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Sample records for professional status australian

  1. Achieving professional status: Australian podiatrists' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Alan M; Nancarrow, Susan A; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper explores the notion of professional status from the perspective of a sample of Australian podiatrists; how it is experienced, what factors are felt to affect it, and how these are considered to influence professional standing within an evolving healthcare system. Underpinning sociological theory is deployed in order to inform and contextualise the study. Methods Data were drawn from a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 21) and focus groups (n = 9) with podiatrists from across four of Australia's eastern states (Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Australian Capital Territory), resulting in a total of 76 participants. Semi-structured interview schedules sought to explore podiatrist perspectives on a range of features related to professional status within podiatry in Australia. Results Central to the retention and enhancement of status was felt to be the development of specialist roles and the maintenance of control over key task domains. Key distinctions in private and public sector environments, and in rural and urban settings, were noted and found to reflect differing contexts for status development. Marketing was considered important to image enhancement, as was the cache attached to the status of the universities providing graduate education. Conclusion Perceived determinants of professional status broadly matched those identified in the wider sociological literature, most notably credentialism, client status, content and context of work (such as specialisation) and an ideological basis for persuading audiences to acknowledge professional status. In an environment of demographic and workforce change, and the resultant policy demands for healthcare service re-design, enhanced opportunities for specialisation appear evident. Under the current model of professionalism, both role flexibility and uniqueness may prove important. PMID:19216783

  2. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  3. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  4. Indigenizing Teacher Professional Development: Anticipating the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Zane Ma

    2012-01-01

    It is the Australian Government's intention that all teachers will have, as a minimum, a proficient level of demonstrable professional expertise in both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education and Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. A raft of government policies are giving shape to the engagement of the Australian…

  5. The Gifted Dimension of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers: Implications for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Lesley; Jarvis, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2016, v.8.2) acknowledges that gifted and talented students are diverse and require educational provisions that meet their special needs. However, without professional learning in gifted education, teachers are ill-equipped to understand, identify and provide for gifted students. This paper reviews the literature…

  6. Enhancing the Australian healthcare sector's responsiveness to environmental sustainability issues: suggestions from Australian healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Jillian L

    2013-05-01

    Identify strategies to implement change across the Australian healthcare sector to better support social and natural environments. Methods. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with Australian healthcare professionals. Interviewees described multiple barriers to implementing change and numerous strategies to overcome these barriers. They argued that action must be taken at the individual and systemic levels to produce substantial and effective change. The strategies recommended fall into four main categories: altering workplace cultures and professional identities, community engagement, political activity, and change from within. The overarching goals of these strategies are to reduce negative impacts on the natural environment, and increase social equity within and across generations. By implementing the strategies described, a more cohesive effort to address sustainability issues across the sector can be made. This may improve local and global health, within current and future generations. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? Healthcare has a significant impact on the natural and social environments, which in turn have a significant impact upon health and healthcare. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper describes strategies to alter healthcare to better support environmental sustainability. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Collective implementation of the described strategies may allow a more cohesive and effective response across the Australian healthcare sector, to enhance local and global health for current and future generations.

  7. The Amateur-Turned-Professional Syndrome: Two Australian Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    In the nineteenth century, and particularly during the era which saw the gradual replacement of positional astronomy by astrophysics, amateur astronomers were able to make an important contribution to international astronomy. Many were blessed with instruments comparable to those found in professional observatories; they pursued the same astronomical research programs as their professional colleagues; published in the same journals; received the same medals and awards; and played key roles in the formation of the earliest astronomical groups and societies. In this healthy environment of amateur-professional co-operation it was possible for talented amateur astronomers to transfer to professional ranks, and the "amateur-turned-professional" (henceforth ATP) was a distinctive feature of late nineteenth century astronomy. In this paper we focus on two Australian-based ATPs, R.T.A. Innes and C.J. Merfield, and examine their contributions as amateur astronomers in Sydney before reviewing the circumstances surrounding their transfer to the Cape Observatory (South Africa) and Sydney Observatory, in 1896 and 1904, respectively.

  8. Player acceleration and deceleration profiles in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R J; Watsford, M L; Austin, D; Pine, M J; Spurrs, R W

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of global positioning system (GPS) units for measuring a standardized set of acceleration and deceleration zones and whether these standardized zones were capable of identifying differences between playing positions in professional Australian football. Eight well trained male participants were recruited to wear two 5 Hz or 10 Hz GPS units whilst completing a team sport simulation circuit to measure acceleration and deceleration movements. For the second part of this article 30 professional players were monitored between 1-29 times using 5 Hz and 10 Hz GPS units for the collection of acceleration and deceleration movements during the 2011 and 2012 Australian Football League seasons. Players were separated into four distinct positional groups - nomadic players, fixed defenders, fixed forwards and ruckman. The GPS units analysed had good to poor levels of error for measuring the distance covered (<19.7%), time spent (<17.2%) and number of efforts performed (<48.0%) at low, moderate and high acceleration and deceleration zones. The results demonstrated that nomadic players and fixed defenders perform more acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match than fixed forwards and ruckman. These studies established that these GPS units can be used for analysing the distance covered and time spent at the acceleration and deceleration zones used. Further, these standardized zones were proven to be capable of distinguishing between player positions, with nomadic players and fixed defenders required to complete more high acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match.

  9. Movement demands and match performance in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R J; Watsford, M L; Pine, M J; Spurrs, R W; Murphy, A; Pruyn, E C

    2012-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between coaches' perception of match performance and movement demands in Australian Football. Movement demands were collected from 21 professional players over 12 matches during one Australian Football League season, with 69 player files collected. Additionally, match events relative to playing time and distance covered, along with player physical characteristics were collected. Based on coaches subjective rating of match performance (out of 20), relatively high calibre (HC) players (≥ 15/20) were compared with relatively low calibre (LC) players (≤ 9/20) for all variables. The HC players were older (+17%, p=0.011), spent a greater percentage of time performing low-speed running (+2%, p=0.039), had more kicks (38%, p=0.001) and disposals (35%, p=0.001) per min and covered less distance per kick (- 50%, p=0.001) and disposal (- 44%, p=0.001) than the LC group, with the effect sizes also supporting this trend. Further, HC players covered less distance (- 14%, p=0.037), spent less percentage of time (- 17%, p=0.037) and performed fewer (- 9%, p=0.026) efforts per min high-speed running than LC players, which was further confirmed by the effect sizes. Movement demands and match events are related to coaches' perception of match performance in professional Australian Football. Further, high levels of involvement with the football appeared to be more important to performance than high exercise speed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Assessment and monitoring practices of Australian fitness professionals.

    PubMed

    Bennie, Jason A; Wiesner, Glen H; van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Harvey, Jack T; Craike, Melinda J; Biddle, Stuart J H

    2017-07-14

    Assessment and monitoring of client health and fitness is a key part of fitness professionals' practices. However, little is known about prevalence of this practice. This study describes the assessment/monitoring practices of a large sample of Australian fitness professionals. Cross-sectional. In 2014, 1206 fitness professionals completed an online survey. Respondents reported their frequency (4 point-scale: [1] 'never' to [4] 'always') of assessment/monitoring of eight health and fitness constructs (e.g. body composition, aerobic fitness). This was classified as: (i) 'high' ('always' assessing/monitoring ≥5 constructs); (ii) 'medium' (1-4 constructs); (iii) 'low' (0 constructs). Classifications are reported by demographic and fitness industry characteristics. The odds of being classified as a 'high assessor/monitor' according to social ecological correlates were examined using a multiple-factor logistic regression model. Mean age of respondents was 39.3 (±11.6) years and 71.6% were female. A total of 15.8% (95% CI: 13.7%-17.9%) were classified as a 'high' assessor/monitor. Constructs with the largest proportion of being 'always' assessed were body composition (47.7%; 95% CI: 45.0%-50.1%) and aerobic fitness (42.5%; 95% CI: 39.6%-45.3%). Those with the lowest proportion of being 'always' assessed were balance (24.0%; 95% CI: 24.7%-26.5%) and mental health (20.2%; 95% CI: 18.1%-29.6%). A perceived lack of client interest and fitness professionals not considering assessing their responsibility were associated with lower odds of being classified as a 'high assessor/monitor'. Most fitness professionals do not routinely assess/monitor client fitness and health. Key factors limiting client health assessment and monitoring include a perceived lack of client interest and professionals not considering this their role. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Advanced Skills Teachers: Professional Identity and Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, C.; Goodwyn, A.; Francis-Brophy, E.

    2013-01-01

    The teaching profession continues to struggle with defining itself in relation to other professions. Even though public opinion positions teachers second only to doctors and nurses in terms of their professional status and prestige research in the UK suggests that teachers still believe that they have much lower status than other professions. With…

  12. Culture Clash or Ties That Bind? What Australian Academics Think of Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a framework analysis to explore the opinions a cohort of Australian academic staff hold towards professional staff. Five indicative themes were identified from the extant literature on university professional staff: the professional other; managerialism; an expensive bureaucracy; complementary agendas; and the third space and…

  13. Seasonal variation of leg stiffness in professional Australian rules footballers.

    PubMed

    Pruyn, Elizabeth C; Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J; Pine, Matthew J; Spurrs, Robert W; Cameron, Matkthew L; Johnston, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    Leg stiffness (Kleg) is an important component to consider in both performance and injury in the Australian Football League (AFL). Kleg has not yet been examined longitudinally throughout an entire AFL season. A unilateral hop test was used to measure Kleg in the left and right legs of 25 professional AFL players (24.9 ± 4.3 years, 86.8 ± 8.1 kg, 187.0 ± 7.3 cm). Kleg was assessed at least once per month for each participant. Furthermore, the session rate of perceived exertion method was used to quantify the average weekly training loads experienced by the participants. One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between the average monthly bilateral Kleg scores; however, average weekly training loads varied between 1,400 and 2,000 AU, depending on the training period. Thirteen participants were randomly selected to perform hop tests on 2 consecutive weeks. Reliability tests revealed these measurements to have a typical error of the measurement of 4.15% and an intraclass correlation of 0.8, proving the methods to be reliable. Although training intensity appears to vary, Kleg does not fluctuate significantly across an entire AFL season, suggesting that weekly training loads between 1,400 and 2,000 AU may be prescribed without the risk of fluctuating stiffness levels.

  14. Uniforms, status and professional boundaries in hospital.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen; East, Linda

    2011-11-01

    Despite their comparative neglect analytically, uniforms play a key role in the delineation of occupational boundaries and the formation of professional identity in healthcare. This paper analyses a change to the system of uniforms in one UK hospital, where management have required all professions (with the exception of doctors) to wear the same 'corporate' uniform. Focus groups were conducted with the professionals and patients. We analyse this initiative as a kind of McDonaldisation, seeking to create a new 'corporate' worker whose allegiance is principally to the organisation, rather than a profession. Our findings show how important uniforms are to their wearers, both in terms of the defence of professional boundaries and status, as well as the construction of professional identity.

  15. Status of space science and technology - An Australian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, J. H.

    The ``Tyranny of Distance'' has had a profound influence on Australian history and reaction to it has been an important factor in determining national scientific and technological goals. Because of its size and geographical remoteness, Australia is one of the countries to have gained substantially from the applications of space technology particularly in the fields of communications, meteorology and remote sensing. Australia is the fifth largest investor in INTELSAT which carries a major fraction of the nation's overseas telecommunications. A domestic satellite system, AUSSAT, is being acquired to improve telecommunications within the country. Australia is heavily dependent on satellite data for routine meteorological forecasting. Data from the Australian Landsat Station are in strong demand, particularly for mineral exploration. In the field of space science, Australia is collaborating with Canada and the United States in feasibility studies for STARLAB, a free-flying UV-optical one metre telescope proposed for launch by the US Space Shuttle beginning in 1989. These scientific and technological programs in which Australia is participating are all dependent upon the space programs of other nations and in describing the status of space science and technology from an Australian perspective some comments will be made on particular aspects of the space programs of the United States and Japan.

  16. The professional status of bioethics consultation.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Is bioethics consultation a profession? With few exceptions, the arguments and counterarguments about whether healthcare ethics consultation is a profession have ignored the historical and cultural development of professions in the United States, the ways social changes have altered the work and boundaries of all professions, and the professionalization theories that explain how modern societies institutionalize expertise in professions. This interdisciplinary analysis begins to fill this gap by framing the debate within a larger theoretical context heretofore missing from the bioethics literature. Specifically, the question of whether ethics consultation is a profession is examined from the perspectives of trait theory, Wilensky's five-stage process of professionalization, Abbott's interdependent system of professions, and Haug's deprofessionalization thesis. While healthcare ethics consultation does not meet the criteria to claim professional status, neither could most professions pass these ideal theoretical standards. Instead of a yes or no dichotomous response to the question, it is more helpful to envision a professionalization continuum with sales clerks or carpenters at one end and medicine or law at the other. During the past decade healthcare ethics consultation has been moving along this continuum toward greater professional status.

  17. Continuing Professional Education. Promise and Performance. Australian Education Review, No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Barrie, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a critical appraisal of continuing education for Australian professionals. Part 1 sets the scene, with an introduction in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 examines the key terms from a number of perspectives to provide an overview of the context in which all professionals practice in Australia. Chapter 3 provides a broad framework for the…

  18. Organisational and Occupational Boundaries in Australian Universities: The Hierarchical Positioning of Female Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The effects of gender on organisational structures for professional university staff have been largely overlooked in the literature. Using data from one Australian university, we examine the location of professional female staff in the organisational hierarchy. Our analysis indicated that significant gendered segregation existed within and across…

  19. Organisational and Occupational Boundaries in Australian Universities: The Hierarchical Positioning of Female Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The effects of gender on organisational structures for professional university staff have been largely overlooked in the literature. Using data from one Australian university, we examine the location of professional female staff in the organisational hierarchy. Our analysis indicated that significant gendered segregation existed within and across…

  20. Australian Professional Library and Information Studies Education Programs: Changing Structure and Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willard, Patricia; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2004-01-01

    Australian library and information studies professional education experienced major changes over the past 15 years or so. There has been a growth in first professional level masters programs. Some schools have been involved in organisational relocation. Program structural changes have aimed to make programs more flexible and appealing to…

  1. Associations between family circumstance and weight status of Australian children.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Kylie; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo; Jackson, Michelle; Campbell, Karen

    2007-01-01

    To examine associations between weight status and multiple indicators of family circumstance in Australian elementary school children. Data were combined from the 2001 Children's Leisure Activities Study (CLAS Study) and 2002/3 Health, Eating and Play Study (HEAP Study), involving 2520 children in Grades Prep (mean age 6 years) and 5-6 (mean age 11 years) in Melbourne, Australia. Children's body mass index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight. Weight status (non-overweight or overweight) was determined according to International Obesity Taskforce cut-off points and BMI was transformed to z-scores based on the 2000 US growth chart data. Parents reported family circumstance (number of parents in the home, marital status, presence of siblings, parental education, parental employment status, parental work hours [HEAP Study only]) and parental BMI. Regression analyses were conducted for the sample overall and separately for young girls, young boys, older girls and older boys. Children in single-parent homes, those without siblings, and those with less educated mothers and fathers tended to have higher z-BMIs (p=0.002, p=0.003, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) and were more likely to be overweight (p=0.003, p<0.001, p<0.001 and p=0.02, respectively). Associations were stronger for older children. Parental employment and work hours were not consistently associated with child weight status. The multivariable models did not demonstrate a cumulative explanatory effect (R(2)=0.02), except when maternal BMI was included (R(2)=0.07). Individual measures of family circumstance were differentially associated with child weight status and appeared to be largely independent of other measures of family circumstance. Childhood overweight interventions may need to be tailored based on the age, gender, maternal BMI and family circumstances of the target group.

  2. REGULATION OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND NATIONAL SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THREE CASE STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; McKenna, Michael; Rayner, Johanna; Hawes, Jazmin

    2016-03-01

    In recent times, Australia's national security concerns have had controversial impacts on regulation of Australian medical practitioners in areas related to immigration detention. This column explores three recent case studies relevant to this issue. The first involves the enactment of the Australian Border Force Act 2015 (Cth), which has a significant impact on the regulation of medical professionals who work with people in immigration detention. The second involves the decision of the High Court of Australia in Plaintiff M68/2015 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2016] HCA 1 that an amendment to Australian federal legislation justified sending children back to immigration detention centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. This legislation was previously heavily criticised by the Australian Human Rights Commissioner. The third concerns the deregistration of Tareq Kamleh, an Australian doctor of German-Palestinian heritage who came to public attention on ANZAC Day 2015 with his appearance online in a propaganda video for the Islamic State terrorist organisation al-Dawla al-Islamyia fil Iraq wa'al Sham, also known as Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) or Daesh. Australia's professional regulatory system should presumptively respect professional virtues, such as loyalty to the relief of individual patient suffering, when dealing with doctors (whether in Australia or ISIS-occupied Syria) working under regimes whose principles appear inconsistent with those of ethics and human rights.

  3. Concussion Incidence and Recurrence in Professional Australian Football Match-Play: A 14-Year Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Concussion incidence rates in professional Australian football may be underreported due to the injury classification definition. A myriad of factors contribute to concussion risk; however, there is limited long-term surveillance in Australian football. This study analysed concussion in one Australian football team over an extended period. Method Match-play concussion injuries in one team (n = 116 participants) were diagnosed and treated by the team physician over 14 years. Analysis of factors related to concussion including matches played, time of day and season, and return to play provided an insight into occurrence and recurrence rates. Results 140 concussions were recorded (17.6 per 1000 player match hours). A strong relationship was evident between matches played and concussion incidence (r = 0.70) and match conditions did not negatively affect the concussion rate. Whether an athlete returned to play in the same match or suffered a loss-of-consciousness concussion (p = 0.84), their ensuing rate of concussion was not affected. Conclusion Concussion in professional Australian football was related to the number of matches played. Further, neither previous incidence nor loss of consciousness affected future concussion risk. This study provides ecologically valid evidence of the concussion incidence rate in professional Australian football and has implications for the management of athletes sustaining concussion injuries. PMID:28804753

  4. Professional Development for Education for Sustainability: How Advanced Are Australian Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Sarah; Wyborn, Carina; Bekessy, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report research undertaken to assess the extent to which Australian universities were engaged in professional development (PD) activities focusing on the development of education for sustainability for their academics. Design/methodology/approach: This web-based survey seeks to identify the existence of PD programs and…

  5. TESOL Professional Standards in the "Asian Century": Dilemmas Facing Australian TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanage, Indika; Walker, Tony; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Australian teacher education programmes that prepare teachers of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are confronting the nexus of two facets of globalization: transformations in the Asian region, captured in the notion of the "Asian century", and shifting conceptions of professionalism in TESOL in non-compulsory education. In…

  6. Parent and Professional Perspectives on the Western Australian Infant Hearing Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Jane; Remine, Maria D.; Brown, P. Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the views of parents, newborn hearing screeners and Telethon Speech and Hearing (TSH) professionals of the Western Australian Infant Screening for Hearing (WISH) Program. Three questionnaires were used to gather information from the participants. Sixteen responses to the questionnaire were obtained (five parents, five…

  7. Parent and Professional Perspectives on the Western Australian Infant Hearing Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Jane; Remine, Maria D.; Brown, P. Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the views of parents, newborn hearing screeners and Telethon Speech and Hearing (TSH) professionals of the Western Australian Infant Screening for Hearing (WISH) Program. Three questionnaires were used to gather information from the participants. Sixteen responses to the questionnaire were obtained (five parents, five…

  8. TESOL Professional Standards in the "Asian Century": Dilemmas Facing Australian TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanage, Indika; Walker, Tony; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Australian teacher education programmes that prepare teachers of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are confronting the nexus of two facets of globalization: transformations in the Asian region, captured in the notion of the "Asian century", and shifting conceptions of professionalism in TESOL in non-compulsory education. In…

  9. Careers of Professional Staff in Australian and UK Universities: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gander, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    This article confirms the reliability of a protean and boundaryless career attitudes scale, tested in a pilot study. Additionally, it summarises the results of this study into the career attitudes of professional staff in Australian and UK universities. A mixed methods approach was taken using a survey consisting of both closed questions on a…

  10. A prospective study of the relationship between lower body stiffness and hamstring injury in professional Australian rules footballers.

    PubMed

    Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J; McLachlan, Ken A; Bryant, Adam L; Cameron, Matt L; Crossley, Kay M; Makdissi, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Hamstring strains remain one of the most prevalent injuries in Australian Rules football. The authors prospectively examined the relationship between musculotendinous stiffness of the hamstring and leg stiffness with hamstring injury in professional Australian Rules footballers during the 2006 season. Higher hamstring stiffness and leg stiffness are related to noncontact, soft tissue hamstring injury risk in professional Australian Rules footballers. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Unilateral hamstring stiffness and leg stiffness were assessed in 136 professional footballers in the month before the commencement of the competitive season. This information was then investigated relative to players who suffered noncontact, soft tissue hamstring injuries during either matches or training throughout the season to identify whether preseason stiffness was related to injury occurrence. Fourteen tested players recorded acute, noncontact hamstring injuries, resulting in 3.3 ± 2.8 weeks of missed match play per injury. At preseason testing, the players who ended up sustaining a hamstring injury during the season recorded significantly higher mean hamstring stiffness (11%, P = .04) and leg stiffness (5%, P = .03). When considering the injured players, the leg stiffness of the involved limb was significantly higher than the noninjured players (P = .02), whereas hamstring stiffness was significantly higher on the noninvolved limb (P = .01). Further, those players who suffered a hamstring injury were significantly older than the noninjured players (P = .01). It appears that a high bilateral hamstring stiffness and leg stiffness may be a determinant in the risk of sustaining a hamstring injury. Further, relatively lower hamstring stiffness in the involved limb of injured players appears to be associated with increased injury and may be related to a lack of strength. The information from stiffness assessment may allow medical staff to determine the hamstring risk status

  11. Game story space of professional sports: Australian rules football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiley, Dilan Patrick; Reagan, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Lewis; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2016-05-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of "game stories," we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories rather than distinct clusters. We show how coarse graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last-minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with biased random walks, we show that real AFL games deliver a broader array of motifs than null models, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  12. Academic Leaders' Perspectives on Adopting ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Professional Capabilities in Australian Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Dale; McGuigan, Nicholas; Kavanagh, Marie; Leitch, Shona; Ngo, Leanne; Salzman, Scott; Watty, Kim; McKay, Jade

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a major stage of data collection and reporting on an Australian Office for Learning and Teaching Innovation and Development grant investigating the adoption of ePortfolios for developing and assessing professional capabilities in Australian undergraduate business education. Assessing desired capabilities with and through…

  13. Academic Leaders' Perspectives on Adopting ePortfolios for Developing and Assessing Professional Capabilities in Australian Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Dale; McGuigan, Nicholas; Kavanagh, Marie; Leitch, Shona; Ngo, Leanne; Salzman, Scott; Watty, Kim; McKay, Jade

    2016-01-01

    This paper represents a major stage of data collection and reporting on an Australian Office for Learning and Teaching Innovation and Development grant investigating the adoption of ePortfolios for developing and assessing professional capabilities in Australian undergraduate business education. Assessing desired capabilities with and through…

  14. Australian Healthcare Professionals' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cain, Belinda; Buck, Kimberly; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Krug, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate Australian healthcare practitioners' knowledge and attitudes toward binge eating disorder (BED). Method: Participants were 175 healthcare professionals, who were randomized to one of two conditions that assessed diagnostic and treatment knowledge of either comorbid BED and obesity or only obesity via case vignette, as well as weight bias toward obese patients. Results: Results suggested that participants demonstrated a reluctance to diagnose comorbid BED and obesity, that their knowledge of physical complications associated with BED was limited, and that they indicated a narrow range of evidence-based treatment options. When compared with levels of weight bias expressed by healthcare professionals in previous international studies, Australian clinicians were significantly less biased, however, still largely endorsed 'negative' attitudes toward obesity. Conclusion: Findings suggest that future clinical training in eating disorders should therefore focus not only on diagnostic criteria, physical complications and treatment options, but also on practitioner attitudes toward eating and weight.

  15. Challenges of Bystander Intervention in Male-Dominated Professional Sport: Lessons From the Australian Football League.

    PubMed

    Corboz, Julienne; Flood, Michael; Dyson, Sue

    2016-03-01

    Programs aimed at preventing violence against women have increasingly adopted bystander approaches, yet large gaps remain in our knowledge about what drives bystanders to act or not, particularly in settings where there is an increased risk of violence against women occurring. This article contributes to this gap by examining data from research with professional male athletes from the Australian Football League. Drawing from a mixed methods approach, including a survey and interviews with football players, we outline some of the challenges to bystander intervention faced by professional athletes and discuss some of the possible similarities and differences between these and other groups of men.

  16. Codes of professional conduct for Australian Defence Force military physicians: evenomating the serpent?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mike

    2010-09-01

    The scandal of health professionals' involvement in recent human rights abuses in United States military detention centres has prompted concern that Australian military physicians should be well protected against similar pressures to participate in harsh interrogations. A framework of military health ethics has been proposed. Would a code of professional conduct be a partial solution? This article examines the utility of professional codes: can they transform unethical behaviour or are they only of value to those who already behave ethically? How should such codes be designed, what support mechanisms should be in place and how should complaints be managed? A key recommendation is that codes of professional conduct should be accompanied by publicly transparent procedures for the investigation of serious infractions and appropriate disciplinary action when proven. The training of military physicians should also aim to develop a sound understanding of both humanitarian and human rights law. At present, both civil and military education of physicians generally lacks any component of human rights law. The Australian Defence Force (ADF) seems well placed to add codes of professional conduct to its existing ethical framework because of strong support at the highest executive levels.

  17. Mandatory continuing professional development requirements: what does this mean for Australian nurses.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kay; Barr, Jennieffer; Stevens, John

    2013-03-27

    This paper presents a discussion related to the recent decision in Australia to introduce mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for nurses. Historically there has been international debate surrounding mandatory CPD requirements; this debate is ongoing as Australian nurses face a diverse range of CPD offerings from a variety of providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine how mandatory CPD requirements for national nursing registration in Australia have evolved and to present an analysis of what this will mean for Australian nurses. What is yet to be determined is how to measure professional development and the effectiveness of professional development education. This is important to the international community with consensus in the literature that professional development is linked to ongoing education. Contradicting arguments are presented about whether this professional development should be mandatory. Presenting a contemporary discussion about the current and potential impact of mandatory CPD requirements for nurses, this discussion paper utilises the case of Australia's current national policy and CPD operation to examine the choices that nurses make in order to fulfil their legislative requirements. Additional arguments are presented about the barriers nurses face in undertaking CPD. The quest for effective CPD is complex and should incorporate different situations for nurses and individual learning styles.

  18. Reporting Physical Activity: Perceptions and Practices of Australian Media Professionals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ben J; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M F

    2015-08-01

    Advocacy informed by scientific evidence is necessary to influence policy and planning to address physical inactivity. The mass media is a key arena for this advocacy. This study investigated the perceptions and practices of news media professionals reporting physical activity and sedentariness to inform strategic communication about these issues. We interviewed media professionals working for major television, radio, newspaper and online news outlets in Australia. The interviews explored understandings of physical activity and sedentariness, attributions of causality, assignment of responsibility, and factors affecting news reporting on these topics. Data were thematically analyzed using NVivo. Physical inactivity was recognized as pervasive and important, but tended to be seen as mundane and not newsworthy. Sedentariness was regarded as more novel than physical activity, and more likely to require organizational and environment action. Respondents identified that presenting these issues in visual and engaging ways was an ongoing challenge. Physical activity researchers and advocates need to take account of prevailing news values and media practices to improve engagement with the news media. These include understanding the importance of novelty, narratives, imagery, and practical messages, and how to use these to build support for environmental and policy action.

  19. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Australian Professional Rugby Union 2014 Super Rugby Competition

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Timothy; Orr, Robin; Fitzgerald, Edward; Harries, Simon; McLellan, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rugby union is a collision-based ball sport played at the professional level internationally. Rugby union has one of the highest reported incidences of injury of all team sports. Purpose: To identify the characteristics, incidence, and severity of injuries occurring in Australian professional Super Rugby Union. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The present study was a prospective epidemiology study on a cohort of 180 professional players from 5 Australian Super Rugby teams during the 2014 Super Rugby Union Tournament. Team medical staff collected and submitted daily training and match-play injury data through a secure, web-based electronic platform. The injury data included the main anatomic location of the injury, specific anatomic structure of the injury, injury diagnosis, training or match injury occurrence, main player position, mechanism of injury, and the severity of the injury quantified based on the number of days lost from training and/or competition due to injury. Results: The total combined incidence rate for injury during training and match-play across all Australian Super Rugby Union teams was 6.96 per 1000 hours, with a mean injury severity of 37.45 days lost from training and competition. The match-play injury incidence rate was 66.07 per 1000 hours, with a mean severity of 39.80 days lost from training and competition. No significant differences were observed between forward- and back-playing positions for match or training injury incidence rate or severity. Conclusion: The incidence of injury for the present study was lower during match-play than has previously been reported in professional rugby union; however, the overall time loss was higher compared with previous studies in professional rugby union. The high overall time loss was due fundamentally to a high incidence of injuries with greater than 28 days’ severity. PMID:27069947

  20. Assisted reproductive technologies: professional and legal restrictions in Australian clinics.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kerry; Baker, H W G; Pitts, Marian; Thorpe, Rachel

    2005-02-01

    The professional and legal regulation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Australia is a vast maze of intersecting laws and guidelines which place restrictions on the provision of services such as infertility treatment, surrogacy, sex selection for social reasons, donor insemination, pre-implantation diagnosis and human embryo research. This study investigated the application of these restrictions on clinical practice in New South Wales, a relatively unregulated State, and Victoria, a relatively highly regulated State. The results of the survey indicate that the range of ART services in Victorian clinics was far more limited than in New South Wales clinics. The Victorian clinics uniformly restricted access of single and lesbian women and did not offer social sex selection procedures. The New South Wales clinics adopted different polices regarding these services. It was found that restrictive laws governing "social" issues have a significant impact on the availability of ART services and some respondents seemed unclear about the nature of restrictions and laws relevant to their work. It was also found that "reproductive tourism" is prevalent and restrictions were circumnavigated by patients with assistance from clinics. It was concluded that more evidence is required to evaluate regulation in this field of medicine.

  1. Community pharmacy compounding-impact on professional status.

    PubMed

    Giam, Jennifer Anne; McLachlan, Andrew J; Krass, Ines

    2011-04-01

    Extemporaneous compounding has been a core function for pharmacists and was the basis of pharmacy's claim to professional status. The re-emergence of compounding as a specialised practice warrants investigation regarding the influence of this practice on pharmacy's professional status. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of extemporaneous compounding to the professional status of pharmacists in community practice. A search of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, IPA, ISI WEB OF KNOWLEDGE, PROQUEST SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNALS, JSTOR and SOCIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS databases to identify relevant original research articles, reviews or commentaries. Compounding was an important part of pharmacy's claim to professional status. The expansion of the pharmaceutical industry and decline in demand for compounded medications led to a view that pharmacy suffered a loss of professional status. In recent decades patient centred services have been introduced as a reprofessionalisation strategy. Evidence suggests that compounding, as a specialty practice based on a patient centred approach, is increasingly provided in Australia and the United States. Compounding has emerged as a specialised area of pharmacy practice in Australia and the United States, and when practiced as a patient centred activity may be a strategy for reprofessionalisation. The extension of compounding beyond mere supply and distribution of a pharmaceutical product to become a platform for development of collaborative professional relationships may also lead to enhanced professional status of pharmacists.

  2. Ehealth education for future clinical health professionals: an integrated analysis of Australian expectations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dattakumar, Ambica; Gray, Kathleen; Maeder, Anthony; Butler-Henderson, Kerryn

    2013-01-01

    Australia is experiencing challenges in its health workforce profile to embrace reforms based on ehealth. Although there is much literature on the importance of ehealth education, our study shows that ehealth education for entry-level clinicians is not meeting the demands for a technologically savvy clinical health workforce. This poster reports on a nationally funded project Support for this project has been provided by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. The views in this project do not necessarily reflect the views of the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. which examines ehealth education for the future clinical workforce in Australia. It discusses 3 key components: the current state of teaching, learning and assessment of ehealth education in health profession degrees in Australia; inclusion of ehealth competencies in accreditation guidelines of health profession degrees and ehealth skills and competencies in job descriptions for the future Australian clinical workforce. It is based on a systems view methodology that these three components are interrelated and influence the development of an ehealth capable health workforce. Results highlight that further research and development across the health workforce is needed before the education of future clinical health professionals can keep pace with the changes that ehealth is bringing to the Australian healthcare system.

  3. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  4. Handwashing compliance depends on professional status.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, P A; Swoboda, S M

    2001-01-01

    Nosocomial infections can be transmitted from microorganisms on the hands of health care workers to patients. Handwashing (HW) has a proven benefit in preventing transmission of infection, yet compliance with handwashing, especially in intensive care units, ranges between 28% and 74%. To determine if HW behavior varies as a function of health care professional status and patient interaction, we conducted an observational study of a surgical intermediate care unit in a large university teaching hospital. HW compliance was observed among all health care workers (HCW): physicians (MD; N = 46), nurses (RN; N = 295), and nursing support personnel (NSP; N = 93). Over an 8-week period, unidentified, trained observers documented all HCW interactions in 1-h random blocks. HW opportunities were classified into low and high risk of pathogen acquisition and transmission. A total of 493 HW opportunities were observed, of which 434 involved MD, RN, and NSP. Two hundred and sixty-one low-risk (MD 35, RN 171, NSP 55) and 173 (MD 11, RN 124, NSP 38) high-risk interactions were observed. Overall HW rates were low (44%). Significant differences existed among HCW, with MDs being the least likely to wash (15% versus RN 50%, NSP 37%, p < 0.01). In adjusting for high-risk situations, MDs (odds ratio [OR] 5.58, 95% CI 2.49-12.54; NSP, OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.13-2.64; RN, OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.77-1.23) were significantly less likely to perform HW when compared to RNs. Nursing groups were significantly less likely to wash in low-risk versus high-risk situations (MD 9.2% versus 17.1%; RN 69.4% versus 39.6%; NSP 85% versus 23.3%), suggesting individual discrimination of the importance of HW. Although nurses were less likely to wash in high-risk situations compared to NSP, the overall number of opportunities was greater, suggesting that improvement in HW to the level of NSP could have a major impact on infection transmission. Significant opportunities exist for quality improvement, novel educational

  5. The Slippery Slope to Efficiency? An Australian Perspective on School/University Partnerships for Teacher Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale school/university partnerships for the enhancement of teacher professionalism and teacher professional learning have been part of the teacher development landscape in Australia for the past two decades. This paper takes a historical perspective on Australian school/university partnerships through detailing three national projects over…

  6. The Slippery Slope to Efficiency? An Australian Perspective on School/University Partnerships for Teacher Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale school/university partnerships for the enhancement of teacher professionalism and teacher professional learning have been part of the teacher development landscape in Australia for the past two decades. This paper takes a historical perspective on Australian school/university partnerships through detailing three national projects over…

  7. Teacher Professional Development Strategies in Australian Government and Professional Associations Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostina, Ludmyla

    2015-01-01

    Teacher in Australia is determined as an active participant of professional community with high level of collaboration, professional development coherent activities and collaborative learning practice. Thus, teacher quality is one of critical factors affecting student outcomes. The article touches upon the issue of the potential to improve…

  8. Teacher Professional Development Strategies in Australian Government and Professional Associations Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostina, Ludmyla

    2015-01-01

    Teacher in Australia is determined as an active participant of professional community with high level of collaboration, professional development coherent activities and collaborative learning practice. Thus, teacher quality is one of critical factors affecting student outcomes. The article touches upon the issue of the potential to improve…

  9. Teaching Students Using Technology: Facilitating Success for Students from Low Socioeconomic Status Backgrounds in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; McKay, Jade

    2016-01-01

    Australian higher education has adopted a widening participation agenda with a focus on the participation of disadvantaged students, particularly those from low socioeconomic status (LSES) backgrounds. As these students begin to enter university in greater number and proportion than ever before, there is increasing interest in how best to…

  10. Status of the X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, C.; McKinlay, J.; Clift, M.; Barg, B.; Boldeman, J.; Ridgway, M.; Foran, G.; Garret, R.; Lay, P.; Broadbent, A.

    2007-02-01

    We present herein the current status of the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The optical design and performance, details of the insertion device (Wiggler), end station capabilities and construction and commissioning timeline are given.

  11. Teaching Students Using Technology: Facilitating Success for Students from Low Socioeconomic Status Backgrounds in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; McKay, Jade

    2016-01-01

    Australian higher education has adopted a widening participation agenda with a focus on the participation of disadvantaged students, particularly those from low socioeconomic status (LSES) backgrounds. As these students begin to enter university in greater number and proportion than ever before, there is increasing interest in how best to…

  12. Language issues: an important professional practice dimension for Australian International Medical Graduates.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Henderson, David; Holewa, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    Issues associated with speech and language have been noted in the international literature as an important aspect of the process of integration for Australian International Medical Graduates (IMGs). This paper makes a contribution through the presentation of a sub-set of findings on the factors associated with speech and language practices for IMGs, taken from a qualitative study which examined the IMGs' experience of integration into the Australian healthcare system. A purposive sample of 30 IMGs were interviewed via telephone. Participants were asked to share their experience with communicating in English with patients and other health professionals in the context of the Australian healthcare system. The taped interviews were transcribed verbatim and then coded and thematically analysed. The findings indicate that the months following the point of entry into a medical position are a critical time for the majority of IMGs in terms of difficulties with communicating in English. A range of suggestions to improve speech and language skills for IMGs is provided. The findings emphasize the importance of speech and language skills and the serious implications of this issue for the clinical practice of IMGs.

  13. Professional portfolios and Australian registered nurses' requirements for licensure: developing an essential tool.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane

    2009-06-01

    A requirement of many nurses in the process of licensing for practice each year is a declaration of continuing competence to practice. In Australia, each state and territory currently has its own regulatory authority for nurses and midwives, whose main role is to protect public safety. Like many other registering authorities in the Asia-Pacific region, Australian regulatory authorities undertake the random auditing of nurses and midwives in order to assess their competence to practice. Professional portfolios commonly are considered to be a tool that nurses can use to demonstrate to regulatory authorities, employers, and others how they meet the required competencies. This article examines the different types of portfolios that fall under the umbrella term, professional portfolio, and recommends that nurses explore the strategies that identify evidence of their continuing competence to practice for inclusion in such a document.

  14. Exploring an increased role for Australian community pharmacy in mental health professional service delivery: evaluation of the literature().

    PubMed

    Hattingh, H Laetitia; Scahill, Shane; Fowler, Jane L; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2016-12-01

    Australian general practitioners primarily treat mental health problems by prescribing medication dispensed by community pharmacists. Pharmacists therefore have regular interactions with mental health consumers and carers. This narrative review explored the potential role of community pharmacy in mental health services. Medline, CINAHL, ProQuest, Emerald, PsycINFO, Science Direct, PubMed, Web of Knowledge and IPA were utilised. The Cochrane Library as well as grey literature and "lay" search engines such as GoogleScholar were also searched. Four systematic reviews and ten community pharmacy randomised controlled trials were identified. Various relevant reviews outlining the impact of community pharmacy based disease state or medicines management services were also identified. International studies involving professional service interventions for mental health consumers could be contextualised for the Australian setting. Australian studies of pharmacy professional services for chronic physical health conditions provided further guidance for the expansion of community pharmacy mental health professional services.

  15. Perceptions of US and Australian Medical Students and Instructors About Clinical Professional Attire: LAPEL Study.

    PubMed

    Bramstedt, Katrina A; Colaco, Clinton M G; De Silva, Eve; Rehfield, Patricia L; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer S

    2016-04-01

    White coats have long been the professional uniform of physicians. However, when physicians opt to remove the white coat, their clothing underneath is brought to the forefront and can influence how they are perceived by their patients. To explore the perceptions of medical students and their instructors about appropriate clinical professional attire. An anonymous, voluntary 55-question survey was electronically distributed to medical students and their instructors at 2 US and 2 Australian medical schools. The survey incorporated 30 images of sample attire, 9 demographic questions, and 16 questions regarding culture and context of clothing and accessories. In total, 411 students and 73 instructors participated in this study. The data revealed that white coats and neckties are nearly absent in Australian clinical attire. Overall, students were significantly more supportive of full facial coverage due to religious or cultural values compared with instructors (P<.001), and US medical students were significantly more supportive than Australian students (P<.001). All cohorts preferred dress code policies that directed students to avoid but not prohibit the use of perfume or cologne. Nose rings were controversial with significantly more support for use from medical students than instructors (pooled cohorts, P=.002). Medical students in both the United States and Australia indicated that they were most influenced by observing the attire of physicians at work (155 [38%]), compared with courses in medical ethics (19 [5%]), school policy (16 [4%]), or hospital policy (9 [2%]). Although regional dress code practices are different in the United States compared with Australia, medical students were overall most influenced by their instructors' attire in clinical settings.

  16. Competing Priorities in Professional Development: An Australian Study of Teacher Professional Development Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Ian

    2008-01-01

    This paper argues that neoliberal and managerial pressures external to the teaching profession, as well as more progressive and democratic approaches internal to the profession, have simultaneously influenced professional development policy and practice in Australia. In making this case, the paper reviews the nature of the teacher professional…

  17. Towards a definition of professionalism in Australian occupational therapy: using the Delphi technique to obtain consensus on essential values and behaviours.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Alejandra; Stupans, Ieva; Scutter, Sheila; King, Sharron

    2013-06-01

    Professionalism involves practitioners applying the values of their profession and demonstrating essential professional behaviours and attitudes. Within the Australian occupational therapy profession, there is little research on the values, behaviours and attitudes that constitute professionalism. As a result, there is limited understanding of professionalism, and the approaches used to enhance the professionalism of future practitioners are not evidence based. This study aimed to contribute to the understanding of professionalism within the Australian occupational therapy profession, by obtaining consensus among Australian occupational therapists on the professional values and behaviours essential for practice. A constructivist paradigm guided this study. The Delphi technique was used to obtain consensus on essential professional values and behaviours among 68 occupational therapists. Consensus was identified by numerical and content analysis. After two Delphi rounds, 61 professional values were identified as essential for practice. These values related to ethical practice, client-centred practice, contemporary practice and to the foundational beliefs of the profession. Seven professional behaviours also achieved consensus, but there was clear disparity in participants' opinions. The results provide insight into several professional values and behaviours perceived as essential for practice. Consequently, these professional values need to be taken into consideration when defining the values of the profession. The professional behaviours need to be taken into account when finalising the essential behaviours that constitute professionalism in the profession. This study takes an initial but fundamental step towards defining professionalism within the Australian occupational therapy profession. © 2012 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2012 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. Analysis of the social network development of a virtual community for Australian intensive care professionals.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Kaye Denise; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Social media platforms can create virtual communities, enabling healthcare professionals to network with a broad range of colleagues and facilitate knowledge exchange. In 2003, an Australian state health department established an intensive care mailing list to address the professional isolation experienced by senior intensive care nurses. This article describes the social network created within this virtual community by examining how the membership profile evolved from 2003 to 2009. A retrospective descriptive design was used. The data source was a deidentified member database. Since 2003, 1340 healthcare professionals subscribed to the virtual community with 78% of these (n = 1042) still members at the end of 2009. The membership profile has evolved from a single-state nurse-specific network to an Australia-wide multidisciplinary and multiorganizational intensive care network. The uptake and retention of membership by intensive care clinicians indicated that they appeared to value involvement in this virtual community. For healthcare organizations, a virtual community may be a communications option for minimizing professional and organizational barriers and promoting knowledge flow. Further research is, however, required to demonstrate a link between these broader social networks, enabling the exchange of knowledge and improved patient outcomes.

  19. The contribution of individual psychological resilience in determining the professional quality of life of Australian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hegney, Desley G.; Rees, Clare S.; Eley, Robert; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Francis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Research Topic: The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of trait negative affect and individual psychological resilience in explaining the professional quality of life of nurses. Materials and Methods: One thousand, seven hundred and forty-three Australian nurses from the public, private, and aged care sectors completed an online Qualtrics survey. The survey collected demographic data as well as measures of depression, anxiety and stress, trait negative affect, resilience, and professional quality of life. Results: Significant positive relationships were observed between anxiety, depression and stress, trait negative affectivity, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (compassion fatigue). Significant negative relationships were observed between each of the aforementioned variables and resilience and compassion satisfaction (CS). Results of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS. Conclusion: Results confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life. Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse’s professional quality of life. PMID:26539150

  20. The contribution of individual psychological resilience in determining the professional quality of life of Australian nurses.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley G; Rees, Clare S; Eley, Robert; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Francis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Research Topic: The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of trait negative affect and individual psychological resilience in explaining the professional quality of life of nurses. One thousand, seven hundred and forty-three Australian nurses from the public, private, and aged care sectors completed an online Qualtrics survey. The survey collected demographic data as well as measures of depression, anxiety and stress, trait negative affect, resilience, and professional quality of life. Significant positive relationships were observed between anxiety, depression and stress, trait negative affectivity, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (compassion fatigue). Significant negative relationships were observed between each of the aforementioned variables and resilience and compassion satisfaction (CS). RESULTS of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS. RESULTS confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life. Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse's professional quality of life.

  1. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. This paper analyses how the use of mobile technology by nurses at point of care is governed. It highlights the existence of a mobile technology paradox: an identified inability of nurses to access mobile technology in a context where it is increasingly recognised that its use in situ can enhance nursing practice while contributing to mobile learning and continuing professional development. While the recent release of the Registered Nurse Standards for Practice and accompanying Standard for Continuing Professional Development provides some direction regarding professional standards to support the use of mobile technology for mobile learning, we argue a more inclusive approach is required if emerging technologies are to be fully embraced. We describe how an implementation framework, underpinned by more detailed standards, guidelines and codes, could enable the nursing profession to be leaders in embedding mobile technology in healthcare environments nationally and globally. The prevalence of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance in healthcare environments. Its limited availability at point of care is hindering nursing practice, mobile learning and continuing professional development. We discuss the emergence of mobile technology and impediments for its use by nurses in situ. We analyse the professional codes governing nursing, outlining potential reforms to enable implementation of mobile technology at point of care by nurses.

  2. Self-Reported Wellness Profiles of Professional Australian Football Players During the Competition Phase of the Season.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Tania F; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Lorenzen, Christian H

    2017-02-01

    Gallo, TF, Cormack, SJ, Gabbett, TJ, and Lorenzen, CH. Self-reported wellness profiles of professional Australian football players during the competition phase of the season. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 495-502, 2017-With the prevalence of customized self-report measures in high-performance sport, and the incomplete understanding of athletes' perceived wellness in response to matches and training load, the objective of this study was to explore weekly wellness profiles within the context of the competitive season of professional Australian football. Internal match load, measured through the session-rating of perceived exertion method, match-to-match microcycle, stage of the season, and training load were included in multivariate linear models to determine their effect on weekly wellness profile (n = 1,835). There was a lower weekly training load on a 6-day microcycle compared with a 7-day and 8-day microcycle. Match load had no significant impact on weekly wellness profile, while there was an interaction between microcycle and days postmatch. There was a likely moderately lower wellness Z-score 1 day postmatch for an 8-day microcycle (mean; 95% confidence interval: -1.79; -2.02 to -1.56) compared with a 6-day (-1.19; -1.30 to -1.08) and 7-day (-1.22; -1.34 to -1.09) cycle (d; 95% confidence interval: -0.82; -1.3 to -0.36, -0.78; -1.3 to -0.28, respectively). The second half of the season saw a possibly small reduction in overall wellness Z-score than the first half of the season (0.22; 0.12-0.32). Finally, training load had no effect on wellness Z-score when controlled for days postmatch, microcycle, and stage of the season. These results provide information on the status of players in response to matches and fixed conditions. Knowing when wellness Z-score returns to baseline relative to the length of the microcycle may lead practitioners to prescribe the heaviest load of the week accordingly. Furthermore, wellness "red flags" should be made relative to the

  3. The relationship between breastfeeding and weight status in a national sample of Australian children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding has been shown consistently in observational studies to be protective of overweight and obesity in later life. This study aimed to investigate the association between breastfeeding duration and weight status in a national sample of Australian children and adolescents. Methods A secondary analysis of the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey data involving 2066, males and females aged 9 to 16 years from all Australian states and territories. The effect of breastfeeding duration on weight status was estimated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Compared to those who were never breastfed, children breastfed for ≥6 months were significantly less likely to be overweight (adjusted odds ratio: 0.64, 95%CI: 0.45, 0.91) or obese (adjusted odds ratio: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.29, 0.90) in later childhood, after adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education and ethnicity) and children's age, gender, mean energy intake, level of moderate and vigorous physical activity, screen time and sleep duration. Conclusions Breastfeeding for 6 or more months appears to be protective against later overweight and obesity in this population of Australian children. The beneficial short-term health outcomes of breastfeeding for the infant are well recognised and this study provides further observational evidence of a potential long-term health outcome and additional justification for the continued support and promotion of breastfeeding to six months and beyond. PMID:22314050

  4. Factors associated with low vitamin D status of Australian alpacas.

    PubMed

    Judson, G J; McGregor, B A; Partington, D L

    2008-12-01

    To investigate factors associated with low vitamin D status of alpacas at pasture in southern Australia. A 2-year survey of alpacas from two farms in South Australia and three in Victoria. Blood samples were collected from 20 to 30 alpacas on each farm on five occasions each year. Breed, gender, age and fleece colour of animals were recorded. Blood samples were assayed for plasma 2.5-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OH D(3)) and plasma inorganic phosphorus (Pi). Data sets from 802 animal samples were analysed by multiple regression to determine variables associated with low vitamin D status of alpacas. The relationship between plasma 25-OH D(3) and plasma Pi was also investigated. Vitamin D status was significantly affected by month of sampling, with low values in late winter and high values in summer. Plasma vitamin D concentrations increased with age, were higher in alpacas with light fleeces than in those with dark fleeces and were also higher in the Suri than in the Huacaya breed. Plasma Pi concentrations were generally lower in alpacas with plasma 25-OH D(3) values < 25 nmol/L. Young alpacas with dark fleeces are most at risk from vitamin D insufficiency in late winter in southern Australia. The present study indicates that plasma Pi values are not a reliable indicator of vitamin D status of alpacas as assessed by plasma 25-OH D(3) concentrations.

  5. The Mental Status Examination: Its Use by Professional Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanski, Patricia J.; Hinkle, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about professional counselors' use of the mental status examination (MSE) in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Includes an overview of the MSE format and explanation of terminology, counseling skills used for the MSE, considerations in using the MSE across cultures and age groups, and guidelines for writing an MSE…

  6. The Quest for (Higher) Professional Status: Second Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baizerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The sociopolitical movement to enhance youth workers' occupational status and related emoluments strategically links this goal to competency-based assessment. While the goals of improved conditions, remuneration, and career opportunities for workers is supported, the joining of those goals to both professionalization and in turn competency-based…

  7. The Quest for (Higher) Professional Status: Second Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baizerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The sociopolitical movement to enhance youth workers' occupational status and related emoluments strategically links this goal to competency-based assessment. While the goals of improved conditions, remuneration, and career opportunities for workers is supported, the joining of those goals to both professionalization and in turn competency-based…

  8. WORKERS IN ADULT EDUCATION, THEIR STATUS, RECRUITMENT, AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JESSUP, F.W.

    A PILOT STUDY PREPARED FOR THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE COMPARES ADULT EDUCATOR STATUS, RECRUITMENT, AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN FRANCE, FLANDERS (BELGIUM), WEST GERMANY, THE NETHERLANDS, NORWAY, AND THE UNITED KINGDOM. MAJOR CONCERNS INCLUDE SALARIES AND BENEFITS, QUALIFICATIONS, INSERVICE TRAINING, SPONSORING BODIES, ATTITUDES TOWARD FORMAL STAFF…

  9. Dietary intake and iron status of Australian vegetarian women.

    PubMed

    Ball, M J; Bartlett, M A

    1999-09-01

    Despite the possible overall health benefits of a vegetarian diet, there is concern that some vegetarians and infrequent meat eaters, particularly females, may have inadequate iron status because of low or no heme-iron intakes. The objective was to investigate the nutritional intake and iron status of vegetarian women. The nutritional intakes of 50 free-living vegetarian women aged 18-45 y and 24 age-matched omnivorous control women were assessed by using 12-d weighed dietary records. Iron status was assessed by measuring hemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations. There was no significant difference between mean (+/-SD) daily iron intakes of vegetarians and omnivores (10.7 +/- 4.4 and 9.9 +/- 2.9 mg, respectively), although heme-iron intakes were low in the vegetarians. Vegetarians had significantly lower intakes of protein (P < 0.01), saturated fat (P < 0.01), and cholesterol (P < 0.001), and significantly higher intakes of dietary fiber (P < 0.001) and vitamin C (P < 0.05). Mean serum ferritin concentrations were significantly lower (P = 0.025) in vegetarians (25.0 +/- 16.2 microg/L) than in omnivores (45.5 +/- 42.5 microg/L). However, similar numbers of vegetarians (18%) and omnivores (13%) had serum ferritin concentrations <12 microg/L, which is a value often used as an indicator of low iron stores. Hemoglobin concentrations were not significantly different. It is important that both vegetarian and omnivorous women maintain an adequate iron status and follow dietary practices that enhance iron absorption.

  10. Relationship between leg stiffness and lower body injuries in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Pruyn, Elizabeth C; Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J; Pine, Matthew J; Spurrs, Robert W; Cameron, Matthew L; Johnston, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Leg stiffness is a modifiable mechanical property that may be related to soft tissue injury risk. The purpose of this study was to examine mean leg stiffness and bilateral differences in leg stiffness across an entire professional Australian Football League (AFL) season, and determine whether this parameter was related to the incidence of lower body soft tissue injury. The stiffness of the left and right legs of 39 professional AFL players (age 24.4 ± 4.4 years, body mass 87.4 ± 8.1 kg, stature 1.87 ± 0.07 m) was measured using a unilateral hopping test at least once per month throughout the season. Injury data were obtained directly from the head medical officer at the football club. Mean leg stiffness and bilateral differences in leg stiffness were compared between the injured and non-injured players. There was no difference between the season mean leg stiffness values for the injured (219.3 ± 16.1 N x m(-1) x kg(-1)) and non-injured (217.4 ± 14.9 N x m(-1) x kg(-1); P = 0.721) groups. The injured group (7.5 ± 3.0%) recorded a significantly higher season mean bilateral difference in leg stiffness than the non-injured group (5.5 ± 1.3%; P = 0.05). A relatively high bilateral difference in leg stiffness appears to be related to the incidence of soft tissue injury in Australian football players. This information is of particular importance to medical and conditioning staff across a variety of sports.

  11. Becoming Professional? Exploring Early Years Professional Status and Its Implications for Workforce Reform in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Across the "European learning space" (Lawn, 2006) professionalisation of early years workforces has become a key priority and there has been a flow of this policy between borders (Oberhuemer, 2005). Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) is central to these developments in England. Within what is regarded as a traditionally…

  12. Becoming Professional? Exploring Early Years Professional Status and Its Implications for Workforce Reform in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Across the "European learning space" (Lawn, 2006) professionalisation of early years workforces has become a key priority and there has been a flow of this policy between borders (Oberhuemer, 2005). Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) is central to these developments in England. Within what is regarded as a traditionally…

  13. Hydration status of underground miners in a temperate Australian region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dehydration is a health risk for miners in tropical regions of Australia. However, it is not known whether dehydration poses a health risk to miners working in temperate regions of Australia. Methods A cross-sectional study of 88 miners from two underground mines was undertaken in south-eastern New South Wales, Australia. Participants had their height, weight, waist circumference and hydration status measured and completed a self-administered questionnaire on fluid intake, access to water, and socio-demographic characteristics. Health and Safety managers were surveyed about guidelines relating to healthy work and lifestyle behaviours which impact/influence hydration. Results Hydration tests indicated that more than half of the miners (approximately 58%) were dehydrated (Urinary Specific Gravity (USG) >1.020) both before and after their shift, with three workers pre-shift and four workers post-shift displaying clinical dehydration (USG>1.030). Overall, 54.0% of participants were overweight and 36.8% were obese. Miners who commenced the shift with poor hydration status were 2.6 times more likely to end the shift with poor hydration, compared to those who commenced the shift with good hydration (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.06, 6.44). Miners who had a mean USG result for the entire shift indicating dehydration were more likely to be obese (42.9%) and have a waist measurement in the high risk range for metabolic complications (40.8%) than those workers that were adequately hydrated for their entire shift (29.4% and 14.7% respectively). Some guidelines promoting healthy lifestyles and supportive work environments were in place, but there were limited guidelines on healthy weight and hydration. Conclusions Dehydration, being overweight and obesity were linked issues in this cohort of miners. Strategies are needed to: adapt the workplace environment to increase water accessibility; encourage appropriate consumption of water both at work and at home; and to promote physical

  14. Quantification of tackling demands in professional Australian football using integrated wearable athlete tracking technology.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; McLean, Owen; Spittle, Michael; Breed, Ray V P

    2013-11-01

    To describe and quantify the frequency, velocity and acceleration at impact during tackling in Australian football using a combination of video and athlete tracking technology. Quasi-experimental. Data was collected from twenty professional Australian Football League players during four in-season matches. All tackles made by the player and those against the player were video-coded and time stamped at the point of contact and then subjectively categorised into low, medium and high intensity impact groups. Peak GPS and acceleration data were identified at the point of contact. Two-way analysis of variance was used to assess differences (p<0.05) between tackle type (made and against) and tackle intensity. A total of 173 tackles made and 179 tackles against were recorded. Significant differences were found between all tackle intensity groups. Peak velocity was significantly greater in high (19.5±6.1 k mh(-1)) compared to medium (13.4±5.8 k mh(-1)) and low intensity (11.3±5.0 k mh(-1)) tackles. Peak Player Load, a modified vector magnitude of tri-axial acceleration, was significantly greater in high (7.5±1.7 a.u.) compared to medium (4.9±1.5 a.u.) and low intensity (4.0±1.3 a.u.) tackles. High intensity tackles, although less frequent, are significantly greater in speed of movement immediately prior to contact and in the resultant impact acceleration compared to tackles of lower intensity. Differences in accelerometer data between tackles observed to be progressively greater in intensity suggest a level of ecological validity and provide preliminary support for the use of accelerometers to assess impact forces in contact invasion sports. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Conservation Status of the Australian Humpback Dolphin (Sousa sahulensis) Using the IUCN Red List Criteria.

    PubMed

    Parra, Guido J; Cagnazzi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Australian humpback dolphins (Sousa sahulensis) were recently described as a new species endemic to northern Australia and potentially southern New Guinea. We assessed the species conservation status against IUCN Red List Criteria using available information on their biology, ecology and threatening processes. Knowledge of population sizes and trends across the species range is lacking. Recent genetic studies indicate Australian humpback dolphins live in small and relatively isolated populations with limited gene flow among them. The available abundance estimates range from 14 to 207 individuals and no population studied to date is estimated to contain more than 104 mature individuals. The Potential Biological Removal method indicates populations are vulnerable to even low rates of anthropogenic mortality. Habitat degradation and loss is ongoing and expected to increase across the species range in Australia, and a continuing decline in the number of mature individuals is anticipated. Considering the available evidence and following a precautionary approach, we considered this species as Vulnerable under IUCN criterion C2a(i) because the total number of mature individuals is plausibly fewer than 10,000, an inferred continuing decline due to cumulative impacts, and each of the populations studied to date is estimated to contain fewer than 1000 mature individuals. Ongoing research efforts and recently developed research strategies and priorities will provide valuable information towards the future conservation and management of Australian humpback dolphins. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Professional and psychosocial factors affecting the intention to retire of Australian medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Chanaka; Earl, Joanne K; Peisah, Carmelle; Luscombe, Georgina M; Tibbertsma, Johanna

    2017-03-20

    To determine the professional and personal factors associated with the intention to retire (ITR) by medical practitioners. Cross-sectional survey of currently practising Australian doctors aged 55 or older registered with a commercial database. Participants completed an online self-report questionnaire in October 2015. Associations between intention to retire and demographic and practice characteristics; health; emotional, social and financial resources; work centrality; and anxiety about ageing. 62.0% of 1048 respondents (17.5% response rate) intended to retire, 11.4% had no intention of retiring and 26.6% were unsure. The odds of retiring were higher for those with adequate financial resources (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18-1.44) and greater anxiety about ageing (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09); the odds of retiring were lower for international medical graduates (aOR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.44-0.85), for those with greater work centrality (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.85-0.92) and greater emotional resources (aOR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98). In a model including medical specialty as a variable, being a psychiatrist (aOR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20-0.79) or general practitioner (aOR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34-0.87) were associated with reduced odds of intending to retire. Intention to retire was determined by a mixture of professional and psychosocial characteristics. In particular, our results support the view that delaying retirement by doctors may be related to the primacy of work compared with other life roles. Our results may be used to develop educational programs that support the transition to and improve adjustment to retirement.

  17. Inequalities in Tooth Decay in Australian Children by Neighbourhood Characteristics and Indigenous Status.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Jamieson, Lisa M; Ha, Diep; Luzzi, Liana

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay is related to poverty, measured at individual and neighbourhood levels. It is however uncertain if living in an advantaged neighbourhood reduces tooth decay similarly in Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. This study describes tooth decay by neighbourhood characteristics and Indigenous status, and examines inequalities by Indigenous status. In deciduous dentition the percentage of children with tooth decay and untreated decay decreased on average 26% and 20% respectively in the non-Indigenous sample from poor to affluent neighbourhoods. In Indigenous children tooth decay and untreated decay decreased on average 6% and 8%, respectively, from poor to affluent neighbourhoods. While all children from affluent areas had less tooth decay, the gap between non-Indigenous and Indigenous children remained significant across neighbourhood characteristics. This suggests that both universal and targeted prevention programs should be considered for all Indigenous children irrespective of where they live.

  18. Inequalities in Tooth Decay in Australian Children by Neighbourhood Characteristics and Indigenous Status.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Jamieson, Lisa M; Ha, Diep; Luzzi, Liana

    2016-01-01

    Tooth decay is related to poverty, measured at individual and neighbourhood levels. It is however uncertain if living in an advantaged neighbourhood reduces tooth decay similarly in Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. This study describes tooth decay by neighbourhood characteristics and Indigenous status, and examines inequalities by Indigenous status. In deciduous dentition the percentage of children with tooth decay and untreated decay decreased on average 26% and 20% respectively in the non-Indigenous sample from poor to affluent neighbourhoods. In Indigenous children tooth decay and untreated decay decreased on average 6% and 8%, respectively, from poor to affluent neighbourhoods. While all children from affluent areas had less tooth decay, the gap between non-Indigenous and Indigenous children remained significant across neighbourhood characteristics. This suggests that both universal and targeted prevention programs should be considered for all Indigenous children irrespective of where they live.

  19. Shoulder functional performance status of Minor League professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Fronek, Jan; Yang, Jingzhen Ginger; Osbahr, Daryl C; Pollack, Keshia M; ElAttrache, Neal S; Noonan, Thomas J; Conte, Stan A; Mandelbaum, Bert R; Yocum, Lewis A

    2015-01-01

    The Overhead Shoulder and Elbow Score (Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic [KJOC] score) among healthy or uninjured professional baseball pitchers is lacking. We hypothesized that shoulder function and performance status measured by the KJOC score among active Minor League professional baseball pitchers were high at pre-participation and that the pitchers who had not been previously treated for a shoulder injury and were playing without arm trouble had significantly higher KJOC scores than their counterparts. In this cross-sectional survey, data on pre-participation KJOC scores, along with other study measures, were collected from a cohort of Minor League professional baseball pitchers. Generalized estimating equations with a Poisson distribution were used for analysis. A total of 366 Minor League professional pitchers were included, with a mean KJOC score of 92.8 points (SD, 12.1 points), suggesting that participating pitchers' shoulder function and performance were high. Participating pitchers who had not received treatment for a shoulder injury had significantly higher KJOC scores than those who had received treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical (β = 0.0238, P = .0495). In addition, pitchers who were not currently injured, were playing without arm trouble, or had not missed games in the past 12 months because of a shoulder injury also had statistically significantly higher KJOC scores than their counterparts. This study provides an empirical profile of the KJOC score for a large sample of active Minor League professional baseball pitchers and identifies risk factors associated with decreased KJOC scores. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Professional Status of Teachers: Some Theoretical Concerns and Ontario Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fris, Joe

    1975-01-01

    This paper is designed to help clarify thinking about professionalism and the process of professionalization and to report the status of a study that attempted to assess the professional status of secondary school teachers in Ontario. (Published by Department of Educational Administration, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1) (Author)

  1. A comparative analysis of ethical and professional challenges experienced by Australian and U.S. genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Alliman, Sarah; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Bartels, Dianne M; Lian, Fengqin; James, Carolyn; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2009-08-01

    Ethical issues are an inevitable part of genetic counseling practice. Prior research identified 16 domains of ethical and professional challenges encountered by practitioners in the United States. In order to further validate these domains, the present study surveyed Australian genetic counselors. Sixty-three respondents rated the frequency with which they encountered each domain, and 39 individuals also provided personal anecdotes detailing their most challenging ethical and professional dilemmas. Every domain reportedly was experienced by the Australian sample. However, there were some differences between Australian respondents and U.S. genetic counselors in frequencies of domain occurrence, and in strategies recommended for resolving them. Several anecdotes illustrate challenging situations due to Australia's geography, universal healthcare system, and the genetic counseling profession's evolution in that country. The results generally validate domains identified for U.S. genetic counselors. They further suggest that certain ethical issues may manifest in ways unique to a given country, and therefore they must be addressed in a culturally-appropriate manner.

  2. What does personality tell us about working in the bush? Temperament and character traits of Australian remote allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Narelle; Eley, Diann; McAllister, Lindy

    2013-10-01

    To describe the personality (temperament and character traits) of remote Australian allied health professionals (AHPs). Recent research shows that health professionals can be differentiated by personality traits but little is known about the personality traits of AHPs. Cross-sectional (online) survey design with snowball sampling of participants. Australian AHPs (N = 561; women, n = 502) classified into Remote (n = 266), Not Remote (n = 295). Demographic variables and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI R-140). Remote AHPs were higher in novelty seeking (P = 0.037) and self-transcendence (P = 0.042). Remote women were lower in harm avoidance (P = 0.042). Older remote AHPS were lower in reward dependence (P = 0.001); younger remote AHPs were lower in self directedness (P = 0.001) and higher in harm avoidance (P < 0.001). Women were more reward dependent (P < 0.001) and cooperative (P = 0.008) than men. The sample demonstrated personality trait levels aligned with research on rural doctors and nurses and which might be advantageous for working in a challenging environment. Exploring the more stable nature of temperament traits coupled with the modifiable potential of character traits provides new insight into people who choose to work as a remote AHP. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of the personality trends in these AHPs which might provide clues to improve recruitment and retention strategies. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. Physiological and performance responses to a training camp in the heat in professional Australian football players.

    PubMed

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Bilsborough, Johann; Bourdon, Pitre C; Cordy, Justin; Coutts, Aaron J

    2014-07-01

    To examine the physiological and performance responses to a heat-acclimatization camp in highly trained professional team-sport athletes. Eighteen male Australian Rules Football players trained for 2 wk in hot ambient conditions (31-33°C, humidity 34-50%). Players performed a laboratory-based heat-response test (24-min walk + 24 min seated; 44°C), a YoYo Intermittent Recovery Level 2 Test (YoYoIR2; indoor, temperate environment, 23°C) and standardized training drills (STD; outdoor, hot environment, 32°C) at the beginning and end of the camp. The heat-response test showed partial heat acclimatization (eg, a decrease in skin temperature, heart rate, and sweat sodium concentration, P < .05). In addition, plasma volume (PV, CO rebreathing, +2.68 [0.83; 4.53] mL/kg) and distance covered during both the YoYoIR2 (+311 [260; 361] m) and the STD (+45.6 [13.9; 77.4] m) increased postcamp (P < .01). None of the performance changes showed clear correlations with PV changes (r < .24), but the improvements in running STD distance in hot environment were correlated with changes in hematocrit during the heat-response test (r = -.52, 90%CI [-.77; -.12]). There was no clear correlation between the performance improvements in temperate and hot ambient conditions (r < .26). Running performance in both hot and temperate environments was improved after a football training camp in hot ambient conditions that stimulated heat acclimatization. However, physiological and performance responses were highly individual, and the absence of correlations between physical-performance improvements in hot and temperate environments suggests that their physiological basis might differ.

  4. Continuing professional development needs of Australian radiation oncology medical physicists--an analysis of applications for CPD funding.

    PubMed

    Perkins, A; Kron, T

    2007-09-01

    In November 2004, the Australian federal government allocated $775,000 to individual Australian radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) to access continuing professional development (CPD) activities. The funding was administered by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM). In order to receive funding, individuals had to submit an application to ACPSEM, which assessed each application and distributed funds to successful applicants. 248 separate applications were received from 143 individuals in two rounds of applications. Information from the applications was collated and analysed, with the aim of identifying patterns that will be of use in future planning for CPD. This paper presents a summary of the information extracted from the analysis.

  5. Is socioeconomic status associated with dietary sodium intake in Australian children? A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Carley A; Campbell, Karen J; Riddell, Lynn J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2013-01-01

    To assess the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and dietary sodium intake, and to identify if the major dietary sources of sodium differ by socioeconomic group in a nationally representative sample of Australian children. Cross-sectional survey. 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. A total of 4487 children aged 2-16 years completed all components of the survey. Sodium intake was determined via one 24 h dietary recall. The population proportion formula was used to identify the major sources of dietary salt. SES was defined by the level of education attained by the primary carer. In addition, parental income was used as a secondary indicator of SES. Dietary sodium intake of children of low SES background was 2576 (SEM 42) mg/day (salt equivalent 6.6 (0.1) g/day), which was greater than that of children of high SES background 2370 (35) mg/day (salt 6.1 (0.1) g/day; p<0.001). After adjustment for age, gender, energy intake and body mass index, low SES children consumed 195 mg/day (salt 0.5 g/day) more sodium than high SES children (p<0.001). Low SES children had a greater intake of sodium from processed meat, gravies/sauces, pastries, breakfast cereals, potatoes and potato snacks (all p<0.05). Australian children from a low SES background have on average a 9% greater intake of sodium from food sources compared with those from a high SES background. Understanding the socioeconomic patterning of salt intake during childhood should be considered in interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease.

  6. What is the status of food literacy in Australian high schools? Perceptions of home economics teachers.

    PubMed

    Ronto, Rimante; Ball, Lauren; Pendergast, Donna; Harris, Neil

    2017-01-01

    The high school setting has been identified as an ideal setting to teach adolescents about healthy dietary behaviours. This study explored home economics teachers' (HETs) views on the role of high schools in enhancing adolescents' food literacy and promoting healthy dietary behaviours. Semi-structured interviews with 22 HETs were conducted. The interview questions focused on the perceived strengths/opportunities and the limitations/barriers in enhancing adolescents' food literacy and healthy dietary behaviours in Australian high schools. Thematic data analysis was used to identify five key themes from the interview transcripts: (1) the standing of food-related life skills; (2) food literacy in the Australian school curriculum; (3) emphasis on resources; (4) learning through school canteens; and (5) building a school to home and community nexus. Overall, HETs reported that home economics was regarded by parents and other school staff to be less important than Maths or English for adolescents to learn in Australian high schools. Some teachers indicated that their schools offered one year compulsory teaching of food related studies which is typically delivered in the leaning areas of Technologies or Health and Physical Education (HPE). However, HETs stated that the time was insufficient to develop sustainable food-related life skills and introduce broader concepts of food literacy such as environmental sustainability. The lack of financial resources and non-supportive school food environments, including school canteens, were reportedly major factors that prevented food literacy education and healthy dietary behaviours of adolescents. Increasing the status of food literacy education in schools would support adolescents to develop food-related life skills and mobilise them as agents of dietary behaviour change in the home setting.

  7. Is socioeconomic status associated with dietary sodium intake in Australian children? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Carley A; Campbell, Karen J; Riddell, Lynn J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and dietary sodium intake, and to identify if the major dietary sources of sodium differ by socioeconomic group in a nationally representative sample of Australian children. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Participants A total of 4487 children aged 2–16 years completed all components of the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures Sodium intake was determined via one 24 h dietary recall. The population proportion formula was used to identify the major sources of dietary salt. SES was defined by the level of education attained by the primary carer. In addition, parental income was used as a secondary indicator of SES. Results Dietary sodium intake of children of low SES background was 2576 (SEM 42) mg/day (salt equivalent 6.6 (0.1) g/day), which was greater than that of children of high SES background 2370 (35) mg/day (salt 6.1 (0.1) g/day; p<0.001). After adjustment for age, gender, energy intake and body mass index, low SES children consumed 195 mg/day (salt 0.5 g/day) more sodium than high SES children (p<0.001). Low SES children had a greater intake of sodium from processed meat, gravies/sauces, pastries, breakfast cereals, potatoes and potato snacks (all p<0.05). Conclusions Australian children from a low SES background have on average a 9% greater intake of sodium from food sources compared with those from a high SES background. Understanding the socioeconomic patterning of salt intake during childhood should be considered in interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease. PMID:23396559

  8. Faculty Status, Tenure, and Professional Identity: A Pilot Study of Academic Librarians in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Faculty status, tenure, and professional identity have been long-lasting issues for academic librarians for nearly forty years, yet there is little agreement on the benefits of faculty status. This paper examines faculty status and tenure for academic librarians and presents the results of a survey inquiry into professional identity, current and…

  9. Faculty Status, Tenure, and Professional Identity: A Pilot Study of Academic Librarians in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Faculty status, tenure, and professional identity have been long-lasting issues for academic librarians for nearly forty years, yet there is little agreement on the benefits of faculty status. This paper examines faculty status and tenure for academic librarians and presents the results of a survey inquiry into professional identity, current and…

  10. Identity, Intimacy, Status and Sex Dating Goals as Correlates of Goal-Consistent Behavior and Satisfaction in Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Boislard-P., Marie-Aude

    2012-01-01

    The most common dating goals of adolescents are identity, intimacy, status and sex. In this study of Australian youth (16-30 years, N = 208), dating goals were expected to explain goal-consistent behavior in each domain. Also, goals coupled with consistent behavior were expected to be associated with greater satisfaction in each domain. Age,…

  11. Identity, Intimacy, Status and Sex Dating Goals as Correlates of Goal-Consistent Behavior and Satisfaction in Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Boislard-P., Marie-Aude

    2012-01-01

    The most common dating goals of adolescents are identity, intimacy, status and sex. In this study of Australian youth (16-30 years, N = 208), dating goals were expected to explain goal-consistent behavior in each domain. Also, goals coupled with consistent behavior were expected to be associated with greater satisfaction in each domain. Age,…

  12. Health Status and Coping Strategies among Older Parent-Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in an Australian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McConnell, David; Gething, Lindsay; Cant, Rosemary; Kendig, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Background: Older parent-carers in Australia are the subject of increasing policy and practice attention due to concerns about their ongoing ability to care in the light of their own ageing and the ageing of their adult son or daughter. This paper examines health status and the coping strategies of a group of older Australian parents caring for an…

  13. Effects of acculturation on lifestyle and health status among older Vietnam-born Australians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong Thuy; Jorm, Louisa; Johnson, Maree; Bambrick, Hilary; Lujic, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Vietnamese immigrants represent a substantial culturally and linguistically diverse population of Australia, but little is known about the health-related effects of acculturation in this population. This study investigated the relationship between measures of acculturation and lifestyle behaviors and health status among 797 older Vietnam-born Australians who participated in the 45 and Up Study (www.45andup.org.au). The findings suggested that higher degrees of acculturation were associated with increased consumption of red meat, white meat, and seafood; higher levels of physical activities; and lower prevalence of overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, and smoking (in men). Targeted health messages could emphasize eating more vegetables, avoiding smoking and alcohol drinking, and increasing levels of physical activity.

  14. Depressive symptomatology, weight status and obesogenic risk among Australian adolescents: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Erin; Millar, Lynne; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Nichols, Melanie; Malakellis, Mary; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adolescence is a period of increased risk for mental health problems and development of associated lifestyle risk behaviours. This study examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between obesogenic risk factors, weight status, and depressive symptomatology in a cohort of Australian adolescents. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The study used repeated measures data from the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) It's Your Move project, an Australian community-based obesity prevention intervention. Intervention effect was non-significant therefore intervention and comparison groups were combined in this study. Participants Total sample was 634 secondary school students (female n=338, male n=296) with mean age 13 years (SD=0.6) at baseline (2012) and 15 years (SD=0.6) at follow-up (2014) recruited from 6 government secondary schools in the ACT. Primary and secondary outcomes measures Primary outcome was depressive symptomatology measured by Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were weight status, physical activity, screen time and diet related measures. Results Increased physical activity was associated to lower depressive symptomatology among males (OR=0.35, p<0.05). Sweet drink (OR=1.15, p<0.05) and takeaway consumption (OR=1.84, p<0.05) were associated with higher levels of depressive symptomatology among females at follow-up. Males who were classified as overweight or obese at baseline, and remained so over the study period, were at increased risk of depressive symptomatology at follow-up (b=1.63, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.92). Inactivity among males over the 2-year study period was predictive of higher depressive symptomatology scores at follow-up (b=2.55, 95% CI 0.78 to 4.32). For females, those who increased their consumption of takeaway foods during the study period were at increased risk for developing depressive symptomatology (b=1.82, 95% CI −0.05 to 3.71). Conclusions There are multiple, probably complex

  15. Effective University Teaching: Views of Australian University Students from Low Socio-Economic Status Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; O'Shea, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As the Australian higher education population further diversifies as a result of federal government policy changes, the collective understanding of effective university teaching in the Australian context will need to evolve to incorporate such shifts. The Australian Government has set clear targets for increased university participation of people…

  16. Malnutrition on the menu: nutritional status of institutionalised elderly Australians in low-level care.

    PubMed

    Woods, J L; Walker, K Z; Iuliano Burns, S; Strauss, B J

    2009-10-01

    Most studies reporting malnutrition in the elderly relate to high-level care. However, one third of Australians in aged care reside in low-level care facilities. Data is limited on their nutritional status. To investigate the nutritional status of elderly in low-level care facilities. A cross sectional study design. 14 low-level aged care facilities in metropolitan Melbourne. Convenience sample of 103 ambulatory elderly (86 +/- 6.6 years (mean +/- SD), 76% female, comprising 15% of the hostel population) able to perform daily functions of living. Nutritional intake assessed by three-day weighed food records, and nutritional status by haematological and biochemical markers and body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). FOOD served did not supply the estimated average requirements (EAR) for 5 of the 14 nutrients analysed. Compared with EAR, 34% of participants were protein malnourished and 62% had energy intake deficits. Micronutrient intake was low for calcium, magnesium, folate, zinc (for men) and dietary fibre. Vitamin D deficiency (serum 25OH Vitamin D < 50 nmol/L) was present in 58% of residents. More men than women had low haemoglobin (P < 0.000), low red blood cells (P < 0.000), and a raised white blood cell count (P = 0.004). Forty three percent of men and 21% women had sarcopenia, 28% of men and 44% women had excess body fat (> 28% and >40%, respectively) and 14% of men and 12 % of women were sarcopenic-obese. Only 12% showed no sign of undernutrition using seven different nutritional indicators. Around 65% had two or more indicators of undernutrition. These findings highlight the need for the supply of more, better quality, nutrient dense food to residents and better detection of undernutrition in aged care facilities. Maintenance of nutritional status has the potential to reduce morbidity and delay the transition to high-level care.

  17. Nutritional status of haemodialysis patients: comparison of Australian cohorts of Aboriginal and European descent.

    PubMed

    Todd, Alwyn; Carroll, Robert; Gallagher, Meghan; Meade, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    It is not known whether nutritional status differs between Australian Aboriginal and non Aboriginal haemodialysis subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal haemodialysis subjects at satellite dialysis centres. Seventy-six (25 Aboriginal, 51 non-Aboriginal) prevalent haemodialysis patients were enrolled in a 3-month cross-sectional study. Each month anthropometric and biochemical measurements were collected. Nutritional status (diet history, patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA), handgrip strength) was assessed by a dietitian. PG-SGA detected mild to moderate malnutrition in 35% of Aboriginal patients and 25% of non-Aboriginal patients. The overall physical rating on the PG-SGA was significantly higher in Aboriginal patients, indicating the presence of a greater deficit in muscle mass in this population. Inter-dialytic weight gain was significantly greater in Aboriginal subjects (median [range] 3.0 [2.1-5.7] vs 2.5 [-0.3-5.0] kg, P<0.001). Glucose and HbA1c were significantly higher in Aboriginal subjects with diabetes than in non-Aboriginal patients with diabetes (median [range] 9.4 [4.9-23.4] vs 5.7 [3.1-12.9], P=0.002; 7.0 [5.2-11.0] vs 5.8 [4.6-9.0], P<0.000; respectively). These findings occurred in the setting of each cohort having adequate dialysis parameters (median Kt/V of >1.6 and median normalized protein catabolic rate 1.5). Difficulties were encountered in obtaining dietary information from Aboriginal subjects using the diet history method. Subjects had acceptable parameters of dialysis adequacy; however, 35% had evidence of malnutrition. Further research should focus on establishing a knowledge base for the nutritional management for Aboriginal dialysis subjects, and the development of a validated individual dietary assessment method for use in this population group. © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  18. Marital Status and Problem Gambling Among Australian Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Loneliness.

    PubMed

    Botterill, Emma; Gill, Peter Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Gomez, Rapson

    2016-09-01

    Problem gambling rates in older adults have risen dramatically in recent years and require further investigation. Limited available research has suggested that social needs may motivate gambling and hence problem gambling in older adults. Un-partnered older adults may be at greater risk of problem gambling than those with a partner. The current study explored whether loneliness mediated the marital status-problem gambling relationship, and whether gender moderated the mediation model. It was hypothesised that the relationship between being un-partnered and higher levels of loneliness would be stronger for older men than older women. A community sample of Australian men (n = 92) and women (n = 91) gamblers aged from 60 to 90 years (M = 69.75, SD = 7.28) completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. The results supported the moderated mediation model, with loneliness mediating the relationship between marital status and problem gambling for older men but not for older women. It appears that felt loneliness is an important predictor of problem gambling in older adults, and that meeting the social and emotional needs of un-partnered men is important.

  19. Stigmatising attitudes towards people with mental disorders: a comparison of Australian health professionals with the general community.

    PubMed

    Reavley, Nicola J; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Morgan, Amy J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore attitudes towards people with mental disorders among Australian health professionals (psychiatrists, psychologists and general practitioners (GPs)) and to compare their attitudes with members of the general community. The study involved a postal survey of 518 GPs, 506 psychiatrists and 498 clinical psychologists and a telephone survey of 6019 members of the general community. Participants were given a case vignette describing a person with either depression, depression with suicidal thoughts, early schizophrenia, chronic schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or social phobia and two questionnaires to assess stigmatising attitudes (the Depression Stigma Scale and the Social Distance Scale). Exploratory structural equation modelling was used to elucidate the structure of stigma as measured by the two scales, to establish dimensions of stigma and to compare patterns of association according to gender, age, vignette and professional grouping. The measurement characteristics of stigmatising attitudes in health professionals were found to be comparable to those in members of the general community in social distance and also in personal and perceived attitude stigma, with each forming distinct dimensions and each comprising 'Weak-not-sick' and 'Dangerous/unpredictable' components. Among health professionals, female gender, age and being a GP were associated with higher scores on the personal stigma scales. Mental health professionals had lower scores on the personal 'Weak-not-sick' and 'Dangerous/unpredictable' scales than members of the general community, while there were no significant differences in the desire for social distance between health professionals and the general community. While mental health professionals have less stigmatising attitudes than the general public, the greater beliefs in dangerousness and personal weakness by GPs should be addressed.

  20. Influences of ethnicity and socioeconomic status on the body dissatisfaction and eating behaviour of Australian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaimin; Byrne, Nuala M; Kenardy, Justin A; Hills, Andrew P

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the association between socioeconomic status (SES), ethnicity, body dissatisfaction, and eating behaviours of 10- to 18-year-old children and adolescents. The study participants (N = 768) were categorised as Caucasian (74.7%), Chinese or Vietnamese (18.2%), and Italian or Greek (7.0%), and high (82%), middle (8.6%), and low SES (9.4%) according to parents' occupations. The chi(2), Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test and logistic regression model were used to determine the interaction between variables. Females and older participants were more likely to desire a body figure that was thinner than their perceived current figure. Furthermore, the same groups were also more likely to be preoccupied with eating problems (females 7.1% vs. males 1.4%; for participants aged 15-18 years, 7.8% vs. participants aged 10-14 years, 3.9%). The body dissatisfaction gender difference was females 42.8% vs. males 11.8%, and participants aged 15-18 years 41.7% vs. those aged 10-14 years, 28.3%. Participants whose parents were managers/professionals were more likely to desire a body figure that was thinner than their perceived current figure than those from white-collar and blue-collar families. This was also the case for Caucasian Australians compared to those from Chinese or Vietnamese backgrounds. In conclusion, age and gender differences in body image and problems in eating behaviour were evident among children and adolescents. However, there was no significant SES and ethnic difference in the proportion of participants with eating problems and body dissatisfaction.

  1. Transforming STEM Education in an Innovative Australian School: The Role of Teachers' and Academics' Professional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissaker, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Science and Mathematics School (ASMS) is a purpose-built innovative senior secondary school situated on the grounds of Flinders University, South Australia. The school was established to address declining enrollments in senior secondary mathematics and science, students' negative attitudes, a shortage of qualified science,…

  2. Pay, Professionalism, and Politics: Reforming Teachers, Reforming Education. Australian Education Review No. 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri, Ed.

    In the late 1980s a new concept entered the educational lexicon in Australia--"award restructuring," or paid training leave for teachers. However, by 1993 the term had disappeared from public view. What began as a new politics of work developed into a complex debate about governance and leadership in Australian education. This book…

  3. Professional Development Programmes for Accountants through Distance Education: An Australian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcott, Paul; Holt, Dale

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes collaboration between Australian Society of Accountants and Deakin University in designing, developing, delivering, and evaluating an inservice distance education program for practicing accountants. The developers' role as educational technologists and their contributions to material development, test construction, testing, and program…

  4. From the Bush to the City: Reversing an Australian Trend in Teacher Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tony

    Australian society in the 1990s has been marked by the gradual disenfranchisement of rural communities due to the urban bias of political and economic decision-makers. In Victoria, curriculum changes based on strategic centralism, consumer capture, and educational accountability were accompanied by a more controlled, urban-biased approach to…

  5. Promoting Early Childhood Teacher Professionalism in the Australian Context: The Place of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer; Shepherd, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The early childhood education (ECE) sector in Australia is marked by a habitus where "professionalism" is confined to objective, technical practices. The authors suggest that this is a diminished view of professionalism, and one that compromises high-quality ECE. This article is concerned with how teacher professionalism can be…

  6. Suboptimal iodine status of Australian pregnant women reflects poor knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Karen E; Gemming, Luke; Yeatman, Heather; Ma, Gary

    2010-10-01

    To assess the iodine status and knowledge and practices related to iodine nutrition of Australian women during pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a public antenatal clinic in the Illawarra region of New South Wales. One hundred thirty-nine pregnant women across all trimesters provided a spot urine sample (n = 110) and completed a short questionnaire (n = 139) in English. Iodine status was based on World Health Organization/International Committee for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders urine iodine concentration (UIC) categories. Median UIC was 87.5 μg/L (interquartile range 62); only 14.5% of participants had an adequate UIC value ≥150 μg/L. Fifteen percent of women had very low UIC values (<50 μg/L), whereas 45.5% had values in the 50- to 99-μg/L range. Knowledge of the adverse health effects of an inadequate iodine intake was poor. Approximately half the participants were able to indicate good dietary sources of iodine, such as fish (58%) and iodized salt (51%). However, a high level of confusion regarding other foods was evident. Only a small number of participants (11%) reported that they had intentionally changed their diet to increase iodine intake during pregnancy, but 59% indicated supplement use, of which 35% contained iodine. Those who were taking supplements that contained iodine had significantly higher UIC levels (139.1 μg/L) than those who were not (90.8 μg/L, P < 0.05). Public health strategies, including nutritional education and supplementation, are urgently required to improve the iodine status of pregnant women. Currently, no readily accessible information on iodine is available to women attending antenatal clinics in Australia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Australian Universities and International Standards: Australian Compliance with the 1997 UNESCO "Recommendation Concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Soft law, that is, regulation which is technically unenforceable, is one means whereby international ethical and professional standards are now increasingly enunciated. This paper looks at one specific standard-setting instrument, the 1997 UNESCO "Recommendation concerning the status of higher education teaching personnel," and…

  8. Status of ECPD Accreditation of Advanced Professional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordby, Gene M.

    1972-01-01

    Describes problems associated with accreditation of professional engineering programs and the new accreditation procedures used by the Engineering Education and Accreditation Committee of ECPD (Engineers Council for Professional Development). (PR)

  9. Social capital, socio-economic status and psychological distress among Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Phongsavan, Philayrath; Chey, Tien; Bauman, Adrian; Brooks, Robert; Silove, Derrick

    2006-11-01

    High levels of social capital may be associated with positive mental health in adults. However, quantifying the various dimensions of social capital has presented a challenge due in part to the diverse definitions and measures used. Data from a representative, population-wide survey of Australian adults aged 16 years and older were used to investigate the links between dimensions of social capital and mental health morbidity. Social capital comprised three constructs and was measured at the individual level: feelings of trust and safety, community participation and neighbourhood connections and reciprocity. Mental health was measured by the 10-item Kessler (K10) instrument and assessed symptoms of psychological distress (i.e., depression and anxiety) over the previous month. Community participation showed a weak, and neighbourhood connections and reciprocity a moderate association with distress. Having higher levels of trust and feeling safe were consistently associated with low levels of psychological distress, after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics and health conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that having trust in people, feeling safe in the community and having social reciprocity are associated with lower risk of mental health distress. The implications for conceptualising and measuring the individual and collective (contextual) dimensions of social capital are discussed. The findings also suggest the importance of examining the interrelationships between socio-economic status, social capital and mental health for community-dwelling adults.

  10. Metabolic power and energetic costs of professional Australian Football match-play.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Aaron J; Kempton, Thomas; Sullivan, Courtney; Bilsborough, Johann; Cordy, Justin; Rampinini, Ermanno

    2015-03-01

    To compare the metabolic power demands between positional groups, and examine temporal changes in these parameters during Australian Football match-play. Longitudinal observational study. Global positioning system data were collected from 39 Australian Football players from the same club during 19 Australian Football League competition games over two seasons. A total of 342 complete match samples were obtained for analysis. Players were categorised into one of six positional groups: tall backs, mobile backs, midfielders, tall forwards, mobile forwards and rucks. Instantaneous raw velocity data obtained from the global positioning system units was exported to a customised spreadsheet which provided estimations of both speed-based (e.g. total and high-speed running distance) and derived metabolic power and energy expenditure variables (e.g. average metabolic power, high-power distance, total energy expenditure). There were significant differences between positional groups for both speed-based and metabolic power indices, with midfielders covering more total and high-speed distance, as well as greater average and overall energy expenditure compared to other positions (all p<0.001). There were reductions in total, high-speed, and high-power distance, as well as average metabolic power throughout the match (all p<0.001). Positional differences exist for both metabolic power and traditional running based variables. Generally, midfielders, followed by mobile forwards and mobile backs had greater activity profiles compared to other position groups. We observed that the reductions in most metabolic power variables during the course of the match are comparable to traditional running based metrics. This study demonstrates that metabolic power data may contribute to our understanding of the physical demands of Australian Football. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Match-to-match variation in physical activity and technical skill measures in professional Australian Football.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Thomas; Sullivan, Courtney; Bilsborough, Johann C; Cordy, Justin; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the match-to-match variability in physical activity and technical performance measures in Australian Football, and examine the influence of playing position, time of season, and different seasons on these measures of variability. Longitudinal observational study. Global positioning system, accelerometer and technical performance measures (total kicks, handballs, possessions and Champion Data rank) were collected from 33 players competing in the Australian Football League over 31 matches during 2011-2012 (N=511 observations). The global positioning system data were categorised into total distance, mean speed (mmin(-1)), high-speed running (>14.4 kmh(-1)), very high-speed running (>19.9 kmh(-1)), and sprint (>23.0 kmh(-1)) distance while player load was collected from the accelerometer. The data were log transformed to provide coefficient of variation and the between subject standard deviation (expressed as percentages). Match-to-match variability was increased for higher speed activities (high-speed running, very high-speed running, sprint distance, coefficient of variation %: 13.3-28.6%) compared to global measures (speed, total distance, player load, coefficient of variation %: 5.3-9.2%). The between-match variability was relativity stable for all measures between and within AFL seasons, with only few differences between positions. Higher speed activities (high-speed running, very high-speed running, sprint distance), but excluding mean speed, total distance and player load, were all higher in the final third phase of the season compared to the start of the season. While global measures of physical performance are relatively stable, higher-speed activities and technical measures exhibit a large degree of between-match variability in Australian Football. However, these measures remain relatively stable between positions, and within and between Australian Football League seasons. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  12. Green Space and Child Weight Status: Does Outcome Measurement Matter? Evidence from an Australian Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Taren; Feng, Xiaoqi; Fahey, Paul P; Lonsdale, Chris; Astell-Burt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether neighbourhood green space is beneficially associated with (i) waist circumference (WC) and (ii) waist-to-height ratio (WtHR) across childhood. Gender-stratified multilevel linear regressions were used to examine associations between green space and objective measures of weight status in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, a nationally representative source of data on 4,423 children aged 6 y to 13 y. WC and WtHR were measured objectively. Percentage green space within the local area of residence was calculated. Effect modification by age was explored, adjusting for socioeconomic confounding. Compared to peers with 0-5% green space locally, boys and girls with >40% green space tended to have lower WC (β boys  -1.15, 95% CI -2.44, 0.14; β girls  -0.21, 95% CI -1.47, 1.05) and WtHR (β boys  -0.82, 95% CI -1.65, 0.01; β girls  -0.32, 95% CI -1.13, 0.49). Associations among boys were contingent upon age (p  valuesage∗green  space < 0.001) and robust to adjustment for socioeconomic variables. The benefits of greener neighbourhoods appeared from age 7, with mean WC and WtHR for boys aged 13 y with >40% green space at 73.85 cm and 45.75% compared to those with 0-5% green space at 75.18 cm and 46.62%, respectively. Greener neighbourhoods appear beneficial to alternative child weight status measures, particularly among boys.

  13. Relationships between Psychosocial Resilience and Physical Health Status of Western Australian Urban Aboriginal Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Katrina D.; Shepherd, Carrington C. J.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths’ psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status. Method and Results We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12–17 years, n = 677) drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups- Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, p<.001) and carer reported lifetime health problems (OR 1.76, p<.04) than Less Resilient youth. Conclusion The findings are consistent with biopsychosocial models and provide a more nuanced understanding of the patterns of risks, resources and adaptation that impact on the physical health of Aboriginal youth. The results support the posited biological pathways between chronic stress and physical health, and identify the protective role of social connections impacting not only psychosocial function but also physical health. Using a resilience framework may identify potent protective factors otherwise undetected in aggregated analyses, offering important insights to augment general public health prevention strategies. PMID:26716829

  14. Socio-Economic Status and Peritonitis in Australian Non-Indigenous Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Grace, Blair; McDonald, Stephen P; Hawley, Carmel M; Badve, Sunil V; Boudville, Neil C; Brown, Fiona G; Clayton, Philip A; Johnson, David W

    2015-01-01

    ♦ The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. ♦ Associations between area SES and peritonitis risk and outcomes were examined in all non-indigenous patients who received PD in Australia between 1 October 2003 and 31 December 2010 (peritonitis outcomes). SES was assessed by deciles of postcode-based Australian Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), including Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (IRSD), Index of Relative Socio-economic Advantage and Disadvantage (IRSAD), Index of Economic Resources (IER) and Index of Education and Occupation (IEO). ♦ 7,417 patients were included in the present study. Mixed-effects Poisson regression demonstrated that incident rate ratios for peritonitis were generally lower in the higher SEIFA-based deciles compared with the reference (decile 1), although the reductions were only statistically significant in some deciles (IRSAD deciles 2 and 4 - 9; IRSD deciles 4 - 6; IER deciles 4 and 6; IEO deciles 3 and 6). Mixed-effects logistic regression showed that lower probabilities of hospitalization were predicted by relatively higher SES, and lower probabilities of peritonitis-associated death were predicted by less SES disadvantage status and greater access to economic resources. No association was observed between SES and the risks of peritonitis cure, catheter removal and permanent hemodialysis (HD) transfer. ♦ In Australia, where there is universal free healthcare, higher SES was associated with lower risks of peritonitis-associated hospitalization and death, and a lower risk of peritonitis in some categories. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  15. Socio-Economic Status and Peritonitis in Australian Non-Indigenous Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen; Grace, Blair; McDonald, Stephen P.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Badve, Sunil V.; Boudville, Neil C.; Brown, Fiona G.; Clayton, Philip A.; Johnson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. ♦ Methods: Associations between area SES and peritonitis risk and outcomes were examined in all non-indigenous patients who received PD in Australia between 1 October 2003 and 31 December 2010 (peritonitis outcomes). SES was assessed by deciles of postcode-based Australian Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), including Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (IRSD), Index of Relative Socio-economic Advantage and Disadvantage (IRSAD), Index of Economic Resources (IER) and Index of Education and Occupation (IEO). ♦ Results: 7,417 patients were included in the present study. Mixed-effects Poisson regression demonstrated that incident rate ratios for peritonitis were generally lower in the higher SEIFA-based deciles compared with the reference (decile 1), although the reductions were only statistically significant in some deciles (IRSAD deciles 2 and 4 – 9; IRSD deciles 4 – 6; IER deciles 4 and 6; IEO deciles 3 and 6). Mixed-effects logistic regression showed that lower probabilities of hospitalization were predicted by relatively higher SES, and lower probabilities of peritonitis-associated death were predicted by less SES disadvantage status and greater access to economic resources. No association was observed between SES and the risks of peritonitis cure, catheter removal and permanent hemodialysis (HD) transfer. ♦ Conclusions: In Australia, where there is universal free healthcare, higher SES was associated with lower risks of peritonitis-associated hospitalization and death, and a lower risk of peritonitis in some categories. PMID:24497587

  16. Relationships between Psychosocial Resilience and Physical Health Status of Western Australian Urban Aboriginal Youth.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Katrina D; Shepherd, Carrington C J; Taylor, Catherine L; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths' psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status. We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12-17 years, n = 677) drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups- Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, p<.001) and carer reported lifetime health problems (OR 1.76, p<.04) than Less Resilient youth. The findings are consistent with biopsychosocial models and provide a more nuanced understanding of the patterns of risks, resources and adaptation that impact on the physical health of Aboriginal youth. The results support the posited biological pathways between chronic stress and physical health, and identify the protective role of social connections impacting not only psychosocial function but also physical health. Using a resilience framework may identify potent protective factors otherwise undetected in aggregated analyses, offering important insights to augment general public health prevention strategies.

  17. The Production of Australian Professional Development Policy Texts as a Site of Contest: The Case of the Federal Quality Teacher Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This paper reveals how the provision of teacher professional development is conceptualised within the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme (AGQTP) policy text and its predecessors, and uses these texts to infer the nature of the production practices associated with the development of these policies. The paper argues that multiple…

  18. Imagining a Future: Changing the Landscape for Third Space Professionals in Australian Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veles, Natalia; Carter, Margaret-Anne

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a shift in the discourses around professional staff in higher education that has been influenced by neoliberal agenda that focused on driving education reforms. Earlier discussions centring around nomenclature variations have progressed to those about creating and developing borderless professionals operating in…

  19. Imagining a Future: Changing the Landscape for Third Space Professionals in Australian Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veles, Natalia; Carter, Margaret-Anne

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a shift in the discourses around professional staff in higher education that has been influenced by neoliberal agenda that focused on driving education reforms. Earlier discussions centring around nomenclature variations have progressed to those about creating and developing borderless professionals operating in…

  20. Relevance and Quality in Australian Tourism Higher Education: Educator and Professional Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jacintha A. C.; Morgan, Damian J.

    2001-01-01

    Survey responses from 56 tourism educators and 100 professionals indicate that one-quarter of the professionals believe the tourism major gives graduates a competitive edge. Competencies in logical thinking, social interaction, content knowledge, and generic skills were outcomes identified by both groups. Communication between academics and…

  1. Standards of Professional Practice for Accomplished Teaching in Australian Classrooms. A National Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Coll. of Education, Curtin.

    This discussion paper provides a rationale for the development of professional teaching standards in Australia. It is the result of a 2000 national forum on professional teaching standards held in Melbourne, Australia, which included 150 educators who explored contemporary issues associated with such standards and constructed a framework for…

  2. Professional Standards for Australian Teachers of Languages: Context, Processes and Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Professional standards for the teaching profession have received considerable attention over the last decade in Australia and internationally. Teachers of languages and cultures in Australia have been active in this period in developing their own professional standards, supported by a series of nationally funded projects arising from federal…

  3. Professional Standards for Australian Teachers of Languages: Context, Processes and Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Professional standards for the teaching profession have received considerable attention over the last decade in Australia and internationally. Teachers of languages and cultures in Australia have been active in this period in developing their own professional standards, supported by a series of nationally funded projects arising from federal…

  4. The effect of Transition to Specialty Practice Programs on Australian emergency nurses' professional development, recruitment and retention.

    PubMed

    Morphet, Julia; Kent, Bridie; Plummer, Virginia; Considine, Julie

    2015-11-01

    To date, emergency nursing Transition to Specialty Practice Program (TSPP) evaluations have been single-site observational studies. The aim of this paper was to examine the professional development, recruitment and retention outcomes of Australian emergency nursing TSPPs. An explanatory sequential design was used. Data were collected via online surveys and interviews of emergency Nurse Unit Managers and Nurse Educators. Survey data from EDs with TSPPs and EDs without TSPPs were compared. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. Data were collected from 118 EDs, and 13 interviews. TSPPs were offered in 72.1% of EDs. EDs with TSPPs had higher proportions of nurses with postgraduate qualifications (Mdn 28.3% vs. 22.1%, p=0.45) and Clinical Specialists (Mdn 16.4% vs. 6.3%, p=0.04). The median proportion of currently rostered nurses with TSPP completion was 34.2% in EDs with TSPPs introduced in 2000-2005 indicating ED high levels of retention. Emergency nursing TSPPs have had a positive effect on nursing professional development, recruitment and retention. To ensure consistency in outcomes and optimise reliability of emergency nursing skills and knowledge, a national emergency nursing TSPP framework is needed. Copyright © 2015 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Routes to Qualified Status: Practices and Trends among UK Professional Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Stan

    2009-01-01

    In the UK fully qualified status in professional occupations is normally awarded by a professional association or registration body. Both the requirements and the routes for qualifying vary between professions, although the majority include an academic component combined with or followed by a period of assessed practice. In recent years there have…

  6. Evaluation of the Current Status and Knowledge Contributions of Professional Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the status and knowledge contributions of professional doctorates (PDs) undertaken by practising professionals who in most cases are not intending to join the academic community. The purpose of these doctorates is usually to research and develop an original contribution to practice through practitioner-research. Giving greater…

  7. Quality in Australian after-hours doctor home visits: exploring the clinical, professional and security supports available to involved practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ifediora, Chris Onyebuchi

    2017-04-01

    The after-hours house call (AHHC) services in Australia has gained huge popularity in recent years, but it is not clear how well supported the involved doctors feel regarding the clinical, professional and security aspects of their work. It is important that this knowledge gap is filled given that appropriate support helps engender quality in health service delivery. This is a questionnaire-based electronic survey involving a sample frame of all 300 doctors participating in AHHC through the National Home Doctor Service. National Home Doctor Service is Australia's largest AHHC service provider. A total of 168 valid responses (56.0%) were received. Overall, the mean support levels were mild to moderate, ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 out of 4.0 for all three parameters. Specifically, 65.3% of the respondents felt well-supported on clinical issues, 64.7% on professional issues and 43.2% on security issues. Australian-trained doctors were less likely to feel well supported on all aspects [Clinical: odds ratio (OR) 0.38, confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.90; Professional: OR 0.30, CI 0.13 to 0.72; and Security: OR 0.22; CI 0.09 to 0.53] compared with overseas-trained ones. Unsurprisingly, doctors who adopted protective measures felt significantly better supported regarding security (OR 2.75; CI 1.31 to 5.78). There is room for improvement regarding support on AHHC in Australia, and concerned Surgeries should ensure that where available these supports are appropriately utilized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Impact of Professional Development and Indigenous Education Officers on Australian Teachers' Indigenous Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Han, Feifei

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the impact of professional development (PD) in Indigenous teaching on teachers' psychological and behavioural aspects, and Indigenous students' learning engagement. Adopting a multiple-indicator-multiple-indicator-cause model, frequency of PD was found to have positive paths to teachers' self-concept in Indigenous teaching…

  9. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  10. Implementing Curriculum Reform: Insights into How Australian Early Childhood Directors View Professional Development and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmer, Kaye; Waniganayake, Manjula; Field, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    A range of studies has demonstrated that collaborative professional development and learning (PD&L) is effective in implementing curriculum reform. PD&L that is contextualised within a specific setting enables educators to explore new theoretical perspectives, review existing knowledge and beliefs, and examine their current practice. This…

  11. The consequences of English language testing for international health professionals and students: An Australian case study.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, Michele; Thiessen, Jodi; Buchan, James; Daly, John

    2016-02-01

    To discuss the perceptions about the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and its impact on migration and practice of migrant health professionals in Australia. Thematic analysis of interviews with 14 health industry participants and 35 migrated health professionals in Australia. Language testing is a barrier to health professional registration for migrant health workers in Australia. While two English language tests are recognised by the registration authorities in Australia, it is the International English Language Testing System that is most commonly used. This paper reports that study participants had underlying negative perceptions of the International English Language Testing System which they report, affect their move to Australia. These negative perceptions are caused by: frustration due to changes to processes for migration and registration; challenges regarding the structure of IELTS including timing of when test results expire, scoring requirements, cost, and suitability; and the resulting feelings of inadequacy caused by the test itself. This study has shown that some respondents have experienced difficulties in relation to the International English Language Testing System as part of their migration process. It was found that there is very little research into the effectiveness of the IELTS as it is currently administered for overseas health care professionals. Several recommendations are provided including areas for further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.01); the proportion of people with psychological sub-heath and moderate pressure after mental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  13. Professional status in a changing world: The case of medicines use reviews in English community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ruth; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Sanders, Caroline; Ashcroft, Darren

    2010-08-01

    The health professions are engaged in an ongoing and dynamic process involving reflection and adaptation, with factors such as socio-economic and cultural developments and technological innovations compelling professions to respond to changed circumstances. This paper concerns English community pharmacy, where recent reforms provide financial incentives to deliver interventions, which have the potential for pharmacists to promote their knowledge and skills, as part of a professionalising strategy. The paper, drawing on interviews with 49 pharmacists, describes how responses to reforms are not necessarily in accordance with either national policy goals or enhancement of professional status. Debates about professional status and role extension have often focused on health professions' subordination to medicine. This paper highlights the importance and interplay of other factors which help explain the inability to capitalise fully on the potential contribution to professional status, which reforms to extend professional roles afford.

  14. Activity profiles of professional soccer, rugby league and Australian football match play.

    PubMed

    Varley, Matthew C; Gabbett, Tim; Aughey, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Abstract We compared the match activity profiles of elite footballers from Australian football (AF), rugby league (RL) and soccer (SOC), using identical movement definitions. Ninety-four elite footballers from AF, RL or SOC clubs in Australia participated in this study. Movement data were collected using a 5-Hz global positioning system from matches during the 2008-2011 competitive seasons, including measures of velocity, distance, acceleration and bouts of repeat sprints (RS). Australian footballers covered the greatest relative running distances (129 ± 17 m.min(-1)) compared to RL (97 ± 16 m.min(-1)) and SOC (104 ± 10 m.min(-1)) (effect size [ES]; 1.0-2.8). The relative distance covered (4.92 ± 2.10 m.min(-1) vs. 5.42 ± 2.49 m.min(-1); 0.74 ± 0.78 m.min(-1) vs. 0.97 ± 0.80 m.min(-1)) and the number of high-velocity running (0.4 ± 0.2 no.min(-1) vs. 0.4 ± 0.2 no.min(-1)) and sprint (0.06 ± 0.06 no.min(-1) vs. 0.08 ± 0.07 no.min(-1)) efforts between RL and SOC players were similar (ES; 0.1-0.3). Rugby league players undertook the highest relative number of accelerations (1.10 ± 0.56 no.min(-1)). RS bouts were uncommon for all codes. RL and SOC players perform less running than AF players, possibly due to limited open space as a consequence of field size and code specific rules. While training in football should be code specific, there may be some transference of conditioning drills across codes.

  15. State of the Profession: Study Measures Status of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Wei, Ruth Chung; Andree, Alethea; Richardson, Nikole; Orphanos, Stelios

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights several key findings from the research project sponsored by the National Staff Development Council. Data and findings drawn from this study will be used to establish benchmarks for assessing progress in professional development over time. Taken as a whole, this work will provide the most comprehensive picture and…

  16. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Changes in Anthropometry, Upper-Body Strength, and Nutrient Intake in Professional Australian Football Players During a Season.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, Johann C; Greenway, Kate; Livingston, Steuart; Cordy, Justin; Coutts, Aaron J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the seasonal changes in body composition, nutrition, and upper-body (UB) strength in professional Australian Football (AF) players. The prospective longitudinal study examined changes in anthropometry (body mass, fat-free soft-tissue mass [FFSTM], and fat mass) via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry 5 times during an AF season (start preseason, midpreseason, start season, midseason, end season) in 45 professional AF players. Dietary intakes and strength (bench press and bench pull) were also assessed at these time points. Players were categorized as experienced (>4 y experience, n = 23) or inexperienced (<4 y experience, n = 22). Fat mass decreased during the preseason but was stable through the in-season for both groups. %FFSTM was increased during the preseason and remained constant thereafter. UB strength increased during the preseason and was maintained during the in-season. Changes in UB FFSTM were related to changes in UB-strength performance (r = .37-.40). Total energy and carbohydrate intakes were similar between the experienced and inexperienced players during the season, but there was a greater ratio of dietary fat intake at the start-preseason point and an increased alcohol, reduced protein, and increased total energy intake at the end of the season. The inexperienced players consumed more fat at the start of season and less total protein during the season than the experienced players. Coaches should also be aware that it can take >1 y to develop the appropriate levels of FFSTM in young players and take a long-term view when developing the physical and performance abilities of inexperienced players.

  18. The nurses' self-concept instrument (NSCI): a comparison of domestic and international student nurses' professional self-concepts from a large Australian University.

    PubMed

    Angel, Elizabeth; Craven, Rhonda; Denson, Nida

    2012-08-01

    Professional self-concept is a critical driver of job satisfaction. In Australia, as international nursing enrolments rise, nursing is increasingly characterised by a professional body of international nurses who may differ from domestic Australian nurses in their nursing self-concept. At present, little is known about the extent to which domestic and international students nurses' self-concepts may differ. The present study aimed to elucidate and contrast domestic and international nursing students' self-concepts from one large Australian university. A total of 253 domestic (n=218) and international (n=35) undergraduate nursing students from a large public university in Sydney, Australia completed the Nurses' Self-Concept Instrument (NSCI). Multiple-Indicator-Multiple-Indicator-Cause (MIMIC) modelling was used to assess the effects of student group (domestic and international) on the latent self-concept factors of the NSCI. Domestic and international students' professional self-concepts were similarly high. MIMIC modelling demonstrated that domestic students had a higher patient care self-concept in comparison to international students. Results imply that it may be useful for Australian universities to foster strategies that enhance specific domains of self-concepts (e.g., care) which may be underdeveloped for at least some cultural groups within the international nursing student population compared with domestic nursing students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge claims, jurisdictional control and professional status: the case of nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, professional boundaries in health care have come under pressure, and the expansion of prescriptive authority to include nurses touches on issues of professional domains and interprofessional competition. Knowledge claims play an important role in achieving jurisdictional control. Knowledge can take on multiple forms, ranging from indeterminate to technical (I/T ratio) and from everyday to exclusive knowledge. To investigate the interrelatedness of jurisdiction, knowledge claims and professional status, we examine which knowledge claims were made by the medical and nursing professions in the Netherlands to secure or obtain, respectively, jurisdictional control over prescribing, and which form this knowledge took. The study is based on thirteen semi-structured stakeholder interviews and an extensive document analysis. We found that the nursing profession in its knowledge claims strongly emphasized the technicality and everyday knowledge character of the prescribing task, by asserting that nurses were already prescribing medicines, albeit on an illegal basis. Their second claim focused on the indeterminate knowledge skills of nurses and stated that nurse prescribing would do justice to nurses' skills and expertise. This is a strong claim in a quest for (higher) professional status. Results showed that the medical profession initially proclaimed that prescribing should be reserved for doctors as it is a task requiring medical knowledge, i.e. indeterminate knowledge. Gradually, however, the medical profession adjusted its claims and tried to reduce nurse prescribing to a task almost exclusively based on technicality knowledge, among others by stating that nurses could prescribe in routine cases, which would generate little professional status. By investigating the form that professional knowledge claims took, this study was able to show the interconnectedness of jurisdictional control, knowledge claims and professional status. Knowledge claims are

  20. Knowledge Claims, Jurisdictional Control and Professional Status: The Case of Nurse Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Francke, Anneke L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, professional boundaries in health care have come under pressure, and the expansion of prescriptive authority to include nurses touches on issues of professional domains and interprofessional competition. Knowledge claims play an important role in achieving jurisdictional control. Knowledge can take on multiple forms, ranging from indeterminate to technical (I/T ratio) and from everyday to exclusive knowledge. To investigate the interrelatedness of jurisdiction, knowledge claims and professional status, we examine which knowledge claims were made by the medical and nursing professions in the Netherlands to secure or obtain, respectively, jurisdictional control over prescribing, and which form this knowledge took. The study is based on thirteen semi-structured stakeholder interviews and an extensive document analysis. We found that the nursing profession in its knowledge claims strongly emphasized the technicality and everyday knowledge character of the prescribing task, by asserting that nurses were already prescribing medicines, albeit on an illegal basis. Their second claim focused on the indeterminate knowledge skills of nurses and stated that nurse prescribing would do justice to nurses’ skills and expertise. This is a strong claim in a quest for (higher) professional status. Results showed that the medical profession initially proclaimed that prescribing should be reserved for doctors as it is a task requiring medical knowledge, i.e. indeterminate knowledge. Gradually, however, the medical profession adjusted its claims and tried to reduce nurse prescribing to a task almost exclusively based on technicality knowledge, among others by stating that nurses could prescribe in routine cases, which would generate little professional status. By investigating the form that professional knowledge claims took, this study was able to show the interconnectedness of jurisdictional control, knowledge claims and professional status. Knowledge claims

  1. Action learning enhances professional development of research supervisors: an Australian health science exemplar.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kierrynn; Brownie, Sonya; Doran, Frances; Evans, Sue; Hutchinson, Marie; Mozolic-Staunton, Beth; Provost, Stephen; van Aken, Rosalie

    2012-03-01

    The worldwide academic workforce is ageing. At the same time, health and human services workforces are expanding. The preparation of educators to fill gaps in expertise and to position the health sciences for future growth is an urgent need. The findings from a recent action learning project that aimed to enhance the professional growth and development of higher degree researcher student supervisors in a School of Health and Human Sciences are presented. Seven early career researchers and the facilitator met for two hours every two to three weeks over 4 months between April and July 2010, in a rural and regional university in New South Wales, Australia. The processes initiated were a combination of experiential knowledge, referral to relevant published reports, use of an effective supervision checklist, and critical conversations. Learning outcomes centered on higher degree management and supervision pedagogy, communities of practice, knowledge translation, and the establishment of a research culture. The contextual barriers and implications of the methodology and learning outcomes for the professional development of health and human science practitioners, researchers and educators is also discussed.

  2. Professional Certification in Public Management: A Status Report and Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Steven W.; Duke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Provides a status report on the accomplishments of 16 Certified Public Manager (CPM) certification programs. Describes the growth and development of the program and argues that the interests of the public management community might be served if CPM and Master of Public Administration programs were to cooperate more aggressively. (Author/JOW)

  3. Professional Certification in Public Management: A Status Report and Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Steven W.; Duke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Provides a status report on the accomplishments of 16 Certified Public Manager (CPM) certification programs. Describes the growth and development of the program and argues that the interests of the public management community might be served if CPM and Master of Public Administration programs were to cooperate more aggressively. (Author/JOW)

  4. Qualitative study on the implementation of professional pharmacy services in Australian community pharmacies using framework analysis.

    PubMed

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-08-25

    Multiple studies have explored the implementation process and influences, however it appears there is no study investigating these influences across the stages of implementation. Community pharmacy is attempting to implement professional services (pharmaceutical care and other health services). The use of implementation theory may assist the achievement of widespread provision, support and integration. The objective was to investigate professional service implementation in community pharmacy to contextualise and advance the concepts of a generic implementation framework previously published. Purposeful sampling was used to investigate implementation across a range of levels of implementation in community pharmacies in Australia. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a framework methodology. Data was charted using implementation stages as overarching themes and each stage was thematically analysed, to investigate the implementation process, the influences and their relationships. Secondary analyses were performed of the factors (barriers and facilitators) using an adapted version of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), and implementation strategies and interventions, using the Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) discrete implementation strategy compilation. Six stages emerged, labelled as development or discovery, exploration, preparation, testing, operation and sustainability. Within the stages, a range of implementation activities/steps and five overarching influences (pharmacys' direction and impetus, internal communication, staffing, community fit and support) were identified. The stages and activities were not applied strictly in a linear fashion. There was a trend towards the greater the number of activities considered, the greater the apparent integration into the pharmacy organization. Implementation factors varied over the implementation stages, and additional factors were added

  5. Why is polypharmacy increasing in aged care facilities? The views of Australian health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Jokanovic, Natali; Tan, Edwin C K; Dooley, Michael J; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Elliott, Rohan A; Bell, J Simon

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of polypharmacy in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) is high and increasing. Although not necessarily inappropriate, polypharmacy has been associated with drug interactions, adverse drug events, geriatric syndromes and hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify and prioritize factors contributing to the increasing prevalence of polypharmacy in RACFs. Seventeen health care professionals from metropolitan and regional Victoria and South Australia identified and prioritized factors using a modified nominal group technique. The top five factors ranked from most important to fifth most important were 'changes in resident mix', 'increasing numbers of prescribers and the reluctance of one prescriber to discontinue a medicine commenced by another prescriber', 'better adherence to clinical practice guidelines', 'increasing reliance on locums' and 'greater recognition and pharmacological management of pain'. Reasons for the increase in polypharmacy are multifactorial. Understanding the factors contributing to polypharmacy may help to guide future research and develop interventions to manage polypharmacy in RACFs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Australian health professionals' social media (Web 2.0) adoption trends: early 21st century health care delivery and practice promotion.

    PubMed

    Usher, Wayne T

    2012-01-01

    This study was concerned with identifying reasons behind patterns of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major health professions. Attention was given to uncovering some of the more significant motivations for the resistance or adoption of Web 2.0 technologies for health care delivery and practice promotion by Australian health professionals. Surveys were developed from a common set of questions with specific variations between professions negotiated with professional health societies. Survey questions were constructed in an attempt to identify Web 2.0 adoption trends. An online survey (www.limesurvey.org) was used to collect data. Initial data preparation involved the development of one integrated SPSS file to incorporate all responses from the eight surveys undertaken. Initial data analysis applied Frequencies and Crosstabs to the identified groups and provided a profile of respondents by key business and demographic characteristics. Of the 935 respondents, 9.5% of participants indicated that they used Web 2.0 for their professional work, 19.1% of them did not use it for work but used it for their personal needs and 71.3% of them did not use Web 2.0 at all. Participants have indicated that the main reason for 'choosing not to adopt' Web 2.0 applications as a way of delivering health care to their patients is due to the health professionals' lack of understanding of Web 2.0 (83.3%), while the main reason for 'choosing to adopt' Web 2.0 applications is the perception of Web 2.0 as a quick and effective method of communication (73.0%). This study has indicated that Australian health professionals 'choose not to adopt' Web 2.0 usage as a way of delivering health care primarily due to 'a lack of understanding as to how social media would be used in health care' (83.3%). This study identifies that Australian health professionals are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies in their private lives but are failing to see how such technologies

  7. The Professional Status of Educational Research: Professionalism and Developmentalism in Twenty-First-Century Working Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2013-01-01

    "How helpful and how necessary is it for at least some of us to see ourselves as professional educational researchers?" asked Donald McIntyre in his 1996 presidential address to the British Educational Research Association. Still pertinent to consideration of the direction in which the British educational research community ought to…

  8. The Incidence of Concussion in a Professional Australian Rugby League Team, 1998–2012

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background. Rugby league is a physically demanding team sport and the National Rugby League is the highest-level competition of rugby league in Australia. Frequent tackles and collisions between players result in a high incidence of injury to players. Concussion injuries have been the source of much debate, with reporting varying greatly depending on the definition used. Method. Injury records of 239 players from one professional National Rugby League were analysed during a continuous period of 15 years, with particular interest in the incidence and recurrence of concussions and the change in incidence over time. Result. A total of 191 concussions were recorded, affecting 90 players. The incidence of concussion injuries was found to be 28.33 per 1000 player match hours, with an increase over time (P = 0.0217). Multiple concussions were recorded for 51 players. Conclusion. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of concussion injuries was found, without a concurrent increase in the number of head injuries or total injuries. New rules which mandate removal of players from the field may be beneficial for protection of players on the long term, although they risk being counterproductive, if they make players less likely to report their symptoms during matches. PMID:26464875

  9. PSRO: current status of the professional standards review organization program.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L

    1976-07-01

    Since Public Law 92-603 was enacted in October 1972 considerable progress has been made in the establishment of Professional Standards Review Organizations (PSROs) for the purpose of determining the necessity, appropriateness, and quality of medical care provided beneficiaries of the major programs authorized in the Social Security Act. Sixty-five conditional PSROs are implementing review in acute care hospitals in their geographic area, and 55 planning groups are developing plans to qualify for conditional PSRO designation. The PSRO hospital review system is based on three interrelated review mechanisms. These are concurrent review, which includes admission certification, and continued stay review through discharge; medical care evaluation studies; and analysis of hospital, practitioner, and patient profiles. This article describes the review system in some detail and the potential opportunities the PSRO program offers to occupational therapists.

  10. The shield of professional status: Comparing internationally educated nurses' and international medical graduates' experiences of discrimination.

    PubMed

    Neiterman, Elena; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the intersecting roles of gender, ethnicity, and professional status in shaping the experiences of internationally educated health professionals in Canada. The article is based on 140 semi-structured qualitative interviews with internationally trained nurses and physicians who came to Canada within past 10 years with the intention to practice their profession. Describing the challenging process of professional integration in Canada, our participants highlighted incidents of discrimination they experienced along the way. Although some of the participants from both professional groups experienced racial discrimination, the context of those experiences differed. Physicians rarely reported instances of discrimination in communication with patients or nurses. Instead, they were concerned with instances of discrimination within their own professional group. Nurses, on the other hand, reported discrimination at the hands of patients and their families as well as racialization by physicians, management, and other nurses. We conclude our article with a reflection on the role that gender and professional status play in shaping the experiences of ethnic discrimination of internationally educated health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The role of the general practitioner in the Australian approach to HIV care: interviews with 'key informants' from government, non-government and professional organisations.

    PubMed

    Newman, Christy E; de Wit, John B F; Kippax, Susan C; Reynolds, Robert H; Canavan, Peter G; Kidd, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    HIV care is provided in a range of settings in Australia, but advances in HIV treatment and demographic and geographic changes in the affected population and general practitioner (GP) workforce are testing the sustainability of the special role for GPs. This paper explores how a group of 'key informants' described the role of the GP in the Australian approach to HIV care, and conceptualised the challenges currently inspiring debate around future models of care. A thematic analysis was conducted of semistructured interviews carried out in 2010 with 24 professionals holding senior roles in government, non-government and professional organisations that influence Australian HIV care policy. The strengths of the role of the GP were described as their community setting, collaborative partnership with other medical and health professions, and focus on patient needs. A number of associated challenges were also identified including the different needs of GPs with high and low HIV caseloads, the changing expectations of professional roles in general practice, and barriers to service accessibility for people living with HIV. While there are many advantages to delivering HIV services in primary care, GPs need flexible models of training and accreditation, support in strengthening relationships with other health and medical professionals, and assistance in achieving service accessibility. Consideration of how to support the GP workforce so that care can be made available in the broadest range of geographical and service settings is also critical if systems of HIV care delivery are to be realistic and cost-effective and meet consumer needs.

  12. Whey protein isolate improves vitamin B12 and folate status in elderly Australians with subclinical deficiency of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Varinderpal S; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Almond, Theodora; Cavuoto, Paul; James-Martin, Genevieve; Fenech, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) contains vitamin B12 and folate. However, the efficacy of WPI as a bioavailable source of these vitamins in the elderly with low vitamin B12 was not previously tested. We investigated the effects of WPI supplementation on vitamin B12 and folate status in blood and measured changes in homocysteine (HCY), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and genome integrity biomarkers in elderly individuals with low vitamin B12 status. The effect of WPI was compared to soy protein isolate (SPI). In this randomized controlled cross-over intervention trial, 56 subclinically vitamin B12 -deficient participants received 50 g WPI or 50 g SPI as a control for 8 wk followed by 16-wk washout phase and then cross-over to alternative supplement for next 8 wk. Consumption of WPI resulted in significant increase in serum active B12 (p < 0.0001) and serum folate (p = 0.0094). MMA, HCY, and nucleoplasmic bridges increased significantly after SPI intake but not after WPI (p = 0.052; p = 0.028; p = 0.0009, respectively). Results indicate that WPI consumption improves active B12 and folate status. Unlike SPI, WPI consumption may prevent increase in MMA, HCY, and genome instability in older Australians with low vitamin B12 status. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dietary Intake, Body Composition, and Nutrition Knowledge of Australian Football and Soccer Players: Implications for Sports Nutrition Professionals in Practice.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Brooke L; Leveritt, Michael D; Kingsley, Michael; Belski, Regina

    2017-04-01

    Sports nutrition professionals aim to influence nutrition knowledge, dietary intake and body composition to improve athletic performance. Understanding the interrelationships between these factors and how they vary across sports has the potential to facilitate better-informed and targeted sports nutrition practice. This observational study assessed body composition (DXA), dietary intake (multiple-pass 24-hr recall) and nutrition knowledge (two previously validated tools) of elite and subelite male players involved in two team-based sports; Australian football (AF) and soccer. Differences in, and relationships between, nutrition knowledge, dietary intake and body composition between elite AF, subelite AF and elite soccer players were assessed. A total of 66 (23 ± 4 years, 82.0 ± 9.2 kg, 184.7 ± 7.7 cm) players participated. Areas of weaknesses in nutrition knowledge are evident (57% mean score obtained) yet nutrition knowledge was not different between elite and subelite AF and soccer players (58%, 57% and 56%, respectively, p > .05). Dietary intake was not consistent with recommendations in some areas; carbohydrate intake was lower (4.6 ± 1.5 g/kg/day, 4.5 ± 1.2 g/kg/day and 2.9 ± 1.1 g/kg/day for elite and subelite AF and elite soccer players, respectively) and protein intake was higher (3.4 ± 1.1 g/kg/day, 2.1 ± 0.7 g/kg/day and 1.9 ± 0.5 g/kg/day for elite and subelite AF and elite soccer players, respectively) than recommendations. Nutrition knowledge was positively correlated with fat-free soft tissue mass (n = 66; r(2) = .051, p = .039). This insight into known modifiable factors may assist sports nutrition professionals to be more specific and targeted in their approach to supporting players to achieve enhanced performance.

  14. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  15. Examining the Professional Status of Full-Time Sociology Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitulik, Brian P.; Rowell, Katherine R.; Smith, Michelle A.; Amaya, Nicole V.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we utilize national survey data to assess the professional status of full-time sociology faculty in community colleges. Traditionally, sociologists have argued that for a particular type of work to be conceptualized as a profession, it must meet certain criteria, such as: esoteric knowledge and skills, high levels of workplace…

  16. Improving the Professional Status of Teaching: Perspectives of Future Teachers, Current Teachers, and Education Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Hsieh, Chia-lin

    1999-01-01

    Examined future teachers', current teachers', and teacher educators' attitudes regarding various suggestions for improving the professional status of teaching. All groups rated extrinsic and intrinsic rewards for teaching the most important. They considered raising the standards of preservice programs and teacher certification important and…

  17. Improving the Professional Status of Teaching: Perspectives of Future Teachers, Current Teachers, and Education Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Hsieh, Chia-lin

    1999-01-01

    Examined future teachers', current teachers', and teacher educators' attitudes regarding various suggestions for improving the professional status of teaching. All groups rated extrinsic and intrinsic rewards for teaching the most important. They considered raising the standards of preservice programs and teacher certification important and…

  18. Examining the Professional Status of Full-Time Sociology Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitulik, Brian P.; Rowell, Katherine R.; Smith, Michelle A.; Amaya, Nicole V.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we utilize national survey data to assess the professional status of full-time sociology faculty in community colleges. Traditionally, sociologists have argued that for a particular type of work to be conceptualized as a profession, it must meet certain criteria, such as: esoteric knowledge and skills, high levels of workplace…

  19. Health care cost containment in Denmark and Norway: a question of relative professional status?

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lotte B

    2014-04-01

    The demand for publicly subsidized health care services is insatiable, but the costs can be contained in different ways: formal rules can limit access to and the number of subsidized services, demand and supply can be regulated through the price mechanism, the relevant profession can contain the costs through state-sanctioned self-regulation, and other professions can contain the costs (e.g. through referrals). The use of these cost containment measures varies between countries, depending on demand and supply factors, but the relative professional status of the health professions may help explain why different countries use cost containment measures differently for different services. This article compares cost containment measures in Denmark and Norway because these countries vary with regard to the professional status of the medical profession relative to other health care providers, while other relevant variables are approximately similar. The investigation is based on formal agreements and rules, historical documents, existing analyses and an analysis of 360 newspaper articles. It shows that high relative professional status seems to help professions to avoid user fees, steer clear of regulation from other professions and regulate the services produced by others. This implies that relative professional status should be taken into consideration in analyses of health care cost containment.

  20. Does one workshop on respecting cultural differences increase health professionals' confidence to improve the care of Australian Aboriginal patients with cancer? An evaluation.

    PubMed

    Durey, Angela; Halkett, Georgia; Berg, Melissa; Lester, Leanne; Kickett, Marion

    2017-09-15

    Aboriginal Australians have worse cancer survival rates than other Australians. Reasons include fear of a cancer diagnosis, reluctance to attend mainstream health services and discrimination from health professionals. Offering health professionals education in care focusing on Aboriginal patients' needs is important. The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether participating in a workshop improved the confidence of radiation oncology health professionals in their knowledge, communication and ability to offer culturally safe healthcare to Aboriginal Australians with cancer. Mixed methods using pre and post workshop online surveys, and one delivered 2 months later, were evaluated. Statistical analysis determined the relative proportion of participants who changed from not at all/a little confident at baseline to fairly/extremely confident immediately and 2 months after the workshop. Factor analysis identified underlying dimensions in the items and nonparametric tests recorded changes in mean dimension scores over and between times. Qualitative data was analysed for emerging themes. Fifty-nine participants attended the workshops, 39 (66% response rate) completed pre-workshop surveys, 32 (82% of study participants) completed post-workshop surveys and 25 (64% of study participants) completed surveys 2 months later. A significant increase in the proportion of attendees who reported fair/extreme confidence within 2 days of the workshop was found in nine of 14 items, which was sustained for all but one item 2 months later. Two additional items had a significant increase in the proportion of fair/extremely confident attendees 2 months post workshop compared to baseline. An exploratory factor analysis identified three dimensions: communication; relationships; and awareness. All dimensions' mean scores significantly improved within 2 days (p < 0.005) and persisted to 2 months. The workshop raised awareness about barriers and enablers to delivering services respectful of

  1. The association of socio-demographic status, lifestyle factors and dietary patterns with total urinary phthalates in Australian men.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peter Y; Wittert, Gary A; Taylor, Anne W; Martin, Sean A; Milne, Robert W; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the associations between socio-demographic status, lifestyle factors, dietary patterns and urinary total phthalate concentration in a cohort of South Australian men. We randomly selected 1527 males aged 39 to 84 from wave two of the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) study. Total phthalate concentration was examined in fasting morning urine samples. Socio-demographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire. Food intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were constructed using factor analysis. Total phthalates were detected in 99.6% of the urine samples. The overall geometric mean (95% CI) of total phthalate concentration was 112.4 (107.5-117.5) ng/mL. The least square geometric means (LSGMs) of total phthalate concentration were significantly higher among people who were obese (127.8 ng/mL), consuming less than two serves fruit per day (125.7 ng/mL) and drinking more than one can (375mL) of carbonated soft drink per day (131.9 ng/mL). Two dietary patterns were identified: a prudent dietary pattern and a western dietary pattern. Both the western dietary pattern (p = 0.002) and multiple lifestyle risk factors including smoking, obesity, insufficient physical activity and the highest quartile of the western dietary pattern (p<0.001), were positively associated with total phthalate levels. There was no significant relationship between total phthalate concentration and socio-demographic status. Phthalate exposure is ubiquitous and positively associated with lifestyle risk factors in urban dwelling Australian men.

  2. The Association of Socio-Demographic Status, Lifestyle Factors and Dietary Patterns with Total Urinary Phthalates in Australian Men

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Peter Y.; Wittert, Gary A.; Taylor, Anne W.; Martin, Sean A.; Milne, Robert W.; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between socio-demographic status, lifestyle factors, dietary patterns and urinary total phthalate concentration in a cohort of South Australian men. Method We randomly selected 1527 males aged 39 to 84 from wave two of the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) study. Total phthalate concentration was examined in fasting morning urine samples. Socio-demographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire. Food intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were constructed using factor analysis. Results Total phthalates were detected in 99.6% of the urine samples. The overall geometric mean (95% CI) of total phthalate concentration was 112.4 (107.5–117.5) ng/mL. The least square geometric means (LSGMs) of total phthalate concentration were significantly higher among people who were obese (127.8 ng/mL), consuming less than two serves fruit per day (125.7 ng/mL) and drinking more than one can (375mL) of carbonated soft drink per day (131.9 ng/mL). Two dietary patterns were identified: a prudent dietary pattern and a western dietary pattern. Both the western dietary pattern (p = 0.002) and multiple lifestyle risk factors including smoking, obesity, insufficient physical activity and the highest quartile of the western dietary pattern (p<0.001), were positively associated with total phthalate levels. There was no significant relationship between total phthalate concentration and socio-demographic status. Conclusion Phthalate exposure is ubiquitous and positively associated with lifestyle risk factors in urban dwelling Australian men. PMID:25875472

  3. Implementing lean methods in the emergency department: the role of professions and professional status.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen; Coffey, Frank; Vezyridis, Paraskevas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of lean methods in an Emergency Department (ED) and the role of the professions in this process. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews with ED staff in a UK NHS hospital. Lean was met with more engagement and enthusiasm by the professionals than is usually reported in the literature. The main reasons for this were a combination of a national policy, the unique clinical environment and the status of the professional project for doctors in emergency medicine. Single site, one-off study. The status and development of professionals involved may play a big part in the acceptability of initiatives like lean methods in health care. The longer-term sustainability of the organisational changes introduced remains open to question. This paper analyses the success of lean methods in health care with reference to the professional status and stage of development of the professions involved, using the sociology of professions. This approach has not been used elsewhere.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance status of Enterococcus from Australian cattle populations at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Robert S; McMillan, Kate E; Duffy, Lesley L; Fegan, Narelle; Jordan, David; Mellor, Glen E

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used in cattle production systems for the prevention and control of bacterial associated diseases. A consequence of their use is the potential development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis that are resistant to antimicrobials are of increased concern to public health officials throughout the world as they may compromise the ability of various treatment regimens to control disease and infection in human medicine. Australia is a major exporter of beef; however it does not have an ongoing surveillance system for AMR in cattle or foods derived from these animals. This study examined 910 beef cattle, 290 dairy cattle and 300 veal calf faecal samples collected at slaughter for the presence of enterococci. Enterococcus were isolated from 805 (88.5%) beef cattle faeces, 244 (84.1%) dairy cattle faeces and 247 (82.3%) veal calf faeces with a total of 800 enterococci subsequently selected for AMR testing. The results of AMR testing identified high levels of resistance to antimicrobials that are not critically or highly important to human medicine with resistance to flavomycin (80.2%) and lincomycin (85.4-94.2%) routinely observed. Conversely, resistance to antibiotics considered critically or highly important to human medicine such as tigecycline, daptomycin, vancomycin and linezolid was not present in this study. There is minimal evidence that Australian cattle production practices are responsible for disproportionate contributions to AMR development and in general resistance to antimicrobials of critical and high importance in human medicine was low regardless of the isolate source. The low level of antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus from Australian cattle is likely to result from comprehensive controls around the use of antimicrobials in food-production animals in Australia. Nevertheless, continued monitoring of the effects of all antimicrobial use is required to support Australia's reputation

  5. Vitamin D status and skin cancer risk independent of time outdoors: 11-year prospective study in an Australian community.

    PubMed

    van der Pols, Jolieke C; Russell, Anne; Bauer, Ulrike; Neale, Rachel E; Kimlin, Michael G; Green, Adèle C

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin D may have anti-skin cancer effects, but population-based evidence is lacking. We therefore assessed associations between vitamin D status and skin cancer risk in an Australian subtropical community. We analyzed prospective skin cancer incidence for 11 years following baseline assessment of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D in 1,191 adults (average age 54 years) and used multivariable logistic regression analysis to adjust risk estimates for age, sex, detailed assessments of usual time spent outdoors, phenotypic characteristics, and other possible confounders. Participants with serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations above 75 nmol  l(-1) versus those below 75 nmol  l(-1) more often developed basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.51 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.07, P=0.01) and melanoma (OR=2.71 (95% CI: 0.98-7.48, P=0.05)). Squamous cell carcinoma incidence tended to be lower in persons with serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations above 75 nmol  l(-1) compared with those below 75 nmol  l(-1) (OR=0.67 (95% CI: 0.44-1.03, P=0.07)). Vitamin D status was not associated with skin cancer incidence when participants were classified as above or below 50 nmol  l(-1) 25(OH)-vitamin D. Our findings do not indicate that the carcinogenicity of high sun exposure can be counteracted by high vitamin D status. High sun exposure is to be avoided as a means to achieve high vitamin D status.

  6. Australian Mineral Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides details on the philosophy and operation of the Australian Mineral Foundation, established in 1970 to update professionals in the mining and petroleum industries. Services in continuing education courses and to secondary school teachers and students are described. (CS)

  7. Australian Public Relations: Status at the Turn of the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raveena; Smyth, Rosaleen

    2000-01-01

    Notes how over the last two decades the Public Relations Institute of Australia together with its strategic alliances have made many changes, structurally, strategically, and academically towards the professional growth of public relations. Discusses the views of the Public Relations Institute of Australia and offers a snapshot of two surveys on…

  8. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  9. Vitamin D status: multifactorial contribution of environment, genes and other factors in healthy Australian adults across a latitude gradient.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Dear, Keith; Valery, Patricia C; Taylor, Bruce; van der Mei, Ingrid; McMichael, Anthony J; Pender, Michael P; Chapman, Caron; Coulthard, Alan; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Stankovich, Jim; Williams, David; Dwyer, Terence

    2013-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common and implicated in risk of several human diseases. Evidence on the relative quantitative contribution of environmental, genetic and phenotypic factors to vitamin D status (assessed by the serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 25(OH)D) in free-living populations is sparse. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 494 Caucasian adults aged 18-61years, randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll according to groups defined by age, sex and region (spanning 27°-43°South). Data collected included personal characteristics, sun exposure behaviour, biomarkers of skin type and past sun exposure, serum 25(OH)D concentration and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms. Ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels in the month six weeks before blood sampling best predicted vitamin D status. Serum 25(OH)D concentration increased by 10nmol/L as reported time in the sun doubled. Overall, 54% of the variation in serum 25(OH)D concentration could be accounted for: 36% of the variation was explained by sun exposure-related factors; 14% by genetic factors (including epistasis) and 3.5% by direct measures of skin phenotype. Novel findings from this study are demonstration of gene epistasis, and quantification of the relative contribution of a wide range of environmental, constitutional and genetic factors to vitamin D status. Ambient UVR levels and time in the sun were of prime importance but it is nonetheless important to include the contribution of genetic factors when considering sun exposure effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.

  10. Combinations of social participation and trust, and association with health status-an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Ronan, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    A limited number of studies have examined the 'miniaturization of community' model which is based on belief that 'new' individualistic, and narrower forms of social participation, do not promote generalized trust in others. Little is known about miniaturization of community and self-reported health, physical health and psychological health in Australia. Data from a 2009 computer-assisted-telephone-interview survey was used to investigate generalized trust, social participation and health-related quality of life in a regional Australian population (n = 1273; mean age 51.2 years). Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between generalized trust, social participation and poor self-reported health (global self-rated, psychological and physical), and included four social participation/trust categories. A majority (67%) reported high generalized trust of others, 54% were categorized as high social participators. Miniaturization of community was a risk factor for poor self-rated psychological health across genders, and a risk factor for poor self-rated health for males. For women, low social participation (irrespective of trust level) was associated with poor self-reported health. Given current and previous findings, there is a need for further research in a range of contexts which explores the underlying concept of miniaturization of community, that is, the changes in social participation and social networks which may negatively impact community health.

  11. Plasma selenium status in a group of Australian blood donors and fresh blood components.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles; Colebourne, Kathryn; Faddy, Helen M; Flower, Robert; Fraser, John F

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess plasma selenium levels in an Australian blood donor population and measure extra-cellular selenium levels in fresh manufactured blood components. Selenium levels were measured using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. The mean plasma selenium level in healthy plasmapharesis donors was 85.6±0.5 μg/L and a regional difference was observed between donors in South East Queensland and Far North Queensland. Although participants had selenium levels within the normal range (55.3-110.5 μg/L), 88.5% had levels below 100 μg/L, a level that has been associated with sub-optimal activity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Extra-cellular selenium levels in clinical fresh frozen plasma (cFFP) and apheresis-derived platelets (APH Plt) were within the normal range. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) and pooled buffy coat-derived platelets (BC Plt) had levels at the lower limit of detection, which may have clinical implications to the massively transfused patient.

  12. Does Professional Suitability Matter? A National Survey of Australian Counselling Educators in Undergraduate and Post-Graduate Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brear, Pamela D.; Dorrian, Jillian

    2010-01-01

    This Australian national study was undertaken to profile the unsuitable counselling student, and to achieve greater operational specificity to guide counselling educators who must make critical decisions that impact admittance to the counselling profession. Findings suggest that in every 25 students as many as three will have questionable…

  13. Monitoring of oxidative status in three native Australian species during cold acclimation and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Funnekotter, Bryn; Colville, Louise; Kaczmarczyk, Anja; Turner, Shane R; Bunn, Eric; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2017-09-12

    Three wild species exhibited a significant reduction in antioxidants throughout the cryopreservation protocol, whilst the half-cell reduction potential became more oxidised. Antioxidant content recuperated in recovering shoot tips. Cryopreservation is the most efficient and cost-effective long-term storage solution for the conservation of a wide range of plant species and material. Changes in the levels of antioxidants during the process of cryopreservation are known to reduce post-cryogenic survival due to oxidative stress. Low-molecular-weight thiols (cysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine, and glutathione) and ascorbic acid, which represent the two major water-soluble antioxidants in plants, were analysed at specific stages during cryopreservation of shoot tip material of three native Australian plant species [Anigozanthos viridis (Haemodoraceae), Lomandra sonderi (Asparagaceae), and Loxocarya cinerea (Restionaceae)] to quantify the oxidative stress experienced during cryopreservation. Post-cryogenic regeneration of shoot tips was greatest in A. viridis (78%) followed by L. sonderi (50%), whilst L. cinerea did not show any post-cryogenic regeneration. The application of a 3-week cold (5 °C) preconditioning regime, commonly used to increase post-cryogenic survival, resulted in significantly lower post-cryogenic regeneration for A. viridis (33%), but had little effect on the other two species. Total antioxidant concentration in shoot material decreased significantly with each step throughout the cryopreservation process, particularly in the cryoprotection and washing stages. Antioxidant levels in shoot tips then increased during the subsequent 7-day post-cryopreservation recovery period, with the greatest increase measured in A. viridis. Concentrations of thiols and their corresponding disulphides were used to calculate the corresponding half-cell reduction potentials, whereby the ability of these plant species to maintain a strong reducing environment in shoot tissues

  14. The Oz Effect? An Examination of Middle Management Roles and Perceptions of Professionalism in an Australian TAFE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Ann R. J.

    2007-01-01

    A recent study of middle managers in English further education (FE) colleges explored the concept of professionalism as displayed by the various types of manager in the study. The study tracked the shifting patterns of professional identity in the sector. Within any one college, individual managers may hold differing constructs of professionalism;…

  15. Relationship of Periodontal Status and Dental Caries Status with Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior among Professional Students in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Archana J; Shetty, Srinath

    2009-01-01

    Aim To find the relationship of periodontal status and dental caries status with oral health knowledge, attitude, behavior, among professional students in India. Methodology In a cross sectional study, a total of 825 students (males: 577, females: 248) from six professions were surveyed using a self administered structured questionnaire including 41 multiple choice questions and the WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997). The data was analyzed using the SPSS version 13.0 to perform the Student's t-test, ANOVA test, Scheffe's test and Chi-square test, linear regression analysis. Results The mean percentage scores of the students for knowledge were 53.25 ± 15.05; for attitude 74.97 ±20.48; and for behavior 59.09 ± 18.77. The percentage of students with calculus score was found to be significantly high (43.8%). The percentage of professional students with DMFT>4 was 14.1% and the percentage of students with decayed teeth was 46.2%. The regression analysis showed that the oral health behavior of the students was dependent on the attitude (P <0.001), but showed no significant linear relation with the knowledge. Also, that the mean DMFT score was dependent on the oral health behavior (P <0.05), but showed no significant relationship with the knowledge and attitude of the students. The periodontal status was independent on the knowledge, but showed a significant relationship with attitude and behavior of the students. Conclusion A positive attitude and adherence to good oral hygiene behaviors is associated with better oral health. PMID:20690423

  16. The association between parental socioeconomic status (SES) and medical students' personal and professional development.

    PubMed

    Fan, Angela P C; Chen, Chen-Huan; Su, Tong-Ping; Shih, Wan-Jing; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2007-09-01

    In order to commit to their mission and placement requirements, medical education policy-makers are required to understand the background and character of students in order to admit, cultivate and support them efficiently and effectively. This study sample consisted of 408 homogeneous medical students with the same level of education, occupation, school and societal environment. They differed mainly in their family background. Therefore, this study used part of a multidimensional "student portfolio system" database to assess the correlation between family status (indexed by parental education and occupation) and medical students' mental health status and characters. The controls were a group of 181 non-medical students in another university. The parents of the medical students were from a higher socioeconomic status (SES) than the parents of those in the control group. This showed the heritability of genetic and environment conditions as well as the socioeconomic forces at play in medical education. Students' personal and professional development were associated with their parents' SES. The mother's SES was associated with the student's selfreported stress, mental disturbances, attitude towards life, personality, health, discipline, internationalisation and professionalism. The fathers' SES did not show a statistically significant association with the above stress, physical and mental health factors, but showed an association with some of the personality factors. The greater the educational difference between both parents, the more stress, hopelessness and pessimism the student manifested. Medical educators need to be aware that socioeconomic factors have meaningful patterns of association with students' mental and physical health, and their characters relating to personal and professional development. Low maternal SES negatively influences medical students' personal and professional development, suggesting that medical education policy-makers need to initiate

  17. Food neophobia and associations with cultural diversity and socio-economic status amongst rural and urban Australian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Flight, Ingrid; Leppard, Phillip; Cox, David N

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to diverse cultures and higher socio-economic status (SES) may increase knowledge of a wide variety of stimuli, including food, and be negatively associated with food neophobia. We contrasted questionnaire responses from two groups of Australian high school students (aged 12-18 years) from remote rural (rural, n=243) and cosmopolitan urban (city, n=696) locations to the food neophobia scale (FNS), familiarity with certain foods and willingness to try those foods. Cultural diversity measures and two SES scales were created. City students were less food neophobic than rural students (mean FNS scores 29.35 versus 34.68, p<0.001). City students were also significantly more familiar with different foods and more willing to try unfamiliar foods, were of higher SES and had greater exposure to cultural diversity. However, the association between the FNS and familiarity with foods, willingness to try unfamiliar foods, SES, and exposure to cultural diversity, were only weak or moderate for both city and rural students. Greater exposure to cultural diversity and higher SES has some influence on adolescents' responses to unfamiliar foods, but the relationship between these factors and the FNS score is tenuous.

  18. Role of Dietary Pattern Analysis in Determining Cognitive Status in Elderly Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ashby-Mitchell, Kimberly; Peeters, Anna; Anstey, Kaarin J.

    2015-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to determine the association between dietary patterns and cognitive function and to examine how classification systems based on food groups and food items affect levels of association between diet and cognitive function. The present study focuses on the older segment of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) sample (age 60+) that completed the food frequency questionnaire at Wave 1 (1999/2000) and the mini-mental state examination and tests of memory, verbal ability and processing speed at Wave 3 (2012). Three methods were used in order to classify these foods before applying PCA. In the first instance, the 101 individual food items asked about in the questionnaire were used (no categorisation). In the second and third instances, foods were combined and reduced to 32 and 20 food groups, respectively, based on nutrient content and culinary usage—a method employed in several other published studies for PCA. Logistic regression analysis and generalized linear modelling was used to analyse the relationship between PCA-derived dietary patterns and cognitive outcome. Broader food group classifications resulted in a greater proportion of food use variance in the sample being explained (use of 101 individual foods explained 23.22% of total food use, while use of 32 and 20 food groups explained 29.74% and 30.74% of total variance in food use in the sample, respectively). Three dietary patterns were found to be associated with decreased odds of cognitive impairment (CI). Dietary patterns derived from 101 individual food items showed that for every one unit increase in ((Fruit and Vegetable Pattern: p = 0.030, OR 1.061, confidence interval: 1.006–1.118); (Fish, Legumes and Vegetable Pattern: p = 0.040, OR 1.032, confidence interval: 1.001–1.064); (Dairy, Cereal and Eggs Pattern: p = 0.003, OR 1.020, confidence interval: 1.007–1.033)), the odds of cognitive impairment decreased. Different results were

  19. Health behaviours, socioeconomic status and diabetes incidence: the Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab).

    PubMed

    Williams, E D; Tapp, R J; Magliano, D J; Shaw, J E; Zimmet, P Z; Oldenburg, B F

    2010-12-01

    To identify the impact of socioeconomic status on incident impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes and to investigate the mediating role of health behaviours on this relationship using national, population-based data. The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) Study is a national, population-based, longitudinal study of adults aged 25 years and above. A total sample of 4,405 people provided complete baseline (1999-2000) and 5 year follow-up (2004-2005) data relevant for these analyses. Fasting plasma glucose and 2 h plasma glucose were obtained from an OGTT, and demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural data were collected by interview and questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression examined the role of socioeconomic position in the development of diabetes and mediation analyses tested the contribution of health behaviours in this relationship. Highest level of education was a stronger predictor of incident impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes (p = 0.002), compared with household income (p = 0.103), and occupational grade (p = 0.202). Education remained a significant independent predictor of diabetes in fully adjusted models. However, the relationship was attenuated by the health behaviours (smoking and physical activity). Mediation analyses indicated that these behaviours were partial mediators (explaining 27%) of the socioeconomic status-diabetes relationship. Smoking and physical activity partly mediate the relationship between low education and type 2 diabetes. Identification of these modifiable behavioural mediators should facilitate the development of effective health promotion campaigns to target those at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

  20. Inter-seasonal population dynamics and pest status of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B in an Australian cropping system.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, R V; Shields, A; Moore, A; De Barro, P

    2009-08-01

    indicates that native parasitoid species and other natural enemies are important sources of SLW mortality in Australian cotton production systems. Weather conditions and use of broad-spectrum insecticides for pest control are implicated in the initial outbreak and on-going pest status of SLW in the region.

  1. The National Status of In-Service Professional Development Systems for Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Stayton, Vicki D.; Dietrich, Sylvia L.

    2009-01-01

    Early intervention and preschool special education coordinators in the 50 states and territories were interviewed about the current status of professional development in-service systems in their state. A definition consisting of 8 components of an in-service professional development system was used to analyze the state systems. Twenty Part C early…

  2. The National Status of In-Service Professional Development Systems for Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Stayton, Vicki D.; Dietrich, Sylvia L.

    2009-01-01

    Early intervention and preschool special education coordinators in the 50 states and territories were interviewed about the current status of professional development in-service systems in their state. A definition consisting of 8 components of an in-service professional development system was used to analyze the state systems. Twenty Part C early…

  3. Chaos in Western Medicine: how issues of social-professional status are undermining our health.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nathan W

    2012-07-25

    From the period immediately following the second world war, western (orthodox) medicine - both as a philosophy of medicine and as a professional guild of medical professionals actively practicing medicine - has made progress in leaps and bounds, especially considering the advances in technology and associated enterprises. Over the last thirty years, however, the practice of orthodox medicine has taken a turn for the worst despite progressive philosophies and tenets of basic practice as offered by the professional bodies that regulate how medicine is operated and implemented. Current healthcare environments are in a chaotic state of affairs, most notably due to issues involving affordability of medical professionals. It is argued that the social-professional status of medical doctors allow exorbitant and unreachable demands on governments for increased salaries. The title-based supremacy of doctors within the occupations domain is not supported by what they are offering society at large, and it compromises the ability of medical institutions and governments to provide better and more affordable healthcare. From a sociological point of view, this paper examines the social-religious history of such social class-based occupational power and dominance, and paves the way toward an overhaul of current medical education frameworks that proactively will ensure greater occupational equity in healthcare settings, across all healthcare disciplines tasked with patient care and improvement of healthcare services. In essence, doctoral titles should only be awarded after successful completion of postgraduate doctoral studies, and a new breed of medical professionals must emerge, able to contribute more meaningfully to the advancement of medicine as a profession, as well as toward increased standards of healthcare and improved health services delivery.

  4. Chaos in Western Medicine: How Issues of Social-Professional Status are Undermining Our Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N. W.

    2012-01-01

    From the period immediately following the second world war, western (orthodox) medicine – both as a philosophy of medicine and as a professional guild of medical professionals actively practicing medicine – has made progress in leaps and bounds, especially considering the advances in technology and associated enterprises. Over the last thirty years, however, the practice of orthodox medicine has taken a turn for the worst despite progressive philosophies and tenets of basic practice as offered by the professional bodies that regulate how medicine is operated and implemented. Current healthcare environments are in a chaotic state of affairs, most notably due to issues involving affordability of medical professionals. It is argued that the social-professional status of medical doctors allow exorbitant and unreachable demands on governments for increased salaries. The title-based supremacy of doctors within the occupations domain is not supported by what they are offering society at large, and it compromises the ability of medical institutions and governments to provide better and more affordable healthcare. From a sociological point of view, this paper examines the social-religious history of such social class-based occupational power and dominance, and paves the way toward an overhaul of current medical education frameworks that proactively will ensure greater occupational equity in healthcare settings, across all healthcare disciplines tasked with patient care and improvement of healthcare services. In essence, doctoral titles should only be awarded after successful completion of postgraduate doctoral studies, and a new breed of medical professionals must emerge, able to contribute more meaningfully to the advancement of medicine as a profession, as well as toward increased standards of healthcare and improved health services delivery. PMID:23121737

  5. The first Australian nurse practitioner census: A protocol to guide standardized collection of information about an emergent professional group.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sandy; Gardner, Glenn; Gardner, Anne; Della, Phillip; Gibb, Michelle; Millar, Lynne

    2010-10-01

    Internationally, collection of reliable data on new and evolving health-care roles is crucial. We describe a protocol for design and administration of a national census of an emergent health-care role, namely nurse practitioners in Australia using databases held by regulatory authorities. A questionnaire was developed to obtain data on the role and scope of practice of Australian nurse practitioners. Our tool comprised five sections and included a total of 56 questions, using 28 existing items from the National Nursing and Midwifery Labour Force Census and nine items recommended in the Nurse Practitioner Workforce Planning Minimum Data Set. Australian Nurse Registering Authorities (n = 6) distributed the survey on our behalf. This paper outlines our instrument and methods. The survey was administered to 238 authorized Australian nurse practitioners (85% response rate). Rigorous collection of standardized items will ensure health policy is informed by reliable and valid data. We will re-administer the survey 2 years following the first survey to measure change over time. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Integration of the thiol redox status with cytokine response to physical training in professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Slowinska-Lisowska, M; Ziemba, A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the plasma markers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and cytokines, and their relationship with thiol redox status of basketball players during training. Sixteen professional players of the Polish Basketball Extraleague participated in the study. The study was performed during the preparatory period and the play-off round. Markers of ROS activity (lipid peroxidation TBARS, protein carbonylation PC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) demonstrated regularity over time, i.e. TBARS, PC and GSH were elevated at the beginning and decreased at the end of training periods. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was not affected by exercise training. Thiol redox status (GSH(total)-2GSSG/GSSG) correlated with TBARS and PC in both training periods. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) was increased and positively correlated with thiol redox (r=0.423) in the preparatory period, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) was increased and inversely correlated with thiol redox (r= 0.509) in the play-off round. The present study showed significant shifts in markers of ROS activity, thiol redox status and inflammatory mediators (IL-6, TNFalpha) following professional sport training as well as correlation between changes in thiol redox and cytokine response.

  7. Relationship between daily training load and psychometric status of professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Moalla, Wassim; Fessi, Mohamed Saifeddin; Farhat, Fayçal; Nouira, Sabeur; Wong, Del P; Dupont, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    We studied the relationship between daily training load (TL) experienced by professional soccer players and the Hooper questionnaire reflecting their perceived quality of sleep, fatigue, stress and delayed onset muscle soreness. During a 16-week training period, the rating of perceived exertion and duration were collected after each training session, and daily TL was calculated from 14 professional soccer players. The Hooper questionnaire was completed every day before the first training session and the Hooper's score (HS) was then calculated. The daily TL and HS were 379.9 ± 198.3 AU and 16.2 ± 5.1, respectively. Pearson correlation showed significant relationships (p < 0.01) between TL and perceived fatigue, muscle soreness, sleep and stress. Our findings revealed that the perceived sleep, stress, fatigue and muscle soreness are moderately related to the daily TL in professional soccer players. The Hooper questionnaire is both a simple and useful tool for monitoring perceived wellness and psychometric players' status of professional soccer players.

  8. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project.

  9. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  10. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  11. 1980 Status of the Chemical Sciences in the Undergraduate Professional Programs of American Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszak, Alice Jean; Sarnoff, Darwin

    1981-01-01

    A 1980 mail survey of the 72 American colleges of pharmacy concerning the status of required chemistry courses in the professional curriculum was conducted. Results of the survey are discussed and the survey was used to establish the baseline for the status of chemistry courses in the undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. (Author/MLW)

  12. Socio-Economic Status and Related Variables That Influence the Initiation of Professional Medical Care among Montana Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Jack J.

    The purpose of this study was to determine for a sample of Montana families if a positive relationship existed between the family's socioeconomic status and its medical initiation behavior, and then, controlling for socioeconomic status, to determine if a relationship existed between initiation of professional medical care and a number of…

  13. Impact of New Regulations On Assessing Driving Status (INROADS): a South Australian seizure clinic cohort.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jessica; Horn, Sharon; Robinson, Martin; Purdie, Grant; Jannes, Jim

    2014-11-01

    The ability to drive is important to patients and driving restriction often leads to restriction of employment and social opportunities. In March 2012, Austroads released revised Assessing Fitness to Drive Guidelines (AFTDG) with significant changes for drivers with seizures and epilepsy. Our study aimed to assess the impact of the 2012 AFTDG on a Seizure Clinic cohort compared to the previous 2003 AFTDG and an individual's current driving status. We also aimed to quantify the difference in AFTDG interpretation between expert and non-expert doctors. We performed a retrospective observational audit of case notes for all patients managed in a public hospital outpatient Seizure Clinic between 1 March 2010 and 1 March 2012. A total of 142 patients were included in the analysis. Comparison between the 2003 and 2012 AFTDG resulted in reduced eligibility to drive a private vehicle by 2.1% (52.5% versus 50.4%) and commercial vehicle by 2.2% (4.5% versus 2.3%). The proportion of those currently driving against guideline recommendations increased (private 8.8% versus 19%; commercial 50% versus 100%) and the non-expert assessor was more likely to agree with the experts with the 2012 AFTDG. In summary, the 2012 AFTDG has had a measurable impact on driving eligibility in individuals with seizure although it is easier to interpret for non-expert doctors. Greater awareness of the 2012 AFTDG is required to reduce the proportion of patients driving against current recommendations.

  14. The influence of professional status on maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics in elite soccer referees.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ty B; Hawkey, Matt J; Smith, Doug B; Thompson, Brennan J

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of maximal and rapid isometric torque characteristics of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh and lower-body power to discriminate between professional status in full-time and part-time professional soccer referees. Seven full-time (mean ± SE: age = 36 ± 2 years; mass = 82 ± 4 kg; and height = 179 ± 3 cm) and 9 part-time (age = 34 ± 2 years; mass = 84 ± 2 kg; and height = 181 ± 2 cm) professional soccer referees performed 2 isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh. Peak torque (PT) and absolute and relative rate of torque development (RTD) were calculated from a torque-time curve that was recorded during each MVC. Lower-body power output was assessed through a vertical jump test. Results indicated that the rapid torque characteristics were greater in the full-time compared with the part-time referees for absolute RTD (p = 0.011) and relative RTD at 1/2 (p = 0.022) and 2/3 (p = 0.033) of the normalized torque-time curve. However, no differences were observed for PT (p = 0.660) or peak power (Pmax, p = 0.149) between groups. These findings suggest that rapid torque characteristics of the posterior muscles of the hip and thigh may be sensitive and effective measures for discriminating between full-time and part-time professional soccer referees. Strength and conditioning coaches may use these findings to help identify professional soccer referees with high explosive strength-related capacities and possibly overall refereeing ability.

  15. A Prospective Review of Hip Fracture Subtypes, Surgical Procedure, Cognitive Status, and Analgesia Use Across 4 Australian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Jenson C. S.; Lattouf, Ihab; Narushevich, Alexei; Lai, Charles; O’Rourke, Fintan; Shen, Qing; Chan, Daniel K. Y.; Cameron, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To correlate analgesia use among patients with hip fracture requiring surgery with hip fracture subtype, cognitive status, and type of surgery in the postacute period. Design and Participants: Prospective review of patients with hip fractures requiring surgical intervention. A total of 415 patients (mean age: 81.2 ± 9.1 years, 74.3% women) presented with 195 subcapital fractures (39 undisplaced, 156 displaced) and 220 trochanteric fractures (136 stable, 84 unstable) requiring surgery. Setting: Inpatient orthopedic units in 4 Australian hospitals. Measurements: The primary outcome measures were mean analgesia usage (oral morphine equivalent) for 4 defined time intervals and total amount 36 hours following surgery. Results: Patients with subtrochanteric fractures required more analgesia compared with displaced-subcapital, undisplaced-subcapital, basicervical, stable-pertrochanteric, and unstable-pertrochanteric fractures in the 24 to 36 hours following operation (24.7 vs 11.3 vs 8.8 vs 12.1 vs 7.6 vs 9.7, P = .001). Total analgesia requirements were higher in patients treated with an intramedullary nail, increasing by 1.3- to 3.3-fold in the 36 hours postsurgery. Patients with cognitive impairment utilized markedly less analgesia at all time periods measured. At 24 to 36 hours, higher levels of analgesia were noted in patients with higher premorbid level of mobility (P = .015) and activities of daily living function (P = .007). Conclusion: Important differences in utilization of analgesia following hip fracture across readily defined clinical groups exist. Proactive pain management for those with cognitive impairment, certain hip fracture subtypes, and surgical procedures may enable early functional mobility and other activities. PMID:23569669

  16. Pre- and Post-harvest Influences on Seed Dormancy Status of an Australian Goodeniaceae species, Goodenia fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Gemma L.; Steadman, Kathryn J.; Daws, Matthew I.; Adkins, Steve W.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The period during which seeds develop on the parent plant has been found to affect many seed characteristics, including dormancy, through interactions with the environment. Goodenia fascicularis (Goodeniaceae) seeds were used to investigate whether seeds of an Australian native forb, harvested from different environments and produced at different stages of the reproductive period, differ in dormancy status. Methods During the reproductive phase, plants were grown ex situ in warm (39/21 °C) or cool (26/13 °C) conditions, with adequate or limited water availability. The physiological dormancy of resulting seeds was measured in terms of the germination response to warm stratification (34/20 °C, 100 % RH, darkness). Key Results Plants in the cool environment were tall and had high above-ground biomass, yet yielded fewer seeds over a shorter, later harvest period when compared with plants in the warm environment. Seeds from the cool environment also had higher viability and greater mass, despite a significant proportion (7 % from the cool-wet environment) containing no obvious embryo. In the warm environment, the reproductive phase was accelerated and plants produced more seeds despite being shorter and having lower above-ground biomass than those in the cool environment. Ten weeks of warm stratification alleviated physiological dormancy in seeds from all treatments resulting in 80–100 % germination. Seeds that developed at warm temperatures were less dormant (i.e. germination percentages were higher) than seeds from the cool environment. Water availability had less effect on plant and seed traits than air temperature, although plants with reduced soil moisture were shorter, had lower biomass and produced fewer, less dormant seeds than plants watered regularly. Conclusions Goodenia fascicularis seeds are likely to exhibit physiological dormancy regardless of the maternal environment. However, seeds collected from warm, dry environments are

  17. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of migrant status in adults with psychotic disorders: data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Morgan, V A; Castle, D; Silove, D; McGrath, J J

    2015-12-01

    The links between migrant status and psychosis have attracted considerable attention in recent decades. The aim of the study was to explore the demographic and clinical correlates of migrant v. Australia-born status in individuals with psychotic disorders using a large community-based sample. Data were drawn from a population-based prevalence survey of adults with psychotic disorders. Known as the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP), it was conducted in seven Australian catchment areas in 2010. Logistic regression was used for the main analyses, examining associations of migrant status with sociodemographic and clinical variables. Of the 1825 participants with psychotic disorders, 17.8% (n = 325) were migrants, of whom 55.7% (n = 181) were male. Compared to Australia-born individuals with psychosis, migrants were more likely to be currently married, to have completed a higher level at school, to have left school later, and to be employed with full-time jobs. Migrants with psychosis were either no different from or less impaired or disadvantaged compared to their Australian-born counterparts on a range of clinical and demographic variables. In a sample of individuals with psychotic disorders, there was no evidence to suggest that migrant status was associated with worse clinical or socio-economic outcomes compared to their native-born counterparts.

  18. The Association of Vitamin D Status with Dyslipidaemia and Biomarkers of Endothelial Cell Activation in Older Australians

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Ali M.; Lam, Virginie; Soares, Mario J.; Zhao, Yun; Sherriff, Jillian L.; Mamo, John C.; James, Anthony P.; Coombes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Vitamin D has been investigated for many non-skeletal effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether circulating lipids, systemic inflammation, and biomarkers of endothelial cell activation varied with the vitamin D status of older Australians. Methods: One hundred and one participants were proportionately and randomly sampled across tertiles of 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) from a larger cohort of free living older adults (T1 median = 97; T2 median = 74.5; T3 median = 56.8 nmol/L). Overnight fasting blood samples were assayed for 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), insulin, triacylglycerol (TAG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Markers of systemic inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) and endothelial activation (hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), P-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM), soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)) were determined. A general linear model multivariate analysis with a backward elimination procedure was performed. Results: Eighty-three participants (48 women, 35 men), aged 65 ± 7.7 years, BMI 28 ± 4.5 kg/m2, with complete data were analyzed. The final parsimonious model controlled for age, gender, BMI, and McAuley’s index, but excluded season, medications, and PTH. There were significant differences across 25(OH)D tertiles in TC (T1 < T3, p = 0.003; T2 < T3, p = 0.001), LDL-C (T1 < T3, p = 0.005; T2 < T3, p = 0.001), TAG (T2 < T3, p = 0.026), HGF (T1 > T3, p = 0.009) and sVCAM (T1 > T3, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Higher vitamin D status may protect the endothelium through reduced dyslipidaemia and increased HGF. PMID:27483306

  19. For love or money? Australian attitudes to financially compensated (commercial) surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Tremellen, Kelton; Everingham, Sam

    2016-12-01

    Australian law allows for altruistic surrogacy but prohibits compensation of surrogates beyond their expenses, or the use of professional surrogacy agencies. These restrictions limit local access to surrogacy, driving Australians overseas where they can access commercial surrogacy. To assess the Australian public's views regarding the use of gestational surrogacy under various social and medical scenarios, together with their level of support for financial compensation of surrogates and the use of professional surrogacy agencies. Online survey of 500 Australians of reproductive age (18-49 years) regarding views on surrogacy and acceptable levels of compensation, conducted during January 2016. The majority of respondents supported access to surrogacy for couples, irrespective of a couple's marital status or sexuality, with only 9% believing that surrogacy was unjustified under any circumstances. Of those who held a view on compensated surrogacy, over half (58%) believed the current ban was unjustified, with close to two-thirds (62%) also believing that Australians should be allowed to access commercial surrogacy overseas. In relation to compensation, most believed that payment should be determined by negotiation between the surrogate and commissioning parents, while also supporting additional payments for 'hardship' pregnancies. Half of the surveyed cohort supported the legalisation of professional surrogacy agencies, with only 17% being totally opposed. The majority of Australians support surrogacy, compensation for surrogates and professional surrogacy agencies. Therefore, the existing legal restrictions should be replaced with professional guidelines that protect the surrogate and commissioning parents, while also improving Australians' access to surrogacy. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Development of guidelines for tertiary education institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers.

    PubMed

    Reavley, Nicola J; Ross, Anna M; Killackey, Eoin; Jorm, Anthony F

    2013-01-01

    Background. The age at which most young people are in tertiary education is also the age of peak onset for mental illness. Because mental health problems can have adverse effects on students' academic performance and welfare, institutions require guidance how they can best provide support. However, the scientific evidence for how best to do this is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. Methods. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 172 item survey containing strategies that institutions might use to support students with a mental illness. Two panels of Australian experts (74 professionals and 35 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. Results. The overall response rate across three rounds was 83% (80% consumers, 85% professionals). 155 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of panel members. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy, measures to promote support services, service provision, accessibility of support services, relationships between services, other types of support and issues associated with reasonable adjustments. They also provided guidance on the procedures the institutions should have for making staff aware of issues associated with mental illness, mental illness training, support for staff and communicating with a student with a mental illness. They also covered student rights and responsibilities, the procedures the institutions should have for making students aware of issues associated with mental illness, dealing with mental health crises, funding and research and evaluation. Conclusions. The guidelines provide guidance for tertiary institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and

  1. Anemia and iron status in young fertile non-professional female athletes.

    PubMed

    Di Santolo, Manuela; Stel, Giuliana; Banfi, Giuseppe; Gonano, Fabio; Cauci, Sabina

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of regular physical exercise on anemia and iron status in young non-professional female athletes. A total of 191 healthy white Italian women (23.5 +/- 4.68 years) were analyzed; 70 were non-professional athletes performing 11.1 +/- 2.63 h week(-1) exercise and 121 were sedentary controls. Blood markers of anemia and iron status-hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), red blood cells (RBC), serum ferritin, iron, transferrin (Tf), transferrin saturation (TfS), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio (sTfR-F index)-were evaluated. Anemia threshold was Hb < 120 g l(-1). Ferritin concentrations < 12 microg l(-1) were considered as iron deficiency (ID). Frequency of anemia (15.7 versus 10.7%, P = 0.32), ID (27.1 versus 29.8%, P = 0.70), and ID anemia (8.6 versus 5.8%, P = 0.46) was not different in athletes and controls. However, athletes were threefold more likely than controls (17.1 versus 5.8%) to have serum iron < 50 microg dl(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.37, P = 0.012]. Low-TfS (<15%) was found in 25.7% of athletes and in 13.2% of controls, OR 2.27, P = 0.030. Elevated-sTfR (>1.76 mg l(-1)) was found in 24.3% of athletes and in 12.4% of controls, OR 2.27, P = 0.034. Regular non-professional sport activity does not cause an increased rate of anemia or of iron deficiency in fertile women. However, physical exercise has an impact on iron status as it reduces serum iron and transferrin saturation, and elevates sTfR. Nearly one fifth of recreational athletes have anemia and a third have iron deficit, these conditions can decrease their physical performance.

  2. Interested and Influential: The Role of a Professional Association in the Development of the Foundation to Year 10 Australian Curriculum: Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Geography Teachers Association (AGTA) represents the views of Australian geography teachers on educational matters. AGTA also seeks to improve the capacity of geography teachers to respond to a changing teaching and learning landscape. The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) is an independent authority…

  3. Regenerating the Australian Landscape of Professional VET Practice: Practitioner-Driven Changes to Teaching and Learning. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figgis, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Donald Schon once famously pictured professional practice as a high, hard ground overlooking a swamp. The high ground is the place of theory and, one might add, of policy. The swampy lowland is where vocational education and training (VET) practitioners meet the learners. It is where the skills, knowledge, and attitudes they wish to see instilled…

  4. Professional Capabilities for Twenty-First Century Creative Careers: Lessons from Outstandingly Successful Australian Artists and Designers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Artists and designers are positioned at the centre of the twenty-first century creative economy. In order to recognise and make the most of the opportunities afforded by this new era, artists and designers still require the creativity, disciplinary depth of knowledge and technical skills traditionally possessed by professionals in these…

  5. Professional Capabilities for Twenty-First Century Creative Careers: Lessons from Outstandingly Successful Australian Artists and Designers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Artists and designers are positioned at the centre of the twenty-first century creative economy. In order to recognise and make the most of the opportunities afforded by this new era, artists and designers still require the creativity, disciplinary depth of knowledge and technical skills traditionally possessed by professionals in these…

  6. Prevalence and correlates of suboptimal vitamin D status in people living with psychotic disorders: Data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Suetani, Shuichi; Saha, Sukanta; Eyles, Darryl W; Scott, James G; McGrath, John J

    2017-09-01

    Having sufficient sera concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is important for a range of health outcomes including cardiometabolic diseases. Clinical studies in people with psychotic disorders suggest that a sizable proportion has suboptimal vitamin D status (i.e. vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency). Individuals with psychosis also have many of the risk factors associated with suboptimal vitamin D status such as smoking, obesity, and reduced physical activity. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of vitamin D status using a large, population-based sample of adults with psychotic disorders. Data were collected as part of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis, a population-based survey of Australians aged 18-64 years with a psychotic disorder. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was measured in 463 participants. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentration was dichotomised into optimal (above 50 nmol/L) and suboptimal (below 50 nmol/L). The influence of a range of socio-demographic and clinical variables on vitamin D status was examined using logistic regression. Nearly half (43.6%) of the participants had suboptimal vitamin D status. Those with (a) increased physical activity or (b) positive symptoms had significantly reduced odds of having suboptimal vitamin D status. However, there were no significant associations between suboptimal vitamin D status and other psychiatric symptom measures or cardiometabolic risk factors. Many people with psychotic disorders have suboptimal vitamin D status. As part of the routine assessment of physical health status, clinicians should remain mindful of vitamin D status in this vulnerable population and encourage the use of appropriate vitamin D supplements.

  7. Predictors of professional placement outcome: cultural background, English speaking and international student status.

    PubMed

    Attrill, Stacie; McAllister, Sue; Lincoln, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Placements provide opportunities for students to develop practice skills in professional settings. Learning in placements may be challenging for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students, international students, or those without sufficient English proficiency for professional practice. This study investigated whether these factors, which are hypothesized to influence acculturation, predict poor placement outcome. Placement outcome data were collected for 854 students who completed 2747 placements. Placement outcome was categorized into 'Pass' or 'At risk' categories. Multilevel binomial regression analysis was used to determine whether being CALD, an international student, speaking 'English as an additional language', or a 'Language other than English at home' predicted placement outcome. In multiple multilevel analysis speaking English as an additional language and being an international student were significant predictors of 'at risk' placements, but other variables tested were not. Effect sizes were small indicating untested factors also influenced placement outcome. These results suggest that students' English as an additional language or international student status influences success in placements. The extent of acculturation may explain the differences in placement outcome for the groups tested. This suggests that learning needs for placement may differ for students undertaking more acculturative adjustments. Further research is needed to understand this and to identify placement support strategies.

  8. Implementing evidence-informed policy into practice for health care professionals managing people with low back pain in Australian rural settings: a preliminary prospective single-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Slater, Helen; Briggs, Andrew M; Smith, Anne J; Bunzli, Samantha; Davies, Stephanie J; Quintner, John L

    2014-10-01

    To provide access to professional development opportunities for health care professionals, especially in rural Australian regions, consistent with recommendations in the Australian National Pain Strategy and state government policy. A preliminary prospective, single-cohort study design, which aligned health policy with evidence-informed clinical practice, evaluated the implementation and effectiveness of an interprofessional, health care provider pain education program (hPEP) for management of nonspecific low back pain (nsLBP) in rural Western Australia. The 6.5-hour hPEP intervention was delivered to 60 care providers (caseload nsLBP 19.8% ± 22.5) at four rural WA regions. Outcomes were recorded at baseline and 2 months post-intervention regarding attitudes, beliefs (modified Health Care Providers Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale [HC-PAIRS]), Back Pain Beliefs Questionnaire [BBQ]), and self-reported evidence-based clinical practice (knowledge and skills regarding nsLBP, rated on a 5-point Likert scale with 1 = nil and 5 = excellent). hPEP was feasible to implement. At 2 months post-hPEP, responders' (response rate 53%) improved evidence-based beliefs were indicated by HC-PAIRS scores: baseline mean (SD) [43.2 (9.3)]; mean difference (95% CI) [-5.9 (-8.6 to -3.1)]; and BBQ baseline [34.3 (6.8)]; mean difference [2.1 (0.5 to 3.6)]. Positive shifts were observed for all measures of clinical knowledge and skills (P < 0.001) and increased assistance with planning lifestyle changes (P < 0.001), advice on self-management (P = 0.010), and for decreased referrals for spinal imaging (P = 0.03). This policy-into-practice educational program is feasible to implement in rural Western Australia (WA). While preliminary data are encouraging, a further randomized controlled trial is recommended. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Discretionary food and beverage consumption and its association with demographic characteristics, weight status, and fruit and vegetable intakes in Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhixian; Wong, Weng Kei; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Rangan, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Excessive consumption of discretionary foods/beverages in the Australian population has been identified, increasing the risk of obesity and chronic disease. The present study aimed to examine the associations between demographic, anthropometric and dietary factors and the consumption of discretionary foods, discretionary beverages and discretionary foods/beverages combined. Discretionary food/beverage consumption reported in two 24 h recalls was analysed, stratified by gender, age, socio-economic status, country of birth, BMI, waist circumference, and fruit and vegetable intakes. 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Australian adults (n 7873) aged 19 years or above. Mean discretionary food and beverage consumption was 631 g (28 % by weight from foods; 72 % from beverages), providing 2721 kJ of energy intake (72 % from foods; 28 % from beverages). Total discretionary food/beverage consumption was higher in younger age groups (P<0·001), those in lower socio-economic categories (P<0·001), those born in Australia (P<0·001), those with higher BMI (P<0·001) and those with lower fruit (P<0·001) or vegetable intake (P<0·001). Discretionary beverage consumption (β=6·6, P<0·001) was more strongly associated with BMI than discretionary food consumption (β=0·5, P=0·01). Total discretionary food/beverage consumption as well as discretionary foods alone and discretionary beverages alone were associated with BMI in Australian adults. In addition, high intakes were associated with younger age, lower socio-economic status, and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables.

  10. Reliability of a viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-professional osteopathy program assessed using generalizability theory

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is situation-dependent and case-specific; therefore, assessments incorporating different patient presentations are warranted. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a multi-station case-based viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-registration osteopathy program using generalizability theory. Students (from years 4 and 5) and examiners were recruited from the osteopathy program at Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. The study took place on a single day in the student teaching clinic. Examiners were trained before the examination. Students were allocated to 1 of 3 rounds consisting of 5 10-minute stations in an objective structured clinical examination-style. Generalizability analysis was used to explore the reliability of the examination. Fifteen students and 5 faculty members participated in the study. The examination produced a generalizability coefficient of 0.53, with 18 stations required to achieve a generalizability coefficient of 0.80. The reliability estimations were acceptable and the psychometric findings related to the marking rubric and overall scores were acceptable; however, further work is required in examiner training and ensuring consistent case difficulty to improve the reliability of the examination. PMID:28104901

  11. Reliability of a viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-professional osteopathy program assessed using generalizability theory.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Brett; Orrock, Paul; Grace, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is situation-dependent and case-specific; therefore, assessments incorporating different patient presentations are warranted. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a multi-station case-based viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-registration osteopathy program using generalizability theory. Students (from years 4 and 5) and examiners were recruited from the osteopathy program at Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. The study took place on a single day in the student teaching clinic. Examiners were trained before the examination. Students were allocated to 1 of 3 rounds consisting of 5 10-minute stations in an objective structured clinical examination-style. Generalizability analysis was used to explore the reliability of the examination. Fifteen students and 5 faculty members participated in the study. The examination produced a generalizability coefficient of 0.53, with 18 stations required to achieve a generalizability coefficient of 0.80. The reliability estimations were acceptable and the psychometric findings related to the marking rubric and overall scores were acceptable; however, further work is required in examiner training and ensuring consistent case difficulty to improve the reliability of the examination.

  12. Motivation to Study Music in Australian Schools: The Impact of Music Learning, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Gary E.; Osborne, Margaret S.; Barrett, Margaret S.; Davidson, Jane W.; Faulkner, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This study extends an eight-country mapping exercise (McPherson & O'Neill, 2010; see "Research Studies in Music Education" issues 2010-2011) to include students' motivation to study music within the Australian context. It sought to determine whether music learners (students learning an instrument or voice), might be more motivated to…

  13. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health) Initiative (BFHI) is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23%) have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the current processes used to

  14. Vitamin D status and insulin sensitivity are novel predictors of resting metabolic rate: a cross-sectional analysis in Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Calton, E K; Pathak, K; Soares, M J; Alfonso, H; Keane, K N; Newsholme, P; Cummings, N K; Chan She Ping-Delfos, W; Hamidi, A

    2016-09-01

    Resting metabolic rate (RMR) accounts for two-thirds of the total energy expenditure in sedentary individuals. After accounting for traditional factors, there still remains a considerable unexplained variance in RMR. There is a pandemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) which coexists with a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of vitamin D status, insulin sensitivity (IS) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on RMR in Australian adults. RMR, respiratory quotient (RQ), McAuley's insulin sensitivity index, fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM) and vitamin D status were assessed in Australian adults. The presence of MetS was evaluated by current standard criteria. Predictors of RMR were examined through multiple linear regression based on stepwise and backward regression approaches with attention to multi-collinearity. All analyses were conducted on SPSS version 21. One hundred and twenty-seven participants (45 men, 82 women), aged 53.4 ± 11.7 years and BMI 31.9 ± 5.2 kg/m(2), were included. Forty-one subjects were insufficient in vitamin D status (<50 nmol/L), and 75 participants had the MetS. A parsimonious regression model explained 85.8 % of RMR and was given by: RMR (kJ/d) = 1931 + 83.5 × FFM (kg) + 29.5 × FM (kg) + 5.65 × 25(OH)D (nmol/L) - 17.6 × age (years) - 57.51 × IS. Vitamin D status and IS are novel independent predictors of RMR in adults. Future studies could validate a causal role for these factors in human energy metabolism.

  15. [Current status of nurses' perceived professional benefits and influencing factors in 3A-level hospitals in Tianjin].

    PubMed

    Ma, H W; Dan, X; Xu, S H; Hou, R N; Zhao, N M

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the current status of nurses' perceived professional benefits in 3A-level hospitals in Tianjin, and analyze its influencing factors. Methods: A total of 421 clinical nurses from five 3A-level hospitals in Tianjin were recruited for investigation on perceived professional benefits by Nurses'Perceived Professional Benefits Scale. Results: The total score of nurses' perceived professional benefit was 110.50±14.24, the score index was 77.34%. Among five dimensions, the highest scores index was 84.80% for personal development, the lowest was 71.57% for identification by relatives and friends. Multiple linear regression analysis showed the three variables, such as department, teaching and cooperative relation between doctors and nurses entered the model, higher perceived professional benefits was observed in medical nurses, teaching nurses, and those with better cooperative relation between doctors and nurses (P<0.05) . Conclusion: The investigated nurses in 3A-level hospitals in Tianjin show upper-moderate level of perceived professional benefits. Nursing managers should develop targeted interventions based on the factors affecting the perceived professional benefits of the nurses and further enhance their perceived professional benefits.

  16. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of Professional Development's Impact on Self- and Collective Efficacy by School Accountability Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study used the Schools and Staffing Survey of 2007-2008, a school-based stratified probability-proportionate-to-size sample of all American schools, to explore the relationships of professional development to teachers' self- and collective efficacy by school accountability status as measured by adequate yearly progress (AYP). In…

  17. Whole Body Vibration Exposures and Health Status among Professional Truck Drivers: A Cross-sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Zigman, Monica; Aulck, Lovenoor S; Ibbotson, Jennifer A; Dennerlein, Jack T; Johnson, Peter W

    2016-10-01

    Many professional truck drivers suffer from low back pain (LBP) which is thought to be associated with exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV). The objectives of this study were to: (i) characterize general health, regional body pain and WBV exposures, (ii) evaluate the associations between different WBV parameters and health outcomes, and (iii) determine whether there were factors which affect a truck driver's WBV exposures. This study analyzed WBV exposures from 96 long-haul truck drivers over their regular work shift (6-15h) per International Standards Organization (ISO) 2631-1 and 2631-5 WBV standards. This study also evaluated regional body pain (10-point scale), low back disability (the Oswestry Disability Index), and physical and mental health (the Short Form 12-item Health Survey). The results demonstrated that the daily vector sum WBV exposures [A(8), VDV(8) and Sed(8)] were above action limits while the predominant z-axis exposures were below action limits. Among all the musculoskeletal outcomes, LBP was the most prevalent (72.5%) with average LBP score of 2.9 (SD: 2.0). The SF-12 health scores demonstrated that truck drivers in general had lower physical health status than the general US population (P's < 0.04) and that physical health status decreased as WBV exposures increased (P = 0.03). In addition, the correlations between the WBV measures and health outcomes indicated that A(8) exposure measures had a stronger link to musculoskeletal (LBP) and other health outcomes than the VDV(8) and Sed(8) measures. Finally, seat manufacturer and seat age were two factors which had a strong influence on WBV exposures. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. How Comprehensively Is Evidence-Based Practice Represented in Australian Health Professional Accreditation Documents? A Systematic Audit.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Maureen P; Crilly, Mike; Young, Taryn; Farrelly, Jane; Lewis, Lucy Kate

    2016-01-01

    PHENONENON: In many developed countries, accreditation documents, which reflect the practice standards of health professions, form the basis for evaluation of education programs for meeting the requirements for registration. The 2005 Sicily statement proposed a 5-step model of training in evidence-based practice (ask, access, appraise, apply, and assess). A key recommendation was that evidence-based practice should be incorporated into entry-level health professional training and registration. No previous research has assessed the extent to which this has occurred. We undertook a systematic audit of the accreditation documents for the registered health professions in Australia. The 11 health professional disciplines included in the audit were medicine, nursing and midwifery, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dentistry, psychology, occupational therapy, optometry, podiatry, osteopathy, and chiropractic. Two investigators independently identified the occurrence of the term evidence that related to "evidence-based practice" and the occurrences of terms related to the 5 steps in the accreditation documents. Occurrence of the term evidence as it relates specifically to "evidence-based practice" ranged from 0 (pharmacy, dentistry and occupational therapy) to 8 (physiotherapy) in the accreditation documents. Overall, there were 77 occasions when terms relating to any of the 5 steps of evidence-based practice were used across all 11 accreditation documents. All 5 steps were included in the physiotherapy and psychology documents; 4 steps in medicine and optometry; 3 steps in pharmacy; 2 steps each in documents for chiropractic, osteopathy, and podiatry; and 1 step for nursing. There was no inclusion of terms relating to any of the 5 steps in the dentistry and occupational therapy documents. Insights: Terminology relating explicitly to evidence-based practice and to the 5 steps of evidence-based practice appears to be lacking in the accreditation documents for health professions

  19. Effects of regular away travel on training loads, recovery, and injury rates in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the acute and longitudinal effects of regular away travel on training load (TL), player wellness, and injury surrounding competitive football (soccer) matches. Eighteen male professional football players, representing a team competing in the highest national competition in Australia, volunteered to participate in the study. Training loads, player wellness and injury incidence, rate, severity, and type, together with the activity at the time of injury, were recorded on the day before, the day of, and for 4 d after each of the 27 matches of the 2012-13 season. This included 14 home and 13 away matches, further subdivided based on the midpoint of the season into early (1-13) and late competition (14-27) phases. While TLs were significantly greater on day 3 at home compared with away during the early competition phase (P=.03), no other significant effects of match location were identified (P>.05). Total TL and mean wellness over the 6 d surrounding matches and TL on day 3 were significantly reduced during the late compared with the early competition phase at home and away (P<.05). Although not significantly (P>.05), training missed due to injury was 60% and 50% greater during the late than during the early competition phase at home and away, respectively. In conclusion, no significant interactions between match location and competition phase were evident during the late competition phase, which suggests that away travel had negligible cumulative effects on the reduction in player wellness in the latter half of the season.

  20. Shorter time to first injury in first year professional football players: A cross-club comparison in the Australian Football League.

    PubMed

    Fortington, Lauren V; Berry, Jason; Buttifant, David; Ullah, Shahid; Diamantopoulou, Kathy; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-01-01

    Australian Football League (AFL) players have a high risk of injury. Anecdotally, this injury risk is greater in emerging players (i.e. those in their first year), compared with established players (with 3+ years of experience). This study aimed to conduct the first comparison of injury risk and playing experience in these two player groups across a large number of AFL clubs. Prospective, cohort. Injuries, game participation and training participation were collected weekly by 8 AFL clubs for 61 emerging and 64 established players. Injury incidence rates (IIR) and Cox proportional hazard models for time to first injury, separately for games and training, were computed. The game IIR was significantly higher for emerging than established players: 45.6 (95% CI: 35.7, 57.6) versus 18.3 (95% CI: 13.1, 24.9) per 1000 game-hours. Emerging players also had a higher training IIR than did the established players: 9.6 (95% CI: 7.6, 11.9) versus 8.9 (95% CI: 7.0, 11.1) per 1000 training-hours. Emerging players were significantly less likely to remain injury free in games than established players (HR=3.46, 95% CI: 1.27, 9.45). A similar outcome was seen in training sessions, although to a lesser degree (HR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.69). Despite efforts to modify the playing/training program of emerging players, this group remain at greater risk of injury in games and training sessions, compared with established players. Continued efforts should be made toward understanding reasons for this increased risk to better prevent injury during the early years of a professional football career. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P<.01, d>0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P<.05, d>0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P<.05, d>0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition.

  2. "They Just Want to Know" - Genetic Health Professionals' Beliefs About Why Parents Want to Know their Child's Carrier Status.

    PubMed

    Vears, Danya F; Delany, Clare; Massie, John; Gillam, Lynn

    2017-02-04

    In the context of a child being diagnosed with a genetic condition, reports from both parents and health professionals suggest many genetic health professionals are reluctant to provide carrier testing for unaffected siblings, despite the lack of evidence of harm. We propose that genetic health professionals' understandings of why parents want to have their children tested may contribute to their reluctance to test. We draw on interviews with 17 genetic health professionals, reporting their beliefs about parents' motivations for testing and their intentions to communicate results to their children. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Genetic health professionals reported attributions that contrasted with reasons parents actually report. These disparities fall into two categories: 1) attributing reasons that parents do not themselves report (i.e. for reassurance about their child's health), and 2) not recognizing the reasons that parents actually do report for wanting testing (i.e. to communicate the information to their child). By identifying that genetic health professionals may be misattributing reasons to parents for desiring their child"s carrier status, they may be missing an opportunity to assist parents to make decisions that are in line with their values and the best interests of the family.

  3. Health care professionals' comprehension of the legal status of end-of-life practices in Quebec: study of clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Isabelle; Boivin, Antoine; Arsenault, Claude; Toupin, Mélanie; Youssef, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    To determine health care professionals' understanding of the current legal status of different end-of-life practices and their future legal status if medical aid in dying were legalized, and to identify factors associated with misunderstanding surrounding the current legal status. Cross-sectional survey using 6 clinical scenarios developed from a validated European questionnaire and from a validated classification of end-of-life practices. Quebec. Health care professionals (physicians and nurses). Perceptions of the current legal status of the given scenarios and whether or not the practices would be authorized in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized. Among the respondents (n = 271, response rate 88.0%), more than 98% knew that the administration or prescription of lethal medication was currently illegal. However, 45.8% wrongly thought that it was not permitted to withdraw a potentially life-prolonging treatment at the patient's request, and this misconception was more common among nurses and professionals who had received their diplomas longer ago. Only 39.5% believed that, in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized, the use of lethal medication would be permitted at the patient's request, and 34.6% believed they would be able to give such medication to an incompetent patient upon a relative's request. Health care professionals knew which medical practices were illegal, but some wrongly believed that current permitted practices were not legal. There were various interpretations of what would or would not be allowed if medical aid in dying were legalized. Education on the clinical implications of end-of-life practice legislation should be promoted.

  4. Sleepless nights: the effect of socioeconomic status, physical activity, and lifestyle factors on sleep quality in a large cohort of Australian women.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammmad; Haytabakhsh, Mohammad R; Najman, Jake M; Williams, Gail M; O'Callaghan, Michael J; Bor, William; Dingle, Kaeleen; Clavarino, Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study were to examine: (1) the association between sociodemographic and lifestyle factors and sleep quality in a population-based cohort of Australian women and (2) possible influence of reproductive status and mental and physical health factors on these associations. Data on 3,655 women (mean age = 46.6 years, range 34.3-67.4) were obtained from the Mater Hospital University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy for this cross-sectional study. Self-rated sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. For the purpose of this study, two cutoff points (scores 5 and 10) were used to divide women into three categories: normal (65.2%), moderately poor (26.4%), and very poor sleep quality (8.5%). Other covariates were measured at 21-year follow-up as well. After adjusting for reproductive status, mental and physical health, there were significant associations between moderately poor sleep quality and education and between very poor sleep quality and unemployment, both measures of socioeconomic status. In addition, work-related exertion was associated with increased rates of moderately poor sleep quality, whereas those women undertaking moderate exercise were less likely to experience very poor sleep quality. Independent associations between sociodemographic factors and exercise with moderately poor and very poor sleep quality were identified. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the association between exercise/exertion, socioeconomic status, and sleep quality and highlight the importance of taking these into consideration when dealing with issues of poor sleep quality in women.

  5. The Current Status of Nursing Professionalism Among Nursing Faculty in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Michiko; Taketomi, Kikuko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2017-02-01

    The faculty of nursing schools plays an important role in the successful execution of nursing education. Therefore, faculty behavior strongly affects the professional development of nurses. However, few studies have examined professional nursing behaviors from the perspective of nursing faculty. Members of nursing faculty in Japan were surveyed regarding their perspectives on behaviors related to professionalism. The model, Miller's Wheel of Professionalism in Nursing, was used as the theoretical framework. The Behavioral Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing (BIPN) was completed by 74 full-time nursing faculty who were currently working at 10 institutes of nursing education in Japan. The mean BIPN score for the participants was 11.56 (SD = 6.08) of a possible total of 27. The highest and lowest BIPN category scores were for "research development, use, and evaluation" and "community service," respectively. Professionalism was found to relate significantly to higher educational preparation (F = 32.17, p < .0001). The Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test found a significant association between having a graduate degree and higher scores for professionalism (p < .0001). The Spearman correlation coefficient was significant and positive for the relationship between professionalism and both educational preparation (r = .85, p < .0001) and number of years as a nursing educator (r = .31, p = .0077). The results support the idea that a higher level of educational preparation and more years of experience as a member of a nursing faculty are associated with higher levels of nursing professionalism. The professional behavior scores suggest that "community service" is an issue that requires further improvement among Japanese nursing faculty. Awareness of extrinsic factors such as education is important to maximize nursing professionalism. The findings of this study may help nursing faculty continue their self-development.

  6. Continuing professional education: Status, trends, and issues related to electronic delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1975-01-01

    Four professional groups, teachers, doctors, lawyers, and engineers were examined to determine if they constitute a potential market for continuing professional education via large scale electronic technology. Data were collected in view of social and economic forces, such as mandatory periodic relicensure, additional course requirements for certification, or the economic health of supporting industries.

  7. The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senyonyi, Ruth M.; Ochieng, Lois A.; Sells, James

    2012-01-01

    Professional counseling in Uganda has foundations in traditional cultures of its peoples, guidance offered in schools, and counseling to curb the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Currently, a definitive professional counselor profile in Uganda is being established. The Uganda Counselling Association continues the process of seeking legal authority to regulate…

  8. The Perceived Status of the Professional School Counselor's Advocacy Role, Training, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Darla Janene

    2012-01-01

    Although professionals and organizations in counseling and related fields have identified advocacy as an important role of the professional school counselor, researchers have failed to provide data on how practicing school counselors actually perceive and practice advocacy. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to address how school…

  9. Individual fluid plans versus ad libitum on hydration status in minor professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Dawn M; Torres-McGehee, Toni M; Emerson, Charles C; LaSalle, Teri L

    2017-01-01

    Despite exercising in cool environments, ice hockey players exhibit several dehydration risk factors. Individualized fluid plans (IFPs) are designed to mitigate dehydration by matching an individual's sweat loss in order to optimize physiological systems and performance. A randomized control trial was used to examine IFP versus ad libitum fluid ingestion on hydration in 11 male minor professional ice hockey players (mean age = 24.4 ± 2.6 years, height = 183.0 ± 4.6 cm, weight = 92.9 ± 7.8 kg). Following baseline measures over 2 practices, participants were randomly assigned to either control (CON) or intervention (INT) for 10 additional practices. CON participants were provided water and/or carbohydrate electrolyte beverage to drink ad libitum. INT participants were instructed to consume water and an electrolyte-enhanced carbohydrate electrolyte beverage to match sweat and sodium losses. Urine specific gravity, urine color, and percent body mass change characterized hydration status. Total fluid consumed during practice was assessed. INT consumed significantly more fluid than CON (1180.8 ± 579.0 ml vs. 788.6 ± 399.7 ml, p = 0.002). However, CON participants replaced only 25.4 ± 12.9% of their fluid needs and INT 35.8 ± 17.5%. Mean percent body mass loss was not significantly different between groups and overall indicated minimal dehydration (<1.2% loss). Pre-practice urine specific gravity indicated CON and INT began hypohydrated (mean = 1.024 ± 0.007 and 1.024 ± 0.006, respectively) and experienced dehydration during practice (post = 1.026 ± 0.006 and 1.027 ± 0.005, respectively, p < 0.001). Urine color increased pre- to post-practice for CON (5 ± 2 to 6 ± 1, p < 0.001) and INT (5 ± 1 to 6 ± 1, p < 0.001). Participants consistently reported to practice hypohydrated. Ad libitum fluid intake was not significantly different than IFP on hydration status. Based on urine measures, both methods were

  10. The influence of mandatory iodine fortification on the iodine status of Australian school children residing in an iodine sufficient region.

    PubMed

    Samidurai, Anna J; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter Sw

    To counter emerging iodine deficiency mandatory iodine fortification of bread was introduced throughout Australia in 2009. This study investigated the impact of iodine fortification on the iodine status of school aged children living in the iodine replete state of Queensland, and investigated which foods had greatest influence on overall iodine status. A convenience sample of 30 children aged 8.0-10.9 years living in south east Queensland, Australia, provided spot morning and afternoon urine samples on two consecutive days. Iodine status was categorised by the World Health Organization criterion. Semiquantitative food questionnaires (FFQ) completed by carers were used to investigate which foods were having the greatest influence on UIC. Analysis of variance was used to reduce the within person variation observed in urinary iodine concentrations (UIC) and the data were log transformed before statistical analysis. Adjusted median UIC was 144 ug/L (IQR 120-210 ug/L) indicating iodine sufficient status. No samples were above the cut off for excessive UIC. Bread was the only statistically significant contributor to UIC (standardized β=0.37, p=0.04) with 14% of variation in UIC explained by bread consumption. UIC increased by 8.7% for each additional serve of bread. Iodine fortification of bread has increased the iodine status of school aged children in this Queensland cohort. Despite the small sample size in this study, improvements in methodology allowed its findings to be comparable to other, larger surveys.

  11. Current status of therapeutic drug monitoring in Australia and New Zealand: a need for improved assay evaluation, best practice guidelines, and professional development.

    PubMed

    Norris, Ross L; Martin, Jennifer H; Thompson, Erin; Ray, John E; Fullinfaw, Robert O; Joyce, David; Barras, Michael; Jones, Graham R; Morris, Raymond G

    2010-10-01

    The measurement of drug concentrations, for clinical purposes, occurs in many diagnostic laboratories throughout Australia and New Zealand. However, the provision of a comprehensive therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) service requires the additional elements of pre- and postanalytical advice to ensure that concentrations reported are meaningful, interpretable, and clinically applicable to the individual patient. The aim of this project was to assess the status of TDM services in Australia and New Zealand. A range of professions involved in key aspects of TDM was surveyed by questionnaire in late 2007. Information gathered included: the list of drugs assayed; analytical methods used; interpretation services offered; interpretative methods used; and further monitoring advice provided. Fifty-seven responses were received, of which 42% were from hospitals (public and/or private); 11% a hospital (public and/or private) and pathology provider; and 47% a pathology provider only (public and/or private). Results showed that TDM is applied to a large number of different drugs. Poorly performing assay methods were used in some cases, even when published guidelines recommended alternative practices. Although there was a wide array of assays available, the evidence suggested a need for better selection of assay methods. In addition, only limited advice and/or interpretation of results was offered. Of concern, less than 50% of those providing advice on aminoglycoside dosing in adults used pharmacokinetic tools with six of 37 (16.2%) respondents using Bayesian pharmacokinetic tools, the method recommended in the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic. In conclusion, the survey highlighted deficiencies in the provision of TDM services, in particular assay method selection and both quality and quantity of postanalytical advice. A range of recommendations, some of which may have international implications, are discussed. There is a need to include measures of impact on clinical

  12. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: Gardasil vaccination status and knowledge amongst a nationally representative sample of Australian secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Agius, Paul A; Pitts, Marian K; Smith, Anthony M A; Mitchell, Anne

    2010-06-17

    The aim of this paper was to measure student knowledge of HPV and risks associated with cervical cancer, explore associated factors, correlate knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer with other domains of sexual health related knowledge and estimate student self-reported rates of HPV immunisation. Data were from a nationally representative cross-sectional stratified cluster sample of year 10 and 12 students in the Australian secondary school system. Contingency table, comparison of means, correlation and multiple OLS regression analyses of students answering HPV (n=1927) and cervical cancer (n=2680) knowledge questions was undertaken. Student HPV and cervical cancer knowledge was generally poor. Young women exhibited better knowledge than young men however the difference was, to some extent, accounted for by vaccination for HPV. Sexually active students and those having more sexual partners in the previous year did not report higher levels of HPV and cervical cancer knowledge. The large majority of young women surveyed reported a HPV vaccination as did a small proportion of young men. Students who reported being vaccinated had higher levels of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer. Student knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer is considerably limited. There is some evidence that being vaccinated for HPV improves a person's level of understanding of the disease and cervical cancer. The recent national public health campaign focussing on cervical cancer vaccination for young women may be partly responsible for a lack of understanding of HPV as a common STI.

  13. Do physical qualities influence the attainment of professional status within elite 16-19 year old rugby league players?

    PubMed

    Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben; Geeson-Brown, Tom

    2016-07-01

    The current study retrospectively compared the physical qualities of elite academy rugby league players (aged 16-19 years) by career attainment level (i.e., academy or professional). Retrospective cross-sectional and longitudinal design. Eighty-one academy rugby league players were assessed for physical qualities (height, body mass, skinfolds, speed, momentum, vertical jump, Yo-Yo Level 1 and 1-RM squat, bench press and prone row) at the Under 17-19 age categories between 2007 and 2012. Player's career attainment level was determined in 2014. Longitudinal changes in physical qualities between Under 17 and 19s were compared by career attainment level. Professional players demonstrated moderate significant advantages for height (d=0.98) and 1-RM squat (d=0.66) at the Under 17s, 1-RM bench press (d=0.76) at the Under 18s and 1-RM prone row (d=0.73) at the Under 19s age categories when compared to academy players. When assessed longitudinally (Under 17s-19s), professional players significantly outperformed academy players for 1-RM squat (η(2)=0.20). Professional players also demonstrated greater increases in body mass (8.2 vs. 2.9kg) and 10m momentum (47 vs. 17kgs(-1)) than academy players between the Under 17s and 19s. Advanced physical qualities, particularly height and absolute strength, within 16-19 year old players may contribute to attaining professional status in rugby league. Further, the development of body mass and momentum for players within an academy is an important consideration in the progress towards professional rugby league. Therefore, practitioners should aim to identify and develop the physical qualities, especially size and strength, within academy rugby league players. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Status and Inflammation after Preseason Training Program in Professional and Recreational Soccer Players: a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Sánchez, Francisco J.; Villalón, José María; Zamorano-León, José J.; Rosas, Luis Fernández; Proietti, Ricardo; Mateos-Caceres, Petra J.; González-Armengol, Juan J.; Villarroel, Pedro; Macaya, Carlos; López-Farré, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if an intensive pre- season training program modifies the inflammatory status in professional soccer players and if this inflammatory profile may be associated with the physical state. We compared plasma protein biomarkers, using proteomics, and the physiological state and cardiac function in 12 professional soccer players and 9 recreational soccer players. Reduced cardiac low frequency [LF] after the pre- season training program previous competition with respect to recreational soccer players was found. No differences were found in cardiac high frequency, cardiac high frequency/low frequency ratio, tension index and oxygen volume consumption. Alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-3, fibrinogen-gamma isotypes-1, 2 and 3 and vitamin-D-binding protein isotype-1 were reduced in professionals players compared with those in recreational players. However, an increased content of alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-6 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin 1 and 4 were found in professional soccer players. Spearman’s analysis showed a positive correlation between LF and fibrinogen-gamma chain isotype 3; but LF was negatively correlated with alpha-antichymotrypsin isotype 4. Professional soccer players submitted to an intensive training showed differences in the content of plasma proteins associated with inflammatory/oxidative stress and thrombosis with respect to recreational soccer players. Proteomics analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function assessment may be useful to know more in depth molecular processes associated with sport and intensive exercise. Key points Proteomics allow us to find differences in the plasma protein content in sportsmen. Just after pre-season training program, professional soccer players showed lower content of circulating proteins associated with inflammation compared to recreational soccer players. Proteomic analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function may be useful to know more in depth

  15. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    PubMed

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  16. Commentary: The relationship status of digital media and professionalism: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Farnan, Jeanne M; Paro, John A M; Higa, Jennifer T; Reddy, Shalini T; Humphrey, Holly J; Arora, Vineet M

    2009-11-01

    The rising popularity of digital applications, such as social networking, media share sites, and blogging, has significantly affected how medical trainees interact with educators, colleagues, and the public. Despite the increased popularity and use of such applications amongst the current generation of trainees, medical educators have little evidence or guidance about preventing misuse and ensuring standards for professional conduct. As trainees become more technologically savvy, it is the responsibility of medical educators to familiarize themselves not only with the advantages of this technology but also with the potential negative effects of its misuse. Professionalism, appropriateness for public consumption, and individual or institutional representation in digital media content are just some of the salient issues that arise when considering the ramifications of trainees' digital behavior in the absence of established policies or education on risk. In this commentary the authors explore the rising use of digital media and its reflection of medical trainees' professionalism. To address possible issues related to professionalism in digital media, the authors hypothesize potential solutions, including exploring faculty familiarity with digital media and policy development, educating students on the potential risks of misuse, and modeling professionalism in this new digital age.

  17. Is Walk Score associated with hospital admissions from chronic diseases? Evidence from a cross-sectional study in a high socioeconomic status Australian city-state

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Learnihan, Vincent; Cochrane, Thomas; Phung, Hai; O'Connor, Bridget; Davey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore patterns of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).To ascertain the effect of the neighbourhood built environmental features and especially walkability on health outcomes, specifically for hospital admissions from NCDs. Design A cross-sectional analysis of public hospital episode data (2007–2013). Setting Hospitalisations from the ACT, Australia at very small geographic areas. Participants Secondary data on 75 290 unique hospital episodes representing 39 851 patients who were admitted to ACT hospitals from 2007 to 2013. No restrictions on age, sex or ethnicity. Main exposure measures Geographic Information System derived or compatible measures of general practitioner access, neighbourhood socioeconomic status, alcohol access, exposure to traffic and Walk Score walkability. Main outcome measures Hospitalisations of circulatory diseases, specific endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, respiratory diseases and specific cancers. Results Geographic clusters with significant high and low risks of NCDs were found that displayed an overall geographic pattern of high risk in the outlying suburbs of the territory. Significant relationships between neighbourhood walkability as measured by Walk Score and the likelihood of hospitalisation with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (heart attack) were found. A possible relationship was also found with the likelihood of being hospitalised with 4 major lifestyle-related cancers. Conclusions Our research augments the growing literature underscoring the relationships between the built environment and health outcomes. In addition, it supports the importance of walkable neighbourhoods, as measured by Walk Score, for improved health. PMID:27932340

  18. Far from Ideal: Everyday Experiences of Mothers and Early Childhood Professionals Negotiating an Inclusive Early Childhood Experience in the Australian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Rebekah; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Wedgwood, Nikki; Fenech, Marianne; McConnell, David

    2008-01-01

    Using narrative interviews underpinned by an ecocultural framework, this Australian study investigated the experiences of 39 mothers of children with disabilities and 27 staff members from the early childhood services which these children attended. The data highlight serious limitations of current government policy and provisions in Australia to…

  19. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for…

  20. The influence of match location, quality of opposition, and match status on possession strategies in professional association football.

    PubMed

    Lago, Carlos

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of match location, quality of opposition, and match status on possession strategies in a professional Spanish football team. Twenty-seven matches from the 2005-2006 domestic league season were notated post-event using a computerized match analysis system. Matches were divided into episodes according to evolving match status. Linear regression analysis showed that possession of the ball was greater when losing than when winning (P < 0.01) or drawing (P < 0.05), and playing against strong opposition was associated with a decrease in time spent in possession (P < 0.01). In addition, weighted mean percentage time spent in different zones of the pitch (defensive third, middle third, attacking third) was influenced by match status (P < 0.01) and match location (P < 0.05). A combination of these variables and their interactions can be used to develop a model to predict future possession in football. The findings emphasize the need for match analysts and coaches to consider independent and interactive potential effects of match location, quality of opposition, and match status during assessments of technical and tactical components of football performance. In particular, the findings indicate that strategies in soccer are influenced by match variables and teams alter their playing style during the game accordingly.

  1. 12-month generic health status and psychological distress outcomes following an Australian natural disaster experience: 2009 Black Saturday Wildfires.

    PubMed

    Wasiak, J; Mahar, P; Lee, S; Paul, E; Spinks, A; Pfitzer, B; Cleland, H; Gabbe, B

    2013-11-01

    To describe the generic health status, health-related quality of life and psychological distress over a 12-month period of burns patients affected by the 2009 Black Saturday Wildfires. Cohort study with retrospective assessment of pre-injury status and prospective assessment of physical and psychosocial functioning in the Black Saturday Wildfires burns patients across time. Generic health status and burn specific quality of life using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS) were collected at three, six and twelve months post-burn injury. In addition, similar time points were used to measure level of psychological distress and the presence of pain using the Kessler-10 questionnaire (K-10) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. At 12 months post-injury, patients reported a mean 16.4 (standard error, SE: 3.2) reduction in physical health and a 5.3 (SE 2.5) reduction in mental health scores of the SF-36 as compared to their pre-injury scores, with significant decreases observed in the "bodily pain", "physical functioning", "role physical" and "vitality" subscales. High levels of psychological distress and persistent pain were experienced, with no significant changes during the study period to the overall burns specific quality of life. Even 12 months post-burn injury, patients affected by the 2009 Victorian Wildfires still experienced a significant reduction in generic health, increased psychological distress and persistent pain. The need for early and ongoing identification of physical and psychosocial impairments during hospital admission and upon discharge could be helpful to establish systematic interdisciplinary goals for long-term rehabilitation after severe burn injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Employment status and mental health among persons with and without a disability: evidence from an Australian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Milner, A; LaMontagne, A D; Aitken, Z; Bentley, R; Kavanagh, A M

    2014-11-01

    Unemployment and economic inactivity are associated with worse mental health in the general population, but there is limited understanding of whether these relationships are different for those persons with mental or physical disabilities. The aim of this study was to assess whether there were differences in mental health by labour force status among persons with and without disabilities. Over eight annual waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, a total of 2379 people with disabilities and 11 417 people without disabilities were identified. Mental health using the Mental Component Summary (MCS) from the Short Form 36 was modelled as a function of labour force status using fixed-effects regression models to control for time invariant confounding. Differences between those with and without disabilities were assessed by including an interaction term in regression models. After finding evidence of effect modification, regression models were stratified by disability status. After adjustment, unemployment and economic inactivity were associated with a -1.85 (95% CI -2.96 to -0.73, p=0.001) and -2.66 (95% CI -3.46 to -1.86, p<0.001) reduction in scores of the MCS among those with a disability. For those without a disability, there were smaller declines associated with unemployment (-0.57, 95% CI -1.02 to -0.12, p=0.013) and economic inactivity (-0.34, 95% CI -0.64 to 0.05, p=0.022). These results suggest a greater reduction in mental health for those persons with disabilities who were unemployed or economically inactive than those who were employed. This highlights the value of employment for people with disabilities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. A description of the nutritional status and quality of life of Australian gynaecological cancer patients over time.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mary; White, Kate; Roydhouse, Jessica K; Fethney, Judith

    2012-12-01

    To describe the quality of life, nutritional status and physical activity of women with gynaecological cancer over three time points. Women referred to a major gynaecological cancer service in Sydney for initial treatment were invited to complete validated questionnaires at baseline, three and six months after diagnosis. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF36) and the Symptom Distress Scale. Nutritional status was assessed using the Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment and physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire short form. Effect sizes corrected for correlation were calculated using Cohen's d and Friedman's test was used to compare scores. Complete case analysis was used. Forty women were recruited and twenty-three (58%) completed assessment measures for all three time points. No important clinical or demographic differences existed between women who completed all measures and those who did not. Over the duration of the study, the number of well-nourished women increased from 16 to 21, while the number of malnourished women decreased from 7 to 2. Improvements in SF36 scores were seen in all aspects except general health, which declined (p>0.05). Statistically significant (p<0.05) improvements were seen for role physical, vitality, social functioning and role emotional. The median number of minutes of physical activity per week was highest at diagnosis and declined after that. This study indicates the importance of assessing nutritional status at diagnosis for women with gynaecological cancer. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Benefits, Status and Effectiveness of Continuous Professional Development for Teachers in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, V. Darleen; Pedder, David

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is one part of the nationally representative, "Schools and Continuing Professional Development in England--State of the Nation" research study which was funded by the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA). This paper sets out to understand how teachers and school leaders in England perceive the benefits and…

  5. Status of Chemistry Content in the Professional Pharmacy Curriculum: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Victoria F.; Davis, Patrick J.; Pankaskie, Marvin C.; Currie, Bruce L.; Roche, Edward B.; Sindelar, Robert D.; Wynn, James E.; Zito, S. William

    2000-01-01

    A national survey conducted in 1997-1998 evaluated the current and anticipated future emphasis of chemistry-related content in the professional pharmacy curriculum, the credentials of the teaching faculty, and pedagogical methods used to deliver the content. Thirty-three schools or colleges of pharmacy participated. (Author)

  6. Status of Chemistry Content in the Professional Pharmacy Curriculum: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Victoria F.; Davis, Patrick J.; Pankaskie, Marvin C.; Currie, Bruce L.; Roche, Edward B.; Sindelar, Robert D.; Wynn, James E.; Zito, S. William

    2000-01-01

    A national survey conducted in 1997-1998 evaluated the current and anticipated future emphasis of chemistry-related content in the professional pharmacy curriculum, the credentials of the teaching faculty, and pedagogical methods used to deliver the content. Thirty-three schools or colleges of pharmacy participated. (Author)

  7. The Status and Future of Minority Group Representation in the Graduate and Professional Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Merrill-Jean

    Minority representation in the graduate and professional schools is not in parity with the proportion of minorities in the overall population at this point in the history of American higher education. There are definite reasons for the lack of participation, reasons that have a profound philosophical, sociological, and economic basis. These…

  8. What's in a Name? Seeking Professional Status through Degree Studies within the Scottish Early Years Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This article draws on two small-scale pieces of research that investigated the views of twenty-five final year students in the BA Early Childhood Studies programme at a Scottish university, and the views of ten recent graduates about early years job titles and perceptions of professionalism. Pen-and-paper questionnaires were used in both studies,…

  9. Benefits, Status and Effectiveness of Continuous Professional Development for Teachers in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, V. Darleen; Pedder, David

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is one part of the nationally representative, "Schools and Continuing Professional Development in England--State of the Nation" research study which was funded by the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA). This paper sets out to understand how teachers and school leaders in England perceive the benefits and…

  10. Professional Development Status of Teaching Staff in a Ugandan Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasule, George Wilson; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine general professional development activities perceived to be important in enhancing university teaching staff's job performance, and the extent to which teaching staff participate in these activities in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with faculty deans and department heads (n = 20),…

  11. The Current Status of Contingent Faculty in Technical and Professional Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloncon, Lisa; England, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although much attention has been paid to issues of contingent faculty in the university (American Association of University Professors [AAUP] position statements) and, more specifically, in composition studies (Schell; Bousquet, Scott, and Parascondola; Miller), the matter of contingent faculty in technical and professional communication (TPC)…

  12. Australian Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Australia in World Affairs 1966-1970, (Melbourne: Cheshire Publishing Pty Ltd , 1974), p. 258. 6Department of Defence, Australian Defence Review...Pvt, Ltd .: 1977), p. 69. 74 17Desmond Ball, "American Bases: Implications for Australian Securi- ty" The Strategic and Defence Studies Centre...million with aircraft, or 3) a " Woolworth " carrier costing $300-400 million with aircraft.33 Defence planners are now faced with determin- ing which

  13. Is the audiologic status of professional musicians a reflection of the noise exposure in classical orchestral music?

    PubMed

    Emmerich, Edeltraut; Rudel, Lars; Richter, Frank

    2008-07-01

    The sound in classical orchestral music is louder than noise emissions allowed by national rules in industry. We wanted to assess the audiologic status of professional musicians at different ages of their careers and to look for a coherence of declined hearing ability and the sound emissions in order to substantiate advices for hearing protection and occupational medicine in musicians. Data from questionnaires (anamnestic data on sound exposure in profession and leisure times, use of hearing protection, self-evaluation of hearing function and hearing deficits), audiometric data and amplitudes of OAE were evaluated from 109 professional musicians aged 30-69 years from three major German orchestras and from 110 students of an academy of music (aged 11-19 years). Sound emissions of the whole orchestra and of single instruments/instrument groups were measured at the orchestra stages and pits during rehearsals and performances. None of the musicians was engaged in noisy hobbies and only a few used hearing protectors regularly. More than 50% of the musicians had a hearing loss of 15 dB(A) and more. Highest losses were found among the strings and the brass players. DPOAE amplitudes coincidently declined with the duration of performing music in the orchestras. Professional musicians aged older than 60 years had a significantly greater hearing loss at 4 and 6 kHz than those aged 30-39 years. Among the strings in one orchestra a dominant hearing deficit in the left ears was observed. Musicians need the same health care for their hearing as workers in noisy industry. A better education on the hearing hazards (use of hearing protectors) as well as sound protection in the rehearsal rooms is necessary. Hearing loss in professional musicians should be accepted as an occupational disease.

  14. A cross-sectional exploration of smoking status and social interaction in a large population-based Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Chiew, May; Weber, Marianne F; Egger, Sam; Sitas, Freddy

    2012-07-01

    We used cross-sectional data to investigate whether current, past and never smokers report different levels of social interaction and whether the level of social interaction varied according to the type of interaction being measured. Self-reported questionnaire data were obtained from 239,043 men and women aged 45 years or older living in Australia between February 2006 and February 2010. The study participation rate was 18%. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the percentage differences in the mean values of four social interaction outcomes according to smoking status after adjusting for age, place of residence, income, education, health insurance status, physical limitation, psychological distress and exposure to passive smoke: number of times 1) spent with friends/family, 2) spoken on the telephone, 3) attended social meetings in the past week, and 4) number of people outside of home that can be depended upon. 7.6% of males and 6.9% of females were current smokers, 43.6% of males and 28.6% of females were ex-smokers and 48.8% of males and 64.5% of females had never smoked. Compared to never smokers, current smokers reported significantly fewer social interactions in the past week and had fewer people outside the home that they could depend on. Men and women current smokers attended 24.0% (95% CI, 20.3, 27.5) and 31.1% (95% CI, 28.1, 34.1) fewer social group meetings on average than never smokers. Smokers exposed to passive smoke reported higher levels of social interaction than those not exposed. Past smokers reported levels of social interaction that were intermediate to those of current and never smokers and the more years they had abstained from smoking, the more social interaction they reported on average. Our data are in line with previous research showing that smokers are not only worse off economically, physically and mentally, but are also less likely to be socially connected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The oral health status of older patients in acute care on admission and Day 7 in two Australian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gibney, Jennifer Mary; Wright, Clive; Sharma, Anita; D'Souza, Mario; Naganathan, Vasi

    2017-09-01

    to determine the oral health status of older patients in acute care wards at admission and after 7 days. a prospective descriptive study was conducted in two acute tertiary referral hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Oral health was assessed on admission (within 24 h) and Day 7 using the Oral Health Assessment Tool. a total of 575 patients were admitted under the Geriatric teams at the two hospitals. Four hundred and thirty-five (76%) patients had oral cleanliness (debris) scores in the 'not healthy' range with food particles, tartar or plaque evident in at least one area in most areas of the mouth, teeth or dentures. At Day 7 206 were reassessed. One hundred and forty-nine patients (73%) were in the 'not healthy' range and of these 127 (62%) had the same score as on admission. poor oral health is common in older people admitted to hospital acute care wards and does not improve over a 7-day period. Given the link between oral health and general health the next steps are to determine how oral health can be improved in this setting and see whether this leads to better patient outcomes.

  16. Health Status and Leisure Behavior of Sexual Assault Victims: Educational Opportunities for Health and Leisure Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Emilyn A.; And Others

    The health status and leisure behavior of victims of sexual assault were studied. Data concerning present illness symptoms, past illness symptoms, negative health behavior, family health history, and female reproductive physiology illness symptoms were obtained and analyzed. Sexual assault victims were similar to nonvictims demographically except…

  17. Improving the reliability of female fertility breeding values using type and milk yield traits that predict energy status in Australian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    González-Recio, O; Haile-Mariam, M; Pryce, J E

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to propose changing the selection criteria trait for evaluating fertility in Australia from calving interval to conception rate at d 42 after the beginning of the mating season and (2) to use type traits as early fertility predictors, to increase the reliability of estimated breeding values for fertility. The breeding goal in Australia is conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season. Currently, the Australian model to predict fertility breeding values (expressed as a linear transformation of calving interval) is a multitrait model that includes calving interval (CVI), lactation length (LL), calving to first service (CFS), first nonreturn rate (FNRR), and conception rate. However, CVI has a lower genetic correlation with the breeding goal (conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season) than conception rate. Milk yield, type, and fertility data from 164,318 cow sired by 4,766 bulls were used. Principal component analysis and genetic correlation estimates between type and fertility traits were used to select type traits that could subsequently be used in a multitrait analysis. Angularity, foot angle, and pin set were chosen as type traits to include in an index with the traits that are included in the multitrait fertility model: CVI, LL, CFS, FNRR, and conception rate at d 42 (CR42). An index with these 8 traits is expected to achieve an average bull first proof reliability of 0.60 on the breeding objective (conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season) compared with reliabilities of 0.39 and 0.45 for CR42 only or the current 5-trait Australian model. Subsequently, we used the first eigenvector of a principal component analysis with udder texture, bone quality, angularity, and body condition score to calculate an energy status indicator trait. The inclusion of the energy status indicator trait composite in a multitrait index with CVI, LL, CFS, FNRR, and CR42 achieved a 12-point increase in

  18. Development of guidelines to assist organisations to support employees returning to work after an episode of anxiety, depression or a related disorder: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers.

    PubMed

    Reavley, Nicola J; Ross, Anna; Killackey, Eoin J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2012-09-03

    Mental disorders are a significant cause of disability and loss of workplace productivity. The scientific evidence for how organisations should best support those returning to work after common mental disorders is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 387 item survey containing strategies that organisations might use to support those returning to work after common mental disorders. Three panels of Australian experts (66 health professionals, 30 employers and 80 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. The participation rate across all three rounds was 60.2% (57.6% health professionals, 76.7% employers, 56.3% consumers). 308 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of all three panels. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy and procedures, the roles of supervisors, employees and colleagues in managing absence and return to work, and provision of mental health information and training. The guidelines outline strategies for organisations supporting those returning to work after common mental disorders. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and practice in a variety of workplaces.

  19. A randomized clinical trial of a financial education intervention with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) for low socio-economic status Australian smokers: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Ryan J; Bradford, Deborah; Martire, Kristy A; Bonevski, Billie; Borland, Ron; Doran, Christopher; Hall, Wayne; Farrell, Michael; Siahpush, Mohammad; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; West, Robert; Mattick, Richard P

    2014-10-01

    Reducing smoking prevalence among smokers from low socio-economic status (SES) is a preventative health priority. Financial stress (e.g. shortage of money or inability to pay bills) may be a major barrier to quitting smoking. This study evaluates the efficacy of a financial education and support programme coupled with pharmacotherapy at improving cessation rates at 8-month follow-up among Australian low SES smokers (people receiving a government pension or allowance). A two-group parallel block randomized (ratio 1 : 1) open-label clinical trial (RCT) with allocation concealment will be conducted. Allocation will be concealed to interviewers at data collection-points. The study will be conducted primarily by telephone with baseline, follow-up interviews and telephone-based support sessions. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) delivery will be mail-based. Daily smokers who are interested in quitting smoking and are currently in receipt of government benefits (n = 1046) will be recruited through study advertisements placed in newspapers, posters placed in government social assistance agencies and Quitline telephone-based cessation support services. After completion of a baseline computer-assisted telephone interview, participants will be allocated randomly to control or intervention group using a permuted block approach. Participants in both groups will receive 8 weeks of free combination NRT plus Quitline support. Participants in the intervention group will also receive four telephone-delivered financial education and support sessions. The primary outcome measure will be prolonged abstinence (at 8-month follow-up) assessed using Russell Standard criteria and biochemically verified (urine cotinine). This is the first intervention study to evaluate the potential of co-managing financial stress as a means of enhancing smokers' capacity to quit smoking. Such an intervention may provide a scalable intervention to help low SES smokers to quit. © 2014 Society for

  20. Is Walk Score associated with hospital admissions from chronic diseases? Evidence from a cross-sectional study in a high socioeconomic status Australian city-state.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Learnihan, Vincent; Cochrane, Thomas; Phung, Hai; O'Connor, Bridget; Davey, Rachel

    2016-12-08

    To explore patterns of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).To ascertain the effect of the neighbourhood built environmental features and especially walkability on health outcomes, specifically for hospital admissions from NCDs. A cross-sectional analysis of public hospital episode data (2007-2013). Hospitalisations from the ACT, Australia at very small geographic areas. Secondary data on 75 290 unique hospital episodes representing 39 851 patients who were admitted to ACT hospitals from 2007 to 2013. No restrictions on age, sex or ethnicity. Geographic Information System derived or compatible measures of general practitioner access, neighbourhood socioeconomic status, alcohol access, exposure to traffic and Walk Score walkability. Hospitalisations of circulatory diseases, specific endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, respiratory diseases and specific cancers. Geographic clusters with significant high and low risks of NCDs were found that displayed an overall geographic pattern of high risk in the outlying suburbs of the territory. Significant relationships between neighbourhood walkability as measured by Walk Score and the likelihood of hospitalisation with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (heart attack) were found. A possible relationship was also found with the likelihood of being hospitalised with 4 major lifestyle-related cancers. Our research augments the growing literature underscoring the relationships between the built environment and health outcomes. In addition, it supports the importance of walkable neighbourhoods, as measured by Walk Score, for improved health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Utilization of dental services and its relation to the periodontal status in a group of South Australian employees.

    PubMed

    Srikandi, T W; Carey, S E; Clarke, N G

    1983-04-01

    The pattern of dental service utilization, the perception of periodontal disease, and the oral hygiene habits among 642 industrial employees were evaluated using a self-administered questionnaire against background variables of age, sex, and socioeconomic strata. Of the study population, 50.5% had their most recent dental visit within the previous 12 months and 42.5% claimed to seek regular check ups. There was no significant association between time intervals since the last dental visit and age, sex, occupation, income or education. Regular visits were made more often by subjects in the higher occupation and income level. Multivariate analyses of the number of missing teeth simultaneously considering age, sex, socioeconomic level, regularity and frequency of dental visits revealed that except for age and sex, no other factors were significant. The most common reason for not seeing a dentist in the previous 12 months was an assumption that "nothing was wrong". A large majority of the group surveyed were unaware of the presence of periodontal disease or the need for its treatment, despite the high prevalence in all subgroups. Periodontal status was not significantly associated with sex, socioeconomic levels, regularity of frequency of dental visits, but there was a significant regression on age. The study population's pattern of service utilization was found to be similar to that reported for the general population, and it was anticipated that the hygiene habits of the group was representative of the total community. If that assumption is true the high prevalence of periodontal disease of the study population probably exists in the general community.

  2. Reporting gender, race, ethnicity, and sociometric status: guidelines for research and professional practice.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Samuel R; Kozub, Francis M; Robinson, Leah E; Hersman, Bethany L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what trends exist in the identification and description of participants used in data-based studies published in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly and the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. Data were analyzed using frequency counts for journals and time periods from the 1980s to 2005 with chi-square tests on gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Results indicate, for example, that across the time span both journals published articles reporting males first over females, X2 (3) = 22.16, p < .001. Trend data also reveal that even today most data-based studies in these journals fail to report race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Findings are discussed with guiding principles for future research.

  3. Professional training in nutrition in Central and Eastern Europe: current status and opportunities for capacity development.

    PubMed

    Gurinović, Mirjana; Novaković, Romana; Šatalić, Zvonimir; Nikolić, Marina; Milešević, Jelena; Ranić, Marija; Glibetić, Marija

    2015-02-01

    To examine the availability of academic programmes in nutrition and identify nutrition training needs in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). A questionnaire with close-ended and open-ended questions was distributed to the members of the United Nations University Standing Committee on Nutrition, Regional Network for Capacity Development in Nutrition in CEE (NCDN CEE). Participants' responses to the questionnaire including the comments of their colleagues from home institutions were obtained in group discussions during NCDN CEE meetings in 2010-2013. Sixteen CEE countries' experts and their colleagues from home institutions involved in NCDN CEE activities 2007-2013. The responses were obtained from fourteen out of sixteen participating countries; five countries have established Bachelor, Master and PhD studies in nutrition (Croatia, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovak Republic and Slovenia), whereas in Latvia and Republic of Macedonia only Bachelor and Master studies are set up. Seven countries have no Bachelor, Master or PhD studies: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Romania and Serbia. Introduction to data analysis and Nutritional epidemiology are the most needed nutrition trainings that would increase working competence of nutritionists and nutrition-related professionals in CEE. Availability of academic programmes in nutrition in CEE countries is limited. Opportunities for improving the competence of existing and future nutrition-related professionals should be addressed at national and regional level; distance learning courses and creation of a regional centre for nutrition training were seen as opportunities for sustainable capacity development in nutrition in CEE.

  4. [Food status peculiarities, anthropometric, clinica and biochemical indices at professional sportsmen].

    PubMed

    Gapparova, K M; Nikitiuk, D B; Zaĭnudinov, Z M; Tserekh, A A; Chekhonina, Iu G; Golubeva, A A; Sil'vestrova, G A; Rusakova, D S; Grigor'ian, O N

    2011-01-01

    Under steady state conditions in 66 athletes involved in weightlifting, bodybuilding, judo and taekwondo have studied features of the metabolic status. Data on matter-of-fact nutrition, body weight content within the inter-competition period, energy exchange, clinical and biochemical indices and physical acceptability indices were analyzed. As a result, the decrease indexes of metabolism at all the sportsmen and high-level caloric value at sportsmen who are engaged in weightlifting, which corresponds their energy expenditures, was revealed.

  5. Professional Families--The Development of the Relationship between a Professional Mother and the Child in the Context of the Mother's Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Búšová, Katarína Šmajdová

    2012-01-01

    A professional family is an organizational form of institutional care which is used mainly in residential children's homes. By considering the psychological development of the child and by providing a supportive environment, the professional family provides systematic, purposeful and professional care and education for the child. It attempts to…

  6. Current Status of Human Resource Training Program for Fostering RIBiomics Professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Eun; Jang, Beom-Su; Choi, Dae Seong; Park, Tai-jin; Park, Sang Hyun

    2015-07-01

    training program for fostering RI-Biomics professionals in the following key fields; (1) Radio-pharmaceuticals synthesis and labeled compound development, (2) Development of RI-ADME in the living object and image assessment technology. Personnel training program that carries out theoretical education and practical training in the field related to RI-Biomics in parallel is being conducted. Internship training for university students has been administered twice already while educational program for the existing professionals in the RI-Biomics field will be carried out during the summer of 2014. The human resource training program for combination of RIADME and different molecular imaging techniques can offer synergistic advantages to facilitate understanding RIADME and fostering RI-ADME professionals. (authors)

  7. The use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of adult-onset focal spasticity: a survey of Australian allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; de Graaff, Stephen; Singer, Barbara J

    2012-08-01

    Recently, the European Journal of Neurology published international consensus statements for the assessment, treatment and aftercare associated with the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A. This survey examined current allied health practice in relation to botulinum neurotoxin type A use in Australia in the light of these guidelines. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of neurology groups of the Australian Physiotherapy Association and Occupational Therapy Australia. The questionnaire explored assessment processes used, familiarity with pharmaceutical benefits scheme indications for botulinum neurotoxin type A use, goal setting and outcome measurement, follow-up therapy and access to spasticity management services. The 123 survey respondents (81 from the Australian Physiotherapy Association - response rate 16.2%, 42 from Occupational Therapy Australia - response rate 6.4%) reported that focal spasticity was a major problem for which botulinum neurotoxin type A was a primary intervention. The Tardieu scale was more frequently used than the modified Ashworth scale (82% vs. 48%). Most therapists (76.3%) reported being confident diagnosing spasticity and its functional implications (84.2%), but fewer were confident discussing referral for botulinum neurotoxin type A with doctors (56.1%). Goals were set in conjunction with the client (93.6%). Barriers to injection and adjunctive therapy (motor training etc.) included waiting times for botulinum neurotoxin type A injection, access to specialist adjunctive therapists and referral for treatment. Allied health practitioners in Australia report clinical practice to be closely aligned with international guidelines for the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A in adult spasticity. Therapist confidence in advocating for botulinum neurotoxin type A injection, consistent use of objective measures of spasticity and treatment outcomes and barriers to providing adjunctive therapy need to be addressed. © 2012 The

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Australian hospital-based nurses: knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users.

    PubMed

    Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Arbon, Paul

    2017-05-01

    This study was intended to examine CAM among Australian hospital-based nurses, identifying their knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users. Nurses holding a qualification in nursing and working in surgical wards were included using a convenience sampling technique. A self-complete questionnaire was developed to achieve the aims of the study. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were calculated to describe and analyse data. Overall, 95.7% and 49.7% of nurses reported personal and professional use of CAM, respectively. The most popular CAM/CAM domain personally and professionally used by nurses was massage therapy and mind-body therapies. The primary reason for personal use of CAM was "[it] fits into my way of life/philosophy". Furthermore, massage therapists were the most commonly recommended CAM practitioners to patients. Only 15.8% of nurses would always ask patients about use of herbal medicines as part of nursing history taking. Over one-fifth (22.4%) of nurses rated their attitude as having a very positive, and 60.3% rated themselves as having very little or no knowledge of CAM. A positive correlation was also found between knowledge and attitude about CAM. Positive attitude and higher knowledge about CAM were positively correlated to CAM referrals. Several socio-demographic factors predicted personal and professional use of CAM. This study revealed that nurses generally believe not to have sufficient knowledge of CAM but are open to use CAM with patients. Nurses' positive attitude toward and personal use of CAM could be an indication that they are poised for further integration of evidence-based CAM into nursing practice to treat whole person. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of teamwork in the professional education of physicians: current status and assessment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, David P; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi; Battles, James; Barach, Paul

    2005-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has recommended that organizations establish interdisciplinary team training programs that incorporate proven methods for team management. Teamwork can be assessed during physician medical education, board certification, licensure, and continuing practice. Team members must possess specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs), such as the ability to exchange information, which enable individual team members to coordinate. KSAs might be elicited and assessed across a physician's career, starting in medical school and continuing through licensure and board certification. Professional bodies should be responsible for the development of specific team knowledge and skill competencies and for promoting specific team attitude competencies. Tools are available to assess medical student, resident, and physician competence in these critical team KSAs. For teamwork skills to be assessed and have credibility, team performance measures must be grounded in team theory, account for individual and team-level performance, capture team process and outcomes, adhere to standards for reliability and validity, and address real or perceived barriers to measurement.

  10. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  11. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  12. Promoting leadership and management in Australian general practice nursing: what will it take?

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    This paper outlines the current state of Australian practice nursing, describes the context of general practice and establishes the importance of promoting leadership and management in this setting. Australian general practice nurses have emerged as key stakeholders in primary health care. However, their role in leadership and management has been largely invisible. The reasons for this are multifactorial, including the delay to establish a strong professional organization, their negative power relationships with general medical practitioners, limited nursing leadership and poorly defined roles. To date, the impetus for practice nurse growth has been largely external to the nursing profession. Growth has been driven by the increasing burden of chronic disease and workforce shortages. This has further weakened the control of nurse leaders over the development of the specialty. The Australian practice nurse role is at a crossroads. While the practice nurse role is a viable force to improve health outcomes, the growing strength of the practice nurse challenges traditional professional roles and practice patterns. There is an urgent need to develop practice nurse leaders and managers to not only embrace the challenges of Australian general practice from an operational perspective, but also undertake a clinical leadership role. As clinical leaders, these nurses will need to develop a culture that not only optimizes health outcomes but also advances the status of the nursing profession.

  13. Do neighbourhood socioeconomic circumstances not matter for weight status among Australian men? Multilevel evidence from a household survey of 14 691 adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Wilson, Andrew

    2015-09-16

    A recent analysis of the Australian National Health Survey (2011-2012) reported that the patterning of overweight and obesity among men, unlike for women, was not associated with neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether this gender difference in potential neighbourhood 'effects' on adult weight status can be observed in analyses of a different source of data. A cross-sectional sample of 14 693 people aged 18 years or older was selected from the 2012 wave of the 'Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia' (HILDA). Three person-level outcomes were considered: (1) body mass index (BMI); (2) a binary indicator of 'normal weight' versus 'overweight or obese'; and (3) 'normal weight or overweight' versus 'obese'. Area-level socioeconomic circumstances were measured using quintiles of the Socio Economic Index For Areas (SEIFA). Multilevel linear and logistic regression models were used to examine associations while accounting for clustering within households and neighbourhoods, adjusting for person-level socioeconomic confounders. Neighbourhood-level factors accounted for 4.9% of the overall variation in BMI, whereas 20.1% was attributable to household-level factors. Compared with their peers living in deprived neighbourhoods, mean BMI was 0.7 kg/m(2) lower among men and 2.2 kg/m(2) lower among women living in affluent areas, with a clear trend across categories. Similarly, the percentage of overweight and obese, and obesity specifically, was lower in affluent areas for both men and women. These results were robust to adjustment for confounders. Unlike findings from the national health survey, but in line with evidence from other high-income countries, this study finds an inverse patterning of BMI by neighbourhood disadvantage for men, and especially among women. The potential mediators which underpin this gender difference in BMI within disadvantaged neighbourhoods warrant further investigation. Published

  14. The impact of socioeconomic status on changes in the general and mental health of women over time: evidence from a longitudinal study of Australian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Generally, men and women of higher socioeconomic status (SES) have better health. Little is known about how socioeconomic factors are associated with changes in health as women progress through mid-life. This study uses data from six survey waves (1996 to 2010) of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) to examine associations between SES and changes in the general health and mental health of a cohort of women progressing in years from 45–50 to 59–64. Methods Participants were 12,709 women (born 1946–51) in the ALSWH. Outcome measures were the general health and mental health subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36). The measure of SES was derived from factor analysis of responses to questions in the ALSWH baseline survey (1996) on school leaving age, highest qualifications, and current or last occupation. Multi-level random coefficient models, adjusted for socio-demographic factors and health behaviors, were used to analyze repeated measures of general health and mental health. Survey year accounted for changes in factors across time. In the first set of analyses we investigated associations between the SES index, used as a “continuous” variable, and general health and mental health changes over time. To illuminate the impact of different levels of SES on health, a second analysis was conducted in which SES scores were grouped into three approximately equal sized categories or “tertiles” as reported in an earlier ALSWH study. The least square means of general and mental health scores from the longitudinal models were plotted for the three SES tertiles. Results The longitudinal analysis showed that, after adjusting for the effects of time and possible confounders, the general (mental) health of this cohort of mid-aged women declined (increased) over time. Higher SES women reported better health than lower SES women, and SES significantly modified the effects of time on both general

  15. An Exploration of How Marital Expectations and Socio-Economic Status Impact Post-Secondary Educational and Professional Goals of Northern California Asian Indian Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the impact of marital expectations and socio-economic status on post-secondary educational and professional goals of Northern California Asian Indian immigrant women both before and after marriage. For the purposes of this study, 15 Southeast Asian Indian immigrant women from the Sacramento metropolitan region…

  16. The educational and professional status of clinical embryology and clinical embryologists in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, B; Plas, C; Woodward, B J; Verheyen, G; Prados, F J; Hreinsson, J; De los Santos, M J; Magli, M C; Lundin, K; Plancha, C E

    2015-08-01

    What is the recognition of clinical embryology and the current status of clinical embryologists in European countries, regarding educational levels, responsibilities and workload, and need for a formal education in assisted reproductive technology (ART)? It is striking that the profession of clinical embryology, almost 40 years after the introduction of IVF, is still not officially recognized in most European countries. Reproductive medicine has developed into a sophisticated multidisciplinary medical branch since the birth of Louise Brown 37 years ago. The European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG) has recognized reproductive medicine as a subspeciality and has developed a subspeciality training for gynaecologists in collaboration with the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). However, nothing similar exists for the field of clinical embryology or for clinical embryologists. A questionnaire about the situation in clinical embryology in the period of 2012-2013 in the respective European country was sent to ESHRE National representatives (basic scientists only) in December 2013. At this time, 28 European countries had at least one basic scientist in the ESHRE Committee of National Representatives. The survey consisted of 46 numeric, dichotomous (yes/no) or descriptive questions. Answers were obtained from 27 out of 28 countries and the data were tabulated. Data about the numbers of 'ESHRE Certified Embryologists' were taken from the ESHRE Steering Committee for Embryologist Certification. In 2012, more than 7000 laboratory staff from 1349 IVF clinics in 27 European countries performed over 700 000 fresh and frozen ART cycles. Despite this, clinical embryology is only recognized as an official profession in 3 out of 27 national health systems. In most countries clinical embryologists need to be registered under another profession, and have limited possibilities for organized education in clinical embryology. Mostly they

  17. Perception of prescription medicine sample packs among Australian professional, government, industry, and consumer organizations, based on automated textual analysis of one-on-one interviews.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Greg J; Nissen, Lisa; Tett, Susan

    2008-12-01

    Prescription medicine samples provided by pharmaceutical companies are predominantly newer and more expensive products. The range of samples provided to practices may not represent the drugs that the doctors desire to have available. Few studies have used a qualitative design to explore the reasons behind sample use. The aim of this study was to explore the opinions of a variety of Australian key informants about prescription medicine samples, using a qualitative methodology. Twenty-three organizations involved in quality use of medicines in Australia were identified, based on the authors' previous knowledge. Each organization was invited to nominate 1 or 2 representatives to participate in semistructured interviews utilizing seeding questions. Each interview was recorded and transcribed verbatim. Leximancer v2.25 text analysis software (Leximancer Pty Ltd., Jindalee, Queensland, Australia) was used for textual analysis. The top 10 concepts from each analysis group were interrogated back to the original transcript text to determine the main emergent opinions. A total of 18 key interviewees representing 16 organizations participated. Samples, patient, doctor, and medicines were the major concepts among general opinions about samples. The concept drug became more frequent and the concept companies appeared when marketing issues were discussed. The Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and cost were more prevalent in discussions about alternative sample distribution models, indicating interviewees were cognizant of budgetary implications. Key interviewee opinions added richness to the single-word concepts extracted by Leximancer. Participants recognized that prescription medicine samples have an influence on quality use of medicines and play a role in the marketing of medicines. They also believed that alternative distribution systems for samples could provide benefits. The cost of a noncommercial system for distributing samples or starter packs was a concern

  18. Influence of training years on upper-body strength and power changes during the competitive season for professional Australian rules football players.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con; Buttifant, David

    2012-07-01

    To determine if upper-body strength or power changes during the competitive season for elite Australian rules footballers and what influence the number of training years has on any changes. Repeated measures. Twenty elite Australian rules footballers were assessed at preseason, in-season and postseason. Strength was assessed by the 1 Repetition Maximum bench press and power was assessed by bench press throws. Athletes' results were analysed as a whole group as well as being divided into two groups according to training years: less than 3 years training and greater than 3 years training. All athletes performed the same resistance training program. There were no significant differences in height, body mass, or skinfold measurements between the two age groups. As a whole group, there was no significant change in 1RM bench press. There was a small but significant decrease in mean bench throw power in-season (525 W) compared to preseason (542 W) and it then increased at postseason (541 W). Within group analysis revealed the in-season decrease in upper-body power was largely pertaining to the younger athletes. The older group maintained their upper body power levels while the younger group decreased power in-season (4%) before regaining it at season's end. Older footballers were able to maintain their upper body power while the younger footballers had a small but significant decrease in-season before regaining it by season's end. The overall volume of training and playing appears to have affected the younger athletes' power more than older athletes. Both age groups maintained upper body strength. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low back pain status in elite and semi-elite Australian football codes: a cross-sectional survey of football (soccer), Australian rules, rugby league, rugby union and non-athletic controls.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry; Daff, Chris; Odell, Andrew; Garbutt, Peter; McHardy, Andrew; Hardy, Kate; Dragasevic, George

    2009-04-17

    Our understanding of the effects of football code participation on low back pain (LBP) is limited. It is unclear whether LBP is more prevalent in athletic populations or differs between levels of competition. Thus it was the aim of this study to document and compare the prevalence, intensity, quality and frequency of LBP between elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group. A cross-sectional survey of elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group was performed. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire incorporating the Quadruple Visual Analogue Scale (QVAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (short form) (MPQ-SF), along with additional questions adapted from an Australian epidemiological study. Respondents were 271 elite players (mean age 23.3, range 17-39), 360 semi-elite players (mean age 23.8, range 16-46) and 148 non-athletic controls (mean age 23.9, range 18-39). Groups were matched for age (p = 0.42) and experienced the same age of first onset LBP (p = 0.40). A significant linear increase in LBP from the non-athletic group, to the semi-elite and elite groups for the QVAS and the MPQ-SF was evident (p < 0.001). Elite subjects were more likely to experience more frequent (daily or weekly OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.29-2.42) and severe LBP (discomforting and greater OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.29-2.38). Foolers in Australia have significantly more severe and frequent LBP than a non-athletic group and this escalates with level of competition.

  20. Low back pain status in elite and semi-elite Australian football codes: a cross-sectional survey of football (soccer), Australian rules, rugby league, rugby union and non-athletic controls

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry; Daff, Chris; Odell, Andrew; Garbutt, Peter; McHardy, Andrew; Hardy, Kate; Dragasevic, George

    2009-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the effects of football code participation on low back pain (LBP) is limited. It is unclear whether LBP is more prevalent in athletic populations or differs between levels of competition. Thus it was the aim of this study to document and compare the prevalence, intensity, quality and frequency of LBP between elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group. Methods A cross-sectional survey of elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group was performed. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire incorporating the Quadruple Visual Analogue Scale (QVAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (short form) (MPQ-SF), along with additional questions adapted from an Australian epidemiological study. Respondents were 271 elite players (mean age 23.3, range 17–39), 360 semi-elite players (mean age 23.8, range 16–46) and 148 non-athletic controls (mean age 23.9, range 18–39). Results Groups were matched for age (p = 0.42) and experienced the same age of first onset LBP (p = 0.40). A significant linear increase in LBP from the non-athletic group, to the semi-elite and elite groups for the QVAS and the MPQ-SF was evident (p < 0.001). Elite subjects were more likely to experience more frequent (daily or weekly OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.29–2.42) and severe LBP (discomforting and greater OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.29–2.38). Conclusion Foolers in Australia have significantly more severe and frequent LBP than a non-athletic group and this escalates with level of competition. PMID:19371446

  1. Traces of Discourses and Governmentality within the Content and Implementation of the Western Australian Fundamental Movement Skills Programme (STEPS Professional Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson-Buchanan, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years or more, a plethora of movement programmes have been adopted within primary physical education in the UK and across Australia. One particular programme, Fundamental Movement Skills (STEPS Professional Development), became of interest to the researcher during her dual role as the UK Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS)…

  2. Traces of Discourses and Governmentality within the Content and Implementation of the Western Australian Fundamental Movement Skills Programme (STEPS Professional Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson-Buchanan, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years or more, a plethora of movement programmes have been adopted within primary physical education in the UK and across Australia. One particular programme, Fundamental Movement Skills (STEPS Professional Development), became of interest to the researcher during her dual role as the UK Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS)…

  3. In-Service Professional Development in an Online Environment: What Are South Australian English as an Additional Language or Dialect Teachers' Views?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues concerning in-service English as an additional language or dialect teachers' views on professional development (PD) in an online environment. On the basis of the data collected via a questionnaire survey and a series of interviews, this study finds that intrinsic and extrinsic incentives compel or impede teachers…

  4. In-Service Professional Development in an Online Environment: What Are South Australian English as an Additional Language or Dialect Teachers' Views?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues concerning in-service English as an additional language or dialect teachers' views on professional development (PD) in an online environment. On the basis of the data collected via a questionnaire survey and a series of interviews, this study finds that intrinsic and extrinsic incentives compel or impede teachers…

  5. A Sense of Deja Vu across the Tasman? What Australians Might Learn from the New Zealand Experience with the Te Kotahitanga Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Throughout Australasia, indigenous educational issues remain a subject of considerable debate. In New Zealand, Maori underachievement in education has long been a matter of widespread concern. Currently the most highly visible professional development programme now operating in New Zealand mainstream secondary schools, Te Kotahitanga claims to…

  6. A Sense of Deja Vu across the Tasman? What Australians Might Learn from the New Zealand Experience with the Te Kotahitanga Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Throughout Australasia, indigenous educational issues remain a subject of considerable debate. In New Zealand, Maori underachievement in education has long been a matter of widespread concern. Currently the most highly visible professional development programme now operating in New Zealand mainstream secondary schools, Te Kotahitanga claims to…

  7. A qualitative study to explore how professionals in the United Kingdom make decisions to test children for a sickle cell carrier status

    PubMed Central

    Noke, Melissa; Peters, Sarah; Wearden, Alison; Ulph, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    European guidelines recommend that, unless there are clear benefits of autosomal recessive carrier testing in childhood, it should be deferred to protect children's autonomous decision making. Although it is believed that children receive testing in the United Kingdom, it is unclear how or why professionals make decisions to provide tests. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 professionals in the United Kingdom who advise about, and undertake, childhood sickle cell trait testing. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Few professionals were aware of, or used, guidelines to inform testing decisions and instead, considered the reproductive and clinical relevance of testing, and autonomous rights of parents. Many professionals believed testing was important and readily offered it to parents. Professionals who discouraged testing were met with parental resistance and often provided testing when conflict was difficult to manage. Children were rarely considered to be capable of making decisions and few were engaged in discussions. When consulted, older children demonstrated interest, but younger children usually declined testing. Wide variation in testing advice emerged because of opposing beliefs about children's best interests and potential benefits or harms of testing. An explanation of how children's best interests should be determined in light of conflicting evidence regarding the psychosocial and clinical implications of carrier status is needed. Improved awareness of guidelines might encourage professionals to support the role of children in testing decisions. Strategies are also required to help professionals determine children's cognitive capacity and to protect children's future autonomy during discussions with persistent parents. PMID:26014427

  8. Career Maturity and Well-Being as Determinants of Occupational Status of Recent School Leavers: A Brief Report of an Australian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter A.; Muller, Juanita

    2002-01-01

    Hypothesized that students who continue full-time study after high school have higher levels of career maturity, psychological well-being, and academic achievement while at school. Surveyed 254 Australian seniors and 132 of these students 9 months after graduation. Found that students who proceeded to full-time further study scored higher in all…

  9. Career Maturity and Well-Being as Determinants of Occupational Status of Recent School Leavers: A Brief Report of an Australian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter A.; Muller, Juanita

    2002-01-01

    Hypothesized that students who continue full-time study after high school have higher levels of career maturity, psychological well-being, and academic achievement while at school. Surveyed 254 Australian seniors and 132 of these students 9 months after graduation. Found that students who proceeded to full-time further study scored higher in all…

  10. Subsequent Injuries Are More Common Than Injury Recurrences: An Analysis of 1 Season of Prospectively Collected Injuries in Professional Australian Football.

    PubMed

    Finch, Caroline F; Cook, Jill; Kunstler, Breanne E; Akram, Muhammad; Orchard, John

    2017-07-01

    It is known that some people can, and do, sustain >1 injury over a playing season. However, there is currently little high-quality epidemiological evidence about the risk of, and relationships between, multiple and subsequent injuries. To describe the subsequent injuries sustained by Australian Football League (AFL) players over 1 season, including their most common injury diagnoses. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Within-player linked injury data on all date-ordered match-loss injuries sustained by AFL players during 1 full season were obtained. The total number of injuries per player was determined, and in those with >1 injury, the Subsequent Injury Classification (SIC) model was used to code all subsequent injuries based on their Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) codes and the dates of injury. There were 860 newly recorded injuries in 543 players; 247 players (45.5%) sustained ≥1 subsequent injuries after an earlier injury, with 317 subsequent injuries (36.9% of all injuries) recorded overall. A subsequent injury generally occurred to a different body region and was therefore superficially unrelated to an index injury. However, 32.2% of all subsequent injuries were related to a previous injury in the same season. Hamstring injuries were the most common subsequent injury. The mean time between injuries decreased with an increasing number of subsequent injuries. When relationships between injuries are taken into account, there is a high level of subsequent (and multiple) injuries leading to missed games in an elite athlete group.

  11. Impact of revising the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System definition for catheter-related bloodstream infection in ICU: reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network case definition in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals.

    PubMed

    Worth, Leon J; Brett, Judy; Bull, Ann L; McBryde, Emma S; Russo, Philip L; Richards, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Effective and comparable surveillance for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in the intensive care unit requires a reproducible case definition that can be readily applied by infection control professionals. Using a questionnaire containing clinical cases, reproducibility of the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NNIS) surveillance definition for CLABSI was assessed in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals participating in the Victorian Hospital Acquired Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS). The same questionnaire was then used to evaluate the reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition for CLABSI. Target hospitals were defined as large metropolitan (1A) or other large hospitals (non-1A), according to the Victorian Department of Human Services. Questionnaire responses of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NHSN surveillance experts were used as gold standard comparator. Eighteen of 21 eligible VICNISS centers participated in the survey. Overall concordance with the gold standard was 57.1%, and agreement was highest for 1A hospitals (60.6%). The proportion of congruently classified cases varied according to NNIS criteria: criterion 1 (recognized pathogen), 52.8%; criterion 2a (skin contaminant in 2 or more blood cultures), 83.3%; criterion 2b (skin contaminant in 1 blood culture and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted), 58.3%; non-CLABSI cases, 51.4%. When survey questions regarding identification of cases of CLABSI criterion 2b were removed (consistent with the current NHSN definition), overall percentage concordance increased to 62.5% (72.2% for 1A centers). Further educational interventions are required to improve the discrimination of primary and secondary causes of bloodstream infection in Victorian intensive care units. Although reproducibility of the CLABSI case definition is relatively poor, adoption of the revised NHSN definition

  12. The effect of micro and macro stressors in the work environment on computer professionals' subjective health status and productive behavior in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Maki; Asakura, Takashi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the effect of micro and macro stressors in the work environment on the subjective health status and productive behavior of computer professionals, we conducted a web-based investigation with Japanese IT-related company employees in 53 company unions. The questionnaire consisted of individual attributes, employment characteristics, working hour characteristics, company size and profitability, personal characteristics (i.e., Growth Need Strength), micro and macro stressors scale, and four outcome scales concerning the subjective health status and productive behavior. We obtained 1,049 Japanese IT-related company employees' data (response rate: 66%), and analyzed the data of computer engineers (80%; n=871). The results of hierarchical multiple regressions showed that each full model explained 23% in psychological distress, 20% in cumulative fatigue, 44% in job dissatisfaction, and 35% in intentions to leave, respectively. In micro stressors, "quantitative and qualitative work overload" had the strongest influence on both the subjective health status and intentions to leave. Furthermore, in macro stressors, "career and future ambiguity" was the most important predictor of the subjective health status, and "insufficient evaluation systems" and "poor supervisor's support" were important predictors of productive behavior as well. These findings suggest that improving not only micro stressors but also macro stressors will enhance the subjective health status and increase the productive behavior of computer professionals in Japan.

  13. Geography in Australian Schools: A View from the AGTA Chair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Geography Teachers' Association (AGTA) seeks to: (1) foster the teaching and learning of geography in Australian schools and enhance awareness of its applications in society; (2) promote and circulate the results of research into geography education; (3) maintain a professional network through which teachers of geography in…

  14. Developing professional status: an investigation into the working patterns, working relationships and vision for the future of UK clinical dental technicians.

    PubMed

    Leyssen, W; Clark, R K F; Gallagher, J E; Radford, D R

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the working patterns and patient base of registered clinical dental technicians (CDTs); their relationships with dentists and other professionals in the dental team; their willingness to work within the NHS and their expectations for the future as a new professional group. Face-to-face qualitative interviews of registered CDTs, selected because of their geographic representation and mode of working, informed the development of a postal questionnaire survey of all early registrants with the General Dental Council (GDC). The majority of CDTs reported working part-time, often combining clinical practice with their role as a dental technician. They reported both positive and negative working relationships with dentists and dental technicians, demonstrating collaboration and/or competition depending on whether the scope of CDTs was respected and patient care was shared or lost. CDTs role in the NHS was limited because they did not have the status of becoming a recognised provider of dental care. There was a desire to expand their scope of practice in future. CDTs are embracing their new status as an occupational group within dentistry. Core features of becoming a professional group were exhibited including the importance of social and financial status and the need to negotiate their current and future roles in the healthcare system.

  15. Summary of: Developing professional status: an investigation into the working patterns, working relationships and vision for the future of UK clinical dental technicians.

    PubMed

    Lambert-Humble, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the working patterns and patient base of registered clinical dental technicians (CDTs); their relationships with dentists and other professionals in the dental team; their willingness to work within the NHS and their expectations for the future as a new professional group.Methods Face-to-face qualitative interviews of registered CDTs, selected because of their geographic representation and mode of working, informed the development of a postal questionnaire survey of all early registrants with the General Dental Council (GDC). Results The majority of CDTs reported working part-time, often combining clinical practice with their role as a dental technician. They reported both positive and negative working relationships with dentists and dental technicians, demonstrating collaboration and/or competition depending on whether the scope of CDTs was respected and patient care was shared or lost. CDTs role in the NHS was limited because they did not have the status of becoming a recognised provider of dental care. There was a desire to expand their scope of practice in future. Conclusion CDTs are embracing their new status as an occupational group within dentistry. Core features of becoming a professional group were exhibited including the importance of social and financial status and the need to negotiate their current and future roles in the healthcare system [corrected].

  16. Australian Brain Alliance.

    PubMed

    2016-11-02

    A proposal for an Australian Brain Initiative (ABI) is under development by members of the Australian Brain Alliance. Here we discuss the goals of the ABI, its areas of research focus, its context in the Australian research setting, and its necessity for ensuring continued success for Australian brain research.

  17. The Invisible Hand of Pedagogy in Australian Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Zane Ma; Russell, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC)-funded project "Exploring Problem-Based Learning Pedagogy as Transformative Education in Indigenous Australian Studies" raised a number of issues that resonated with concerns we have had as professionals engaged in teaching and researching Australian Indigenous studies and Indigenous…

  18. Content Validation of Statements Describing the Essential Work of Australian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dally, Kerry A.; Dempsey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the procedures used in developing and validating a set of statements for Australian special education teachers. Using the existing AITSL Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at the proficient level as a basis, a set of statements describing the specific skills and knowledge required by Australian educators working…

  19. Career Education: A Professional Introspection: A Monograph Prepared for the Project The Status and Progress of Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinson, Nancy M.

    An understanding of the professional development of educators involved in career education is necessary for an understanding of changes occurring in the field of education. Changes brought about in education have caused shifts in the professional and occupational behavior of educators, only some of whom perceive themselves as change agents.…

  20. Strongyloides stercoralis: Systematic Review of Barriers to Controlling Strongyloidiasis for Australian Indigenous Communities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Adrian; Smith, Michelle L.; Judd, Jenni A.; Speare, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis infects human hosts mainly through skin contact with contaminated soil. The result is strongyloidiasis, a parasitic disease, with a unique cycle of auto-infection causing a variety of symptoms and signs, with possible fatality from hyper-infection. Australian Indigenous community members, often living in rural and remote settings, are exposed to and infected with S. stercoralis. The aim of this review is to determine barriers to control of strongyloidiasis. The purpose is to contribute to the development of initiatives for prevention, early detection and effective treatment of strongyloidiasis. Methodology/Principle Findings Systematic search reviewing research published 2012 and earlier was conducted. Research articles discussing aspects of strongyloidiasis, context of infection and overall health in Indigenous Australians were reviewed. Based on the PRISMA statement, the systematic search of health databases, Academic Search Premier, Informit, Medline, PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and Academic was conducted. Key search terms included strongyloidiasis, Indigenous, Australia, health, and community. 340 articles were retrieved with 16 original research articles published between 1969 and 2006 meeting criteria. Review found barriers to control defined across three key themes, (1) health status, (2) socioeconomic status, and (3) health care literacy and procedures. Conclusions/Significance This study identifies five points of intervention: (1) develop reporting protocols between health care system and communities; (2) test all Indigenous Australian patients, immunocompromised patients and those exposed to areas with S. stercoralis; (3) health professionals require detailed information on strongyloidiasis and potential for exposure to Indigenous Australian people; (4) to establish testing and treatment initiatives within communities; and (5) to measure and report prevalence rates specific to communities and to act

  1. [Supply of health care in the Australian bush: human resources and government policy].

    PubMed

    Stuer, Anny

    2003-01-01

    The Australian bush--the heart of Australian folklore and a fascinating attraction for tourists, whether from within Australia or other countries--does not enjoy the same attraction for professionals across a range of industries including health, where there is a chronic shortage of human resources. Whilst data vary considerably between regions, in many cases, Australians from rural and remote regions have a lower health status than the overall population. This is particularly true of the population of Indigenous origin. There are about 250 medical practitioners for 100,000 people in Australia. This number varies between about 300 in the capital cities and just over 100 in the remote areas, the latter being mostly general practitioners as there are hardly any hospitals and specialists in those remote areas. The data change across professions--for example the number of nurses is about the same in capital cities and in remote areas: about 1000 full time equivalent for 100,000 people. They change too when we consider rural regions that are less or not isolated: in some instances, these are less supplied than remote areas, where access to care however remains more critical because of distance. The demographic profile of the professions examined in this paper also vary between regions, giving more urgency to workforce planning issues. The Australian government has embarked on the delivery of a major rural health strategy aimed at increasing access to health care in the rural and remote regions--through the provision of more and better services (specialist services; multipurpose centres); attracting more health professionals (scholarships for health students; setting up of rural universities); and retaining and supporting those professionals in rural and remote areas (on-going training; support programs for families and overseas trained doctors; practice management and financial incentives).

  2. Shifts in media images of women appearance and social status from 1960 to 2010: A content analysis of beauty advertisements in two Australian magazines.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ann; Knight, Tess

    2015-12-01

    Ageing well and successful ageing have become important themes to describe how older individuals should keep ageing at bay. Products and services aimed at controlling ageing have become associated with ageing well. In this study we aimed to analyse the representation of older women in advertisements specific to appearance and ageing. In particular, we sought to explore how ageing for women was presented in the media over a period 50 years and when advertisements began to use the term 'anti-ageing'. A content analysis of 710 advertisements from two prominent Australian women's magazines, from 1960 to 2010, was conducted. Analyses showed that advertisements provided a narrow range of images representing women's physical appearance. The underlying messages were that ageing is problematic and that it had become unforgivable to show any signs of ageing. Text contained in advertisements for beauty products from the two chosen Australian magazines often gave specific and prescriptive advice to women on ways to avoid losing their youthful appearance. It was concluded that media relay powerful messages to spread and modify cultural beliefs informing individuals of a range of options that propose liberation from the problem of ageing.

  3. Commercial Activities and Copyright in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelly, Marita

    2008-01-01

    With government funding for most Australian universities below 60% and falling a major strategic emphasis for universities has been on securing other sources of operating revenue, including commercial opportunities and partnerships. The implication of increasing commercial activities such as non-award and tailored professional programmes, contract…

  4. Wilderness quality mapping - the Australian experiences

    Treesearch

    Nick Sawyer

    2015-01-01

    By 1995 wilderness quality maps developed under the Australian Government's National Wilderness Inventory (NWI) program had been published for most of Australia, but few traces of the NWI now remain and the word "wilderness" has become almost unmentionable in government and professional land management circles. Yet its popular appeal is demonstrated by...

  5. Commercial Activities and Copyright in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelly, Marita

    2008-01-01

    With government funding for most Australian universities below 60% and falling a major strategic emphasis for universities has been on securing other sources of operating revenue, including commercial opportunities and partnerships. The implication of increasing commercial activities such as non-award and tailored professional programmes, contract…

  6. Regulating stem-cell research and human cloning in an Australian context: an exercise in protecting the status of the human subject.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Olivia

    2005-01-01

    Over 12 months prior to the recent United Nations decision to defer a decision about what type of international treaty should be developed in the global stem-cell research and human cloning debate, the Federal Parliament of Australia passed two separate pieces of legislation relating to both these concerns. After a five-year long process of community consultation, media spectacle and parliamentary debate, reproductive cloning has been banned in Australia and only embryos considered to be excess to assisted reproductive technologies in existence on the 5th of April 2002 are currently valid research material. This paper argues that underpinning both pieces of legislation is a profound belief in the disruptive potential of all types of human cloning for the very nature and integrity of human species being. A belief, moreover, that is based on a presumption that it is apparently possible to conceptualise what being human even means for all Australians.

  7. The mental health status of refugees and asylum seekers attending a refugee health clinic including comparisons with a matched sample of Australian-born residents.

    PubMed

    Shawyer, Frances; Enticott, Joanne C; Block, Andrew A; Cheng, I-Hao; Meadows, Graham N

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to survey refugees and asylum-seekers attending a Refugee Health Service in Melbourne, Australia to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders based on screening measures and with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specifically highlighted. A secondary aim was to compare the prevalence findings with Australian-born matched comparators from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 135 refugees and asylum-seeker participants using instruments including Kessler-10 (K10) and PTSD-8 to obtain estimates of the prevalence of mental disorders. We also performed a comparative analysis using matched sets of one participant and four Australian-born residents, comparing prevalence results with conditional Poisson regression estimated risk ratios (RR). The prevalence of mental illness as measured by K10 was 50.4%, while 22.9% and 31.3% of participants screened positive for PTSD symptoms in the previous month and lifetime, respectively. The matched analysis yielded a risk ratio of 3.16 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.30, 4.34] for abnormal K10, 2.25 (95% CI: 1.53, 3.29) for PTSD-lifetime and 4.44 (95% CI: 2.64, 7.48) for PTSD-month. This information on high absolute and relative risk of mental illness substantiate the increased need for mental health screening and care in this and potentially other refugee clinics and should be considered in relation to service planning. While the results cannot be generalised outside this setting, the method may be more broadly applicable, enabling the rapid collection of key information to support service planning for new waves of refugees and asylum-seekers. Matching data with existing national surveys is a useful way to estimate differences between groups at no additional cost, especially when the target group is comparatively small within a population.

  8. Respiratory health status of Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War and the effects of exposure to oil fire smoke and dust storms

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, H; Sim, M; Forbes, A; McKenzie, D; Glass, D; Ikin, J; Ittak, P; Abramson, M

    2004-01-01

    Methods: A cross sectional study compared 1456 Australian Gulf War veterans with a randomly sampled military comparison group (n = 1588). A postal questionnaire asked about respiratory conditions, exposures, medications, tobacco use, demographic characteristics, and military service details. During a medical assessment, spirometric tests and a physical examination were performed and a respiratory questionnaire was administered. Results: The response rate for the Gulf War veteran group was 80.5% and for the comparison group 56.8%. Australian Gulf War veterans had a higher than expected prevalence of respiratory symptoms and respiratory conditions suggesting asthma (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.9) and bronchitis first diagnosed since the Gulf War (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.1) but did not have poorer lung function or more ventilatory abnormalities than the comparison group. Veterans who reported exposure to oil fire smoke had slightly poorer forced vital capacity (difference between means –0.10 l; 95% CI –0.18 to –0.03) and those exposed to dust storms had a slightly better peak expiratory flow rate (difference between means 12.0 l/min; 95% CI 0.6 to 23.4) than veterans who did not report exposure. Veterans who were in the Gulf at or after the start of the oil fires had more respiratory conditions suggesting asthma (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.9) than those who completed their deployment before this time. Conclusions: Increased self-reporting of respiratory symptoms, asthma, and bronchitis by veterans was not reflected in poorer lung function. The findings do not suggest major long term sequelae of exposure to oil fire smoke or dust storms. PMID:15454658

  9. Ivermectin treatment of free-ranging endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) pups: effect on hookworm and lice infection status, haematological parameters, growth, and survival.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alan D; Higgins, Damien P; Gray, Rachael

    2015-07-01

    A placebo-controlled study was used to investigate the effectiveness of ivermectin to treat hookworm (Uncinaria sanguinis) and lice (Antarctophthirus microchir) infections in free-ranging Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) pups and to test the hypotheses that these parasitic infections cause anaemia, systemic inflammatory responses, and reduced growth, and contribute towards decreased pup survival. Ivermectin was identified as an effective and safe anthelmintic in this species. Pups administered ivermectin had significantly higher erythrocyte counts and significantly lower eosinophil counts compared to controls at 1-2 months post-treatment, confirming that U. sanguinis and/or A. microchir are causatively associated with disease and demonstrating the positive effect of ivermectin treatment on clinical health parameters. Higher growth rates were not seen in ivermectin-treated pups and, unexpectedly, relatively older pups treated with ivermectin demonstrated significantly reduced growth rates when compared to matched saline-control pups. Differences in survival were not identified between treatment groups; however, this was attributed to the unexpectedly low mortality rate of recruited pups, likely due to the unintended recruitment bias towards pups >1-2 months of age for which mortality due to hookworm infection is less likely. This finding highlights the logistical and practical challenges associated with treating pups of this species shortly after birth at a remote colony. This study informs the assessment of the use of anthelmintics as a tool for the conservation management of free-ranging wildlife and outlines essential steps to further the development of strategies to ensure the effective conservation of the Australian sea lion and its parasitic fauna.

  10. Australian English-Language Textbooks: The Gender Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jackie F. K.; Collins, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and extent of gender stereotyping, both linguistic and pictorial, in a set of 10 Australian English-language textbooks for intermediate learners. In order to determine how accurately the books reflect the status of women in contemporary Australian society a content and linguistic analysis was conducted, focusing on,…

  11. [Influence of Professional Contact with Plutonium-239 on Indicators of the Immune Status of the Personnel at Siberian Chemical Plant].

    PubMed

    Oradovskaya, I V; Radzivil, T T

    2015-01-01

    The results of the examination and monitoring of the personnel at the Siberian Chemical Plant (SChP) and adult population of Seversk are presented. The results of primary examination of the personnel who professionally contact the ionizing radiation (IR) from external sources and incorporated 239Pu showed that clinical symptoms of dysfunction of the immune system manifested themselves with a frequency of 75.30%. Infectious-inflammatory diseases (46.95%) and the combined pathology of infectious and allergic character (20.12%) were the most widespread. The allergic diseases (AD) without manifestations of an infectious component were observed not often (7.62%). The monitoring which was carried out for 10 years revealed a decrease in a percentage of persons with clinical signs of disorders of the immune system up to 60.68% among the personnel at the Chemical-Steel Plant and even more among the whole group of the studied personnel at SChP--49.68% (389 : 783). Among the population their frequency made up 51.78%. Features of clinical manifestations of dysfunction ofthe immune system depending on accumulation of 239Pu in the organism are established. Similar dynamics of infectious and infectious and allergic syndromes is revealed when the activity of 239Pu is 40 nCi. AD frequency reliably increased .when the activity of 239Pu is 20 nCi, but if accumulation is higher than 20-40 nCi it decreases and again increases when the activity is over 40 nCi. Pathologies of infectious and allergic genesis are most often observed when the content of 239Pu in an organism is over 40 nCi. Indicators of the immune status (IS) of the personnel at SChP with incorporated 239Pu are analyzed. 59 people--carriers of 239Pu and 408 people without 239Pu accumulated in an organism are examined. In comparison with the control, IS indicators characteristic for all dose loading groups are revealed: increase of lymphocytes, existence of dissociation in indicators of relative and absolute values of the T

  12. Communication: Are Australians Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansford, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the question of the distinctive nature of communication in Australia. Discusses nonverbal messages, gender concerns, historical influences on communication, the Australian accent, communication with indigenous persons, communication apprehension, and classroom communication. Argues that Australians' communication is relatively similar to…

  13. Curriculum Credos of Professional Curriculum Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Edmund C.

    1991-01-01

    Careful work in comparing, analyzing, and critiquing the positions and communications put forth by various professional curriculum organizations would be valuable to the curriculum research community. Provides an example: "Principles for Australian Curriculum Reform," prepared by the Australian Curriculum Studies Association (ACSA). (MLF)

  14. The envenomation syndrome caused by the Australian Red-bellied Black Snake Pseudechis porphyriacus.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J; McGuire, B; McGuire, L; Richardson, P

    2000-12-01

    The Australian elapids inject venom which is characteristic of each species; and which cause characteristic and specific envenomation syndromes in human victims of snakebite. Because many of the medically significant Australian elapids look similar, when glimpsed in the field by snakebite victims, defining human envenomation syndromes with secure species identification has been a slow process. Correlations between securely identified species and the human envenomation syndromes which they produce are still evolving. The genus Pseudechis is the most widespread in Australia of the dangerous Australian elapid genera; and P. porphyriacus, the Red-bellied Black Snake, was the first terrestrial Australian elapid to be described and illustrated and the first to be the subject of experimental study. We present here five previously unreported cases of human envenomation in which the species diagnosis is secure. From these and with the perspective of a selected literature review, we describe the full envenomation syndrome of this species. Until the development of the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories' Venom Detection Kit in 1979 and the occasional case report of victims of securely identified species, envenomation syndromes for most Australian snake species have remained indeterminate, because of the lack of professional expertise in the identification of the species involved. Symptoms of the P. porphyriacus envenomation syndrome include those of bite-site pain, nausea and vomiting, generalised pruritus, chest pain, prostration and abnormalities of taste and smell. Signs include local necrosis and scarring of tissue at the bite-site, gross inflammation of surrounding tissues and, at least in one case, epilepsy. Although envenomation by the Red-bellied Black Snake is not lethal in adults, the correct therapy is Tiger Snake antivenom, administered with judgement, taking into account knowledge of the specific envenomation syndrome of this species and the clinical status of the

  15. Feasibility, relevance and effectiveness of teaching and assessment of ethical status and communication skills as attributes of professionalism.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Abid; Noor, Sahibzada Mahmood; Ayub, Shahid; Ali, Sobia Sabir; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2015-07-01

    To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of teaching and assessing professionalism in a developing country. The pre-intervention and post-intervention study was conducted from January to August 2012 and comprised 7 workshops of three days each that were held at four teaching hospitals of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province in Pakistan. Overall, there were 10 Objective Structured Clinical Examination stations and 10 written scenarios. After the pre-test, workshop was held on various aspects of professionalism which was considered 'intervention', and it was followed by a post-test similar to the pre-test at the end of day 3. Stata 12 was used for all statistical analyses. There were 136 postgraduate residents in the study. The correlation between Objective Structured Clinical Examination stations and written exam for pre-test was 0.42 (p<0.001), while for post-test the correlation was 0.17(p=0.046). Correlation between pre-test written and post-test Objective Structured Clinical Examination stations was 0.23 (p=0.001), but the correlation between pre-test Objective Structured Clinical Examination stations and post-test written was not significant (p>0.05).The standardised effect size for the adjusted regression was 0.37 for both comparisons (p<0.001).Mean pre-test scores were 38.13+/-13.13% vs. 76.50+/-14.4%for the post-test score (p<0.001). Although post-test scores increased significantly both for the Objective Structured Clinical Examination stations and the written scenarios, the former has shown a higher reliability compared to the written test. Furthermore, teaching and assessment of professionalism was found relevant, effective and feasible in resource-constrained countries. Teaching and assessment of professionalism has become globally relevant and is recommended to be included in the curricula of medical institutions.

  16. Australian Apprentice & Trainee Statistics: Electrical and Electronics Trades, 1995 to 1999. Australian Vocational Education & Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Statistics regarding Australians participating in apprenticeships and traineeships in the electrical and electronics trades in 1995-1999 were reviewed to provide an indication of where skill shortages may be occurring or will likely occur in relation to the following occupations: electrical engineering associate professional; electronics…

  17. Professionalism in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  18. Are healthcare professionals working in Australia's immigration detention centres condoning torture?

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2016-07-01

    Australian immigration detention centres are in secluded locations, some on offshore islands, and are subject to extreme secrecy, comparable with 'black sites' elsewhere. There are parallels between healthcare professionals working in immigration detention centres and healthcare professionals involved with or complicit in torture. In both cases, healthcare professionals are conflicted between a duty of care to improve the health of patients and the interests of the government. While this duality of interests has been recognised previously, the full implications for healthcare professionals working in immigration detention have not been addressed. The Australian Government maintains that immigration detention is needed for security checks, but the average duration of immigration detention has increased from 10 weeks to 14 months, and detainees are not informed of the progress of their application for refugee status. Long-term immigration detention causes major mental health problems, is illegal in international law and arguably fulfils the recognised definition of torture. It is generally accepted that healthcare professionals should not participate in or condone torture. Australian healthcare professionals thus face a major ethical dilemma: patients in immigration detention have pressing mental and physical health needs, but providing healthcare might support or represent complicity in a practice that is unethical. Individual healthcare professionals need to decide whether or not to work in immigration detention centres. If they do so, they need to decide for how long and to what extent restrictive contracts and gagging laws will constrain them from advocating for closing detention centres. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. The Status of Archivists in Relation to Other Information Professionals in the Public Service in Africa: A RAMP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Orleans, Jacques

    Prepared under contract with the International Council on Archives, this study is intended to promote the development of the archival and records management professions in Africa by providing basic data on their status in relation to other information professions in the public service, particularly librarians and documentalists. It addresses the…

  20. The Influence That Marital Status Has on the Advancement of Professional Women in Non-Traditional Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Teah

    This document presents the findings of a study that examined whether the marital status of women in New Brunswick (Canada) influenced their ability to obtain administrative or managerial positions within nontraditional fields. The study cited research suggesting that women are still viewed as dependent, passive, and lacking in competitiveness,…

  1. Intergenerational and cross-cultural differences in emotional wellbeing, mental health service utilisation, treatment-seeking preferences and acceptability of psychological treatments for Arab Australians.

    PubMed

    Kayrouz, Rony; Dear, Blake F; Johnston, Luke; Keyrouz, Liliane; Nehme, Edmond; Laube, Roy; Titov, Nickolai

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the intergenerational and cross-cultural differences in emotional wellbeing and acceptability of psychological treatments for Arab Australians. To contribute to the emerging data about the mental health status and needs of Arab Australians. An Internet survey examined psychological distress and functional impairment as measured by the Kessler 10 Item scale (K-10) and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) among Arab Australians. Additional questions enquired about their help-seeking behaviours, barriers to accessing psychological treatments and preferences for delivery of psychological treatments. A total of 252 participants were recruited through public talks, media and online promotions. Forty-three percent of the respondents reported moderate-to-severe functional impairment (M = 9.5; standard deviation (SD) = 1.8), 32% reported high psychological distress (M = 28.5; SD = 5.4) and 30% were born overseas. First-generation Arab Australians experiencing high psychological distress (i.e. K-10 ≥ 22), reported a greater preference for Internet-delivered treatment when compared to their second-generation counterparts. Only 18% of the sample reported seeking help from a mental health professional in the past year. The significant barriers reported by respondents with high psychological distress were poor mental health literacy, lack of time and stigma. Respondents preferred face-to-face (90%) over Internet-delivered treatment (55%). Finally, Arab Australians experienced higher psychological distress and underutilised mental health services when compared to the Australian population. Targeted public health campaigns that make culturally relevant interventions such as modifying existing Internet-delivered treatment for Arab Australians may reduce barriers and increase treatment options for this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Circulating concentrations of biomarkers and metabolites related to vitamin status, one-carbon and the kynurenine pathways in US, Nordic, Asian, and Australian populations123

    PubMed Central

    Midttun, Øivind; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; McCann, Adrian; Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C; Meyer, Klaus; Ulvik, Arve; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Prentice, Ross; Thomson, Cynthia A; Pettinger, Mary; Giles, Graham G; Hodge, Allison; Cai, Qiuyin; Blot, William J; Wu, Jie; Johansson, Mikael; Hultdin, Johan; Grankvist, Kjell; Stevens, Victoria L; McCullough, Marjorie L; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius; Langhammer, Arnulf; Hveem, Kristian; Næss, Marit; Sesso, Howard D; Gaziano, J Michael; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Severi, Gianluca; Zhang, Xuehong; Han, Jiali; Stampfer, Meir J; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; le Marchand, Loic; Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Ziegler, Regina G; Freedman, Neal D; Visvanathan, Kala; Jones, Miranda R; Relton, Caroline; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ueland, Per M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Circulating concentrations of biomarkers that are related to vitamin status vary by factors such as diet, fortification, and supplement use. Published biomarker concentrations have also been influenced by the variation across laboratories, which complicates a comparison of results from different studies. Objective: We robustly and comprehensively assessed differences in biomarkers that are related to vitamin status across geographic regions. Design: The trial was a cross-sectional study in which we investigated 38 biomarkers that are related to vitamin status and one-carbon and tryptophan metabolism in serum and plasma from 5314 healthy control subjects representing 20 cohorts recruited from the United States, Nordic countries, Asia, and Australia, participating in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium. All samples were analyzed in a centralized laboratory. Results: Circulating concentrations of riboflavin, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, folate, vitamin B-12, all-trans retinol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and α-tocopherol as well as combined vitamin scores that were based on these nutrients showed that the general B-vitamin concentration was highest in the United States and that the B vitamins and lipid soluble vitamins were low in Asians. Conversely, circulating concentrations of metabolites that are inversely related to B vitamins involved in the one-carbon and kynurenine pathways were high in Asians. The high B-vitamin concentration in the United States appears to be driven mainly by multivitamin-supplement users. Conclusions: The observed differences likely reflect the variation in intake of vitamins and, in particular, the widespread multivitamin-supplement use in the United States. The results provide valuable information about the differences in biomarker concentrations in populations across continents. PMID:28424186

  3. Circulating concentrations of biomarkers and metabolites related to vitamin status, one-carbon and the kynurenine pathways in US, Nordic, Asian, and Australian populations.

    PubMed

    Midttun, Øivind; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; McCann, Adrian; Fanidi, Anouar; Muller, David C; Meyer, Klaus; Ulvik, Arve; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Prentice, Ross; Thomson, Cynthia A; Pettinger, Mary; Giles, Graham G; Hodge, Allison; Cai, Qiuyin; Blot, William J; Wu, Jie; Johansson, Mikael; Hultdin, Johan; Grankvist, Kjell; Stevens, Victoria L; McCullough, Marjorie L; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius; Langhammer, Arnulf; Hveem, Kristian; Næss, Marit; Sesso, Howard D; Gaziano, J Michael; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Severi, Gianluca; Zhang, Xuehong; Han, Jiali; Stampfer, Meir J; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; le Marchand, Loic; Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Ziegler, Regina G; Freedman, Neal D; Visvanathan, Kala; Jones, Miranda R; Relton, Caroline; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ueland, Per M

    2017-06-01

    Background: Circulating concentrations of biomarkers that are related to vitamin status vary by factors such as diet, fortification, and supplement use. Published biomarker concentrations have also been influenced by the variation across laboratories, which complicates a comparison of results from different studies.Objective: We robustly and comprehensively assessed differences in biomarkers that are related to vitamin status across geographic regions.Design: The trial was a cross-sectional study in which we investigated 38 biomarkers that are related to vitamin status and one-carbon and tryptophan metabolism in serum and plasma from 5314 healthy control subjects representing 20 cohorts recruited from the United States, Nordic countries, Asia, and Australia, participating in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium. All samples were analyzed in a centralized laboratory.Results: Circulating concentrations of riboflavin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, folate, vitamin B-12, all-trans retinol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and α-tocopherol as well as combined vitamin scores that were based on these nutrients showed that the general B-vitamin concentration was highest in the United States and that the B vitamins and lipid soluble vitamins were low in Asians. Conversely, circulating concentrations of metabolites that are inversely related to B vitamins involved in the one-carbon and kynurenine pathways were high in Asians. The high B-vitamin concentration in the United States appears to be driven mainly by multivitamin-supplement users.Conclusions: The observed differences likely reflect the variation in intake of vitamins and, in particular, the widespread multivitamin-supplement use in the United States. The results provide valuable information about the differences in biomarker concentrations in populations across continents.

  4. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  5. Living with aphasia: three Indigenous Australian stories.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Hersh, Deborah; Hayward, Colleen; Fraser, Joan; Brown, Melita

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disorders and stroke in Australian Aboriginal communities is more than twice as high as non-Indigenous Australians. Approximately 30% of people who survive stroke are left with some level of aphasia, and yet Indigenous Australians appear to be infrequent users of speech-language pathology services, and there is virtually no research literature about the experiences of aphasia for this group of people. This paper presents the stories of living with aphasia for three Indigenous Australian men living in Perth, Western Australia. Their narratives were collected by an Indigenous researcher through in-depth, supported interviews, and were explored using both within-case and cross-case analyses for common and recurring themes. It is argued that there is value for speech-language pathologists, and other health professionals, to be aware of the broad experiences of living with aphasia for Indigenous Australians because their stories are rarely heard and because, as with people with aphasia generally, they are at risk of social isolation and tend to lack visibility in the community. This study explores the key issues which emerge for these three men and highlights the need for further research in this area.

  6. Urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen and nutritional status in Japanese professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Hiromi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the nutritional status from the aspect of bone metabolism in Japanese elite male athletes with increased bone resorption. Urinary levels of a bone resorption marker, cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX), were measured in 71 professional baseball players (age, 18-39 years); the mean urinary NTX level was 65.6 (range, 17.5-269.0) nM BCE/mM Cr. Of 71 athletes, 9 with high levels of urinary NTX (greater than mean + 1 SD) were examined by measuring serum biochemical markers and nutritional assessment (simple food frequency questionnaire). Serum biochemical marker analysis showed that 7 of these 9 athletes had vitamin D insufficiency, as indicated by low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and that all 9 athletes showed vitamin K insufficiency as indicated by low levels of vitamins K(1) and K(2). Nutritional assessment revealed high intakes of protein and low intakes of calcium and vitamin D based on adequate intake (AI). However, daily vitamin K intake achieved the AI. These results suggest that there exist elite male athletes who show increased bone resorption and calcium and vitamin D insufficiency. However, there was a discrepancy between vitamin K intake and serum levels of vitamins K(1) and K(2). The present study raised an issue regarding the nutritional status from the point of view of bone metabolism in elite male athletes such as professional baseball players.

  7. Nutritional Status and Daytime Pattern of Protein Intake on Match, Post-Match, Rest and Training Days in Senior Professional and Youth Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Bettonviel A, E O; Brinkmans N, Y J; Russcher, Kris; Wardenaar, Floris C; Witard, Oliver C

    2016-06-01

    The nutritional status of elite soccer players across match, postmatch, training and rest days has not been defined. Recent evidence suggests the pattern of dietary protein intake impacts the daytime turnover of muscle proteins and, as such, influences muscle recovery. We assessed the nutritional status and daytime pattern of protein intake in senior professional and elite youth soccer players and compared findings against published recommendations. Fourteen senior professional (SP) and 15 youth elite (YP) soccer players from the Dutch premier division completed nutritional assessments using a 24-hr web-based recall method. Recall days consisted of a match, postmatch, rest, and training day. Daily energy intake over the 4-day period was similar between SP (2988 ± 583 kcal/day) and YP (2938 ± 465 kcal/day; p = .800). Carbohydrate intake over the combined 4-day period was lower in SP (4.7 ± 0.7 g·kg-1 BM·day-1) vs. YP (6.0 ± 1.5 g·kg-1 BM·day-1, p = .006) and SP failed to meet recommended carbohydrate intakes on match and training days. Conversely, recommended protein intakes were met for SP (1.9 ± 0.3 g·kg-1 BM·day-1) and YP (1.7 ± 0.4 g·kg-1 BM·day-1), with no differences between groups (p = .286). Accordingly, both groups met or exceeded recommended daily protein intakes on individual match, postmatch, rest and training days. A similar "balanced" daytime pattern of protein intake was observed in SP and YP. To conclude, SP increased protein intake on match and training days to a greater extent than YP, however at the expense of carbohydrate intake. The daytime distribution of protein intake for YP and SP aligned with current recommendations of a balanced protein meal pattern.

  8. Associations between Food Environment around Schools and Professionally Measured Weight Status for Middle and High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuyang; Abbott, Joshua K.; Aggarwal, Rimjhim; Tulloch, David L.; Lloyd, Kristen; Yedidia, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obesity rates among school-age children remain high. Access to energy-dense foods at home, in schools, in stores, and restaurants around homes and schools is of concern. Research on the relationship between food environment around schools and students' weight status is inconclusive. This study examines the association between weight status of middle and high school students and proximity to a comprehensive set of food outlets around schools. Methods: Deidentified nurse-measured heights and weights data were obtained for 12,954 middle and high school students attending 33 public schools in four low-income communities in New Jersey. Geocoded locations of supermarkets, convenience stores, small grocery stores, and limited-service restaurants were obtained from commercial sources. Random-effect regression models with robust standard errors were developed to adjust for unequal variances across schools and clustering of students within schools. Results: Proximity to small grocery stores that offered some healthy options (e.g., five fruits, five vegetables, and low-fat/skim milk) and supermarkets was associated with healthier student weight status. Having a small grocery store within 0.25 mile of school and an additional such store within that radius was associated with a lower BMI z-score (p<0.05). An additional supermarket within 0.25 mile of schools was associated with a lower probability of being overweight/obese (p<0.05). Conclusions: Improving access to healthy food outlets, such as small stores, that offer healthy food options and supermarkets around middle and high schools is a potential strategy for improving weight outcomes among students. PMID:25343730

  9. Associations between food environment around schools and professionally measured weight status for middle and high school students.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuyang; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Abbott, Joshua K; Aggarwal, Rimjhim; Tulloch, David L; Lloyd, Kristen; Yedidia, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity rates among school-age children remain high. Access to energy-dense foods at home, in schools, in stores, and restaurants around homes and schools is of concern. Research on the relationship between food environment around schools and students' weight status is inconclusive. This study examines the association between weight status of middle and high school students and proximity to a comprehensive set of food outlets around schools. Deidentified nurse-measured heights and weights data were obtained for 12,954 middle and high school students attending 33 public schools in four low-income communities in New Jersey. Geocoded locations of supermarkets, convenience stores, small grocery stores, and limited-service restaurants were obtained from commercial sources. Random-effect regression models with robust standard errors were developed to adjust for unequal variances across schools and clustering of students within schools. Proximity to small grocery stores that offered some healthy options (e.g., five fruits, five vegetables, and low-fat/skim milk) and supermarkets was associated with healthier student weight status. Having a small grocery store within 0.25 mile of school and an additional such store within that radius was associated with a lower BMI z-score (p<0.05). An additional supermarket within 0.25 mile of schools was associated with a lower probability of being overweight/obese (p<0.05). Improving access to healthy food outlets, such as small stores, that offer healthy food options and supermarkets around middle and high schools is a potential strategy for improving weight outcomes among students.

  10. Towards a smoke-free hospital: how the smoking status of health professionals influences their knowledge, attitude and clinical activity. Results from a hospital in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, E; Marani, A; Salvati, O; Mangiaracina, G; Prestigiacomo, C; Osborn, J F; Cattaruzza, M S

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, the prevalence of smoking among health professionals is higher than in the general population and this might hamper their role in the promotion of health. This study aimed to investigate how the smoking status of healthcare professionals might influence knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice in a hospital in central Italy in order to enforce effective tobacco control measures. Physicians and professionals of the hospital were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire which yielded epidemiological and environmental information on knowledge, attitude, clinical practice and quality of the hospital environments, in relation to smoking. Overall, among the employees of the hospital, the smoking prevalence was 47%, (42% among physicians and 43% among nurses); 30% admitted smoking in the hospital and three quarters of the smokers would like to quit. Some knowledge, opinions and attitudes differ statistically among the smoking categories. For example, only 35% of the smokers admitted that smoking is more dangerous to health than atmospheric and car pollution compared with 60% of the ex or never smokers (p=0.04). Fewer smokers realize that their behavior is seen as a role model by patients. A greater percentage of smokers state that patients (34%) and visitors (43%) often smoke in hospital and these percentages are significantly higher than those reported by ex or never smokers (p≤0.05). All smokers claim that they never smoke in patient rooms, infirmaries and clinics, whereas over 20% of ex or never smokers report that smoking sometimes occurs in these places (p=0.015). The mean concentration of PM 2.5 in the 25 rooms was 2.4 μg/m3 with a range from 1 to 7 μg/m3. This study implies that the prevalence of smoking among health professionals may be very high, and might be twice the rate observed in the general population. Generally, smokers report less knowledge compared with ex and never-smokers and it seems that they systematically underestimate the

  11. 30-year trends in overweight, obesity and waist-to-height ratio by socioeconomic status in Australian children, 1985 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, L L; Mihrshahi, S; Gale, J; Drayton, B A; Bauman, A; Mitchell, J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective: To report 30-year (1985–2015) prevalence trends in overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity among children by school level and socioeconomic status (SES). Subjects/Methods: Five cross-sectional, population child surveys (age 4–18 years; n=27 808) conducted in 1985–1997–2004–2010–2015 in New South Wales, Australia. Outcomes were prevalence of measured overweight, obesity and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR⩾0.5) by sex, school level (children (primary) and adolescents (high)) and SES tertile. Results: In 2015, the prevalences of overweight, obesity and WHtR⩾0.5 in children were 16.4%, 7.0% and 14.6%, respectively, and in adolescents 21.9%, 17.2% and 4.6%, respectively. Obesity prevalence has not significantly changed in children or adolescents since 1997, nor since 2010 (children, P=0.681; adolescents, P=0.21). Overweight has not significantly changed in children since 1997, but has in adolescents since 1985, with a relative increase of 16 percentage points (P<0.001) between 2010 and 2015. WHtR⩾0.5 prevalence has significantly changed since 1985, except in adolescent girls between 2010 and 2015. Between 2010 and 2015 the relative increase in WHtR⩾0.5 was 17 and 40 percentage points in children and adolescent boys, respectively. Significant disparities in prevalence rates between children and adolescents from low and high SES backgrounds began in 2010 for overweight, since 1997 for obesity and since 2004 for WHtR⩾0.5. Differences between SES groups have become larger over the past 18 years. Conclusions: Since 1997, obesity has remained stable, and overweight has stabilized in children, not in adolescents. WHtR⩾0.5 significantly increased between 1985 and 2015, with prevalence rates at each survey around twice the obesity prevalence. Compared with high SES children and adolescents, the risk of overweight, obesity and WHtR⩾0.5 was significantly higher for low SES children and adolescents. The findings are highly relevant to

  12. Use of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improves nutritional status but not bone mass or turnover, in a group of Australian aged care residents.

    PubMed

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A

    2009-07-01

    In residential care, inadequate calcium and folate intakes and low serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are common. We assessed whether daily provision of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improved nutritional status (serum micronutrients), bone quality (heel ultrasound), bone turnover markers (parathyroid hormone, C-terminal collagen I telopeptide, terminal propeptide of type I procollagen), and/or muscle strength and mobility in a group of Australian aged care residents. One hundred and seven residents completed the study (mean (SD) age: 79.9 (10.1) years; body weight: 68.4 (15.4) kg). The median (inter-quartile range) volume of fortified milk consumed was 160 (149) ml/day. At the end of the study, the median daily vitamin D intake increased to 10.4 (8.7) μg (P < .001), which is 70% of the adequate intake (15 μg); and calcium density (mg/MJ) was higher over the study period compared with baseline (161 ± 5 mg/MJ vs. 142 ± 4 mg/MJ, P < .001). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased by 23 ± 2 nmol/L (83 (107)%, P < .001), yet remained in the insufficient range (mean 45 ± 2 nmol/L). Consumption of greater than the median intake of milk (160 ml/day) (n = 54, 50%) increased serum 25(OH)D levels into the adequate range (53 ± 2 nmol/L) and reduced serum parathyroid hormone by 24% (P = .045). There was no effect on bone quality, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, or mobility. Consumption of fortified milk increased dietary vitamin D intake and raised serum 25(OH)D concentrations, but not to the level thought to reduce fracture risk. If calcium-fortified milk also was used in cooking and milk drinks, this approach could allow residents to achieve a dietary calcium intake close to recommended levels. A vitamin D supplement would be recommended to ensure adequate vitamin D status for all residents.

  13. Over and undernutrition in the children of Australian immigrants: Assessing the influence of birthplace of primary carer and English language use at home on the nutritional status of 4-5-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Renzaho, A M N; Oldroyd, J; Burns, C; Waters, E; Riggs, E; Renzaho, C

    2009-01-01

    To document the relationship between childhood nutrition status and ethnicity (defined as the birthplace of primary carer and English language use at home) using a nationally representative sample of 4- to 5-year-old children. Cross-sectional population survey of 4 983 4- to 5-year-old children (2 537 boys and 2 446 girls) as part of Wave 1 (2004) of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Overweight/obesity and thinness using the newly published body mass index cut-off points of Cole (2007). In total, 20.6% (95%CI 19.5, 21.7) of children aged 4 to 5 years were estimated to be overweight or obese, while 1.0% (95%CI 0.8, 1.3) was thin. Unadjusted analyses showed a significant relationship between childhood overweight/obesity and primary carer's country of birth (chi2=15.9, p<0.01), but the significance became minimal after adjusting for socio-economic and demographic factors. The adjusted model suggests that boys of primary carer's born in Europe (excluding UK and Ireland) were less likely to be overweight/obese than boys whose primary carers were born in Australia, but the overall effect size was negligible. No difference was found for girls. In addition, boys who mainly spoke English at home were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR=0.49; 95%CI 0.27, 0.88; p=0.017) and thin (OR=0.27; 95%CI 0.12, 0.62; p=0.002) than boys who spoke a language other than English at home. No difference was found for girls. There is a relationship between main language spoken at home and nutritional status in 4-5-year-old boys but not girls. The use of English language at home may be a protective factor for normal weight in young boys. After adjustment for socio-economic and demographics characteristics, there was a negligible relationship between overweight/obesity in children and their primary carer's country of birth.

  14. Reporting of suicide in the Australian media.

    PubMed

    Pirkis, Jane; Francis, Catherine; Blood, Richard Warwick; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew; Putnis, Peter

    2002-04-01

    The media monitoring project aimed to establish a baseline picture of the extent, nature and quality of reporting of suicide by the Australian media, with a view to informing future strategies intended to optimize reporting of suicide. Newspaper, television and radio items on suicide were retrieved over 12 months. Identifying and descriptive information were extracted for each item. Approximately 10% of items were rated for quality, using a rating scale based on criteria from Achieving the Balance, a kit designed to promote awareness among media professionals of issues relating to suicide. The scale ranged from 0 (poor quality) to 100 (good quality). Reporting of suicide was extensive (with 4813 items retrieved). The nature of reporting was variable. Items tended to be about completed suicide (rather than attempted suicide or suicidal ideation), and most commonly involved content related to an individual's experiences, policy/programme initiatives and/or suicide statistics, although there were differences across media types. Items showed variability across dimensions of quality. The majority of suicide items did not have examples of inappropriate language, were not inappropriately located, did not use the word 'suicide' in the headline, and did not use explicit photographs/diagrams or footage. However, around half of the suicide items provided a detailed discussion of the method of self-harm and portrayed suicide as merely a social phenomenon. Where items concerned the suicide of a celebrity, reference was commonly made to that person's celebrity status. Most items failed to provide information on help services. The median total quality score was 57.1%. The reporting of suicide is extensive across all media types, and varies in nature and quality. In general, good items outnumber poorer items. However, there are still opportunities for improving media reporting of suicide.

  15. The mental health of Australian elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gulliver, Amelia; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Mackinnon, Andrew; Batterham, Philip J; Stanimirovic, Rosanna

    2015-05-01

    Currently, little is known about the prevalence of mental disorders in athletes. This study aims to investigate Australian elite athletes' symptoms of general psychological distress and common mental disorders. A cross-sectional survey design was employed to assess self-reported symptom prevalence. A total of 224 elite athletes (118 female, 106 male) from national sporting organisations in Australia were administered a self-report internet-based survey comprising measures of demographic status and mental health symptoms. Overall, 46.4% of athletes were experiencing symptoms of at least one of the mental health problems assessed. Percentages meeting criteria for mental disorders were similar to previous epidemiological studies of both international athlete and community samples: depression (27.2%), eating disorder (22.8%), general psychological distress (16.5%), social anxiety (14.7%), generalised anxiety disorder (7.1%), and panic disorder (4.5%). Injured athletes had higher levels of both symptoms of depression (t=3.23, p=.001) and generalised anxiety disorder (t=2.26, p=.025). The level of symptoms of mental health problems reported by elite athletes appears similar to that observed in the community. However, caution must be exercised in interpreting the findings, as possible demographic differences between athletes and comparison population datasets may exist. Furthermore, self-selection of respondents in the present study may have reduced the representativeness of the sample and the validity of the comparisons. Athletes, particularly those currently injured, should be well-supported to seek help for mental disorders through access to mental health professionals. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-Standard Assessment Practices in the Evaluation of Communication in Australian Aboriginal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal children typically receive communication assessment services from Standard Australian English (SAE) speaking non-Aboriginal speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Educational assessments, including intelligence testing, are also primarily conducted by non-Aboriginal educational professionals. While the current paper will show…

  17. Against Short Term Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Anne

    2011-01-01

    A three-year study was conducted involving teacher interviews and observation in one high school in NSW. Initially the contact between teacher and researcher came from an Australian Government Quality Teaching Program that provided 12-month funding to support teachers in professional learning. The role of the academic partner was to facilitate…

  18. Professional Staff Carve out a New Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 paper, "The invisible workers" by Szekeres, lamented the "invisibility" of professional staff in Australian higher education. Even then, professional staff constituted more than half the university workforce, but they were defined by what they were not (non-academic) and they experienced a high level of frustration in…

  19. A Reflection on Continuing Professional Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Barrie

    2017-01-01

    Barrie Brennan's thesis entitled "Continuing Professional Education in Australia. A Tale of Missed Opportunities" offers a history of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the Australian context. This paper arose from Brennan's research for his thesis and is focused on issues that arose from the introduction of Australia's…

  20. Professionalization and its discontents.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    The sociology of professions has generally considered professionalization as a desirable outcome for occupational groups. This case study of professionalization in the UK National Health Service, based on an analysis of documents, presents a challenge to that view. For many groups, the state is now so comprehensively dominant in the process of professionalization that it can effectively dictate professional status on its own terms. Many of the advantages that accrued to professions that developed historically will not be available to groups that professionalize under this new regime. Though elite groups within the profession studied (Operating Department Practice) were strongly in favour of professionalization, throughout the process there were also dissenting voices. This case study will show how professionalization, despite being described as the 'Holy Grail' by those in favour of it, turned out to be, at best, a mixed blessing. While medicine may still be able to negotiate with the state for other groups, professionalization can in the future be equated with regulation.

  1. Demographic factors, weight management behaviours, receipt of healthcare professional's counselling and having knowledge in basic anthropometric measurements associated with underassessment of weight status in overweight and obese type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Mogre, Victor; Nsoh, Jonas A; Wanaba, Peter; Apala, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of underassessment of weight status and weight management behaviours and to evaluate how underassessment of weight status is associated with demographic factors, receipt of healthcare professional's weight management counselling, weight management behaviours and having knowledge in basic anthropometric measurements. This cross-sectional study included 222 overweight and obese type 2 diabetes patients. Participants' weight and height were determined using appropriate tools. Demographic characteristics, knowledge in basic anthropometric measurements and self-assessment of weight status were determined using a questionnaire. They were more overweight (65.8%) than obese (34.2%) participants. Sixty percent reported receipt of weight management counselling from health care professionals. The majority (50.5%) of the participants did not know which category of weight status they were, 30.6% assessed themselves as normal weight and 18.0% assessed themselves as overweight/obese. Prevalence of underassessment was 63.6%. Participants underassessing (2.9% vs. 20%; p=0.004) their weight status were less likely to be able to measure their weight and calculate BMI than their counterparts who accurately self-assessed their weight status. Overweight participants were 3 times more likely to underassess their weight status than obese participants. Underassessment of weight status was less likely in females and in participants who reported receipt of weight management counselling than in those who did not receive weight management counselling. Underassessment of weight status was more common in overweight than in obese participants. Receipt of weight management counselling was associated with having accurate assessment of weight status. Lack of knowledge in anthropometric measurements was widespread. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of patients' professional and educational status on perception of an antibiotic policy campaign: a pilot study at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Athanasia, Sofia; Plachouras, Diamantis; Kanellaki, Stavroula; Bobota, Fani; Tzepetzi, Georgia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are overused in many European countries, particularly Greece, leading to emerging antimicrobial resistance with sustained high mortality among hospitalised patients. Limited data are available regarding factors influencing people's knowledge and the impact of public campaigns on antibiotic misuse. Patients' beliefs regarding antibiotics were investigated in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Athens, Greece. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted to examine patients' opinions on antibiotic use in the waiting room of the outpatient clinic. All participants read an illustrated pocket-sized leaflet endorsed by official authorities on the European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD). Volunteers then completed a questionnaire containing information on demographics, knowledge on antibiotic use and overuse, and remarks on the quality of the leaflet's content. In a logistic regression analysis including age, sex, educational level and professional status of 605 eligible participants, women were more aware [odds ratio (OR)=3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-5.8; P<0.0001] and people with elementary education were less aware (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.1-0.9; P=0.04) of antimicrobial misuse. Workers were also more aware than retired or unemployed people (P=0.007). However, only 16.0% of participants knew about the EAAD. All participants agreed on antibiotic misuse in Greece, mentioning patient accountability as the main cause (26.8%), an opinion more pronounced in highly educated individuals. In conclusion, targeted interventions taking into account variations in educational level and employee status should be considered in future scheduled educative campaigns on antibiotic overconsumption in highly prescribing antibiotic countries.

  3. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice.

  4. Intellectual disability in Indigenous Australians: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Balaratnasingam, Sivasankaran; Roy, Meera

    2015-12-01

    Literature on Indigenous Australians (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people) and intellectual disability (ID) is summarized in order to identify current state of knowledge, gaps, and areas for further research. A selective review of psychiatric literature using relevant medical databases was undertaken. Key articles were identified and their findings described. ID is reported to be more prevalent in Indigenous Australians. Sociocultural constructs and a lack of validated psychometric measures affect what is considered to be ID in Indigenous communities. Prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal factors impair brain development and contribute to ID in Indigenous communities. Comorbid physical and psychiatric disorders need to be assessed and managed. ID is an emerging area of health concern for general and mental health professionals working with Indigenous Australians. This important area requires further research, appropriate training, and resourcing. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  5. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants…

  6. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants…

  7. Military Retirement Reform: An Australian Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    international retirement models, public retirement, private retirement, DFRB, DFRDB, MSBS, High-3, REDUX 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 83 16. PRICE CODE 17...ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ADF Australian Defence Force COLA cost of living adjustment CPI consumer price index CSB career status bonus CSS...calculations that include income and total assets (with exemptions for house ownership); for example, a retiree with other retirement income over AU$47,605

  8. Professionalism. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Stephanie; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Presents four articles about professionalism in early childhood education: "Early Childhood Education as an Emerging Profession: Ongoing Conversations" (Stephanie Feeney and Nancy Freeman); "Voices in Search of Cultural Continuity in Communities" (Marion Cowee and others); "Early Childhood Professionals: Current Status and…

  9. AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION CONFERENCE, 1962, REVIEWS, PAPERS, AND REPORTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Melbourne (Australia).

    IN THIS REPORT OF AN AUSTRALIAN TECHNICAL CONFERENCE ON AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, EMPHASIS IS PLACED ON CASE STUDIES AND RESEARCH APPLICABLE TO PROFESSIONAL EXTENSION WORK, INCLUDING FARMER CONTACTS AND SUCH SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES AS LIAISON WORK AND COURSE WORK IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES. THE FIRST SECTION DESCRIBES SERVICES IN EACH STATE AND IN THE…

  10. Australian Engineering Educators' Attitudes towards Aboriginal Cultures and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfinch, Thomas; Prpic, Juliana Kaya; Jolly, Lesley; Leigh, Elyssebeth; Kennedy, Jade

    2017-01-01

    In Australia, representation of Aboriginal populations within the engineering profession is very low despite participation targets set by Government departments, professional bodies and Universities. Progressing the Aboriginal inclusion agenda within Australian Engineering Education requires a clearer understanding of engineering educators'…

  11. The Social and Lifestyle Characteristics of Australian Orienteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, David

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 1,296 members of the Orienteering Federation of Australia indicates that Australian orienteers are well educated, have well-paid professional jobs, possess a strong commitment to a healthy lifestyle, and are generally interested in outdoor activities. Most were introduced to orienteering through personal contact with family members and…

  12. Examining Education Qualifications for Australian Vocational Education Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kim Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the practice of professional development within the vocational education and training (VET) arena. The study objective was to explore appropriate education qualifications for Australian VET practitioners in the tourism and hospitality sector required for effective teaching practice. The study was conducted utilising…

  13. Examining Education Qualifications for Australian Vocational Education Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kim Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the practice of professional development within the vocational education and training (VET) arena. The study objective was to explore appropriate education qualifications for Australian VET practitioners in the tourism and hospitality sector required for effective teaching practice. The study was conducted utilising…

  14. Wider Professional Experiences: The Value of Pre-Service Teachers Learning in Wider Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Peta; Hill, Angela; Navin, Fiona; Knight, Cecily

    2013-01-01

    Within teacher education, professional standards across Australian jurisdictions consistently note the importance of developing the ability to "engage professionally" with a community (QCT, 2009; AITSL, 2012). Paralleling this however, are calls for more "classroom" time (Australian Government, 2012). This paper explores…

  15. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Stephen T; Duursma, Daisy E; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K; Weston, Michael A; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Franklin, Donald C

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically with new data for existing fields and the addition of new fields. The dataset has already had, and will continue to have applications in Australian and international ornithology, especially those that require standard information for a large number of taxa.

  16. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Duursma, Daisy E.; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K.; Weston, Michael A.; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M.; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Franklin, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically with new data for existing fields and the addition of new fields. The dataset has already had, and will continue to have applications in Australian and international ornithology, especially those that require standard information for a large number of taxa. PMID:26594379

  17. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Duursma, Daisy E.; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K.; Weston, Michael A.; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M.; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Franklin, Donald C.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically with new data for existing fields and the addition of new fields. The dataset has already had, and will continue to have applications in Australian and international ornithology, especially those that require standard information for a large number of taxa.

  18. Biochemical assessments of retinol, alpha-tocopherol, pyridoxal--5-phosphate oxidative stress index and total antioxidant status in adolescent professional basketball players and sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Necat; Erel, Ozcan; Hazer, Muhsin; Bağci, Cahit; Namiduru, Emine; Gül, Ece

    2007-01-01

    Physical training is known to increase the antioxidant defence system and reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, intense physical aerobic and anaerobic training with competition, such as those imposed on young professional basketball players can induce an increase of oxidative stress, which can be implicated with overtraining. The aim of this study was to test the effect of training and competition load on oxidative stress, antioxidant status, and vitamin levels in basketball players. Oxidative Stres Index (OSI 1), Total Peroxide (TPx) antioxidant (vitamin E, A and The total antioxidant status (TAC 1)), biochemical lipid parameters, as well as training results were measured. Results showed that all plasma vitamin levels were significantly higher in basketball players (vitamin A: 1.61 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, vitamin E: 26.45 +/- 0.72 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 10.58 +/- 0.7 mgr/l) than sedentary controls (vitamin A: 1.22 +/- 0.04 mmol /l, vitamin E: 19.24 +/- 0.73 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 6.0 +/- 0.35 mgr/l) (p < 0.01). In addition TAC 1 was 2.06 +/- 0.02 and 1.89 +/- 0.01 mmol Trolox eq/L in basketball players and controls, respectively (p < 0.01). Conversely OSI was 0.89 +/- 0.09 arbitrary unit and 0.88 +/- 0.071 arbitrary unit in basketball players and controls, respectively (p > 0.05). However, total plasma peroxide level (TPx) of basketball players and controls was not statistically different (18.55 +/- 2.07 and 17.18 +/- 1.61 micromol H2O2/L, respectively; p > 0.05). We conclude that physical exercise increase antioxidant levels and cause balance of the homeostasis. Training can not have positive or negative effects on oxidative stress depending on training load. The results suggested that oxidative stress and antioxidant measurement are significant in the biological follow-up of young basketball players.

  19. The National Action Plan. Australian School Science Education National Action Plan, 2008-2012. Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrum, Denis; Rennie, Leonie J.

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the Australian Government released a report, commissioned by the then Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs, entitled "The Status and Quality of Teaching and Learning of Science in Australian Schools" (Goodrum, Hackling, & Rennie, 2001). Its recommendations included actions to address raising community…

  20. Professional Employees and Collective Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    The status of professional employees at colleges and their role within the unionized workplace are considered in two articles. In "The Position of Professional Employees," Eliot Freidson discusses findings of a study on professionals and implications for college collective bargaining. Attention is directed to the validity of the position…

  1. Teaching Professionalism: Passing the Torch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, William A.; Dickey, Nancy W.

    1998-01-01

    Medical faculty must ensure that students understand the appropriate balance between financial and professional considerations. Faculty should place financial considerations in proper perspective and should teach the basic components of professionalism, how current cost-containment efforts may threaten medicine's professional status, appropriate…

  2. Social determinants of health and local government: understanding and uptake of ideas in two Australian states.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Angela; Lane, Anna; Lewis, Felicity-Ann; Baum, Fran; Harris, Patrick

    2016-10-23

    To examine the awareness and perceptions of local government staff about the social determinants of health (SDoH) and health inequity and use of these ideas to shape policy and practice. 96 staff at 17 councils in South Australia or New South Wales responded to questions in a pilot online survey concerning: sources of knowledge about, familiarity with the evidence on, attitudes towards, and uses of ideas about the social determinants of health. Eight of 68 SA councils and 16 of 152 NSW councils were randomly selected stratified by state and metropolitan status. Differences between states and metropolitan/non-metropolitan status were explored. The majority of respondents (88.4%) reported some familiarity with ideas about the broad determinants of health and 90% agreed that the impact of policy action on health determinants should be considered in all major government policy and planning initiatives. Research articles, government/professional reports, and professional contacts were rated as important sources of knowledge about the social determinants of health. Resources need to be dedicated to systematic research on practical implementation of interventions on social determinants of health inequities and towards providing staff with more practical information about interventions and tools to evaluate those interventions. The findings suggest there is support for action addressing the social determinants of health in local government. The findings extend similar research regarding SDoH and government in NZ and Canada to Australian local government. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Australian Courseware in Geographical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidstone, John G.; Gerber, Rod

    Students pursuing Australian studies should be given every possible opportunity to work with materials produced in Australia. There is a substantial and growing list of good curriculum software written within Australia and from an Australian perspective which can add interest and excitement to Australian geography classrooms. Computers can be used…

  4. An Investigation of the Importance of Stress as a Factor in the Academic Performance of Australian Adolescents. Report to the Council of the Brisbane College of Advanced Education, Following a Professional Experience Program during Semester 1, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe, John P.

    The research described in this report, part of a professional experience program funded by Brisbane (Australia) College of Advanced Education, was undertaken to investigate the incidence and causes of high stress levels among secondary students in Queensland, and to recommend ways of helping these students reduce stress or cope with it more…

  5. The complexities of defining nurse practitioner scope of practice in the Australian context.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Andrew; Cashin, Andrew; Bryce, Julianne; Kelly, John G; Buckely, Tom

    2016-01-01

    To explore the legislative and regulatory constraints that defines nurse practitioner scope of practice within the Australian context. Nurse practitioners have been endorsed to practice in Australia for over 13 years. However, despite this lengthy period, there still remains confusion amongst newly endorsed nurse practitioners and their employers as to what determines the scope of their practice in Australia. A review of available policy and regulatory documents related to the Australian operational requirements for nurse practitioner scope of practice cited within or referred to by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia. Data were collected over a 2-month period in 2013. This utilized the current standards, codes and guidelines cited by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia related to scope of practice and nurse practitioner, as well as legislation and regulation referred to in relation to nurse practitioner practice. Information was also obtained through government health and professional organization websites. All information in the literature regarding current and past status, and nomenclature of advanced practice nursing was considered relevant. Implications for nursing: Providing a means of interpreting the determinants of nurse practitioner scope of practice within Australia. The factors that determine nurse practitioner scope of practice, education, clinical experience, and competence leading to endorsement, are straightforward. However, the context of clinical practice, including jurisdictional restrictions, is major barriers to the expression of nurse practitioner scope of practice. These restrictions, although not insurmountable, continue to hinder nurse practitioners from practicing to their full scope of practice.

  6. Representations of childhood obesity in Australian newsprint media and academic literature.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Amber

    2011-04-01

    To examine how the issue of childhood obesity is represented in Australian newsprint media and academic literature. Australian newsprint media coverage and academic literature on childhood obesity during the first three months of 2009 was analysed using Bacchi's method of problem representation. The two types of literature examined offered two dominant paradigms for childhood obesity treatment and prevention solutions: the individual and the social-structural. The individual behaviour change account emphasises the role of parents in providing children with healthy food and physical activity, placing them at fault for their obese children. The account focusing on the circumstances within which people live--such as the physical environment, lifestyle, socio-economic status, access to services and advertising/marketing of food aimed at children--places responsibility on the government to respond with policy change. While both the individual and social-structural paradigms are found in each source, newsprint media favours the individual responsibility account while the academic literature favours the social-structural account. Public health professionals may need to be more media savvy to shift this focus. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  7. Professional boundaries and the ethics of dual and multiple overlapping relationships in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crowden, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    The moral status of professional boundaries and the ethical nature of dual and multiple overlapping human relationships in contemporary clinical practice remain enduring problems in all health care disciplines. In this paper I explore the ethics of dual or multiple overlapping relationship and apply a virtue ethics framework to the case of psychotherapy. After clarifying the context and meaning of commonly used terminology, and considering what some of the key Australian codes of ethics relevant to psychotherapy advise about dual relationships, I identify some commonly occurring situations where overlapping relationships are unavoidable. A case study from a rural context where size, isolation, and community expectations profoundly impact on the capacity of a psychotherapist to maintain clearly defined professional therapeutic relationship boundaries is analysed. The rural example is pertinent. A virtue ethics approach goes some way toward alleviating perceptions about the nature of dual relationships that contribute to an enduring reticence amongst psychotherapists (and other professionals) to practice in rural settings. Clearly, if a dual relationship involves exploitation then that relationship is a boundary crossing that should rightly be categorised as a boundary violation. Boundary violations are exploitative and unethical. However, some dual relationships may involve boundary crossings that are not necessarily boundary violations. Despite their general prohibition by Australian (and many other countries') codes of ethics relevant to psychotherapy, I argue that in certain situations, if a psychotherapist (who crosses a professional relationship boundary) acts with professional integrity from the distinct professional role-related virtues and/or regulative ideals that ensure the goals of psychotherapy (to increase autonomy and psychological wellbeing) are met, then a dual or multiple overlapping relationship in psychotherapy will be ethical.

  8. Reworking professional nursing identity.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Judith

    2003-10-01

    In spite of professional socialization through nursing education programs, new graduates experience stress as they become working professionals. This grounded theory study explores experienced nurses' perceptions of how they became professional. The central problem for nurses was dissonance between expectations and experiences; they addressed this through an iterative, three-stage process of reworking professional identity. The stages of this process are assuming adequacy, realizing practice, and developing a reputation. Iterations of this process occur as new discrepancies are noticed, enhanced awareness dawns, practice changes, learning is undertaken, or experienced nurses become relative novices in another work area. Nurses move through stages more quickly and at different levels with each iteration. Three contextual factors influence the process: expectation; perception of the status accorded by others to nursing; and supportiveness by acceptance, assistance, and advocacy from others in the workplace. These findings expand knowledge about professional socialization and how nurses themselves understand developing professional identity.

  9. Environmental and perceived stress in Australian dental undergraduates: Preliminary outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Astill, Shannon; Ricketts, Nikelle; Singh, Love-Amrit; Kurtz, Dylan; Gim, Yong Hoon; Huang, Boyen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dental students have reported a high prevalence of psychological stress and the causes are associated with the challenging dental environmental and demographic factors. This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation on dental students’ stress status, using a sample of first-to-third-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in an Australian university. Special interests included causes of dental environmental stress and access to help services. Methods. A sample of 145 students was surveyed with a modified Dental Environmental Survey and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale in 2014. The participants’ demographic information was also collected. Results. The response rate was 95.4%. Second-year (P = 0.042), third-year (P < 0.001) and employed students (P = 0.027) were more likely to report stress resulting from transition to clinical learning. Third-year students were more often stressed about communicating and approaching staff (P = 0.023) as well as different opinions between staff (P < 0.001) and reduced holidays (P < 0.001). Students that were younger than 21 years of age (P = 0.001), that were first years (P < 0.001), and that were not in a relationship (P = 0.010) more often found difficulty of course work stressful. Students who were not in a relationship more often considered learning manual dexterity a source of stress (P = 0.034). Students previously seeking professional help were more likely to be stressed (P = 0.010). Conclusion. Causes of dental environment stress varied among years of study and demographic backgrounds. Professional support to stressed students should be enhanced. Further investigation is indicated. PMID:28096955

  10. Prevalence and associations of psychological distress in Australian junior medical officers.

    PubMed

    Lau, Michelle W; Li, Wenlong E; Llewellyn, Anthony; Cyna, Allan M

    2017-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of psychological distress in Australian junior medical officers (JMO) and investigate the determinants associated with psychological distress over a 3-year (2014-2016) period. JMO were surveyed using the 2014-2016 JMO Census (n = 220, 399 and 466 each year; response rate approximately 15%). Levels of psychological distress were assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). A K10 ≥ 25 was chosen to indicate high psychological distress, and this determinant was compared to various demographic and work-related factors. Australian JMO experience a high level of psychological distress (mean: 18.1, median 16.0). There were no differences in demographical variables, such as age, gender, marital status, dependants and between postgraduate years 1 and 2. Increasing hours worked per week was associated with a higher K10, with every hour worked increasing odds by 3%. Attitudinal items, including feeling unwilling to study medicine again, feeling poorly trained and experiences of bullying, were related to high psychological distress. Coping strategies like exercise and spending time with friends correlated positively with lower distress, while time off work, frequent alcohol use, smoking and drug use were associated with increased distress levels. Of those with a high K10, 54.5% indicated that they did not use any form of professional support; 17.83% expressed that given their time again, they would not choose to study medicine. A focused approach to JMO support and education regarding significant risk factors identified is likely to assist health policies that aim to improve the mental well-being of Australian JMO. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Australian Rural Accountants' Views on How Locally Provided CPD Compares with City-Based Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses Australian rural accountants' attitudes and levels of satisfaction with continuing professional development (CPD), based on whether the CPD was delivered by a professional accounting body in a rural or metropolitan area. The paper responds to prior research that finds rural accountants are dissatisfied with professional…

  12. Australian Rural Accountants' Views on How Locally Provided CPD Compares with City-Based Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses Australian rural accountants' attitudes and levels of satisfaction with continuing professional development (CPD), based on whether the CPD was delivered by a professional accounting body in a rural or metropolitan area. The paper responds to prior research that finds rural accountants are dissatisfied with professional…

  13. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  14. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  15. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  16. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes…

  17. Trialling the Australian Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashman, Di

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, St. Leonards Primary School in Tasmania, along with other selected schools throughout Australia, trialled the draft Australian Curriculum: Mathematics. Mathematics had been a whole school focus at St. Leonards Primary School for several years, and the school found that the opportunity to be part of the trial strongly connected with their…

  18. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes…

  19. Australian Film Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Although Australia had a vigorous film industry in the silent film era, it was stifled in the 1930s when United States and British interests bought up the Australian distribution channels and closed down the indigenous industry. However, the industry and film study have undergone a renaissance since the advent of the Labor government in 1972,…

  20. Numeracy and Australian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgasz, Helen; Leder, Gilah

    2016-01-01

    Australian teachers, recruited via Facebook, completed an online survey about aspects of numeracy. The survey was designed to explore views on numeracy and capacity to respond to numeracy tasks. In this paper, we focus primarily on responses to two numeracy tasks--one numerical, the other requiring critical evaluation. On the first item, 40%…

  1. Music in Australian Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle, Graham

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a survey of music in Australian schools. The survey included all types of schools, and includes facilities and equipment for musical education, and the use made of them. The courses of study, organization of musical activities, finance, supervision, teacher training, and…

  2. Fraud and Australian Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Brian

    1989-01-01

    A series of highly publicized cases of alleged fraud in the Australian academic community are described. Each case reveals an apparent failure of peer review. The right to pursue investigations and make comments that may offend powerful figures within the scholarly community is precarious. (MLW)

  3. Australian Film Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Although Australia had a vigorous film industry in the silent film era, it was stifled in the 1930s when United States and British interests bought up the Australian distribution channels and closed down the indigenous industry. However, the industry and film study have undergone a renaissance since the advent of the Labor government in 1972,…

  4. Team-building through sailing: effects on health status, job satisfaction and work performance of health care professionals involved in organ and tissue donation.

    PubMed

    Ponzin, Diego; Fasolo, Adriano; Vidale, Enrico; Pozzi, Annalaura; Bottignolo, Elisa; Calabrò, Francesco; Rupolo, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a team-building learning project on job satisfaction, psychological wellbeing, and performance of health care workers involved in the process of organ and tissue donation. The project was conducted between June and September 2011 and consisted of two one-day meetings and a one week sailing, involving 20 staff members. GHQ-12, MBI-HSS, and 25 items taken from the Multidimensional Organizational Health Questionnaire (MOHQ) were used to assess health status, burnout, and job satisfaction. Results of the descriptive analyses were expressed as mean ± SD and as counts and percentages; Chi-square test was used to evaluate statistical significance of differences before and after the initiative. 6 (30,0%) participants showed the likelihood to suffering from anxiety and depression (i.e. recognized as 'cases' by the GHQ-12), 3 (15.0%) of them at baseline and 3 (15.0%), different from the previous ones, in the post-intervention. The presence of stress was revealed in 9 (45.0%) and 12 subjects (60.0%) before and after the experience, respectively (6 subjects showed the presence of stress in both circumstances). We documented 4 burnout cases, 3 (15.0%) at baseline and 1 (5.0%) after the experience. Nevertheless, about 80% of the participants showed a high degree ofjob satisfaction, in terms of positive influence of job in the professional satisfaction and of clear satisfaction for the organization, during both evaluation. In respect to 2010, the number of organ donors and that of ocular tissue donors improved of about 16% and 10%, respectively, during the year of the project and in the following year (mean value). We recognize that our team-building project for personnel involved in the stressful and demanding setting of organ and tissue donation, worthwhile and recompensing at the same time, possibly influenced the personal commitment and the quality of job provided. The high level of stress showed by participants should be

  5. Australian university proposes academic program changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    The University of Melbourne in Australia has adopted a 10-year plan to create a U.S.-style of education where undergraduate university students would first have to complete a three-year general degree in science or the arts before being allowed to continue onto graduate or professional studies. Unlike in the United States, most Australian students are able to move from secondary school directly into professional studies.A major change for Earth science students would be the replacement of the one-year Bachelor of Science Honours with a two-year Masters program. According to Janet Hergt, head of the university's School of Earth Sciences, the longer program could allow students more time to develop and complete research projects, and would provide them with a better understanding of Ph.D.studies.

  6. [The Australian nurses in France during the Great War].

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil

    2014-06-01

    Australia was dragged into the First World War due to its status as a dominion of the British Empire. High numbers of nurses, both civilian and military, served during this conflict, notably in France, reflecting the surge of support and sympathy felt by Australians for the country.

  7. GLBTIQ Teachers in Australian Education Policy: Protections, Suspicions, and Restrictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany; Gray, Emily; Harris, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of human rights on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status by the United Nations has led to the development of new policies concerning homophobia and transphobia in educational contexts. This paper examines new Australian education policies impacting gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer…

  8. GLBTIQ Teachers in Australian Education Policy: Protections, Suspicions, and Restrictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany; Gray, Emily; Harris, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of human rights on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status by the United Nations has led to the development of new policies concerning homophobia and transphobia in educational contexts. This paper examines new Australian education policies impacting gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer…

  9. The current status of diabetes professional educational standards and competencies in the UK--a position statement from the Diabetes UK Healthcare Professional Education Competency Framework Task and Finish Group.

    PubMed

    Walsh, N; George, S; Priest, L; Deakin, T; Vanterpool, G; Karet, B; Simmons, D

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant health concern, both in the UK and globally. Management can be complex, often requiring high levels of knowledge and skills in order to provide high-quality and safe care. The provision of good, safe, quality care lies within the foundations of healthcare education, continuing professional development and evidence-based practice, which are inseparable and part of a continuum during the career of any health professional. Sound education provides the launch pad for effective clinical management and positive patient experiences. This position paper reviews and discusses work undertaken by a Working Group under the auspices of Diabetes UK with the remit of considering all health professional educational issues for people delivering care to people with diabetes. This work has scoped the availability of education for those within the healthcare system who may directly or indirectly encounter people with diabetes and reviews alignment to existing competency frameworks within the UK's National Health Service.

  10. The nutritional knowledge of Australian nurses.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Christine; James, Erica L

    2005-07-01

    Sound nutrition is an essential component of good health. A number of health professionals, including nurses, provide nutritional information to the community. However, little research exists which measures the nutrition knowledge of nurses in Australia. The aim of this study was to determine the nutrition knowledge of nurses in regional Victoria. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used with 103 nurses (81% currently practicing in an acute regional hospital). The nurses answered 48 multiple choice general knowledge questions (using a valid and reliable questionnaire) and provided educational and demographic details. Each multiple choice question was scored as correct or incorrect and given the value of one point (maximum possible 48 points). The mean knowledge score for all nurses was 60.2% (SD = 8.4). Older nurses, those with more years of experience, and nurses with general training (rather than a degree) scored higher average knowledge scores. Respondents reported requests for nutrition information from patients and clients, and indicated that the most frequently used nutrition information sources were dietitians, other nurses, professional journals, books and literature from the National Heart Foundation. The nutrition knowledge score reported in this study is low to moderate by definition from previous studies using the same questionnaire. It is recommended that the Australian nursing profession determines its own nutrition knowledge standard and the nutrition knowledge needs of nurses working in particular areas of practice. Further work is required to determine the validity and reliability of an Australian knowledge instrument.

  11. Professional Certification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The WaterSense Professional Certification Program Labeling System specifies the requirements a professional certifying organization must meet to have the professional certification program labeled under one of the WaterSense program specifications.

  12. Bridging and bonding interactions in higher education: social capital and students’ academic and professional identity formation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dorthe H.; Jetten, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that graduates’ achievements depend in important ways on their opportunities to develop an academic and a professional identity during their studies. Previous research has shown that students’ socio-economic status (SES) and social capital prior to entering university affects their ability to obtain these identities in higher education. However, what is less well understood is whether social capital that is built during university studies shapes identity development, and if so, whether the social capital gained during university years impacts on academic and professional identity differently. In a qualitative study, we interviewed 26 Danish and 11 Australian university students about their social interaction experiences, their opportunities to develop bonding capital as well as bridging capital, and their academic and professional identity. Findings show that while bonding social capital with co-students facilitated academic identity formation, such social capital does not lead to professional identity development. We also found that the development of bridging social capital with educators facilitated students’ professional identity formation. However, bonding social capital among students stood in the way of participating in bridging interaction with educators, thereby further hindering professional identity formation. Finally, while students’ parental background did not affect the perceived difficulty of forming professional identity, there was a tendency for students from lower SES backgrounds to be more likely to make internal attributions while those from higher SES backgrounds were more likely to make external attributions for the failure to develop professional identity. Results point to the importance of creating opportunities for social interaction with educators at university because this facilitates the generation of bridging social capital, which, in turn, is essential for students’ professional identity

  13. Bridging and bonding interactions in higher education: social capital and students' academic and professional identity formation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dorthe H; Jetten, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that graduates' achievements depend in important ways on their opportunities to develop an academic and a professional identity during their studies. Previous research has shown that students' socio-economic status (SES) and social capital prior to entering university affects their ability to obtain these identities in higher education. However, what is less well understood is whether social capital that is built during university studies shapes identity development, and if so, whether the social capital gained during university years impacts on academic and professional identity differently. In a qualitative study, we interviewed 26 Danish and 11 Australian university students about their social interaction experiences, their opportunities to develop bonding capital as well as bridging capital, and their academic and professional identity. Findings show that while bonding social capital with co-students facilitated academic identity formation, such social capital does not lead to professional identity development. We also found that the development of bridging social capital with educators facilitated students' professional identity formation. However, bonding social capital among students stood in the way of participating in bridging interaction with educators, thereby further hindering professional identity formation. Finally, while students' parental background did not affect the perceived difficulty of forming professional identity, there was a tendency for students from lower SES backgrounds to be more likely to make internal attributions while those from higher SES backgrounds were more likely to make external attributions for the failure to develop professional identity. Results point to the importance of creating opportunities for social interaction with educators at university because this facilitates the generation of bridging social capital, which, in turn, is essential for students' professional identity development.

  14. USGS analysis of the Australian UNCLOS submission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Rowland, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    features of the US margins. The Australian margin has significant geological and morphological variety, similar to the US margin and gives a good idea of the complexity of issues related to the U.S. margin. Decisions about basins and ridges in the Lord Howe Rise and Three Kings Ridge regions will likely bear on the status of ridges in the Arctic, such as Lomonosov Ridge. The Naturaliste Plateau and the South Tasman Rise appear to have parallels with the Chukchi Plateau in the Arctic and the Blake Plateau off the southeastern U.S. The ECS on Macquarie Island/Ridge may determine how boundaries along ridges such as the Mariannas are treated.

  15. Injury in Australian veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, Lin; Day, Lesley; Shirangi, Adeleh; Robertson, Ian; Lucas, Michael; Vizard, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    There are a number of risk factors for traumatic injury in veterinary practice but there is little information on the prevalence of injuries or the factors associated with injury in this profession. To identify the prevalence of injuries sustained by veterinarians and the groups most at risk for different types of injury. Cross-sectional survey of Australian veterinarians. Subjects were asked whether they had ever had a significant work-related injury, a less serious acute work injury in the last 12 months, a work-related chronic musculoskeletal problem or dog or cat bites. The prevalence of injuries by gender, practice type and decade of graduation were reported and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the risk of each type of injury. Of 2800 veterinarians, over half (51%) reported a significant work-related injury during their career while 26% of practitioners reported having at least one injury in the previous 12 months. Chronic work-related musculoskeletal problems were reported by 49% of respondents. Dog and cat bites were also very common. After adjusting for graduation year and university, males were more likely than females to have experienced cat or dog bites or have a chronic or significant injury, and large animal veterinarians were most likely to have chronic or significant injuries. A high injury prevalence was found among Australian veterinarians with large animal practitioners at highest risk. This is the largest study of Australian veterinarians to have been reported and has shown that injuries are common and serious in the profession.

  16. Designing CBE for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Keith

    Deakin Australia (DA) CBE (Continuing Business Education) programs are designed for use in conjunction with print and audio materials which are distributed as distance learning packages to business studies graduates working or planning to work as accountants, who are enrolled in the professional licensing program run by the Australian Society of…

  17. Developing Professional Standards for Accomplished Language Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations (AFMLTA) has recently developed a set of professional standards for accomplished language teachers. Standards of teaching are statements of values about the processes of teaching, learning, and knowing, and of the practices of those who teach languages and cultures. These standards…

  18. Getting the Measure of the VET Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlotkowski, Peter; Guthrie, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    This report draws on analyses of Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data from the Survey of Education and Training (SET) and the Census of Population and Housing to provide an updated demographic profile of vocational education and training (VET) professionals and VET practitioners. A number of caveats are attached to this analysis, all…

  19. Lesson Study for Professional Development and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that "lesson study" may be adapted from its primary use as a professional development strategy for use as a research strategy, especially to identify principles of good lesson design. We report on a project undertaken in two Australian secondary schools where lesson study research was used to investigate the…

  20. Professional autonomy - is it the future of general practice?

    PubMed

    Fraser, John

    2006-05-01

    Internationally, rising financial costs and increasing expectations of health care delivery have increased regulation and decreased the autonomy of general practitioners and other health care professionals. This article explores professional autonomy within Australian general practice, and outlines the importance of autonomy in systems approaches to organisational change in general practice.

  1. How Competent Are Healthcare Professionals in Working According to a Bio-Psycho-Social Model in Healthcare? The Current Status and Validation of a Scale.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Eijkelkamp, Ank; Peersman, Wim; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a paradigm shift from a purely biomedical towards a bio-psycho-social (BPS) conception of disability and illness, which has led to a change in contemporary healthcare. However, there seems to be a gap between the rhetoric and reality of working within a BPS model. It is not clear whether healthcare professionals show the necessary skills and competencies to act according to the BPS model. The aim of this study was (1) to develop a scale to monitor the BPS competencies of healthcare professionals, (2) to define its factor-structure, (3) to check internal consistency, (4) test-retest reliability and (5) feasibility. Item derivation for the BPS scale was based on qualitative research with seven multidisciplinary focus groups (n = 58) of both patients and professionals. In a cross-sectional study design, 368 healthcare professionals completed the BPS scale through a digital platform. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine underlying dimensions. Statistical coherence was expressed in item-total correlations and in Cronbach's α coefficient. An intra-class-correlation coefficient was used to rate the test-retest reliability. The qualitative study revealed 45 items. The exploratory factor analysis showed five underlying dimensions labelled as: (1) networking, (2) using the expertise of the client, (3) assessment and reporting, (4) professional knowledge and skills and (5) using the environment. The results show a good to strong homogeneity (item-total ranged from 0.59 to 0.79) and a strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranged from 0.75 to 0.82). ICC ranged between 0.82 and 0.93. The BPS scale appeared to be a valid and reliable measure to rate the BPS competencies of the healthcare professionals and offers opportunities for an improvement in the healthcare delivery. Further research is necessary to test the construct validity and to detect whether the scale is responsive and able to detect changes over time.

  2. Review of Australian Higher Education: An Australian Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is one of the key foundations that economic prosperity is founded upon. Government policies, funding and strategic planning require a fine balance to stimulate growth, prosperity health and well-being. The key Australian government policies influenced by a Review of Australian Higher Education report include attracting many more…

  3. Review of Australian Higher Education: An Australian Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is one of the key foundations that economic prosperity is founded upon. Government policies, funding and strategic planning require a fine balance to stimulate growth, prosperity health and well-being. The key Australian government policies influenced by a Review of Australian Higher Education report include attracting many more…

  4. Race Based Inequalities for Indigenous Australians' Participation and Engagement in VET: A Targeted Review of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roslyn; Stuart, Lynne; Bell, Terry

    2017-01-01

    The poor outcomes in education, training and employment achieved by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia have been well documented. The transition from a traditional Indigenous society to the statuses of mainstream Australian society has been, and continues to be problematic for Indigenous Australians. The participation in…

  5. The Nature and Status of STEM Professional Development: Effective Practices for Secondary Level Engineering Education. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.; Daugherty, Jenny L.

    2009-01-01

    Recently engineering has emerged on the K-12 scene as a potentially important content area. However, K-12 teachers typically lack sufficient backgrounds to effectively integrate engineering into their classrooms. Thus teacher professional development is of critical importance. Although there have been several initiatives emerge to assist teachers…

  6. Graduate and Professional School Applications, Admissions and Enrollments (1981-1988): A Status Report on Ethnic Groups Underrepresented at UC Davis. Research Synopsis No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Davis. Office of Student Affairs Research and Information.

    This report describes postgraduate enrollment trends for ethnic groups underrepresented at University of California, Davis. The UC Davis Student Affirmative Action (SAA) Plan identifies the following groups as underrepresented in both the Graduate Division and professional schools: American Indian, Black/African-American, Chicano/Mexican American,…

  7. The Chimera of Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bonnie R.

    1980-01-01

    Much of what passes for professionalism is self-serving elitism and not relevant to librarianship. Librarians, most of whom are women, should continue to improve service to the public and strive by pragmatic means to overcome low pay and status. (RAA)

  8. The Chimera of Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bonnie R.

    1980-01-01

    Much of what passes for professionalism is self-serving elitism and not relevant to librarianship. Librarians, most of whom are women, should continue to improve service to the public and strive by pragmatic means to overcome low pay and status. (RAA)

  9. Australian University International Student Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2009-01-01

    The omission of international students from the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that Australians perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study…

  10. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  11. Ambiguities in Spoken Australian English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, C. V.

    1971-01-01

    Pronunciation of some sounds in Australian English causes ambiguities in cases where phonemes seem to have merged. This paper discusses some of the ambiguities arising from phonemic changes and provides examples of pronunciation variations in British and Australian English--mainly in vowels, but also in consonants and syllabification. Several…

  12. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  13. Australian University International Student Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2009-01-01

    The omission of international students from the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that Australians perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study…

  14. Professional Practices Boards for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shive, J. Jerrald

    1988-01-01

    Establishment of professional practices boards (PPB) would serve the public interest and help move teaching toward full professional status. Topics include national and state PPB, board composition, the PPB role in assessing candidates for entry into teaching, and recruiting and retaining minority teachers. (IAH)

  15. Sexuality and Australian law.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The author describes the changing legal environment concerning same-sex relationships in the common law world with special reference to Australia. He refers to shifts in public opinion recorded in opinion polls; important decisions of human rights courts and tribunals; and changes in national law and court decisions. He then reviews the Australian constitutional setting which divides lawmaking responsibility on such subjects between the federal, State and Territory legislatures. He describes initiatives adopted in the States and Territories and the more modest changes effected in federal law and practice. He concludes on a note of optimism concerning Australia's future reforms affecting discrimination on the grounds of sexuality.

  16. How Competent Are Healthcare Professionals in Working According to a Bio-Psycho-Social Model in Healthcare? The Current Status and Validation of a Scale

    PubMed Central

    Eijkelkamp, Ank; Peersman, Wim; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past decades, there has been a paradigm shift from a purely biomedical towards a bio-psycho-social (BPS) conception of disability and illness, which has led to a change in contemporary healthcare. However, there seems to be a gap between the rhetoric and reality of working within a BPS model. It is not clear whether healthcare professionals show the necessary skills and competencies to act according to the BPS model. Objective The aim of this study was (1) to develop a scale to monitor the BPS competencies of healthcare professionals, (2) to define its factor-structure, (3) to check internal consistency, (4) test-retest reliability and (5) feasibility. Design and Setting Item derivation for the BPS scale was based on qualitative research with seven multidisciplinary focus groups (n = 58) of both patients and professionals. In a cross-sectional study design, 368 healthcare professionals completed the BPS scale through a digital platform. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine underlying dimensions. Statistical coherence was expressed in item-total correlations and in Cronbach’s α coefficient. An intra-class-correlation coefficient was used to rate the test-retest reliability. Results The qualitative study revealed 45 items. The exploratory factor analysis showed five underlying dimensions labelled as: (1) networking, (2) using the expertise of the client, (3) assessment and reporting, (4) professional knowledge and skills and (5) using the environment. The results show a good to strong homogeneity (item-total ranged from 0.59 to 0.79) and a strong internal consistency (Cronbach’s α ranged from 0.75 to 0.82). ICC ranged between 0.82 and 0.93. Conclusion The BPS scale appeared to be a valid and reliable measure to rate the BPS competencies of the healthcare professionals and offers opportunities for an improvement in the healthcare delivery. Further research is necessary to test the construct validity and to detect whether

  17. Is resilience relevant to smoking abstinence for Indigenous Australians?

    PubMed

    Tsourtos, George; Ward, Paul R; Lawn, Sharon; Winefield, Anthony H; Hersh, Deborah; Coveney, John

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence rate of tobacco smoking remains high for Australian Indigenous people despite declining rates in other Australian populations. Given many Indigenous Australians continue to experience a range of social and economic structural problems, stress could be a significant contributing factor to preventing smoking abstinence. The reasons why some Indigenous people have remained resilient to stressful adverse conditions, and not rely on smoking to cope as a consequence, may provide important insights and lessons for health promotion policy and practice. In-depth interviews were employed to collect oral histories from 31 Indigenous adults who live in metropolitan Adelaide. Participants were recruited according to smoking status (non-smokers were compared with current smokers to gain a greater depth of understanding of how some participants have abstained from smoking). Perceived levels of stress were associated with encouraging smoking behaviour. Many participants reported having different stresses compared with non-Indigenous Australians, with some participants reporting having additional stressors such as constantly experiencing racism. Resilience often occurred when participants reported drawing upon internal psychological assets such as being motivated to quit and where external social support was available. These findings are discussed in relation to a recently developed psycho-social interactive model of resilience, and how this resilience model can be improved regarding the historical and cultural context of Indigenous Australians' experience of smoking.

  18. Dental caries experience in young Australian Army recruits 2008.

    PubMed

    Hopcraft, M S; Yapp, K E; Mahoney, G; Morgan, M V

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown a substantial decline in caries experience in Australian Army recruits between 1996 and 2002-2003, and in Australian adults between 1987-1988 and 2004-2006. However, studies in children have reported an increasing trend in caries experience between 1998 and 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate caries experience in Australian Army recruits in 2008. A cross-sectional study involving 1084 Australian Army recruits was conducted from January to May 2008. Data were obtained from a clinical dental examination with bitewing radiographs, and a questionnaire elicited socio-demographic data and history on lifetime exposure to fluoridated drinking water. Mean DMFT scores were 3.16, 4.08, 5.16 and 7.11 for recruits aged 17-20, 21-25, 26-30 and 31-35 years, respectively. Recruits with a lifetime exposure to fluoridated drinking water had a mean DMFT of 3.02, while recruits with no exposure had a mean DMFT of 3.87. Caries experience in Australian Army recruits aged 17-25 years increased between 2002-2003 and 2008. Recruits with lifetime exposure to fluoridated drinking water had 25 per cent less caries experience compared with recruits who had no exposure to fluoridated drinking water after adjusting for the effects of age, gender, education and socio-economic status.

  19. Responses to advanced cancer: Chinese-Australians.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ying-Yu; Donoghue, Judith; Chenoweth, Lynn

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a study identifying the impact of key aspects of Chinese culture on the responses of mid-aged Chinese-Australians to their advanced cancer in order to make recommendations about their care within the health system. Studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s focused on understanding people's psychological responses to their experiences of terminal illness, but the issue of culture was not addressed. In recent years, a few studies have been conducted with Chinese-Australians, but were limited to issues related to their information needs and the disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. There is a lack of understanding of the impact of Chinese culture on the experiences of these patients. A grounded theory approach was used to generate a substantive theory to explain how mid-aged Chinese-Australians respond to advancing cancer. Eleven participants were recruited and data were collected from face-to-face interviews, telephone contacts, observation and researcher field notes. Data generation occurred between 1997 and 1999. Four modes of response to advanced cancer were identified: acute crisis, combat, despondency and waiting for death. This paper deals particularly with the combat mode which incorporated five culturally specific strategies used by participants in their struggle against advanced cancer. These were traditional Chinese medicine, traditional Chinese beliefs on the use of food for health maintenance, qi gong (a form of exercise), feng shui (which involves paying attention to spatial organization) and the worship of ancestors and gods. Deeply entrenched within these responses is the influence of Chinese culture, rooted in the beliefs and practices of traditional Chinese medicine and the philosophy of harmony and balance of yin and yang and qi. Health care professionals need to be aware of the cultural practices and beliefs of the different ethnic groups for whom they care, and of the importance of accommodation to and negotiation about these

  20. "The Sacred Spark of Wonder": Local Museums, Australian Curriculum History, and Pre-Service Primary Teacher Education: A Tasmanian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the intersections between museum learning in a distinctive Tasmanian setting, the possibilities of a new national History curriculum, and the evolving views and professional practices of pre-service primary teachers at one Australian university. Following a brief overview of the framework for local and Australian history that…

  1. Through a Freirean Lens: Professional Learning, Faith-Based Schooling and Liberatory Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John Trevitt; Armstrong, Ann Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on a broader qualitative study of professional learning in schools of the Peoples of the Book (Christians, Jews and Muslims) in post-colonial Australia, addressing the role that the growing number of Australian faith-based schools play in shaping a just and inclusive Australian society. By reviewing material in the public domain,…

  2. Through a Freirean Lens: Professional Learning, Faith-Based Schooling and Liberatory Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John Trevitt; Armstrong, Ann Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on a broader qualitative study of professional learning in schools of the Peoples of the Book (Christians, Jews and Muslims) in post-colonial Australia, addressing the role that the growing number of Australian faith-based schools play in shaping a just and inclusive Australian society. By reviewing material in the public domain,…

  3. Professional development for teaching in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Leigh N.; Vu, Tori; Bower, Matt; Brown, Natalie; Skalicky, Jane; Donovan, Diane; Loch, Birgit; Joshi, Nalini; Bloom, Walter

    2011-10-01

    Due to the changing nature of learning and teaching in universities, there is a growing need for professional development for lecturers and tutors teaching in disciplines in the mathematical sciences. Mathematics teaching staff receive some training in learning and teaching but many of the courses running at university level are not tailored to the mathematical sciences. This article reports on a collaborative research project aimed at investigating the type of professional development that Australian tertiary mathematics teachers need and their preference for delivery modes. Effective teaching promotes effective learning in our students and discipline-specific professional development will enhance outcomes for teachers, students, and mathematics.

  4. Healthcare professionals' perspectives on environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Jillian L

    2014-06-01

    Human health is dependent upon environmental sustainability. Many have argued that environmental sustainability advocacy and environmentally responsible healthcare practice are imperative healthcare actions. What are the key obstacles to healthcare professionals supporting environmental sustainability? How may these obstacles be overcome? Data-driven thematic qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews identified common and pertinent themes, and differences between specific healthcare disciplines. A total of 64 healthcare professionals and academics from all states and territories of Australia, and multiple healthcare disciplines were recruited. Institutional ethics approval was obtained for data collection. Participants gave informed consent. All data were de-identified to protect participant anonymity. Qualitative analysis indicated that Australian healthcare professionals often take more action in their personal than professional lives to protect the environment, particularly those with strong professional identities. The healthcare sector's focus on economic rationalism was a substantial barrier to environmentally responsible behaviour. Professionals also feared conflict and professional ostracism, and often did not feel qualified to take action. This led to healthcare professionals making inconsistent moral judgements, and feeling silenced and powerless. Constraints on non-clinical employees within and beyond the sector exacerbated these difficulties. The findings are consistent with the literature reporting that organisational constraints, and strong social identification, can inhibit actions that align with personal values. This disparity can cause moral distress and residue, leading to feelings of powerlessness, resulting in less ethical behaviour. The data highlight a disparity between personal and professional actions to address environmental sustainability. Given the constraints Australian healthcare professionals encounter, they are unlikely to

  5. The Relationship between Career Variables and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations for Australian High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed 925 Australian high school students enrolled in grades 8 through 12 on measures of occupational aspirations, occupational expectations, career status aspirations, and career status expectations; it tested the association between these variables and career maturity, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy, and…

  6. The Relationship between Career Variables and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations for Australian High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed 925 Australian high school students enrolled in grades 8 through 12 on measures of occupational aspirations, occupational expectations, career status aspirations, and career status expectations; it tested the association between these variables and career maturity, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy, and…

  7. What Do We Really Know about the Outcomes of Australian International Education? A Critical Review and Prospectus for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Denise; Smith, Wendy; Boey, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Australia has been a significant provider of international education in the Asia-Pacific region since 1950 with the inception of the Colombo Plan. Thus, graduates from these early days would by now be mature professionals in a variety of fields, with several decades of professional and academic attainment enabled by their Australian education. Yet…

  8. Professional Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Cindy; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reviews three books of relevance to early childhood educators: (1) "Distinctions between Self-Esteem and Narcissism: Implications for Practice" (L. G. Katz); (2) "We All Belong: Multicultural Child Care That Works" (Australian Early Childhood Association); and (3) "Words Can Hurt You: Beginning a Program of Anti-Bias…

  9. Professional Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Cindy; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reviews three books of relevance to early childhood educators: (1) "Distinctions between Self-Esteem and Narcissism: Implications for Practice" (L. G. Katz); (2) "We All Belong: Multicultural Child Care That Works" (Australian Early Childhood Association); and (3) "Words Can Hurt You: Beginning a Program of Anti-Bias…

  10. Employment of Professionals under NAFTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabetsos, Andrew P.

    1995-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides Canadian and Mexican professionals with an option not available to citizens of other countries: Trade NAFTA, or "TN" status, which provides authorization for business persons. Discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of this status with that of the more conventional H-1B…

  11. Employment of Professionals under NAFTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabetsos, Andrew P.

    1995-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides Canadian and Mexican professionals with an option not available to citizens of other countries: Trade NAFTA, or "TN" status, which provides authorization for business persons. Discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of this status with that of the more conventional H-1B…

  12. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 2. Professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-06-01

    Although dentists have well recognised legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, the definition of their role and the corresponding responsibilities broaden further as the profession evolves, the demands from dentistry increase and the context of professionalism changes. Thus, continuous evaluation of the role and responsibilities of dentists is vital for provision of quality care, improvement of professional standards and maintaining professional status. In addition, efforts must be made to uphold the credibility of the profession and the associated public trust as well as meeting the increasing expectations from the profession and individual dentists.

  13. The corporatization of community pharmacy: implications for service provision, the public health function, and pharmacy's claims to professional status in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bush, Joseph; Langley, Christopher A; Wilson, Keith A

    2009-12-01

    Pharmacy has experienced both incomplete professionalization and deprofessionalization. Since the late 1970s, a concerted attempt has been made to re-professionalize pharmacy in the United Kingdom (UK) through role extension-a key feature of which has been a drive for greater pharmacy involvement in public health. However, the continual corporatization of the UK community pharmacy sector may reduce the professional autonomy of pharmacists and may threaten to constrain attempts at reprofessionalization. The objectives of the research: to examine the public health activities of community pharmacists in the UK; to explore the attitudes of community pharmacists toward recent relevant UK policy and barriers to the development of their public health function; and, to investigate associations between activity, attitudes, and the type of community pharmacy worked in (eg, supermarket, chain, independent). A self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of practicing community pharmacists, stratified for country and sex, within Great Britain (n=1998), with a follow-up to nonresponders 4 weeks later. Data were analyzed using SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) (v12.0). A final response rate of 51% (n=1023/1998) was achieved. The level of provision of emergency hormonal contraception on a patient group direction, supervised administration of medicines, and needle-exchange schemes was lower in supermarket pharmacies than in the other types of pharmacy. Respondents believed that supermarkets and the major multiple pharmacy chains held an advantageous position in terms of attracting financing for service development despite suggesting that the premises of such pharmacies may not be the most suitable for the provision of such services. A mixed market in community pharmacy may be required to maintain a comprehensive range of pharmacy-based public health services and provide maximum benefit to all patients. Longitudinal monitoring is recommended to ensure that

  14. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  15. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  16. Australians' use of surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Everingham, Sam G; Stafford-Bell, Martyn A; Hammarberg, Karin

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics of parents and intended parents and their current and planned behaviour in relation to surrogacy arrangements. Members of two Australian parenting support forums who were considering surrogacy or were currently or previously in a surrogacy arrangement were invited to complete an online survey during July 2013. Sociodemographic characteristics; proportions engaging in domestic uncompensated and overseas compensated arrangements; countries used; costs incurred; and impact on behaviour of state laws criminalising compensated surrogacy. Of 1135 potential participants, 312 (27%) commenced the survey. Of these, 24 did not fulfil inclusion criteria and 29 did not complete the survey. Eighty-nine respondents were considering surrogacy and 170 had commenced or completed surrogacy. Many respondents (53%) considered both overseas and domestic surrogacy. Among those who only considered one option, overseas surrogacy was considered significantly more often than domestic surrogacy (92% v 8%; P < 0.05). Only 22 respondents (8%) commenced with a surrogate in Australia. The most common countries used for compensated surrogacy were India and the United States, and average total estimated costs were $69 212 for India and $172 347 for the US. Barriers discouraging domestic surrogacy included concern that the surrogate might keep the child (75%), belief that it was too long and complicated a process (68%) and having no one of the right age or life stage to ask (61%). Few intended parents (9%) were deterred by state laws criminalising compensated surrogacy. Most Australian intended parents via surrogacy consider or use overseas compensated arrangements. Laws banning compensated surrogacy do not appear to deter those seeking surrogacy arrangements.

  17. Understanding occupational sitting: prevalence, correlates and moderating effects in Australian employees.

    PubMed

    De Cocker, Katrien; Duncan, Mitch J; Short, Camille; van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2014-10-01

    To (1) compare occupational sitting between different socio-demographic, health-related, work-related and psychosocial categories, (2) identity socio-demographic, health-related, work-related and psychosocial correlates of occupational sitting, and (3) examine the moderating effect of work-related factors in the relation between correlates and occupational sitting. Randomly-selected Australian adults completed a web-based survey assessing socio-demographic (country of birth, gender, age, education, income), health-related (general health, weight, physical activity), work-related (employment status, occupational task, occupational classification) and sedentary-specific psychosocial (social norm, social support, self-efficacy, control, advantages, disadvantage, intention) factors, and occupational sitting-time. t-tests, ANOVAs and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted (in 2013) on a sample of employees (n=993). Respondents sat on average for 3.75 (SD=2.45) h/day during work. Investigated correlates explained 41% of the variance in occupational sitting. More occupational sitting was associated with being male, being younger, higher education and income, part-time and full-time employment, sedentary job tasks, white-collar/professional occupations, higher BMI, and perceiving more advantages of sitting less at work. Employment status and occupational classification moderated the association between control to sit less and occupational sitting. A lack of control to sit less was associated with higher occupational sitting in part-time and full-time workers, but not in casual workers; and in white-collar and professional workers, but not in blue-collar workers. Most important contributors to occupational sitting were work-related and socio-demographic correlates. More research is needed to confirm present results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving forensic mental health care for Aboriginal Australians: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Durey, Angela; Wynaden, Dianne; Barr, Lesley; Ali, Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    Mental illnesses constitute a major burden of disease in Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders (hereafter Aboriginal Australians), who are also overrepresented in the prison system. A legacy of colonization compounds such prevalence, and is further exacerbated by the persistence of racial discrimination and insensitivity across many sectors, including health. This research completed in a Western Australian forensic mental health setting identifies non-Aboriginal health professionals' support needs to deliver high-quality, culturally-safe care to Aboriginal patients. Data were collected from health professionals using an online survey and 10 semistructured interviews. Survey and interview results found that ongoing education was needed for staff to provide culturally-safe care, where Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values were respected. The findings also support previous research linking Aboriginal health providers to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal patients. In a colonized country, such as Australia, education programmes that critically reflect on power relations privileging white Anglo-Australian cultural dominance and subjugating Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values are important to identify factors promoting or compromising the care of Aboriginal patients and developing a deeper understanding of 'cultural safety' and its clinical application. Organizational commitment is needed to translate the findings to support non-Aboriginal health professionals deliver high-quality care to Aboriginal patients that is respectful of cultural differences. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. The HOME network: an Australian national initiative for home therapies.

    PubMed

    Chow, Josephine; Fortnum, Debbie; Moodie, Jo-Anne; Simmonds, Rosemary; Tomlins, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Longer, more frequent dialysis at home can improve life expectancy for patients with chronic kidney disease. Increased use of home dialysis therapies also benefits the hospital system, allowing for more efficient allocation of clinic resources. However, the Australian and New Zealand Data Registry statistics highlight the low uptake of home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis across Australia. In August 2009, the Australia's HOME Network was established as a national initiative to engage and empower healthcare professionals working in the home dialysis specialty. The aim was to develop solutions to advocate for and ultimately increase the use of home therapies. This paper describes the development, achievement and future plan of the Australian HOME Network. Achievements to date include: a survey of HOME Network members to assess the current state of patient and healthcare professional-targeted education resources; development of two patient case studies and activities addressing how to overcome the financial burden experienced by patients on home dialysis. Future projects aim to improve patient and healthcare professional education, and advocacy for home dialysis therapies. The HOME Network is supporting healthcare professionals working in the home dialysis specialty to develop solutions and tools that will help to facilitate greater utilisation of home dialysis therapies. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  20. Health concerns and expectations of Anglo and ethnic older Australians: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Quine, S

    1999-06-01

    Australia is a multicultural society in which the most rapidly ageing groups are immigrants, many of whom cannot speak English well. Minimal research has been conducted to identify ethnic variation in health concerns and expectations of older Australians from non-English-speaking backgrounds, necessary to facilitate culturally appropriate services. This paper presents findings from 12 focus group sessions (4 Anglo, 3 Italian, 2 Chinese, 2 Arabic, 1 Greek) with older (60+) Australians. Common areas of concern were inadequate medication information, labelling and instructions. Anglo participants differed from ethnic participants in their use of herbal remedies, language, relationship with pharmacist and doctor and awareness of health rights. Other concerns and expectations were specific to a particular ethnic group. The findings should increase health professionals' awareness of the similarities and differences which exist between mainstream Anglo and ethnic Australians, and also between ethnic groups, thereby avoiding the use of a blanket approach when communicating with, or planning policies for, ethnic older Australians.

  1. Smoking patterns and readiness to quit--a study of the Australian Arabic community.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Seham; Adily, Armita; Velasco, Maria-Jose; Garden, Frances L; Zwar, Nicholas A; Jalaludin, Bin B; Ward, Jeanette E

    2009-03-01

    Smoking cessation interventions have typically focused on majority populations who, in Australia, are English speaking. There has been an overall decline in the prevalence of smoking in the Australian community. However, there remains a relative paucity of useful information about tobacco use and the effectiveness of tobacco interventions among specific ethnic minorities. To determine associations of tobacco use and tobacco control indicators for Arabic speakers seen in the Australian general practice setting. A cross sectional study in a consecutive sample of Arabic patients (n=1371) attending the practices of 29 Arabic speaking general practitioners in Sydney, New South Wales. Twenty-nine (53.7%) of 54 eligible Arabic speaking GPs in southwest Sydney participated in this study. Of 1371 patients seen, 29.7% were smokers. Smokers were more likely to report poorer health (chi2=21.7, df=1, p<0.001); 35.7% reported high nicotine dependence. Dependence was more in men (chi2=11.7, df=1, p<001) and those who reported poorer health (chi2=4.9, df=1, p<0.03); 35.9% had attempted to quit in the previous year; 17% were in preparation stage of change; 42.7% recalled quit advice. Poorer self reported health status (AOR=2.13, 95% CI: 1.14-3.97, p=0.017) and unemployment (AOR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.51-4.90, p=0.033) were independent predictors of advice from a health professional, most often a GP (71%). Our study confirms previous reports that the proportion of self reported current smokers among the Arabic community is higher than for the Anglo-European majority. There is a need for ethno specific campaigns in tobacco control.

  2. An exploration of Australian midwives' knowledge of intimate partner violence against women during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathleen M; Saito, Amornrat S; Eustace, Jennifer; Creedy, Debra K

    2015-09-01

    Intimate partner violence is recognised as a global public health issue. Living with intimate partner violence results in poorer health status with reduced quality of life and higher utilisation of health services. Increased awareness, education and training, and an understanding of multi-agency collaboration are vital in order for health practitioners to respond to women experiencing partner violence and abuse. Midwives are well placed to identify, provide immediate support, and refer women onto appropriate support agencies but may lack appropriate education, training or support. To investigate midwives' knowledge of intimate partner violence against women during pregnancy. An online survey link was distributed through the Australian College of Midwives. The survey included personal, professional and practice details, and 25 questions that tested knowledge about intimate partner violence. 152 midwives completed the online questionnaire. Knowledge scores ranged from 27 to 48 (out of a possible 50), with the mean total score of 42.8 (SD=3.3). Although 60% of participants scored 48, two-thirds did not know about the risks and signs of intimate partner violence. One-third of the midwives did not know about age risks associated with intimate partner violence. Around 25% incorrectly believed that perpetrators are violent because of alcohol or drug use. Nearly 90% (88%) of participants had some education or training about intimate partner violence. Those with some training achieved higher knowledge scores than those with no formal training (Mann-Whitney U=1272, p=0.003). Participating midwives generally reported a high level of knowledge about intimate partner violence but held misconceptions about risks and characteristics of perpetrators of violence. These knowledge gaps may adversely affect their ability to identify women at risk of violence. Education about intimate partner violence was associated with improved knowledge. Future training and education on intimate

  3. Nursing on the australian trail.

    PubMed

    1988-01-23

    Sharks, crocodiles, spitting spiders and army rations were just some of the health hazards encountered by Accident and Emergency Staff Nurse Linda Mutti on her recent trip to the Australian island of Badu with Operation Raleigh.

  4. A review of tobacco interventions for Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Rowena G

    2003-01-01

    To conduct a review of interventions to reduce the harm resulting from tobacco use among Indigenous Australians and to discuss the likely effect of a range of tobacco interventions if conducted in this population. A systematic review of medical literature and an audit of information from 32 government departments, non-government organisations and indigenous health organisations, which was completed in March 2001. A number of small tobacco programs had been conducted. Only four tobacco interventions had been evaluated in indigenous communities: a trial of training health professionals in conducting a brief intervention for smoking cessation; a trial of a CD-ROM on tobacco for use with indigenous schoolchildren; a qualitative evaluation of the effect of a mainstream advertising campaign on Indigenous people; and a pilot study of smoke-free workplaces, evaluated by qualitative methods. None of these studies assessed smoking cessation as an outcome. Two of these studies were unable to conclusively show any effect of the interventions; training health professionals in delivering a brief intervention resulted in some changes to practice and the evaluation of the mainstream advertising campaign showed that following the campaign, knowledge about tobacco had increased. There was a major lack of research on and evaluation of tobacco interventions for Indigenous Australians. More research and evaluation is required to ensure that tobacco interventions are appropriate and effective for Indigenous people. It is time to cease chronicling the ill health of Indigenous Australians and time to ensure the availability of well-evaluated, effective tobacco programs.

  5. Oral health promotion for our ageing Australian population.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J M

    2003-03-01

    The ageing Australian population living in the new millennium has dental needs that are very different and more complex than those experienced by previous older adult cohorts during the twentieth century. A summary of the oral health status of older Australians is presented, together with a review of the important relationships between general health and oral health. The key to maintaining and improving older adults' oral health status is the use of oral health promotion strategies that focus not only on dental characteristics, but also on the life characteristics of older adults, and on their quality of life issues. Traditionally, there has been very limited geriatric oral health promotion, with several myths contributing to this situation. Contemporary geriatric oral health promotion in the new millenium has an evidence-based and planned approach. It encompasses not only the treatment of oral diseases and conditions, but has an increased focus on the prevention of oral diseases and conditions to enhance oral health status and older adults' quality of life. Using the Ottawa Charter and a functional dependence classification, a geriatric oral health promotion matrix is presented, using a specific example of Australian residential care.

  6. The h-index in Australian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2011-06-01

    The Hirsch h-index is now widely used as a metric to compare individual researchers. To evaluate it in the context of Australian astronomy, the h-index for every member of the Astronomical Society of Australia (ASA) is found using NASA's Astrophysics Data System Bibliographic Services. Percentiles of the h-index distribution are detailed for a variety of categories of ASA members, including students. This enables a list of the top ten Australian researchers by h-index to be produced. These top researchers have h-index values in the range 53status. To attempt to specify the h-index distribution relative to opportunity, we also detail the percentiles of its distribution by years since Ph.D. award date. This shows a steady increase in h-index with seniority, as can be expected.

  7. RADIATION PROTECTION IN AN INTERVENTIONAL LABORATORY: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN AND SAUDI ARABIAN HOSPITALS.

    PubMed

    Alahmari, Mohammed Ali S; Sun, Zhonghua; Bartlett, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the use of protection devices and attitudes of interventional professionals (including radiologists, cardiologists, vascular surgeons, medical imaging technicians and nurses) towards radiation protection will differ between Saudi Arabian and Australian hospitals. Hard copies of an anonymous survey were distributed to 10 and 6 clinical departments in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia and metropolitan hospitals in Western Australia, respectively. The overall response rate was 43 % comprising 110 Australian participants and 63 % comprising 147 Saudi participants. Analysis showed that Australian respondents differed significantly from Saudi respondents with respect to their usages of leaded glasses (p < 0.001), ceiling-suspended lead screen (p < 0.001) and lead drape suspended from the table (p < 0.001). This study indicates that the trained interventional professionals in Australia tend to adhere to benefit from having an array of tools for personal radiation protection than the corresponding group in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Australian helminths in Australian rodents: an issue of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Warner, L R

    1998-06-01

    The Australian public as well as Australian funding bodies are generally unsympathetic to native murids, rats and mice, in spite of the fact that 36% have either become extinct or critically endangered since European settlement. The endemic Australian parasites of these rats and mice have been even less sympathetically regarded. Prior to 1958 very little work was carried out on the helminths of Australian rodents and little more is known today. Records are known from only 28% of the extant host species, comprising some 109 species of helminth identified at least to generic level. The rodents invaded Australia from the north, perhaps through New Guinea in at least two separate waves, 5-8 then about 1 million years ago. The parasites they brought with them have adapted and speciated and there has been some host switching between rodent groups and between rodents and the Australian marsupials. This is illustrated particularly in the Trichostrongyloidea. The origins of the rodents from Southeast Asia down the Indonesian island chain are reflected in the presence of the nematode genus Tikusnema in both Australia and Indonesia, and Cyclodontostomum purvisi across Southeast Asia and into New Guinea. Hydromys chrysogaster, the Australian water-rat, illustrates how the biogeographical influences of the host's distribution and lifestyle can affect its parasite fauna. Most of the research to date is merely indicative of where more data are needed. The links between Australian and New Guinean helminth fauna, as well as the links between rodent and marsupial hosts and their fauna, cannot be determined without further research.

  9. Professional Certification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  10. The Experience of Evidence-Based Practice in an Australian Public Library: An Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ann; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine; Howlett, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the findings from a project that investigated the lived experiences of library and information professionals in relation to evidence-based practice within an Australian public library. Method: The project employed ethnography, which allows holistic description of people's experiences within a particular community…

  11. From Surveillance to Formation? A Generative Approach to Teacher "Performance and Development" in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities and limitations of the AITSL Performance and Development Framework (Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership, 2012b) as a vehicle for authentic teacher professional learning. It suggests that the Framework offers a range of implementation possibilities, from surveillance of teaching practice at…

  12. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  13. Mentoring Australian Emerging Researchers in Aging: Evaluation of a Pilot Mentoring Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henwood, Tim; Bartlett, Helen; Carroll, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Australian emerging researchers in aging identified the need for greater professional development and networking opportunities. To address this, a formal mentorship scheme was developed and evaluated. Fourteen postgraduate researchers (proteges) were matched by discipline and research interest to experienced academics (mentors).…

  14. What's in a Word? Australian Experts' Knowledge, Views and Experiences Using the Term Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serry, Tanya Anne; Hammond, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Australian learning difficulties specialists' knowledge about, and the use of, the term dyslexia. An online survey was constructed based on a current definition of, and evidence about, dyslexia and distributed to members of relevant professional associations. A total of 179 participants responded to the…

  15. Employees' Perceptions of Email Communication, Volume and Management Strategies in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignata, Silvia; Lushington, Kurt; Sloan, Jeremy; Buchanan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Despite email playing a central role in university business, little is known about the strategies used by staff to manage email and the factors contributing to email overload. In a mixed method study undertaken in one Australian university comparing academic (n = 193) and professional (n = 278) staff, we found that while email volume was higher in…

  16. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  17. Capping Them Off! Exploring and Explaining the Patterns in Undergraduate Capstone Subjects in Australian Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Acker, Liz; Bailey, Janis; Wilson, Keithia; French, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Universities are increasingly offering capstone subjects as part of curricula to prepare final-year undergraduates for employment through consolidating and integrating their knowledge and skills while bridging the gap between academic learning and professional work. This study investigates capstone subjects offered by Australian business schools,…

  18. Development and Trialling of a Graduated Descriptors Tool for Australian Pharmacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupans, Ieva; Owen, Susanne; McKauge, Leigh; Pont, Lisa; Ryan, Greg; Woulfe, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Profession-derived competency standards are key determinants for curriculum and assessment in many professional university programmes. An Australian Learning and Teaching Council funded project used a participatory action research approach to enable the collaborative development of a graduated (or incremental) descriptors tool related to…

  19. What's in a Word? Australian Experts' Knowledge, Views and Experiences Using the Term Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serry, Tanya Anne; Hammond, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Australian learning difficulties specialists' knowledge about, and the use of, the term dyslexia. An online survey was constructed based on a current definition of, and evidence about, dyslexia and distributed to members of relevant professional associations. A total of 179 participants responded to the…

  20. Classroom Computer Climate, Teacher Reflections and "Reenvisioning" Pedagogy in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Margaret; Fluck, Andrew; Webb, Ivan; Loechel, Barton

    2004-01-01

    Considerable resources have been committed to providing information and communication technology in Australian schools. However, little is known about their effects on professional practice and student learning. This paper reports two main aspects of the data emerging from a current, ongoing three-year study (2002-04) Years 3, 5 and 7 of…

  1. Capping Them Off! Exploring and Explaining the Patterns in Undergraduate Capstone Subjects in Australian Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Acker, Liz; Bailey, Janis; Wilson, Keithia; French, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Universities are increasingly offering capstone subjects as part of curricula to prepare final-year undergraduates for employment through consolidating and integrating their knowledge and skills while bridging the gap between academic learning and professional work. This study investigates capstone subjects offered by Australian business schools,…

  2. Development and Trialling of a Graduated Descriptors Tool for Australian Pharmacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupans, Ieva; Owen, Susanne; McKauge, Leigh; Pont, Lisa; Ryan, Greg; Woulfe, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Profession-derived competency standards are key determinants for curriculum and assessment in many professional university programmes. An Australian Learning and Teaching Council funded project used a participatory action research approach to enable the collaborative development of a graduated (or incremental) descriptors tool related to…

  3. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  4. Employees' Perceptions of Email Communication, Volume and Management Strategies in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignata, Silvia; Lushington, Kurt; Sloan, Jeremy; Buchanan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Despite email playing a central role in university business, little is known about the strategies used by staff to manage email and the factors contributing to email overload. In a mixed method study undertaken in one Australian university comparing academic (n = 193) and professional (n = 278) staff, we found that while email volume was higher in…

  5. Mentoring Australian Emerging Researchers in Aging: Evaluation of a Pilot Mentoring Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henwood, Tim; Bartlett, Helen; Carroll, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Australian emerging researchers in aging identified the need for greater professional development and networking opportunities. To address this, a formal mentorship scheme was developed and evaluated. Fourteen postgraduate researchers (proteges) were matched by discipline and research interest to experienced academics (mentors).…

  6. Preparing for Parents: How Australian Teacher Education Is Addressing the Question of Parent-School Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Barr, Jenny; Chapman, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Parent-school engagement is widely embraced as a policy and educational ideal, yet to date there are few studies of how teacher education prepares students for this important aspect of their professional lives. In this paper, we consider findings from a recent Australian study that explored how the issue of parent-school relations is currently…

  7. Ethical perspectives of the Australian live export trade.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C J C

    2005-09-01

    To examine the ethical perspectives of the Australian live export trade. The perspectives of farmers and other industry personnel, overseas consumers, the Australian public, veterinarians and the assumed interests of transported animals are compared in relation to the ethical consequences. Animal welfare, societal, personal and professional ethics are identified and the ratification of different perspectives considered. There are positive and negative aspects of the trade for each stakeholder group, and the overall position adopted by any individual reflects their perspective of the balance of these components. The debate as to whether Australia should continue with the trade will be best served by consideration of the interests of all parties in the trade, including the consumers and animals, which are among the most affected by the trade. There is a need for further research to address the major welfare problems for the animals, an openness to inspection on the part of the trade and balance in media reporting.

  8. Potential exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus, Queensland, 1996-1999.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, B. J.; Epstein, J. H.; Neill, A. S.; Heel, K.; Field, H.; Barrett, J.; Smith, G. A.; Selvey, L. A.; Rodwell, B.; Lunt, R.

    2000-01-01

    Two human deaths caused by Australian bat lyssavirus (ABL) infection have been reported since 1996. Information was obtained from 205 persons (mostly adults from south Brisbane and the South Coast of Queensland), who reported potential ABL exposure to the Brisbane Southside Public Health Unit from November 1,1996, to January 31, 1999. Volunteer animal handlers accounted for 39% of potential exposures, their family members for 12%, professional animal handlers for 14%, community members who intentionally handled bats for 31%, and community members with contacts initiated by bats for 4%. The prevalence of Lyssavirus detected by fluorescent antibody test in 366 sick, injured, or orphaned bats from the area was 6%. Sequelae of exposure, including the requirement for expensive postexposure prophylaxis, may be reduced by educating bat handlers and the public of the risks involved in handling Australian bats. PMID:10827115

  9. Tackling inequalities in health: the Australian experience.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, M; Judge, K; Hunter, D J; Maxwell, R; Scheuer, M A

    1993-01-01

    Federal and state governments in Australia have embarked on a series of national initiatives which show a firm commitment to tackling social inequalities in health. The development of national goals and targets for health, for example, covers social and environmental conditions and sets differential targets for specific social groups with very poor health status. In a complementary initiative, a wide ranging analysis of the health care system--the National Health Strategy--has as one of its main objectives to improve the equitable impact of the health system. Where problems of access to and quality of services have been exposed, policies have been devised to deal with them. The exceptionally poor health of the Aboriginal community has elicited cross party support for action. Resources have been allocated to implement the National Aboriginal Health Strategy: to improve living and working conditions, education, and employment opportunities. Britain can glean much from the Australian experience. Images p783-a p787-a PMID:8490345

  10. Are we there yet? Travel vaccinations for Australian children.

    PubMed

    Slonim, Marnie; Starr, Mike; Blashki, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Australians travel overseas frequently and general practitioners (GPs) are often asked to provide detailed advice on travel vaccinations for children. Planning a safe and effective vaccination schedule is dependent on the context: where and when the family is travelling, the individual child's medical needs and past vaccination history, and if they are visiting family and friends. In this paper we provide an overview of the issues to consider when vaccinating Australian children for overseas travel. We also list the suite of common travel vaccinations and discuss some clinical scenarios that are likely to present in Australian general practice. Australians love to travel overseas and, increasingly, GPs are asked by patients to provide detailed advice on travel vaccinations for their children. Decisions regarding vaccinations for travelling children can be complex and the advice often differs from that provided for adults. Children differ from adults in their vulnerability to illnesses and side effects of medications. These differences, as well as their status regarding routine childhood vaccinations, all need to be taken into account. As with adults, it is important to consider the location and duration of travel and time until departure. The age of the child is also important and there may be a case for accelerating the routine childhood vaccinations in some children. The aim of this paper is to provide a clear and simple outline of the vaccination recommendations for children travelling overseas from Australia.

  11. Bipolar I and II disorders in a random and representative Australian population.

    PubMed

    Goldney, Robert D; Fisher, Laura J; Grande, Eleonora Dal; Taylor, Anne W; Hawthorne, Graeme

    2005-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of bipolar I and II disorders in an Australian population. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) was administered to 3015 respondents in a random and representative sample in South Australia. Health status, quality of life and demographic data were also collected. There was a 2.5% lifetime prevalence of bipolar I and II disorders delineated by the MDQ. Those people had a significantly greater use of services and a poorer health status and quality of life than those who were MDQ-negative. These results in an Australian population are consistent with other international studies showing a greater prevalence of bipolar disorders than hitherto appreciated.

  12. Beverage intake and obesity in Australian children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There have been increases in the obesity and overweight rates in Australian children over the past 25 years and it has been suggested that sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) have played a role in this increase. Objective The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine SSB intakes in the 2007 Australian Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2) relate SSB intake to rates of overweight and obesity, socio-economic status (SES), TV viewing time, and activity levels and (3) compare 2007 SSB intakes with data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. Design A computer assisted 24 h dietary recall in 4,400 children aged 2-16 years was performed. Results In the 2007 survey 47% of all children reported drinking SSBs with 25% consuming sugar sweetened soft drinks on the day of the survey. The mean consumption of soft drink was 436 g/d/consumer. Activity levels were unrelated to SSB consumption. Television viewing was positively related to soft drink consumption with a difference of 55 g/day from bottom to top tertile of time spent TV viewing (p = 0.015) in children aged 9-16 years. 55% of SSB consumption occurred at home and 10% occurred at school. Lower SES status was associated with a greater prevalence of SSB consumption- 30% for the lowest SES quartile vs 19% in the highest quartile. The proportion of overweight who consumed SSBs (which excludes 100% fruit) was not different from the non-overweight children although the proportion of SSB consumers in the 6% of children who were obese was significant compared with the non-overweight children (59% vs 47%, p < 0.05). In the 2007 survey 23% of children were overweight (17%) or obese (6%) while in the 1995 survey this figure was 21%. The proportion of children consuming SSBs in 1995 and 2007 for selected age groups were: 2-3 years - 25.8% and 12.8% respectively and 4-7 years - 33.6% and 20.5% respectively (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusions This cross-sectional data set provides evidence that SSB

  13. Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

  14. Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

  15. The Civic Mission of Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lawrence; Muirhead, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins and meaning of civic responsibility in the Australian model of the university, beginning with medieval European universities and progressing through Australian reforms of the 20th century. Warns against the university without a civic mission. (SLD)

  16. Australian Institute of Sport and Australian Medical Association position statement on concussion in sport.

    PubMed

    Elkington, Lisa J; Hughes, David C

    2017-01-16

    Sport-related concussion is a growing health concern in Australia. Public concern is focused on the incidence and potential long term consequences of concussion. Children may be more prone to concussion and take longer to recover. The Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Medical Association have collaborated to present the most contemporary evidence-based information in a format appropriate for all stakeholders. This position statement aims to ensure that participant safety and welfare is paramount when dealing with concussion in sport.First aid principles apply in the management of the athlete with suspected concussion, including protection of the cervical spine. Tools exist for use by members of the community, allowing identification of key symptoms and signs that raise the suspicion of concussion. Medical professionals should use the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3, in conjunction with clinical assessment for the diagnosis of concussion. Clinical assessment includes mechanism of injury, symptoms and signs, cognitive functioning, and neurological assessment including balance testing. In any situation where concussion is suspected, the athlete must be immediately removed from sport and not be allowed to return to activity until they have been assessed by a medical practitioner. "If in doubt, sit them out."A diagnosis of concussion requires immediate physical and cognitive rest, followed by a structured, graduated return to physical activity. Children require a longer period of recovery from concussion. Algorithms are provided for use by medical and non-medically trained stakeholders in the recognition and management of concussion.

  17. Combining Marriage and Career: The Professional Adjustment of Marital Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Afroz Haider

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, the researcher attempted to assess Professional Adjustment status and level of teachers according to their marital status on a sample of 792 teachers. Teachers have been classified into two categories viz. married and unmarried. To evaluate the status of professional adjustment of teachers, a tool viz. "Manual on Teachers…

  18. Contemporary issues in Australian midwifery regulation.

    PubMed

    Brodie, P; Barclay, L

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on research that examined the Nurses' Acts, regulations and current policies of each state and territory in Australia, in order to determine their adequacy in regulating the education and practice of midwifery. This is part of a three-year study (Australian Midwifery Action Project) set up to identify and investigate barriers to midwifery within the provision of mainstream maternity services in Australia. Through an in-depth examination and comparison of key factors in the various statutes, the paper identifies their effect on contemporary midwifery roles and practices. The work assessed whether the current regulatory system that subsumes midwifery into nursing is adequate in protecting the public appropriately and ensuring that minimum professional standards are met. This is of particular importance in Australia, where many maternity health care services are seeking to maximise midwives' contributions through the development of new models of care that increase midwives' autonomy and level of accountability. A lack of consistency and evidence of discrepancies in the standards of midwifery education and practice regulation nationally are identified. When these are considered alongside the planned development of a three-year Bachelor of Midwifery, due to be introduced into Australia in mid-2002, there exists an urgent need for regulatory change. The need is also identified for appropriate national midwifery competency standards that meet consumer, employer and practitioner expectations, which can be used to guide state and territory regulations. We argue the importance of a need for change in the view and legal positioning of the Australian Nursing Council and all Nurses Boards regarding the identification of midwifery as distinct from nursing, and substantiate it with a rationale for a national and consistent approach to midwifery regulation.

  19. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Stafford, Julia; Pierce, Hannah; Daube, Mike

    2017-07-01

    In Australia, most alcohol is sold as packaged liquor from off-premises retailers, a market increasingly dominated by supermarket chains. Competition between retailers may encourage marketing approaches, for example, discounting, that evidence indicates contribute to alcohol-related harms. This research documented the nature and variety of promotional methods used by two major supermarket retailers to promote alcohol products in their supermarket catalogues. Weekly catalogues from the two largest Australian supermarket chains were reviewed for alcohol-related content over 12 months. Alcohol promotions were assessed for promotion type, product type, number of standard drinks, purchase price and price/standard drink. Each store catalogue included, on average, 13 alcohol promotions/week, with price-based promotions most common. Forty-five percent of promotions required the purchase of multiple alcohol items. Wine was the most frequently promoted product (44%), followed by beer (24%) and spirits (18%). Most (99%) wine cask (2-5 L container) promotions required multiple (two to three) casks to be purchased. The average number of standard drinks required to be purchased to participate in catalogue promotions was 31.7 (SD = 24.9; median = 23.1). The median price per standard drink was $1.49 (range $0.19-$9.81). Cask wines had the lowest cost per standard drink across all product types. Supermarket catalogues' emphasis on low prices/high volumes of alcohol reflects that retailers are taking advantage of limited restrictions on off-premise sales and promotion, which allow them to approach market competition in ways that may increase alcohol-related harms in consumers. Regulation of alcohol marketing should address retailer catalogue promotions. [Johnston R, Stafford J, Pierce H, Daube M. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:456-463]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  20. Socio-Demographic Determinants of Diet Quality in Australian Adults Using the Validated Healthy Eating Index for Australian Adults (HEIFA-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Grech, Amanda; Sui, Zhixian; Siu, Hong Ying; Zheng, Miaobing; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Rangan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Diet quality indices have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease, cancer, Type 2 Diabetes, obesity and all-cause mortality. This study aimed to determine the socio-demographics of Australian adults with poor diet quality. Diet quality was assessed for participants of the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey aged 18 years or above (n = 9435), with the validated 11-component Healthy Eating Index for Australians (HEIFA-2013), based on the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines. Differences in scores by demographics (ANOVA) and regression models for associations between the HEIFA-2013 score and demographic characteristics were conducted. The mean (SD) HEIFA-2013 score was 45.5 (14.7) out of 100 due to poor intakes of vegetables, fruit, grains, dairy and fat and high intakes of added sugar, sodium and discretionary foods. Lower mean HEIFA-2013 scores (SD) were found for males 43.3 (14.7), young-adults 41.6 (14.2) obese 44.1 (14.3), smokers 40.0 (14.2), low socio-economic status 43.7 (14.9) and Australian country-of-birth 44.2 (14.6) (p < 0.05). The overall diet quality of the Australian population is poor and targeted interventions for young-adults, males, obese and those with lower socio-economic status are recommended. PMID:28165394

  1. Emotional Intelligence Throughout the Lifecycle of Australian Radiographers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sarah Jayne; Eccles, Grace Rose; Mackay, Stuart James; Robinson, John

    2017-09-01

    To measure global and domain trait emotional intelligence (EI) throughout the professional lifecycle of Australian radiographers and report the trends. A combination retrospective and prospective cross-sectional multiple-cohort study using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) was designed to collect global and domain trait EI scores of several populations, including radiography students (n = 95), inexperienced radiographers (0-5 years' experience; n = 94), experienced radiographers (≥ 6 years' experience; n = 451), chief radiographers (n = 107), clinical educators (n = 24), application specialists (n = 24), and radiographers working in education (n = 15). Mean EI scores were calculated and statistical tests were performed to determine whether significant differences existed among the groups. Statistically significant differences were found among populations for global EI and the domains of self-control and well-being, with students demonstrating consistently lower scores than qualified radiographers (P ≥ .001). Chief radiographers demonstrated higher scores for well-being than inexperienced radiographers, radiographers working in education, and students (P < .001). Global EI scores increased steadily throughout the professional lifecycle of Australian radiographers, plateauing at 10 years of clinical experience. Chief radiographers demonstrated the highest scores for well-being, which is consistent with prior research acknowledging the importance of EI in organizational leadership. Students demonstrated lower EI scores likely because they are at the beginning of their careers and might not yet perceive themselves as confident or successful. Higher EI scores are expected in normal career advancement, plateauing at about 10 years of clinical experience. A statistically significant difference exists between global and domain trait EI scores throughout the professional lifecycle of Australian radiologic technologists. Global trait

  2. Risky professional boundaries. Articulations of the personal self by antenatal screening professionals.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Janice

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the role of various boundaries in giving both professional groups and individuals a sense of identity that provides both with status and legitimacy. Close attention is paid to the boundaries between personal and professional identities and values. Sociologists working with a discursive approach argue that professional identity and status are achieved through the rhetorical presentation of certain values and responsibilities as personal, and therefore outside the boundaries of professional practice. This paper takes this argument forward, by arguing that in particular contexts, certain kinds of values are consciously articulated as personal and incorporated into the defence of professional legitimacy. Bringing personal claims inside professional boundaries is further evidence of the fluid and negotiated quality of the boundary between personal and professional values and notions of self. The paper consists of a discussion of the construction of professional boundaries, professional involvement in risk, issues raised by antenatal screening and analysis of a study of a group of professionals involved in antenatal screening. The paper explores the circumstances within which even senior professional groups and individuals look to representations of the personal self as a defence against critiques of their professional practice. Where the risks that professionals generate and interpret are medically ambiguous and socially contentious the abstract professional and medical framework is insufficient and other rhetorical values become resources in securing the professional role.

  3. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper…

  4. Embracing Babel: The "Framework for Australian Languages"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy, Jaky; Walsh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has been developing language-specific curricula for a range of languages in the "Australian Curriculum: Language"s and has also undertaken development of a "Framework for Australian Languages", to provide guidance for the development of curricula for specific…

  5. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper…

  6. "English" in the "Australian Curriculum: English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the text of a paper given at the 2011 Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities on the theme, "Educating the Nation: The Humanities in the New Australian Curriculum", the 42nd Annual Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities at the University of Melbourne, 17 November 2011. It was presented in a session on…

  7. Embracing Babel: The "Framework for Australian Languages"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy, Jaky; Walsh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has been developing language-specific curricula for a range of languages in the "Australian Curriculum: Language"s and has also undertaken development of a "Framework for Australian Languages", to provide guidance for the development of curricula for specific…

  8. National Mythology on Television: The Australian Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    In view of the increasing interest in the mass media's role in the creation, maintenance, transformation, and celebration of whole cultures, the Australian experience with nationalistic mythmaking in film and television should be examined. Research reveals that Australians prefer watching Australian programs to watching British or American…

  9. Overseas-trained doctors in Indigenous rural health services: negotiating professional relationships across cultural domains.

    PubMed

    Durey, Angela; Hill, Peter; Arkles, Rachelle; Gilles, Marisa; Peterson, Katia; Wearne, Susan; Canuto, Condy; Pulver, Lisa Jackson

    2008-12-01

    To examine how OTDs and staff in rural and remote Indigenous health contexts communicate and negotiate identity and relationships, and consider how this may influence OTDs' transition, integration and retention. Ten case studies were conducted in rural and remote settings across Australia, each of an OTD providing primary care in a substantially Indigenous practice population, his/her partner, co-workers and Indigenous board members associated with the health service. Cases were purposefully sampled to ensure diversity in gender, location and country of origin. Identity as 'fluid' emerged as a key theme in effective communication and building good relationships between OTDs and Indigenous staff. OTDs enter a social space where their own cultural and professional beliefs and practices intersect with the expectations of culturally safe practice shaped by the Australian Indigenous context. These are negotiated through differences in language, role expectation, practice, status and identification with locus with uncertain outcomes. Limited professional and cultural support often impeded this process. The reconstruction of OTDs' identities and mediating beyond predictable barriers to cultural engagement contributes significantly not only to OTDs' integration and, to a lesser extent, their retention, but also to maximising effective communication across cultural domains. Retention of OTDs working in Indigenous health contexts rests on a combination of OTDs' capacity to adapt culturally and professionally to this complex environment, and of effective strategies to support them.

  10. Electrical safety: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Ward, A

    1982-02-01

    Australia has an electricity mains supply that differs from those of most countries. Safety standards relating to both the mains supply and mains-powered apparatus also differ. This paper describes the mechanism of electric shock and methods of shock protection - core-balance relays, protected earth-free supplies and equipotential earthing are considered. Australian safety standards as applied to earthed mains-powered apparatus are summarized. Particular attention is given to class A and B treatment areas and electromedical apparatus having a patient circuit. Class A, B and Z patient circuits are described. Copyright © 1982 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  11. Tube-weaning infants and children: a survey of Australian and international practice.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Alison Y; Fuller, David G; Vuillermin, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe paediatric feeding-tube weaning practice in Australian children's hospitals and to compare this with practice in tube weaning programmes internationally. A literature review regarding tube weaning practices was conducted to inform questionnaire design. Six Australian children's hospitals and six international paediatric service providers completed a written questionnaire. Four of six Australian children's hospitals surveyed reported that they have adopted informal paediatric tube weaning practices; four of six lacked clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), and five of six lacked a clearly defined case leadership. Practice varied substantially within and between these Australian feeding teams. By comparison, all six international feeding teams reported having developed formal CPGs. Five of six reported clearly defined case leadership with no more than three lead professionals overseeing cases and concordantly reported a high level of practice consistency within and between teams. The majority of Australian children's hospitals lack a formal CPG and clearly defined case leadership to guide tube weaning practices, and accordingly, there is considerable practice variation. This is in contrast to the situation in a select group of international centres. There is a need for further research to define best practice models and for Australian CPGs. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Professional Synergy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  13. Second Languages and Australian Schooling. Australian Education Review No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    It is an underlying principle of Australian Education Review (AER) 54 that active efforts should be made to cultivate the latent bilingual potential within Australia's wider population and that this should be linked to major improvements in the quality of language teaching in schools. A combined approach of this kind will require investment in…

  14. Second Languages and Australian Schooling. Australian Education Review No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    It is an underlying principle of Australian Education Review (AER) 54 that active efforts should be made to cultivate the latent bilingual potential within Australia's wider population and that this should be linked to major improvements in the quality of language teaching in schools. A combined approach of this kind will require investment in…

  15. Professional care seeking for mental health problems among women and men in Europe: the role of socioeconomic, family-related and mental health status factors in explaining gender differences.

    PubMed

    Buffel, V; Van de Velde, S; Bracke, P

    2014-10-01

    This comparative study examines cross-national variation in gender differences in primary and specialized mental health care use in Europe. We investigate to what extent socioeconomic, family-related, and mental health factors explain the gender difference, and how the impact of these groups of determinants on gender differences in mental health care use varies between countries. Data from the Eurobarometer 248 (2005-2006) for 29 European countries is used and country-specific logistic regression analyses are performed. Gender differences in professional care seeking are largely need based. In almost one-third of the countries examined, the gender difference is mainly attributable to women's poorer mental health status. However, in some countries, family and socioeconomic characteristics also have an independent contribution to the gender difference in mental health care use. Women's higher likelihood of a lower socioeconomic position, might partly explain their higher primary care use, while in some countries, it restricts their specialized care use. In addition, some social conditions, as having children and being widowed, seem to function in a few countries as suppressors of women's care use. Our study has shown that the gender difference in mental health care use, with women having a higher care use, is not a consistent European phenomenon and is dependent on the type of care provider, with greater gender inequity in the use of primary health care. The social roles adopted by men and women have in some countries on top of the mental health status a relevant influence on the greater tendency among women to contact a care provider. How the socioeconomic and family characteristics moderate the relation between gender and mental health care use is not straightforward and country dependent.

  16. Depression literacy among Australians of Chinese-speaking background in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the knowledge of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background, and the perceptions of this population of the causes of mental illness. Methods Adopting a cluster convenience sampling method, the study recruited 200 Chinese-speaking subjects from four major areas in metropolitan Melbourne where many Chinese live. The respondents were presented with a vignette describing an individual with depression and then asked questions to assess their understanding of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods. A comparative approach was used to compare the findings with those of a previous study of the mental health literacy of Australian and Japanese adults. Results Compared to the Australian and Japanese samples, a much lower percentage of Chinese-speaking Australians (14%) could correctly identify major depression described in the vignette, and a higher percentage believed that counseling professionals could be helpful. Higher percentages of those who believed that close family members could be helpful were found in the Chinese-speaking Australian and Japanese samples, and these two groups also expressed more uncertainty about the usefulness or harmfulness of certain medications compared to the Australian sample. Higher percentages of respondents in both the Chinese-speaking Australian and the Australian sample considered "lifestyle changes" to be helpful compared to the Japanese sample. In the Chinese-speaking sample, 30%, 17.4%, 33% and 27% of the respondents rated "traditional Chinese medicine doctors," "Chinese herbal medications," "taking Chinese nutritional foods/supplements" and "qiqong" as helpful. Many perceived "changing fungshui" and "traditional Chinese worship" to be harmful. Regarding the perception of causes of mental illness, items related to psychosocial perspectives including "life stress" and

  17. Transnational Education: A Case Study of One Professional Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a Doctor of Education program in a transnational setting is contextualized in Australian national policies for international higher education and influences of regionalization and globalization. The doctorate was designed to meet aspirations of professional practitioners in Australia and South East Asia where the School had…

  18. Professional Learning in Mathematical Reasoning: Reflections of a Primary Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sandra; Widjaja, Wanty; Bragg, Leicha A.; Loong, Esther; Vale, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Reasoning is an important aspect in the understanding and learning of mathematics. This paper reports on a case study presenting one Australian primary teacher's reflections regarding the role played by a professional learning program in her developing understanding of mathematical reasoning. Examination of the transcripts of two interviews…

  19. Professional Experience: Learning from the Past to Build the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Cornu, Rosie

    2016-01-01

    The title of the 2014 Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA) conference was "Teacher Education, An Audit: Building a platform for future engagement." One of the conference themes was "Professional Experience: What works? Why?" I seized upon this theme and the title of the conference as it afforded me an opportunity to…

  20. Three-Dimensional Pedagogy: A New Professionalism in Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Dorothy; Abawi, Lindy

    2017-01-01

    This article provides evidence of a new teacher professionalism whereby teachers, acting as collaborative individuals working together, are the key to effectively meeting the needs of diverse student cohorts. Drawing on data from Australian school contexts and the work of researchers from the Leadership Research International team, new…