities instead of marketing's more conventional customer-product grid. Overturn traditional price/performance assumptions. (Fidelity Investments unlocked a vast new market by packaging sophisticated investment vehicles for middle-income investors.) And lead customers rather than simply follow them. Creating new markets is a risky business, however--a lot like shooting arrows into the mist. Imaginative companies minimize the risk not by being fast followers but through the process the authors call expeditionary marketing: low-cost, fast-paced market incursions designed to bring the target quickly into view. Toshiba introduced laptop computers to the market at such a blistering pace that it could explore every conceivable niche--and afford an occasional failure without compromising its credibility with customers. To stimulate corporate imagination, top management needs to redefine failure and develop new time- and risk-adjusted yardsticks for managerial performance. Managers must be encouraged to stretch their company's opportunity horizon well beyond the boundaries of its current businesses. PMID:10112922

  15. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be.

  16. The end of corporate imperialism.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be. PMID:12884671

  17. Professional Identity and Professionals' Workplace Learning: A Theoretical Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Jim

    2008-01-01

    When organizations employ professionals it is critical to comprehend the nature of professional identity as it relates to learning in the workplace. These findings indicate ways that professional identity influences workplace learning behavior in doctors of veterinary medicine. Using grounded theory, ethnographic investigation and analysis…

  18. Professional Cultures and Professional Knowledge: Owning, Loaning and Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messenger, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the relationship between professional culture and collaborative working in Children's Centres in a region of England. In Children's Centres, professionals from different professional backgrounds and different organisations are required to work together towards common goals as required by the Children Act 2004.…

  19. Reframing Professional Development through Understanding Authentic Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster-Wright, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Continuing to learn is universally accepted and expected by professionals and other stakeholders across all professions. However, despite changes in response to research findings about how professionals learn, many professional development practices still focus on delivering content rather than enhancing learning. In exploring reasons for the…

  20. Secondary Professional Socialization through Professional Organizations: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, K. Andrew; Eberline, Andrew D.; Templin, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The…

  1. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  2. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  3. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  4. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  5. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  6. Professional Ethics: Caught and Taught.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickols, Sharon Y.; Belliston, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    Compares codes of professional ethics of several professional associations in light of rapidly changing technology. Explores the relation between academic honesty and ethical practice and provides a summary of approaches to teaching ethics. (Contains 34 references.) (JOW)

  7. [Medical ethics as professional ethics].

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ivo

    2012-09-25

    Contemporary medical ethics is far from the traditional concept of "In-Sul (benevolent art)" or "Yul-Li (倫, ethics), which emphasizes so much the personality or the character of a doctor. Nowadays, medical ethics should be considered as "professional ethics" which regulates the acts and medical practices of ordinary doctors in their daily practice. The key concepts of the professional ethics are "autonomy", "integrity", and "professional standard" established by medical organizations such as medical societies or associations. Most of Korean doctors have not been familiar with the concept of professional ethics or professionalism, which is due to the modern history of Korea. However, the concept of professional ethics is really critical to Korean doctors from the perspective of professional dignity and social respect to this profession. The current healthcare system of Korea is suffering from many problems of both private and public sector. Nonetheless, the professional ethics is urgently demanded for that very reason.

  8. Medical professionalism: a Parsonian view.

    PubMed

    Latham, Stephen R

    2002-11-01

    This paper argues for a normative conception of medical professionalism based on the work of sociologist Talcott Parsons. Such a conception grounds medical professionalism on the expert authority of the physician; the concept of authority is therefore discussed at length. Parsons view also lays much stress on the fact that the proper exercise of medical authority nearly always involves aligning the interests of individual patients with those of society at large. Parsonian professionalism looks to professional institutions such as medical schools, societies and journals to secure the competence and ethical behavior of professionals, and to help ensure that professionals exercise of authority is never biased by private financial interests or by public political power. Professional institutions should encourage professionals to develop a set of preferences and desires (e.g., for respect of their peers, and not for power or financial gain) that will tend to make them trustworthy authorities. PMID:12429954

  9. Educational Programs for Intelligence Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jerry P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for education programs for competitive intelligence professionals. Highlights include definitions of intelligence functions, focusing on business intelligence; information utilization by decision makers; information sources; competencies for intelligence professionals; and the development of formal education programs. (38…

  10. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.11 Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations... union; (2) Primarily serves credit unions; (3) Restricts its services to those related to the...

  11. Transnational Corporations and Corporate Citizenship: Analyzing New Roles of Organization Development Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Ingo Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that too few transnational corporations (TNCs) have the organizational capacity to manage corporate citizenship. Evidence exists that ever more TNCs adopt programs of corporate citizenship development in order to increase this capacity. However, both in academic and practical literature, there is a general lack of a strategic…

  12. Parental corporal punishment predicts behavior problems in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Matthew K; Mebert, Carolyn J

    2007-09-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (Research Triangle Institute, 2002), this study examined the impact of corporal punishment (CP) on children's behavior problems. Longitudinal analyses were specified that controlled for covarying contextual and parenting variables and that partialed child effects. The results indicate that parental CP uniquely contributes to negative behavioral adjustment in children at both 36 months and at 1st grade, with the effects at the earlier age more pronounced in children with difficult temperaments. Parents and mental health professionals who work to modify children's negative behavior should be aware of the unique impact that CP likely plays in triggering and maintaining children's behavior problems. Broad-based family policies that reduce the use of this parenting behavior would potentially increase children's mental health and decrease the incidence of children's behavior problems.

  13. Current and future pharmacy initiatives in institutional and corporate practice.

    PubMed

    Oddis, J A

    1984-02-01

    The future of pharmacy in organized health-care settings is discussed in light of changes in the health-care industry. The shift of health-care financing from cost-based reimbursement to prospective pricing provides pharmacists with the challenge of providing high-quality, cost-effective pharmaceutical services. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services will be a key factor in containing costs and improving patient care. The consolidation and corporate restructuring of hospitals will permit diversified services to develop in a highly competitive market. The formulary system, within which the medical staff may authorize and place conditions on the use of therapeutic equivalent drug products, will continue to play an important role in hospitals. Changes in the health-care industry will offer institutional pharmacists opportunities to enhance their roles as health professionals and as providers of economical quality care. PMID:6702832

  14. Nursing Informatics Competencies for Emerging Professionals: International Leaders Panel.

    PubMed

    Pruinelli, Lisiane

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a cursory review of the competencies necessary for acquire a successful career in a competitive job market, the panel will bring together leaders from renowned academic, successful health corporations, and international leaders in nursing informatics to the table for discussion, dialogue, and make recommendations. Panelists will reflect on their experiences within the different types of informatics organizations and present some of the current challenges when educating skillful professionals. The panel will provide personal experiences, thoughts, and advice on the competencies development in nursing informatics from their lens.

  15. Using Facet Clusters to Guide Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Lane; DeWater, L. S.; Vokos, S.; Kraus, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Department of Physics and the School of Education at Seattle Pacific University, together with FACET Innovations, LLC, are beginning the second year of a five-year NSF TPC project, Improving the Effectiveness of Teacher Diagnostic Skills and Tools. We are working in partnership with school districts in Washington State to help teachers make their classrooms into better diagnostic learning environments. In this talk, we describe initial efforts to construct content-rich professional development courses for teachers, which are infused with diagnostic assessment that target the fine structure of student ideas in specific topical areas. * Supported in part by NSF grant #ESI-0455796, The Boeing Corporation, and the SPU Science Initiative.

  16. Moral distress and the contemporary plight of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Austin, Wendy

    2012-03-01

    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, "moral distress" is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in healthcare practice changed? "Plight" encompasses not only the act of pledging, but that of predicament and peril. The author claims that health professionals are increasingly put in peril by healthcare reform that undermines their efficacy and jeopardizes ethical engagement with those in their care. The re-engineering of healthcare to give precedence to corporate and commercial values and strategies of commodification, service rationing, streamlining, and measuring of "efficiency," is literally demoralizing health professionals. Healthcare practice needs to be grounded in a capacity for compassion and empathy, as is evident in standards of practice and codes of ethics, and in the understanding of what it means to be a professional. Such grounding allows for humane response to the availability of unprecedented advances in biotechnological treatments, for genuine dialogue and the raising of difficult, necessary ethical questions, and for the mutual support of health professionals themselves. If healthcare environments are not understood as moral communities but rather as simulated marketplaces, then health professionals' moral agency is diminished and their vulnerability to moral distress is exacerbated. Research in moral distress and relational ethics is used to support this claim. PMID:22441996

  17. Moral distress and the contemporary plight of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Austin, Wendy

    2012-03-01

    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, "moral distress" is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in healthcare practice changed? "Plight" encompasses not only the act of pledging, but that of predicament and peril. The author claims that health professionals are increasingly put in peril by healthcare reform that undermines their efficacy and jeopardizes ethical engagement with those in their care. The re-engineering of healthcare to give precedence to corporate and commercial values and strategies of commodification, service rationing, streamlining, and measuring of "efficiency," is literally demoralizing health professionals. Healthcare practice needs to be grounded in a capacity for compassion and empathy, as is evident in standards of practice and codes of ethics, and in the understanding of what it means to be a professional. Such grounding allows for humane response to the availability of unprecedented advances in biotechnological treatments, for genuine dialogue and the raising of difficult, necessary ethical questions, and for the mutual support of health professionals themselves. If healthcare environments are not understood as moral communities but rather as simulated marketplaces, then health professionals' moral agency is diminished and their vulnerability to moral distress is exacerbated. Research in moral distress and relational ethics is used to support this claim.

  18. Corporal punishment: mother's disciplinary behavior and child's psychological profile in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; El-Bourgy, Mohamed D; Seif El Din, Amira G; Mehanna, Azza A

    2009-01-01

    Although all professionals oppose abusive physical punishment, nonabusive physical punishment is still controversial. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine parents' behavior regarding the discipline of their children using corporal punishment or other alternative disciplinary methods, (ii) to identify the different associated factors for corporal punishment, and (iii) to determine the association between exposure of the child to corporal punishment and his or her psychosocial well-being. A representative sample of 400 fifth-grade primary school children and their mothers were subjected to a cross-sectional survey. Mothers were subjected to a questionnaire to assess their behavior on corporal punishment and other disciplinary methods. The children were subjected to Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory to assess their self-esteem, and a questionnaire to assess their relationship with others. About three-quarter of children (76.3%) were corporally punished, and about half of them (46.2%) were punished on sites other than the extremities or buttocks. In 59.3% of them the frequency of the punishment ranged from once or twice/week to more than once/day, and it left marks in about 20%. Other disciplinary methods used by mothers were yelling/insulting (43.5%), taking away a toy or privilege (39.3%), discussing/explaining (9.5%), and time out (2.8%). The significant predictors of mothers' use of corporal punishment were male gender of the child (p < 0.01), rural origin of the father (p= 0.02), the mother's bad history of rearing experience (p < 0.01), and poor interparental relationship (p= 0.02). The relation between corporal punishment of children and their self-esteem was not statistically significant; however, corporally punished children scored lower on their relationship with others than noncorporally punished ones (Z= 2.60, p < 0.05). Corporal punishment is a widespread disciplinary method in Alexandria. The use of corporal punishment could have adverse

  19. Professionalism in court

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Serving as an expert witness can be a rewarding experience. It affords the neurologist the opportunity to contribute expertise to the legal system's pursuit of justice and benefits the public interest. However, serving as an expert witness without understanding and incorporating relevant professional and specialty guidelines concerning expert witness testimony can place the neurologist at risk. The American Academy of Neurology has established standards governing expert witness testimony and a disciplinary process to respond to complaints of violation of its standards. Increased understanding of and adherence to these qualifications and guidelines, coupled with an awareness of how the legal system differs from clinical practice, will better equip neurologists serving as expert witnesses and minimize their professional risk when doing so. PMID:25279255

  20. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  1. Corporate Strategy an Evolutionary Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    As Richard Rumelt indicates in his book, "Fundamental Issues in Strategy: A Research Agenda", corporate strategy is a relatively recent discipline. While pioneers in the field like B.H. Liddell Hart and Bruce Henderson (later to found the Boston Consulting Group and creator of the famous BCG Growth-Share Matrix) began their research during the Second World War, the modern field of business strategy as an academic discipline, taught in schools and colleges of business emerged rather later. Rumelt provides an interesting chronicle in the introduction to his volume by noting that historically corporate strategy, even when taught as a capstone course, was not really an organized discipline. Typically, depending on the school's location and resources, the course would either be taught by the senior most professor in the department or by an outside lecturer from industry. The agenda tended to be very much instructor specific and idiosyncratic rather than drawing in any systematized fashion upon the subject matter of an organized discipline.

  2. Develop a Professional Learning Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A professional learning plan establishes short-and long-term plans for professional learning and implementation of the learning. Such plans guide individuals, schools, districts, and states in coordinating learning experiences designed to achieve outcomes for educators and students. Professional learning plans focus on the program of educator…

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

  4. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  5. Who Is the "Professional" in a Professional Learning Community? An Exploration of Teacher Professionalism in Collaborative Professional Development Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servage, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This study is a survey and interpretation of professional development literature related to professional learning communities (PLCs) in schools. Current K 12 trade publications focusing on PLCs were analyzed against four different theoretical models of professionalism. Each model encourages and legitimates a different understanding of the…

  6. Teaching Professionalism: Passing the Torch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, William A.; Dickey, Nancy W.

    1998-01-01

    Medical faculty must ensure that students understand the appropriate balance between financial and professional considerations. Faculty should place financial considerations in proper perspective and should teach the basic components of professionalism, how current cost-containment efforts may threaten medicine's professional status, appropriate…

  7. Internationally educated health professionals.

    PubMed

    Leatt, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Even as recently as a decade ago, it was not uncommon for many Canadian decision- and policy makers in healthcare and government to ignore the matter of internationally educated healthcare professional (IEHP) integration and retention. With all the talk in the past few years, however, of employee shortages in nearly every healthcare profession and a rapidly aging population that requires more and more care, nobody can afford to neglect this potentially large and highly skilled talent pool. PMID:20523134

  8. Corporate funding and conflicts of interest: a primer for psychologists.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Wendy S; Fox, Ronald E; Zimbardo, Philip; Antonuccio, David O

    2007-12-01

    A presidential task force on external funding was established by the American Psychological Association (APA) in 2003 to review APA policies, procedures, and practices regarding the acceptance of funding and support from private corporations for educational and training programs; continuing education offerings; research projects; publications; advertising; scientific and professional meetings and conferences; and consulting, practice, and advocacy relationships. This article, based on the Executive Summary of the APA Task Force on External Funding Final Report, presents the findings and unanimous recommendations of the task force in the areas of association income, annual convention, research and journals, continuing education, education, practice, and conflicts of interest and ethics. The task force concluded that it is important for both APA and individual psychologists to become familiar with the challenges that corporate funding can pose to their integrity. The nature and extent of those challenges led the task force to recommend that APA develop explicit policies, educational materials, and continuing education programs to preserve the independence of psychological science, practice, and education.

  9. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-2 - Certain foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation, passive foreign investment company, or foreign personal holding company has made a gratuitous..., the controlled foreign corporation, passive foreign investment company, or foreign personal holding... gratuitous transfer to a United States person, the controlled foreign corporation, passive foreign...

  10. Summer enrichment partnership (SEP) - society of hispanic professional engineers (SHPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    SEP recruits talented Hispanic high school students in the Washington metropolitan area and seeks to increase the number of Hispanics who enter graduate programs in engineering and science. New students are exposed to engineering, experimental science and business, and visit R&D centers and corporations. Returning students take college level courses, such as Vector-Based Analytic Geometry and Probability and Statistics. Advanced students work on special projects. Hispanic engineers, scientists, and managers offer career guidance. Parental participation is actively encouraged. Students are selected based on: (a) commitment to succeed, (b) academic record, and (c) willingness to attend the program through graduation. Courses are taught by university faculty, with one teacher assistant per five students. Program evaluation encompasses: (1) student participation and performance, (2) school achievement, and (3) continuation to college. SEP is a partnership between the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, The Catholic University of America, NASA, school districts, parents and students, and Hispanic professionals.

  11. The Corporate University Landscape in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Maike; Lichtenberger, Bianka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks first to present an overview of the corporate university landscape in Germany contrasting it with the US-American corporate university market and, second, to outline the development in Germany during the last 15 years and to have a look at future trends such as learning alliances. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  12. Against the Corporal Punishment of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John

    2004-01-01

    John Wilson suggests there are six advantages for corporal punishment: cheap and easy to administer, effective deterrent, effective reform, adjustable pain, fair because of similar dislike of pain, no permanent damage. None of these survive close scrutiny. An alternative, deontological argument against corporal punishment is proposed building on…

  13. Special Libraries and the Corporate Political Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    This examination of the position of the special library and its services in the corporate setting highlights reasons why libraries are often taken for granted, library's role in corporate financial calculations, generalizations concerning librarian characteristics, and situations that may indicate trouble for a library that is not serving its…

  14. Corporate Support of Higher Education 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of an annual survey of corporate giving to higher education show corporate support continuing to advance, both in dollar amounts and in relation to several important indicators. Among the highlights are these: national estimates show education support at a new high of $870 million, a 17.6 percent rise over 1978 and almost double the 1975…

  15. Virtual Libraries: Meeting the Corporate Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan S.; Blumenstein, Lynn C.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses virtual libraries in corporate settings from the viewpoint of five special librarians. Highlights include competitive advantage, space and related collection issues, the use of technology, corporate culture, information overload, library vulnerability and downsizing, and the importance of service over format. (LRW)

  16. A Methodology for Distributing the Corporate Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Fred R.

    The trend to distributed processing is being fueled by numerous forces, including advances in technology, corporate downsizing, increasing user sophistication, and acquisitions and mergers. Increasingly, the trend in corporate information systems (IS) departments is toward sharing resources over a network of multiple types of processors, operating…

  17. Going Corporate: Teaching English in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayflich, Faith

    1998-01-01

    The accelerated globalization of business is one factor causing the growth of corporate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) in North America (which provides increased opportunities for ESL teachers). This paper discusses challenges and changes in teaching ESL within corporations; creative class scheduling; instructional settings; diverse students,…

  18. When Corporate Restructuring Meets Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Robert N.; Jerome, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    Despite ambiguous results of corporate restructuring efforts, higher education has adopted many of the methods used in hostile corporate takeovers and leveraged buyouts, affecting "ownership" of the educational process by faculty and the relationship between faculty and administration. A common element in successful restructuring is the…

  19. 78 FR 29366 - Green Mountain Power Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Green Mountain Power Corporation Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 2, 2013, Green Mountain Power Corporation filed additional information in support of its request...

  20. 25 CFR 214.3 - Corporate information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.3 Corporate information. A corporation shall file with its... office addresses, and showing the number of shares of capital stock held by each; together with a sworn statement of its proper officer showing: (a) The total number of shares of the capital stock actually...

  1. Societal Perceptions of Corporal Punishment in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Klaus H.

    The reform movement to abolish corporal punishment in Canadian schools has been stymied by the new conservative political movement. The public mood, troubled by political and economic disturbances, is no longer inclined to substitute expensive rehabilitative programs for traditional disciplining. Retention of corporal punishment is also encouraged…

  2. The Corporate Value and Social Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Edward R.

    In the past two decades, corporate social responsibility has become a controversial issue which is usually responded to according to the management style of individual corporations. Three concepts of management style have developed. Profit maximization considers that money and wealth are most important, labor is a commodity to be bought and sold,…

  3. The Corporate Stake in Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oketch, Moses O.

    2005-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a function that transcends, but includes, making profits, creating jobs, and producing goods and services. The effectiveness with which corporations perform this function determines their contribution (or lack of contribution) to social cohesion. This article therefore presents a discussion of some of the…

  4. 12 CFR 543.1 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 543.1 Corporate title. (a) General. A Federal savings association...) Title change. Prior to changing its corporate title, an association must file with the OTS a written notice indicating the intended change. The OTS, shall provide to the association a timely...

  5. Nonprofit Communications from a Corporate Communications Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Ava

    2006-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations, such as social service agencies, charities, and hospitals, plan and prepare communications that are vital to their missions. Although not corporations, these organizations produce news releases, newsletters, and annual reports that are similar to those created in the corporate sector. In this research project for a course…

  6. Capital's Daisy Chain: Exposing Chicago's Corporate Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrastia, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This article uses the global city of Chicago as an urban exemplar of a thirty-year worldwide economic shift toward public (state) private (corporate) partnerships. Advanced by racialized youth-development discourses in Chicago, private corporations, public education, and social housing are in alliance to transform "the problems of urban America."…

  7. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  8. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  9. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  10. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  11. 19 CFR 113.37 - Corporate sureties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Government Financial Operations Regulations (31 CFR 223.11). (b) Name of corporation on the bond. The name of... on the bond. (d) Social security number of agent or attorney on the bond. In the appropriate place on... place his/her social security number, as it appears on the corporate surety power of attorney....

  12. Corporate Philanthropy: Philosophy, Management, Trends, Future, Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Foundations, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Major policy considerations and the management of corporate philanthropy, along with new directions and future prospects of corporate philanthropy, are addressed in 40 articles written by chief executive officers, lawyers, economists, and other leading analysts. In addition, a list of resource materials, a glossary, and a list of organizations…

  13. A Convergence of Corporate and Academic Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    One of the particular gifts in history for the present generation, is the increasingly large opportunity afforded to universities and corporations to be mutually supportive, not exploitative, of one another. As the federal Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 has imposed new challenges on management of all stripes, this anti-corporate-fraud law also has…

  14. Corporate Learning: A Knowledge Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocetti, Clara

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between learning and knowledge management in corporate training which forms the framework for the development of an effective learning management system (LMS). Highlights include a theoretical analysis; examples of how training issues are connected to other processes; corporate universities; and the functionalities that…

  15. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1981 survey of 789 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and institutional expenditures; the…

  16. Higher Education and the Corporate Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetar, Joseph M.

    Most of the people who are involved in higher education recognize that corporate interest in developing significant, job-related educational opportunities is growing. The motivation to provide corporate educational programs ranges from the need to improve skills to an interest in responding to legal and social responsibilities by expanding…

  17. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  18. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  19. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  20. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  1. 12 CFR 615.5010 - Funding Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding Corporation. 615.5010 Section 615.5010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Funding § 615.5010 Funding Corporation. (a) The...

  2. Employment of the Disabled in Large Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabby, Rami

    1983-01-01

    Large corporations are in a unique position to employ the disabled, but they sometimes lack the motivation to do so. The author discusses elements of a corporate policy for the disabled, ways of formulating and disseminating it, assignment of responsibility, changes in management attitudes, and the special case of the multinational company.…

  3. Corporate Universities: Driving Force of Knowledge Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rademakers, Martijn

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explain the rapid emergence of corporate universities on the basis of fundamental developments presently shaping the economy and society on a world-wide scale. Design/methodology/approach: Four key forms of innovation are identified and combined with the corporate university concept. The paper explains why corporate…

  4. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  5. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  6. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  7. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  8. 12 CFR 543.1 - Corporate title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 543.1 Section 543.1 Banks and...-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 543.1 Corporate title. (a) General. A Federal savings association shall not adopt a title that misrepresents the nature of the institution or the services it offers....

  9. Marketing the Corporate University or Enterprise Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccles, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers solutions to the one of the areas of greatest weakness in corporate university management, that of the marketing of its purpose and benefits. It draws upon a stakeholder framework to define the different relational perspectives which have to be managed for success in establishing the corporate university brand as having the…

  10. The Corporate University: Global or Local Phenomenon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article considers the extent to which a corporate university transcends national boundaries through an examination of the operation of Motorola University in China. The aim is to extend understanding of the role and function of a corporate university and the human resource management (HRM) convergence/divergence debate within an…

  11. The Changing Shape of Corporate Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucus, David; Baucus, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    About seven years ago, technological innovation gave rise to the e-learning industry and the growth of corporate universities. Early in the evolution of the industry, corporate universities represented a reasonable deployment of learning technologies. They enabled companies to deliver the right content to target markets (e.g., employees, partners,…

  12. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for

  13. Reclaiming Professional Identity through Postgraduate Professional Development: Careers Practitioners Reclaiming their Professional Selves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Siobhan

    2014-01-01

    Careers advisers in the UK have experienced significant change and upheaval within their professional practice. This research explores the role of postgraduate-level professional development in contributing to professional identity. The research utilises a case study approach and adopts multiple tools to provide an in-depth examination of…

  14. Structure Enables Corporations with a Conscience

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-11-10

    November Economic Diversity column for the Tri-City Herald - Topic: Social Purpose Corporations - Excerpt below: On March 31, Governor Chris Gregoire made history when she signed HB2239 and created Washington’s first alternative for-profit corporate structure, the social purpose corporation, or SPC. The new structure allows for-profit entities to formally strive toward creation of social and environmental good as their top corporate priority. This significantly contrasts with the expectation that traditional companies must put creation of shareholder value first. It signals that Washington State believes corporate leadership should have the flexibility and legal backing to make decisions based on the company’s impact on all of its stakeholders rather than on the ability to maximize profits.

  15. Continuing Professional Education: Responsibilities and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Margaret; Bauer, Martha

    1998-01-01

    Presents a philosophical analysis of professionalism to clarify professional responsibilities for continuing education; illustrates professional organizations' responses, using occupational therapy as an example. Provides a framework for planning continuing professional-education activities based on a systems approach. (SK)

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edwin D.

    2006-01-01

    The dialog within aviation management education regarding ethics is incomplete without a discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR research requires discussion involving: (a) the current emphasis on CSR in business in general and aviation specifically; (b) business and educational theory that provide a basis for aviation companies to engage in socially responsible actions; (c) techniques used by aviation and aerospace companies to fulfill this responsibility; and (d) a glimpse of teaching approaches used in university aviation management classes. The summary of this research suggests educators explain CSR theory and practice to students in industry and collegiate aviation management programs. Doing so extends the discussion of ethical behavior and matches the current high level of interest and activity within the aviation industry toward CSR.

  17. Child Care Aware: A Guide to Promoting Professional Development in Family Child Care. Lessons Learned from Child Care Aware Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombro, Amy Laura

    This guide is designed to help educators and community leaders plan and implement professional development initiatives for family child care providers at the community level, and is based on Dayton Hudson Corporation's 1992 Child Care Aware (CCA) campaign to educate child care consumers about quality family child care. Part 1 provides an overview…

  18. A Largely Unsatisfied Need: Continuing Professional Development for Process and Process Plant Industries. A Summary. FEU/PICKUP Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldhart, D.; Brown, A. S.

    This summary report outlines the aims of a project that focused on provision of short courses for technical professionals in the chemical and allied process industry and the process plant industry. Continuing education needs of both companies and individuals, as well as corporate policies and attitudes toward continuing education and constraints…

  19. Traditional medicine, professional monopoly and structural interests: a Korean case.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J

    2000-01-01

    Oriental medicine (OM) is a widely practised traditional healing modality across the East Asian countries. The typical operating mode of traditional medicine in the region is characterized by a relatively stable, though asymmetrical, relationship with the biomedically-oriented health care system with a varying degree of collaboration. The present paper looks at the major conflict between OM and pharmacy in South Korea in the 1990s. Most of the discussions over the so-called 'Hanyak Punjaeng'(OM vs pharmacy dispute) have so far been carried out in the perspective of interest/pressure group politics. But this paper presents an alternative analysis about the genesis, process and resolution of the dispute. It is argued that Robert Alford's 'structural interests' model, rather than the conventional pluralist perspective, offers the most plausible explanation of the conflict. Three key findings are ascertained. First, a sectional, inter-professional conflict can erupt into a major social cataclysm beyond the confines of health care services, an unlikely incident of a 'low politics' case becoming a 'high politics' affair. Second, a bipartite professional monopoly based on the principle of professional credentialism came to be established. Third, the dispute brought about a notable change in the structural power distribution between the corporate rationalizer and professional monopolist. PMID:10622699

  20. Professional ethics and collective professional autonomy: a conceptual analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Asa

    2005-03-01

    In the first section, it is argued that a professional activity involves systematic knowledge and proficiency, a form of continuous improvement of the related bodies of knowledge and proficiency, as well as two levels of understanding: a local one, which is the ability to justify and explain professional acts, and a global one, which involves a conception of the whole profession and its ethical principles. The second section is devoted to a conceptual analysis of professional ethics. It is argued that it consists of a general conception of professionality, a particular conception of the profession under consideration, and a conception of the normative requirements made by the societal envelope of the professional activity, in particular basic norms of democracy. The third section draws conclusions with respect to the nature and limits of professional autonomy. It is shown that such autonomy is much more restricted than its apparent extent. Examples from engineering and other professions are provided.

  1. Teaching and assessing veterinary professionalism.

    PubMed

    Mossop, Liz H; Cobb, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The teaching and assessment of professional behaviors and attitudes are important components of veterinary curricula. This article aims to outline some important considerations and concepts which will be useful for veterinary educators reviewing or developing this topic. A definition or framework of veterinary professionalism must be decided upon before educators can develop relevant learning outcomes. The interface between ethics and professionalism should be considered, and both clinicians and ethicists should deliver professionalism teaching. The influence of the hidden curriculum on student development as professionals should also be discussed during curriculum planning because it has the potential to undermine a formal curriculum of professionalism. There are several learning theories that have relevance to the teaching and learning of professionalism; situated learning theory, social cognitive theory, adult learning theory, reflective practice and experiential learning, and social constructivism must all be considered as a curriculum is designed. Delivery methods to teach professionalism are diverse, but the teaching of reflective skills and the use of early clinical experience to deliver valid learning opportunities are essential. Curricula should be longitudinal and integrated with other aspects of teaching and learning. Professionalism should also be assessed, and a wide range of methods have the potential to do so, including multisource feedback and portfolios. Validity, reliability, and feasibility are all important considerations. The above outlined approach to the teaching and assessment of professionalism will help ensure that institutions produce graduates who are ready for the workplace.

  2. Professional occupation after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kos, M-I; Degive, C; Boex, C; Guyot, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The aims of this study were to verify whether cochlear implants helped profoundly deaf adults to maintain or even to develop their professional occupations, and to identify other elements that may contribute to or, on the contrary, impede such patients' professional success. All adult patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. Demographic data, health information, hearing performance and degree of satisfaction with the implant were also considered. Sixty-seven adults had been implanted, with three different devices, since 1985. At the time of implantation, 34 had been professionally active. After implantation, 29 had remained professionally active, four of whom reported positive developments in their careers. Five patients had become professionally inactive. Those patients who had previously been professionally inactive remained so. There had been no difference in performance, either between different types of cochlear implants or between professionally active or inactive patients. The implanted patients had kept their jobs and many of them had developed their professional skills. In spite of this, cochlear implants may still be perceived as proving insufficiently satisfactory hearing to enable professionally inactive patients to reintegrate and to facilitate further learning or career developments. PMID:17052367

  3. Corporate compliance plans in health care organizations: a top-down perspective.

    PubMed

    Forgione, D A

    1998-01-01

    Recently, at an all-day professional meeting that was targeted at about 100 junior-level health care financial professionals, we covered a whole spectrum of subjects. We covered topics ranging from the Hill-Burton Act to Medicare managed care organizations (MCOs) and capitation; the Stark rules on physician self-referral; the financial incentives within various payment systems for physicians, hospitals, and other providers; Medicare fraud and abuse rules; and the need for well-designed corporate compliance plans. After responding to a number of the participants' questions, I could not help but be reminded of the students every semester who ask me, "Will this be on the test?" In other words, if there are no real teeth in the subject, then they have too many other urgent priorities demanding their attention to give the issue serious consideration. Perhaps this highlights the need for taking corporate compliance planning seriously--starting at the top levels of the organization. It is well documented that leadership attitudes filter downward in any organization. If change for the better is going to take place in the area of corporate compliance, it needs to begin with each of us as individuals, from the top down.

  4. Corporate compliance plans in health care organizations: a top-down perspective.

    PubMed

    Forgione, D A

    1998-01-01

    Recently, at an all-day professional meeting that was targeted at about 100 junior-level health care financial professionals, we covered a whole spectrum of subjects. We covered topics ranging from the Hill-Burton Act to Medicare managed care organizations (MCOs) and capitation; the Stark rules on physician self-referral; the financial incentives within various payment systems for physicians, hospitals, and other providers; Medicare fraud and abuse rules; and the need for well-designed corporate compliance plans. After responding to a number of the participants' questions, I could not help but be reminded of the students every semester who ask me, "Will this be on the test?" In other words, if there are no real teeth in the subject, then they have too many other urgent priorities demanding their attention to give the issue serious consideration. Perhaps this highlights the need for taking corporate compliance planning seriously--starting at the top levels of the organization. It is well documented that leadership attitudes filter downward in any organization. If change for the better is going to take place in the area of corporate compliance, it needs to begin with each of us as individuals, from the top down. PMID:9612741

  5. Marshalling Corporate Resources for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, James

    2011-03-01

    In 1988, the Education Task Force of the Business Roundtable recommended that American corporations invest in pre-college education. Prior to that date, corporate investment was targeted at higher education. IBM and other corporations responded by encouraging their employees and their corporate philanthropic organizations to develop programs aimed at enhancing pre-college education. The IBM TJ Watson Research Center initiated a Local Education Outreach program, active for these past 23 years, that marshals the resources of our science-rich institution to enhance STEM education in our local schools. We have broad and deep partnerships between the Research Center and local school districts, including New York City. We have just completed our 19th consecutive year of Family Science Saturdays, which brings 4th and 5th grade children, along with their parents, to our Research Center for hands-on workshops in topics like States of Matter, Polymer Science, Kitchen Chemistry, and Sound and Light. The workshops are staffed by IBM volunteers, assisted by local high school student ``Peer Teachers.'' Since 1990, the IBM Corporation has joined with a coalition of other companies, professional engineering societies, and government agencies to sponsor the annual Engineers Week (EWeek) campaign of technical education outreach, serving as Corporate Chair in 1992, 2001, and 2008. In recent years, we have annually recruited around 5000 IBM volunteers to reach out to more than 200,000 K-12 students in order to increase their awareness and appreciation of technical careers and encourage them to continue their studies of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The speaker, who helped found the APS Forum on Education (FED) and served as FED Councillor for 8 years, will review these and other programs for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement.

  6. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 2. Professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-06-01

    Although dentists have well recognised legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, the definition of their role and the corresponding responsibilities broaden further as the profession evolves, the demands from dentistry increase and the context of professionalism changes. Thus, continuous evaluation of the role and responsibilities of dentists is vital for provision of quality care, improvement of professional standards and maintaining professional status. In addition, efforts must be made to uphold the credibility of the profession and the associated public trust as well as meeting the increasing expectations from the profession and individual dentists. PMID:16826884

  7. [Can tobacco companies be good corporate citizens?].

    PubMed

    Palazzo, G; Mena, S

    2009-07-01

    Tobacco companies have jumped on the Corporate social responsibility (CSR) bandwagon as a tentative to be societally accepted as responsible actors and good corporate citizens. This is however not possible for two reasons. First, the product they sell is lethal and thus not compatible with the precondition of doing no harm to be a good corporate citizen. Second, the behavior of tobacco firms is not responsible, being illustrated by four examples: junk science versus sound science strategy, seducing young smokers, political lobbying and getting customers on new markets. To conclude, three implications for regulating the activities of the tobacco industry are given.

  8. The politics of professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Brecher, Bob

    2010-04-01

    In order to illustrate how terms of reference themselves, such as those announced by 'professional ethics', delimit and distort moral consideration I start with an extended discussion of how Just War Theory operates to do this; and go on to discuss 'the power of naming' with reference to the British attack on Iraq. Having thus situated my approach to the politics of professional ethics in a broader political context I offer a critique of 'professional' ethics in terms of what is left out of the moral picture and how in particular political considerations are sidelined. Finally I argue that 'codes' of professional ethics are especially insidious.

  9. In Defence of Professional Judgement

    PubMed Central

    Downie, Robin; Macnaughton, Jane

    2013-01-01

    A judgement is an assertion made with evidence or good reason in a context of uncertainty. In psychiatry the uncertainty is inherent in the professional context, and the evidence derives from the academic literature and scientific studies as they are applied to a specific patient. The nature of the uncertainty and the factors which should inform professional judgement are explored. Professional judgement is currently facing two serious challenges: an obsession with numbers, which comes from within medicine, and the ‘patient choice’ agenda, which is politically inspired and comes from outside medicine. This paper strives to defend professional judgement in the clinic against both challenges. PMID:24077903

  10. Continuing professional development for veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Caple, I W

    2005-04-01

    Continuing professional development for veterinarians is expected to commence in the year after graduation and continue until retirement. The World Organisation for Animal Health standard for veterinary services is based on principles of an ethical, organisational and technical nature, and a mix of regulation, self-regulation and quality assurance approaches are used. Few jurisdictions have made a minimum requirement of continuing professional development, measured in hours or units, mandatory in 2004, however, there is an increasing expectation of veterinarians to keep a personal record of their continuing professional development activities. Such records might assist in defending complaints about professional misconduct, and provide a basis for planning and monitoring personal professional growth. Continuing professional development can be obtained by a variety of means through structured and unstructured learning activities. The rapid advances in communication technologies and ready access to available electronic databases at the beginning of the 21st century is rapidly changing the way students learn in veterinary schools and how they will acquire continuing professional development during their careers. Universities, governments, professional associations and special interest groups all have roles to play in the delivery of continuing professional development to the veterinary profession and to ensure a structure is in place to monitor improvements in the delivery of quality veterinary services. PMID:15907035

  11. Future focus for professional development.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicole K; Coplit, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Professional development has evolved from individually focused sabbaticals and professional leaves to institutionally focused programs with an interest in developing faculty members' ability to teach in various environments as well as to succeed in the many endeavors they undertake. We address various issues related to professional development in the medical school arena. Professional development in medical school takes place in a context where faculty are stretched to engage in research and service not only for their own sake but also to financially support their institutions. This obligates professional developers to acknowledge and address the environments in which teaching faculty work, and to use approaches to professional development that honor the time and efforts of teaching faculty. These approaches may be brief interventions that make use of principles of education, and may include online offerings. Professional development will be most effective when professional developers acknowledge that most faculty members aspire to excellence in teaching, but they do so in an environment that pushes them to address competing concerns. Offering professional development opportunities that fit within the workplace environment, take little time, and build upon faculty's existing knowledge will assist in enhancing faculty success.

  12. Professional social networking.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    We review the current state of social communication between healthcare professionals, the role of consumer social networking, and some emerging technologies to address the gaps. In particular, the review covers (1) the current state of loose social networking for continuing medical education (CME) and other broadcast information dissemination; (2) social networking for business promotion; (3) social networking for peer collaboration, including simple communication as well as more robust data-centered collaboration around patient care; and (4) engaging patients on social platforms, including integrating consumer-originated data into the mix of healthcare data. We will see how, as the nature of healthcare delivery moves from the institution-centric way of tradition to a more social and networked ambulatory pattern that we see emerging today, the nature of health IT has also moved from enterprise-centric systems to more socially networked, cloud-based options.

  13. Professional social networking.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    We review the current state of social communication between healthcare professionals, the role of consumer social networking, and some emerging technologies to address the gaps. In particular, the review covers (1) the current state of loose social networking for continuing medical education (CME) and other broadcast information dissemination; (2) social networking for business promotion; (3) social networking for peer collaboration, including simple communication as well as more robust data-centered collaboration around patient care; and (4) engaging patients on social platforms, including integrating consumer-originated data into the mix of healthcare data. We will see how, as the nature of healthcare delivery moves from the institution-centric way of tradition to a more social and networked ambulatory pattern that we see emerging today, the nature of health IT has also moved from enterprise-centric systems to more socially networked, cloud-based options. PMID:25308391

  14. 27 CFR 40.93 - Change in corporate name.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change in corporate name... Changes in Name § 40.93 Change in corporate name. Where there is a change in the name of a corporate... to establish that the corporate name has been changed. (72 Stat. 1421; 26 U.S.C. 5712) Changes...

  15. 27 CFR 40.93 - Change in corporate name.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Change in corporate name... Changes in Name § 40.93 Change in corporate name. Where there is a change in the name of a corporate... necessary to establish that the corporate name has been changed. (72 Stat. 1421; 26 U.S.C. 5712) Changes...

  16. 26 CFR 1.48-5 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.48-5... business corporations. (a) In general. (1) In the case of an electing small business corporation (as... business corporation. The bases of all new section 38 properties which have a useful life falling within...

  17. 26 CFR 1.47-4 - Electing small business corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporation. 1.47-4... business corporation. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of corporation. If an electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)) or a former electing small...

  18. 26 CFR 1.58-4 - Electing small business corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electing small business corporations. 1.58-4... TAXES Tax Preference Regulations § 1.58-4 Electing small business corporations. (a) In general. Section... business corporation among the shareholders of such corporation. Section 58(d)(2) provides rules for...

  19. Emerging technologies and corporate culture at Microsoft: a methodological note.

    PubMed

    Klein, David; Schmeling, James; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article explores factors important in the study and examination of corporate culture and change. The particular focus is on the technological methods used to conduct a study of accessible technology and corporate culture at Microsoft Corporation. Reasons for particular approaches are explained. Advantages and challenges of emerging technologies that store and retrieve information in the study of corporate culture are reviewed.

  20. 12 CFR 704.3 - Corporate credit union capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate credit union capital. 704.3 Section... CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.3 Corporate credit union capital. (a) Capital plan. A corporate credit union... strategies which provide for the building of capital consistent with regulatory requirements, the...

  1. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  2. 26 CFR 1.537-3 - Business of the corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Business of the corporation. 1.537-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Corporations Used to Avoid Income Tax on Shareholders § 1.537-3 Business of the corporation. (a) The business of a corporation is not merely that which it has...

  3. 7 CFR 4279.71 - Public bodies and nonprofit corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. 4279.71... § 4279.71 Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. Any public body or nonprofit corporation that... by a public body or nonprofit corporation in compliance with OMB Circulars A-128 or A-133 or...

  4. 7 CFR 4279.71 - Public bodies and nonprofit corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. 4279.71... § 4279.71 Public bodies and nonprofit corporations. Any public body or nonprofit corporation that... by a public body or nonprofit corporation in compliance with OMB Circulars A-128 or A-133 or...

  5. 24 CFR 964.120 - Resident management corporation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 964.120 Resident management corporation requirements. A resident management corporation must consist... resident management corporation and the resident council, so long as the corporation meets the requirements... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident management...

  6. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  7. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  8. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  9. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  10. 19 CFR 113.33 - Corporations as principals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corporations as principals. 113.33 Section 113.33... TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Principals and Sureties § 113.33 Corporations as principals. (a) Name of corporation on the bonds. The name of a corporation executing a Customs bond as a principal, may be printed...

  11. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  12. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  13. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  14. 12 CFR 7.2000 - Corporate governance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Corporate governance procedures. 7.2000 Section... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2000 Corporate governance procedures. (a) General. A national bank proposing to engage in a corporate governance procedure shall comply with applicable Federal...

  15. Professional Development for School Library Media Professionals: Elements for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol A.; Dotson, Lana Kaye; Yontz, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for School Librarians suggests an important mission for school librarians is to ensure personal growth through ongoing exposure to conferences, journal articles, webinars, presentations, and membership in professional organizations. As professional educators, School Librarians should exemplify the vision for being…

  16. Professional Education: Post-Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakalys, Jurate A.; Watson, Jean

    1986-01-01

    In response to increased interest in interdisciplinary and liberal arts emphases in professional education programs, the University of Colorado has reorganized its nursing education program structure into a core academic unit and four major divisions, and has proposed that the first professional nursing degree be post-baccalaureate. (MSE)

  17. Creating Professional Learning Communities: The Work of Professional Development Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Gini; Sudeck, Maria; Rattigan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    If professional learning communities offer opportunities for improving the teaching and learning process, then developing strong professional development school (PDS) partnerships establish an appropriate framework for that purpose. PDS partnerships, however, can be less than effective without proper planning and discussion about the aims of those…

  18. Professional Doctoral Theses by Explication as Professional Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explain the nature, and identify the quality criteria of a doctoral thesis by explication for professional management development. Design/methodology/approach: A working definition of a professional doctoral explication thesis (DET) is proposed and substantiated by five experts. The paper takes a practical, educational…

  19. Professional Development for the New Millennium. Professional Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    In 1998, the Mississippi Legislature amended Mississippi Code Section 37-17 concerning the requirements for local school district professional development programs. The Department of Education then revised this portion of the model to reflect the statutory changes. This handbook contains the definition and purpose of professional development and…

  20. Becoming an Early Years Professional: Developing a New Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Research on professional identity places various emphasis on the influence of internal or external components (Beijaard, Meijer and Verloop 2004; McGillivray 2008; Osgood 2010), which can create tension between the normative and subjective view of what it means to be a particular type of professional. This small scale research sought to uncover…

  1. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  2. A Corporate Communication Major for Clarke College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Michael L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a program in which students are specifically trained in corporate communication. Lists courses required for completion of the program and tells about students' involvement in operating a communication agency simulation. (TJ)

  3. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  4. Developing a corporate drug testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrath, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Management reaction to employee drug abuse at a gas distribution company resulted in the development and implementation of a corporate drug testing program before DOT mandated drug testing. The author explains the background, planning, operation and communication work involved.

  5. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

  6. Corporate dashboard for payphone service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siraj, Fadzilah; Shadan, Hezlin

    2015-12-01

    Making assured that managements are kept abreast of what is happening in the company is not an easy task. The quantity of data generated by the business process is astonishing large and non-centralized. The challenge facing business organizations is how to extract, load, transform data, and then deliver useful information to key decision makers. The major challenge for the payphone industries is in making a good decision, particularly to increase quality of service, customer satisfaction while achieving high revenue. With current practice, the process is very time consuming and therefore, a systematic and informative corporate dashboard needs to be provided especially for managerial level in supporting their decision making process. This paper proposed a dashboard application design that provides a single-screen display of relevant information such as the phone performance and coin collection reports, as well as generated revenue to enable faster and more effective decision making. The development of the dashboard is divided into requirement, design and implementation phases. The implementation using real data has demonstrated the potential use of the dashboard. The evaluation results indicate that the dashboard can be used as a tool that can support payphone operation works and decision process by providing the analytical analysis of the KPI report and the performance status. In addition, the results can be used as a guideline for the dashboard developer to understand the process and focuses on the key elements and the principle in designing the effective dashboard.

  7. Mobile screening mammography for the corporate customer.

    PubMed

    Kettlehake, J; Malott, J C

    1988-01-01

    While the concept of mobile imaging services is not new, mobile screening mammography has recently gained a great deal of attention, and several mobile breast screening programs are in operation throughout the United States. This article describes the development of a mobile breast screening program designed to attract corporations' employees as its primary source of participants. The design of the program, corporate concerns and operational issues are discussed as well as the findings of its first year of operation.

  8. Corporeality, Equality, and Education: A Biopedagogical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlieghe, Joris

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author develops a new perspective on the role and the position of the human body in the world of education. The interest in the theme of corporeality is far from new, and this applies not only to the field of social sciences in general (where in the last two decades a corporeal turn has taken place, see Sheets-Johnstone 2009),…

  9. Compact private hubs for corporate VSAT networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, Tom M.; Subbarayan, Ravi

    Satellite communications has played a significant role in making information networks a strategic corporate asset. Very small aperture terminal (VSAT) networks, in particular, have special appeal for the corporate network user community because of unique advantages in cost, operations, and user control. The recent rapid proliferation of these networks in a multitude of market segments, as diverse as retail and financial services, is evidence of their wide acceptance for business communications.

  10. Corporate Donors Can Make a Huge Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Drew A.

    2009-01-01

    It is time to educate corporate America on the need to finance higher education by using a need-based giving standard. Corporations need to realize that two-year colleges significantly affect their work force and economy. Only 25 percent of the jobs in the United States require a degree from a four-year college, yet up to 75 percent of the jobs…

  11. 26 CFR 1.902-1 - Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a foreign corporation for foreign income taxes paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit for domestic corporate shareholder of a...)(2)(iii) (26 CFR revised as of April 1, 2006). The reduction in foreign income taxes paid or accrued... earnings to Corporation M, which Corporation M receives on January 20, 1992. Corporation M uses a...

  12. Professional Language in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The use of 3-5 languages that involves professional language to form varied cooperative networks for the creation of new knowledge is of the greatest importance for the development of humans, institutions and society (Maslo, 2006). Aim of the Study: To identify and analyze professional language in engineering education on the…

  13. Social Networking Strategies for Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Library professionals have always engaged with associations and communities to share experiences and information. Going back through the earliest times of the profession, librarians have interacted through conference meetings, professional publications, and a variety of other venues. These in-person and print-based interactions continue as…

  14. Dialogue: Professionalism and Human Beings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazler, Richard J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Focuses on two implicit assumptions that Carl Rogers saw as dangerous undercurrents in the educational process: that ability to pass examinations is the best criterion for student selection and for judging professional promise, and that evaluation is education and education is evaluation. Opinions are offered by three professionals, each with…

  15. Professional Development: Setting the Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Gordon E.; Hammons, James O.

    2002-01-01

    States that professional development programs, though they run the gamut from fledgling to comprehensive, have developed over the last three decades as a result of the rapid growth of the community college. Examines some of the early struggles of the professional development movement and discusses future challenges. (AUTH/NB)

  16. Common Issues in Professional Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janosik, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Most conversations about ethics and professional behavior involve case studies and hypothetical situations. This study identifies and examines the most common concerns in professional behavior as reported by 303 student affairs practitioners in the field. Differences by gender, years of experience, organizational level, institutional type, and…

  17. The Professional as Organizational Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecke, David S.

    1973-01-01

    This study uses a sample of 56 ministers to assess the effect of professional and organizational perspectives on determining leadership effectiveness and work satisfaction. The organizational perspective was more important for determining effectiveness than the professional perspective. Both perspectives contributed to satisfaction. (Author/JH)

  18. Effective Teacher Professionalization in Networks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Roelande H.; Dijkstra, Bernadette J.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher professionalization has been focused too strongly on external experts and a one-size-fits-all set of solutions that often fail to distinguish between the needs of different teachers. This article describes a research into teacher networks that might be more successful vehicles for professional development of teachers. The results show that…

  19. The Ecuadorian Professional Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berzins, Anton Robert

    2008-01-01

    Across all fields of psychology within the United States, many mental health and educational professionals involved in the assessment of school-age children are not members of a minority population. As a result, these professionals are unfamiliar with the diverse cultural and linguistic characteristics of the individuals that they serve. This…

  20. Facilitating Respectful Diversity Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David L.; Thomas, Earl E.

    2007-01-01

    Changing demographics continue to challenge professional development programs to prepare school personnel to serve a rapidly expanding diverse student body. Popular diversity professional development models are on a continuum. They range from preparing teachers to design themes and activities that are culturally relevant all the way to enabling…

  1. Research Degrees as Professional Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing trend within higher education and, more specifically, in higher degrees by research, to treat a professional skills set as a desirable graduate outcome. The increasing value that is being placed on a professional skills set in large part reflects growing interest around the world in the role of research degrees in labour…

  2. Creating Your Own Professional Portfolio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides educators with guidelines and resources for developing professional portfolios that reflect their experiences, training, and achievements as educators. It discusses developing a portfolio, what to include in a portfolio, organizing a portfolio, the benefits of a professional portfolio, and packaging a portfolio. (Author/CR)

  3. Health Professionals and the Bereaved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterweis, Marian; Townsend, Jessica

    Based on the premise that health care providers and institutions have a professional obligation to help bereaved families, this booklet focuses on the role of health care professionals in lessening distress, helping prevent pathological outcomes, and assisting the bereaved toward a satisfactory outcome. The information provided in this guide is…

  4. Professional Cosmetology Practices. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopcus, Sharron; Armstrong, Ivan J.

    This publication is designed to assist the instructor and students in understanding the latest concepts and techniques of the instructional phase of cosmetology programs. The instructional units are in five areas: (1) orientation, (2) professional practices: hair, (3) professional practices: skin and nails, (4) cosmetology science, and (5)…

  5. Professional Issues for Primary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ann, Ed.; Haylock, Derek, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book is intended to be a contribution to raising the awareness of primary teachers and trainee teachers as to what is involved in all the different professional dimensions of their work in schools. The book deals with the key professional issues in primary teaching that are addressed in primary teacher training courses. The book aims to…

  6. Online Professional Development: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Meg S.; Phalen, Lena; Moran, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Many teachers are turning to online professional development to meet their learning needs, but the vast array of available opportunities may be overwhelming. This article provides a framework for making sense of common online teacher learning opportunities. It also suggests situations where online professional development may be most useful and…

  7. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  8. Guidelines for Professional Standards Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards.

    This document is a report of the Joint Committee on Professional Standards Boards appointed by the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC), the National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards (NCTEPTS), and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). A…

  9. Professional Development: Specialization or Hybridization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agha, Syed Salim

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the professional development of librarians and information professionals and considers the future direction it should take. Topics include the forces of capitalism, the growth in information and communication technology, and the changing demands and needs of users (or customers). (LRW)

  10. Open Book Professional Accountancy Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlands, J. E.; Forsyth, D.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the structure and rationale for an open-book approach in professional accountancy examinations. The concept of knowledge management and the recognition that some knowledge ought to be embedded in the minds of professional accountants while other knowledge ought to be readily accessible and capable of application forms the…

  11. Open File: Professionalism in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy, Ed.; Lo, Leslie N. K., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on professionalism in teaching. It begins with an article in Viewpoints/Controversies titled "A Renewed Sense for the Purposes of Schooling: The Challenges of Education and Social Cohesion in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Central Asia" (Stephen P. Heyneman; Sanja Todoric-Bebic). In Open File: Professionalism in…

  12. Professional Development: Then and Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolt, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments have altered pedagogies in classroom teaching but approaches to teacher professional development have remained largely unchanged. The purpose of this paper is to describe an evolving learning process that spans the last decade and draws from three different investigations into professional development. The author…

  13. What Is an Information Professional?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Richard O.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the definition of a profession focuses on the definition of information professionals. Seven illustrative information careers are described, the importance of judgment in information professions is emphasized, ethics are considered, and implications for the education of an information professional are suggested. (three references)…

  14. Continuing Education for the Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, G. L., Jr.

    University education for the practicing or aspiring professional-practitioner should be considered the beginning or extension of lifelong learning, a continuing educational requirement. University Extension programming at the University of Wisconsin covers a wide range of professional, farming, and other areas. Efforts are underway to redesign…

  15. Minority Students and Professional Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The role of professional associations in facilitating minority access to graduate and professional education is addressed. Information on minority applications, financial aid, recruitment, and support activities was requested from 29 associations; 16 responded. The general posture of the associations appears to be limited to expressions of support…

  16. Making Art for Professional Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadeson, Harriet

    2003-01-01

    Although art therapists readily recognize the value of artmaking for their clients and for themselves, do they utilize its potentialities for professional self-processing? In the hope of encouraging art therapists to use this valuable resource, this paper presents examples of art expressions for professional processing by many art therapists…

  17. Empowering Teachers through Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Professional development is an ongoing process, one that evolves as teachers assess and reexamine their teaching beliefs and practices. This article highlights some reasons for teachers to pursue professional development. It also suggests techniques that help teachers feel empowered and motivated in their English language classrooms. She includes…

  18. Revisiting Professional Dispositions: Research Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gail; Jones, Jami L.

    2011-01-01

    As the authors progressed through their research agenda last year, they contributed an article to "School Library Monthly" entitled "Forecasting Professional Dispositions of School Librarians" (January 2011, 54-56) wherein they described a Delphi study they conducted in the fall of 2009 that identified professional dispositions based on responses…

  19. Professional Development of Mathematics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hung-Hsi

    1999-01-01

    This essay discusses inservice professional development and suggests that any improvement in mathematics education must begin with teachers already in the classroom. It includes three examples of mathematical presentations in professional development made in Californian schools relating to discrete mathematics, connections, and technology. (MM)

  20. New Directions for New Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Elizabeth J.; Eaker, Michelle A.

    Institutions of higher education spend considerable resources in the recruiting, screening, and hiring processes, yet often pay little attention to acclimating new professionals to their surroundings. This document presents a step-by-step outline of how to orient new employees. The success of the new professional/institution relationship depends…

  1. Teacher Professionalism: The Wrong Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, David; Orme, Liz

    2000-01-01

    Defining teachers as professionals in the same way that doctors or engineers are professionals is reductionist because such definition generally distorts the moral dimensions of teaching by using the wrong language (clients, customers), focusing on limited forms of knowledge, and ignoring the fundamental democratic character of education.…

  2. The Future of Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary

    2013-01-01

    What will technology-based teacher professional development look like in the next few years? In this article, teacher training curriculum designer Mary Burns presents her 5 top picks from the professional learning technologies now emerging around the world: (1) IPTV; (2) Immersive Environments; (3) Video; (4) Social Media; and (5) Mobile…

  3. Observation Tools for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Professional development of teachers, including English language teachers, empowers them to change in ways that improve teaching and learning (Gall and Acheson 2011; Murray 2010). In their seminal research on staff development--professional development in today's terms--Joyce and Showers (2002) identify key factors that promote teacher change.…

  4. Continuing professional development: best practices.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Helena P; Silva, Eduardo D; Stulting, Andries A; Golnik, Karl C

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed.

  5. Lay obligations in professional relations.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, M

    1985-02-01

    Little has been written recently about the obligations of lay people in professional relationships. Yet the Code of Medical Ethics adopted by the American Medical Association in 1847 included an extensive statement on "Obligations of patients to their physicians'. After critically examining the philosophical foundations of this statement, I provide an alternative account of lay obligations in professional relationships. Based on a hypothetical social contract and included in a full specification of professional as well as lay obligations, this account requires lay people to honor commitments and disclose relevant information. Ethically, the account assumes that all parties in lay-professional relationships should be given equal consideration and respect in determining rights and obligations. Factually, it assumes that the treatment of many illnesses and injuries required collaboration and cooperation among lay persons and health professionals, that medical resources and personnel are limited, and that medicine, nursing, and related health professions, are, in MacIntyre's sense, practices.

  6. Continuing Professional Development: Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Helena P.; Silva, Eduardo D.; Stulting, Andries A.; Golnik, Karl C.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed. PMID:24791104

  7. Professional socialization: students becoming nurses.

    PubMed

    Shinyashiki, Gilberto Tadeu; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Day, René A

    2006-01-01

    Usually colleges are evaluated by the quality of the knowledge and technical training offered to the students. Little attention is given to the acquisition of the values, behaviors and attitudes necessary to assume their professional role. This exploratory study aims to increase understanding of the professional socialization process that occurs at nursing schools and the results obtained through the socialization of professional values and standards. The educational experience of nursing students involves more than a body of scientific knowledge and the acquisition of abilities to provide care to patients. Questionnaires were filled out by 278 students of two public Nursing Schools in São Paulo state, 164 in school A and 114 in school B. The results indicated that some professional values, norms and behaviors are influenced by College years, studying at a College of Nursing during four years leads to a difference in values, norms and professional behavior.

  8. Genre Analysis, ESP and Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Vijay K.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of professional genres and professional practices are invariably seen as complementing each other, in that they not only influence each other but are often co-constructed in specific professional contexts. However, professional genres have often been analyzed in isolation, leaving the study of professional practice almost completely out,…

  9. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values. PMID:21061069

  10. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values.

  11. Corporate management and clinical autonomy: the ethical dilemma in mental health.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, B; Ward, P

    1997-01-01

    Funding constraints and management practices are increasing pressure on clinical autonomy within Australian mental health services. The introduction of total quality management, output-based funding and changes to public mental health policy have promoted business-like efficiency and increased control of resources. It is argued that such moves significantly circumscribe the discretionary authority that mental health professionals have previously enjoyed. This paper attempts to highlight the ethical and moral tension inherent with a corporate management approach, and calls for mental health services to acknowledge the value of intellectual capital, creativity and innovation.

  12. 75 FR 60138 - Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... August 23, 2010 (75 FR 51849). Workers are engaged in employment related to the production of laminated... Employment and Training Administration Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian... (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation,...

  13. 76 FR 19472 - Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Register on September 29, 2010 (75 FR 60139). Workers are engaged in employment related to the production... Employment and Training Administration Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian... for the workers and former workers of Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary...

  14. Corporate Giving: The Views of Chief Executive Officers of Major American Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur H.; Bartolomeo, John S.

    The attitudes of chief executive officers (CEO's) of a sample of major U.S. corporations toward corporate philanthropy were surveyed. The sample consisted of 69 Fortune 1300 companies, 73 companies with $50 to $100 million annual sales volume, and 77 companies with $25 to $49 million annual sales volume. Attention was directed to current giving…

  15. Corporate Score: Marrying Two Expert Tools Will Help You Sustain Your Corporate Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarazzo, James M.; Pearlstein, Toby

    2007-01-01

    Corporate librarians hold the key to determining new ways to work within their environments. They must drive the process to change the view of the company library as a liability--as overhead, as a cost center, as part of the problem--to the library as a solution center, a necessary investment. For the sixth consecutive year, corporate libraries…

  16. The Lethality of the Corporate Image to the Recovering Corporate Executive Alcoholic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machell, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the emotional impact of the internalized corporate image on the recovering alcoholic corporate executive. Cautions organizations to realize that alcoholics in early recovery may react to their work and career responsibilities excessively and completely. Suggests that supervisors need training workshops in understanding alcoholism and…

  17. 75 FR 20389 - Resinoid Engineering Corporation Hebron, OH; Resinoid Engineering Corporation Heath, OH; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... January 25, 2010, applicable to workers of Resinoid Engineering Corporation, Hebron, Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal Register March 5, 2010 (75 FR 10323). At the request of the State Agency, the... Employment and Training Administration Resinoid Engineering Corporation Hebron, OH; Resinoid...

  18. 76 FR 35024 - Precision Dynamics Corporation San Fernando, CA; Precision Dynamics Corporation, Also Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... FR 51848). At the request of the company, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of... Employment and Training Administration Precision Dynamics Corporation San Fernando, CA; Precision Dynamics Corporation, Also Known as the St. John Companies, Valencia, CA; Amended Certification Regarding...

  19. The Pervasiveness and Impact of Corporate Quality Circles: A Survey of Major American Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.; And Others

    To assess the pervasiveness of quality circles in American corporations, as well as to ascertain perceptions of their impact in terms of various organizational outcomes, a 45-item questionnaire was mailed to personnel directors of the Fortune 500 corporations. Some time after the initial mailing, a follow-up mailing was executed to maximize the…

  20. Shifting boundaries in professional care.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, A; Solomon, J; Abelson, J

    1996-01-01

    The nature of the work undertaken by different health professionals and inter-professional boundaries are constantly shifting. The greater knowledge of users of health care, and the increasing technical and organizational complexity of modern medicine, have partly eroded the control of health professionals over the substance of their work. The definition of a field of work as lying within the province of any one profession is culturally rather than scientifically determined. It is evident that care of good quality should be delivered at the lowest possible cost. This might include delivery of care by a less trained person than heretofore, or by someone with limited but focused training. Sharing of skills is a more sensible subject for discussion than transfer of tasks. We review a number of studies which show the effectiveness of inter-professional substitution in various care settings, and also the effectiveness of substitution by those other than health professionals. The views of users of health services on inter-professional substitution need to be considered. Health professionals and others need to work together to devise innovative ways of delivering effective health care. The legal issues need clarification. PMID:8774532

  1. Shifting boundaries in professional care.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, A; Solomon, J; Abelson, J

    1996-07-01

    The nature of the work undertaken by different health professionals and inter-professional boundaries are constantly shifting. The greater knowledge of users of health care, and the increasing technical and organizational complexity of modern medicine, have partly eroded the control of health professionals over the substance of their work. The definition of a field of work as lying within the province of any one profession is culturally rather than scientifically determined. It is evident that care of good quality should be delivered at the lowest possible cost. This might include delivery of care by a less trained person than heretofore, or by someone with limited but focused training. Sharing of skills is a more sensible subject for discussion than transfer of tasks. We review a number of studies which show the effectiveness of inter-professional substitution in various care settings, and also the effectiveness of substitution by those other than health professionals. The views of users of health services on inter-professional substitution need to be considered. Health professionals and others need to work together to devise innovative ways of delivering effective health care. The legal issues need clarification.

  2. The Infusion of Corporate Values into Progressive Education: Professional Vulnerability or Complicity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamson, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Examines the history of educational administration in the USA during the Progressive era (1890-1940). Using Callahan's Education and the Cult of Efficiency as a starting point, examines school district-based administrative practices that offered viable alternatives to the business-oriented, "scientific management" reforms that tended to dominate…

  3. From Mountaintop to Corporate Ladder--What New Professionals Really Really Want in a Capstone Experience!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Erica; Bailey, Janis; van Acker, Elizabeth; Wood, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Capstone subjects are increasingly used in Universities worldwide to complete the undergraduate program experience and to transition graduates into the workplace. As such, capstones fulfil a large role consolidating one experience and traversing the gap to another. Yet, little is known or understood about their design, their implementation or…

  4. [Corporal Punishment. Three Works:] The Influence of Corporal Punishment on Learning: A Statistical Study. The Bible and the Rod. 1001 Alternatives to Corporal Punishment, Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Adah; Wallerstein, James S.

    Arguments against the use of corporal punishment in schools are presented in the three publications collected here. "The Influence of Corporal Punishment on Learning: A Statistical Study," by Adah Maurer and James S. Wallerstein, examines the relationship between rates of corporal punishment use and noncompletion of high school in the 50 states.…

  5. Formal Instruction in Dental Professional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozar, David T.

    1985-01-01

    Three common arguments against formal classes in professional ethics are examined. A minimum curriculum in dental professional ethics is proposed and a proposed program in professional ethics in dentistry is appended. (MLW)

  6. Constructing an Integrated Model for Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, W. Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for a model of professional education based on an interdisciplinary approach developed at the University of Calgary. Highlights include professional growth; experts' behavior; mentorship; professional knowledge base; elaboration theory; and fuzzy logic. (Contains 21 references.) (LRW)

  7. Leadership Lessons for New Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonabocker, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Forty years ago, the author arrived in Boston with an associate's degree and two years' experience in the corporate world. The idea of working at a college appealed, so she boarded the B line trolley to Boston College. She arrived on campus, found the human resources office, took a typing test, interviewed with the director of freshman financial…

  8. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas. 5.3 Section 5.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS DESIGNATION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE AREAS § 5.3 Procedures for designation of health professional(s)...

  9. Prison psychiatry and professional responsibility.

    PubMed

    Smith, C E

    1987-05-01

    Professional responsibility is a multifaceted concept embracing elements of technical competence and accountability. It may seem anachronistic to examine professional responsibility in the context of prison psychiatry, which is a relatively unpopular and often controversial health service activity. Upon closer scrutiny, however, it appears that prison psychiatry presents a paradigm of the uncertainties, conflicts, and dilemmas which underlie current concerns about professional responsibility in psychiatry. In this paper, the author examines some of these issues and proposes some tentative answers, focusing on the critical question of the proper roles of psychiatry in prisons.

  10. Perioperative Nurse Leaders and Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    Professionalism in nursing leadership encompasses key elements that include a common body of knowledge, autonomous practice, self-regulation through education and licensure, a set code of ethics, and a commitment to altruism. Perioperative nurse leaders also must embrace collaboration, vision, accountability, and patient and staff member advocacy based on established ethics, values, and standards of care. Nurse leaders who are committed to professional development through pursuit of higher degrees, application of evidence-based practice, collaboration with colleagues, and certification show a strong commitment to their profession and serve as role models for staff members. This article discusses professionalism in nursing and offers information specific to perioperative nurse leaders. PMID:27472973

  11. Professional chaplaincy: an absent profession?

    PubMed

    VandeCreek, L

    1999-01-01

    A content analysis of 60 articles from six health care journal issues devoted to the topic of spirituality suggest that interdisciplinary health care authors neglect professional chaplaincy when they discuss spirituality. Notes that possible reasons for this neglect include the continuing negative fall-out from the historic religion-science conflicts, the perception that both religion and clergy are irrelevant, and the belief that interdisciplinary professionals themselves can improve their patient services by giving attention to spirituality without the involvement of chaplains. Discusses the results and possible implications for professional chaplaincy and for health care.

  12. Mentoring: the ultimate professional relationship.

    PubMed

    Belcher, A E; Sibbald, R G

    1998-04-01

    Mentoring plays a significant role in business, industry, government, education, and healthcare. Mentoring relationships help promote the individual's professional growth and development. Such development involves knowledge and skill acquisition, which is facilitated by interaction with other, more experienced and proficient professionals. The Belcher-Sibbald Continuum of Learning describes the relationship among the concepts of role modeling, networking, preceptoring, and mentoring. Each concept is defined and described as a unique relationship which promotes professional growth and development. In addition, three mentoring/networking relationships in the context of the wound care community are presented to provide insight into this type of relationship.

  13. When funds for professional development are scarce.

    PubMed

    Wider, Lottchen Crane; Sind, Joann

    2012-01-01

    This column describes an approach to sustaining interprofessional education for perioperative staff when budgetary cuts in professional education significantly limit professional development. PMID:22214413

  14. Examining corporate reputation judgments with generalizability theory.

    PubMed

    Highhouse, Scott; Broadfoot, Alison; Yugo, Jennifer E; Devendorf, Shelba A

    2009-05-01

    The researchers used generalizability theory to examine whether reputation judgments about corporations function in a manner consistent with contemporary theory in the corporate-reputation literature. University professors (n = 86) of finance, marketing, and human resources management made repeated judgments about the general reputations of highly visible American companies. Minimal variability in the judgments is explained by items, time, persons, and field of specialization. Moreover, experts from the different specializations reveal considerable agreement in how they weigh different aspects of corporate performance in arriving at their global reputation judgments. The results generally support the theory of the reputation construct and suggest that stable estimates of global reputation can be achieved with a small number of items and experts.

  15. The clinic as a good corporate neighbor.

    PubMed

    Sass, Hans-Martin

    2013-02-01

    Clinics today specialize in health repair services similar to car repair shops; procedures and prices are standardized, regulated, and inflexibly uniform. Clinics of the future have to become Health Care Centers in order to be more respected and more effective corporate neighbors in offering outreach services in health education and preventive health care. The traditional concept of care for health is much broader than repair management and includes the promotion of lay health competence and responsibility in healthy social and natural environments. The corporate profile and ethics of the clinic as a good and competitive local neighbor will have to focus on [a] better personalized care, [b] education and services in preventive care, [c] direct or web-based information and advice for general, seasonal, or age related health risks, and on developing and improving trustworthy character traits of the clinic as a corporate person and a good neighbor. PMID:23444251

  16. Examining corporate reputation judgments with generalizability theory.

    PubMed

    Highhouse, Scott; Broadfoot, Alison; Yugo, Jennifer E; Devendorf, Shelba A

    2009-05-01

    The researchers used generalizability theory to examine whether reputation judgments about corporations function in a manner consistent with contemporary theory in the corporate-reputation literature. University professors (n = 86) of finance, marketing, and human resources management made repeated judgments about the general reputations of highly visible American companies. Minimal variability in the judgments is explained by items, time, persons, and field of specialization. Moreover, experts from the different specializations reveal considerable agreement in how they weigh different aspects of corporate performance in arriving at their global reputation judgments. The results generally support the theory of the reputation construct and suggest that stable estimates of global reputation can be achieved with a small number of items and experts. PMID:19450013

  17. The clinic as a good corporate neighbor.

    PubMed

    Sass, Hans-Martin

    2013-02-01

    Clinics today specialize in health repair services similar to car repair shops; procedures and prices are standardized, regulated, and inflexibly uniform. Clinics of the future have to become Health Care Centers in order to be more respected and more effective corporate neighbors in offering outreach services in health education and preventive health care. The traditional concept of care for health is much broader than repair management and includes the promotion of lay health competence and responsibility in healthy social and natural environments. The corporate profile and ethics of the clinic as a good and competitive local neighbor will have to focus on [a] better personalized care, [b] education and services in preventive care, [c] direct or web-based information and advice for general, seasonal, or age related health risks, and on developing and improving trustworthy character traits of the clinic as a corporate person and a good neighbor.

  18. Professional Development: Substance or Fad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H. Stuart, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses three issues that may weaken the professional development movement in higher education: overemphasis on teaching methodology in faculty development, administrative apathy towards the programs, and the lack of a philosophic framework upon which to develop the programs. (AYC)

  19. [Professional occupation after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kós, Maria-Izabel; Degive, Colette; Boëx, Colette; Maire, Raphaël; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2006-10-01

    This study verifies whether cochlear implants helps deaf adults to maintain or develop their professional occupations. Sixty-seven patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. At the time of implantation 34 were professionally active. After the implantation 29 remained active, 4 of them reporting positive developments in their careers. Five patients became inactive. The previously inactive patients remained inactive. There was no difference in auditory performances between professionally active or inactive patients. Cochlear implants enable most implanted adults to maintain and even progress in their professions. However, deafness still represents an obstacle to social integration as inactive patients who searched for a job were rejected after the job interviews. PMID:17076153

  20. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project (hereafter the Guidelines) fosters the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

  1. The Laboratory in Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Harold N.

    1979-01-01

    The role of laboratory experience in professional education is discussed. Although laboratory experiments are often expensive and demanding on faculty time, they can offer a unique experience to the veterinary medicine student. (BH)

  2. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race.

  3. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    PubMed

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race. PMID:3957511

  4. Capital punishment and professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L A

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the issue of capital punishment and whether a professional nurse has the right to choose to participate in it. Capital punishment is an extremely emotional ethical issue, and there is abundant literature to support both viewpoints. Professional nursing upholds values and special moral obligations, as expressed in its code. The American Nurses Association Code for Nurses guides conduct in carrying out nursing responsibilities consistent with the ethical obligations of the profession.

  5. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    provided, to the extent that the system supports patients collectively. A doctor's corporate responsibility, shared as it is with managers and others, is a frequently neglected aspect of modern practice. The audience for this report is, first and foremost, doctors. But we believe it should be of equal interest to patients, policy-makers, members of other health professions, and the media. All these groups have a vital part to play in discussing and advancing medical professionalism. This report is only the beginning of an effort by the Royal College of Physicians, together with others, to initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a healthier and fairer society. Medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of modern healthcare. This Working Party could not hope to solve all the issues and conflicts surrounding professionalism in practice today. But our collective and abiding wish is to put medical professionalism back onto the political map of health in the UK.

  6. The challenge of teaching professionalism.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    2004-11-01

    The medical profession has been conscious of all the changes happening in society in the last quarter of the 20th century and has tried to cope with it. Numerous criticisms about the profession and its professionals have stimulated a revision of the professional's behaviour and professionalism. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada has launched its own proposal under the name of CanMEDS 2000. Among the revised roles and competences one find professionalism. This theme is at the heart of our profession since the early days of the 20th century when medicine became a modern profession. Responsibility for the patient remains fundamental for any doctor but, today, society expects more accountability from the medical profession. We have the obligation to educate our residents not only for healing and caring of patients but also for active participation in managing the healthcare system. In this paper, we examine this renewed post-modern professionalism. My intention is to propose a visual approach for the teaching of professionalism.

  7. Building an effective corporate compliance plan.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E

    1997-09-01

    Corporate compliance plans are essential for healthcare organizations to cope with, and perhaps even stave off, investigations arising from allegations of illegal business practices. Initial development and implementation of a corporate compliance plan can be facilitated through four steps: determining the content of the code of conduct, determining how the code will be distributed, assigning responsibility for implementing the plan, and appointing a compliance task force to guide the implementation process. Special attention should be paid to education requirements of the United States Sentencing Guidelines to see that all employees understand and can apply provisions of the plan.

  8. Corporate information systems in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nature of corporate information systems and their applications in health organisations. It emphasises the importance of financial and human resource information in the creation of a corporate data model. The paper summarises the main features of finance and human resource systems as they are used in health organisations. It looks at a series of case studies carried out in health organisations, which were selected on the basis of their representation of different aspects of service delivery. It also discusses the theoretical and practical perspectives of the systems themselves, their roles in information management, executive and decision support, and in planning and forecasting. PMID:10173702

  9. The network of global corporate control.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers.

  10. Concept of JINR Corporate Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filozova, I. A.; Bashashin, M. V.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Musulmanbekov, G.; Semenov, R. N.; Shestakova, G. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Ustenko, P. V.; Zaikina, T. N.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the concept of JINR Corporate Information System (JINR CIS). Special attention is given to the information support of scientific researches - Current Research Information System as a part of the corporate information system. The objectives of such a system are focused on ensuring an effective implementation and research by using the modern information technology, computer technology and automation, creation, development and integration of digital resources on a common conceptual framework. The project assumes continuous system development, introduction the new information technologies to ensure the technological system relevance.

  11. 78 FR 26357 - Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 25, 2013, Cranberry Pipeline Corporation (Cranberry) submitted tariff records to reflect revisions...

  12. 36 CFR 902.13 - Indexes of Corporation records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT General Administration § 902.13 Indexes of Corporation records. (a) The... indexes shall be published promptly on a quarterly basis unless the Chairman determines by order...

  13. 12 CFR 611.1135 - Incorporation of service corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... completed application, we will issue a charter for your service corporation as a corporate body and a...) Reason(s) for the amendment; (iii) Language of the articles of incorporation provision, as amended;...

  14. 12 CFR 611.1135 - Incorporation of service corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... completed application, we will issue a charter for your service corporation as a corporate body and a...) Reason(s) for the amendment; (iii) Language of the articles of incorporation provision, as amended;...

  15. Corporate Proprietary Data vs. Thesis Publication, an Exercise in Diplomacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Alan

    1987-01-01

    The tripling of corporate money in research support at Colorado School of Mines has had a considerable impact on contractual considerations. Governmental agencies normally encourage publication of research while private corporations discourage same. Negotiation processes with companies are discussed. (MLW)

  16. Corporate cost of occupational accidents: an activity-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Rikhardsson, Pall M; Impgaard, Martin

    2004-03-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents for a company with 3.600 employees was estimated to approximately US$ 682.000. The paper includes an introduction regarding accident cost analysis in companies, a presentation of the SACA project methodology and the SACA method itself, a short overview of some of the results of the SACA project and a conclusion. Further information about the project is available at http://www.asb.dk/saca. PMID:14642872

  17. Corporate cost of occupational accidents: an activity-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Rikhardsson, Pall M; Impgaard, Martin

    2004-03-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents for a company with 3.600 employees was estimated to approximately US$ 682.000. The paper includes an introduction regarding accident cost analysis in companies, a presentation of the SACA project methodology and the SACA method itself, a short overview of some of the results of the SACA project and a conclusion. Further information about the project is available at http://www.asb.dk/saca.

  18. Corporate wellness programs: implementation challenges in the modern american workplace.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G; Cavico, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Being healthy is important for living well and achieving longevity. In the business realm, furthermore, employers want healthy employees, as these workers tend to be more productive, have fewer rates of absenteeism, and use less of their health insurance resources. This article provides an overview of corporate "wellness" efforts in the American workplace and the concomitant challenges which employers will confront in implementing these programs. Consequently, employers and managers must reflect upon wellness policies and objectives, consult with professionals, and discuss the ramifications thereof prior to implementation. The authors herein explore how employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead "healthy" lifestyles as well as ones that impose costs on employees who lead "unhealthy" lifestyles. The distinctive contribution of this article is that it proactively explores wellness program implementation challenges and also supplies "best practices" in the modern workplace, so employers can be better prepared when they promulgate wellness policies, and then take practical steps to help their employees become healthier and thereby help to reduce insurance costs. The article, moreover, addresses how wellness policy incentives-in the form of "carrots" as well as penalties-in the form of "sticks" could affect employees, especially "non-healthy" employees, as well as employers, particularly legally. Based on the aforementioned challenges, the authors make practical recommendations for employers and managers, so that they can fashion and implement wellness policies that are deemed to be legal, ethical, and efficacious.

  19. Corporate Wellness Programs: Implementation Challenges in the Modern American Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Cavico, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Being healthy is important for living well and achieving longevity. In the business realm, furthermore, employers want healthy employees, as these workers tend to be more productive, have fewer rates of absenteeism, and use less of their health insurance resources. This article provides an overview of corporate “wellness” efforts in the American workplace and the concomitant challenges which employers will confront in implementing these programs. Consequently, employers and managers must reflect upon wellness policies and objectives, consult with professionals, and discuss the ramifications thereof prior to implementation. The authors herein explore how employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead “healthy” lifestyles as well as ones that impose costs on employees who lead “unhealthy” lifestyles. The distinctive contribution of this article is that it proactively explores wellness program implementation challenges and also supplies “best practices” in the modern workplace, so employers can be better prepared when they promulgate wellness policies, and then take practical steps to help their employees become healthier and thereby help to reduce insurance costs. The article, moreover, addresses how wellness policy incentives—in the form of “carrots” as well as penalties—in the form of “sticks” could affect employees, especially “non-healthy” employees, as well as employers, particularly legally. Based on the aforementioned challenges, the authors make practical recommendations for employers and managers, so that they can fashion and implement wellness policies that are deemed to be legal, ethical, and efficacious. PMID:24596864

  20. Knowledge discovery based on experiential learning corporate culture management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Kai-Jan

    2014-10-01

    A good corporate culture based on humanistic theory can make the enterprise's management very effective, all enterprise's members have strong cohesion and centripetal force. With experiential learning model, the enterprise can establish an enthusiastic learning spirit corporate culture, have innovation ability to gain the positive knowledge growth effect, and to meet the fierce global marketing competition. A case study on Trend's corporate culture can offer the proof of industry knowledge growth rate equation as the contribution to experiential learning corporate culture management.