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Sample records for progenitor toxin complex

  1. High-resolution crystal structure of HA33 of botulinum neurotoxin type B progenitor toxin complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs) by Clostridium botulinum. The PTCs are composed of BoNT and non-toxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs), which serve to protect and deliver BoNT through the gastrointestinal tract in food borne botulism. HA33 is a key NAP component that specifically recognizes host carbohydrates and helps enrich PTC on the intestinal lumen preceding its transport across the epithelial barriers. Here, we report the crystal structure of HA33 of type B PTC (HA33/B) in complex with lactose at 1.46 Å resolution. The structural comparisons among HA33 of serotypes A–D reveal two different HA33–glycan interaction modes. The glycan-binding pockets on HA33/A and B are more suitable to recognize galactose-containing glycans in comparison to the equivalent sites on HA33/C and D. On the contrary, HA33/C and D could potentially recognize Neu5Ac as an independent receptor, whereas HA33/A and B do not. These findings indicate that the different oral toxicity and host susceptibility observed among different BoNT serotypes could be partly determined by the serotype-specific interaction between HA33 and host carbohydrate receptors. Furthermore, we have identified a key structural water molecule that mediates the HA33/B–lactose interactions. It provides the structural basis for development of new receptor-mimicking compounds, which have enhanced binding affinity with HA33 through their water-displacing moiety. PMID:24631690

  2. Characterization of Botulinum Progenitor Toxins by Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Harry B.; Lebeda, Frank; Hale, Martha; Brueggemann, Ernst E.

    2005-01-01

    Botulinum toxin analysis has renewed importance. This study included the use of nanochromatography-nanoelectrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry to characterize the protein composition of botulinum progenitor toxins and to assign botulinum progenitor toxins to their proper serotype and strain by using currently available sequence information. Clostridium botulinum progenitor toxins from strains Hall, Okra, Stockholm, MDPH, Alaska, and Langeland and 89 representing serotypes A through G, respectively, were reduced, alkylated, digested with trypsin, and identified by matching the processed product ion spectra of the tryptic peptides to proteins in accessible databases. All proteins known to be present in progenitor toxins from each serotype were identified. Additional proteins, including flagellins, ORF-X1, and neurotoxin binding protein, not previously reported to be associated with progenitor toxins, were present also in samples from several serotypes. Protein identification was used to assign toxins to a serotype and strain. Serotype assignments were accurate, and strain assignments were best when either sufficient nucleotide or amino acid sequence data were available. Minor difficulties were encountered using neurotoxin-associated protein identification for assigning serotype and strain. This study found that combined nanoscale chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques can characterize C. botulinum progenitor toxin protein composition and that serotype/strain assignments based upon these proteins can provide accurate serotype and, in most instances, strain assignments using currently available information. Assignment accuracy will continue to improve as more nucleotide/amino acid sequence information becomes available for different botulinum strains. PMID:16085839

  3. Characterization of botulinum progenitor toxins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hines, Harry B; Lebeda, Frank; Hale, Martha; Brueggemann, Ernst E

    2005-08-01

    Botulinum toxin analysis has renewed importance. This study included the use of nanochromatography-nanoelectrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry to characterize the protein composition of botulinum progenitor toxins and to assign botulinum progenitor toxins to their proper serotype and strain by using currently available sequence information. Clostridium botulinum progenitor toxins from strains Hall, Okra, Stockholm, MDPH, Alaska, and Langeland and 89 representing serotypes A through G, respectively, were reduced, alkylated, digested with trypsin, and identified by matching the processed product ion spectra of the tryptic peptides to proteins in accessible databases. All proteins known to be present in progenitor toxins from each serotype were identified. Additional proteins, including flagellins, ORF-X1, and neurotoxin binding protein, not previously reported to be associated with progenitor toxins, were present also in samples from several serotypes. Protein identification was used to assign toxins to a serotype and strain. Serotype assignments were accurate, and strain assignments were best when either sufficient nucleotide or amino acid sequence data were available. Minor difficulties were encountered using neurotoxin-associated protein identification for assigning serotype and strain. This study found that combined nanoscale chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques can characterize C. botulinum progenitor toxin protein composition and that serotype/strain assignments based upon these proteins can provide accurate serotype and, in most instances, strain assignments using currently available information. Assignment accuracy will continue to improve as more nucleotide/amino acid sequence information becomes available for different botulinum strains.

  4. The structure of the neurotoxin-associated protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum suggests a reoccurring beta-trefoil fold in the progenitor toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Joseph W; Gu, Jenny; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Hanson, Michael A; Lebeda, Frank J; Stevens, Raymond C

    2005-03-04

    The hemagglutinating protein HA33 from Clostridium botulinum is associated with the large botulinum neurotoxin secreted complexes and is critical in toxin protection, internalization, and possibly activation. We report the crystal structure of serotype A HA33 (HA33/A) at 1.5 A resolution that contains a unique domain organization and a carbohydrate recognition site. In addition, sequence alignments of the other toxin complex components, including the neurotoxin BoNT/A, hemagglutinating protein HA17/A, and non-toxic non-hemagglutinating protein NTNHA/A, suggests that most of the toxin complex consists of a reoccurring beta-trefoil fold.

  5. Purification of Clostridium botulinum Type F Progenitor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Iwao; Sakaguchi, Genji

    1974-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type F progenitor toxin was purified to a homogeneous state as judged by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, ultracentrifugation, and disc electrophoresis. The sedimentation constant, corrected to water at 20 C, of type F progenitor toxin was determined to be 10.3 and the molecular weight to be 235,000 by ultracentrifugation at pH 6.0. The purified toxin contained a toxicity of 1.2 × 108 50% lethal doses/mg of N. In agar gel double diffusion, it formed two precipitin lines at pH 6.0. The progenitor toxin of type F differs from that of type A in that it contains no hemagglutinin and from that of type E in that it is not activable. Images PMID:4615636

  6. Characterization of Botulinum Progenitor Toxins by Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    strains Hall, Okra , Stockholm, MDPH, Alaska, and Langeland and 89 representing serotypes A through G, respectively, were reduced, alkylated, digested with...sequence information. Clostridium botulinum progenitor toxins from strains Hall, Okra , Stockholm, MDPH, Alaska, Langeland, and 89 representing...from sero- types A (strain 62A), B (strain Okra ), C (003-9), D (CB-16), E (no designation; equivalent to NCTC 11219 by analysis), and F (Langeland) that

  7. The Structure of the Neurotoxin- Associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum Suggests a Reoccurring Beta-Trefoil Fold in the Progenitor Toxin Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-16

    mistletoe lectin I. The ricin and mistle- toe lectin I structures revealed a domain architec- ture that are similar to HA33/A with two b-trefoil...domains. The complex crystal structures of ricin bound to lactose and mistletoe lectin I bound to galactose revealed that only the 1a and 2g repeats of...H., Tonevitsky, A. G., Agapov, I. I., Saward, S., Pfuller, U. & Palmer, R. A. (2003). Crystal structure at 3 Å of mistletoe lectin I, a dimeric

  8. Clostridium botulinum type A progenitor toxin binds to Intestine-407 cells via N-acetyllactosamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shoudou; Eguchi, Hironobu; Ookawara, Tomomi; Fujiwara, Noriko; Yasuda, Jun; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamura, Takehira; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2005-06-03

    Botulism is a highly fatal disease caused by the botulinum progenitor toxin. In this study, the role of oligosaccharides for the binding of botulinum type A progenitor toxin (type A PTX) to human intestinal cells was investigated. The binding of type A PTX to Intestine-407 cells was inhibited by the addition of N-acetyllactosamine, lactose, and galactose. Treatment of Intestine-407 cells with neuraminidase led to a significant increase in the binding of type A PTX, while further digestion of cell surface oligosaccharides by beta-galactosidase and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase decreased the binding. These results indicate that the N-acetyllactosamine moiety is responsible for the binding of type A PTX. These findings were further confirmed by a binding assay using synthesized oligosaccharides. Interestingly, sialylation or fucosylation of oligosaccharides inhibited the binding of type A PTX. These data suggest that the type A PTX binds to intestinal cells via cell surface N-acetyllactosamine moiety.

  9. The receptor and transporter for internalization of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin into HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Atsushi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Lee, Jae-Chul; Miura, Yutaka; Fujinaga, Yukako; Nakada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji

    2004-06-25

    Orally ingested botulinum toxin enters the circulatory system and eventually reaches the peripheral nerves, where it elicits a response of neurological dysfunction. In this study, we report the important findings concerning the mechanism of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin (C16S) endocytic mechanism. C16S toxin bound to high molecular weight proteins on the surface of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells and was internalized, but not if the cells were pretreated with neuraminidase. Benzyl-GalNAc which inhibited O-glycosylation of glycoproteins also interfered in the toxin's ability to bind the cell surface. On the other hand, the toxin was internalized in spite of pretreatment of the cells with PPMP, an inhibitor of ganglioside synthesis. These results suggest that the glycoproteins, like mucin, fulfill the important roles of receptor and transporter of C16S toxin.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the HA3 component of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshio; Tonozuka, Takashi; Kotani, Mao; Obata, Kanae; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2007-12-01

    HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations indicate that there is probably one molecule of HA3 in the asymmetric unit. A search for heavy-atom derivatives has been undertaken.

  11. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  12. Reactivity of murine cytokine fusion toxin, diphtheria toxin390-murine interleukin-3 (DT390-mIL-3), with bone marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, C H; Blazar, B R; Greenfield, L; Kreitman, R J; Vallera, D A

    1996-08-15

    Myeloid leukemias can express interleukin-3 receptors (IL-3R). Therefore, as an antileukemia drug, a fusion immunotoxin was synthesized consisting of the murine IL-3 (mIL-3) gene spliced to a truncated form of the diphtheria toxin (DT390) gene coding for a molecule that retained full enzymatic activity, but excluded the native binding domain. The DT390-mIL-3 hybrid gene was cloned into a vector under the control of an inducible promote. The fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and then purified from inclusion bodies. The fusion toxin was potent because it inhibited FDC-P1, an IL-3R-expressing murine myelomonocytic tumor line (IC50 = 0.025 nmol/L or 1.5 ng/mL). Kinetics were rapid and cell-free studies showed that DT390-mIL-3 was as toxic as native DT. DT390-mIL-3 was selective because anti-mIL-3 monoclonal antibody, but not irrelevant antibody, inhibited its ability to kill. Cell lines not expressing IL-3R were not inhibited by the fusion protein. Because the use of DT390-mIL-3 as an antileukemia agent could be restricted by its reactivity with committed and/or primitive progenitor cells, bone marrow (BM) progenitor assays were performed. DT390-mIL-3 selectively inhibited committed BM progenitor cells as measured by in vitro colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage and in vivo colony-forming unit-spleen colony assays. To determine if this fusion protein was reactive against BM progenitor cells required to rescue lethally irradiated recipients, adoptive transfer experiments were performed. Eight million DT390-mIL-3-treated C57BL/6 Ly5.2 BM cells, but not 4 million, were able to rescue lethally irradiated congenic C57BL/6 Ly5.1 recipients, suggesting that progenitor cells might be heterogenous in their expression of IL-3R. This idea was supported in competitive repopulation experiments in which DT390-mIL-3 treated C57BL/6 Ly5.2 BM cells were mixed with nontreated C57BL/6 Ly5.1 BM cells and used to reconstitute C57BL/6 Ly5.1 mice. A significant reduction

  13. Endothelial Progenitor Cells=EPC=Elemental Pernicious Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ushio-Fukai, Masuko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a heterogeneous population of cells with a pro-angiogenic potential that are derived not only from bone marrow but also from other tissues. Depending on the model and cell type used, the pro-angiogenic effect is a consequence of direct vascular integration, the paracrine release of growth factors and cytokines, or complex interactions with other cellular components like monocytes or platelets. The pro-angiogenic potential of EPCs is dependent on the particular type of EPC studied and modulated by the risk and life style factors of the patient as well as by local factors determining the homing to diseased tissue and the EPC proteome. In this Forum on EPCs these aspects will be covered in individual review articles, which are accompanied by two original research studies on the role of NADPH oxidases for EPC mobilization and the impact of organic nitrates on EPCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 911–914. PMID:21128729

  14. Antiproliferation effect of the uremic toxin para‑cresol on endothelial progenitor cells is related to its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Limin; Ye, Xiaoting; Ding, Jiguang; Zhou, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired endothelial regenerative capacity are key contributors to the high incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Uremic toxins are associated with this pathogenesis. Previous studies have revealed that a uremic toxin, para‑cresol (p‑cresol), exerts an antiproliferation effect on human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were confirmed to function as signaling molecules that regulate growth factor‑dependent EPC proliferation. EPCs were treated with p‑cresol for 72 h, using a concentration range typically found in CKD patients. ROS production was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and protein expression levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, a major source of ROS, were analyzed by western blot analysis. mRNA expression levels of antioxidant genes were assessed by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The results revealed that p‑cresol partially inhibits ROS production, and this effect may be associated with a significant reduction in cytochrome b‑245 alpha and beta chain expression in EPCs. An increase of glutathione peroxidase 4 mRNA expression was also detected. In conclusion, the present study revealed that the antiproliferation effect of p‑cresol on EPCs might act via its antioxidant activity. The results of the present study may facilitate understanding of uremic toxin toxicity on the cardiovascular system.

  15. Molecular characterization of binding subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin for intestinal epithelial cells and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Yukako; Inoue, Kaoru; Watarai, Shinobu; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Lee, Jae-Chul; Jin, Yingji; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Kabumoto, Yuko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2004-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin consists of a neurotoxin (NTX), a non-toxic non-HA (NTNH), and a haemagglutinin (HA). The HA acts as an adhesin, allowing the 16S toxin to bind to intestinal epithelial cells and erythrocytes. In type C, these bindings are dependent on sialic acid. The HA consists of four distinct subcomponents designated HA1, HA2, HA3a and HA3b. To identify the binding subcomponent(s) of HA of type C 16S toxin, all of the HA-subcomponents and some of their precursor forms were produced as recombinant proteins fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). These proteins were evaluated for their capacity to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells of guinea pig and human erythrocytes. GST-HA1, GST-HA3b and GST-HA3 (a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b) bound intestinal epithelial cells and erythrocytes, whereas GST alone, GST-HA2 and GST-HA3a did not. GST-HA3b and GST-HA3 showed neuraminidase-sensitive binding to the intestinal epithelial cells and erythrocytes, whereas GST-HA1 showed neuraminidase-insensitive binding. TLC binding assay revealed that GST-HA3b and GST-HA3 recognized sialosylparagloboside (SPG) and GM3 in the ganglioside fraction of the erythrocytes, like native type C 16S toxin [Inoue, K. et al. (1999). Microbiology 145, 2533-2542]. On the other hand, GST-HA1 recognized paragloboside (PG; an asialo- derivative of SPG) in addition to SPG and GM3. Deletion mutant analyses of GST-HA3b showed that the C-terminal region of HA3b is important for its binding activity. Based on these data, it is concluded that the HA component contains two distinct carbohydrate-binding subcomponents, HA1 and HA3b, which recognize carbohydrates in different specificities.

  16. Metal Complexes And Free Radical Toxins Produced By Pfiesteria Piscicida

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.D.R.; Beauchesne, K.R.; Huncik, K.M.; Davis, W.C.; Christopher, S.J.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.; Gelasco, A.K.

    2009-06-03

    Metal-containing organic toxins produced by Pfiesteria piscicida were characterized, for the first time, by corroborating data obtained from five distinct instrumental methods: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC/PB-GDMS), electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high toxicity of the metal-containing toxins is due to metal-mediated free radical production. This mode of activity explains the toxicity of Pfiesteria, as well as previously reported difficulty in observing the molecular target, due to the ephemeral nature of radical species. The toxins are highly labile in purified form, maintaining activity for only 2-5 days before all activity is lost. The multiple toxin congeners in active extracts are also susceptible to decomposition in the presence of white light, pH variations, and prolonged heat. These findings represent the first formal isolation and characterization of a radical forming toxic organic-ligated metal complex isolated from estuarine/marine dinoflagellates. These findings add to an increased understanding regarding the active role of metals interacting with biological systems in the estuarine environment, as well as their links and implications to human health.

  17. Metal Complexes and Free Radical Toxins Produced by Pfiesteria piscicida

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller,P.; Beauchesne, K.; Huncik, K.; Davis, W.; Christopher, S.; Riggs-Gelasco, P.; Gelasco, A.

    2007-01-01

    Metal-containing organic toxins produced by Pfiesteria piscicida were characterized, for the first time, by corroborating data obtained from five distinct instrumental methods: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC/PB-GDMS), electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high toxicity of the metal-containing toxins is due to metal-mediated free radical production. This mode of activity explains the toxicity of Pfiesteria, as well as previously reported difficulty in observing the molecular target, due to the ephemeral nature of radical species. The toxins are highly labile in purified form, maintaining activity for only 2-5 days before all activity is lost. The multiple toxin congeners in active extracts are also susceptible to decomposition in the presence of white light, pH variations, and prolonged heat. These findings represent the first formal isolation and characterization of a radical forming toxic organic-ligated metal complex isolated from estuarine/marine dinoflagellates. These findings add to an increased understanding regarding the active role of metals interacting with biological systems in the estuarine environment, as well as their links and implications to human health.

  18. Metal complexes and free radical toxins produced by Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Peter D R; Beauchesne, Kevin R; Huncik, Kevin M; Davis, W Clay; Christopher, Steven J; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela; Gelasco, Andrew K

    2007-02-15

    Metal-containing organic toxins produced by Pfiesteria piscicida were characterized, for the first time, by corroborating data obtained from five distinct instrumental methods: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC/PB-G DMS), electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high toxicity of the metal-containing toxins is due to metal-mediated free radical production. This mode of activity explains the toxicity of Pfiesteria, as well as previously reported difficulty in observing the molecular target, due to the ephemeral nature of radical species. The toxins are highly labile in purified form, maintaining activity for only 2-5 days before all activity is lost. The multiple toxin congeners in active extracts are also susceptible to decomposition in the presence of white light, pH variations, and prolonged heat. These findings represent the first formal isolation and characterization of a radical forming toxic organic-ligated metal complex isolated from estuarine/marine dinoflagellates. These findings add to an increased understanding regarding the active role of metals interacting with biological systems in the estuarine environment, as well as their links and implications to human health.

  19. [Botulism: structure and function of botulinum toxin and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Oguma, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Fatmawati, Ni Nengah Dwi; Fujita, Kumiko

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven immunological distinct poisonous neurotoxins, A to G, with molecular masses of approximately 150kDa. In acidic foods and culture fluid, the neurotoxins associate with non-toxic components, and form large complexes designated progenitor toxins. The progenitor toxins are found in three forms named LL, L, and M. These neurotoxins and progenitor toxins were purified, and whole nucleotide sequences of their structure genes were determined. In this manuscript, the structure and function of these toxins, and the application of these toxins to clinical usage have been described.

  20. Complex Code of Extrinsic Influences on Cortical Progenitor Cells of Higher Mammals.

    PubMed

    Reillo, Isabel; de Juan Romero, Camino; Cárdenas, Adrián; Clascá, Francisco; Martínez-Martinez, Maria Ángeles; Borrell, Víctor

    2017-09-01

    Development of the cerebral cortex depends critically on the regulation of progenitor cell proliferation and fate. Cortical progenitor cells are remarkably diverse with regard to their morphology as well as laminar and areal position. Extrinsic factors, such as thalamic axons, have been proposed to play key roles in progenitor cell regulation, but the diversity, extent and timing of interactions between extrinsic elements and each class of cortical progenitor cell in higher mammals remain undefined. Here we use the ferret to demonstrate the existence of a complex set of extrinsic elements that may interact, alone or in combination, with subpopulations of progenitor cells, defining a code of extrinsic influences. This code and its complexity vary significantly between developmental stages, layer of residence and morphology of progenitor cells. By analyzing the spatial-temporal overlap of progenitor cell subtypes with neuronal and axonal populations, we show that multiple sets of migrating neurons and axon tracts overlap extensively with subdivisions of the Subventricular Zones, in an exquisite lamina-specific pattern. Our findings provide a framework for understanding the feedback influence of both intra- and extra-cortical elements onto progenitor cells to modulate their dynamics and fate decisions in gyrencephalic brains. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Comparison of toxicity induced by HT-2 toxin on human and rat granulo-monocytic progenitors with an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lautraite, S; Parent-Massin, D; Rio, B; Hoellinger, H

    1996-03-01

    HT-2 toxin is a trichothecene mycotoxin occurring naturally in various agricultural products. Many in vitro studies have shown that HT-2 toxin is a major metabolite of the parent compound T-2 toxin. In man as well as in animals both toxins have been shown to cause alimentary intoxications and haematological disorders. Granulomonocytic progenitors (CFU-GM) from human umbilical cord blood and from rat bone marrow were cultured in the presence of HT-2 toxin (10(-7) M to 10(-10) M) for 14 days. The concentration-effect relationship was studied and the IC50 were determined on Days 7, 10 and 14. The IC50 was 1.8 x 10(-9) M, 3.5 x 10(-9) M and 1.8 x 10(-9) M for human cells, and 2 x 10(-9) M, 2.3 x 10(-9) M and 2.2 x 10(-9) M for rat cells. The results have been compared with previous findings for T-2 toxin. Although T-2 and HT-2 toxins had a similar IC50 on human and rat CFU-GM, the expression of their cytotoxicities was different. These findings are relevant to investigation of the cellular targets of T-2 and HT-2 in elucidating the mechanism of trichothecene haematotoxicity.

  2. Comparison of toxicity induced by T-2 toxin on human and rat granulo-monocytic progenitors with an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lautraite, S; Parent-Massin, D; Rio, B; Hoellinger, H

    1995-08-01

    T-2 toxin is a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by various species of fungi. Trichothecenes are known as major contaminants of cereals and their derivatives. In man as well as in animals, T-2 toxin has been shown to induce alimentary intoxication and, among others, haematological symptoms. Granulo-monocytic progenitors from human umbilical cord blood on the one hand and granulo-monocytic progenitors from rat bone marrow on the other, were cultured in the presence of T-2 toxin (from 10(-7) to 10(-10) M) for 14 days. A study of concentration and effect relationships showed a strong and rapid effect of T-2 toxin on rat colony forming unit-granulocyte and macrophage (CFU-GM) between 5 x 10(-9) M and 10(-9) M. On the other hand, human CFU-GM were able to grow in the presence of the same T-2 toxin concentrations. IC50 were determined on day 7, 10 and 14. They were, respectively, 1.6 x 10(-9) M; 3.6 x 10(-9) M; 1.4 x 10(-9) M for human cells, and 2.2 x 10(-9) M; 3.3 x 10(-9) M; 2.6 x 10(-9) M for rat cells. The present study was prompted by the need to define precisely the cytotoxic and inhibitory T-2 toxin concentrations for rat and human CFU-GM. It is particularly relevant for the investigation of cellular T-2 toxin targets and in order to elucidate the mechanism of trichothecene haematotoxicity.

  3. α-Toxin Regulates Local Granulocyte Expansion from Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Wounds.

    PubMed

    Falahee, Patrick C; Anderson, Leif S; Reynolds, Mack B; Pirir, Mauricio; McLaughlin, Bridget E; Dillen, Carly A; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S; Simon, Scott I

    2017-09-01

    The immune response to Staphylococcus aureus infection in skin involves the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from the bone marrow via the circulation and local granulopoiesis from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that also traffic to infected skin wounds. We focus on regulation of PMN number and function and the role of pore-forming α-toxin (AT), a virulence factor that causes host cell lysis and elicits inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in wounds. Infection with wild-type S. aureus enriched in AT reduced PMN recruitment and resulted in sustained bacterial burden and delayed wound healing. In contrast, PMN recruitment to wounds infected with an isogenic AT-deficient S. aureus strain was unimpeded, exhibiting efficient bacterial clearance and hastened wound resolution. HSPCs recruited to infected wounds were unaffected by AT production and were activated to expand PMN numbers in proportion to S. aureus abundance in a manner regulated by TLR2 and IL-1R signaling. Immunodeficient MyD88-knockout mice infected with S. aureus experienced lethal sepsis that was reversed by PMN expansion mediated by injection of wild-type HSPCs directly into wounds. We conclude that AT-induced IL-1β promotes local granulopoiesis and effective resolution of S. aureus-infected wounds, revealing a potential antibiotic-free strategy for tuning the innate immune response to treat methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in immunodeficient patients. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. The Elimination of DNA from the Cry Toxin-DNA Complex Is a Necessary Step in the Mode of Action of the Cry8 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bingjie; Li, Jie; Feng, Dongmei; Li, Feng; Guo, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Several crystal (Cry) proteins are known to occur as DNA-protein complexes. However, the role of the DNA associated with the activated toxin in the mechanism of action of the Cry toxin has long been ignored. Here, we focused on the DNA-activated Cry toxin complex. Both forms of the Cry8Ca2 and Cry8Ea1 toxins, i.e., with or without bound DNA, were separately obtained. Size-exclusion chromatography analysis indicated that the Cry8Ca2 toxin-DNA complex has a tight or compact structure. The Cry8Ca2 toxin-DNA complex is more likely to move toward the air/water interface and is more hydrophobic than the toxin without DNA. Competitive binding assays indicated that the Cry8Ca2 and Cry8Ea1 toxins without DNA specifically bind to the midgut of Anomala corpulenta and Holotrichia parallela larvae, respectively. In contrast, the association of DNA with each toxin might result in the nonspecific recognition of the Cry toxin and its target receptor in the insect midgut. The association of the DNA fragment with the Cry8 toxin was shown to protect the Cry protein from digestion by proteases. Based on our results, we propose an additional step in the mechanism of action of the Cry8 toxin and elucidate the function of the associated DNA as well as the importance of the removal of this DNA for the insecticidal activity of the toxin. PMID:24324685

  5. Developmental exposure to T-2 toxin reversibly affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis and reduces neural stem cells and progenitor cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Abe, Hajime; Kimura, Masayuki; Onda, Nobuhiko; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    To determine the developmental exposure effects of T-2 toxin on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis, pregnant ICR mice were provided a diet containing T-2 toxin at 0, 1, 3, or 9 ppm from gestation day 6 to day 21 on weaning after delivery. Offspring were maintained through postnatal day (PND) 77 without T-2 toxin exposure. In the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male PND 21 offspring, GFAP(+) and BLBP(+) type-1 stem cells and PAX6(+) and TBR2(+) type-2 progenitor cells decreased in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at 9 and ≥3 ppm, respectively, in parallel with increased apoptosis at ≥3 ppm. In the dentate hilus, reelin(+) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons increased at 9 ppm, suggesting reflection of neuronal mismigration. T-2 toxin decreased transcript levels of cholinergic and glutamate receptor subunits (Chrna4, Chrnb2 and Gria2) and glutamate transporter (Slc17a6) in the dentate gyrus, suggesting decreased cholinergic signals on hilar GABAergic interneurons innervating type-2 cells and decreased glutamatergic signals on type-1 and type-2 cells. T-2 toxin decreased SGZ cells expressing stem cell factor (SCF) and increased cells accumulating malondialdehydes. Neurogenesis-related changes disappeared on PND 77, suggesting that T-2 toxin reversibly affects neurogenesis by inducing apoptosis of type-1 and type-2 cells with different threshold levels. Decreased cholinergic and glutamatergic signals may decrease type-2 cells at ≥3 ppm. Additionally, decreased SCF/c-Kit interactions and increased oxidative stress may decrease type-1 and type-2 cells at 9 ppm. The no-observed-adverse-effect level for offspring neurogenesis was determined to be 1 ppm (0.14-0.49 mg/kg body weight/day).

  6. Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro Secretion of Alpha Toxin (hla) Correlates with the Affiliation to Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Stieber, Bettina; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The alpha toxin of Staphylococcus aureus is a pore forming toxin that penetrates host cell membranes causing osmotic swelling, rupture, lysis and subsequently cell death. Haemolysin alpha is toxic to a wide range of different mammalian cells; i.e., neurotoxic, dermonecrotic, haemolytic, and it can cause lethality in a wide variety of animals. In this study, the in vitro alpha toxin production of 648 previously genotyped isolates of S. aureus was measured quantitatively using antibody microarrays. Isolates originated from medical and veterinary settings and were selected in order to represent diverse clonal complexes and defined clinical conditions. Generally, the production of alpha toxin in vitro is related to the clonal complex affiliation. For clonal complexes CC22, CC30, CC45, CC479, CC705 and others, invariably no alpha toxin production was noted under the given in vitro conditions, while others, such as CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15 or CC96 secreted variable or high levels of alpha toxin. There was no correlation between alpha toxin yield and clinical course of the disease, or between alpha toxin yield and host species. PMID:24940872

  7. Molecular assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E

    DOE PAGES

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; ...

    2015-12-07

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. Furthermore, the similarity of the general architecture betweenmore » the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex.« less

  8. Molecular assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-12-07

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. Furthermore, the similarity of the general architecture between the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex.

  9. Molecular Assembly of Clostridium botulinum progenitor M complex of type E.

    PubMed

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Singh, Bal Ram; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-12-07

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is released as a progenitor complex, in association with a non-toxic-non-hemagglutinin protein (NTNH) and other associated proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of M type Progenitor complex of botulinum neurotoxin E [PTC-E(M)], a heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure reveals that the complex exists as a tight, interlocked heterodimer of BoNT and NTNH. The crystal structure explains the mechanism of molecular assembly of the complex and reveals several acidic clusters at the interface responsible for association at low acidic pH and disassociation at basic/neutral pH. The similarity of the general architecture between the PTC-E(M) and the previously determined PTC-A(M) strongly suggests that the progenitor M complexes of all botulinum serotypes may have similar molecular arrangement, although the neurotoxins apparently can take very different conformation when they are released from the M complex.

  10. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    PubMed

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. “Non-Toxic” Proteins of the Botulinum Toxin Complex Exert In-vivo Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes muscle paralysis and is the most potent toxin in nature. BoNT is associated with a complex of auxiliary “Non-Toxic” proteins, which constitute a large-sized toxin complex (L-TC). However, here we report that the “Non-Toxic” complex of serotype D botulinum L-TC, when administered to rats, exerts in-vivo toxicity on small-intestinal villi. Moreover, Serotype C and D of the “Non-Toxic” complex, but not BoNT, induced vacuole-formation in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), resulting in cell death. Our results suggest that the vacuole was formed in a manner distinct from the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) and Vibrio cholerae haemolysin induce vacuolation. We therefore hypothesise that the serotype C and D botulinum toxin complex is a functional hybrid of the neurotoxin and vacuolating toxin (VT) which arose from horizontal gene transfer from an ancestral BoNT-producing bacterium to a hypothetical VT-producing bacterium. PMID:27507612

  12. Crystal structure of the MazE/MazF complex: molecular bases of antidote-toxin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Burley, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    A structure of the Escherichia coli chromosomal MazE/MazF addiction module has been determined at 1.7 A resolution. Addiction modules consist of stable toxin and unstable antidote proteins that govern bacterial cell death. MazE (antidote) and MazF (toxin) form a linear heterohexamer composed of alternating toxin and antidote homodimers (MazF(2)-MazE(2)-MazF(2)). The MazE homodimer contains a beta barrel from which two extended C termini project, making interactions with flanking MazF homodimers that resemble the plasmid-encoded toxins CcdB and Kid. The MazE/MazF heterohexamer structure documents that the mechanism of antidote-toxin recognition is common to both chromosomal and plasmid-borne addiction modules, and provides general molecular insights into toxin function, antidote degradation in the absence of toxin, and promoter DNA binding by antidote/toxin complexes.

  13. Pdl1 is a putative lipase that enhances Photorhabdus toxin complex secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guowei; Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Beeton, Michael L; Wilkinson, Paul; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Waterfield, Nicholas R

    2012-01-01

    The Toxin Complex (TC) is a large multi-subunit toxin first characterized in the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus, but now seen in a range of pathogens, including those of humans. These complexes comprise three protein subunits, A, B and C which in the Xenorhabdus toxin are found in a 4:1:1 stoichiometry. Some TCs have been demonstrated to exhibit oral toxicity to insects and have the potential to be developed as a pest control technology. The lack of recognisable signal sequences in the three large component proteins hinders an understanding of their mode of secretion. Nevertheless, we have shown the Photorhabdus luminescens (Pl) Tcd complex has been shown to associate with the bacteria's surface, although some strains can also release it into the surrounding milieu. The large number of tc gene homologues in Pl make study of the export process difficult and as such we have developed and validated a heterologous Escherichia coli expression model to study the release of these important toxins. In addition to this model, we have used comparative genomics between a strain that releases high levels of Tcd into the supernatant and one that retains the toxin on its surface, to identify a protein responsible for enhancing secretion and release of these toxins. This protein is a putative lipase (Pdl1) which is regulated by a small tightly linked antagonist protein (Orf53). The identification of homologues of these in other bacteria, linked to other virulence factor operons, such as type VI secretion systems, suggests that these genes represent a general and widespread mechanism for enhancing toxin release in gram negative pathogens.

  14. Construction of "Toxin Complex" in a Mutant Serotype C Strain of Clostridium botulinum Harboring a Defective Neurotoxin Gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    A non-toxigenic mutant of the toxigenic serotype C Clostridium botulinum strain Stockholm (C-St), C-N71, does not produce the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). However, the original strain C-St produces botulinum toxin complex, in which BoNT is associated with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin proteins (HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17). Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of bont gene knockout on the formation of the "toxin complex." Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that a premature stop codon was introduced in the bont gene, whereas other genes were not affected by this mutation. Moreover, we successfully purified the "toxin complex" produced by C-N71. The "toxin complex" was identified as a mixture of NTNHA/HA-70/HA-17/HA-33 complexes with intact NTNHA or C-terminally truncated NTNHA, without BoNT. These results indicated that knockout of the bont gene does not affect the formation of the "toxin complex." Since the botulinum toxin complex has been shown to play an important role in oral toxin transport in the human and animal body, a non-neurotoxic "toxin complex" of C-N71 may be valuable for the development of an oral drug delivery system.

  15. The occurrence of Photorhabdus-like toxin complexes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, genomic sequencing of a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) isolate from our collection revealed the presence of an apparent operon encoding an insecticidal toxin complex (Tca) similar to that first described from the entomopathogen Photorhabdus luminescens. To determine whether these genes are w...

  16. Topology of feather melanocyte progenitor niche allows complex pigment patterns to emerge.

    PubMed

    Lin, S J; Foley, J; Jiang, T X; Yeh, C Y; Wu, P; Foley, A; Yen, C M; Huang, Y C; Cheng, H C; Chen, C F; Reeder, B; Jee, S H; Widelitz, R B; Chuong, C M

    2013-06-21

    Color patterns of bird plumage affect animal behavior and speciation. Diverse patterns are present in different species and within the individual. Here, we study the cellular and molecular basis of feather pigment pattern formation. Melanocyte progenitors are distributed as a horizontal ring in the proximal follicle, sending melanocytes vertically up into the epithelial cylinder, which gradually emerges as feathers grow. Different pigment patterns form by modulating the presence, arrangement, or differentiation of melanocytes. A layer of peripheral pulp further regulates pigmentation via patterned agouti expression. Lifetime feather cyclic regeneration resets pigment patterns for physiological needs. Thus, the evolution of stem cell niche topology allows complex pigment patterning through combinatorial co-option of simple regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Molecular phylogeny and PSP toxin profile of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex along the coast of China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Cheng; Ye, Rui-Min; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Luo, Zhao-He; Gu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng

    2014-12-15

    To explore the genetic diversity and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin profile of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex along the coast of China, 67 strains of A. tamarense from the China Sea were collected and genetic diversity were analyzed based on the rDNA sequences. In addition, PSP toxin compositions and contents were detected by HPLC. According to the 5.8S rDNA and ITS, and LSU rDNA D1-D2 sequence, A. tamarense in the China Sea comprises at least Group IV and Group I ribotypes. In these Chinese strains, the toxins with the highest concentration in the profile were C1/2, gonyautoxins 1/4 (GTX1/4) and neosaxitoxin (NEO). However, the toxin profiles were atypical and C1/2 toxins were not detected in some strains. No strict correlation was observed between the PSP toxins profile and the geographical distribution.

  18. 3D structure of the Yersinia entomophaga toxin complex and implications for insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Landsberg, Michael J.; Jones, Sandra A.; Rothnagel, Rosalba; Busby, Jason N.; Marshall, Sean D. G.; Simpson, Robert M.; Lott, J. Shaun; Hankamer, Ben; Hurst, Mark R. H.

    2011-01-01

    Toxin complex (Tc) proteins are a class of bacterial protein toxins that form large, multisubunit complexes. Comprising TcA, B, and C components, they are of great interest because many exhibit potent insecticidal activity. Here we report the structure of a novel Tc, Yen-Tc, isolated from the bacterium Yersinia entomophaga MH96, which differs from the majority of bacterially derived Tcs in that it exhibits oral activity toward a broad range of insect pests, including the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). We have determined the structure of the Yen-Tc using single particle electron microscopy and studied its mechanism of toxicity by comparative analyses of two variants of the complex exhibiting different toxicity profiles. We show that the A subunits form the basis of a fivefold symmetric assembly that differs substantially in structure and subunit arrangement from its most well characterized homologue, the Xenorhabdus nematophila toxin XptA1. Histopathological and quantitative dose response analyses identify the B and C subunits, which map to a single, surface-accessible region of the structure, as the sole determinants of toxicity. Finally, we show that the assembled Yen-Tc has endochitinase activity and attribute this to putative chitinase subunits that decorate the surface of the TcA scaffold, an observation that may explain the oral toxicity associated with the complex. PMID:22158901

  19. A Polychaete’s Powerful Punch: Venom Gland Transcriptomics of Glycera Reveals a Complex Cocktail of Toxin Homologs

    PubMed Central

    von Reumont, Björn M.; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A.; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. PMID:25193302

  20. Stability of isolated antibody-antigen complexes as a predictive tool for selecting toxin neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Hale, Martha L.; Anderson, George P.; Olson, Mark A.; Millard, Charles B.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ricin is an A-B ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) toxin composed of an A-chain subunit (RTA) that contains a catalytic N-glycosidase and a B-chain (RTB) lectin domain that binds cell surface glycans. Ricin exploits retrograde transport to enter into the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum, and then dislocates into the cytoplasm where it can reach its substrate, the rRNA. A subset of isolated antibodies (Abs) raised against the RTA subunit protect against ricin intoxication, and RTA-based vaccine immunogens have been shown to provide long-lasting protective immunity against the holotoxin. Anti-RTA Abs are unlikely to cross a membrane and reach the cytoplasm to inhibit the enzymatic activity of the A-chain. Moreover, there is not a strict correlation between the apparent binding affinity (Ka) of anti-RTA Abs and their ability to successfully neutralize ricin toxicity. Some anti-RTA antibodies are toxin-neutralizing, whereas others are not. We hypothesize that neutralizing anti-RTA Abs may interfere selectively with conformational change(s) or partial unfolding required for toxin internalization. To test this hypothesis, we measured the melting temperatures (Tm) of neutralizing single-domain Ab (sdAb)-antigen (Ag) complexes relative to the Tm of the free antigen (Tm-shift = Tmcomplex – TmAg), and observed increases in the Tmcomplex of 9–20 degrees. In contrast, non-neutralizing sdAb-Ag complexes shifted the TmComplex by only 6–7 degrees. A strong linear correlation (r2 = 0.992) was observed between the magnitude of the Tm-shift and the viability of living cells treated with the sdAb and ricin holotoxin. The Tm-shift of the sdAb-Ag complex provided a quantitative biophysical parameter that could be used to predict and rank-order the toxin-neutralizing activities of Abs. We determined the first structure of an sdAb-RTA1-33/44-198 complex, and examined other sdAb-RTA complexes. We found that neutralizing sdAb bound to regions involved in the early stages

  1. Characterization of toxin complex produced by a unique strain of Clostridium botulinum serotype D 4947.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kimiko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sato, Hiroaki; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Mutoh, Shingo; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamano, Akihito; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Takeshi, Kouichi; Kamaguchi, Arihide; Fujinaga, Yukako; Oguma, Keiji; Ohyama, Tohru

    2004-08-01

    A unique strain of Clostridium botulinum, serotype D 4947 (D-4947), produces a considerable amount of a 650 kDa toxin complex (L-TC) and a small amount of a 280 kDa M-TC, a 540 kDa TC, and a 610 kDa TC. The complexes are composed of only un-nicked components, including neurotoxin (NT), nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) and hemagglutinin subcomponents (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). Unlike other NTs from all serotype strains, separation of D-4947 NT from L-TC, except for M-TC, during chromatography required highly alkaline conditions around pH 8.8. The separated NT and NTNHA/HAs complex can be reconstituted to L-TC that is indistinguishable from the parent L-TC with respect to toxicity, hemagglutination activity and gel filtration profile. The isoelectric points of NT and NTNHA/HAs were close together depending on the number of HA-33/17 molecules. We have established a new method to separate the unique D-4947 NT from the complex, which will yield valuable information on structure of botulinum toxin.

  2. Gating modifier toxin interactions with ion channels and lipid bilayers: Is the trimolecular complex real?

    PubMed

    Agwa, Akello J; Henriques, Sónia T; Schroeder, Christina I

    2017-04-08

    Spider peptide toxins have attracted attention because of their ability to target voltage-gated ion channels, which are involved in several pathologies including chronic pain and some cardiovascular conditions. A class of these peptides acts by modulating the gating mechanism of voltage-gated ion channels and are thus called gating modifier toxins (GMTs). In addition to their interactions with voltage-gated ion channels, some GMTs have affinity for lipid bilayers. This review discusses the potential importance of the cell membrane on the mode of action of GMTs. We propose that peptide-membrane interactions can anchor GMTs at the cell surface, thereby increasing GMT concentration in the vicinity of the channel binding site. We also propose that modulating peptide-membrane interactions might be useful for increasing the therapeutic potential of spider toxins. Furthermore, we explore the advantages and limitations of the methodologies currently used to examine peptide-membrane interactions. Although GMT-lipid membrane binding does not appear to be a requirement for the activity of all GMTs, it is an important feature, and future studies with GMTs should consider the trimolecular peptide-lipid membrane-channel complex.

  3. Analysis of the mechanisms that underlie absorption of botulinum toxin by the inhalation route.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Ancharski, Denise M; Joshi, Suresh G; Elias, M; Singh, Ajay; Nasser, Zidoon; Simpson, Lance L

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is a highly potent oral and inhalation poison, which means that the toxin must have an efficient mechanism for penetration of epithelial barriers. To date, three models for toxin passage across epithelial barriers have been proposed: (i) the toxin itself undergoes binding and transcytosis; (ii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, transports toxin from the apical to the basal side of epithelial cells; and (iii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, acts on the basal side of epithelial cells to disrupt tight junctions, and this permits paracellular flux of toxin. These models were evaluated by studying toxin absorption following inhalation exposure in mice. Three types of experiments were conducted. In the first, the potency of pure neurotoxin was compared with that of progenitor toxin complex, which contains HA35. The results showed that the rate and extent of toxin absorption, as well as the potency of absorbed toxin, did not depend upon, nor were they enhanced by, the presence of HA35. In the second type of experiment, the potencies of pure neurotoxin and progenitor toxin complex were compared in the absence or presence of antibodies on the apical side of epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against the neurotoxin protected against challenge, but antibodies against HA35 did not. In the final type of experiment, the potency of pure neurotoxin and toxin complex was compared in animals pretreated to deliver antibodies to the basal side of epithelial cells. Once again, antibodies directed against the neurotoxin provided resistance to challenge, but antibodies directed against HA35 did not. Taken collectively, the data indicate that the toxin by itself is capable of crossing epithelial barriers. The data do not support any hypothesis in which HA35 is essential for toxin penetration of epithelial barriers.

  4. ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncogene initiates breast cancer from committed mammary progenitors via activation of AP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Tognon, Cristina E.; Godinho, Frank J.; Yasaitis, Laura; Hock, Hanno; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Lannon, Chris L.; Cho, Eunah; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bronson, Roderick T.; Perou, Charles M.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY To better understand the cellular origin of breast cancer, we developed a mouse model that recapitulates expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion oncoprotein, the product of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation characteristic of human secretory breast carcinoma. Activation of EN expression in mammary tissues by Wap-Cre leads to fully penetrant, multifocal malignant breast cancer with short latency. We provide genetic evidence that in nulliparous Wap-Cre;EN females, committed alveolar bipotent or CD61+ luminal progenitors, are targets of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, EN transforms these otherwise transient progenitors through activation of the AP1 complex. Given increasing relevance of chromosomal translocations in epithelial cancers, such mice serve as a paradigm for the study of their genetic pathogenesis and cellular origins, and generation of novel preclinical models. SIGNIFICANCE For the largest class of human tumors, those of epithelial origin, little is known about their initiating genetic hits or cells of origin. Whether tissue stem cells or more committed progenitors are targets for transformation is uncertain. We developed a system in which epithelial tumorigenesis can be assessed from the initial event to frank malignancy. In this breast cancer model based on chromosomal translocation, we show through genetic marking that committed mammary progenitors, rather than mammary stem cells, are direct targets of transformation. We show that activation of the AP1 complex represents a critical downstream event of the ETV6-NTRK3 translocation. Further focus on this transcriptional complex as a target in human breast cancer is warranted. PMID:18068631

  5. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  6. Effects of the plasmid-encoded toxin of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli on focal adhesion complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Renato E; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Irles, Claudine; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Bloch, Robert J; Nataro, James P

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging diarrheal pathogen. Many EAEC strains produce the plasmid encoded toxin (Pet), which elicits cytotoxic effects on human intestinal tissue. Pet-intoxicated HEp-2 cells exhibit rounding and detachment from the substratum, accompanied by loss of F-actin stress fibers and condensation of the spectrin-containing membrane cytoskeleton. Although studies suggest that Pet directly cleaves spectrin, it is not known if this is the essential mode of action of the toxin. In addition, the effects of Pet on cytoskeletal elements other than actin and spectrin have not been reported. Here, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that upon Pet intoxication, HEp-2 and HT29 cells lose focal adhesion complexes (FAC), a process that includes redistribution of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), α-actinin, paxillin, vinculin, F-actin, and spectrin itself. This redistribution was coupled with depletion of phosphotyrosine labeling at FACs. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that FAK was tyrosine dephosphorylated, prior to the redistribution of FAK and spectrin. Moreover, phosphatase inhibition blocked cell retraction, suggesting that tyrosine dephosphorylation is an event that precedes FAK cleavage. Finally, we show that in vitro tyrosine-dephophorylated FAK was susceptible to Pet cleavage. These data suggest that mechanisms other than spectrin redistribution occur during Pet intoxication. PMID:21205005

  7. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes.

    PubMed

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-09-20

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na(+)-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH 7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a-psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH 7.25 the pore is approximately 10 Å in diameter, whereas at pH 5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7 Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  8. HicAB toxin-antitoxin complex from Escherichia coli: expression and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingsi; Xu, Bingshuang; Gao, Zengqiang; Zhou, Ke; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yuhui; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Quansheng

    2017-09-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are widespread in both bacteria and archaea, where they enable cells to adapt to environmental cues. TA systems play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as programmed cell death, cell growth, persistence and virulence. Here, two distinct forms of the type II toxin-antitoxin complex HicAB were identified and characterized in Escherichia coli K-12, and both were successfully overexpressed and purified. The two proposed forms, HicAB(L) and HicAB(S), differed in the presence or absence of a seven-amino-acid segment at the N-terminus in the antitoxin HicB. The short form HicAB(S) readily crystallized under the conditions 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.0, 20%(w/v) PEG 6000, 0.2 M ammonium sulfate. The HicAB(S) crystal diffracted and data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.04, b = 66.31, c = 120.78 Å. Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of two molecules each of HicA and HicB(S) in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 55.28% and a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 2.75 Å(3) Da(-1).

  9. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating.

  10. Crystal structures of ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit (RTA) in complex with neutralizing and non-neutralizing single-chain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Michael J; Vance, David J; Cheung, Jonah; Franklin, Matthew C; Burshteyn, Fiana; Cassidy, Michael S; Gary, Ebony N; Herrera, Cristina; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-08-26

    Ricin is a select agent toxin and a member of the RNA N-glycosidase family of medically important plant and bacterial ribosome-inactivating proteins. In this study, we determined X-ray crystal structures of the enzymatic subunit of ricin (RTA) in complex with the antigen binding domains (VHH) of five unique single-chain monoclonal antibodies that differ in their respective toxin-neutralizing activities. None of the VHHs made direct contact with residues involved in RTA's RNA N-glycosidase activity or induced notable allosteric changes in the toxin's subunit. Rather, the five VHHs had overlapping structural epitopes on the surface of the toxin and differed in the degree to which they made contact with prominent structural elements in two folding domains of the RTA. In general, RTA interactions were influenced most by the VHH CDR3 (CDR, complementarity-determining region) elements, with the most potent neutralizing antibody having the shortest and most conformationally constrained CDR3. These structures provide unique insights into the mechanisms underlying toxin neutralization and provide critically important information required for the rational design of ricin toxin subunit vaccines.

  11. Highly sensitive sandwich immunoassay and immunochromatographic test for the detection of Clostridial epsilon toxin in complex matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mazuet, Christelle; Pauillac, Serge; Krüger, Maren; Lacroux, Caroline; Popoff, Michel R.; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Andréoletti, Olivier; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Epsilon toxin is one of the four major toxins of Clostridium perfringens. It is the third most potent clostridial toxin after botulinum and tetanus toxins and is thus considered as a potential biological weapon classified as category B by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the case of a bioterrorist attack, there will be a need for a rapid, sensitive and specific detection method to monitor food and water contamination by this toxin, and for a simple human diagnostic test. We have produced and characterized five monoclonal antibodies against common epitopes of epsilon toxin and prototoxin. Three of them neutralize the cytotoxic effects of epsilon toxin in vitro. With these antibodies, we have developed highly sensitive tests, overnight and 4-h sandwich enzyme immunoassays and an immunochromatographic test performed in 20 min, reaching detection limits of at least 5 pg/mL (0.15 pM), 30 pg/mL (0.9 pM) and 100 pg/mL (3.5 pM) in buffer, respectively. These tests were also evaluated for detection of epsilon toxin in different matrices: milk and tap water for biological threat detection, serum, stool and intestinal content for human or veterinary diagnostic purposes. Detection limits in these complex matrices were at least 5-fold better than those described in the literature (around 1 to 5 ng/mL), reaching 10 to 300 pg/mL using the enzyme immunoassay and 100 to 2000 pg/mL using the immunochromatographic test. PMID:28700661

  12. Highly sensitive sandwich immunoassay and immunochromatographic test for the detection of Clostridial epsilon toxin in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Féraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Pauillac, Serge; Krüger, Maren; Lacroux, Caroline; Popoff, Michel R; Dorner, Brigitte G; Andréoletti, Olivier; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Epsilon toxin is one of the four major toxins of Clostridium perfringens. It is the third most potent clostridial toxin after botulinum and tetanus toxins and is thus considered as a potential biological weapon classified as category B by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the case of a bioterrorist attack, there will be a need for a rapid, sensitive and specific detection method to monitor food and water contamination by this toxin, and for a simple human diagnostic test. We have produced and characterized five monoclonal antibodies against common epitopes of epsilon toxin and prototoxin. Three of them neutralize the cytotoxic effects of epsilon toxin in vitro. With these antibodies, we have developed highly sensitive tests, overnight and 4-h sandwich enzyme immunoassays and an immunochromatographic test performed in 20 min, reaching detection limits of at least 5 pg/mL (0.15 pM), 30 pg/mL (0.9 pM) and 100 pg/mL (3.5 pM) in buffer, respectively. These tests were also evaluated for detection of epsilon toxin in different matrices: milk and tap water for biological threat detection, serum, stool and intestinal content for human or veterinary diagnostic purposes. Detection limits in these complex matrices were at least 5-fold better than those described in the literature (around 1 to 5 ng/mL), reaching 10 to 300 pg/mL using the enzyme immunoassay and 100 to 2000 pg/mL using the immunochromatographic test.

  13. Multipotent neural stem cells generate glial cells of the central complex through transit amplifying intermediate progenitors in Drosophila brain development.

    PubMed

    Viktorin, Gudrun; Riebli, Nadia; Popkova, Anna; Giangrande, Angela; Reichert, Heinrich

    2011-08-15

    The neural stem cells that give rise to the neural lineages of the brain can generate their progeny directly or through transit amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells (INPs). The INP-producing neural stem cells in Drosophila are called type II neuroblasts, and their neural progeny innervate the central complex, a prominent integrative brain center. Here we use genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis to show that the INPs of these type II neuroblast lineages give rise to glial cells as well as neurons during postembryonic brain development. Our data indicate that two main types of INP lineages are generated, namely mixed neuronal/glial lineages and neuronal lineages. Genetic loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments show that the gcm gene is necessary and sufficient for gliogenesis in these lineages. The INP-derived glial cells, like the INP-derived neuronal cells, make major contributions to the central complex. In postembryonic development, these INP-derived glial cells surround the entire developing central complex neuropile, and once the major compartments of the central complex are formed, they also delimit each of these compartments. During this process, the number of these glial cells in the central complex is increased markedly through local proliferation based on glial cell mitosis. Taken together, these findings uncover a novel and complex form of neurogliogenesis in Drosophila involving transit amplifying intermediate progenitors. Moreover, they indicate that type II neuroblasts are remarkably multipotent neural stem cells that can generate both the neuronal and the glial progeny that make major contributions to one and the same complex brain structure.

  14. The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis toxin complex is active against cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hares, Michelle C; Hinchliffe, Stewart J; Strong, Philippa C R; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Dowling, Andrea J; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Waterfield, Nick

    2008-11-01

    The toxin complex (Tc) genes were first identified in the insect pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens and encode approximately 1 MDa protein complexes which are toxic to insect pests. Subsequent genome sequencing projects have revealed the presence of tc orthologues in a range of bacterial pathogens known to be associated with insects. Interestingly, members of the mammalian-pathogenic yersiniae have also been shown to encode Tc orthologues. Studies in Yersinia enterocolitica have shown that divergent tc loci either encode insect-active toxins or play a role in colonization of the gut in gastroenteritis models of rats. So far little is known about the activity of the Tc proteins in the other mammalian-pathogenic yersiniae. Here we present work to suggest that Tc proteins in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis are not insecticidal toxins but have evolved for mammalian pathogenicity. We show that Tc is secreted by Y. pseudotuberculosis strain IP32953 during growth in media at 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C. We also demonstrate that oral toxicity of strain IP32953 to Manduca sexta larvae is not due to Tc expression and that lysates of Escherichia coli BL21 expressing the Yersinia Tc proteins are not toxic to Sf9 insect cells but are toxic to cultured mammalian cell lines. Cell lysates of E. coli BL21 expressing the Y. pseudotuberculosis Tc proteins caused actin ruffles, vacuoles and multi-nucleation in cultured human gut cells (Caco-2); similar morphology was observed after application of a lysate of E. coli BL21 expressing the Y. pestis Tc proteins to mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, but not Caco-2 cells. Finally, transient expression of the individual Tc proteins in Caco-2 and NIH3T3 cell lines reproduced the actin and nuclear rearrangement observed with the topical applications. Together these results add weight to the growing hypothesis that the Tc proteins in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis have been adapted for mammalian pathogenicity. We further

  15. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs). The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presenc...

  16. Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Lucien; Santelli, Eugenio; Mountassif, Driss; Donoghue, Annemarie; Hanein, Dorit; Volkmann, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin comprises three soluble proteins: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). PA must be cleaved by host proteases before it oligomerizes and forms a prepore, to which LF and EF bind. After endocytosis of this tripartite complex, the prepore transforms into a narrow transmembrane pore that delivers unfolded LF and EF into the host cytosol. Here, we find that translocation of multiple 90-kD LF molecules is rapid and efficient. To probe the molecular basis of this translocation, we calculated a three-dimensional map of the fully loaded (PA63)7–(LF)3 prepore complex by cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The map shows three LFs bound in a similar way to one another, via their N-terminal domains, to the surface of the PA heptamer. The model also reveals contacts between the N- and C-terminal domains of adjacent LF molecules. We propose that this molecular arrangement plays an important role in the maintenance of translocation efficiency through the narrow PA pore. PMID:27670897

  17. Preoperative abdominal muscle elongation with botulinum toxin A for complex incisional ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Faisal; Jacombs, Anita S W; Roussos, Emmanouel; Read, John W; Dardano, Anthony N; Edye, Michael; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repair of recurrent abdominal incisional hernia(s) can be challenging due to complex operative conditions, intense post-operative pain, potential respiratory compromise and lateral muscle traction predisposing to early recurrence. We report our preliminary results with botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection causing flaccid paralysis (relaxation) of the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to surgery. A prospective pilot study measured the effect of preoperative BTA prior to elective repair of recurrent abdominal hernias. Under ultrasound control, 2 weeks prior to surgery, 50 units of BTA was injected into the external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles at three sites on each side of the lateral abdominal wall (total dose 300 units). Pre- and post-BTA abdominal computed tomography measured changes in abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. All hernias were repaired with laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted mesh techniques in a single or two-staged procedure. Eight patients received BTA injections which were tolerated with no complications. Post-BTA preoperative computed tomography showed a significant increase in mean length of lateral abdominal wall from 18.5 cm pre-BTA to 21.3 cm post-BTA (P = 0.017) with a mean unstretched length gain of 2.8 cm per side (range 0.8-6.0 cm). All hernias were surgically reduced with mesh with no early recurrence. Preoperative BTA injection prior to complex abdominal hernia repair is a safe procedure that causes flaccid relaxation, elongation and thinning of the lateral abdominal muscles and decrease in hernia defect. Although further evaluation is required, BTA injections may be a useful adjunct to surgical repair of complex incisional hernias. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Potential dysregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by bacterial toxins and insulin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory W; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta Sue; Craun, Michael L; Bar-Or, David

    2009-09-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA, effectively controlling the entrance of glycolysis products into aerobic metabolism. Because hyperlactatemia is one of the hallmarks of sepsis, we hyphothesized that gram-positive and negative bacterial toxin treatment will interfere with mRNA levels of regulatory enzymes of the PDC and overall enzyme activity in hepatocytes. HEP G2 hepatocarcinoma cells were incubated for 24 hours in the presence of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid. Total RNA was then isolated and message RNA levels for both pyruvate dehydrogense kinase 4 and phosphatase 2 were determined by RTPCR. Amplified DNA fragments were visualized by ethidium bromide in agarose gels and densitometry of the bands was performed. Data were then normalized to the housekeeping gene, GAPDH. Enzyme activity was then determined by capturing intact PDC on nitrocellulose membranes then determining PDC-dependent production of NADH. LPS treatment led to a time dependent increase in PDK4 message while decreasing PDP2 levels. Enzyme activity, in these cells, also significantly decreased 24 hours after exposure to LPS. Cells cultured in the presence of lipoteichoic acid and insulin exhibited differing message ratios and activity levels when evaluated at 4 hours, but at 24 hours shifted to mimic those observed in LPS treated cells. This data may indicate that exposure to bacterial cell wall components and insulin could create cellular environments that result in a build-up of lactate.

  19. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, P; Diez, A; Mourad, W; Parsonnet, J; Geha, R S; Chatila, T

    1989-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, and interferon-gamma induced the expression of class II molecules as well as TSST-1 binding sites on human skin-derived fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR, but not to HLA-DP or HLA-DQ, strongly inhibited TSST-1 binding. Affinity chromatography of 125I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the alpha and beta chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells. Images PMID:2542966

  20. Structure of the Proteus vulgaris HigB-(HigA)2-HigB toxin-antitoxin complex.

    PubMed

    Schureck, Marc A; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Miles, Stacey J; Marquez, Jhomar; Cho, Shein Ei; Erdman, Rachel; Dunham, Christine M

    2014-01-10

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems regulate key cellular processes to promote cell survival during periods of stress. During steady-state cell growth, antitoxins typically interact with their cognate toxins to inhibit activity presumably by preventing substrate recognition. We solved two x-ray crystal structures of the Proteus vulgaris tetrameric HigB-(HigA)2-HigB TA complex and found that, unlike most other TA systems, the antitoxin HigA makes minimal interactions with toxin HigB. HigB adopts a RelE family tertiary fold containing a highly conserved concave surface where we predict its active site is located. HigA does not cover the solvent-exposed HigB active site, suggesting that, in general, toxin inhibition is not solely mediated by active site hindrance by its antitoxin. Each HigA monomer contains a helix-turn-helix motif that binds to its own DNA operator to repress transcription during normal cellular growth. This is distinct from antitoxins belonging to other superfamilies that typically only form DNA-binding motifs upon dimerization. We further show that disruption of the HigB-(HigA)2-HigB tetramer to a HigBA heterodimer ablates operator binding. Taken together, our biochemical and structural studies elucidate the novel molecular details of the HigBA TA system.

  1. The role of TcdB and TccC subunits in secretion of the Photorhabdus Tcd toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guowei; Waterfield, Nicholas R

    2013-01-01

    The Toxin Complex (TC) is a large multi-subunit toxin encoded by a range of bacterial pathogens. The best-characterized examples are from the insect pathogens Photorhabdus, Xenorhabdus and Yersinia. They consist of three large protein subunits, designated A, B and C that assemble in a 5∶1∶1 stoichiometry. Oral toxicity to a range of insects means that some have the potential to be developed as pest control technology. The three subunit proteins do not encode any recognisable export sequences and as such little progress has been made in understanding their secretion. We have developed heterologous TC production and secretion models in E. coli and used them to ascribe functions to different domains of the crucial B+C sub-complex. We have determined that the B and C subunits use a secretion mechanism that is either encoded by the proteins themselves or employ an as yet undefined system common to laboratory strains of E. coli. We demonstrate that both the N-terminal domains of the B and C subunits are required for secretion of the whole complex. We propose a model whereby the N-terminus of the C-subunit toxin exports the B+C sub-complex across the inner membrane while that of the B-subunit allows passage across the outer membrane. We also demonstrate that even in the absence of the B-subunit, that the C-subunit can also facilitate secretion of the larger A-subunit. The recognition of this novel export system is likely to be of importance to future protein secretion studies. Finally, the identification of homologues of B and C subunits in diverse bacterial pathogens, including Burkholderia and Pseudomonas, suggests that these toxins are likely to be important in a range of different hosts, including man.

  2. The Role of TcdB and TccC Subunits in Secretion of the Photorhabdus Tcd Toxin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guowei; Waterfield, Nicholas R.

    2013-01-01

    The Toxin Complex (TC) is a large multi-subunit toxin encoded by a range of bacterial pathogens. The best-characterized examples are from the insect pathogens Photorhabdus, Xenorhabdus and Yersinia. They consist of three large protein subunits, designated A, B and C that assemble in a 5∶1∶1 stoichiometry. Oral toxicity to a range of insects means that some have the potential to be developed as pest control technology. The three subunit proteins do not encode any recognisable export sequences and as such little progress has been made in understanding their secretion. We have developed heterologous TC production and secretion models in E. coli and used them to ascribe functions to different domains of the crucial B+C sub-complex. We have determined that the B and C subunits use a secretion mechanism that is either encoded by the proteins themselves or employ an as yet undefined system common to laboratory strains of E. coli. We demonstrate that both the N-terminal domains of the B and C subunits are required for secretion of the whole complex. We propose a model whereby the N-terminus of the C-subunit toxin exports the B+C sub-complex across the inner membrane while that of the B-subunit allows passage across the outer membrane. We also demonstrate that even in the absence of the B-subunit, that the C-subunit can also facilitate secretion of the larger A-subunit. The recognition of this novel export system is likely to be of importance to future protein secretion studies. Finally, the identification of homologues of B and C subunits in diverse bacterial pathogens, including Burkholderia and Pseudomonas, suggests that these toxins are likely to be important in a range of different hosts, including man. PMID:24098116

  3. Progenitor genotyping reveals a complex clonal architecture in a subset of CALR-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah; Wright, Casey M; Scott, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    The identification of acquired CALR mutations in patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) has meant that disease-initiating mutations can now be detected in about 90% of all patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Here, we show that only those CALR mutations that cause a +1 frameshift, thereby altering the carboxy-terminus of calreticulin, promote cytokine independence in vitro; in-frame deletions were not functional, and are unlikely to be the pathogenetic mutation underlying some MPN cases. Expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, was also necessary for factor-independence. Although the CALR mutations are considered to occur only in JAK2 V617F-negative cases and in a heterozygous state, progenitor genotyping revealed that this is not always true. Notably, CALR mutation-positive MPNs can be polyclonal: in one case, two distinct CALR mutation-positive subpopulations could be identified; in another, separate populations of JAK2 V617F-positive and CALR-mutated cells were present. Mitotic recombination involving chromosome 19 in a third instance resulted in the emergence of a CALR mutation-homozygous subclone. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that occasional patients with CALR mutation-positive ET or MF carry other MPN-initiating genetic mutations (including JAK2 V617F), acquire "secondary mutations" before or after the CALR mutation, or evolve over time to being CALR mutation-homozygous.

  4. The apical complex protein Pals1 is required to maintain cerebellar progenitor cells in a proliferative state.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Young; Hughes, Lucinda J; Moon, Uk Yeol; Park, Raehee; Kim, Sang-Bae; Tran, Khoi; Lee, Ju-Seog; Cho, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seonhee

    2016-01-01

    Through their biased localization and function within the cell, polarity complex proteins are necessary to establish the cellular asymmetry required for tissue organization. Well-characterized germinal zones, mitogenic signals and cell types make the cerebellum an excellent model for addressing the crucial function of polarity complex proteins in the generation and organization of neural tissues. Deletion of the apical polarity complex protein Pals1 in the developing cerebellum results in a remarkably undersized cerebellum with disrupted layers in poorly formed folia and strikingly reduced granule cell production. We demonstrate that Pals1 is not only essential for cerebellum organogenesis, but also for preventing premature differentiation and thus maintaining progenitor pools in cerebellar germinal zones, including cerebellar granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer. In the Pals1 mouse mutants, the expression of genes that regulate the cell cycle was diminished, correlating with the loss of the proliferating cell population of germinal zones. Furthermore, enhanced Shh signaling through activated Smo cannot overcome impaired cerebellar cell generation, arguing for an epistatic role of Pals1 in proliferation capacity. Our study identifies Pals1 as a novel intrinsic factor that regulates the generation of cerebellar cells and Pals1 deficiency as a potential inhibitor of overactive mitogenic signaling.

  5. The apical complex protein Pals1 is required to maintain cerebellar progenitor cells in a proliferative state

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Young; Hughes, Lucinda J.; Moon, Uk Yeol; Park, Raehee; Kim, Sang-Bae; Tran, Khoi; Lee, Ju-Seog; Cho, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seonhee

    2016-01-01

    Through their biased localization and function within the cell, polarity complex proteins are necessary to establish the cellular asymmetry required for tissue organization. Well-characterized germinal zones, mitogenic signals and cell types make the cerebellum an excellent model for addressing the crucial function of polarity complex proteins in the generation and organization of neural tissues. Deletion of the apical polarity complex protein Pals1 in the developing cerebellum results in a remarkably undersized cerebellum with disrupted layers in poorly formed folia and strikingly reduced granule cell production. We demonstrate that Pals1 is not only essential for cerebellum organogenesis, but also for preventing premature differentiation and thus maintaining progenitor pools in cerebellar germinal zones, including cerebellar granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer. In the Pals1 mouse mutants, the expression of genes that regulate the cell cycle was diminished, correlating with the loss of the proliferating cell population of germinal zones. Furthermore, enhanced Shh signaling through activated Smo cannot overcome impaired cerebellar cell generation, arguing for an epistatic role of Pals1 in proliferation capacity. Our study identifies Pals1 as a novel intrinsic factor that regulates the generation of cerebellar cells and Pals1 deficiency as a potential inhibitor of overactive mitogenic signaling. PMID:26657772

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Platform for Characterization of Shiga-like Toxin 1 from Complex Samples.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chang, Bo-Yao; Wu, Ching-Yi; Mong, Kwok-Kong Tony; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-10-20

    Foodborne illness outbreaks resulting from contamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 remain a serious concern in food safety. E. coli O157:H7 can cause bloody diarrhea, hemolytic uremic syndrome, or even death. The pathogenicity of E. coli O157:H7 is mainly caused by the expression of Shiga-like toxins (SLTs), i.e., SLT-1 and SLT-2. SLTs are pentamers composed of a single A and five B subunits. In this study, we propose a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-based platform to rapidly identify SLT-1 from the complex cell lysate of E. coli O157:H7. The core of the MNPs is made of iron oxide, whereas the surface of the core is coated with a thin layer of alumina (Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs). The Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs are functionalized with pigeon ovalbumin (POA), which contains Gal-α(1→4)-Gal-β(1→4)-GlcNAc termini that can bind SLT-1B selectively. Furthermore, POA is a phosphate protein. Thus, it can be easily immobilized on the surface of the Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through aluminum phosphate chelation under microwave heating within 1.5 min. The generated POA-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs are capable of effectively enriching SLT-1B from complex cell lysates simply by pipetting 20 μL of the sample in and out of the tip in a vial for ∼1 min. To release SLT-1 from the MNPs, Gal-α(1→4)-Gal disaccharides were used for displacement. The released target species are sufficient to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Although the sample volume used in this approach is small (20 μL) and the enrichment time is short (1 min), the selectivity of this approach toward SLT-1B is quite good. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach for rapid determination of the presence of SLT-1 from complex cell lysates and ham/juice samples based on the detection of SLT-1B.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex between a human anti-alpha toxin antibody fragment and alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Barnes, Arnita; Tkaczyk, Christine; Ferguson, Andrew; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin (AT) has been crystallized in complex with the Fab fragment of a human antibody (MEDI4893). This constitutes the first reported crystals of AT bound to an antibody. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=85.52, b=148.50, c=93.82 Å, β=99.82°. The diffraction of the crystals extended to 2.56 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two MEDI4893 Fab-AT complexes. This corresponds to a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.3 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 47%. The three-dimensional structure of this complex will contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis of the interaction of MEDI4893 with AT. It will also shed light on the mechanism of action of this antibody, the current evaluation of which in the field of S. aureus-mediated diseases makes it a particularly interesting case study. Finally, this study will provide the three-dimensional structure of AT in a monomeric state for the first time.

  8. CCT chaperonin complex is required for efficient delivery of anthrax toxin into the cytosol of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Louise H.; Hett, Erik C.; Clatworthy, Anne E.; Mark, Kevin G.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial toxins have evolved successful strategies for coopting host proteins to access the cytosol of host cells. Anthrax lethal factor (LF) enters the cytosol through pores in the endosomal membrane formed by anthrax protective antigen. Although in vitro models using planar lipid bilayers have shown that translocation can occur in the absence of cellular factors, recent studies using intact endosomes indicate that host factors are required for translocation in the cellular environment. In this study, we describe a high-throughput shRNA screen to identify host factors required for anthrax lethal toxin-induced cell death. The cytosolic chaperonin complex chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1 (CCT) was identified, and subsequent studies showed that CCT is required for efficient delivery of LF and related fusion proteins into the cytosol. We further show that knockdown of CCT inhibits the acid-induced delivery of LF and the fusion protein LFN-Bla (N terminal domain of LF fused to β-lactamase) across the plasma membrane of intact cells. Together, these results suggest that CCT is required for efficient delivery of enzymatically active toxin to the cytosol and are consistent with a direct role for CCT in translocation of LF through the protective antigen pore. PMID:23716698

  9. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium Botulinum Strain PS-5.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Sachdeva, Amita; Degrasse, Jeffrey A; Croley, Timothy R; Stanker, Larry H; Hodge, David; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins. The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presence of NT genes was validated by PCR amplification of toxin specific fragments from genomic DNA of Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5 which indicated the presence of both serotype A and B genes on PS-5 genome. Further, TC was purified and characterized by Western blotting, Digoxin-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, endopeptidase activity assay, and Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry. The data showed the presence of serotype A specific neurotoxin. Based on the analysis of neurotoxin genes and characterization of TC, PS-5 strain appears as a serotype A (B) strain of C. botulinum which produces only serotype A specific TC in the cell culture medium.

  10. The BAF complex interacts with Pax6 in adult neural progenitors to establish a neurogenic cross-regulatory transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Ninkovic, Jovica; Steiner-Mezzadri, Andrea; Jawerka, Melanie; Akinci, Umut; Masserdotti, Giacomo; Petricca, Stefania; Fischer, Judith; von Holst, Alexander; Beckers, Johanes; Lie, Chichung D; Petrik, David; Miller, Erik; Tang, Jiong; Wu, Jiang; Lefebvre, Veronique; Demmers, Jeroen; Eisch, Amelia; Metzger, Daniel; Crabtree, Gerald; Irmler, Martin; Poot, Raymond; Götz, Magdalena

    2013-10-03

    Numerous transcriptional regulators of neurogenesis have been identified in the developing and adult brain, but how neurogenic fate is programmed at the epigenetic level remains poorly defined. Here, we report that the transcription factor Pax6 directly interacts with the Brg1-containing BAF complex in adult neural progenitors. Deletion of either Brg1 or Pax6 in the subependymal zone (SEZ) causes the progeny of adult neural stem cells to convert to the ependymal lineage within the SEZ while migrating neuroblasts convert to different glial lineages en route to or in the olfactory bulb (OB). Genome-wide analyses reveal that the majority of genes downregulated in the Brg1 null SEZ and OB contain Pax6 binding sites and are also downregulated in Pax6 null SEZ and OB. Downstream of the Pax6-BAF complex, we find that Sox11, Nfib, and Pou3f4 form a transcriptional cross-regulatory network that drives neurogenesis and can convert postnatal glia into neurons. Taken together, elements of our work identify a tripartite effector network activated by Pax6-BAF that programs neuronal fate.

  11. Preoperative Botulinum toxin A enabling defect closure and laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Elstner, Kristen E; Jacombs, Anita S W; Read, John W; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Arduini, Fernando; Wehrhahm, Michael; Craft, Colette; Cosman, Peter H; Dardano, Anthony N; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2017-07-21

    Operative management of complex ventral hernia still remains a significant challenge for surgeons. Closure of large defects in the unprepared abdomen has serious pathophysiological consequences due to chronic contraction and retraction of the lateral abdominal wall muscles. We report outcomes of 56 consecutive patients who had preoperative Botulinum toxin A (BTA) abdominal wall relaxation facilitating closure and repair. This was a prospective observational study of 56 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided BTA into the lateral abdominal oblique muscles prior to elective ventral hernia repair between November 2012 and January 2017. Serial non-contrast abdominal CT imaging was performed to evaluate changes in lateral oblique muscle length and thickness. All hernias were repaired laparoscopically, or laparoscopic-open-laparoscopic (LOL) using intraperitoneal onlay mesh. 56 patients received BTA injections at predetermined sites to the lateral oblique muscles, which were well tolerated. Mean patient age was 59.7 years, and mean BMI was 30.9 kg/m(2) (range 21.8-54.0). Maximum defect size was 24 × 27 cm. A subset of 18 patients underwent preoperative pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct procedure. A comparison of pre-BTA to post-BTA imaging demonstrated an increase in mean lateral abdominal wall length from 16.1 cm to 20.1 cm per side, a mean gain of 4.0 cm/side (range 1.0-11.7 cm/side) (p < 0.0001). This corresponds to an unstretched mean length gain of 8.0 cm of the lateral abdominal wall. Laparoscopic/LOL primary closure was achieved in all cases, with no clinical evidence of raised intra-abdominal pressures. One patient presented with a new fascial defect 26 months post-operative. Preoperative BTA to the lateral abdominal wall muscles is a safe and effective technique for the preparation of patients prior to operative management of complex ventral hernias. BTA temporary flaccid paralysis relaxes, elongates and thins the chronically contracted abdominal

  12. A Burkholderia cepacia complex non-ribosomal peptide-synthesized toxin is hemolytic and required for full virulence

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Euan L.S.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have recently gained notoriety as significant bacterial pathogens due to their extreme levels of antibiotic resistance, their transmissibility in clinics, their persistence in bacteriostatic solutions, and their intracellular survival capabilities. As pathogens, the Bcc are known to elaborate a number of virulence factors including proteases, lipases and other exoproducts, as well as a number of secretion system associated effectors. Through random and directed mutagenesis studies, we have identified a Bcc gene cluster capable of expressing a toxin that is both hemolytic and required for full Bcc virulence. The Bcc toxin is synthesized via a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase mechanism, and appears to be related to the previously identified antifungal compound burkholdine or occidiofungin. Further testing shows mutations to this gene cluster cause a significant reduction in both hemolysis and Galleria mellonella mortality. Mutation to a glycosyltransferase gene putatively responsible for a structural-functional toxin variant causes only partial reduction in hemolysis. Molecular screening identifies the Bcc species containing this gene cluster, of which several strains produce hemolytic activity. PMID:22546908

  13. Structure of a pore-blocking toxin in complex with a eukaryotic voltage-dependent K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirban; Lee, Alice; Campbell, Ernest; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2013-01-01

    Pore-blocking toxins inhibit voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) by plugging the ion-conduction pathway. We have solved the crystal structure of paddle chimera, a Kv channel in complex with charybdotoxin (CTX), a pore-blocking toxin. The toxin binds to the extracellular pore entryway without producing discernable alteration of the selectivity filter structure and is oriented to project its Lys27 into the pore. The most extracellular K+ binding site (S1) is devoid of K+ electron-density when wild-type CTX is bound, but K+ density is present to some extent in a Lys27Met mutant. In crystals with Cs+ replacing K+, S1 electron-density is present even in the presence of Lys27, a finding compatible with the differential effects of Cs+ vs K+ on CTX affinity for the channel. Together, these results show that CTX binds to a K+ channel in a lock and key manner and interacts directly with conducting ions inside the selectivity filter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00594.001 PMID:23705070

  14. Complex Toxin Profile of French Mediterranean Ostreopsis cf. ovata Strains, Seafood Accumulation and Ovatoxins Prepurification

    PubMed Central

    Brissard, Charline; Herrenknecht, Christine; Séchet, Véronique; Hervé, Fabienne; Pisapia, Francesco; Harcouet, Jocelyn; Lémée, Rodolphe; Chomérat, Nicolas; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    Ostreopsis cf. ovata produces palytoxin analogues including ovatoxins (OVTXs) and a putative palytoxin (p-PLTX), which can accumulate in marine organisms and may possibly lead to food intoxication. However, purified ovatoxins are not widely available and their toxicities are still unknown. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the ecophysiology of Ostreopsis cf. ovata and its toxin production as well as to optimize the purification process for ovatoxin. During Ostreopsis blooms in 2011 and 2012 in Villefranche-sur-Mer (France, NW Mediterranean Sea), microalgae epiphytic cells and marine organisms were collected and analyzed both by LC-MS/MS and hemolysis assay. Results obtained with these two methods were comparable, suggesting ovatoxins have hemolytic properties. An average of 223 μg·kg−1 of palytoxin equivalent of whole flesh was found, thus exceeding the threshold of 30 μg·kg−1 in shellfish recommended by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Ostreopsis cells showed the same toxin profile both in situ and in laboratory culture, with ovatoxin-a (OVTX-a) being the most abundant analogue (~50%), followed by OVTX-b (~15%), p-PLTX (12%), OVTX-d (8%), OVTX-c (5%) and OVTX-e (4%). Ostreopsis cf. ovata produced up to 2 g of biomass per L of culture, with a maximum concentration of 300 pg PLTX equivalent cell−1. Thus, an approximate amount of 10 mg of PLTX-group toxins may be produced with 10 L of this strain. Toxin extracts obtained from collected biomass were purified using different techniques such as liquid-liquid partition or size exclusion. Among these methods, open-column chromatography with Sephadex LH20 phase yielded the best results with a cleanup efficiency of 93% and recovery of about 85%, representing an increase of toxin percentage by 13 fold. Hence, this purification step should be incorporated into future isolation exercises. PMID:24828292

  15. Characterization of the interaction between subunits of the botulinum toxin complex produced by serotype D through tryptic susceptibility of the isolated components and complex forms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Mutoh, Shingo; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Fujinaga, Yukako; Oguma, Keiji; Ohyama, Tohru

    2005-05-01

    The 650 kDa large toxin complex (L-TC) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotype D strain 4947 (D-4947) has a subunit structure composed of unnicked components, i.e. neurotoxin (NT), non-toxic non-haemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three haemagglutinin subcomponents (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). In this study, subunit interactions were investigated through the susceptibilities of the toxin components to limited trypsin proteolysis. Additionally, complex forms were reconstituted in vitro by various combinations of individual components. Trypsin treatment of intact D-4947 L-TC led to the formation of mature L-TC with nicks at specific sites of each component, which is usually observed in other strains of serotype D. NT, NTNHA and HA-17 were cleaved at their specific sites in either the single or complex forms, but HA-33 showed no sign of proteolysis. Unlike the other components, HA-70 was digested into random fragments as a single form, but it was cleaved into two fragments in the complex form. Based on the relative position of exposed or hidden regions of the individual components in the complex derived from their tryptic susceptibilities, an assembly model is proposed for the arrangement of individual subunits in the botulinum L-TC.

  16. MUTATIONS IN KATNB1 CAUSE COMPLEX CEREBRAL MALFORMATIONS BY DISRUPTING ASYMMETRICALLY DIVIDING NEURAL PROGENITORS

    PubMed Central

    Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Schaffer, Ashleigh E.; Chabu, Chiswili; Henegariu, Octavian; Vonhoff, Fernando; Akgümüş, Gözde Tuğce; Nishimura, Sayoko; Han, Wenqi; Tu, Shu; Baran, Burcin; Gumus, Hakan; Dilber, Cengiz; Zaki, Maha S.; Hossni, Heba AA; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Kayserili, Hülya; Spencer, Emily G.; Rosti, Rasim O.; Schroth, Jana; Per, Hüseyin; Cağlar, Caner; Cağlar, Cagri; Dölen, Duygu; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Kumandaş, Sefer; Minja, Frank J.; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Mane, Shrikant M.; Lifton, Richard P.; Xu, Tian; Keshishian, Haig; Dobyns, William B; Chi, Neil C.; Šestan, Nenad; Louvi, Angeliki; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Exome sequencing analysis of over 2,000 children with complex malformations of cortical development identified 5 independent homozygous deleterious mutations in KATNB1, encoding the regulatory subunit of the microtubule severing enzyme katanin. Mitotic spindle formation is defective in patient-derived fibroblasts, a consequence of disrupted interactions of mutant KATNB1 with KATNA1, the catalytic subunit of katanin, and other microtubule associated proteins. Loss of KATNB1 orthologs in zebrafish (katnb1) and flies (kat80) results in microcephaly, recapitulating the human phenotype. In the developing Drosophila optic lobe, kat80 loss specifically affects the asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts, which display supernumerary centrosomes and spindle abnormalities during mitosis, leading to cell cycle progression delays and reduced cell numbers. Furthermore, kat80 depletion results in dendritic arborization defects in sensory and motor neurons, affecting neural architecture. Taken together, we provide insight into the mechanisms by which KATNB1 mutations cause human cerebral cortical malformations, demonstrating its fundamental role during brain development. PMID:25521378

  17. Spatial domains of progenitor-like cells and functional complexity of a stem cell niche in the neonatal rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Marichal, Nicolás; García, Gabriela; Radmilovich, Milka; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E.

    2012-01-01

    During spinal cord development, progenitors in the neural tube are arranged within spatial domains that generate specific cell types. The ependyma of the post-natal spinal cord seems to retain cells with properties of the primitive neural stem cells, some of which are able to react to injury with active proliferation. However, the functional complexity and organization of this stem cell niche in mammals remains poorly understood. Here, we combined immunohistochemistry for cell-specific markers with patch-clamp recordings to test the hypothesis that the ependyma of the neonatal rat spinal cord contains progenitor-like cells functionally segregated within specific domains. Cells on the lateral aspects of the ependyma combined morphological and molecular traits of ependymocytes and radial glia (RG) expressing S100β and vimentin, displayed passive membrane properties and were electrically coupled via Cx43. Cells contacting the ventral and dorsal poles expressed the neural stem cell markers nestin and/or vimentin, had the typical morphology of RG and appeared uncoupled displaying various combinations of K+ and Ca2+ voltage-gated currents. Although progenitor-like cells were mitotically active around the entire ependyma, the proliferative capacity seemed higher on lateral domains. Our findings represent the first evidence that the ependyma of the rat harbors progenitor-like cells with heterogeneous electrophysiological phenotypes organized in spatial domains. The manipulation of specific functional properties in the heterogeneous population of progenitor-like cells contacting the ependyma may in a future help to regulate their behavior and lineage potential, providing the cell types required for the endogenous repair of the injured spinal cord. PMID:22821702

  18. Two conformational states of the membrane-associated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba {delta}-endotoxin complex revealed by electron crystallography: Implications for toxin-pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ounjai, Puey; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2007-10-05

    The insecticidal nature of Cry {delta}-endotoxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is generally believed to be caused by their ability to form lytic pores in the midgut cell membrane of susceptible insect larvae. Here we have analyzed membrane-associated structures of the 65-kDa dipteran-active Cry4Ba toxin by electron crystallography. The membrane-associated toxin complex was crystallized in the presence of DMPC via detergent dialysis. Depending upon the charge of the adsorbed surface, 2D crystals of the oligomeric toxin complex have been captured in two distinct conformations. The projection maps of those crystals have been generated at 17 A resolution. Both complexes appeared to be trimeric; as in one crystal form, its projection structure revealed a symmetrical pinwheel-like shape with virtually no depression in the middle of the complex. The other form revealed a propeller-like conformation displaying an obvious hole in the center region, presumably representing the toxin-induced pore. These crystallographic data thus demonstrate for the first time that the 65-kDa activated Cry4Ba toxin in association with lipid membranes could exist in at least two different trimeric conformations, conceivably implying the closed and open states of the pore.

  19. Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis and Toxin Complex Formation by Arginine and Glucose in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, Chase M; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridia, is the most potent biological toxin known and the causative agent of the paralytic disease botulism. The nutritional, environmental, and genetic regulation of BoNT synthesis, activation, stability, and toxin complex (TC) formation is not well studied. Previous studies indicated that growth and BoNT formation were affected by arginine and glucose in Clostridium botulinum types A and B. In the present study, C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was grown in toxin production medium (TPM) with different levels of arginine and glucose and of three products of arginine metabolism, citrulline, proline, and ornithine. Cultures were analyzed for growth (optical density at 600 nm [OD600]), spore formation, and BoNT and TC formation by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation and for BoNT activity by mouse bioassay. A high level of arginine (20 g/liter) repressed BoNT production approximately 1,000-fold, enhanced growth, slowed lysis, and reduced endospore production by greater than 1,000-fold. Similar effects on toxin production were seen with equivalent levels of citrulline but not ornithine or proline. In TPM lacking glucose, levels of formation of BoNT/A1 and TC were significantly decreased, and extracellular BoNT and TC proteins were partially inactivated after the first day of culture. An understanding of the regulation of C. botulinum growth and BoNT and TC formation should be valuable in defining requirements for BoNT formation in foods and clinical samples, improving the quality of BoNT for pharmaceutical preparations, and elucidating the biological functions of BoNTs for the bacterium.IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a major food safety and bioterrorism concern and is also an important pharmaceutical, and yet the regulation of its synthesis, activation, and stability in culture media, foods, and clinical samples is not well understood. This paper provides insights into the effects of critical nutrients

  20. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  1. Field evaluation against Aedes aegypti larvae of aluminum-carboxymethylcellulose-encapsulated spore-toxin complex formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Meza, O; Ramírez-Suero, M; Bernal, J S; Ramírez-Lepe, M

    2010-06-01

    The insecticidal activity after field exposure of an aluminum-carboxymethylcellulose microencapsulated formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spore-toxin complex, with malachite green as photoprotective agent, was evaluated using third-instar Aedes aegypti (L.) larvae in laboratory bioassays in Veracruz, México. Four insecticide treatments and an untreated control were compared at low and high doses over 96 d of field exposure under full sun or full shade conditions: 1) microencapsulated Bti spore-toxin complex, 2) nonmicroencapsulated Bti spore-toxin complex, 3) a commercial Bti formulation, 4) a commercial formulation of temephos, and 5) an untreated control. The low and high doses corresponded to the LC50 and LC90 concentrations for the Bti insecticides and to 0.5 and 1.0 mg/liter for temephos; the corresponding values for the microencapsulated Bti and commercial Bti, estimated in this study, were 0.061 and 0.14 mg/ml and 0.13 and 0.30 mg/ml, respectively. Overall, the study demonstrated that microencapsulation with aluminum-carboxymethylcellulose improved the activity against Ae. aegypti larvae of B. t. israelensis spore-toxin complex over that of a nonmicroencapsulated spore-toxin complex and that the improvement was particularly important under full sun and high dose. Moreover, insecticidal activity of the microencapsulated B. thuringiensis israelensis spore-toxin complex was superior to that of a commercial B. thuringiensis israelensis formulation and comparable to that of the chemical insecticide temephos. Finally, it was suggested that the microencapsulated B. thuringiensis israelensis formulation should be evaluated for field use in Veracruz because its activity against Ae. aegypti larvae remained high through 31 d and this would allow halving of the current insecticide application frequency.

  2. Hemagglutinin gene shuffling among Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D yields distinct sugar recognition of the botulinum toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Keita; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum strains produce a large-sized toxin complex (TC) that is composed of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), non-toxic non-hemagglutinin and three different hemagglutinins (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). HA components enhance toxin delivery across the intestinal cell wall in a sugar chain-dependent manner. Here we characterized the sugar recognition of serotype D strain 1873 (D-1873) botulinum L-TC. Most L-TCs produced by serotype C and D strains bind to cells via interactions between HA-33 and cell surface sialo-oligosaccharides. However, like the previously reported L-TC produced by serotype C strain Yoichi (C-Yoichi), D-1873 L-TC binds only to cells that have been treated with neuraminidase, indicating that they recognize asialo-oligosaccharides. The D-1873 HA-33 amino acid sequence is similar to that of C-Yoichi, but had lower similarity to the majority of serotype C and D HA-33s. A comparison of TC component primary structures for 12 serotype C and D strains suggested that at least three types of HA-33 genes exist, and these are shuffled among the serotype C and D strains independently of BoNT serotype. This shuffling produces the distinct sugar recognition of serotype C and D botulinum TCs. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Safe, rapid, and sensitive method of quantitating and distinguishing among Shiga toxins in complex media and human serum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shiga toxins are primarily responsible for the virulence associated with Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. The expression of the Shiga toxins is controlled by a phage that infects the host. More than one phage can infect a host and the host can inactivate infecting phages. T...

  4. Overcoming the challenges of safely quantifying and distinguishing among Shiga toxins in complex media and human serum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are responsible for many of the serious foodborne disease outbreaks. A major virulence factor of STEC is the production of Shiga toxins or verotoxins. Although the toxins are associated with an Escherichia coli host, their production is under the indepe...

  5. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin induces complex changes in sympathetic nerve discharge regulation.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M J; Mosher, L J; Fels, R J

    2012-09-25

    Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LeTx) alters blood pressure and visceral sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) regulation (Garcia et al., 2012). The present results indicate that LeTx infusions produce similar response profiles in peripheral (lumbar) and visceral (renal) SND; an initial widespread activation of sympathetic nerve outflow, followed by a generalized reduction in lumbar and renal SND from peak levels, although the sympathoinhibition tended to be attenuated in lumbar SND. Combined hypoxia+hypercapnia during the hypotensive phase of LeTx infusions increased lumbar and renal SND, indicating that sympathetic neural circuits can be activated during the circulatory shock phase of B. anthracis septicemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Botulinum Toxin Complex Increases Paracellular Permeability in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    MIYASHITA, Shin-ichiro; SAGANE, Yoshimasa; INUI, Ken; HAYASHI, Shintaro; MIYATA, Keita; SUZUKI, Tomonori; OHYAMA, Tohru; WATANABE, Toshihiro; NIWA, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  7. Laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia facilitated by pre-operative chemical component relaxation using Botulinum Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Elstner, K E; Jacombs, A S W; Read, J W; Rodriguez, O; Edye, M; Cosman, P H; Dardano, A N; Zea, A; Boesel, T; Mikami, D J; Craft, C; Ibrahim, N

    2016-04-01

    The operative management of complex ventral hernia poses a formidable challenge, despite recent advances in surgical techniques. Recurrence rates after complex ventral hernia repair remain high, and increase with each failed attempt. This study examines the effect of pre-operative abdominal wall chemical component relaxation using Botulinum Toxin A (BTA) to induce temporary flaccid paralysis in order to facilitate laparoscopic repair of large complex ventral hernia. This is a prospective evaluation of 27 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 who underwent ultrasound guided BTA injections to the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to elective complex ventral hernia repair. Non-contrast serial CT imaging was obtained pre- and post-BTA injection to measure change in fascial defect size and abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. Fascial defects were closed and hernias repaired using laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted intra-peritoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) techniques. 27 patients received pre-operative BTA injections which were well tolerated with no complications. Comparison of pre-BTA and post-BTA CT imaging demonstrated a significant increase in mean length of the lateral abdominal wall from 15.7 cm pre-BTA to 19.9 cm post-BTA (p < 0.0001), with mean unstretched length gain of 4.2 cm/side (range 0-11.7 cm/side). All hernias were surgically reduced and repaired with mesh, with no early recurrences. Pre-operative administration of BTA is a safe and effective technique in the pre-operative preparation of patients undergoing elective complex ventral hernia repair. This technique lengthens and relaxes the laterally retracted abdominal muscles and enables laparoscopic closure of large complex ventral hernia.

  8. Characterization of Toxin Complex Gene Clusters and Insect Toxicity of Bacteria Representing Four Subgroups of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Lorena I; Henkels, Marcella D; Shaffer, Brenda T; Walker, Francesca L; Davis, Edward W; Stockwell, Virginia O; Bruck, Denny; Taylor, Barbara J; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-01-01

    Ten strains representing four lineages of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group (P. chlororaphis, P. corrugata, P. koreensis, and P. fluorescens subgroups) were evaluated for toxicity to the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and the common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains within the P. chlororaphis subgroup exhibited both oral and injectable toxicity to the lepidopteran M. sexta. All three strains have the gene cluster encoding the FitD insect toxin and a ΔfitD mutant of P. protegens strain Pf-5 exhibited diminished oral toxicity compared to the wildtype strain. Only one of the three strains, P. protegens Pf-5, exhibited substantial levels of oral toxicity against the dipteran D. melanogaster. Three strains in the P. fluorescens subgroup, which lack fitD, consistently showed significant levels of injectable toxicity against M. sexta. In contrast, the oral toxicity of these strains against D. melanogaster was variable between experiments, with only one strain, Pseudomonas sp. BG33R, causing significant levels of mortality in repeated experiments. Toxin complex (Tc) gene clusters, which encode insecticidal properties in Photorhabdus luminescens, were identified in the genomes of seven of the ten strains evaluated in this study. Within those seven genomes, six types of Tc gene clusters were identified, distinguished by gene content, organization and genomic location, but no correlation was observed between the presence of Tc genes and insect toxicity of the evaluated strains. Our results demonstrate that members of the P. fluorescens group have the capacity to kill insects by both FitD-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  9. Characterization of Toxin Complex Gene Clusters and Insect Toxicity of Bacteria Representing Four Subgroups of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Lorena I.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Walker, Francesca L.; Davis, Edward W.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Bruck, Denny; Taylor, Barbara J.; Loper, Joyce E.

    2016-01-01

    Ten strains representing four lineages of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group (P. chlororaphis, P. corrugata, P. koreensis, and P. fluorescens subgroups) were evaluated for toxicity to the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and the common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains within the P. chlororaphis subgroup exhibited both oral and injectable toxicity to the lepidopteran M. sexta. All three strains have the gene cluster encoding the FitD insect toxin and a ΔfitD mutant of P. protegens strain Pf-5 exhibited diminished oral toxicity compared to the wildtype strain. Only one of the three strains, P. protegens Pf-5, exhibited substantial levels of oral toxicity against the dipteran D. melanogaster. Three strains in the P. fluorescens subgroup, which lack fitD, consistently showed significant levels of injectable toxicity against M. sexta. In contrast, the oral toxicity of these strains against D. melanogaster was variable between experiments, with only one strain, Pseudomonas sp. BG33R, causing significant levels of mortality in repeated experiments. Toxin complex (Tc) gene clusters, which encode insecticidal properties in Photorhabdus luminescens, were identified in the genomes of seven of the ten strains evaluated in this study. Within those seven genomes, six types of Tc gene clusters were identified, distinguished by gene content, organization and genomic location, but no correlation was observed between the presence of Tc genes and insect toxicity of the evaluated strains. Our results demonstrate that members of the P. fluorescens group have the capacity to kill insects by both FitD-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:27580176

  10. In vitro toxicity of trichothecenes on human haematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Parent-Massin, D; Fuselier, R; Thouvenot, D

    1994-01-01

    The culture of human haematopoietic progenitors, Colony-Forming-Unit Granulocyte and Macrophage (CFU-GM), has been performed in the presence of four trichothecenes, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), and deoxynivalenol (DON). Our results showed that trichothecenes were cytotoxic for human haematopoietic progenitors. This work and the analysis of results described in the literature allowed us to propose that the haematologic lesions observed during human intoxication could be due to a destruction of haematopoietic progenitors such as granulocytic and macrophage colony-forming cells.

  11. Backbone dynamics in an intramolecular prolylpeptide-SH3 complex from the diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Nilakshee; Yi, Myunggi; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Logan, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The diphtheria toxin repressor contains an SH3-like domain that forms an intramolecular complex with a proline-rich (Pr) peptide segment and stabilizes the inactive state of the repressor. Upon activation of DtxR by transition metals, this intramolecular complex must dissociate as the SH3 domain and Pr segment form different interactions in the active repressor. In this study we investigate the dynamics of this intramolecular complex using backbone amide nuclear spin relaxation rates determined using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics trajectories. The SH3 domain in the unbound and bound states showed typical dynamics in that the secondary structures were fairly ordered with high generalized order parameters and low effective correlation times while residues in the loops connecting β-strands exhibited reduced generalized order parameters and required additional motional terms to adequately model the relaxation rates. Residues forming the Pr segment exhibited low order parameters with internal rotational correlation times on the order of 0.6 – 1 ns. Further analysis showed that the SH3 domain was rich in millisecond timescale motions while the Pr segment was rich in motions on the 100s μs timescale. Molecular dynamics simultations indicated structural rearrangements that may contribute to the observed relaxation rates and, together with the observed relaxation rate data, suggested that the Pr segment exhibits a binding ↔ unbinding equilibrium. The results of this study provide new insights into the nature of the intramolecular complex and provide a better understanding of the biological role of the SH3 domain in regulating DtxR activity. PMID:17976643

  12. Lipophilic Cationic Cyanines Are Potent Complex I Inhibitors and Specific in Vitro Dopaminergic Toxins with Mechanistic Similarities to Both Rotenone and MPP(.).

    PubMed

    Kadigamuwa, Chamila C; Mapa, Mapa S T; Wimalasena, Kandatege

    2016-09-19

    We have recently reported that simple lipophilic cationic cyanines are specific and potent dopaminergic toxins with a mechanism of toxicity similar to that of the Parkinsonian toxin MPP(+). In the present study, a group of fluorescent lipophilic cyanines have been used to further exploit the structure-activity relationship of the specific dopaminergic toxicity of cyanines. Here, we report that all cyanines tested were highly toxic to dopaminergic MN9D cells with IC50s in the range of 60-100 nM and not toxic to non-neuronal HepG2 cells parallel to that previously reported for 2,2'- and 4,4'-cyanines. All cyanines nonspecifically accumulate in the mitochondria of both MN9D and HepG2 cells at high concentrations, inhibit the mitochondrial complex I with the inhibition potencies similar to the potent complex I inhibitor, rotenone. They increase the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production specifically in dopaminergic cells causing apoptotic cell death. These and other findings suggest that the complex I inhibition, the expression of low levels of antioxidant enzymes, and presence of high levels of oxidatively labile radical propagator, dopamine, could be responsible for the specific increase in ROS production in dopaminergic cells. Thus, the predisposition of dopaminergic cells to produce high levels of ROS in response to mitochondrial toxins together with their inherent greater demand for energy may contribute to their specific vulnerability toward these toxins. The novel findings that cyanines are an unusual class of potent mitochondrial toxins with specific dopaminergic toxicity suggest that their presence in the environment could contribute to the etiology of PD similar to that of MPP(+) and rotenone.

  13. Structure of a bimodular botulinum neurotoxin complex provides insights into its oral toxicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent oral poisons produced by Clostridium botulinum. BoNTs are secreted along with several auxiliary proteins forming progenitor toxin complexes (PTC). Here, we report the structure of a ~760 kDa 14-subunit PTC using a combination of X-ray crystallography a...

  14. Comparative Proteomics Identifies the Cell-Associated Lethality of M. tuberculosis RelBE-like Toxin-Antitoxin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miallau, Linda; Jain, Paras; Arbing, Mark A.; Cascio, Duilio; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Chan, Sum; Chernishof, Irina; Maxson, Michelle; Chiang, Janet; Jacobs, William R.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome encodes approximately 90 toxin-antitoxin protein complexes, including three RelBE family members, which are believed to play a major role in bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. We have determined the crystal structures of Mtb RelBE-2 and RelBE-3, and the structures reveal homologous heterotetramers. Our structures suggest RelE-2, and by extension the closely related RelE-1, use a different catalytic mechanism than RelE-3, because our analysis of the RelE-2 structure predicts additional amino acid residues that are likely to be functionally significant and are missing from analogous positions in the RelE-3 structure. Toxicity assays corroborate our structural findings; overexpression of RelE-3, whose active site is more similar to Escherichia coli YoeB, has limited consequences on bacterial growth, whereas RelE-1 and RelE-2 overexpression results in acute toxicity. Moreover, RelE-2 overexpression results in an elongated cell phenotype in Mycobacterium smegmatis and protects M. tuberculosis against antibiotics, suggesting a different functional role for RelE-2. PMID:23523424

  15. Simultaneous quantification of five bacterial and plant toxins from complex matrices using a multiplexed fluorescent magnetic suspension assay.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Diana; Kirchner, Sebastian; Stoermann, Britta; Schreiber, Tanja; Kaulfuss, Stefan; Schade, Rüdiger; Zbinden, Reto; Avondet, Marc-André; Dorner, Martin B; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2009-10-01

    Proteotoxins such as ricin, abrin, botulinum neurotoxins type A and B (BoNT/A, BoNT/B) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are regarded as potential biological warfare agents which could be used for bioterrorism attacks on the food chain. In this study we used a novel immunisation strategy to generate high-affinity monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against native ricin, BoNT/A, and BoNT/B. The antibodies were used along with antibodies against SEB and abrin to establish a highly sensitive magnetic and fluorescent multiplex bead array with excellent sensitivities between 2 ng/L and 546 ng/L from a minimal sample volume of 50 microL. The assay was validated using 20 different related analytes and the assay precision was determined. Advancing the existing bead array technology, the novel magnetic and fluorescent microbeads proved amenable to enrichment procedures, by further increasing sensitivity to 0.3-85 ng/L, starting from a sample volume of 500 microL. Furthermore, the method was successfully applied for the simultaneous identification of the target toxins spiked into complex food matrices like milk, baby food and yoghurt. On the basis of our results, the assay appears to be a good tool for large-scale screening of samples from the food supply chain.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Fic Toxin-Like Protein in Complex with Its Cognate Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Frédéric V.; Harms, Alexander; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    FIC domain proteins mediate post-translational modifications of target proteins, which typically results in their inactivation. Depending on the conservation of crucial active site residues, the FIC fold serves as structural scaffold for various enzymatic activities, mostly target adenylylation. The founding member of the vast Fic protein family, EcFicT, was identified in Escherichia coli some time ago. The G55R point mutant of EcFicT displays the “filamentation induced by cAMP” (Fic) phenotype at high 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations and elevated temperature, but the underlying molecular mechanism and any putative biochemical activity of EcFicT have remained unknown. EcFicT belongs to class I Fic toxin proteins that are encoded together with a small inhibitory protein (antitoxin), named EcFicA in E. coli. Here, we report the crystal structures of two mutant EcFicT/EcFicA complexes (EcFicTG55RA and EcFicTAE28G) both showing close resemblance with the structure of the AMP-transferase VbhT from Bartonella schoenbuchensis in complex with its cognate antitoxin VbhA. However, crucial differences in the active site of EcFicT compared to VbhT and other AMP-transferases rationalize the lack of evidence for adenylylation activity. Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis suggests that EcFicT has evolved from canonical AMP-transferases and has acquired a conserved binding site for a yet to be discovered novel substrate. The G55R mutation has no effect on structure or thermal stability of EcFicT, such that the molecular basis for its associated Fic phenotype remains elusive. We anticipate that this structure will inspire further bioinformatic and experimental analyses in order to characterize the enzymatic activity of EcFicT and help revealing its physiological role. PMID:27657533

  17. Noise spectroscopy as an efficient tool for impedance based sub-femtomolar toxin detection in complex mixture using nanoporous silicon oxide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, H; RoyChaudhuri, C

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we demonstrate an efficient and non-interfering computational method for sub-femtomolar food toxin detection in complex mixture based on nanoporous silicon oxide impedance immunosensor by employing noise spectroscopy analysis at the peak frequency. It has been observed that the peak frequency (fp) values obtained from steady state impedance measurements cannot distinguish between solution with only the specific toxin, which is aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) and mixture of AfB1 with other non-specific toxins (NSTs), thus leading to erroneous quantification of AfB1 in complex mixture. On the other hand, the first cut-off frequency (fc) ranges obtained from noise spectroscopy analysis can qualitatively differentiate between solution containing only AfB1, AfB1 and NSTs and no AfB1. However fc values being very close for different concentration of AfB1 in pure solution and being overlapping for different mixtures cannot quantify AfB1 either in pure solution or in complex mixture. To address this problem, the proposed computational method first clusters the fp and fc values in 11 categories each using k-means clustering algorithm and then applies a simple combinational digital logic on the clusters of fps and fcs to obtain the final output, realizable with standard NAND-NOR gates. The output digital word differs only with AfB1 concentration and not with concentration of NSTs and is found to be capable of detecting sub-femtomolar AfB1 range down to 0.1 fg/ml not only in pure solution but also in complex mixture with as high as 1000 ng/ml NSTs. This is the most sensitive and selective report so far on electrochemical food toxin immunosensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Xiu; Li, Yan-Nan; Vogl, Claus; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Guo, Yan-Ping

    2010-04-13

    In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae). It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg.

  19. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae). It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. Results In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. Conclusions The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg. PMID:20388203

  20. Host-derived, pore-forming toxin-like protein and trefoil factor complex protects the host against microbial infection.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Yan, Chao; Guo, Xiaolong; Zhou, Kaifeng; Li, Sheng'an; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-05-06

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the bacterial β-pore-forming toxin superfamily. Surprisingly, numerous aerolysin-like proteins exist in vertebrates, but their biological functions are unknown. βγ-CAT, a complex of an aerolysin-like protein subunit (two βγ-crystallin domains followed by an aerolysin pore-forming domain) and two trefoil factor subunits, has been identified in frogs (Bombina maxima) skin secretions. Here, we report the rich expression of this protein, in the frog blood and immune-related tissues, and the induction of its presence in peritoneal lavage by bacterial challenge. This phenomena raises the possibility of its involvement in antimicrobial infection. When βγ-CAT was administrated in a peritoneal infection model, it greatly accelerated bacterial clearance and increased the survival rate of both frogs and mice. Meanwhile, accelerated Interleukin-1β release and enhanced local leukocyte recruitments were determined, which may partially explain the robust and effective antimicrobial responses observed. The release of interleukin-1β was potently triggered by βγ-CAT from the frog peritoneal cells and murine macrophages in vitro. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed and translocated to lysosomes, where it formed high molecular mass SDS-stable oligomers (>170 kDa). Lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin B release were detected, which may explain the activation of caspase-1 inflammasome and subsequent interleukin-1β maturation and release. To our knowledge, these results provide the first functional evidence of the ability of a host-derived aerolysin-like protein to counter microbial infection by eliciting rapid and effective host innate immune responses. The findings will also largely help to elucidate the possible involvement and action mechanisms of aerolysin-like proteins and/or trefoil factors widely existing in vertebrates in the host defense against pathogens.

  1. Effectiveness of switching therapy from complexing protein-containing botulinum toxin type A to a formulation with low immunogenicity in spasticity after stroke: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Ranieri, Maurizio; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza; Micello, Maria Francesca; Filoni, Serena; Fiore, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    Some patients receiving botulinum toxin type A therapy develop immunological resistance due to the production of neutralizing antibodies against the neurotoxin, thus partially or completely reducing the therapeutic effect. We report here neurophysiological and clinical findings for a 58-year-old man treated with botulinum toxin type A for spasticity after ischaemic stroke, who became a secondary non-responder patient. Subsequent treatment with a different preparation of botulinum toxin type A had a great therapeutic effect on his spasticity. The muscles injected and the dosages were the same for each treatment, but evaluation with the Modified Ashworth Scale after treatment with the second preparation showed a reduction of approximately 2 points compared with the first examination. The clinical results were also supported by extensor digitorum brevis testing of the right muscle, which showed a reduction in compound muscle action potential, whereas it was unchanged in the non-injected muscle. No side-effects were reported, and after 1 year of treatment with this formulation clinical benefits were still evident. The neurophysiological and clinical results obtained in this patient suggest that switching therapy from a complexing protein-containing product to a product potentially free of complexing proteins, which has low immunogenicity, may be a viable therapeutic option in secondary non-responder patients.

  2. Optimal Neutralization of Centruroides noxius Venom Is Understood through a Structural Complex between Two Antibody Fragments and the Cn2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Ledezma-Candanoza, Luis M; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Fernández-Taboada, Guillermo; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia; Gómez-Ramírez, Ilse V; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-22

    The current trend of using recombinant antibody fragments in research to develop novel antidotes against scorpion stings has achieved excellent results. The polyclonal character of commercial antivenoms, obtained through the immunization of animals and which contain several neutralizing antibodies that recognize different epitopes on the toxins, guarantees the neutralization of the venoms. To avoid the use of animals, we aimed to develop an equivalent recombinant antivenom composed of a few neutralizing single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that bind to two different epitopes on the scorpion toxins. In this study, we obtained scFv RU1 derived from scFv C1. RU1 showed a good capacity to neutralize the Cn2 toxin and whole venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius. Previously, we had produced scFv LR, obtained from a different parental fragment (scFv 3F). LR also showed a similar neutralizing capacity. The simultaneous administration of both scFvs resulted in improved protection, which was translated as a rapid recovery of previously poisoned animals. The crystallographic structure of the ternary complex scFv LR-Cn2-scFv RU1 allowed us to identify the areas of interaction of both scFvs with the toxin, which correspond to non-overlapping sites. The epitope recognized by scFv RU1 seems to be related to a greater efficiency in the neutralization of the whole venom. In addition, the structural analysis of the complex helped us to explain the cross-reactivity of these scFvs and how they neutralize the venom.

  3. Optimal Neutralization of Centruroides noxius Venom Is Understood through a Structural Complex between Two Antibody Fragments and the Cn2 Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Ledezma-Candanoza, Luis M.; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Fernández-Taboada, Guillermo; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia; Gómez-Ramírez, Ilse V.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Possani, Lourival D.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    The current trend of using recombinant antibody fragments in research to develop novel antidotes against scorpion stings has achieved excellent results. The polyclonal character of commercial antivenoms, obtained through the immunization of animals and which contain several neutralizing antibodies that recognize different epitopes on the toxins, guarantees the neutralization of the venoms. To avoid the use of animals, we aimed to develop an equivalent recombinant antivenom composed of a few neutralizing single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that bind to two different epitopes on the scorpion toxins. In this study, we obtained scFv RU1 derived from scFv C1. RU1 showed a good capacity to neutralize the Cn2 toxin and whole venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius. Previously, we had produced scFv LR, obtained from a different parental fragment (scFv 3F). LR also showed a similar neutralizing capacity. The simultaneous administration of both scFvs resulted in improved protection, which was translated as a rapid recovery of previously poisoned animals. The crystallographic structure of the ternary complex scFv LR-Cn2-scFv RU1 allowed us to identify the areas of interaction of both scFvs with the toxin, which correspond to non-overlapping sites. The epitope recognized by scFv RU1 seems to be related to a greater efficiency in the neutralization of the whole venom. In addition, the structural analysis of the complex helped us to explain the cross-reactivity of these scFvs and how they neutralize the venom. PMID:26589800

  4. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  5. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    PubMed

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  6. Common, but complex, mode of resistance of Plutella xylostella to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Ali H; Gatsi, Roxani; Ibiza-Palacios, M Sales; Escriche, Baltasar; Wright, Denis J; Crickmore, Neil

    2005-11-01

    A field collected population of Plutella xylostella (SERD4) was selected in the laboratory with Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins Cry1Ac (Cry1Ac-SEL) and Cry1Ab (Cry1Ab-SEL). Both subpopulations showed similar phenotypes: high resistance to the Cry1A toxins and little cross-resistance to Cry1Ca or Cry1D. A previous analysis of the Cry1Ac-SEL showed incompletely dominant resistance to Cry1Ac with more than one factor, at least one of which was sex influenced. In the present study reciprocal mass crosses between Cry1Ab-SEL and a laboratory susceptible population (ROTH) provided evidence that Cry1Ab resistance was also inherited as incompletely dominant trait with more than one factor, and at least one of the factors was sex influenced. Analysis of single pair mating indicated that Cry1Ab-SEL was still heterogeneous for Cry1Ab resistance genes, showing genes with different degrees of dominance. Binding studies showed a large reduction of specific binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac to midgut membrane vesicles of the Cry1Ab-SEL subpopulation. Cry1Ab-SEL was found to be more susceptible to trypsin-activated Cry1Ab toxin than protoxin, although no defect in toxin activation was found. Present and previous results indicate a common basis of resistance to both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac in selected subpopulations and suggest that a similar set of resistance genes are responsible for resistance to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac and are selected whichever toxin was used. The possibility of an incompletely dominant trait of resistant to these toxins should be taken into account when considering refuge resistance management strategies.

  7. Pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Sekura, R.D.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Functional Studies of Pertussis Toxin Substrates; Effect of Pertussis Toxin on the Hormonal Responsiveness of Different Tissues; Extracellular Adenylate Cyclase of Bordetella pertussis; and GTP-Regulatory Proteins are Introcellular Messagers: A Model for Hormone Action.

  8. Deletion of Rictor in neural progenitor cells reveals contributions of mTORC2 signaling to tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Carson, Robert P; Fu, Cary; Winzenburger, Peggy; Ess, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder with severe neurologic manifestations, including epilepsy, autism, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. TSC is caused by the loss of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that normally regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. mTOR exists within two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Loss of either TSC gene leads to increased mTORC1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. As the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling to neural development and homeostasis has not been well studied, we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) of Rictor, a key component of mTORC2. mTORC2 signaling is impaired in the brain, whereas mTORC1 signaling is unchanged. Rictor CKO mice have small brains and bodies, normal lifespan and are fertile. Cortical layering is normal, but neurons are smaller than those in control brains. Seizures were not observed, although excessive slow activity was seen on electroencephalography. Rictor CKO mice are hyperactive and have reduced anxiety-like behavior. Finally, there is decreased white matter and increased levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex. Loss of mTORC2 signaling in the cortex independent of mTORC1 can disrupt normal brain development and function and may contribute to some of the neurologic manifestations seen in TSC.

  9. The crystal structure of the intact E. coli RelBE toxin-antitoxin complex provides the structural basis for conditional cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Bøggild, Andreas; Sofos, Nicholas; Andersen, Kasper R; Feddersen, Ane; Easter, Ashley D; Passmore, Lori A; Brodersen, Ditlev E

    2012-10-10

    The bacterial relBE locus encodes a toxin-antitoxin complex in which the toxin, RelE, is capable of cleaving mRNA in the ribosomal A site cotranslationally. The antitoxin, RelB, both binds and inhibits RelE, and regulates transcription through operator binding and conditional cooperativity controlled by RelE. Here, we present the crystal structure of the intact Escherichia coli RelB2E2 complex at 2.8 Å resolution, comprising both the RelB-inhibited RelE and the RelB dimerization domain that binds DNA. RelE and RelB associate into a V-shaped heterotetrameric complex with the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) dimerization domain at the apex. Our structure supports a model in which relO is optimally bound by two adjacent RelB2E heterotrimeric units, and is not compatible with concomitant binding of two RelB2E2 heterotetramers. The results thus provide a firm basis for understanding the model of conditional cooperativity at the molecular level.

  10. The Crystal Structure of the Intact E. coli RelBE Toxin-Antitoxin Complex Provides the Structural Basis for Conditional Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Bøggild, Andreas; Sofos, Nicholas; Andersen, Kasper R.; Feddersen, Ane; Easter, Ashley D.; Passmore, Lori A.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The bacterial relBE locus encodes a toxin-antitoxin complex in which the toxin, RelE, is capable of cleaving mRNA in the ribosomal A site cotranslationally. The antitoxin, RelB, both binds and inhibits RelE, and regulates transcription through operator binding and conditional cooperativity controlled by RelE. Here, we present the crystal structure of the intact Escherichia coli RelB2E2 complex at 2.8 Å resolution, comprising both the RelB-inhibited RelE and the RelB dimerization domain that binds DNA. RelE and RelB associate into a V-shaped heterotetrameric complex with the ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) dimerization domain at the apex. Our structure supports a model in which relO is optimally bound by two adjacent RelB2E heterotrimeric units, and is not compatible with concomitant binding of two RelB2E2 heterotetramers. The results thus provide a firm basis for understanding the model of conditional cooperativity at the molecular level. PMID:22981948

  11. Receptors of anthrax toxin and cell entry.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Gisou; Young, John A T

    2009-12-01

    Anthrax toxin-receptor interactions are critical for toxin delivery to the host cell cytoplasm. This review summarizes what is known about the molecular details of the protective antigen (PA) toxin subunit interaction with either the ANTXR1 and ANTXR2 cellular receptors, and how receptor-type can dictate the low pH threshold of PA pore formation. The roles played by cellular factors in regulating the endocytosis of toxin-receptor complexes is also discussed.

  12. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  13. In vitro toxicity of trichothecenes on rat haematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Parent-Massin, D; Thouvenot, D

    1995-01-01

    The fusarial toxicosis induced by trichothecenes is characterized by common syndromes such as vomiting, inflammation, haemorrhages, diarrhoea and haematological changes. Subchronic ingestion of trichothecenes causes a decrease in circulating white cells. This leukopenic change of animals is reported as a characteristic feature in the best known human disorder: Alimentary Toxic Aleukia (ATA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the haematologic disorders imputed to trichothecenes were a result of myelotoxicity by investigating in an in vitro model. Rat haematopoietic progenitors, Colony Forming Units-Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM), were cultured in the presence of several concentrations of four trichothecenes; T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and deoxynivalenol (DON). All these trichothecenes were cytotoxic to rat haematopoietic progenitor cells. It is concluded that haematological disorders observed during trichothecene intoxication of animals are caused by the destruction of haematopoietic progenitors such as CFU-GM cells.

  14. Interactions of Kid-Kis toxin-antitoxin complexes with the parD operator-promoter region of plasmid R1 are piloted by the Kis antitoxin and tuned by the stoichiometry of Kid-Kis oligomers.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria C; Hernández-Arriaga, Ana M; Kamphuis, Monique B; López-Villarejo, Juan; Heck, Albert J R; Boelens, Rolf; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; van den Heuvel, Robert H H

    2007-01-01

    The parD operon of Escherichia coli plasmid R1 encodes a toxin-antitoxin system, which is involved in plasmid stabilization. The toxin Kid inhibits cell growth by RNA degradation and its action is neutralized by the formation of a tight complex with the antitoxin Kis. A fascinating but poorly understood aspect of the kid-kis system is its autoregulation at the transcriptional level. Using macromolecular (tandem) mass spectrometry and DNA binding assays, we here demonstrate that Kis pilots the interaction of the Kid-Kis complex in the parD regulatory region and that two discrete Kis-binding regions are present on parD. The data clearly show that only when the Kis concentration equals or exceeds the Kid concentration a strong cooperative effect exists between strong DNA binding and Kid2-Kis2-Kid2-Kis2 complex formation. We propose a model in which transcriptional repression of the parD operon is tuned by the relative molar ratio of the antitoxin and toxin proteins in solution. When the concentration of the toxin exceeds that of the antitoxin tight Kid2-Kis2-Kid2 complexes are formed, which only neutralize the lethal activity of Kid. Upon increasing the Kis concentration, (Kid2-Kis2)n complexes repress the kid-kis operon.

  15. A comparison of the efficacy of carbamazepine and the novel anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam in the tetanus toxin model of focal complex partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Doheny, H C; Whittington, M A; Jefferys, J G R; Patsalos, P N

    2002-01-01

    The tetanus toxin seizure model, which is associated with spontaneous and intermittent generalized and non-generalized seizures, is considered to reflect human complex partial epilepsy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine with that of levetiracetam, a new anti-epileptic drug in this model. One μl of tetanus toxin solution (containing 12 mLD50 μl−1 of tetanus toxin) was placed stereotactically into the rat left hippocampus resulting in generalized and non-generalized seizures. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) and levetiracetam (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) were administered during a 7 day period via an osmotic minipump which was placed in the peritoneal cavity. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) exhibited no significant anticonvulsant effect, compared to control, when the entire 7 day study period was evaluated but the reduction in generalized seizures was greater (35.5%) than that for non-generalized seizures (12.6%). However, during the first 2 days of carbamazepine administration a significant reduction in both generalized seizure frequency (90%) and duration (25%) was observed. Non-generalized seizures were unaffected. This time-dependent anticonvulsant effect exactly paralleled the central (CSF) and peripheral (serum) kinetics of carbamazepine in that steady-state concentrations declined over time, with the highest concentrations achieved during the first 2 days. Also there was a significant 27.3% reduction in duration of generalized seizures during the 7 day study period (P=0.0001). Levetiracetam administration (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in the frequency of both generalized (39 v 57%) and non-generalized (36 v 41%) seizures. However, seizure suppression was more substantial for generalized seizures. Also a significant dose-dependent reduction in overall generalized seizure duration was observed. These data provide

  16. Toxins-antitoxins: diversity, evolution and function.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Finbarr; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA) complexes are widespread in prokaryote genomes, and species frequently possess tens of plasmid and chromosomal TA loci. The complexes are categorized into three types based on genetic organization and mode of action. The toxins universally are proteins directed against specific intracellular targets, whereas the antitoxins are either proteins or small RNAs that neutralize the toxin or inhibit toxin synthesis. Within the three types of complex, there has been extensive evolutionary shuffling of toxin and antitoxin genes leading to considerable diversity in TA combinations. The intracellular targets of the protein toxins similarly are varied. Numerous toxins, many of which are sequence-specific endoribonucleases, dampen protein synthesis levels in response to a range of stress and nutritional stimuli. Key resources are conserved as a result ensuring the survival of individual cells and therefore the bacterial population. The toxin effects generally are transient and reversible permitting a set of dynamic, tunable responses that reflect environmental conditions. Moreover, by harboring multiple toxins that intercede in protein synthesis in response to different physiological cues, bacteria potentially sense an assortment of metabolic perturbations that are channeled through different TA complexes. Other toxins interfere with the action of topoisomersases, cell wall assembly, or cytoskeletal structures. TAs also play important roles in bacterial persistence, biofilm formation and multidrug tolerance, and have considerable potential both as new components of the genetic toolbox and as targets for novel antibacterial drugs.

  17. The Main Virulence Determinant of Yersinia entomophaga MH96 Is a Broad-Host-Range Toxin Complex Active against Insects▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Mark R. H.; Jones, Sandra A.; Binglin, Tan; Harper, Lincoln A.; Jackson, Trevor A.; Glare, Travis R.

    2011-01-01

    Through transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequence analysis, the main disease determinant of the entomopathogenic bacterium Yersinia entomophaga MH96 was localized to an ∼32-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) designated PAIYe96. Residing within PAIYe96 are seven open reading frames that encode an insecticidal toxin complex (TC), comprising not only the readily recognized toxin complex A (TCA), TCB, and TCC components but also two chitinase proteins that form a composite TC molecule. The central TC gene-associated region (∼19 kb) of PAIYe96 was deleted from the Y. entomophaga MH96 genome, and a subsequent bioassay of the ΔTC derivative toward Costelytra zealandica larvae showed it to be innocuous. Virulence of the ΔTC mutant strain could be restored by the introduction of a clone containing the entire PAIYe96 TC gene region. As much as 0.5 mg of the TC is released per 100 ml of Luria-Bertani broth at 25°C, while at 30 or 37°C, no TC could be detected in the culture supernatant. Filter-sterilized culture supernatants derived from Y. entomophaga MH96, but not from the ΔTC strain grown at temperatures of 25°C or less, were able to cause mortality. The 50% lethal doses (LD50s) of the TC toward diamondback moth Plutella xylostella and C. zealandica larvae were defined as 30 ng and 50 ng, respectively, at 5 days after ingestion. Histological analysis of the effect of the TC toward P. xylostella larva showed that within 48 h after ingestion of the TC, there was a general dissolution of the larval midgut. PMID:21278295

  18. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current limitations in genome sequencing technology require the construction of physical maps for high-quality draft sequences of large plant genomes, such as that of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor. To construct a physical map of the Ae. tauschii genome, we fingerprinted 461,70...

  19. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  20. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  1. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  3. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  4. Botulinum Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1980) and the other in gibbons (Hylobates lar) (Smith et aI., 1985). In addition to nonhuman primates , most other animal species that show some...nonhuman primate species are known to be susceptible to type Cl and D toxins both in nature and as experimental models. A large natural outbreak of... primates were previously reported, one in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus and Cebus olivaceus) (Smart et al

  5. Legionella Toxin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-29

    of a cytotoxin produced by Legionella pneumophila. Infect. Immun. 29:271-274. Fumarola, D. (1978) Legionnaires ’ disease agent and Limulus endotoxin... Legionnaires ’ disease bacterium in the AKR/J mouse. Ann. intern. Med. 90:676-679. Hedlund, K. W. and Larson, R. (1981) Legionella pneumophila toxin, isolation... Legionella Species New Name Old Name Lpneumophila Legionnaires ’ disease organism, OLDA L. bozemanil WIGA, MI 15 L. dumoffii NY 23, TEX-KL *L. micdadei

  6. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the addiction antidote CcdA in complex with its toxin CcdB

    SciTech Connect

    Buts, Lieven; De Jonge, Natalie; Loris, Remy Wyns, Lode; Dao-Thi, Minh-Hoa

    2005-10-01

    The CcdA C-terminal domain was crystallized in complex with CcdB in two crystal forms that diffract to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. CcdA and CcdB are the antidote and toxin of the ccd addiction module of Escherichia coli plasmid F. The CcdA C-terminal domain (CcdA{sub C36}; 36 amino acids) was crystallized in complex with CcdB (dimer of 2 × 101 amino acids) in three different crystal forms, two of which diffract to high resolution. Form II belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.6, b = 60.5, c = 83.8 Å and diffracts to 1.8 Å resolution. Form III belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.0, b = 37.9, c = 69.6 Å, β = 96.9°, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution.

  7. Four molecules of the 33 kDa haemagglutinin component of the Clostridium botulinum serotype C and D toxin complexes are required to aggregate erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Shingo; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Nakazawa, Yozo; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru

    2005-12-01

    Normally, large-sized botulinum toxin complexes (L-TC) of serotype C and D are composed of a single neurotoxin, a single non-toxic non-haemagglutinin, two HA-70 molecules, four HA-33 molecules and four HA-17 molecules that assemble to form a 650 kDa L-TC. The 540 and 610 kDa TC species (designated here as L-TC2 and L-TC3, respectively) were purified in addition to the 650 kDa L-TC from the culture supernatants of serotype D strains (D-4947 and D-CB16) and serotype C strains (C-6814 and C-Yoichi). The 650 kDa L-TC from D-4947, D-CB16 and C-6814 showed haemagglutination and erythrocyte-binding activity, but their L-TC2 and L-TC3 species had only binding activity. In contrast, every TC species from C-Yoichi having the C-terminally truncated variant of HA-33 exhibited neither haemagglutination activity nor erythrocyte-binding activity. Four strain-specific HA-33/HA-17 complexes were isolated from the 650 kDa L-TC of each strain. The 650 kDa HA-hybrid L-TCs were reconstituted by various combinations of isolated HA-33/HA-17 complexes and haemagglutination-negative L-TC2 or L-TC3 from each strain. HA-hybrid 650 kDa L-TC, including at least one HA-33/HA-17 complex derived from C-Yoichi, lost haemagglutination activity, leading to the conclusion that the binding of four HA-33 molecules is required for haemagglutination activity of botulinum L-TC. The results of the modelling approach indicated that the structure of a variant C-Yoichi HA-33 molecule reveals clear deformation of the beta-trefoil domain responsible for the carbohydrate recognition site.

  8. Stool C. difficile toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... test detects harmful substances produced by the bacterium Clostridium difficile ( C difficile) . This infection is a common ... toxin; Necrotizing colitis - toxin; C difficile - toxin Images Clostridium difficile organism References Beavis KG, Charnot-Katsikas A. ...

  9. X-ray structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1-snake toxin complex reveals open state of a Na(+)-selective channel.

    PubMed

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Bohlen, Christopher J; Goehring, April; Julius, David; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-02-13

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) detect extracellular protons produced during inflammation or ischemic injury and belong to the superfamily of degenerin/epithelial sodium channels. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of chicken ASIC1a with MitTx, a pain-inducing toxin from the Texas coral snake, to define the structure of the open state of ASIC1a. In the MitTx-bound open state and in the previously determined low-pH desensitized state, TM2 is a discontinuous α helix in which the Gly-Ala-Ser selectivity filter adopts an extended, belt-like conformation, swapping the cytoplasmic one-third of TM2 with an adjacent subunit. Gly 443 residues of the selectivity filter provide a ring of three carbonyl oxygen atoms with a radius of ∼3.6 Å, presenting an energetic barrier for hydrated ions. The ASIC1a-MitTx complex illuminates the mechanism of MitTx action, defines the structure of the selectivity filter of voltage-independent, sodium-selective ion channels, and captures the open state of an ASIC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. X-ray structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1–snake toxin complex reveals open state of a Na+-selective channel

    PubMed Central

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Bohlen, Christopher J.; Goehring, April; Julius, David; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) detect extracellular protons produced during inflammation or ischemic injury and belong to the super family of degenerin/epithelial sodium channels. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of chicken ASIC1a with MitTx, a pain-inducing toxin from the Texas coral snake, to define the structure of the open state of ASIC1a. In the MitTx-bound open state and in the previously determined low pH desensitized state, TM2 is a discontinuous α-helix in which the Gly-Ala-Ser selectivity filter adopts an extended, belt-like conformation, swapping the cytoplasmic one-third of TM2 with an adjacent subunit. Gly 443 residues of the selectivity filter provide a ring of 3 carbonyl oxygen atoms with a radius of ~3.6 Å, presenting an energetic barrier for hydrated ions. The ASIC1a-MitTx complex illuminates the mechanism of MitTx action, defines the structure of the selectivity filter of voltage-independent, sodium-selective ion channels and captures the open state of an ASIC. PMID:24507937

  11. σ-1 Receptor Inhibition of ASIC1a Channels is Dependent on a Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive G-Protein and an AKAP150/Calcineurin Complex.

    PubMed

    Mari, Yelenis; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2015-10-01

    ASIC1a channels play a major role in various pathophysiological conditions including depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke. Sigma-1 (σ-1) receptor stimulation depresses the activity of ASIC1a channels in cortical neurons, but the mechanism(s) by which σ-1 receptors exert their influence on ASIC1a remains unknown. Experiments were undertaken to elucidate the signaling cascade linking σ-1 receptors to ASIC1a channels. Immunohistochemical studies showed that σ-1 receptors, ASIC1a and A-kinase anchoring peptide 150 colocalize in the plasma membrane of the cell body and processes of cortical neurons. Fluorometric Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that disruption of the macromolecular complexes containing AKAP150 diminished the effects of the σ-1 on ASIC1a, as did application of the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A and FK-506. Moreover, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that σ-1 receptors were less effective at decreasing ASIC1a-mediated currents in the presence of the VIVIT peptide, which binds to calcineurin and prevents cellular effects dependent on AKAP150/calcineurin interaction. The coupling of σ-1 to ASIC1a was also disrupted by preincubation of the neurons in the G-protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX). Taken together, our data reveal that σ-1 receptor block of ASIC1a function is dependent on activation of a PTX-sensitive G-protein and stimulation of AKAP150 bound calcineurin.

  12. Yersinia pestis insecticidal-like toxin complex (Tc) family proteins: characterization of expression, subcellular localization, and potential role in infection of the flea vector.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Justin L; Jarrett, Clayton O; LaRock, Doris L; Miller, Samuel I; Collins, Carleen M; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2012-12-18

    Toxin complex (Tc) family proteins were first identified as insecticidal toxins in Photorhabdus luminescens and have since been found in a wide range of bacteria. The genome of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, contains a locus that encodes the Tc protein homologues YitA, YitB, YitC, and YipA and YipB. Previous microarray data indicate that the Tc genes are highly upregulated by Y. pestis while in the flea vector; however, their role in the infection of fleas and pathogenesis in the mammalian host is unclear. We show that the Tc proteins YitA and YipA are highly produced by Y. pestis while in the flea but not during growth in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at the same temperature. Over-production of the LysR-type regulator YitR from an exogenous plasmid increased YitA and YipA synthesis in broth culture. The increase in production of YitA and YipA correlated with the yitR copy number and was temperature-dependent. Although highly synthesized in fleas, deletion of the Tc proteins did not alter survival of Y. pestis in the flea or prevent blockage of the proventriculus. Furthermore, YipA was found to undergo post-translational processing and YipA and YitA are localized to the outer membrane of Y. pestis. YitA was also detected by immunofluorescence microscopy on the surface of Y. pestis. Both YitA and YipA are produced maximally at low temperature but persist for several hours after transfer to 37°C. Y. pestis Tc proteins are highly expressed in the flea but are not essential for Y. pestis to stably infect or produce a transmissible infection in the flea. However, YitA and YipA localize to the outer membrane and YitA is exposed on the surface, indicating that at least YitA is present on the surface when Y. pestis is transmitted into the mammalian host from the flea.

  13. The scorpion toxin and the potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Kenton J

    2013-05-21

    The structure of a complex containing a toxin bound to a potassium ion channel has been solved for the first time, revealing how scorpions have designed toxins that can recognize and target the filter that controls the movement of potassium ions through these channels.

  14. Architecture of the botulinum neurotoxin complex: a molecular machine for protection and delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kwok-Ho; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely poisonous protein toxins that cause the fatal paralytic disease botulism. They are naturally produced in bacteria with several nontoxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) and together they form a progenitor toxin complex (PTC), the largest bacterial toxin complex known. In foodborne botulism, the PTC functions as a molecular machine that helps BoNT breach the host defense in the gut. Here, we discuss the substantial recent advance in elucidating the atomic structures and assembly of the 14-subunit PTC, including structures of BoNT and four NAPs. These structural studies shed light on the molecular mechanisms by which BoNT is protected against the acidic environment and proteolytic destruction in the gastrointestinal tract, and how it is delivered across the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:25889616

  15. Biocompatible hybrid nanomaterials involving polymers and hydrogels interfaced with phosphorescent complexes and toxin-free metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marpu, Sreekar B.

    The major topics discussed are all relevant to interfacing brightly phosphorescent and non-luminescent coinage metal complexes of [Ag(I) and Au(I)] with biopolymers and thermoresponsive gels for making hybrid nanomaterials with an explanation on syntheses, characterization and their significance in biomedical fields. Experimental results and ongoing work on determining outreaching consequences of these hybrid nanomaterials for various biomedical applications like cancer therapy, bio-imaging and antibacterial abilities are described. In vitro and in vivo studies have been performed on majority of the discussed hybrid nanomaterials and determined that the cytotoxicity or antibacterial activity are comparatively superior when compared to analogues in literature. Consequential differences are noticed in photoluminescence enhancement from hybrid phosphorescent hydrogels, phosphorescent complex ability to physically crosslink, Au(I) sulfides tendency to form NIR (near-infrared) absorbing AuNPs compared to any similar work in literature. Syntheses of these hybrid nanomaterials has been thoroughly investigated and it is determined that either metallic nanoparticles syntheses or syntheses of phosphorescent hydrogels can be carried in single step without involving any hazardous reducing agents or crosslinkers or stabilizers that are commonly employed during multiple step syntheses protocols for syntheses of similar materials in literature. These astounding results that have been discovered within studies of hybrid nanomaterials are an asset to applications ranging from materials development to health science and will have striking effect on environmental and green chemistry approaches.

  16. Key role of LaeA and velvet complex proteins on expression of β-lactam and PR-toxin genes in Penicillium chrysogenum: cross-talk regulation of secondary metabolite pathways.

    PubMed

    Martín, Juan F

    2016-08-26

    Penicillium chrysogenum is an excellent model fungus to study the molecular mechanisms of control of expression of secondary metabolite genes. A key global regulator of the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is the LaeA protein that interacts with other components of the velvet complex (VelA, VelB, VelC, VosA). These components interact with LaeA and regulate expression of penicillin and PR-toxin biosynthetic genes in P. chrysogenum. Both LaeA and VelA are positive regulators of the penicillin and PR-toxin biosynthesis, whereas VelB acts as antagonist of the effect of LaeA and VelA. Silencing or deletion of the laeA gene has a strong negative effect on penicillin biosynthesis and overexpression of laeA increases penicillin production. Expression of the laeA gene is enhanced by the P. chrysogenum autoinducers 1,3 diaminopropane and spermidine. The PR-toxin gene cluster is very poorly expressed in P. chrysogenum under penicillin-production conditions (i.e. it is a near-silent gene cluster). Interestingly, the downregulation of expression of the PR-toxin gene cluster in the high producing strain P. chrysogenum DS17690 was associated with mutations in both the laeA and velA genes. Analysis of the laeA and velA encoding genes in this high penicillin producing strain revealed that both laeA and velA acquired important mutations during the strain improvement programs thus altering the ratio of different secondary metabolites (e.g. pigments, PR-toxin) synthesized in the high penicillin producing mutants when compared to the parental wild type strain. Cross-talk of different secondary metabolite pathways has also been found in various Penicillium spp.: P. chrysogenum mutants lacking the penicillin gene cluster produce increasing amounts of PR-toxin, and mutants of P. roqueforti silenced in the PR-toxin genes produce large amounts of mycophenolic acid. The LaeA-velvet complex mediated regulation and the pathway cross-talk phenomenon has great relevance for improving the

  17. Three Dimensional Structure of the MqsR:MqsA Complex: a Novel TA Pair Comprised of a Toxin Homologous to RelE and an Antitoxin with Unique Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Grigoriu, S; Kim, Y; Arruda, J; Davenport, A; wood, T; Peti, W; Page, R

    2009-01-01

    One mechanism by which bacteria survive environmental stress is through the formation of bacterial persisters, a sub-population of genetically identical quiescent cells that exhibit multidrug tolerance and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. Recently, the Escherichia coli gene mqsR (b3022) was identified as the gene most highly upregulated in persisters. Here, we report multiple individual and complex three-dimensional structures of MqsR and its antitoxin MqsA (B3021), which reveal that MqsR:MqsA form a novel toxin:antitoxin (TA) pair. MqsR adopts an alpha/beta fold that is homologous with the RelE/YoeB family of bacterial ribonuclease toxins. MqsA is an elongated dimer that neutralizes MqsR toxicity. As expected for a TA pair, MqsA binds its own promoter. Unexpectedly, it also binds the promoters of genes important for E. coli physiology (e.g., mcbR, spy). Unlike canonical antitoxins, MqsA is also structured throughout its entire sequence, binds zinc and coordinates DNA via its C- and not N-terminal domain. These studies reveal that TA systems, especially the antitoxins, are significantly more diverse than previously recognized and provide new insights into the role of toxins in maintaining the persister state.

  18. The gallium(III)-salicylidene acylhydrazide complex shows synergistic anti-biofilm effect and inhibits toxin production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rzhepishevska, Olena; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Nygren, Yvonne; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Bucht, Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Boily, Jean-François; Ramstedt, Madeleine

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause a range of problems in many areas and especially in health care. Biofilms are difficult to eradicate with traditional antibiotics and consequently there is a need for alternative ways to prevent and/or remove bacterial biofilms. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria creates a challenge to find new types of antibiotics with a lower evolutionary pressure for resistance development. One route to develop such drugs is to target the so called virulence factors, i.e. bacterial systems used when bacteria infect a host cell. This study investigates synergy effects between Ga(III) ions, previously reported to suppress biofilm formation and growth in bacteria, and salicylidene acylhydrazides (hydrazones) that have been proposed as antivirulence drugs targeting the type three secretion system used by several Gram-negative pathogens, including Pseudomonas aerugionosa, during bacterial infection of host cells. A library of hydrazones was screened for: Fe(III) binding, enhanced anti-biofilm effect with Ga(III) on P. aeruginosa, and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. The metal coordination for the most promising ligand, 2-Oxo-2-[N-(2,4,6-trihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazino]-acetamide (ME0163) with Ga(III) was investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as well as density functional theory. The results showed that Ga(III) chelates the hydrazone with 5- and 6-membered chelating rings, and that the Ga(III)-ME0163 complex enhanced the antibiofilm effect of Ga(III) while suppressing the type three secretion system in P. aeruginosa. The latter effect was not observed for the hydrazone alone and was similar for Ga(III)-citrate and Ga(III)-ME0163 complexes, indicating that the inhibition of virulence was caused by Ga(III). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Resident vascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Evelyn; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-02-01

    Homeostasis of the vessel wall is essential for maintaining its function, including blood pressure and patency of the lumen. In physiological conditions, the turnover rate of vascular cells, i.e. endothelial and smooth muscle cells, is low, but markedly increased in diseased situations, e.g. vascular injury after angioplasty. It is believed that mature vascular cells have an ability to proliferate to replace lost cells normally. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates stem/progenitor cells may participate in vascular repair and the formation of neointimal lesions in severely damaged vessels. It was found that all three layers of the vessels, the intima, media and adventitia, contain resident progenitor cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, Sca-1+ and CD34+ cells. Data also demonstrated that these resident progenitor cells could differentiate into a variety of cell types in response to different culture conditions. However, collective data were obtained mostly from in vitro culture assays and phenotypic marker studies. There are many unanswered questions concerning the mechanism of cell differentiation and the functional role of these cells in vascular repair and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. In the present review, we aim to summarize the data showing the presence of the resident progenitor cells, to highlight possible signal pathways orchestrating cell differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and to discuss the data limitations, challenges and controversial issues related to the role of progenitors. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  20. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Causes Selective Death of Mature Oligodendrocytes and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Jennifer R.; Ma, Yinghua; Zhao, Baohua; Harris, Jason Michael; Rumah, Kareem Rashid; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ε-toxin) is responsible for a devastating multifocal central nervous system (CNS) white matter disease in ruminant animals. The mechanism by which ε-toxin causes white matter damage is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ε-toxin causes pathological changes to white matter. In primary CNS cultures, ε-toxin binds to and kills oligodendrocytes but not astrocytes, microglia, or neurons. In cerebellar organotypic culture, ε-toxin induces demyelination, which occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while preserving neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. ε-Toxin specificity for oligodendrocytes was confirmed using enriched glial culture. Sensitivity to ε-toxin is developmentally regulated, as only mature oligodendrocytes are susceptible to ε-toxin; oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are not. ε-Toxin sensitivity is also dependent on oligodendrocyte expression of the proteolipid myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL), as MAL-deficient oligodendrocytes are insensitive to ε-toxin. In addition, ε-toxin binding to white matter follows the spatial and temporal pattern of MAL expression. A neutralizing antibody against ε-toxin inhibits oligodendrocyte death and demyelination. This study provides several novel insights into the action of ε-toxin in the CNS. (i) ε-Toxin causes selective oligodendrocyte death while preserving all other neural elements. (ii) ε-Toxin-mediated oligodendrocyte death is a cell autonomous effect. (iii) The effects of ε-toxin on the oligodendrocyte lineage are restricted to mature oligodendrocytes. (iv) Expression of the developmentally regulated proteolipid MAL is required for the cytotoxic effects. (v) The cytotoxic effects of ε-toxin can be abrogated by an ε-toxin neutralizing antibody. PMID:26081637

  1. Targeting bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2012-04-23

    Protein toxins constitute the main virulence factors of several species of bacteria and have proven to be attractive targets for drug development. Lead candidates that target bacterial toxins range from small molecules to polymeric binders, and act at each of the multiple steps in the process of toxin-mediated pathogenicity. Despite recent and significant advances in the field, a rationally designed drug that targets toxins has yet to reach the market. This Review presents the state of the art in bacterial toxin targeted drug development with a critical consideration of achieved breakthroughs and withstanding challenges. The discussion focuses on A-B-type protein toxins secreted by four species of bacteria, namely Clostridium difficile (toxins A and B), Vibrio cholerae (cholera toxin), enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (Shiga toxin), and Bacillus anthracis (anthrax toxin), which are the causative agents of diseases for which treatments need to be improved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Unbinding forces of single pertussis toxin-antibody complexes measured by atomic force spectroscopy correlate with their dissociation rates determined by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nadège; Chevalier, Michel; Ronzon, Frédéric; Manin, Catherine; Dupuy, Monique; Krell, Tino; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    An inactivated form of pertussis toxin (PTX) is the primary component of currently available acellular vaccines against Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. The PTX analyzed here is purified at industrial scale and is subsequently inactivated using glutaraldehyde. The influence of this treatment on antibody recognition is of crucial importance and is analyzed in this study. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments using PTX and its inactivated form (toxoid) with 10 different monoclonal antibodies were conducted. PTX was found to recognize the antibodies with an average affinity of 1.34 ± 0.50 nM, and chemical inactivation caused only a modest decrease in affinity by a factor of approximately 4.5. However, glutaraldehyde treatment had contrary effects on the kinetic association constant k(a) and the dissociation constant k(d) . A significant reduction in k(a) was observed, whereas the dissociation of the toxoid from the bound antibody occurred slower than PTX. These data indicate that the chemical inactivation of PTX not only reduces the velocity of antibody recognition but also stabilizes the interaction with antibodies as shown by a reduction in k(d) . The same interactions were also studied by dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS). Data reveal a correlation between the k(d) values determined by SPR and the mean unbinding force as measured by DFS. The unbinding forces of one complex were determined as a function of the loading rate to directly estimate the k(d) value. Several interactions were impossible to be analyzed using SPR because of ultratight binding. Using DFS, the unbinding forces of these interactions were determined, which in turn could be used to estimate k(d) values. The use of DFS as a technique to study ultratight binding is discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Efficacy and safety of higher doses of botulinum toxin type A NT 201 free from complexing proteins in the upper and lower limb spasticity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Ranieri, Maurizio; Frisardi, Vincenza; Micello, Maria Francesca; Filoni, Serena; Fortunato, Francesca; Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, Mario; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) represents the gold standard therapy for focal spasticity after stroke, with low prevalence of complications, reversibility, and efficacy in reducing spastic hypertonia. Current guidelines suggest the employment of a dosage up to 600 units (U) of BTX-A to treat spasticity after stroke, to avoid important adverse effects and the development of antibodies against the neurotoxin. In recent years, NT 201, a new BTX-A free of complexing proteins, has been used for treating several movement disorders, showing safety and efficacy in upper limb spasticity. In a prospective, non-randomized, open-label study, we studied the efficacy and safety of higher doses of BTX-A NT 201 (up to 840 U) in 25 consecutive patients with upper and lower limb spasticity after stroke, evaluated at 30 and 90 days after injections. Before and after the treatment, the grade of spasticity, the disability, and spasticity-related pain were extensively measured. After 30 days of follow-up, a great reduction of spasticity and pain with improvement of disability was observed. The effects were still present at 90 days of follow-up. No major adverse events were observed. Higher doses of BTX-A NT 201 appeared to be safe and efficacious in patients with upper and lower limb spasticity after stroke. However, further investigations are needed to determine its reproducibility in larger case series or randomized clinical trials and to observe the absence of antibodies against the neurotoxin also after repeated injections.

  4. The genetic architecture of a complex trait: Resistance to multiple toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis in the dengue and yellow fever vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Aurélie; Paris, Margot; Frérot, Hélène; Bianco, Erica; Tetreau, Guillaume; Després, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is an increasingly popular alternative to chemical insecticides for controlling mosquito populations. Because Bti toxicity relies on the action of four main toxins, resistance to Bti is very likely a complex phenotype involving several genes simultaneously. Dissecting the underlying genetic basis thus requires associating a quantitative measure of resistance to genetic variation at many loci in a segregating population. Here, we undertake this task using the dengue and yellow fever vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, as a study model. We conducted QTL (Quantitative Trait Locus) and admixture mapping analyses on two controlled crosses and on an artificial admixed population, respectively, all obtained from resistant and susceptible lab strains. We detected 16 QTL regions, among which four QTLs were revealed by different analysis methods. These four robust QTLs explained altogether 29.2% and 62.2% of the total phenotypic variance in the two QTL crosses, respectively. They also all showed a dominant mode of action. In addition, we found six loci showing statistical association with Bti resistance in the admixed population. Five of the supercontigs highlighted in this study contained candidate genes as suggested by their function, or by prior evidence from expression and/or outlier analyses. These genomic regions are thus good starting points for fine mapping of resistance to Bti or functional analyses aiming at identifying the underlying genes and mutations. Moreover, for the purpose of this work, we built the first Ae. aegypti genetic map based on markers associated with genes expressed in larvae. This genetic map harbors 229 SNP markers mapped across the three chromosomes for a total length of 311.9cM. It brought to light several assembly discrepancies with the reference genome, suggesting a high level of genome plasticity in Ae. aegypti.

  5. Biological activity of two botulinum toxin type A complexes (Dysport and Botox) in volunteers: a double-blind, randomized, dose-ranging study.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, K; Schwandt, I; Wegner, F; Jürgens, T; Gelbrich, G; Wagner, A; Bogdahn, U; Schulte-Mattler, W

    2008-12-01

    Despite extensive clinical experience and published data regarding botulinum toxin, questions remain about the clinical substitution of one botulinum toxin formulation for another. In the case of Dysport and Botox, dose-equivalence ratios ranging from 1:1 to 6:1 (Dysport:Botox) have been advocated. This dose-ranging, electroneurographic study investigated the dose equivalence, diffusion characteristics (spread) and safety of these two type-A toxins in 79 volunteers. Dysport and Botox caused significant and similar reductions in compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude in the target muscle (extensor digitorum brevis, EDB) 2 weeks after injection, with effects persisting to the 12-week timepoint. For both products, the reduction in amplitude was increased with increasing doses and with increasing concentration. The effects of toxin on neighbouring muscles were much smaller and of a shorter duration than those on the target muscle, implying a modest spread of toxin. Unlike the target muscle, the effects were greater with the higher volume, suggesting this volume led to greater diffusion from the EDB. No adverse events were reported. Statistical modelling with CMAP amplitude data from the target muscle gave a bioequivalence of 1.57 units of Dysport:1 unit of Botox (95 % CI: 0.77-3.20 units). The data indicate that a dose-equivalence ratio of 3:1 was within the statistical error limits, but ratios over 3:1 are too high.

  6. Neuropeptides: developmental signals in placode progenitor formation.

    PubMed

    Lleras-Forero, Laura; Tambalo, Monica; Christophorou, Nicolas; Chambers, David; Houart, Corinne; Streit, Andrea

    2013-07-29

    Few families of signaling factors have been implicated in the control of development. Here, we identify the neuropeptides nociceptin and somatostatin, a neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine hormone, as a class of developmental signals in both chick and zebrafish. We show that signals from the anterior mesendoderm are required for the formation of anterior placode progenitors, with one of the signals being somatostatin. Somatostatin controls ectodermal expression of nociceptin, and both peptides regulate Pax6 in lens and olfactory progenitors. Consequently, loss of somatostatin and nociceptin signaling leads to severe reduction of lens formation. Our findings not only uncover these neuropeptides as developmental signals but also identify a long-sought-after mechanism that initiates Pax6 in placode progenitors and may explain the ancient evolutionary origin of neuropeptides, predating a complex nervous system.

  7. Anthrax Toxins in Context of Bacillus anthracis Spores and Spore Germination.

    PubMed

    Cote, Christopher K; Welkos, Susan L

    2015-08-17

    The interaction of anthrax toxin or toxin components with B. anthracis spores has been demonstrated. Germinating spores can produce significant amounts of toxin components very soon after the initiation of germination. In this review, we will summarize the work performed that has led to our understanding of toxin and spore interactions and discuss the complexities associated with these interactions.

  8. Anthrax Toxins in Context of Bacillus anthracis Spores and Spore Germination

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Christopher K.; Welkos, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of anthrax toxin or toxin components with B. anthracis spores has been demonstrated. Germinating spores can produce significant amounts of toxin components very soon after the initiation of germination. In this review, we will summarize the work performed that has led to our understanding of toxin and spore interactions and discuss the complexities associated with these interactions. PMID:26287244

  9. The Crab Nebula's progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.; Sugimoto, D.; Sparks, W. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Gull, T. R.; Miyaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    The initial mass of the Crab Nebula's progenitor star is estimated by comparing the observed nebular chemical abundances with detailed evolutionary calculations for 2.4- and 2.6-solar-mass helium cores of stars with masses of 8 to 10 solar masses. The results indicate that the mass of the Crab's progenitor was between the upper limit of about 8 solar masses for carbon deflagration and the lower limit of about 9.5 solar masses set by the dredge-up of the helium layer before the development of the helium-burning convective region. A scenario is outlined for the evolution of the progenitor star. It is suggested that the Crab Nebula was probably the product of an electron-capture supernova.

  10. Immune-privileged embryonic Swiss mouse STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells: major histocompatibility complex and cell differentiation antigen expression patterns resemble those of human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katherine S; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Maehr, Rene; Pellicciotta, Illenia; Ploegh, Hidde L; Zanetti, Maurizio; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2006-09-01

    Embryonic mouse STO (S, SIM; T, 6-thioguanine resistant; O, ouabain resistant) and 3(8)21-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cell lines exhibit long-term survival and hepatic progenitor cell behaviour after xenogeneic engraftment in non-immunosuppressed inbred rats, and were previously designated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- and class II-negative lines. To determine the molecular basis for undetectable MHC determinants, the expression and haplotype of H-2K, H-2D, H-2L and I-A proteins were reassessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cDNA sequencing, RNA hybridization, immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR (QPCR), immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. To detect cell differentiation (CD) surface antigens characteristic of stem cells, apoptotic regulation or adaptive immunity that might facilitate progenitor cell status or immune privilege, flow cytometry was also used to screen untreated and cytokine [interferon (IFN)-gamma]-treated cultures. Despite prior PCR genotyping analyses suggestive of H-2q haplotypes in STO, 3(8)21-EGFP and parental 3(8)21 cells, all three lines expressed H-2K cDNA sequences identical to those of d-haplotype BALB/c mice, as well as constitutive and cytokine-inducible H-2K(d) determinants. In contrast, apart from H-2L(d[LOW]) display in 3(8)21 cells, H-2Dd, H-2Ld and I-Ad determinants were undetectable. All three lines expressed constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD34; however, except for inducible CD117([LOW]) expression in 3(8)21 cells, no expression of CD45, CD117, CD62L, CD80, CD86, CD90.1 or CD95L/CD178 was observed. Constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD95([LOW]) expression was detected in STO and 3(8)21 cells, but not in 3(8)21-EGFP cells. MHC (class I(+[LOW])/class II-) and CD (CD34+/CD80-/CD86-/CD95L-) expression patterns in STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells resemble patterns reported for human embryonic stem cell lines. Whether these patterns reflect associations with

  11. GSK-3 is a master regulator of neural progenitor homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo-Yang; Wang, Xinshuo; Wu, Yaohong; Doble, Bradley W; Patel, Satish; Woodgett, James R; Snider, William D

    2016-01-01

    The development of the brain requires the exquisite coordination of progenitor proliferation and differentiation to achieve complex circuit assembly. It has been suggested that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) acts as an integrating molecule for multiple proliferation and differentiation signals because of its essential role in the RTK, Wnt and Shh signaling pathways. We created conditional mutations that deleted both the α and β forms of GSK-3 in mouse neural progenitors. GSK-3 deletion resulted in massive hyperproliferation of neural progenitors along the entire neuraxis. Generation of both intermediate neural progenitors and postmitotic neurons was markedly suppressed. These effects were associated with the dysregulation of β-catenin, Sonic Hedgehog, Notch and fibroblast growth factor signaling. Our results indicate that GSK-3 signaling is an essential mediator of homeostatic controls that regulate neural progenitors during mammalian brain development. PMID:19801986

  12. Stealth and mimicry by deadly bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Yates, Susan P; Jørgensen, René; Andersen, Gregers R; Merrill, A Rod

    2006-02-01

    Diphtheria toxin and exotoxin A are well-characterized members of the ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin family that function as virulence factors in the pathogenic bacteria Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Recent high-resolution structural data of the Michaelis (enzyme-substrate) complex of the P. aeruginosa toxin with an NAD(+) analog and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) have provided insights into the mechanism of inactivation of protein synthesis caused by these protein factors. In addition, rigorous steady-state and stopped-flow kinetic analyses of the toxin-catalyzed reaction, in combination with inhibitor studies, have resulted in a quantum leap in our understanding of the mechanistic details of this deadly enzyme mechanism. It is now apparent that these toxins use stealth and molecular mimicry in unleashing their toxic strategy in the infected host eukaryotic cell.

  13. Toxins and Secretion Systems of Photorhabdus luminescens

    PubMed Central

    Rodou, Athina; Ankrah, Dennis O.; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs), the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir) proteins, the “makes caterpillars floppy” (Mcf) toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC); the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection. PMID:22069636

  14. Toxins and secretion systems of Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Rodou, Athina; Ankrah, Dennis O; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-06-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs), the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir) proteins, the "makes caterpillars floppy" (Mcf) toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC); the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  15. Treating glabellar lines with botulinum toxin type A-hemagglutinin complex: A review of the science, the clinical data, and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Fagien, Steven; Sommer, Boris; Glogau, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A treatment is the foundation of minimally invasive aesthetic facial procedures. Clinicians and their patients recognize the important role, both negative and positive, that facial expression, particularly the glabellar frown lines, plays in self-perception, emotional well-being, and perception by others. This article provides up-to-date information on fundamental properties and mechanisms of action of the major approved formulations of botulinum toxin type A, summarizes recent changes in naming conventions (nonproprietary names) mandated by the United States Food and Drug Administration, and describes the reasons for these changes. The request for these changes provides recognition that formulations of botulinum toxins (eg, onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA) are not interchangeable and that dosing recommendations cannot be based on any one single conversion ratio. The extensive safety, tolerability, and efficacy data are summarized in detail, including the patient-reported outcomes that contribute to overall patient satisfaction and probability treatment continuation. Based on this in-depth review, the authors conclude that botulinum toxin type A treatment remains a cornerstone of facial aesthetic treatments, and clinicians must realize that techniques and dosing from one formulation cannot be applied to others, that each patient should undergo a full aesthetic evaluation, and that products and procedures must be selected in the context of individual needs and goals. PMID:20458348

  16. Molecular dynamics of sialic acid analogues complex with cholera toxin and DFT optimization of ethylene glycol-mediated zinc nanocluster conjugation.

    PubMed

    Sharmila, D Jeya Sundara; Jino Blessy, J

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is an infectious disease caused by cholera toxin (CT) protein of bacterium Vibrio cholerae. A sequence of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid, NeuNAc or Neu5Ac) analogues modified in its C-5 position is modelled using molecular modelling techniques and docked against the CT followed by molecular dynamics simulations. Docking results suggest better binding affinity of NeuNAc analogue towards the binding site of CT. The NeuNAc analogues interact with the active site residues GLU:11, TYR:12, HIS:13, GLY:33, LYS:34, GLU:51, GLN:56, HIE:57, ILE:58, GLN:61, TRP:88, ASN:90 and LYS:91 through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Analogues N-glycolyl-NeuNAc, N-Pentanoyl-NeuNAc and N-Propanoyl-NeuNAc show the least XPGscore (docking score) of -9.90, -9.16, and -8.91, respectively, and glide energy of -45.99, -42.14 and -41.66 kcal/mol, respectively. Stable nature of CT-N-glycolyl-NeuNAc, CT-N-Pentanoyl-NeuNAc and CT-N-Propanoyl-NeuNAc complexes was verified through molecular dynamics simulations, each for 40 ns using the software Desmond. All the nine NeuNAc analogues show better score for drug-like properties, so could be considered as suitable candidates for drug development for cholera infection. To improve the enhanced binding mode of NeuNAc analogues towards CT, the nine NeuNAc analogues are conjugated with Zn nanoclusters through ethylene glycol (EG) as carriers. The NeuNAc analogues conjugated with EG-Zn nanoclusters show better binding energy towards CT than the unconjugated nine NeuNAc analogues. The electronic structural optimization of EG-Zn nanoclusters was carried out for optimizing their performance as better delivery vehicles for NeuNAc analogues through density functional theory calculations. These sialic acid analogues may be considered as novel leads for the design of drug against cholera and the EG-Zn nanocluster may be a suitable carrier for sialic acid analogues.

  17. Target-Driven Evolution of Scorpion Toxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shangfei; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2015-10-07

    It is long known that peptide neurotoxins derived from a diversity of venomous animals evolve by positive selection following gene duplication, yet a force that drives their adaptive evolution remains a mystery. By using maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution, we analyzed molecular adaptation in scorpion sodium channel toxins from a specific species and found ten positively selected sites, six of which are located at the core-domain of scorpion α-toxins, a region known to interact with two adjacent loops in the voltage-sensor domain (DIV) of sodium channels, as validated by our newly constructed computational model of toxin-channel complex. Despite the lack of positive selection signals in these two loops, they accumulated extensive sequence variations by relaxed purifying selection in prey and predators of scorpions. The evolutionary variability in the toxin-bound regions of sodium channels indicates that accelerated substitutions in the multigene family of scorpion toxins is a consequence of dealing with the target diversity. This work presents an example of atypical co-evolution between animal toxins and their molecular targets, in which toxins suffered from more prominent selective pressure from the channels of their competitors. Our discovery helps explain the evolutionary rationality of gene duplication of toxins in a specific venomous species.

  18. The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is the prototype of actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. The toxin consists of the enzyme component C2I and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. C2II is proteolytically activated to form heptamers, which bind the enzyme component. After endocytosis of the receptor-toxin complex, the enzyme component enters the cytosol from an acidic endosomal compartment to modify G-actin at arginine177. Recent data indicate that chaperons are involved in the translocation process of the toxin.

  19. *CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are naturally-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. These photosynthesizing prokaryotes thrive in warm, shallow, nutrient-rich waters. Many produce potent toxins as secondary metabolites. Cyanobacteria toxins have been document...

  20. *CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are naturally-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. These photosynthesizing prokaryotes thrive in warm, shallow, nutrient-rich waters. Many produce potent toxins as secondary metabolites. Cyanobacteria toxins have been document...

  1. Detection of Protein Toxins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have focused on ricin, shiga-like toxin, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), developing sensitive test methods for toxins and marker compounds in food matrices. Although animal models provide the best means for risk assessment, especially for crude toxins in compl...

  2. [The results of single-event multilevel orthopedic surgeries and the early rehabilitation used in complex with botulinum toxin treatment in patients with spastic forms of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Popkov, D A; Zmanovskaya, V A; Gubina, E B; Leonchuk, S S; Butorina, M N; Pavlova, O L

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate motor possibilities of patients with children spastic palsy (CSP) one year after single-event multilevel orthopedic low extremity surgeries in combination with early rehabilitation treatment including botulinum toxin treatment. Authors studied the results of operative orthopedic treatment in 55 patients with CSP, aged from 5 to 17 years (mean 11.9 ± 2.5 years), who underwent multilevel surgeries with early functional rehabilitation using 1.5 treatment courses with 6-8 week treatment-free periods during 9-12 months in combination with a single injection of disport in the post-operative period. We performed 74 surgeries 140 episodes of botulinum toxin treatment using average doses of Botulinum toxin 10 U per kg of body mass injected into low extremity muscles. In the post-operative period, authors recorded a significant reduction in pain syndrome, assessed with a pain intensity scale, from 8.6 ± 1.2 to 4.3 ± 1.1 scores (p < 0.001). An analysis of gait demonstrated an improvement of gait patterns in all patients able to move independently. An increase in motor abilities, measured with the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, by 1 level was identified in 28 (50.9%) patients, by 2 levels in 2 (3.6%) patients, no changes were observed in 25 (45.5%) patients. Single-event multilevel orthopedic surgeries in children with CSP reduce a number of repeated surgeries. The effective control over pain syndrome in patients with CSP using multilevel botulinum toxin treatment in the post-operative period promotes the functional rehabilitation, increases rates of loading during training sessions and the motivation of CSP patients to restore the lost activity.

  3. Mojave Toxin: A Selective Ca(++) Channel Antagonist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    other than maitotoxin, blocking 3H-nitrendipine binding to the high affinity dihydropyridine receptor associated with the Ca++ channel, as well as... dihydropyridine receptors in rat synaptic membranes suggests that this toxin may be a useful proble of the Ca++ channel complex. It is not certain whether MoTX has...increase in intracellular Ca++ resulting from the binding of the toxin to dihydropyridine receptors coupled to Ca++ channels. The resolution of this

  4. Bioterrorism: toxins as weapons.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter D

    2012-04-01

    The potential for biological weapons to be used in terrorism is a real possibility. Biological weapons include infectious agents and toxins. Toxins are poisons produced by living organisms. Toxins relevant to bioterrorism include ricin, botulinum, Clostridium perfrigens epsilson toxin, conotoxins, shigatoxins, saxitoxins, tetrodotoxins, mycotoxins, and nicotine. Toxins have properties of biological and chemical weapons. Unlike pathogens, toxins do not produce an infection. Ricin causes multiorgan toxicity by blocking protein synthesis. Botulinum blocks acetylcholine in the peripheral nervous system leading to muscle paralysis. Epsilon toxin damages cell membranes. Conotoxins block potassium and sodium channels in neurons. Shigatoxins inhibit protein synthesis and induce apoptosis. Saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin inhibit sodium channels in neurons. Mycotoxins include aflatoxins and trichothecenes. Aflatoxins are carcinogens. Trichothecenes inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Nicotine produces numerous nicotinic effects in the nervous system.

  5. Bacterial toxins as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, David S; Williams, Neil A

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial toxins are the causative agent at pathology in a variety of diseases. Although not always the primary target of these toxins, many have been shown to have potent immunomodulatory effects, for example, inducing immune responses to co-administered antigens and suppressing activation of immune cells. These abilities of bacterial toxins can be harnessed and used in a therapeutic manner, such as in vaccination or the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, the ability of toxins to gain entry to cells can be used in novel bacterial toxin based immuno-therapies in order to deliver antigens into MHC Class I processing pathways. Whether the immunomodulatory properties of these toxins arose in order to enhance bacterial survival within hosts, to aid spread within the population or is pure serendipity, it is interesting to think that these same toxins potentially hold the key to preventing or treating human disease.

  6. Lung Epithelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, Emma L.

    2008-01-01

    The current enthusiasm for stem cell research stems from the hope that damaged or diseased tissues may one day be repaired through the manipulation of endogenous or exogenous stem cells. The postnatal human respiratory system is highly accessible and provides unique opportunities for the application of such techniques. Several putative adult lung epithelial stem cells have been identified in the mouse model system. However, their in vivo capabilities to contribute to different lineages, and their control mechanisms, remain unclear. If stem cell–based therapies are to be successful in the lung, it is vitally important that we understand the normal behavior of adult lung stem cells, and how this is regulated. Lung embryonic progenitor cells are much better defined and characterized than their adult counterparts. Moreover, experiments on a variety of developing tissues are beginning to uncover general mechanisms by which embryonic progenitors influence final organ size and structure. This provides a framework for the study of lung embryonic progenitor cells, facilitating experimental design and interpretation. A similar approach to investigating adult lung stem cells could produce rapid advances in the field. PMID:18684716

  7. A 4-gigbase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilop tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomes of wheat and its relatives in the tribe Triticeae are large, containing nearly 90% repetitive DNA, and some are polyploid. These genomes can currently be completely sequenced only by the ordered-clone genome sequencing approach, which reduces the complexity of sequence assembly from th...

  8. Risk Assessment of Shellfish Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex; Reeve, John

    2013-01-01

    Complex secondary metabolites, some of which are highly toxic to mammals, are produced by many marine organisms. Some of these organisms are important food sources for marine animals and, when ingested, the toxins that they produce may be absorbed and stored in the tissues of the predators, which then become toxic to animals higher up the food chain. This is a particular problem with shellfish, and many cases of poisoning are reported in shellfish consumers each year. At present, there is no practicable means of preventing uptake of the toxins by shellfish or of removing them after harvesting. Assessment of the risk posed by such toxins is therefore required in order to determine levels that are unlikely to cause adverse effects in humans and to permit the establishment of regulatory limits in shellfish for human consumption. In the present review, the basic principles of risk assessment are described, and the progress made toward robust risk assessment of seafood toxins is discussed. While good progress has been made, it is clear that further toxicological studies are required before this goal is fully achieved. PMID:24226039

  9. Differential dynamics of dinophysistoxins and pectenotoxins between blue mussel and common cockle: a phenomenon originating from the complex toxin profile of Dinophysis acuta.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2004-08-01

    Different toxin profiles of dinophysistoxins and pectenotoxins have been reported before between blue mussel and other bivalve species, such as common cockle, razor clam, clams, etc. Comparison of toxins present in plankton in mussel growing areas and in cockle growing areas, respectively, showed there was no particular incidence of dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX2) in plankton from mussel growing areas that could account for the higher percentage of DTX2 in relation to okadaic acid (OA) found in mussels; or of pectenotoxin-2 in cockle growing areas that could explain the higher levels of pectenotoxin-2 seco acid (PTX2sa) found in cockles. A detoxification experiment between mussels and cockles showed the higher percentage of DTX2 in mussels was due to slower elimination of this toxin in relation to OA; while the lower levels of PTX2sa were due to quicker elimination by mussels than by cockles. The slower elimination of DTX2 explains why in late summer and autumn this toxin gradually accumulate in mussels throughout the entire coast, while other bivalves species have a lower percentage of DTX2, very close to the 3:2 OA:DTX2 ratio found in natural plankton assemblages when Dinophysis acuta predominates. In the clam Donax spp., DTX2 concentration also tends to build up in relation to OA, this being made up predominantly by free DTX2 while esterified DTX2 is found only in trace levels (similarly to what is found in mussel for DTX2). We hypothesise that the esterified forms of OA and DTX2 are more easily eliminated than the free forms, by all shellfish species. The free forms are more difficult to eliminate. This is particularly notable in these two species that present a very low conversion of DTX2 into acyl esters. The high pool of free toxins is partially responsible for these two species (mussel and Donax clams) being the sentinel species for DSP contamination throughout the Portuguese coast. Esters of OA and DTX2 were found in a plankton sample where D. acuta was the

  10. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  11. PLASMA SPHINGOSINE 1-PHOSPHATE IS A MAJOR CHEMOATTRACTANT THAT DIRECTS EGRESS OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM PROGENITOR CELLS FROM BONE MARROW AND ITS LEVEL IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD INCREASES DURING MOBILIZATION DUE TO ACTIVATION OF COMPLEMENT CASCADE/MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Lee, HakMo; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Wan, Wu; Marlicz, Wojciech; Laughlin, Mary J.; Kucia, Magda; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Ratajczak, Janina

    2010-01-01

    Complement cascade (CC) becomes activated and its cleavage fragments play a crucial role in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Here, we sought to determine which major chemottractant present in peripheral blood (PB) is responsible for the egress of HSPCs from the BM. We noticed that normal and mobilized plasma strongly chemoattracts HSPCs in a stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-independent manner because i) plasma SDF-1 level does not correlate with mobilization efficiency, ii) the chemotactic plasma gradient is not affected in the presence of AMD3100, and iii) it is resistant to denaturation by heat. Surprisingly, the observed loss of plasma chemotactic activity after charcoal stripping suggested involvement of bioactive lipids and we focused on sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), a known chemoattracant of HSPCs. We found that S1P i) creates in plasma a continuously present gradient for BM-residing HSPCs, ii) is at physiologically relevant concentrations a chemoattractant several magnitudes stronger than SDF-1, and iii) its plasma level increases during mobilization due to CC activation and the interaction of membrane attack complex (MAC) with erythrocytes that are a major reservoir of S1P. We conclude and propose a new paradigm that S1P is a crucial chemoattractant for BM-residing HSPCs and that CC via MAC induces release of S1P from erythrocytes for optimal egress/mobilization of HSPCs. PMID:20357827

  12. Identification of functional progenitor cells in the pulmonary vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Yuan, Jason X. -J.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary vasculature comprises a complex network of branching arteries and veins all functioning to reoxygenate the blood for circulation around the body. The cell types of the pulmonary artery are able to respond to changes in oxygen tension in order to match ventilation to perfusion. Stem and progenitor cells in the pulmonary vasculature are also involved, be it in angiogenesis, endothelial dysfunction or formation of vascular lesions. Stem and progenitor cells may be circulating around the body, residing in the pulmonary artery wall or stimulated for release from a central niche like the bone marrow and home to the pulmonary vasculature along a chemotactic gradient. There may currently be some controversy over the pathogenic versus therapeutic roles of stem and progenitor cells and, indeed, it is likely both chains of evidence are correct due to the specific influence of the immediate environmental niche a progenitor cell may be in. Due to their great plasticity and a lack of specific markers for stem and progenitor cells, they can be difficult to precisely identify. This review discusses the methodological approaches used to validate the presence of and subtype of progenitors cells in the pulmonary vasculature while putting it in context of the current knowledge of the therapeutic and pathogenic roles for such progenitor cells. PMID:22558524

  13. A unique hetero-hexadecameric architecture displayed by the Escherichia coli O157 PaaA2-ParE2 antitoxin-toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Yann G-J; Jové, Thomas; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Geerts, Lieselotte; De Kerpel, Maia; Lah, Jurij; De Greve, Henri; Van Melderen, Laurence; Loris, Remy

    2016-04-24

    Many bacterial pathogens modulate their metabolic activity, virulence and pathogenicity through so-called "toxin-antitoxin" (TA) modules. The genome of the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157 contains two three-component TA modules related to the known parDE module. Here, we show that the toxin EcParE2 maps in a branch of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily that is distinct from the branches that contain verified gyrase and ribosome inhibitors. The structure of EcParE2 closely resembles that of Caulobacter crescentus ParE but shows a distinct pattern of conserved surface residues, in agreement with its apparent inability to interact with GyrA. The antitoxin EcPaaA2 is characterized by two α-helices (H1 and H2) that serve as molecular recognition elements to wrap itself around EcParE2. Both EcPaaA2 H1 and H2 are required to sustain a high-affinity interaction with EcParE2 and for the inhibition of EcParE2-mediated killing in vivo. Furthermore, evidence demonstrates that EcPaaA2 H2, but not H1, determines specificity for EcParE2. The initially formed EcPaaA2-EcParE2 heterodimer then assembles into a hetero-hexadecamer, which is stable in solution and is formed in a highly cooperative manner. Together these findings provide novel data on quaternary structure, TA interactions and activity of a hitherto poorly characterized family of TA modules.

  14. The Enhancer of Split Complex and Adjacent Genes in the 96f Region of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Required for Segregation of Neural and Epidermal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schrons, H.; Knust, E.; Campos-Ortega, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] of Drosophila melanogaster is located in the 96F region of the third chromosome and comprises at least seven structurally related genes, HLH-mδ, HLH-mγ, HLH-mβ, HLH-m3, HLH-m5, HLH-m7 and E(spl). The functions of these genes are required during early neurogenesis to give neuroectodermal cells access to the epidermal pathway of development. Another gene in the 96F region, namely groucho, is also required for this process. However, groucho is not structurally related to, and appears to act independently of, the genes of the E(spl)-C; the possibility is discussed that groucho acts upstream to the E(spl)-C genes. Indirect evidence suggests that a neighboring transcription unit (m4) may also take part in the process. Of all these genes, only gro is essential; m4 is a dispensable gene, the deletion of which does not produce detectable morphogenetic abnormalities, and the genes of the E(spl)-C are to some extent redundant and can partially substitute for each other. This redundancy is probably due to the fact that the seven genes of the E(spl)-C encode highly conserved putative DNA-binding proteins of the bHLH family. The genes of the complex are interspersed among other genes which appear to be unrelated to the neuroepidermal lineage dichotomy. PMID:1427039

  15. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon.

  16. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox - larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography - guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy - ...

  17. Chorea caused by toxins.

    PubMed

    Miyasaki, Janis M

    2011-01-01

    Chorea is uncommonly caused by toxins. Anecdotal evidence from cases of toxin-induced chorea assists in our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases associated with chorea. Beginning in medieval Europe with ergotism and the "fire that twisted people," spanning to crack dancing in contemporary times and the coexistence of alcohol abuse with chorea, toxins may exert direct effects to enhance mesolimbic dopamine transmission or indirect effects through gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation. The following chapter will discuss toxins associated with chorea and the presumed pathophysiology underlying the movement disorders in these case series. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  19. Defense against toxin weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide basic information on biological toxins to military leaders and health-care providers at all levels to help them make informed decisions on protecting their troops from toxins. Much of the information contained herein will also be of interest to individuals charged with countering domestic and international terrorism. We typically fear what we do not understand.

  20. Myelin Proteolipid Protein Complexes with αv Integrin and AMPA Receptors In Vivo and Regulates AMPA-Dependent Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Migration through the Modulation of Cell-Surface GluR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Saul, Katherine E.; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, stimulation of ionotropic AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors on cultured oligodendrocyte cells induced the formation of a signaling complex that includes the AMPA receptor, integrins, calcium-binding proteins, and, surprisingly, the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). AMPA stimulation of cultured oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) also caused an increase in OPC migration. The current studies focused primarily on the formation of the PLP–αv integrin–AMPA receptor complex in vivo and whether complex formation impacts OPC migration in the brain. We found that in wild-type cerebellum, PLP associates with αv integrin and the calcium-impermeable GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, but in mice lacking PLP, αv integrin did not associate with GluR2. Live imaging studies of OPC migration in ex vivo cerebellar slices demonstrated altered OPC migratory responses to neurotransmitter stimulation in the absence of PLP and GluR2 or when αv integrin levels were reduced. Chemotaxis assays of purified OPCs revealed that AMPA stimulation was neither attractive nor repulsive but clearly increased the migration rate of wild-type but not PLP null OPCs. AMPA receptor stimulation of wild-type OPCs caused decreased cell-surface expression of the GluR2 AMPA receptor subunit and increased intracellular Ca2+ signaling, whereas PLP null OPCs did not reduce GluR2 at the cell surface or increase Ca2+ signaling in response to AMPA treatment. Together, these studies demonstrate that PLP is critical for OPC responses to glutamate signaling and has important implications for OPC responses when levels of glutamate are high in the extracellular space, such as following demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After demyelination, such as occurs in multiple sclerosis, remyelination of axons is often incomplete, leading to loss of neuronal function and clinical disability. Remyelination may fail because oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not completely migrate into

  1. A rational nomenclature for naming peptide toxins from spiders and other venomous animals.

    PubMed

    King, Glenn F; Gentz, Margaret C; Escoubas, Pierre; Nicholson, Graham M

    2008-08-01

    Molecular toxinology research was initially driven by an interest in the small subset of animal toxins that are lethal to humans. However, the realization that many venomous creatures possess a complex repertoire of bioactive peptide toxins with potential pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications has led to an explosion in the number of new peptide toxins being discovered and characterized. Unfortunately, this increased awareness of peptide-toxin diversity has not been matched by the development of a generic nomenclature that enables these toxins to be rationally classified, catalogued, and compared. In this article, we introduce a rational nomenclature that can be applied to the naming of peptide toxins from spiders and other venomous animals.

  2. Protection against Shiga Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Dyve Lingelem, Anne Berit; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxins consist of an A-moiety and five B-moieties able to bind the neutral glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) on the cell surface. To intoxicate cells efficiently, the toxin A-moiety has to be cleaved by furin and transported retrogradely to the Golgi apparatus and to the endoplasmic reticulum. The enzymatically active part of the A-moiety is then translocated to the cytosol, where it inhibits protein synthesis and in some cell types induces apoptosis. Protection of cells can be provided either by inhibiting binding of the toxin to cells or by interfering with any of the subsequent steps required for its toxic effect. In this article we provide a brief overview of the interaction of Shiga toxins with cells, describe some compounds and conditions found to protect cells against Shiga toxins, and discuss whether they might also provide protection in animals and humans. PMID:28165371

  3. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    The objective of this research grant was to develop an approach for labeling progenitor cells, specifically those that we had identified as being able to replace ischemic heart cells, so that the distribution could be followed non-invasively. In addition, the research was aimed at determining whether administration of progenitor cells resulted in improved myocardial perfusion and function. The efficiency and toxicity of radiolabeling of progenitor cells was to be evaluated. For the proposed clinical protocol, subjects with end-stage ischemic coronary artery disease were to undergo a screening cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan using N-13 ammonia to delineate myocardial perfusion and function. If they qualified based on their PET scan, they would undergo an in-hospital protocol whereby CD34+ cells were stimulated by the administration of granulocytes-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD34+ cells would then be isolated by apharesis, and labeled with indium-111 oxine. Cells were to be re-infused and subjects were to undergo single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning to evaluate uptake and distribution of labeled progenitor cells. Three months after administration of progenitor cells, a cardiac PET scan was to be repeated to evaluate changes in myocardial perfusion and/or function. Indium oxine is a radiopharmaceutical for labeling of autologous lymphocytes. Indium-111 (In-111) decays by electron capture with a t{sub ½} of 67.2 hours (2.8 days). Indium forms a saturated complex that is neutral, lipid soluble, and permeates the cell membrane. Within the cell, the indium-oxyquinolone complex labels via indium intracellular chelation. Following leukocyte labeling, ~77% of the In-111 is incorporated in the cell pellet. The presence of red cells and /or plasma reduces the labeling efficacy. Therefore, the product needed to be washed to eliminate plasma proteins. This repeated washing can damage cells. The CD34 selected product was a 90

  4. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengfang; Wang, Jingying; Guo, Chaoshe; Chang, Weiting; Zhuang, Jian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Xue

    2017-01-24

    The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2(+)) progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV) to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2(+) progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2(+) progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2(+) progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  5. Understanding malarial toxins.

    PubMed

    Starkl Renar, Katarina; Iskra, Jernej; Križaj, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Recognized since antiquity, malaria is one of the most infamous and widespread infectious diseases in humans and, although the death rate during the last century has been diminishing, it still accounts for more than a half million deaths annually. It is caused by the Plasmodium parasite and typical symptoms include fever, shivering, headache, diaphoresis and nausea, all resulting from an excessive inflammatory response induced by malarial toxins released into the victim's bloodstream. These toxins are hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols. The former is the final product of the parasite's detoxification of haeme, a by-product of haemoglobin catabolism, while the latter anchor proteins to the Plasmodium cell surface or occur as free molecules. Currently, only two groups of antimalarial toxin drugs exist on the market, quinolines and artemisinins. As we describe, they both target biosynthesis of hemozoin. Other substances, currently in various phases of clinical trials, are directed towards biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, formation of hemozoin, or attenuation of the inflammatory response of the patient. Among the innovative approaches to alleviating the effects of malarial toxins, is the development of antimalarial toxin vaccines. In this review the most important lessons learned from the use of treatments directed against the action of malarial toxins in antimalarial therapy are emphasized and the most relevant and promising directions for future research in obtaining novel antimalarial agents acting on malarial toxins are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. About lipids and toxins.

    PubMed

    Reig, Núria; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2006-10-09

    Many mono or multicellular organisms secrete soluble proteins, referred to as protein toxins, which alter the behavior of foreign, or target cells, possibly leading to their death. These toxins affect either the cell membrane by forming pores or modifying lipids, or some intracellular target. To reach this target, they must cross one of the cellular membranes, generally that of an intracellular organelle. As described in this minireview, lipids play crucial roles in the intoxication process of most if not all toxins, by allowing/promoting binding, endocytosis, trafficking and/or translocation into the cytoplasm.

  7. Scorpion-Toxin Mimics of CD4 in Complex with Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120: Crystal Structures, Molecular Mimicry, and Neutralization Breadth

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Stricher, Francois; Martin, Loic; Decker, Julie M.; Majeed, Shahzad; Barthe, Phillippe; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Robinson, James; Roumestand, Christian; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Shaw, George M.; Vita, Claudio; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-07-19

    The binding surface on CD4 for the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein has been transplanted previously onto a scorpion-toxin scaffold. Here, we use X-ray crystallography to characterize atomic-level details of gp120 with this transplant, CD4M33. Despite known envelope flexibility, the conformation of gp120 induced by CD4M33 was so similar to that induced by CD4 that localized measures were required to distinguish ligand-induced differences from lattice variation. To investigate relationships between structure, function, and mimicry, an F23 analog of CD4M33 was devised. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed F23 to be a better molecular mimic of CD4 than CD4M33. F23 also showed increased neutralization breadth, against diverse isolates of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVcpz. Our results lend insight into the stability of the CD4 bound conformation of gp120, define measures that quantify molecular mimicry as a function of evolutionary distance, and suggest how such evaluations might be useful in developing mimetic antagonists with increased neutralization breadth.

  8. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against Disparate Epitopes on Ricin Toxin's Enzymatic Subunit Interfere with Intracellular Toxin Transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; O'Hara, Joanne M; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2016-03-07

    Ricin is a member of the A-B family of bacterial and plant toxins that exploit retrograde trafficking to the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a means to deliver their cytotoxic enzymatic subunits into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In this study we demonstrate that R70 and SyH7, two well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against distinct epitopes on the surface of ricin's enzymatic subunit (RTA), interfere with toxin transport from the plasma membrane to the trans Golgi network. Toxin-mAb complexes formed on the cell surface delayed ricin's egress from EEA-1(+) and Rab7(+) vesicles and enhanced toxin accumulation in LAMP-1(+) vesicles, suggesting the complexes were destined for degradation in lysosomes. Three other RTA-specific neutralizing mAbs against different epitopes were similar to R70 and SyH7 in terms of their effects on ricin retrograde transport. We conclude that interference with toxin retrograde transport may be a hallmark of toxin-neutralizing antibodies directed against disparate epitopes on RTA.

  9. Circulating Progenitor Cells and Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a disease of unknown origins that involves tissue ischemia and fibrosis in the skin and internal organs such as the lungs. The tissue ischemia is due to a lack of functional blood vessels and an inability to form new blood vessels. Bone marrow–derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells play a key role in blood vessel repair and neovascularization. Scleroderma patients appear to have defects in the number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. Scleroderma patients also develop fibrotic lesions, possibly as the result of tissue ischemia. Fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that differentiate from a different pool of bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells seem to be involved in this process. Manipulating the production, function, and differentiation of circulating progenitor cells represents an exciting new possibility for treating scleroderma. PMID:18638425

  10. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    PubMed

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required.

  11. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  12. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  13. ArachnoServer: a database of protein toxins from spiders

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venomous animals incapacitate their prey using complex venoms that can contain hundreds of unique protein toxins. The realisation that many of these toxins may have pharmaceutical and insecticidal potential due to their remarkable potency and selectivity against target receptors has led to an explosion in the number of new toxins being discovered and characterised. From an evolutionary perspective, spiders are the most successful venomous animals and they maintain by far the largest pool of toxic peptides. However, at present, there are no databases dedicated to spider toxins and hence it is difficult to realise their full potential as drugs, insecticides, and pharmacological probes. Description We have developed ArachnoServer, a manually curated database that provides detailed information about proteinaceous toxins from spiders. Key features of ArachnoServer include a new molecular target ontology designed especially for venom toxins, the most up-to-date taxonomic information available, and a powerful advanced search interface. Toxin information can be browsed through dynamic trees, and each toxin has a dedicated page summarising all available information about its sequence, structure, and biological activity. ArachnoServer currently manages 567 protein sequences, 334 nucleic acid sequences, and 51 protein structures. Conclusion ArachnoServer provides a single source of high-quality information about proteinaceous spider toxins that will be an invaluable resource for pharmacologists, neuroscientists, toxinologists, medicinal chemists, ion channel scientists, clinicians, and structural biologists. ArachnoServer is available online at http://www.arachnoserver.org. PMID:19674480

  14. Lipid requirements for entry of protein toxins into cells.

    PubMed

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Bergan, Jonas; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Skotland, Tore

    2014-04-01

    The plant toxin ricin and the bacterial toxin Shiga toxin both belong to a group of protein toxins having one moiety that binds to the cell surface, and another, enzymatically active moiety, that enters the cytosol and inhibits protein synthesis by inactivating ribosomes. Both toxins travel all the way from the cell surface to endosomes, the Golgi apparatus and the ER before the ribosome-inactivating moiety enters the cytosol. Shiga toxin binds to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface and is therefore dependent on this lipid for transport into the cells, whereas ricin binds both glycoproteins and glycolipids with terminal galactose. The different steps of transport used by these toxins have specific requirements for lipid species, and with the recent developments in mass spectrometry analysis of lipids and microscopical and biochemical dissection of transport in cells, we are starting to see the complexity of endocytosis and intracellular transport. In this article we describe lipid requirements and the consequences of lipid changes for the entry and intoxication with ricin and Shiga toxin. These toxins can be a threat to human health, but can also be exploited for diagnosis and therapy, and have proven valuable as tools to study intracellular transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Indicators: Algal Toxins (microcystin)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Algal toxins are toxic substances released by some types of algae (phytoplankton) when they are present in large quantities (blooms) and decay or degrade. High nutrient levels and warm temperatures often result in favorable conditions for algae blooms.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Wallpaper May Breed Toxins

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxins are likely to be located on fungal spores, but we also demonstrated that part of the ... News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Indoor Air Pollution Molds About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  18. Highlights in the knowledge of brown spider toxins.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2017-01-01

    Brown spiders are venomous arthropods that use their venom for predation and defense. In humans, bites of these animals provoke injuries including dermonecrosis with gravitational spread of lesions, hematological abnormalities and impaired renal function. The signs and symptoms observed following a brown spider bite are called loxoscelism. Brown spider venom is a complex mixture of toxins enriched in low molecular mass proteins (4-40 kDa). Characterization of the venom confirmed the presence of three highly expressed protein classes: phospholipases D, metalloproteases (astacins) and insecticidal peptides (knottins). Recently, toxins with low levels of expression have also been found in Loxosceles venom, such as serine proteases, protease inhibitors (serpins), hyaluronidases, allergen-like toxins and histamine-releasing factors. The toxin belonging to the phospholipase-D family (also known as the dermonecrotic toxin) is the most studied class of brown spider toxins. This class of toxins single-handedly can induce inflammatory response, dermonecrosis, hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and renal failure. The functional role of the hyaluronidase toxin as a spreading factor in loxoscelism has also been demonstrated. However, the biological characterization of other toxins remains unclear and the mechanism by which Loxosceles toxins exert their noxious effects is yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into brown spider venom toxins and toxicology, including a description of historical data already available in the literature. In this review article, the identification processes of novel Loxosceles toxins by molecular biology and proteomic approaches, their biological characterization and structural description based on x-ray crystallography and putative biotechnological uses are described along with the future perspectives in this field.

  19. [Natural toxin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    Natural toxin poisoning often occurs when amateur who has no expert knowledge of food collects and cooks the wrong material. In many cases, the symptoms of natural toxin poisoning are mild and the patients recover from illness within a day. However, if the patients have respiratory or neurological symptoms after several hours of intake, the patients must go to hospital immediately. Mushroom poisoning is often reported and puffer fish poisoning is sometimes reported in Japan.

  20. Botulinum type A toxin complex for the relief of upper back myofascial pain syndrome: how do fixed-location injections compare with trigger point-focused injections?

    PubMed

    Benecke, Reiner; Heinze, Axel; Reichel, Gerhard; Hefter, Harald; Göbel, Hartmut

    2011-11-01

    This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week, multicenter study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of fixed location injections of botulinum type A toxin (BoNT-A, Dysport) in predetermined injection sites in patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper back. Patients with moderate-to-severe myofascial pain syndrome affecting cervical and/or shoulder muscles (10 trigger points, disease duration 6-24 months) and moderate-to-severe pain intensity were randomized to BoNT-A (N = 81) or saline (N = 72). Patients received treatment into 10 predetermined fixed injection sites in the head, neck, and shoulder (40 units of BoNT-A per site or saline, a total of 400 units of BoNT-A). The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients with mild or no pain at week 5 (responders). Secondary outcomes included changes in pain intensity and the number of pain-free days per week. At week 5, 49% (37/76) of BoNT-A patients and 38% (27/72) of placebo patients had responded to treatment (P = 0.1873). Duration of daily pain was reduced in the BoNT-A group compared with the placebo group from week 5, with statistically significant differences at weeks 9 and 10 (P = 0.04 for both). Treatment was well tolerated. Fixed-location treatment with BoNT-A of patients with upper back myofascial pain syndrome did not lead to a significant improvement of the main target parameter in week 5 after treatment. Only in week 8 were significant differences found. Several secondary parameters, such as physicians' global assessment and patients' global assessment, significantly favored BoNT-A over placebo at weeks 8 and 12. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Snake venom toxins: toxicity and medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Xia, Lixin; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-07-01

    Snake venoms are complex mixtures of small molecules and peptides/proteins, and most of them display certain kinds of bioactivities. They include neurotoxic, cytotoxic, cardiotoxic, myotoxic, and many different enzymatic activities. Snake envenomation is a significant health issue as millions of snakebites are reported annually. A large number of people are injured and die due to snake venom poisoning. However, several fatal snake venom toxins have found potential uses as diagnostic tools, therapeutic agent, or drug leads. In this review, different non-enzymatically active snake venom toxins which have potential therapeutic properties such as antitumor, antimicrobial, anticoagulating, and analgesic activities will be discussed.

  2. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  3. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  4. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  5. Characterization of hematopoietic progenitors from human yolk sacs and embryos.

    PubMed

    Huyhn, A; Dommergues, M; Izac, B; Croisille, L; Katz, A; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1995-12-15

    Hematopoiesis first arises in the extraembryonic yolk sac, and it is generally believed that yolk sac-derived stem cells migrate and seed the fetal liver at approximately week 6 of development in humans. Recently, the identification at day 8.5 to 9 of multipotential stem cells in intraembryonic sites different from the liver suggests that the establishment of hematopoiesis might be more complex than initially believed. In an attempt to understand initial steps of hematopoiesis during human ontogeny, we characterized clonogenic myeloid progenitor cells in human yolk sacs and corresponding embryos at 25 to 50 days of development. Most erythroid colonies derived from the yolk sacs differed from adult marrow-derived progenitors in that they also contained cells of the granulomacrophagic lineage, suggesting that they were pluripotent and exhibited a different response to cytokines. Furthermore, a subclass of nonerythroid progenitors generated very large granulomacrophagic colonies, some of which generated secondary erythroid colonies on replating. Analysis of the distribution of progenitors revealed that in contrast to erythroid progenitors, whose numbers were equally distributed between the yolk sac and the embryo, 80% of the nonerythroid progenitors were found in the embryo at stages II and III. Interestingly, a high proportion of nonerythroid progenitors (including high proliferative potential cells) was present in colony assays initiated with cells remaining after the liver has been removed. These findings were validated in colony assays established with CD34+ cells purified from extraembryonic yolk sacs and intraembryonic tissues. Increased knowledge about the biology of hematopoietic stem cells early in life may help to further understanding of the mechanisms associated with the restriction in proliferative and differentiative potential observed in the adult hematopoietic stem cell compartment.

  6. MyoD-expressing progenitors are essential for skeletal myogenesis and satellite cell development

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William M.; Etemad, Shervin; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Goldhamer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal myogenesis in the embryo is regulated by the coordinated expression of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs). MyoD and Myf-5, which are the primary muscle lineage-determining factors, function in a partially redundant manner to establish muscle progenitor cell identity. Previous diphtheria toxin (DTA)-mediated ablation studies showed that MyoD+ progenitors rescue myogenesis in embryos in which Myf-5-expressing cells were targeted for ablation, raising the possibility that the regulative behavior of distinct, MRF-expressing populations explains the functional compensatory activities of these MRFs. Using MyoDiCre mice, we show that DTA-mediated ablation of MyoD-expressing cells results in the cessation of myogenesis by embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5), as assayed by myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and Myogenin staining. Importantly, MyoDiCre/+;R26DTA/+ embryos exhibited a concomitant loss of Myf-5+ progenitors, indicating that the vast majority of Myf-5+ progenitors express MyoD, a conclusion consistent with immunofluorescence analysis of Myf-5 protein expression in MyoDiCre lineage-labeled embryos. Surprisingly, staining for the paired box transcription factor, Pax7, which functions genetically upstream of MyoD in the trunk and is a marker for fetal myoblasts and satellite cell progenitors, was also lost by E12.5. Specific ablation of differentiating skeletal muscle in ACTA1Cre;R26DTA/+ embryos resulted in comparatively minor effects on MyoD+, Myf-5+ and Pax7+ progenitors, indicating that cell non-autonomous effects are unlikely to explain the rapid loss of myogenic progenitors in MyoDiCre/+;R26DTA/+ embryos. We conclude that the vast majority of myogenic populations transit through a MyoD+ state, and that MyoD+ progenitors are essential for myogenesis and stem cell development. PMID:24055173

  7. Targeted Silencing of Anthrax Toxin Receptors Protects against Anthrax Toxins*

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo, Maria T.; Navarro, Ashley; Arico, Chenoa D.; Li, Junwei; Alkhatib, Omar; Chen, Shan; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax spores can be aerosolized and dispersed as a bioweapon. Current postexposure treatments are inadequate at later stages of infection, when high levels of anthrax toxins are present. Anthrax toxins enter cells via two identified anthrax toxin receptors: tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2). We hypothesized that host cells would be protected from anthrax toxins if anthrax toxin receptor expression was effectively silenced using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Thus, anthrax toxin receptors in mouse and human macrophages were silenced using targeted siRNAs or blocked with specific antibody prior to challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Viability assays were used to assess protection in macrophages treated with specific siRNA or antibody as compared with untreated cells. Silencing CMG2 using targeted siRNAs provided almost complete protection against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cytotoxicity and death in murine and human macrophages. The same results were obtained by prebinding cells with specific antibody prior to treatment with anthrax lethal toxin. In addition, TEM8-targeted siRNAs also offered significant protection against lethal toxin in human macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, silencing CMG2, TEM8, or both receptors in combination was also protective against MEK2 cleavage by lethal toxin or adenylyl cyclase activity by edema toxin in human kidney cells. Thus, anthrax toxin receptor-targeted RNAi has the potential to be developed as a life-saving, postexposure therapy against anthrax. PMID:24742682

  8. Targeted silencing of anthrax toxin receptors protects against anthrax toxins.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Maria T; Navarro, Ashley; Arico, Chenoa D; Li, Junwei; Alkhatib, Omar; Chen, Shan; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-05-30

    Anthrax spores can be aerosolized and dispersed as a bioweapon. Current postexposure treatments are inadequate at later stages of infection, when high levels of anthrax toxins are present. Anthrax toxins enter cells via two identified anthrax toxin receptors: tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2). We hypothesized that host cells would be protected from anthrax toxins if anthrax toxin receptor expression was effectively silenced using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Thus, anthrax toxin receptors in mouse and human macrophages were silenced using targeted siRNAs or blocked with specific antibody prior to challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Viability assays were used to assess protection in macrophages treated with specific siRNA or antibody as compared with untreated cells. Silencing CMG2 using targeted siRNAs provided almost complete protection against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cytotoxicity and death in murine and human macrophages. The same results were obtained by prebinding cells with specific antibody prior to treatment with anthrax lethal toxin. In addition, TEM8-targeted siRNAs also offered significant protection against lethal toxin in human macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, silencing CMG2, TEM8, or both receptors in combination was also protective against MEK2 cleavage by lethal toxin or adenylyl cyclase activity by edema toxin in human kidney cells. Thus, anthrax toxin receptor-targeted RNAi has the potential to be developed as a life-saving, postexposure therapy against anthrax.

  9. [The influence of bacterial toxins on the carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Anna M; Łaniewski, Paweł; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections may constitute an important risk factor of developing cancer disease. Molecular mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to cancer are extremely complex and still remain not fully understood. So far, it is generally accepted that Helicobacter pylori infections are associated with induction of gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Two H. pylori toxins which modulate many cellular functions are VacA and CagA. So far, CagA is the only one known bacterial oncoprotein. However, many other bacteria produce toxins or effector proteins perturbing host cell homeostasis or/and evoking chronic inflammation. Both processes may be associated with tumour formation. Bacterial toxins which interfere, with various host signal transduction pathways, deregulate processes of cell division, proliferation and differentiation and modulate apoptosis. Some toxins cause even direct DNA damage. This review discuss the potential links between action of bacterial toxins and cancer.

  10. Myostatin promotes the terminal differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors.

    PubMed

    Manceau, Marie; Gros, Jérôme; Savage, Kathleen; Thomé, Virginie; McPherron, Alexandra; Paterson, Bruce; Marcelle, Christophe

    2008-03-01

    Myostatin, a TGF-beta family member, is an important regulator of adult muscle size. While extensively studied in vitro, the mechanisms by which this molecule mediates its effect in vivo are poorly understood. We addressed this question using chick and mouse embryos. We show that while myostatin overexpression in chick leads to an exhaustion of the muscle progenitor population that ultimately results in muscle hypotrophy, myostatin loss of function in chick and mouse provokes an expansion of this population. Our data demonstrate that myostatin acts in vivo to regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors by promoting their terminal differentiation through the activation of p21 and MyoD. Previous studies have suggested that myostatin imposes quiescence on muscle progenitors. Our data suggest that myostatin's effect on muscle progenitors is more complex than previously realized and is likely to be context-dependent. We propose a novel model for myostatin mode of action in vivo, in which myostatin affects the balance between proliferation and differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors by enhancing their differentiation.

  11. Myostatin promotes the terminal differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Marie; Gros, Jérôme; Savage, Kathleen; Thomé, Virginie; McPherron, Alexandra; Paterson, Bruce; Marcelle, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Myostatin, a TGF-β family member, is an important regulator of adult muscle size. While extensively studied in vitro, the mechanisms by which this molecule mediates its effect in vivo are poorly understood. We addressed this question using chick and mouse embryos. We show that while myostatin overexpression in chick leads to an exhaustion of the muscle progenitor population that ultimately results in muscle hypotrophy, myostatin loss of function in chick and mouse provokes an expansion of this population. Our data demonstrate that myostatin acts in vivo to regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors by promoting their terminal differentiation through the activation of p21 and MyoD. Previous studies have suggested that myostatin imposes quiescence on muscle progenitors. Our data suggest that myostatin’s effect on muscle progenitors is more complex than previously realized and is likely to be context-dependent. We propose a novel model for myostatin mode of action in vivo, in which myostatin affects the balance between proliferation and differentiation of embryonic muscle progenitors by enhancing their differentiation. PMID:18316481

  12. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  13. Naturally occurring food toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Laurie C; Matulka, Ray A; Burdock, George A

    2010-09-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States.

  14. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  15. Anti-Idiotype Probes for Toxin Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-13

    enterotoxins A and B, the exfoliative toxins A and B and toxic shock syndrome syndrome toxin-1 to activate macrophages. All the toxins tested had the...Staphylococcal enterotoxin A, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and both exfoliative toxins triggered C3HeB/FeJ macrophages to secrete tumor necrosis...toxins A and B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 to activate macrophages. All the toxins tested had the potential to stimulate tumoricidal activity in

  16. In vitro culture of stress erythroid progenitors identifies distinct progenitor populations and analogous human progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jie; Wu, Dai-Chen; Chen, Yuanting

    2015-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia induces a systemic response designed to increase oxygen delivery to tissues. One component of this response is increased erythropoiesis. Steady-state erythropoiesis is primarily homeostatic, producing new erythrocytes to replace old erythrocytes removed from circulation by the spleen. In response to anemia, the situation is different. New erythrocytes must be rapidly made to increase hemoglobin levels. At these times, stress erythropoiesis predominates. Stress erythropoiesis is best characterized in the mouse, where it is extramedullary and utilizes progenitors and signals that are distinct from steady-state erythropoiesis. In this report, we use an in vitro culture system that recapitulates the in vivo development of stress erythroid progenitors. We identify cell-surface markers that delineate a series of stress erythroid progenitors with increasing maturity. In addition, we use this in vitro culture system to expand human stress erythroid progenitor cells that express analogous cell-surface markers. Consistent with previous suggestions that human stress erythropoiesis is similar to fetal erythropoiesis, we demonstrate that human stress erythroid progenitors express fetal hemoglobin upon differentiation. These data demonstrate that similar to murine bone marrow, human bone marrow contains cells that can generate BMP4-dependent stress erythroid burst-forming units when cultured under stress erythropoiesis conditions. PMID:25608563

  17. Short Toxin-like Proteins Abound in Cnidaria Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Linial, Itai; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone) and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:23202321

  18. Short toxin-like proteins abound in Cnidaria genomes.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Linial, Itai; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2012-11-16

    Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone) and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem.

  19. Multiplex detection of protein toxins using MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry: application in unambiguous toxin detection from bioaerosol.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Bhoj; Kamboj, Dev Vrat

    2012-12-04

    Protein toxins, such as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shiga toxin (STX), and plant toxin ricin, are involved in a number of diseases and are considered as potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. From a bioterrorism and warfare perspective, these agents are likely to cause maximum damage to a civilian or military population through an inhalational route of exposure and aerosol is considered the envisaged mode of delivery. Unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol is of paramount importance, both for bringing mitigation protocols into operation and for implementation of effective medical countermeasures, in case a "biological cloud" is seen over a population. A multiplex, unambiguous, and qualitative detection of protein toxins is reported here using tandem mass spectrometry with MALDI-TOF-TOF. The methodology involving simple sample processing steps was demonstrated to identify toxins (ETX, Clostridium perfringes phospholipase C, and SEB) from blind spiked samples. The novel directed search approach using a list of unique peptides was used to identify toxins from a complex protein mixture. The bioinformatic analysis of seven protein toxins for elucidation of unique peptides with conservation status across all known sequences provides a high confidence for detecting toxins originating from any geographical location and source organism. Use of tandem MS data with peptide sequence information increases the specificity of the method. A prototype for generation of aerosol using a nebulizer and collection using a cyclone collector was used to provide a proof of concept for unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol using precursor directed tandem mass spectrometry combined with protein database searching. ETX prototoxin could be detected from aerosol at 0.2 ppb concentration in aerosol.

  20. Marine Toxins: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    Oceans provide enormous and diverse space for marine life. Invertebrates are conspicuous inhabitants in certain zones such as the intertidal; many are soft-bodied, relatively immobile and lack obvious physical defenses. These animals frequently have evolved chemical defenses against predators and overgrowth by fouling organisms. Marine animals may accumulate and use a variety of toxins from prey organisms and from symbiotic microorganisms for their own purposes. Thus, toxic animals are particularly abundant in the oceans. The toxins vary from small molecules to high molecular weight proteins and display unique chemical and biological features of scientific interest. Many of these substances can serve as useful research tools or molecular models for the design of new drugs and pesticides. This chapter provides an initial survey of these toxins and their salient properties.

  1. Transduction of the scorpion toxin maurocalcine into cells. Evidence that the toxin crosses the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Estève, Eric; Mabrouk, Kamel; Dupuis, Alain; Smida-Rezgui, Sophia; Altafaj, Xavier; Grunwald, Didier; Platel, Jean-Claude; Andreotti, Nicolas; Marty, Isabelle; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33 amino acid residue peptide toxin isolated from the scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. External application of MCa to cultured myotubes is known to produce Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. MCa binds directly to the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor, an intracellular channel target of the endoplasmic reticulum, and induces long-lasting channel openings in a mode of smaller conductance. Here, we investigated the way MCa proceeds to cross biological membranes in order to reach its target. A biotinylated derivative of MCa was produced (MCab) and complexed with a fluorescent indicator (streptavidine-cyanine 3) in order to follow the cell penetration of the toxin. The toxin complex efficiently penetrated in various cell types without requiring metabolic energy (low temperature) or implicating an endocytosis mechanism. MCa appeared to share the same features as the so-called Cell-Penetrating Peptides (CPP). Our results provide evidence that MCa has the ability to act as a molecular carrier and to cross cell membranes in a rapid manner (1–2 min) making this toxin the first demonstrated example of a scorpion toxin that translocates into cells. PMID:15653689

  2. Polymyositis after ciguatera toxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Stommel, E W; Parsonnet, J; Jenkyn, L R

    1991-08-01

    Biopsy-proved polymyositis subsequently developed in two patients who were severely poisoned by ciguatera fish toxin. Ciguatera toxin may have several mechanisms of action and may represent more than one toxin. The patients' clinical courses and the unlikelihood of coincidence of contracting both diseases suggested to us a causal relationship. Although we cannot prove this relationship, we suggest a mechanism by which the toxin predisposed the muscle to inflammation.

  3. [Toxins as a biological weapon].

    PubMed

    Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    The criteria for recognizing a chemical compound for the toxin are vague and gave it the possibility of inclusion in this group a number of biological agents. Toxins list is extensive, but the interest is focused on bacterial toxins, poisons derived from snake venoms, algae and plant proteins, and small molecules. Particular attention is focused on the so-called "sea" toxins, which include tetrodotoxin, brevetoxin and saxitoxin. This indicates the search for a new hitherto unknown potential bioterrorist threats. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  4. Toxins of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2002-01-01

    Mycotoxins are low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites of fungi. The most significant mycotoxins are contaminants of agricultural commodities, foods and feeds. Fungi that produce these toxins do so both prior to harvest and during storage. Although contamination of commodities by toxigenic fungi occurs frequently in areas with a hot and humid climate (i.e. conditions favorable for fungal growth), they can also be found in temperate conditions. Production of mycotoxins is dependent upon the type of producing fungus and environmental conditions such as the substrate, water activity (moisture and relative humidity), duration of exposure to stress conditions and microbial, insect or other animal interactions. Although outbreaks of mycotoxicoses in humans have been documented, several of these have not been well characterized, neither has a direct correlation between the mycotoxin and resulting toxic effect been well established in vivo. Even though the specific modes of action of most of the toxins are not well established, acute and chronic effects in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including humans have been reported. The toxicity of the mycotoxins varies considerably with the toxin, the animal species exposed to it, and the extent of exposure, age and nutritional status. Most of the toxic effects of mycotoxins are limited to specific organs, but several mycotoxins affect many organs. Induction of cancer by some mycotoxins is a major concern as a chronic effect of these toxins. It is nearly impossible to eliminate mycotoxins from the foods and feed in spite of the regulatory efforts at the national and international levels to remove the contaminated commodities. This is because mycotoxins are highly stable compounds, the producing fungi are ubiquitous, and food contamination can occur both before and after harvest. Nevertheless, good farm management practices and adequate storage facilities minimize the toxin contamination problems. Current research is

  5. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  6. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  7. Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions Underlie Some Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Wong, Victor W.; Rennert, Robert C.; Davis, Christopher R.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are integral to tissue homeostasis and repair. They contribute to health through their ability to self-renew and commit to specialized effector cells. Recently, defects in a variety of progenitor cell populations have been described in both preclinical and human diabetes. These deficits affect multiple aspects of stem cell biology, including quiescence, renewal, and differentiation, as well as homing, cytokine production, and neovascularization, through mechanisms that are still unclear. More important, stem cell aberrations resulting from diabetes have direct implications on tissue function and seem to persist even after return to normoglycemia. Understanding how diabetes alters stem cell signaling and homeostasis is critical for understanding the complex pathophysiology of many diabetic complications. Moreover, the success of cell-based therapies will depend on a more comprehensive understanding of these deficiencies. This review has three goals: to analyze stem cell pathways dysregulated during diabetes, to highlight the effects of hyperglycemic memory on stem cells, and to define ways of using stem cell therapy to overcome diabetic complications. PMID:26079815

  8. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  9. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  10. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  11. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  12. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  13. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  14. Autoproteolytic activation of bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-05-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  15. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX) and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins. PMID:22069620

  16. Polypeptide toxins from animal venoms.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergey A

    2007-01-01

    In the course of evolution, venomous animals developed highly specialized venomous systems that provided for drastic increase in hunting and defense efficiency. Venoms of a vast number of animal species represent complex mixtures of compounds such as ions, biogenic amines, polyamines, polypeptide neurotoxins, cytolytic peptides, enzymes, etc. that exert different functions. Natural toxins are sequentially variable molecules that are very stable structurally and produce pronounced biological effects on molecular targets. High activity made them very attractive in terms of novel structure discovery and characterization. In the present review we draw attention to the structure of polypeptide molecules preferably in the 2-12 kDa molecular mass range produced by various venomous animals that were published in patent literature. The structures were reviewed on the basis of functional relation to molecular targets. We also compared the sequence information from patents with Uniprot and other protein databanks to define structures that were patented but missing from the public databases.

  17. SVM-Based Prediction of Propeptide Cleavage Sites in Spider Toxins Identifies Toxin Innovation in an Australian Tarantula

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Emily S. W.; Hardy, Margaret C.; Wood, David; Bailey, Timothy; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    Spider neurotoxins are commonly used as pharmacological tools and are a popular source of novel compounds with therapeutic and agrochemical potential. Since venom peptides are inherently toxic, the host spider must employ strategies to avoid adverse effects prior to venom use. It is partly for this reason that most spider toxins encode a protective proregion that upon enzymatic cleavage is excised from the mature peptide. In order to identify the mature toxin sequence directly from toxin transcripts, without resorting to protein sequencing, the propeptide cleavage site in the toxin precursor must be predicted bioinformatically. We evaluated different machine learning strategies (support vector machines, hidden Markov model and decision tree) and developed an algorithm (SpiderP) for prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins. Our strategy uses a support vector machine (SVM) framework that combines both local and global sequence information. Our method is superior or comparable to current tools for prediction of propeptide sequences in spider toxins. Evaluation of the SVM method on an independent test set of known toxin sequences yielded 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, we sequenced five novel peptides (not used to train the final predictor) from the venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes to test the accuracy of the predictor and found 80% sensitivity and 99.6% 8-mer specificity. Finally, we used the predictor together with homology information to predict and characterize seven groups of novel toxins from the deeply sequenced venom gland transcriptome of S. plumipes, which revealed structural complexity and innovations in the evolution of the toxins. The precursor prediction tool (SpiderP) is freely available on ArachnoServer (http://www.arachnoserver.org/spiderP.html), a web portal to a comprehensive relational database of spider toxins. All training data, test data, and scripts used are available from the Spider

  18. SVM-based prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins identifies toxin innovation in an Australian tarantula.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Hardy, Margaret C; Wood, David; Bailey, Timothy; King, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Spider neurotoxins are commonly used as pharmacological tools and are a popular source of novel compounds with therapeutic and agrochemical potential. Since venom peptides are inherently toxic, the host spider must employ strategies to avoid adverse effects prior to venom use. It is partly for this reason that most spider toxins encode a protective proregion that upon enzymatic cleavage is excised from the mature peptide. In order to identify the mature toxin sequence directly from toxin transcripts, without resorting to protein sequencing, the propeptide cleavage site in the toxin precursor must be predicted bioinformatically. We evaluated different machine learning strategies (support vector machines, hidden Markov model and decision tree) and developed an algorithm (SpiderP) for prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins. Our strategy uses a support vector machine (SVM) framework that combines both local and global sequence information. Our method is superior or comparable to current tools for prediction of propeptide sequences in spider toxins. Evaluation of the SVM method on an independent test set of known toxin sequences yielded 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, we sequenced five novel peptides (not used to train the final predictor) from the venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes to test the accuracy of the predictor and found 80% sensitivity and 99.6% 8-mer specificity. Finally, we used the predictor together with homology information to predict and characterize seven groups of novel toxins from the deeply sequenced venom gland transcriptome of S. plumipes, which revealed structural complexity and innovations in the evolution of the toxins. The precursor prediction tool (SpiderP) is freely available on ArachnoServer (http://www.arachnoserver.org/spiderP.html), a web portal to a comprehensive relational database of spider toxins. All training data, test data, and scripts used are available from the Spider

  19. Occurrence of a unique protein toxin from the Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A; De, P; Dasgupta, S C

    2001-01-01

    A unique (lethal-cardiotoxic-hemorrhagic) protein toxin (Toxin CM55) was isolated and purified from Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom by CM-sephadex ion exchange chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The purified toxin had an SDS-molecular weight of 22 +/- 0.5 kD. UV absorption spectra of Toxin CM55 showed a peak at 280 nm, whereas when excited at 280 nm fluorescence, Toxin CM55 showed an E(max) at 333.4 nm. Toxin CM55 had an LD(50) of 28.28 microg/20 g (i. v.) in albino mice. The cardiotoxic action of the toxin was established on isolated guinea pig/rabbit heart and guinea pig auricle. In rats, Toxin CM55 caused ECG abnormalities including widened QRS complex and monomorphic ventricular tachycardia suggesting that the possible site of action of Toxin CM55 was the ventricle. Toxin CM55 produced significant vasoconstriction on peripheral blood vessels. It produced significant contraction of isolated guinea pig ileum, rat fundus and rat uterus, which was completely antagonised by methysergide. The toxin was found to release a significant amount of serotonin from rabbit platelets. Toxin CM55 produced cutaneous hemorrhage in albino mice, which was also produced in reserpine and p-chloro phenylalanine pretreated animals. Rabbit antiserum was raised against Toxin CM55, which gave prominent bands in immunogel diffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The antiserum provided 2 LD(50) protection against Toxin CM55-induced lethality in mice and also neutralised 3 MHD hemorrhagic dose of the toxin.

  20. Dinophysis Toxins: Causative Organisms, Distribution and Fate in Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Beatriz; Riobó, Pilar; Rodríguez, Francisco; Díaz, Patricio A.; Pizarro, Gemita; Paz, Beatriz; Franco, José M.; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Several Dinophysis species produce diarrhoetic toxins (okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins) and pectenotoxins, and cause gastointestinal illness, Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP), even at low cell densities (<103 cells·L−1). They are the main threat, in terms of days of harvesting bans, to aquaculture in Northern Japan, Chile, and Europe. Toxicity and toxin profiles are very variable, more between strains than species. The distribution of DSP events mirrors that of shellfish production areas that have implemented toxin regulations, otherwise misinterpreted as bacterial or viral contamination. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that most of the toxins produced by Dinophysis are released into the medium, raising questions about the ecological role of extracelular toxins and their potential uptake by shellfish. Shellfish contamination results from a complex balance between food selection, adsorption, species-specific enzymatic transformations, and allometric processes. Highest risk areas are those combining Dinophysis strains with high cell content of okadaates, aquaculture with predominance of mytilids (good accumulators of toxins), and consumers who frequently include mussels in their diet. Regions including pectenotoxins in their regulated phycotoxins will suffer from much longer harvesting bans and from disloyal competition with production areas where these toxins have been deregulated. PMID:24447996

  1. Dinophysis toxins: causative organisms, distribution and fate in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Beatriz; Riobó, Pilar; Rodríguez, Francisco; Díaz, Patricio A; Pizarro, Gemita; Paz, Beatriz; Franco, José M; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-20

    Several Dinophysis species produce diarrhoetic toxins (okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins) and pectenotoxins, and cause gastointestinal illness, Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP), even at low cell densities (<103 cells·L⁻¹). They are the main threat, in terms of days of harvesting bans, to aquaculture in Northern Japan, Chile, and Europe. Toxicity and toxin profiles are very variable, more between strains than species. The distribution of DSP events mirrors that of shellfish production areas that have implemented toxin regulations, otherwise misinterpreted as bacterial or viral contamination. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that most of the toxins produced by Dinophysis are released into the medium, raising questions about the ecological role of extracelular toxins and their potential uptake by shellfish. Shellfish contamination results from a complex balance between food selection, adsorption, species-specific enzymatic transformations, and allometric processes. Highest risk areas are those combining Dinophysis strains with high cell content of okadaates, aquaculture with predominance of mytilids (good accumulators of toxins), and consumers who frequently include mussels in their diet. Regions including pectenotoxins in their regulated phycotoxins will suffer from much longer harvesting bans and from disloyal competition with production areas where these toxins have been deregulated.

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a role in Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT)-induced protein synthesis and proliferation in Swiss 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Oubrahim, Hammou; Wong, Allison; Wilson, Brenda A; Chock, P Boon

    2013-01-25

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a potent mitogen known to activate several signaling pathways via deamidation of a conserved glutamine residue in the α subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins. However, the detailed mechanism behind mitogenic properties of PMT is unknown. Herein, we show that PMT induces protein synthesis, cell migration, and proliferation in serum-starved Swiss 3T3 cells. Concomitantly PMT induces phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K1) and its substrate, ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), in quiescent 3T3 cells. The extent of the phosphorylation is time and PMT concentration dependent, and is inhibited by rapamycin and Torin1, the two specific inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Interestingly, PMT-mediated mTOR signaling activation was observed in MEF WT but not in Gα(q/11) knock-out cells. These observations are consistent with the data indicating that PMT-induced mTORC1 activation proceeds via the deamidation of Gα(q/11), which leads to the activation of PLCβ to generate diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate, two known activators of the PKC pathway. Exogenously added diacylglycerol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, known activators of PKC, leads to rpS6 phosphorylation in a rapamycin-dependent manner. Furthermore, PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation is inhibited by PKC inhibitor, Gö6976. Although PMT induces epidermal growth factor receptor activation, it exerts no effect on PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation. Together, our findings reveal for the first time that PMT activates mTORC1 through the Gα(q/11)/PLCβ/PKC pathway. The fact that PMT-induced protein synthesis and cell migration is partially inhibited by rapamycin indicates that these processes are in part mediated by the mTORC1 pathway.

  3. Apoptotic neurons induce proliferative responses of progenitor cells in the postnatal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Volodymyr; Mihhailova, Jevgenia; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-11-01

    Apoptotic cell death is the leading cause of neuronal loss after neonatal brain injury. Little is known about the intrinsic capacity of the immature cerebral cortex for replacing dead cells. Here we test the hypothesis that neuronal apoptosis is able to trigger compensatory proliferation in surrounding cells. In order to establish a "pure" apoptotic cell death model and to avoid the confounding effects of broken blood-brain barrier and inflammatory reactions, we used a diphtheria toxin (DT) and diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) system to induce ablation of layer IV neurons in the rodent somatosensory cortex during the early postnatal period. We found that DT-triggered apoptosis is a slowly progressing event lasting about for 7 days. While dying cells expressed the morphological features of apoptosis, we could not detect immunoreactivity for activated caspase-3 in these cells. Microglia activation and proliferation represented the earliest cellular responses to apoptotic cell death. In addition, we found that induced apoptosis triggered a massive proliferation of undifferentiated progenitor cell pool including Sox2 as well as NG2 cells. The default differentiation pattern of proliferating progenitors appears to be the glial phenotype; we could not find evidence for newly generated neurons in response to apoptotic neuronal death. These results suggest that mitotically active progenitor populations are intrinsically capable to contribute to the repair process of injured cortical tissue and may represent a potential target for neuronal replacement strategies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Toxins and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Lektine, Toxine und Immunotoxine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbruck, Gerhard

    1981-12-01

    A definition and classification of lectins (carbohydrate-binding (glyco)proteins) is given on the basis of new data and experimental results. Especially the biological role of bacterial, vertebrate and sponge lectins is discussed. The lectin-toxin combination offers an excellent model not only for studying adhesion to and penetration through the cell membrane, but also for hybridization with antibody fragments showing anti-tumor specificity.

  6. Pax genes: regulators of lineage specification and progenitor cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Blake, Judith A; Ziman, Melanie R

    2014-02-01

    Pax genes encode a family of transcription factors that orchestrate complex processes of lineage determination in the developing embryo. Their key role is to specify and maintain progenitor cells through use of complex molecular mechanisms such as alternate RNA splice forms and gene activation or inhibition in conjunction with protein co-factors. The significance of Pax genes in development is highlighted by abnormalities that arise from the expression of mutant Pax genes. Here, we review the molecular functions of Pax genes during development and detail the regulatory mechanisms by which they specify and maintain progenitor cells across various tissue lineages. We also discuss mechanistic insights into the roles of Pax genes in regeneration and in adult diseases, including cancer.

  7. [Cytolethal distending toxins].

    PubMed

    Curová, K; Kmeťová, M; Siegfried, L

    2014-06-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDT) are intracellularly acting proteins which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle. They are produced by Gram-negative bacteria with affinity to mucocutaneous surfaces and could play a role in the pathogenesis of various mammalian diseases. The functional toxin is composed of three proteins: CdtB entering the nucleus and by its nuclease activity inducing nuclear fragmentation and chromatin disintegration, CdtA, and CdtC, the two latter being responsible for toxin attachment to the surface of the target cell. Cytotoxic effect of CDT leads to the cell cycle arrest before the cell enters mitosis and to further changes (cell distension and death, apoptosis) depending on the cell type. Thus, CDT may function as a virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria that produce it and thus may contribute to the initiation of certain diseases. Most important are inflammatory bowel diseases caused by intestinal bacteria, periodontitis with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as the aetiologic agent and ulcus molle where Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent.

  8. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  9. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  10. Method for detecting biological toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Ligler, F.S.; Campbell, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Biological toxins are indirectly detected by using polymerase chain reaction to amplify unique nucleic acid sequences coding for the toxins or enzymes unique to toxin synthesis. Buffer, primers coding for the unique nucleic acid sequences and an amplifying enzyme are added to a sample suspected of containing the toxin. The mixture is then cycled thermally to exponentially amplify any of these unique nucleic acid sequences present in the sample. The amplified sequences can be detected by various means, including fluorescence. Detection of the amplified sequences is indicative of the presence of toxin in the original sample. By using more than one set of labeled primers, the method can be used to simultaneously detect several toxins in a sample.

  11. Intracellular trafficking of bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Tsai, Billy

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial toxins often translocate across a cellular membrane to gain access into the host cytosol, modifying cellular components in order to exert their toxic effects. To accomplish this feat, these toxins traffic to a membrane penetration site where they undergo conformational changes essential to eject the toxin's catalytic subunit into the cytosol. In this brief review, we highlight recent findings that elucidate both the trafficking pathways and membrane translocation mechanisms of toxins that cross the plasma, endosomal, or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. These findings not only illuminate the specific nature of the host-toxin interactions during entry, but should also provide additional therapeutic strategies to prevent or alleviate the bacterial toxin-induced diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Today's threat of ricin toxin].

    PubMed

    From, Sławomir; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Since the late 70s of the last century there were more than 700 incidents related to the use of the ricin toxin. For this reason, CDC (Center of Disease Control and Prevention) recognized toxin as a biological weapon category B. The lethal dose of ricin toxin after parenteral administration is 0.0001 mg/kg and after oral administration 0.2 mg. The first symptoms of poisoning occur within a few hours after application of toxin as a nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In the final stage there are observed: cardiac arrhythmia, collapse and symptoms suggestive of involvement of the central nervous system. Stage immediately preceding death is a state of coma. The ricin toxin is still the substance against which action has no optimal antidote. Developed a vaccine called RiVax is waiting for its registration. It should be pointed out that the availability of a ricin toxin makes it possible to use it for real bioterrorists.

  13. Extracorporeal removal of uremic toxins: can we still do better?

    PubMed

    Eloot, Sunny; Ledebo, Ingrid; Ward, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Improving outcomes by manipulating the prescription of renal replacement therapy to increase the removal of uremic toxins has had limited success. Failure to achieve better outcomes can be attributed to the heterogenic nature of uremic toxins, the complex distribution of some toxins in the body, and the predominant regimen of thee times weekly, in-center hemodialysis. This review summarizes the various mechanisms and kinetics of removal for the three major classes of uremic toxin-small water-soluble solutes, middle molecules, and protein-bound solutes-from both a theoretical and an experimental perspective. Taken together, the available data suggest that contemporary dialyzers are not a significant impediment to the removal of water-soluble uremic toxins, particularly when combined with commonly used blood and dialysis fluid flow rates and in online convective therapies. Enhancing the removal of those solutes will require a change in paradigm to longer and more frequent treatment sessions. Whether or not such a strategy also would improve the removal of protein-bound uremic toxins is less clear; that goal might require the development of different, more complex devices than those currently used for renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future. PMID:26248079

  15. Biotechnological applications of brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom toxins.

    PubMed

    Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Henrique da Silva, Paulo; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Paludo, Kátia Sabrina; Bertoni da Silveira, Rafael; Gremski, Waldemiro; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2008-01-01

    Loxoscelism (the term used to define accidents by the bite of brown spiders) has been reported worldwide. Clinical manifestations following brown spider bites are frequently associated with skin degeneration, a massive inflammatory response at the injured region, intravascular hemolysis, platelet aggregation causing thrombocytopenia and renal disturbances. The mechanisms by which the venom exerts its noxious effects are currently under investigation. The whole venom is a complex mixture of toxins enriched with low molecular mass proteins in the range of 5-40 kDa. Toxins including alkaline phosphatase, hyaluronidase, metalloproteases (astacin-like proteases), low molecular mass (5.6-7.9 kDa) insecticidal peptides and phospholipases-D (dermonecrotic toxins) have been identified in the venom. The purpose of the present review is to describe biotechnological applications of whole venom or some toxins, with especial emphasis upon molecular biology findings obtained in the last years.

  16. Interactions between Autophagy and Bacterial Toxins: Targets for Therapy?

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jacques

    2015-08-04

    Autophagy is a physiological process involved in defense mechanisms for clearing intracellular bacteria. The autophagic pathway is finely regulated and bacterial toxins interact with this process in a complex manner. Bacterial toxins also interact significantly with many biochemical processes. Evaluations of the effects of bacterial toxins, such as endotoxins, pore-forming toxins and adenylate cyclases, on autophagy could support the development of new strategies for counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Treatment strategies could focus on drugs that enhance autophagic processes to improve the clearance of intracellular bacteria. However, further in vivo studies are required to decipher the upregulation of autophagy and potential side effects limiting such approaches. The capacity of autophagy activation strategies to improve the outcome of antibiotic treatment should be investigated in the future.

  17. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  18. Recombinant Toxins for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastan, Ira; Fitzgerald, David

    1991-11-01

    Recombinant toxins target cell surface receptors and antigens on tumor cells. They kill by mechanisms different from conventional chemotherapy, so that cross resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic agents should not be a problem. Furthermore, they are not mutagens and should not induce secondary malignancies or accelerate progression of benign malignancies. They can be mass-produced cheaply in bacteria as homogeneous proteins. Either growth factor-toxin fusions or antibody-toxin fusions can be chosen, depending on the cellular target.

  19. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  20. Ricin detection: tracking active toxin.

    PubMed

    Bozza, William P; Tolleson, William H; Rosado, Leslie A Rivera; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Ricin is a plant toxin with high bioterrorism potential due to its natural abundance and potency in inducing cell death. Early detection of the active toxin is essential for developing appropriate countermeasures. Here we review concepts for designing ricin detection methods, including mechanism of action of the toxin, advantages and disadvantages of current detection assays, and perspectives on the future development of rapid and reliable methods for detecting ricin in environmental samples.

  1. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  2. THE SYNERGY OF BACTERIAL TOXINS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TOXINS AND ANTITOXINS, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), BACTERIA , CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS, CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI, CLOSTRIDIUM, STAPHYLOCOCCUS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, PROTEUS, ETIOLOGY, ANTIGENS, ANTIBODIES, AMINO ACIDS.

  3. Time-lapse live imaging of clonally related neural progenitor cells in the developing zebrafish forebrain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Wagle, Mahendra; Guo, Su

    2011-04-06

    Precise patterns of division, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells are crucial for proper brain development and function. To understand the behavior of neural progenitor cells in the complex in vivo environment, time-lapse live imaging of neural progenitor cells in an intact brain is critically required. In this video, we exploit the unique features of zebrafish embryos to visualize the development of forebrain neural progenitor cells in vivo. We use electroporation to genetically and sparsely label individual neural progenitor cells. Briefly, DNA constructs coding for fluorescent markers were injected into the forebrain ventricle of 22 hours post fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos and electric pulses were delivered immediately. Six hours later, the electroporated zebrafish embryos were mounted with low melting point agarose in glass bottom culture dishes. Fluorescently labeled neural progenitor cells were then imaged for 36 hours with fixed intervals under a confocal microscope using water dipping objective lens. The present method provides a way to gain insights into the in vivo development of forebrain neural progenitor cells and can be applied to other parts of the central nervous system of the zebrafish embryo.

  4. Modeling Renal Progenitors – Defining the Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Perantoni, Alan O.

    2016-01-01

    Significant recent advances in methodologies for the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to renal progenitors as well as the definition of niche conditions for sustaining those progenitors have dramatically enhanced our understanding of their biology and developmental programing, prerequisites for establishing viable approaches to renal regeneration. In this article, we review the evolution of culture techniques and models for the study of metanephric development, describe the signaling mechanisms likely to be driving progenitor self-renewal, and discuss current efforts to generate de novo functional tissues, providing in depth protocols and niche conditions for the stabilization of the nephronic Six2+ progenitor. PMID:26856661

  5. Botulinum toxin, Quo Vadis?

    PubMed

    Lim, Erle C H; Seet, Raymond C S

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX), derived from the exotoxin of Clostridium botulinum, cleaves Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-Attachment protein REceptor (SNARE) proteins, causing chemodenervation of cholinergic neurons. BTX also inhibits exocytosis of vesicles containing norepinephrine, glutamate, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and inhibits expression of the vanilloid receptor. Clinical applications of BTX, which include the treatment of overactive skeletal and smooth muscles, hypersecretory and painful disorders, have increased exponentially since it was first used clinically to treat strabismus more than two decades ago. In this editorial, we discuss reports of new therapeutic indications of BTX, and propose new areas for research.

  6. Evolution of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157: eight major lineages of human and cattle origin strain signature genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle are a major reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) and harbor genetic subtypes that do not all associate with human disease. STEC O157 evolved from an E. coli O55:H7 progenitor, however, depauperate nucleotide polymorphism discovery from cattle and human origin...

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fuyong; Zhou, Jun; Gong, Ren; Huang, Xiao; Pansuria, Meghana; Virtue, Anthony; Li, Xinyuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in the maintenance of endothelial homoeostasis and in the process of new vessel formation. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced numbers and dysfunction of EPCs; and that medications alone are able to partially reverse the impairment of EPCs in patients with atherosclerosis. Therefore, novel EPC-based therapies may provide enhancement in restoring EPCs’ population and improvement of vascular function. Here, for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis, we provide a comprehensive overview on EPC characteristics, phenotypes, and the signaling pathways underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis. PMID:22652782

  8. Differences in the toxin profiles of Alexandrium ostenfeldii (Dinophyceae) strains isolated from different geographic origins: Evidence of paralytic toxin, spirolide, and gymnodimine.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Pablo; Riobó, Pilar; Rodríguez, Francisco; Franco, José M; Bravo, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Among toxin-producing dinoflagellates of the genus Alexandrium, Alexandrium ostenfeldii is the only species able to produce paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, spirolides (SPXs) and gymnodimines (GYMs). In this study we characterized and compared three A. ostenfeldii strains isolated from the Baltic, Mediterranean, and southern Chile Seas with respect to their toxin profiles, morphology, and phylogeny. Toxin analyses by HPLC-FD and LC-HRMS revealed differences in the toxin profiles of the three strains. The PSP toxin profiles of the southern Chile and Baltic strains were largely the same and included gonyautoxin (GTX)-3, GTX-2, and saxitoxin (STX), although the total PSP toxin content of the Chilean strain (105.83 ± 72.15 pg cell(-1)) was much higher than that of the Baltic strain (4.04 ± 1.93 pg cell(-1)). However, the Baltic strain was the only strain that expressed detectable amounts of analogues of GYM-A and GYM-B/-C (48.27 ± 26.12 pg GYM-A equivalents cell(-1)). The only toxin expressed by the Mediterranean strain was 13-desmethyl SPX-C (13dMeC; 2.85 ± 4.76 pg cell(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis based on the LSU rRNA showed that the studied strains belonged to distinct molecular clades. The toxin profiles determined in this study provide further evidence of the taxonomic complexity of this species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Botulinum toxin: Bioweapon & magic drug

    PubMed Central

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility. It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin. PMID:21149997

  10. Botulinum toxin: bioweapon & magic drug.

    PubMed

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility . It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  11. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  12. Shaping our minds: stem and progenitor cell diversity in the mammalian neocortex.

    PubMed

    Franco, Santos J; Müller, Ulrich

    2013-01-09

    The neural circuits of the mammalian neocortex are crucial for perception, complex thought, cognition, and consciousness. This circuitry is assembled from many different neuronal subtypes with divergent properties and functions. Here, we review recent studies that have begun to clarify the mechanisms of cell-type specification in the neocortex, focusing on the lineage relationships between neocortical progenitors and subclasses of excitatory projection neurons. These studies reveal an unanticipated diversity in the progenitor pool that requires a revised view of prevailing models of cell-type specification in the neocortex. We propose a "sequential progenitor-diversification model" that integrates current knowledge to explain how projection neuron diversity is achieved by mechanisms acting on proliferating progenitors and their postmitotic offspring. We discuss the implications of this model for our understanding of brain evolution and pathological states of the neocortex.

  13. Genome-wide gene amplification during differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike; Keller, Andreas; Voss, Meike; Backes, Christina; Welter, Cornelius; Meese, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence amplification is a phenomenon that occurs predictably at defined stages during normal development in some organisms. Developmental gene amplification was first described in amphibians during gametogenesis and has not yet been described in humans. To date gene amplification in humans is a hallmark of many tumors. We used array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) to discover gene amplifications during in vitro differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. Here we report a complex gene amplification pattern two and five days after induction of differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. We identified several amplified genes in neural progenitor cells that are known to be amplified in malignant tumors. There is also a striking overlap of amplified chromosomal regions between differentiating neural progenitor cells and malignant tumor cells derived from astrocytes. Gene amplifications in normal human cells as physiological process has not been reported yet and may bear resemblance to developmental gene amplifications in amphibians and insects.

  14. Solid-phase synthesis and biological evaluation of Joro spider toxin-4 from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Barslund, Anne F; Poulsen, Mette H; Bach, Tinna B; Lucas, Simon; Kristensen, Anders S; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2011-03-25

    Polyamine toxins from orb weaver spiders are attractive pharmacological tools particularly for studies of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors in the brain. These polyamine toxins are biosynthesized in a combinatorial manner, providing a plethora of related, but structurally complex toxins to be exploited in biological studies. Here, we have used solid-phase synthetic methodology for the efficient synthesis of Joro spider toxin-4 (JSTX-4) (1) from Nephila clavata, providing sufficient amounts of the toxin for biological evaluation at iGlu receptor subtypes using electrophysiology. Biological evaluation revealed that JSTX-4 inhibits iGlu receptors only in high μM concentrations, thereby being substantially less potent than structurally related polyamine toxins.

  15. Tarantula toxins use common surfaces for interacting with Kv and ASIC ion channels.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kanchan; Zamanian, Maryam; Bae, Chanhyung; Milescu, Mirela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Tilley, Drew C; Sack, Jon T; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Kim, Jae Il; Swartz, Kenton J

    2015-05-07

    Tarantula toxins that bind to voltage-sensing domains of voltage-activated ion channels are thought to partition into the membrane and bind to the channel within the bilayer. While no structures of a voltage-sensor toxin bound to a channel have been solved, a structural homolog, psalmotoxin (PcTx1), was recently crystalized in complex with the extracellular domain of an acid sensing ion channel (ASIC). In the present study we use spectroscopic, biophysical and computational approaches to compare membrane interaction properties and channel binding surfaces of PcTx1 with the voltage-sensor toxin guangxitoxin (GxTx-1E). Our results show that both types of tarantula toxins interact with membranes, but that voltage-sensor toxins partition deeper into the bilayer. In addition, our results suggest that tarantula toxins have evolved a similar concave surface for clamping onto α-helices that is effective in aqueous or lipidic physical environments.

  16. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Assaf; Benhar, Itai

    2010-01-01

    Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin. PMID:22069564

  17. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins.

  18. Toxin production by Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wassenaar, T M

    1997-01-01

    Of all the virulence factors that were proposed for Campylobacter jejuni and related species to cause disease in humans, the discovery of toxin production was the most promising but led to a rather confusing and even disappointing stream of data. The discussion of whether proteinaceous exotoxins are relevant in disease remains open. One important reason for this lack of consensus is the anecdotal nature of the literature reports. To provide a basis for an unbiased opinion, this review compiles all described exotoxins, compares their reported properties, and provides a summary of animal model studies and clinical data. The toxins are divided into enterotoxins and cytotoxins and are sorted according to their biochemical properties. Since many Campylobacter toxins have been compared with toxins of other species, some key examples of the latter are also discussed. Future directions of toxin research that appear promising are defined. PMID:9227862

  19. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  20. Plant toxins that affect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Welch, Kevin D; Panter, Kip E; Lee, Stephen T

    2013-08-19

    Plants produce a wide variety of chemical compounds termed secondary metabolites that are not involved in basic metabolism, photosynthesis, or reproduction. These compounds are used as flavors, fragrances, insecticides, dyes, hallucinogens, nutritional supplements, poisons, and pharmaceutical agents. However, in some cases these secondary metabolites found in poisonous plants perturb biological systems. Ingestion of toxins from poisonous plants by grazing livestock often results in large economic losses to the livestock industry. The chemical structures of these compounds are diverse and range from simple, low molecular weight toxins such as oxalate in halogeton to the highly complex norditerpene alkaloids in larkspurs. While the negative effects of plant toxins on people and the impact of plant toxins on livestock producers have been widely publicized, the diversity of these toxins and their potential as new pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of diseases in people and animals has also received widespread interest. Scientists are actively screening plants from all regions of the world for bioactivity and potential pharmaceuticals for the treatment or prevention of many diseases. In this review, we focus the discussion to those plant toxins extensively studied at the USDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory that affect the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors including species of Delphinium (Larkspurs), Lupinus (Lupines), Conium (poison hemlock), and Nicotiana (tobaccos).

  1. Renal progenitors: Roles in kidney disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Brooke E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence is predicted to significantly increase. The kidney is a complex organ encompassing many diverse cell types organized in a elaborate tissue architecture, making regeneration a challenging feat. In recent years, there has been a surge in the field of stem cell research to develop regenerative therapies for various organ systems. Here, we review some recent progressions in characterizing the role of renal progenitors in development, regeneration, and kidney disease in mammals. We also discuss how the zebrafish provides a unique experimental animal model that can provide a greater molecular and genetic understanding of renal progenitors, which may contribute to the development of potential regenerative therapies for human renal afflictions. PMID:27928463

  2. Immunogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Kapral, F A

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of purified Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin. Rabbits and guinea pigs immunized with delta-toxin incorporated into a multiple antibody, whereas animals given toxin in saline or toxin in saline with Tween 80 did not produce antibody. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction isolated by chromatography on protein A-Sepharose was examined for the presence of anti-delta-toxin antibody by immunoelectrophoresis, immunodiffusion, quantitative precipitation tests, affinity chromatography, and toxin neutralization tests. Although delta-toxin-specific IgG precipitated the toxin in agar gels, the antibody did not neutralize the toxin's hemolytic activity. Delta-toxin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining of toxin-treated erythrocytes. Images PMID:7014461

  3. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Mukesh; Gupta, Sanjay K.; Swapnil, Prashant; Zehra, Andleeb; Dubey, Manish K.; Upadhyay, Ram S.

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs) and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs) which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs). The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs) which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future. PMID:28848500

  4. Effect of the endoparasite Amoebophrya sp. on toxin content and composition in the paralytic shellfish poisoning dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunju; Park, Myung Gil

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Amoebophrya ceratii complex are endoparasitic dinoflagellates that parasitize a number of their dinoflagellate relatives, including toxic and/or harmful algal bloom-forming species. Despite many studies on the occurrence, prevalence, biology and molecular phylogeny of Amoebophrya spp., little attention has been given to toxin dynamics of host population following parasitism. Using Amoebophrya sp. infecting the paralytic shellfish toxin (PSP)-producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense, we addressed the following questions: (1) does parasitism by Amoebophrya sp. alter toxin content and toxin profiles of the dinoflagellate A. fundyense over the infection cycle? and (2) do parasite dinospores produced at the end of the infection cycle retain host toxins and thus potentially act as a vector to convey PSP toxin through the marine microbial food-web? Toxin time-course experiments showed that the PSP toxin contents did not vary significantly over the infection cycle, but mean toxin content for infected cultures was significantly higher than that for uninfected cultures. Host toxins were not detected in the free-living, dinospore stage of the parasite. Therefore, our results indicate that Amoebophrya sp. does not function as a vector for transferring PSP toxins to higher trophic levels. Rather, Amoebophrya infections appear to play an important role in maintaining healthy ecosystems by transforming potent toxins-producing dinoflagellates into non-toxic dinospores, representing "edible food" for consumers of the marine microbial food-web during toxic algal bloom event. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. )

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  6. Toxin bioportides: exploring toxin biological activity and multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Kerkis, Irina; de Brandão Prieto da Silva, Alvaro Rossan; Pompeia, Celine; Tytgat, Jan; de Sá Junior, Paulo L

    2017-02-01

    Toxins have been shown to have many biological functions and to constitute a rich source of drugs and biotechnological tools. We focus on toxins that not only have a specific activity, but also contain residues responsible for transmembrane penetration, which can be considered bioportides-a class of cell-penetrating peptides that are also intrinsically bioactive. Bioportides are potential tools in pharmacology and biotechnology as they help deliver substances and nanoparticles to intracellular targets. Bioportides characterized so far are peptides derived from human proteins, such as cytochrome c (CYCS), calcitonin receptor (camptide), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (nosangiotide). However, toxins are usually disregarded as potential bioportides. In this review, we discuss the inclusion of some toxins and molecules derived thereof as a new class of bioportides based on structure activity relationship, minimization, and biological activity studies. The comparative analysis of the amino acid residue composition of toxin-derived bioportides and their short molecular variants is an innovative analytical strategy which allows us to understand natural toxin multifunctionality in vivo and plan novel pharmacological and biotechnological products. Furthermore, we discuss how many bioportide toxins have a rigid structure with amphiphilic properties important for both cell penetration and bioactivity.

  7. Evidence for antinociceptive activity of botulinum toxin type A in pain management.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K Roger

    2003-01-01

    The neurotoxin, botulinum toxin type A, has been used successfully, in some patients, as an analgesic for myofascial pain syndromes, migraine, and other headache types. The toxin inhibits the release of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the neuromuscular junction thereby inhibiting striated muscle contractions. In the majority of pain syndromes where botulinum toxin type A is effective, inhibiting muscle spasms is an important component of its activity. Even so, the reduction of pain often occurs before the decrease in muscle contractions suggesting that botulinum toxin type A has a more complex mechanism of action than initially hypothesized. Current data points to an antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin type A that is separate from its neuromuscular activity. The common biochemical mechanism, however, remains the same between botulinum toxin type A's effect on the motor nerve or the sensory nerve: enzymatic blockade of neurotransmitter release. The antinociceptive effect of the toxin was reported to block substance P release using in vitro culture systems. The current investigation evaluated the in vivo mechanism of action for the antinociceptive action of botulinum toxin type A. In these studies, botulinum toxin type A was found to block the release of glutamate. Furthermore, Fos, a product of the immediate early gene, c-fos, expressed with neuronal stimuli was prevented upon peripheral exposure to the toxin. These findings suggest that botulinum toxin type A blocks peripheral sensitization and, indirectly, reduces central sensitization. The recent hypothesis that migraine involves both peripheral and central sensitization may help explain how botulinum toxin type A inhibits migraine pain by acting on these two pathways. Further research is needed to determine whether the antinociceptive mechanism mediated by botulinum toxin type A affects the neuronal signaling pathways that are activated during migraine.

  8. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  9. Structure and Function of the Voltage Sensor of Sodium Channels Probed by a β-Scorpion Toxin*S

    PubMed Central

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Qu, Yusheng; Sampieri, François; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage sensing by voltage-gated sodium channels determines the electrical excitability of cells, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. β-Scorpion toxins bind specifically to neurotoxin receptor site 4 and induce a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation through a voltage sensor-trapping mechanism. Kinetic analysis showed that β-scorpion toxin binds to the resting state, and subsequently the bound toxin traps the voltage sensor in the activated state in a voltage-dependent but concentration-independent manner. The rate of voltage sensor trapping can be fit by a two-step model, in which the first step is voltage-dependent and correlates with the outward gating movement of the IIS4 segment, whereas the second step is voltage-independent and results in shifted voltage dependence of activation of the channel. Mutations of Glu779 in extracellular loop IIS1–S2 and both Glu837 and Leu840 in extracellular loop IIS3–S4 reduce the binding affinity of β-scorpion toxin. Mutations of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment do not affect β-scorpion toxin binding but alter voltage dependence of activation and enhance β-scorpion toxin action. Structural modeling with the Rosetta algorithm yielded a three-dimensional model of the toxin-receptor complex with the IIS4 voltage sensor at the extracellular surface. Our results provide mechanistic and structural insight into the voltage sensor-trapping mode of scorpion toxin action, define the position of the voltage sensor in the resting state of the sodium channel, and favor voltage-sensing models in which the S4 segment spans the membrane in both resting and activated states. PMID:16679310

  10. Clostridium difficile binary toxin CDT

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart; Rupnik, Maja; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Binary toxin (CDT) is frequently observed in Clostridium difficile strains associated with increased severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). CDT belongs to the family of binary ADP-ribosylating toxins consisting of two separate toxin components: CDTa, the enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase which modifies actin, and CDTb which binds to host cells and translocates CDTa into the cytosol. CDTb is activated by serine proteases and binds to lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor. ADP-ribosylation induces depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-induced actin depolymerization also produces microtubule-based membrane protrusions which form a network on epithelial cells and increase bacterial adherence. Multiple clinical studies indicate an association between binary toxin genes in C. difficile and increased 30-d CDI mortality independent of PCR ribotype. Further studies including measures of binary toxin in stool, analyses of CDI mortality caused by CDT-producing strains, and examination of the relationship of CDT expression to TcdA and TcdB toxin variants and PCR ribotypes are needed. PMID:24253566

  11. Stoichiometric regulation of phytoplankton toxins.

    PubMed

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Smith, Val H; Declerck, Steven A J; Stam, Eva C M; Elser, James J

    2014-06-01

    Ecological Stoichiometry theory predicts that the production, elemental structure and cellular content of biomolecules should depend on the relative availability of resources and the elemental composition of their producer organism. We review the extent to which carbon- and nitrogen-rich phytoplankton toxins are regulated by nutrient limitation and cellular stoichiometry. Consistent with theory, we show that nitrogen limitation causes a reduction in the cellular quota of nitrogen-rich toxins, while phosphorus limitation causes an increase in the most nitrogen-rich paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin. In addition, we show that the cellular content of nitrogen-rich toxins increases with increasing cellular N : P ratios. Also consistent with theory, limitation by either nitrogen or phosphorus promotes the C-rich toxin cell quota or toxicity of phytoplankton cells. These observed relationships may assist in predicting and managing toxin-producing phytoplankton blooms. Such a stoichiometric regulation of toxins is likely not restricted to phytoplankton, and may well apply to carbon- and nitrogen-rich secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi and plants.

  12. [Botulinum toxin therapy for spasticity].

    PubMed

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) administered as an adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can act as a useful and effective therapeutic tool for treating patients disabled by spasticity. Presence of other non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness, and contracture) can complicate the clinical course and disturb rehabilitative process of patients with spasticity. Treatment of spasticity using BTX can improve paralysis by correcting muscular imbalance that follows these diseases. In patients with chronic severe spasticity, we also have to address unique and difficult-to-treat clinical conditions such as abnormal posture and movement disorders. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is discussed. Because patients with neurological disabilities can show complex dysfunctions, specific functional limitations, goals, and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with the patient, family members, and caregivers, prior to initiating BTX therapy. BTX therapy might improve not only care, passive function, but also motor functions in these patients by supplementing intensive rehabilitation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct-current stimulation, peripheral electrical stimulation, muscle stretching, and other rehabilitation strategies.

  13. Detecting and discriminating among Shiga toxins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The virulence associated with Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections is from the Shiga toxins produced by the E. coli strain. Although Shiga toxins are associated with E. coli, the expression of the toxins is actually controlled by a temperate lambdoid phage that infects the host. ...

  14. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  15. [Shiga toxin and tetanus toxin as a potential biologic weapon].

    PubMed

    Toczyska, Izabela; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Toxins produced by the bacteria are of particular interest as potential cargo combat possible for use in a terrorist attack or war. Shiga toxin is usually produced by shiga toxigenic strains of Escherichia coli (STEC - shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli). To infection occurs mostly after eating contaminated beef. Clinical syndromes associated with Shiga toxin diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS - hemolytic uremic syndrome) or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Treatment is symptomatic. In HUS, in which mortality during an epidemic reaches 20%, extending the kidney injury dialysis may be necessary. Exposure to tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani, resulting in the most generalized tetanus, characterized by increased muscle tension and painful contractions of individual muscle groups. In the treatment beyond symptomatic behavior (among others spasticity medications, anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants) is used tetanus antitoxin and antibiotics (metronidazole choice). A common complication is acute respiratory failure - then it is necessary to implement mechanical ventilation. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  16. Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin--new insights into the cellular up-take of the actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is a member of the family of binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. It consists of the enzyme component C2I, and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. Proteolytically activated C2II forms heptamers and binds to a carbohydrate cell surface receptor. After attachment of C2I, the toxin complex is endocytosed to reach early endosomes. At low pH of endosomes, C2II-heptamers insert into the membrane, form pores and deliver C2I into the cytosol. Here, C2I ADP-ribosylates actin at Arg177 to block actin polymerization and to induce depolymerization of actin filaments. The mini-review describes main properties of C2 toxin and discusses new findings on the involvement of chaperones in the up-take process of the toxin.

  17. Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, S.; Nelemans, G.; Bours, M.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Claeys, J.; Mennekens, N.; Ruiter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. The standard scenarios involve thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs approaching the Chandrasekhar mass; either by accretion from a companion or by a merger of two white dwarfs. We investigate the contribution from both channels to the SNIa rate with the binary population synthesis (BPS) code SeBa in order to constrain binary processes such as the mass retention efficiency of WD accretion and common envelope evolution. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of SNIa progenitors and in particular study how assumptions affect the predicted rates.

  18. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-09-01

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  19. Extracellular matrix-modulated Heartless signaling in Drosophila blood progenitors regulates their differentiation via a Ras/ETS/FOG pathway and target of rapamycin function

    PubMed Central

    Dragojlovic-Munther, Michelle; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of hematopoietic progenitors ensures a continuous supply of blood cells during the lifespan of an organism. Thus, understanding the molecular basis for progenitor maintenance is a continued focus of investigation. A large pool of undifferentiated blood progenitors are maintained in the Drosophila hematopoietic organ, the larval lymph gland, by a complex network of signaling pathways that are mediated by niche-, progenitor-, or differentiated hemocyte-derived signals. In this study we examined the function of the Drosophila fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), Heartless, a critical regulator of early lymph gland progenitor specification in the late embryo, during larval lymph gland hematopoiesis. Activation of Heartless signaling in hemocyte progenitors by its two ligands, Pyramus and Thisbe, is both required and sufficient to induce progenitor differentiation and formation of the plasmatocyte-rich lymph gland cortical zone. We identify two transcriptional regulators that function downstream of Heartless signaling in lymph gland progenitors, the ETS protein, Pointed, and the Friend-of-GATA (FOG) protein, U-shaped, which are required for this Heartless-induced differentiation response. Furthermore, cross-talk of Heartless and target of rapamycin signaling in hemocyte progenitors is required for lamellocyte differentiation downstream of Thisbe-mediated Heartless activation. Finally, we identify the Drosophila heparan sulfate proteoglycan, Trol, as a critical negative regulator of Heartless ligand signaling in the lymph gland, demonstrating that sequestration of differentiation signals by the extracellular matrix is a unique mechanism employed in blood progenitor maintenance that is of potential relevance to many other stem cell niches. PMID:23603494

  20. DISCRIMINATING THE PROGENITOR TYPE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITH IRON K-SHELL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Petre, Robert; Enoto, Teruaki; Badenes, Carles; Nakano, Toshio; Hiraga, Junko S.; Castro, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Safi-Harb, Samar; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-04-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs using solely Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe Kα emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe Kα centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe Kα luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.

  1. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  2. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  3. Prorenin receptor is critical for nephron progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Kidd, Laura; Bushnell, Daniel; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M.; Yosypiv, Ihor V.

    2016-01-01

    Deficient nephrogenesis is the major factor contributing to renal hypoplasia defined as abnormally small kidneys. Nephron induction during kidney development is driven by reciprocal interactions between progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme (CM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The prorenin receptor (PRR) is a receptor for renin and prorenin, and an accessory subunit of the vacuolar proton pump H+-ATPase. Global loss of PRR is lethal in mice and PRR mutations are associated with a high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and X-linked mental retardation in humans. To circumvent lethality of the ubiquitous PRR mutation in mice and to determine the potential role of the PRR in nephrogenesis, we generated a mouse model with a conditional deletion of the PRR in Six2+ nephron progenitors and their epithelial derivatives (Six2PRR−/−). Targeted ablation of PRR in Six2+ nephron progenitors caused a marked decrease in the number of developing nephrons, small cystic kidneys and podocyte foot process effacement at birth, and early postnatal death. Reduced congenital nephron endowment resulted from premature depletion of nephron progenitor cell population due to impaired progenitor cell proliferation and loss of normal molecular inductive response to canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling within the metanephric mesenchyme. At 2 months of age, heterozygous Six2PRR+/− mice exhibited focal glomerulosclerosis, decreased kidney function and massive proteinuria. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a cell-autonomous requirement for the PRR within nephron progenitors for progenitor maintenance, progression of nephrogenesis, normal kidney development and function. PMID:26658320

  4. Epsilon toxin: a fascinating pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Michel R

    2011-12-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by strains of Clostridium perfringens classified as type B or type D. ETX belongs to the heptameric β-pore-forming toxins including aerolysin and Clostridium septicum alpha toxin, which are characterized by the formation of a pore through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells consisting in a β-barrel of 14 amphipatic β strands. By contrast to aerolysin and C. septicum alpha toxin, ETX is a much more potent toxin and is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep. ETX induces perivascular edema in various tissues and accumulates in particular in the kidneys and brain, where it causes edema and necrotic lesions. ETX is able to pass through the blood-brain barrier and stimulate the release of glutamate, which accounts for the symptoms of nervous excitation observed in animal enterotoxemia. At the cellular level, ETX causes rapid swelling followed by cell death involving necrosis. The precise mode of action of ETX remains to be determined. ETX is a powerful toxin, however, it also represents a unique tool with which to vehicle drugs into the central nervous system or target glutamatergic neurons.

  5. Mechanism of Action of the Presynaptic Neurotoxins Tetanus Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-25

    characterized and more work is needed to assess the physiological importance of gangliosides as binding molecules. It is now clear that the initial binding...Rogers, T.B. and Schnaar, R.L. Complex ganglioside expression and tetanus toxin binding by PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. J.Bil Chem. 263:2055-2063, 1983

  6. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sumoylation is tumor-suppressive and confers proliferative quiescence to hematopoietic progenitors in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Kalamarz, Marta E; Paddibhatla, Indira; Nadar, Christina; Govind, Shubha

    2012-03-15

    How cell-intrinsic regulation of the cell cycle and the extrinsic influence of the niche converge to provide proliferative quiescence, safeguard tissue integrity, and provide avenues to stop stem cells from giving rise to tumors is a major challenge in gene therapy and tissue engineering. We explore this question in sumoylation-deficient mutants of Drosophila. In wild type third instar larval lymph glands, a group of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells acquires quiescence; a multicellular niche supports their undifferentiated state. However, how proliferative quiescence is instilled in this population is not understood. We show that Ubc9 protein is nuclear in this population. Loss of the SUMO-activating E1 enzyme, Aos1/Uba2, the conjugating E2 enzyme, Ubc9, or the E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS, results in a failure of progenitors to quiesce; progenitors become hyperplastic, misdifferentiate, and develop into microtumors that eventually detach from the dorsal vessel. Significantly, dysplasia and lethality of Ubc9 mutants are rescued when Ubc9(wt) is provided specifically in the progenitor populations, but not when it is provided in the niche or in the differentiated cortex. While normal progenitors express high levels of the Drosophila cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 homolog, Dacapo, the corresponding overgrown mutant population exhibits a marked reduction in Dacapo. Forced expression of either Dacapo or human p21 in progenitors shrinks this population. The selective expression of either protein in mutant progenitor cells, but not in other hematopoietic populations, limits overgrowth, blocks tumorogenesis, and restores organ integrity. We discuss an essential and complex role for sumoylation in preserving the hematopoietic progenitor states for stress response and in the context of normal development of the fly.

  8. Sumoylation is tumor-suppressive and confers proliferative quiescence to hematopoietic progenitors in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    PubMed Central

    Kalamarz, Marta E.; Paddibhatla, Indira; Nadar, Christina; Govind, Shubha

    2012-01-01

    Summary How cell-intrinsic regulation of the cell cycle and the extrinsic influence of the niche converge to provide proliferative quiescence, safeguard tissue integrity, and provide avenues to stop stem cells from giving rise to tumors is a major challenge in gene therapy and tissue engineering. We explore this question in sumoylation-deficient mutants of Drosophila. In wild type third instar larval lymph glands, a group of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells acquires quiescence; a multicellular niche supports their undifferentiated state. However, how proliferative quiescence is instilled in this population is not understood. We show that Ubc9 protein is nuclear in this population. Loss of the SUMO-activating E1 enzyme, Aos1/Uba2, the conjugating E2 enzyme, Ubc9, or the E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS, results in a failure of progenitors to quiesce; progenitors become hyperplastic, misdifferentiate, and develop into microtumors that eventually detach from the dorsal vessel. Significantly, dysplasia and lethality of Ubc9 mutants are rescued when Ubc9wt is provided specifically in the progenitor populations, but not when it is provided in the niche or in the differentiated cortex. While normal progenitors express high levels of the Drosophila cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 homolog, Dacapo, the corresponding overgrown mutant population exhibits a marked reduction in Dacapo. Forced expression of either Dacapo or human p21 in progenitors shrinks this population. The selective expression of either protein in mutant progenitor cells, but not in other hematopoietic populations, limits overgrowth, blocks tumorogenesis, and restores organ integrity. We discuss an essential and complex role for sumoylation in preserving the hematopoietic progenitor states for stress response and in the context of normal development of the fly. PMID:23213407

  9. Vascular incompetence in dialysis patients--protein-bound uremic toxins and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Dou, Laetitia; Cerini, Claire; Dignat-George, Françoise; Brunet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a much higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than the general population. Endothelial dysfunction, which participates in accelerated atherosclerosis, is a hallmark of CKD. Patients with CKD display impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, elevated soluble biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, and increased oxidative stress. They also present an imbalance between circulating endothelial populations reflecting endothelial injury (endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial cells) and repair (endothelial progenitor cells). Endothelial damage induced by a uremic environment suggests an involvement of uremia-specific factors. Several uremic toxins, mostly protein-bound, have been shown to have specific endothelial toxicity: ADMA, homocysteine, AGEs, and more recently, p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate. These toxins, all poorly removed by hemodialysis therapies, share mechanisms of endothelial toxicity: they promote pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory response and inhibit endothelial repair. This article (i) reviews the evidence for endothelial dysfunction in CKD, (ii) specifies the involvement of protein-bound uremic toxins in this dysfunction, and (iii) discusses therapeutic strategies for lowering uremic toxin concentrations or for countering the effects of uremic toxins on the endothelium.

  10. Yeast as a tool for characterizing mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase toxins.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Zachari; White, Dawn; Jørgensen, René; Visschedyk, Danielle; Fieldhouse, Robert J; Mangroo, Dev; Merrill, A Rod

    2009-11-01

    The emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance poses a significant challenge in the pursuit of novel therapeutics, making new strategies for drug discovery imperative. We have developed a yeast growth-defect phenotypic screen to help solve this current dilemma. This approach facilitates the identification and characterization of a new diphtheria toxin (DT) group, ADP-ribosyltransferase toxins from pathogenic bacteria. In addition, this assay utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a reliable model for bacterial toxin expression, to streamline the identification and characterization of new inhibitors against this group of bacterial toxins that may be useful for antimicrobial therapies. We show that a mutant of the elongation factor 2 target protein in yeast, G701R, confers resistance to all DT group toxins and recovers the growth-defect phenotype in yeast. We also demonstrate the ability of a potent small-molecule toxin inhibitor, 1,8-naphthalimide (NAP), to alleviate the growth defect caused by toxin expression in yeast. Moreover, we determined the crystal structure of the NAP inhibitor-toxin complex at near-atomic resolution to provide insight into the inhibitory mechanism. Finally, the NAP inhibitor shows therapeutic protective effects against toxin invasion of mammalian cells, including human lung cells.

  11. Strategies to improve the insecticidal activity of Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Pardo-López, L; Muñoz-Garay, C; Porta, H; Rodríguez-Almazán, C; Soberón, M; Bravo, A

    2009-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins have been widely used in the control of insect pests either as spray products or expressed in transgenic crops. These proteins are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism of action that involves the sequential interaction with several toxin-receptors. Cry toxins are specific against susceptible larvae and although they are often highly effective, some insect pests are not affected by them or show low susceptibility. In addition, the development of resistance threatens their effectiveness, so strategies to cope with all these problems are necessary. In this review we will discuss and compare the different strategies that have been used to improve insecticidal activity of Cry toxins. The activity of Cry toxins can be enhanced by using additional proteins in the bioassay like serine protease inhibitors, chitinases, Cyt toxins, or a fragment of cadherin receptor containing a toxin-binding site. On the other hand, different modifications performed in the toxin gene such as site-directed mutagenesis, introduction of cleavage sites in specific regions of the protein, and deletion of small fragments from the amino-terminal region lead to improved toxicity or overcome resistance, representing interesting alternatives for insect pest control.

  12. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  13. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Botulinum toxin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, J

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has become a powerful therapeutic tool for a growing number of clinical applications. This review draws attention to new findings about the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin and briefly reviews some of its most frequent uses, focusing on evidence based data. Double blind, placebo controlled studies, as well as open label clinical trials, provide evidence that, when appropriate targets and doses are selected, botulinum toxin temporarily ameliorates disorders associated with excessive muscle contraction or autonomic dysfunction. When injected not more often than every three months, the risk of blocking antibodies is slight. Long term experience with this agent suggests that it is an effective and safe treatment not only for approved indications but also for an increasing number of off-label indications. PMID:15201348

  15. [Biological and toxin terrorism weapons].

    PubMed

    Bokan, Slavko

    2003-03-01

    The use of biological agents and toxins in warfare and terrorism has a long history. Human, animal and plant pathogens and toxins can cause disease and can be used as a threat to humans, animals and staple crops. The same is true for biological agents. Although the use of biological agents and toxins in military conflicts has been a concern of military communities for many years, several recent events have increased the awareness of terrorist use of these weapons against civilian population. A Mass Casualty Biological (Toxin) Weapon (MCBTW) is any biological and toxin weapon capable of causing death or disease on a large scale, such that the military or civilian infrastructure of the state or organization being attacked is overwhelmed. A militarily significant (or terrorist) weapon is any weapon capable of affecting, directly or indirectly, that is physically or psychologically, the outcome of a military operation. Although many biological agents such as toxins and bioregulators can be used to cause diseases, there are only a few that can truly threaten civilian populations on a large scale. Bioregulators or modulators are biochemical compounds, such as peptides, that occur naturally in organisms. They are new class of weapons that can damage nervous system, alter moods, trigger psychological changes and kill. The potential military or terrorist use of bioregulators is similar to that of toxins. Some of these compounds are several hundred times more potent than traditional chemical warfare agents. Important features and military advantages of new bioregulators are novel sites of toxic action; rapid and specific effects; penetration of protective filters and equipment, and militarily effective physical incapacitation. This overview of biological agents and toxins is largely intended to help healthcare providers on all levels to make decisions in protecting general population from these agents.

  16. The insecticidal potential of scorpion beta-toxins.

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Michael; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Ilan, Nitza; Kahn, Roy; Turkov, Michael; Stankiewicz, Maria; Stühmer, Walter; Dong, Ke; Gordon, Dalia

    2007-03-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are a major target for toxins and insecticides due to their central role in excitability, but due to the conservation of these channels in Animalia most insecticides do not distinguish between those of insects and mammals, thereby imposing risks to humans and livestock. Evidently, as long as modern agriculture depends heavily on the use of insecticides there is a great need for new substances capable of differentiating between sodium channel subtypes. Such substances exist in venomous animals, but ways for their exploitation have not yet been developed due to problems associated with manufacturing, degradation, and delivery to the target channels. Engineering of plants for expression of anti-insect toxins or use of natural vectors that express toxins near their target site (e.g. baculoviruses) are still problematic and raise public concern. In this problematic reality a rational approach might be to learn from nature how to design highly selective anti-insect compounds preferably in the form of peptidomimetics. This is a complex task that requires the elucidation of the face of interaction between insect-selective toxins and their sodium channel receptor sites. This review delineates current progress in: (i) elucidation of the bioactive surfaces of scorpion beta-toxins, especially the excitatory and depressant groups, which show high preference for insects and bind insect sodium channels with high affinity; (ii) studies of the mode of interaction of scorpion beta-toxins with receptor site-4 on voltage-gated sodium channels; and (iii) clarification of channel elements that constitute receptor site-4. This information may be useful in future attempts to mimic the bioactive surface of the toxins for the design of anti-insect selective peptidomimetics.

  17. Pattern of Neurogenesis and Identification of Neuronal Progenitor Subtypes during Pallial Development in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Nerea; González, Agustín

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of the pallium during evolution has increased dramatically in many different respects. The highest level of complexity is found in mammals, where most of the pallium (cortex) shows a layered organization and neurons are generated during development following an inside-out order, a sequence not observed in other amniotes (birds and reptiles). Species-differences may be related to major neurogenetic events, from the neural progenitors that divide and produce all pallial cells. In mammals, two main types of precursors have been described, primary precursor cells in the ventricular zone (vz; also called radial glial cells or apical progenitors) and secondary precursor cells (called basal or intermediate progenitors) separated from the ventricle surface. Previous studies suggested that pallial neurogenetic cells, and especially the intermediate progenitors, evolved independently in mammalian and sauropsid lineages. In the present study, we examined pallial neurogenesis in the amphibian Xenopus laevis, a representative species of the only group of tetrapods that are anamniotes. The pattern of pallial proliferation during embryonic and larval development was studied, together with a multiple immunohistochemical analysis of putative progenitor cells. We found that there are two phases of progenitor divisions in the developing pallium that, following the radial unit concept from the ventricle to the mantle, finally result in an outside-in order of mature neurons, what seems to be the primitive condition of vertebrates. Gene expressions of key transcription factors that characterize radial glial cells in the vz were demonstrated in Xenopus. In addition, although mitotic cells were corroborated outside the vz, the expression pattern of markers for intermediate progenitors differed from mammals. PMID:28396626

  18. A genetic analysis of neural progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Geschwind, D H; Ou, J; Easterday, M C; Dougherty, J D; Jackson, R L; Chen, Z; Antoine, H; Terskikh, A; Weissman, I L; Nelson, S F; Kornblum, H I

    2001-02-01

    Genetic mechanisms regulating CNS progenitor function and differentiation are not well understood. We have used microarrays derived from a representational difference analysis (RDA) subtraction in a heterogeneous stem cell culture system to systematically study the gene expression patterns of CNS progenitors. This analysis identified both known and novel genes enriched in progenitor cultures. In situ hybridization in a subset of clones demonstrated that many of these genes were expressed preferentially in germinal zones, some showing distinct ventricular or subventricular zone labeling. Several genes were also enriched in hematopoietic stem cells, suggesting an overlap of gene expression in neural and hematopoietic progenitors. This combination of methods demonstrates the power of using custom microarrays derived from RDA-subtracted libraries for both gene discovery and gene expression analysis in the central nervous system.

  19. Overview of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins: Exposures and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Lora E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Baden, Daniel G.

    2005-01-01

    Florida red tide is caused by Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that periodically blooms, releasing its potent neurotoxin, brevetoxin, into the surrounding waters and air along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Exposure to Florida red tide toxins has been associated with adverse human health effects and massive fish and marine mammal deaths. The articles in this mini-monograph describe the ongoing interdisciplinary and interagency research program that characterizes the exposures and health effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins). The interdisciplinary research program uses animal models and laboratory studies to develop hypotheses and apply these findings to in situ human exposures. Our ultimate goal is to develop appropriate prevention measures and medical interventions to mitigate or prevent adverse health effects from exposure to complex mixtures of aerosolized red tide toxins. PMID:15866773

  20. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  1. Circulating Vascular Progenitor Cells in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Seung; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Various approaches have been attempted in translational moyamoya disease research. One promising material for modeling and treating this disease is vascular progenitor cells, which can be acquired and expanded from patient peripheral blood. These cells may provide a novel experimental model and enable us to obtain insights regarding moyamoya disease pathogenesis. We briefly present the recent accomplishments in regard to the studies of vascular progenitor cells in moyamoya disease. PMID:26180610

  2. Targeted toxins in brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Michael; Hall, Walter A

    2010-11-01

    Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  3. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  4. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  5. Photoactivated perylenequinone toxins in fungal pathogenesis of plants.

    PubMed

    Daub, Margaret E; Herrero, Sonia; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2005-11-15

    Several genera of plant pathogenic fungi produce photoactivated perylenequinone toxins involved in pathogenesis of their hosts. These toxins are photosensitizers, absorbing light energy and generating reactive oxygen species that damage the membranes of the host cells. Studies with toxin-deficient mutants and on the involvement of light in symptom development have documented the importance of these toxins in successful pathogenesis of plants. This review focuses on the well studied perylenequinone toxin, cercosporin, produced by species in the genus Cercospora. Significant progress has been made recently on the biosynthetic pathway of cercosporin, with the characterization of genes encoding a polyketide synthase and a major facilitator superfamily transporter, representing the first and last steps of the biosynthetic pathway, as well as important regulatory genes. In addition, the resistance of Cercospora fungi to cercosporin and to the singlet oxygen that it generates has led to the use of these fungi as models for understanding cellular resistance to photosensitizers and singlet oxygen. These studies have shown that resistance is complex, and have documented a role for transporters, transient reductive detoxification, and quenchers in cercosporin resistance.

  6. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  7. Inositol hexakisphosphate-dependent processing of Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Genisyuerek, Selda; Lü, Wei; Jank, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-04-29

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi α-toxin, which are virulence factors involved in the toxic shock and gas gangrene syndromes, are members of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins. The toxins inactivate Rho/Ras proteins by glucosylation or attachment of GlcNAc (α-toxin). Here, we studied the activation of the autoproteolytic processing of the toxins by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) and compared it with the processing of Clostridium difficile toxin B. In the presence of low concentrations of InsP(6) (<1 μM), toxin fragments consisting of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (or GlcNAc-transferase) domains and the cysteine protease domains (CPDs) of C. sordellii lethal toxin, C. novyi α-toxin, and C. difficile toxin B were autocatalytically processed. The cleavage sites of lethal toxin (Leu-543) and α-toxin (Leu-548) and the catalytic cysteine residues (Cys-698 of lethal toxin and Cys-707 of α-toxin) were identified. Affinity of the CPDs for binding InsP(6) was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In contrast to full-length toxin B and α-toxin, autocatalytic cleavage and InsP(6) binding of full-length lethal toxin depended on low pH (pH 5) conditions. The data indicate that C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi α-toxin are InsP(6)-dependently processed. However, full-length lethal toxin, but not its short toxin fragments consisting of the glucosyltransferase domain and the CPD, requires a pH-sensitive conformational change to allow binding of InsP(6) and subsequent processing of the toxin.

  8. Inositol Hexakisphosphate-dependent Processing of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium novyi α-Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Genisyuerek, Selda; Lü, Wei; Jank, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi α-toxin, which are virulence factors involved in the toxic shock and gas gangrene syndromes, are members of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins. The toxins inactivate Rho/Ras proteins by glucosylation or attachment of GlcNAc (α-toxin). Here, we studied the activation of the autoproteolytic processing of the toxins by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) and compared it with the processing of Clostridium difficile toxin B. In the presence of low concentrations of InsP6 (<1 μm), toxin fragments consisting of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (or GlcNAc-transferase) domains and the cysteine protease domains (CPDs) of C. sordellii lethal toxin, C. novyi α-toxin, and C. difficile toxin B were autocatalytically processed. The cleavage sites of lethal toxin (Leu-543) and α-toxin (Leu-548) and the catalytic cysteine residues (Cys-698 of lethal toxin and Cys-707 of α-toxin) were identified. Affinity of the CPDs for binding InsP6 was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In contrast to full-length toxin B and α-toxin, autocatalytic cleavage and InsP6 binding of full-length lethal toxin depended on low pH (pH 5) conditions. The data indicate that C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi α-toxin are InsP6-dependently processed. However, full-length lethal toxin, but not its short toxin fragments consisting of the glucosyltransferase domain and the CPD, requires a pH-sensitive conformational change to allow binding of InsP6 and subsequent processing of the toxin. PMID:21385871

  9. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  10. A chimeric scorpion alpha-toxin displays de novo electrophysiological properties similar to those of alpha-like toxins.

    PubMed

    Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss; Benkhalifa, Rym; Srairi, Najet; Zenouaki, Ilhem; Ligny-Lemaire, Caroline; Drevet, Pascal; Sampieri, François; Pelhate, Marcel; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Ménez, André; Karoui, Habib; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2002-06-01

    BotXIV and LqhalphaIT are two structurally related long chain scorpion alpha-toxins that inhibit sodium current inactivation in excitable cells. However, while LqhalphaIT from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus is classified as a true and strong insect alpha-toxin, BotXIV from Buthus occitanus tunetanus is characterized by moderate biological activities. To assess the possibility that structural differences between these two molecules could reflect the localization of particular functional topographies, we compared their sequences. Three structurally deviating segments located in three distinct and exposed loops were identified. They correspond to residues 8-10, 19-22, and 38-43. To evaluate their functional role, three BotXIV/LqhalphaIT chimeras were designed by transferring the corresponding LqhalphaIT sequences into BotXIV. Structural and antigenic characterizations of the resulting recombinant chimera show that BotXIV can accommodate the imposed modifications, confirming the structural flexibility of that particular alpha/beta fold. Interestingly, substitution of residues 8-10 yields to a new electrophysiological profile of the corresponding variant, partially comparable to that one of alpha-like scorpion toxins. Taken together, these results suggest that even limited structural deviations can reflect functional diversity, and also that the structure-function relationships between insect alpha-toxins and alpha-like scorpion toxins are probably more complex than expected.

  11. Novel insight into stem cell mobilization-plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate is a major chemoattractant that directs the egress of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells from the bone marrow and its level in peripheral blood increases during mobilization due to activation of complement cascade/membrane attack complex.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z; Lee, H; Wysoczynski, M; Wan, W; Marlicz, W; Laughlin, M J; Kucia, M; Janowska-Wieczorek, A; Ratajczak, J

    2010-05-01

    The complement cascade (CC) becomes activated and its cleavage fragments play a crucial role in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Here, we sought to determine which major chemoattractant present in peripheral blood (PB) is responsible for the egress of HSPCs from the bone marrow (BM). We noticed that normal and mobilized plasma strongly chemoattracts HSPCs in a stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-independent manner because (i) plasma SDF-1 level does not correlate with mobilization efficiency; (ii) the chemotactic plasma gradient is not affected in the presence of AMD3100 and (iii) it is resistant to denaturation by heat. Surprisingly, the observed loss of plasma chemotactic activity after charcoal stripping suggested the involvement of bioactive lipids and we focused on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a known chemoattracant of HSPCs. We found that S1P (i) creates in plasma a continuously present gradient for BM-residing HSPCs; (ii) is at physiologically relevant concentrations a chemoattractant several magnitudes stronger than SDF-1 and (iii) its plasma level increases during mobilization due to CC activation and interaction of the membrane attack complex (MAC) with erythrocytes that are a major reservoir of S1P. We conclude and propose a new paradigm that S1P is a crucial chemoattractant for BM-residing HSPCs and that CC through MAC induces the release of S1P from erythrocytes for optimal egress/mobilization of HSPCs.

  12. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  13. Structure of a novel antibacterial toxin that exploits elongation factor Tu to cleave specific transfer RNAs

    DOE PAGES

    Michalska, Karolina; Gucinski, Grant C.; Garza-Sanchez, Fernando; ...

    2017-08-11

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a mechanism of inter-cellular competition in which Gram-negative bacteria exchange polymorphic toxins using type V secretion systems. Here, we present structures of the CDI toxin from Escherichia coli NC101 in ternary complex with its cognate immunity protein and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). The toxin binds exclusively to domain 2 of EF-Tu, partially overlapping the site that interacts with the 3'-end of aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA). The toxin exerts a unique ribonuclease activity that cleaves the single-stranded 3'-end from tRNAs that contain guanine discriminator nucleotides. EF-Tu is required to support this tRNase activity in vitro, suggesting the toxinmore » specifically cleaves substrate in the context of GTP·EF-Tu·aa-tRNA complexes. However, superimposition of the toxin domain onto previously solved GTP·EF-Tu·aa-tRNA structures reveals potential steric clashes with both aa-tRNA and the switch I region of EF-Tu. Further, the toxin induces conformational changes in EF-Tu, displacing a β-hairpin loop that forms a critical salt-bridge contact with the 3'-terminal adenylate of aa-tRNA. Altogether, these observations suggest that the toxin remodels GTP·EF-Tu·aa-tRNA complexes to free the 3'-end of aa-tRNA for entry into the nuclease active site.« less

  14. Chloroquine derivatives block the translocation pores and inhibit cellular entry of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin.

    PubMed

    Kreidler, Anna-Maria; Benz, Roland; Barth, Holger

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce the binary protein toxins C2 and lethal toxin (LT), respectively. These toxins consist of a binding/transport (B7) component that delivers the separate enzyme (A) component into the cytosol of target cells where it modifies its specific substrate and causes cell death. The B7 components of C2 toxin and LT, C2IIa and PA63, respectively, are ring-shaped heptamers that bind to their cellular receptors and form complexes with their A components C2I and lethal factor (LF), respectively. After receptor-mediated endocytosis of the toxin complexes, C2IIa and PA63 insert into the membranes of acidified endosomes and form trans-membrane pores through which C2I and LF translocate across endosomal membranes into the cytosol. C2IIa and PA63 also form channels in planar bilayer membranes, and we used this approach earlier to identify chloroquine as a potent blocker of C2IIa and PA63 pores. Here, a series of chloroquine derivatives was investigated to identify more efficient toxin inhibitors with less toxic side effects. Chloroquine, primaquine, quinacrine, and fluphenazine blocked C2IIa and PA63 pores in planar lipid bilayers and in membranes of living epithelial cells and macrophages, thereby preventing the pH-dependent membrane transport of the A components into the cytosol and protecting cells from intoxication with C2 toxin and LT. These potent inhibitors of toxin entry underline the central role of the translocation pores for cellular uptake of binary bacterial toxins and as relevant drug targets, and might be lead compounds for novel pharmacological strategies against severe enteric diseases and anthrax.

  15. Uremic toxins and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lameire, N; Vanholder, R; De Smet, R

    2001-02-01

    Uremic toxicity is related in part to the accumulation of toxic substances, the nature of which has only partly been characterized. Because of the use of a highly permeable membrane and better preservation of the residual renal function, it could be anticipated that some of these uremic toxins are more efficiently cleared across the peritoneal membrane, and that the plasma and tissue levels of these compounds are lower than in hemodialysis patients. This article analyzes the generation and removal of several uremic toxins in peritoneal dialysis patients. The following uremic toxins are discussed: beta2-microglobulin, advanced glycation end products, advanced oxidation protein products, granulocyte inhibitory proteins, p-Cresol, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Some recent studies are reviewed suggesting that uremic toxins are involved in the progression of renal failure and are at least partially removed by peritoneal dialysis. We conclude that, although the plasma levels of some of these compounds are lower in peritoneal dialysis versus hemodialysis patients, it does not mean that the peritoneal dialysis patient is "better" protected against the numerous disturbances caused by these toxins.

  16. Bacterial Toxins for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zahaf, Nour-Imene; Schmidt, Gudula

    2017-07-28

    Several pathogenic bacteria secrete toxins to inhibit the immune system of the infected organism. Frequently, they catalyze a covalent modification of specific proteins. Thereby, they block production and/or secretion of antibodies or cytokines. Moreover, they disable migration of macrophages and disturb the barrier function of epithelia. In most cases, these toxins are extremely effective enzymes with high specificity towards their cellular substrates, which are often central signaling molecules. Moreover, they encompass the capacity to enter mammalian cells and to modify their substrates in the cytosol. A few molecules, at least of some toxins, are sufficient to change the cellular morphology and function of a cell or even kill a cell. Since many of those toxins are well studied concerning molecular mechanisms, cellular receptors, uptake routes, and structures, they are now widely used to analyze or to influence specific signaling pathways of mammalian cells. Here, we review the development of immunotoxins and targeted toxins for the treatment of a disease that is still hard to treat: cancer.

  17. The adult pituitary shows stem/progenitor cell activation in response to injury and is capable of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuli; Gremeaux, Lies; Luque, Raul M; Liekens, Daisy; Chen, Jianghai; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Kineman, Rhonda; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The pituitary gland constitutes, together with the hypothalamus, the regulatory core of the endocrine system. Whether the gland is capable of cell regeneration after injury, in particular when suffered at adult age, is unknown. To investigate the adult pituitary's regenerative capacity and the response of its stem/progenitor cell compartment to damage, we constructed a transgenic mouse model to conditionally destroy pituitary cells. GHCre/iDTR mice express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor after transcriptional activation by Cre recombinase, which is driven by the GH promoter. Treatment with DT for 3 d leads to gradual GH(+) (somatotrope) cell obliteration with a final ablation grade of 80-90% 1 wk later. The stem/progenitor cell-clustering side population promptly expands after injury, concordant with the immediate increase in Sox2(+) stem/progenitor cells. In addition, folliculo-stellate cells, previously designated as pituitary stem/progenitor cells and significantly overlapping with Sox2(+) cells, also increase in abundance. In situ examination reveals expansion of the Sox2(+) marginal-zone niche and appearance of remarkable Sox2(+) cells that contain GH. When mice are left after the DT-provoked lesion, GH(+) cells considerably regenerate during the following months. Double Sox2(+)/GH(+) cells are observed throughout the regenerative period, suggesting recovery of somatotropes from stem/progenitor cells, as further supported by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulse-chase lineage tracing. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the adult pituitary gland holds regenerative competence and that tissue repair follows prompt activation and plausible involvement of the stem/progenitor cells.

  18. Prorenin receptor is critical for nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Kidd, Laura; Bushnell, Daniel; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M; Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2016-01-15

    Deficient nephrogenesis is the major factor contributing to renal hypoplasia defined as abnormally small kidneys. Nephron induction during kidney development is driven by reciprocal interactions between progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme (CM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The prorenin receptor (PRR) is a receptor for renin and prorenin, and an accessory subunit of the vacuolar proton pump H(+)-ATPase. Global loss of PRR is lethal in mice and PRR mutations are associated with a high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and X-linked mental retardation in humans. To circumvent lethality of the ubiquitous PRR mutation in mice and to determine the potential role of the PRR in nephrogenesis, we generated a mouse model with a conditional deletion of the PRR in Six2(+) nephron progenitors and their epithelial derivatives (Six2(PRR-/-)). Targeted ablation of PRR in Six2(+) nephron progenitors caused a marked decrease in the number of developing nephrons, small cystic kidneys and podocyte foot process effacement at birth, and early postnatal death. Reduced congenital nephron endowment resulted from premature depletion of nephron progenitor cell population due to impaired progenitor cell proliferation and loss of normal molecular inductive response to canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling within the metanephric mesenchyme. At 2 months of age, heterozygous Six2(PRR+/-) mice exhibited focal glomerulosclerosis, decreased kidney function and massive proteinuria. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a cell-autonomous requirement for the PRR within nephron progenitors for progenitor maintenance, progression of nephrogenesis, normal kidney development and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural Progenitors Adopt Specific Identities by Directly Repressing All Alternative Progenitor Transcriptional Programs.

    PubMed

    Kutejova, Eva; Sasai, Noriaki; Shah, Ankita; Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James

    2016-03-21

    In the vertebrate neural tube, a morphogen-induced transcriptional network produces multiple molecularly distinct progenitor domains, each generating different neuronal subtypes. Using an in vitro differentiation system, we defined gene expression signatures of distinct progenitor populations and identified direct gene-regulatory inputs corresponding to locations of specific transcription factor binding. Combined with targeted perturbations of the network, this revealed a mechanism in which a progenitor identity is installed by active repression of the entire transcriptional programs of other neural progenitor fates. In the ventral neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, together with broadly expressed transcriptional activators, concurrently activates the gene expression programs of several domains. The specific outcome is selected by repressive input provided by Shh-induced transcription factors that act as the key nodes in the network, enabling progenitors to adopt a single definitive identity from several initially permitted options. Together, the data suggest design principles relevant to many developing tissues.

  20. Earmuff restricts progenitor cell potential by attenuating the competence to respond to self-renewal factors

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Derek H.; Komori, Hideyuki; Grbac, Daniel; Chen, Keng; Koe, Chwee Tat; Wang, Hongyan; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Despite expressing stem cell self-renewal factors, intermediate progenitor cells possess restricted developmental potential, which allows them to give rise exclusively to differentiated progeny rather than stem cell progeny. Failure to restrict the developmental potential can allow intermediate progenitor cells to revert into aberrant stem cells that might contribute to tumorigenesis. Insight into stable restriction of the developmental potential in intermediate progenitor cells could improve our understanding of the development and growth of tumors, but the mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), generated by type II neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in fly larval brains, provide an in vivo model for investigating the mechanisms that stably restrict the developmental potential of intermediate progenitor cells. Here, we report that the transcriptional repressor protein Earmuff (Erm) functions temporally after Brain tumor (Brat) and Numb to restrict the developmental potential of uncommitted (immature) INPs. Consistently, endogenous Erm is detected in immature INPs but undetectable in INPs. Erm-dependent restriction of the developmental potential in immature INPs leads to attenuated competence to respond to all known neuroblast self-renewal factors in INPs. We also identified that the BAP chromatin-remodeling complex probably functions cooperatively with Erm to restrict the developmental potential of immature INPs. Together, these data led us to conclude that the Erm-BAP-dependent mechanism stably restricts the developmental potential of immature INPs by attenuating their genomic responses to stem cell self-renewal factors. We propose that restriction of developmental potential by the Erm-BAP-dependent mechanism functionally distinguishes intermediate progenitor cells from stem cells, ensuring the generation of differentiated cells and preventing the formation of progenitor cell-derived tumor-initiating stem cells. PMID

  1. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  2. Botulinum Toxin in Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ILGAZ AYDINLAR, Elif; YALINAY DİKMEN, Pınar; SAĞDUYU KOCAMAN, Ayşe

    2013-01-01

    Since botulinum toxin might have a therapeutic effect on pain, many studies investigating the efficiency of botulinum toxin in headache treatment have been done. The most satisfying results were achieved by botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) in the treatment of chronic migraine. In this paper, we reviewed the clinical effectiveness of BoNT/A in migraine and included our clinical experience. In our ongoing pilot study, where we have repeated BoNT/A injections every 12 weeks, The difference in the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) scores between the first and the second injections was 61.1%; and between the first and the 3rd injections was found to be 65.72%.

  3. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  4. FORMOLIZATION OF PURIFIED AND CONCENTRATED DIPHTHERIA TOXIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method for detoxication of diphtheria toxin by a preliminary culture formolization followed by purification of the antigen and final detoxication of the toxin in a purified, concentrated condition is discussed. (Author)

  5. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  6. Inhibition of cholera toxin and other AB toxins by polyphenolic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    All AB-type protein toxins have intracellular targets despite an initial extracellular location. These toxins use different methods to reach the cytosol and have different effects on the target cell. Broad-spectrum inhibitors against AB toxins are therefore hard to develop because the toxins use dif...

  7. [Clinical application of botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, Takahiro

    2011-07-01

    The clinical application of botulinum toxin (BoNT) was first proposed by Justinus Kerner in 1822. BoNT was formally accepted as a therapeutic agent in the 1970s, and currently, it is used worldwide for treating diseases as well as for cosmetic conditions. In Japan, Botox® is the only type A formulation that has been officially approved for the treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, cervical dystonia, pes equinus of cerebral palsy, adult spasticity of upper and lower limbs, and Botox Vista® is applied for glabellar frown lines. Its effect is symptomatic, but long-lasting remission is noted after treatment in more than 30% of cases with cervical dystonia. Ultrasound guidance is useful and may be even superior to electromyographic monitoring, especially when the obliquus capitis inferior muscle is targeted in rotatocollis, because the vertebral artery or upper cervical nerve root(s) may be injured when the needle penetrates the muscle. BoNT alleviates pain or glandular secretion besides causing a neuromuscular block. After being transported to the axons, BoNT is carried centrally and even to the adjacent neurons via synapses (toxin jump). A direct central action has also been postulated. BoNT is generally safe, but serious adverse reactions may occur very rarely. Individual differences in toxin sensitivity may be considerably greater than assumed, and even the routine clinical dose may be too high in some patients. The future strategy includes clinical application of other types of toxin or chimera toxins, or the use of the toxin as a cargo ("Trojan Horse") carrying some bioactive molecules into the cell. A non-injection procedure for mucosal application or cosmetic use is currently under clinical trials.

  8. Adult c-Kit(+) progenitor cells are necessary for maintenance and regeneration of olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Bradley J; Goss, Garrett M; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E; Rangel, Erika B; Seidler, Barbara; Saur, Dieter; Hare, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium houses chemosensory neurons, which transmit odor information from the nose to the brain. In adult mammals, the olfactory epithelium is a uniquely robust neuroproliferative zone, with the ability to replenish its neuronal and non-neuronal populations due to the presence of germinal basal cells. The stem and progenitor cells of these germinal layers, and their regulatory mechanisms, remain incompletely defined. Here we show that progenitor cells expressing c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase marking stem cells in a variety of embryonic tissues, are required for maintenance of the adult neuroepithelium. Mouse genetic fate-mapping analyses show that embryonically, a c-Kit(+) population contributes to olfactory neurogenesis. In adults under conditions of normal turnover, there is relatively sparse c-Kit(+) progenitor cell (ckPC) activity. However, after experimentally induced neuroepithelial injury, ckPCs are activated such that they reconstitute the neuronal population. There are also occasional non-neuronal cells found to arise from ckPCs. Moreover, the selective depletion of the ckPC population, utilizing temporally controlled targeted diphtheria toxin A expression, results in failure of neurogenesis after experimental injury. Analysis of this model indicates that most ckPCs reside among the globose basal cell populations and act downstream of horizontal basal cells, which can serve as stem cells. Identification of the requirement for olfactory c-Kit-expressing progenitors in olfactory maintenance provides new insight into the mechanisms involved in adult olfactory neurogenesis. Additionally, we define an important and previously unrecognized site of adult c-Kit activity.

  9. Kinetics of expansion of human limbal epithelial progenitor cells in primary culture of explants without feeders.

    PubMed

    Ghoubay-Benallaoua, Djida; Sandali, Otman; Goldschmidt, Pablo; Borderie, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether human limbal explant cultures without feeder cells result in expansion of epithelial progenitors and to estimate the optimal expansion time for progenitor cells. Limbal explants from ten human corneas were cultured for 7, 9, 11, 14, 18, and 21 days. Limbal explants from two corneas were enzymatically dissociated or directly cultured for 14 days. Progenitor cells were characterized by their ability to form colonies, by immunocytochemistry, and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Colonies were identified after 9, 11, 14, and 18 days of culture, but not after 21 days. The number of colonies per explant was significantly higher after 14 days than after 9 and 21 days. The mean percentage of seeded cells giving rise to clones was 4.03% after 14 days of culture and 0.36% for non-cultured dissociated limbal epithelial cells. The number of cells giving rise to clones per cornea significantly increased from an average of 2275 for non-cultured cells to 24266 for cells cultured for 14 days. Immunocytochemical analysis detected positive staining for cytokeratin (CK) 3, CK5/6/8/10/13/18, CK19, vimentin, p63, and p63α, in both cultures and clones. CK3 expression increased significantly with culture time. Transcript expression was observed for CK3, CK19, vimentin, and Delta N p63α at each culture time point, both in cultures and clones. The optimal culture time for limbal explants in cholera toxin-free Green medium without feeder cells was 14 days leading to the expansion of progenitors.

  10. Food-Borne Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, F. S.

    1966-01-01

    Food poisoning caused by the ingestion of preformed bacterial toxins is considered in relation to comparative symptoms, procedures for extraction and purification of the causal toxins, their chemistry, serology, assay procedures and pharmacology, in so far as these are known. The bacteria discussed in this context are Clostridium botulinum, C. perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Vibrio parahemolyticus. The possible roles of the enterococci, Proteus, E. coli and of unknown species, in relation to production of non-antigenic toxic substances, are discussed briefly. Requirements for prevention of the various forms of bacterial food poisoning are outlined. PMID:5905949

  11. Importance of toxin A, toxin B, and CDT in virulence of an epidemic Clostridium difficile strain.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Collery, Mark M; Kelly, Michelle L; Cartman, Stephen T; Cockayne, Alan; Minton, Nigel P

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the main cause of healthcare-acquired diarrhea in the developed world. In addition to the main virulence factors toxin A and B, epidemic, PCR Ribotype 027 strains, such as R20291, produce a third toxin, CDT. To develop effective medical countermeasures, it is important to understand the importance of each toxin. Accordingly, we created all possible combinations of isogenic toxin mutants of R20291 and assessed their virulence. We demonstrated that either toxin A or toxin B alone can cause fulminant disease in the hamster infection model and present tantalizing data that C. difficile toxin may also contribute to virulence.

  12. STELLAR BINARY COMPANIONS TO SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-12-20

    For typical models of binary statistics, 50%-80% of core-collapse supernova (ccSN) progenitors are members of a stellar binary at the time of the explosion. Independent of any consequences of mass transfer, this has observational consequences that can be used to study the binary properties of massive stars. In particular, the secondary companion to the progenitor of a Type Ib/c SN is frequently (approx50%) the more optically luminous star since the high effective temperatures of the stripped progenitors make it relatively easy for a lower luminosity, cooler secondary to emit more optical light. Secondaries to the lower mass progenitors of Type II SN will frequently produce excess blue emission relative to the spectral energy distribution of the red primary. Available data constrain the models weakly. Any detected secondaries also provide an independent lower bound on the progenitor mass and, for historical SN, show that it was not a Type Ia event. Bright ccSN secondaries have an unambiguous, post-explosion observational signature-strong, blueshifted, relatively broad absorption lines created by the developing SN remnant (SNR). These can be used to locate historical SN with bright secondaries, confirm that a source is a secondary, and, potentially, measure abundances of ccSN ejecta. Luminous, hot secondaries will re-ionize the SNR on timescales of 100-1000 yr that are faster than re-ionization by the reverse shock, creating peculiar H II regions due to the high metallicity and velocities of the ejecta.

  13. Toxin yet not toxic: Botulinum toxin in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Archana, M S

    2016-04-01

    Paracelsus contrasted poisons from nonpoisons, stating that "All things are poisons, and there is nothing that is harmless; the dose alone decides that something is a poison". Living organisms, such as plants, animals, and microorganisms, constitute a huge source of pharmaceutically useful medicines and toxins. Depending on their source, toxins can be categorized as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, or zootoxins, which include venoms and bacterial toxins. Any toxin can be harmful or beneficial. Within the last 100 years, the perception of botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) has evolved from that of a poison to a versatile clinical agent with various uses. BTX plays a key role in the management of many orofacial and dental disorders. Its indications are rapidly expanding, with ongoing trials for further applications. However, despite its clinical use, what BTX specifically does in each condition is still not clear. The main aim of this review is to describe some of the unclear aspects of this potentially useful agent, with a focus on the current research in dentistry.

  14. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom toxins: tools for biological purposes.

    PubMed

    Chaim, Olga Meiri; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Wille, Ana Carolina M; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2011-03-01

    Venomous animals use their venoms as tools for defense or predation. These venoms are complex mixtures, mainly enriched of proteic toxins or peptides with several, and different, biological activities. In general, spider venom is rich in biologically active molecules that are useful in experimental protocols for pharmacology, biochemistry, cell biology and immunology, as well as putative tools for biotechnology and industries. Spider venoms have recently garnered much attention from several research groups worldwide. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom is enriched in low molecular mass proteins (5-40 kDa). Although their venom is produced in minute volumes (a few microliters), and contain only tens of micrograms of protein, the use of techniques based on molecular biology and proteomic analysis has afforded rational projects in the area and permitted the discovery and identification of a great number of novel toxins. The brown spider phospholipase-D family is undoubtedly the most investigated and characterized, although other important toxins, such as low molecular mass insecticidal peptides, metalloproteases and hyaluronidases have also been identified and featured in literature. The molecular pathways of the action of these toxins have been reported and brought new insights in the field of biotechnology. Herein, we shall see how recent reports describing discoveries in the area of brown spider venom have expanded biotechnological uses of molecules identified in these venoms, with special emphasis on the construction of a cDNA library for venom glands, transcriptome analysis, proteomic projects, recombinant expression of different proteic toxins, and finally structural descriptions based on crystallography of toxins.

  15. Disposition and clinical implications of protein-bound uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jitske; Jankowski, Joachim; Gajjala, Prathibha R; Wetzels, Jack F M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2017-07-15

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), adequate renal clearance is compromised, resulting in the accumulation of a plethora of uremic solutes. These uremic retention solutes, also named uremic toxins, are a heterogeneous group of organic compounds with intrinsic biological activities, many of which are too large to be filtered and/or are protein bound. The renal excretion of protein-bound toxins depends largely on active tubular secretion, which shifts the binding and allows for active secretion of the free fraction. To facilitate this process, renal proximal tubule cells are equipped with a range of transporters that co-operate in basolateral uptake and luminal excretion. Many of these transporters have been characterized as mediators of drug disposition, but have recently been recognized for their importance in the proximal renal tubular transport of uremic toxins as well. This also indicates that during uremia, drug disposition may be severely affected as a result of drug-uremic toxin interaction. In addition, CKD patients receive various drugs to treat their complications potentially resulting in drug-drug interactions (DDIs), also for drugs that are non-renally excreted. This review discusses the current knowledge on formation, disposition and removal of protein-bound uremic toxins. Furthermore, implications associated with drug treatment in kidney failure, as well as innovative renal replacement therapies targetting the protein-bound uremic toxins are being discussed. It will become clear that the complex problems associated with uremia warrant a transdisciplinary approach that unites research experts in the area of fundamental biomedical research with their colleagues in clinical nephrology. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Membrane pore architecture of a cytolytic toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Promdonkoy, B; Ellar, D J

    2000-08-15

    To investigate the membrane pore structure of Cyt2Aa1 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis, 14 single-cysteine substitutions of the toxin were constructed. Five of these mutants (L172C, V186C, L189C, E214C and L220C) yielded characteristic products when processed by proteinase K; other mutants were degraded by this enzyme. Mutants that yielded characteristic proteolysed products and wild-type toxin were labelled with polarity-sensitive acrylodan (6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) at the thiol group of cysteine residues. A green-blue shift in the emission spectra was observed with all labelled toxins on transfer from an aqueous solution into a solution containing membranes or liposomes from red blood cells. These results suggested that the label moved into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane or became buried within hydrophobic regions of the protein oligomers. Digestion of membrane-bound labelled toxin with proteinase K did not cause a significant decrease in emission intensity from any of the labelled mutants. This suggests that L172C, V186C, L189C, E214C and L220C are inserted into the membrane and are therefore protected from proteolysis. In contrast, a marked decrease in emission intensity was observed when membrane-bound labelled wild-type toxin was digested with proteinase K. This suggests that Cys-19 does not insert into the membrane. Fluorimetric analysis of delipidated pore complexes suggests that L172C, V186C, L189C and E214C point towards the lipid in the membrane, whereas L220C is either within the hydrophobic environment of the protein oligomers or exposed to the membrane lipids. Most of the Cys-19 from wild-type molecules is enclosed within the hydrophobic pockets of the protein oligomers.

  17. Brown Spider (Loxosceles genus) Venom Toxins: Tools for Biological Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Chaim, Olga Meiri; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Wille, Ana Carolina M.; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2011-01-01

    Venomous animals use their venoms as tools for defense or predation. These venoms are complex mixtures, mainly enriched of proteic toxins or peptides with several, and different, biological activities. In general, spider venom is rich in biologically active molecules that are useful in experimental protocols for pharmacology, biochemistry, cell biology and immunology, as well as putative tools for biotechnology and industries. Spider venoms have recently garnered much attention from several research groups worldwide. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom is enriched in low molecular mass proteins (5–40 kDa). Although their venom is produced in minute volumes (a few microliters), and contain only tens of micrograms of protein, the use of techniques based on molecular biology and proteomic analysis has afforded rational projects in the area and permitted the discovery and identification of a great number of novel toxins. The brown spider phospholipase-D family is undoubtedly the most investigated and characterized, although other important toxins, such as low molecular mass insecticidal peptides, metalloproteases and hyaluronidases have also been identified and featured in literature. The molecular pathways of the action of these toxins have been reported and brought new insights in the field of biotechnology. Herein, we shall see how recent reports describing discoveries in the area of brown spider venom have expanded biotechnological uses of molecules identified in these venoms, with special emphasis on the construction of a cDNA library for venom glands, transcriptome analysis, proteomic projects, recombinant expression of different proteic toxins, and finally structural descriptions based on crystallography of toxins. PMID:22069711

  18. The Biochemical Toxin Arsenal from Ant Venoms.

    PubMed

    Touchard, Axel; Aili, Samira R; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Escoubas, Pierre; Orivel, Jérôme; Nicholson, Graham M; Dejean, Alain

    2016-01-20

    Ants (Formicidae) represent a taxonomically diverse group of hymenopterans with over 13,000 extant species, the majority of which inject or spray secretions from a venom gland. The evolutionary success of ants is mostly due to their unique eusociality that has permitted them to develop complex collaborative strategies, partly involving their venom secretions, to defend their nest against predators, microbial pathogens, ant competitors, and to hunt prey. Activities of ant venom include paralytic, cytolytic, haemolytic, allergenic, pro-inflammatory, insecticidal, antimicrobial, and pain-producing pharmacologic activities, while non-toxic functions include roles in chemical communication involving trail and sex pheromones, deterrents, and aggregators. While these diverse activities in ant venoms have until now been largely understudied due to the small venom yield from ants, modern analytical and venomic techniques are beginning to reveal the diversity of toxin structure and function. As such, ant venoms are distinct from other venomous animals, not only rich in linear, dimeric and disulfide-bonded peptides and bioactive proteins, but also other volatile and non-volatile compounds such as alkaloids and hydrocarbons. The present review details the unique structures and pharmacologies of known ant venom proteinaceous and alkaloidal toxins and their potential as a source of novel bioinsecticides and therapeutic agents.

  19. The Biochemical Toxin Arsenal from Ant Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Touchard, Axel; Aili, Samira R.; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Escoubas, Pierre; Orivel, Jérôme; Nicholson, Graham M.; Dejean, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Ants (Formicidae) represent a taxonomically diverse group of hymenopterans with over 13,000 extant species, the majority of which inject or spray secretions from a venom gland. The evolutionary success of ants is mostly due to their unique eusociality that has permitted them to develop complex collaborative strategies, partly involving their venom secretions, to defend their nest against predators, microbial pathogens, ant competitors, and to hunt prey. Activities of ant venom include paralytic, cytolytic, haemolytic, allergenic, pro-inflammatory, insecticidal, antimicrobial, and pain-producing pharmacologic activities, while non-toxic functions include roles in chemical communication involving trail and sex pheromones, deterrents, and aggregators. While these diverse activities in ant venoms have until now been largely understudied due to the small venom yield from ants, modern analytical and venomic techniques are beginning to reveal the diversity of toxin structure and function. As such, ant venoms are distinct from other venomous animals, not only rich in linear, dimeric and disulfide-bonded peptides and bioactive proteins, but also other volatile and non-volatile compounds such as alkaloids and hydrocarbons. The present review details the unique structures and pharmacologies of known ant venom proteinaceous and alkaloidal toxins and their potential as a source of novel bioinsecticides and therapeutic agents. PMID:26805882

  20. [Pharmacological aspects of therapeutic botulinum toxin preparations].

    PubMed

    Dressler, D

    2006-08-01

    Therapeutic preparations of botulinum toxin (BT) consist of botulinum neurotoxin (BNT), complexing proteins, and excipients. Depending on the target tissue, BNT can block cholinergic neuromuscular innervation of intra- and extrafusal muscle fibres or cholinergic autonomic innervation of sweat, lacrimal, and salival glands and smooth muscles. Indirect CNS effects are numerous; direct ones have not been reported after intramuscular application. Botulinum toxin type A is distributed as Botox, Dysport, Xeomin, Hengli/CBTX-A, and Neuronox and BT type B as NeuroBloc/Myobloc. Differences in potency labelling of therapeutic BT preparations can be corrected by introduction of a conversion factor of 1:3 between Botox and Dysport, of 1:1 between Botox and Xeomin, and of 1:40 between Botox and NeuroBloc/Myobloc. Acute adverse effects of BT can be obligate, local or systemic. Adverse effect profiles of the different preparations are similar. However, BT type B frequently produces additional autonomic systemic adverse effects. Long-term application does not produce additional adverse effects. BNT can be partially or completely blocked by antibodies. Risk factors include the amount of BNT applied at each injection series, the interval between injection series, and the specific biological potency (SBP) of the BT preparation used. The SBP is 5 equivalent mouse units/ng BNT for NeuroBloc, 60 for Botox, 100 for Dysport, and 167 for Xeomin. Xeomin should therefore have a particularly low antigenicity. Clinical confirmation of this predicition, however, is lacking.

  1. Collier/OLF/EBF-dependent transcriptional dynamics control pharyngeal muscle specification from primed cardiopharyngeal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Razy-Krajka, Florian; Lam, Karen; Wang, Wei; Stolfi, Alberto; Joly, Marine; Bonneau, Richard; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In vertebrates, pluripotent pharyngeal mesoderm progenitors produce the cardiac precursors of the second heart field as well as the branchiomeric head muscles and associated stem cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the transition from multipotent progenitors to distinct muscle precursors remain obscured by the complexity of vertebrate embryos. Using Ciona intestinalis as a simple chordate model, we show that bipotent cardiopharyngeal progenitors are primed to activate both heart and pharyngeal muscle transcriptional programs, which progressively become restricted to corresponding precursors. The transcription factor COE (Collier/OLF/EBF) orchestrates the transition to pharyngeal muscle fate both by promoting an MRF-associated myogenic program in myoblasts and by maintaining an undifferentiated state in their sister cells through Notch-mediated lateral inhibition. The latter are stem cell-like muscle precursors that form most of the juvenile pharyngeal muscles. We discuss the implications of our findings for the development and evolution of the chordate cardiopharyngeal mesoderm. PMID:24794633

  2. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szotek, Paul P; Chang, Henry L; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2008-08-26

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse-chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary.

  3. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Szotek, Paul P.; Chang, Henry L.; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2008-01-01

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse–chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary. PMID:18711140

  4. PTF 11kx: a type Ia supernova with a symbiotic nova progenitor.

    PubMed

    Dilday, B; Howell, D A; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Nugent, P E; Sullivan, M; Ben-Ami, S; Bildsten, L; Bolte, M; Endl, M; Filippenko, A V; Gnat, O; Horesh, A; Hsiao, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kirkman, D; Maguire, K; Marcy, G W; Moore, K; Pan, Y; Parrent, J T; Podsiadlowski, P; Quimby, R M; Sternberg, A; Suzuki, N; Tytler, D R; Xu, D; Bloom, J S; Gal-Yam, A; Hook, I M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Polishook, D; Poznanski, D

    2012-08-24

    There is a consensus that type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a binary companion. However, direct observation of SN Ia progenitors is lacking, and the precise nature of the binary companion remains uncertain. A temporal series of high-resolution optical spectra of the SN Ia PTF 11kx reveals a complex circumstellar environment that provides an unprecedentedly detailed view of the progenitor system. Multiple shells of circumstellar material are detected, and the SN ejecta are seen to interact with circumstellar material starting 59 days after the explosion. These features are best described by a symbiotic nova progenitor, similar to RS Ophiuchi.

  5. The skin: a home to multiple classes of epithelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaohong; Owens, David M.

    2013-01-01

    To maintain homeostasis in the adult skin, epithelial keratinocyte stem cells are thought to divide infrequently giving rise to short-lived (transit amplifying) cells that undergo a limited number of cell divisions and ultimately terminal differentiation. This model for the epidermal stem cell niche has increased in complexity by the multiple putative progenitor keratinocyte populations that have recently been identified in distinct regions of the interfollicular epidermis and hair follicle appendages. Under normal conditions, these progenitor populations are long-lived and able to sustain the cellular input to certain epidermal structures including the interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous gland. Other putative epithelial progenitors derived from the hair follicle possess high in vitro proliferative capacity and are able to regenerate skin, hair and sebaceous lineages in transplantation studies. These new findings present the cutaneous epithelium as a highly compartmentalized structure potentially maintained by multiple classes of progenitor cells. In this review, we will discuss the implications of these new putative epithelial progenitor populations and their potential to be influenced by external stimuli for skin homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:18491239

  6. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  7. Structural overview of toxin-antitoxin systems in infectious bacteria: a target for developing antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jean; Son, Woo Sung; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2013-06-01

    The bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) system is a module that may play a role in cell survival under stress conditions. Generally, toxin molecules act as negative regulators in cell survival and antitoxin molecules as positive regulators. Thus, the expression levels and interactions between toxins and antitoxins should be systematically harmonized so that bacteria can escape such harmful conditions. Since TA systems are able to control the fate of bacteria, they are considered potent targets for the development of new antimicrobial agents. TA systems are widely prevalent with a variety of systems existing in bacteria: there are three types of bacterial TA systems depending on the property of the antitoxin which binds either the protein toxin or mRNA coding the toxin protein. Moreover, the multiplicity of TA genes has been observed even in species of bacteria. Therefore, knowledge on TA systems such as the individual characteristics of TA systems, integrative working mechanisms of various TA systems in bacteria, interactions between toxin molecules and cellular targets, and so on is currently limited due to their complexity. In this regard, it would be helpful to know the structural characteristics of TA modules for understanding TA systems in bacteria. Until now, 85 out of the total structures deposited in PDB have been bacterial TA system proteins including TA complexes or isolated toxins/antitoxins. Here, we summarized the structural information of TA systems and analyzed the structural characteristics of known TA modules from several bacteria, especially focusing on the TA modules of several infectious bacteria.

  8. Regulating Toxin-Antitoxin Expression: Controlled Detonation of Intracellular Molecular Timebombs

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Finbarr; Kędzierska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Genes for toxin-antitoxin (TA) complexes are widely disseminated in bacteria, including in pathogenic and antibiotic resistant species. The toxins are liberated from association with the cognate antitoxins by certain physiological triggers to impair vital cellular functions. TAs also are implicated in antibiotic persistence, biofilm formation, and bacteriophage resistance. Among the ever increasing number of TA modules that have been identified, the most numerous are complexes in which both toxin and antitoxin are proteins. Transcriptional autoregulation of the operons encoding these complexes is key to ensuring balanced TA production and to prevent inadvertent toxin release. Control typically is exerted by binding of the antitoxin to regulatory sequences upstream of the operons. The toxin protein commonly works as a transcriptional corepressor that remodels and stabilizes the antitoxin. However, there are notable exceptions to this paradigm. Moreover, it is becoming clear that TA complexes often form one strand in an interconnected web of stress responses suggesting that their transcriptional regulation may prove to be more intricate than currently understood. Furthermore, interference with TA gene transcriptional autoregulation holds considerable promise as a novel antibacterial strategy: artificial release of the toxin factor using designer drugs is a potential approach to induce bacterial suicide from within. PMID:24434949

  9. Abnormal development of NG2+PDGFRα+ neural progenitor cells leads to neonatal hydrocephalus in a ciliopathy mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Calvin S.; Vogel, Timothy W.; Zhang, Qihong; Seo, Seongjin; Swiderski, Ruth E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Cassell, Martin D.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Nopoulos, Peggy; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Searby, Charles C.; Bugge, Kevin; Sheffield, Val C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological disorder leading to expansion of the cerebral ventricles and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most neonatal cases are of unknown etiology and are likely to display complex inheritance involving multiple genes and environmental factors. Identifying molecular mechanisms for neonatal hydrocephalus and developing non-invasive treatment modalities are high priorities. Here we employ a hydrocephalic mouse model of the human ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) and identify a role for neural progenitors in the pathogenesis of neonatal hydrocephalus. We found that hydrocephalus in this mouse model is caused by aberrant PDGFRα signaling, resulting in increased apoptosis and impaired proliferation of NG2+PDGFRα+ neural progenitors. Targeting this pathway with lithium treatment rescued NG2+PDGFRα+ progenitor cell proliferation in BBS mutant mice, reducing ventricular volume. Our findings demonstrate that neural progenitors are critical in the pathogenesis of neonatal hydrocephalus and we identify novel therapeutic targets for this common neurological disorder. PMID:23160237

  10. BLOS2 negatively regulates Notch signaling during neural and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenwen; He, Qiuping; Zhang, Chunxia; He, Xin; Cui, Zongbin; Liu, Feng; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in controling the proliferation and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells during embryogenesis or organogenesis, but its regulation is incompletely understood. BLOS2, encoded by the Bloc1s2 gene, is a shared subunit of two lysosomal trafficking complexes, biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1) and BLOC-1-related complex (BORC). Bloc1s2−/− mice were embryonic lethal and exhibited defects in cortical development and hematopoiesis. Loss of BLOS2 resulted in elevated Notch signaling, which consequently increased the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and inhibited neuronal differentiation in cortices. Likewise, ablation of bloc1s2 in zebrafish or mice led to increased hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell production in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. BLOS2 physically interacted with Notch1 in endo-lysosomal trafficking of Notch1. Our findings suggest that BLOS2 is a novel negative player in regulating Notch signaling through lysosomal trafficking to control multiple stem and progenitor cell homeostasis in vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18108.001 PMID:27719760

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Poay Sian Sabrina; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vasculogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk factors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evaluate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome. PMID:25126384

  12. Transient nuclear Prospero induces neural progenitor quiescence.

    PubMed

    Lai, Sen-Lin; Doe, Chris Q

    2014-10-29

    Stem cells can self-renew, differentiate, or enter quiescence. Understanding how stem cells switch between these states is highly relevant for stem cell-based therapeutics. Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) have been an excellent model for studying self-renewal and differentiation, but quiescence remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that when neuroblasts enter quiescence, the differentiation factor Prospero is transiently detected in the neuroblast nucleus, followed by the establishment of a unique molecular profile lacking most progenitor and differentiation markers. The pulse of low level nuclear Prospero precedes entry into neuroblast quiescence even when the timing of quiescence is advanced or delayed by changing temporal identity factors. Furthermore, loss of Prospero prevents entry into quiescence, whereas a pulse of low level nuclear Prospero can drive proliferating larval neuroblasts into quiescence. We propose that Prospero levels distinguish three progenitor fates: absent for self-renewal, low for quiescence, and high for differentiation.

  13. A Bispecific Antibody Promotes Aggregation of Ricin Toxin on Cell Surfaces and Alters Dynamics of Toxin Internalization and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristina; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    JJX12 is an engineered bispecific antibody against ricin, a member of the medically important A-B family of toxins that exploits retrograde transport as means to gain entry into the cytosol of target cells. JJX12 consists of RTA-D10, a camelid single variable domain (VHH) antibody directed against an epitope on ricin’s enzymatic subunit (RTA), linked via a 15-mer peptide to RTB-B7, a VHH against ricin’s bivalent galactose binding subunit (RTB). We previously reported that JJX12, but not an equimolar mixture of RTA-D10 and RTB-B7 monomers, was able to passively protect mice against a lethal dose ricin challenge, demonstrating that physically linking RTB-B7 and RTA-D10 is critical for toxin-neutralizing activity in vivo. We also reported that JJX12 promotes aggregation of ricin in solution, presumably through the formation of intermolecular crosslinking. In the current study, we now present evidence that JJX12 affects the dynamics of ricin uptake and trafficking in human epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy, as well as live cell imaging coupled with endocytosis pathway-specific inhibitors, revealed that JJX12-toxin complexes are formed on the surfaces of mammalian cells and internalized via a pathway sensitive to amiloride, a known inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Moreover, in the presence of JJX12, retrograde transport of ricin to the trans-Golgi network was significantly reduced, while accumulation of the toxin in late endosomes was significantly enhanced. In summary, we propose that JJX12, by virtue of its ability to crosslink ricin toxin, alters the route of toxin uptake and trafficking within cells. PMID:27300140

  14. Turf Protecting Toxins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Points out the enthusiasm of students towards the complex chemical survival mechanism of some plants during the early stages of life. Uses allelopathic research to introduce students to conducting experimental research. Includes sample procedures, a timetable, and a sample grading sheet. (YDS)

  15. THE AGES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Aubourg, Eric; Strauss, Michael A.; Tojeiro, Rita; Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul

    2010-09-15

    Using light curves and host galaxy spectra of 101 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with redshift z {approx}< 0.3 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Survey (SDSS-SN), we derive the SN Ia rate as a function of progenitor age (the delay time distribution, DTD). We use the VESPA stellar population synthesis algorithm to analyze the SDSS spectra of all galaxies in the field searched by SDSS-SN, giving us a reference sample of 77,000 galaxies for our SN Ia hosts. Our method does not assume any a priori shape for the DTD and is therefore minimally parametric. We present the DTD in physical units for high-stretch (luminous, slow declining) and low-stretch (subluminous, fast declining) supernovae in three progenitor age bins. We find strong evidence of two progenitor channels: one that produces high-stretch SNe Ia {approx}<400 Myr after the birth of the progenitor system, and one that produces low-stretch SNe Ia with a delay {approx}>2.4 Gyr. We find that each channel contributes roughly half of the Type Ia rate in our reference sample. We also construct the average spectra of high-stretch and low-stretch SN Ia host galaxies, and find that the difference of these spectra looks like a main-sequence B star with nebular emission lines indicative of star formation. This supports our finding that there are two populations of SNe Ia, and indicates that the progenitors of high-stretch supernovae are at the least associated with very recent star formation in the last few tens of Myr. Our results provide valuable constraints for models of Type Ia progenitors and may help improve the calibration of SNe Ia as standard candles.

  16. Polymer antidotes for toxin sequestration.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Adam; Chou, Beverly; O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2015-08-01

    Toxins delivered by envenomation, secreted by microorganisms, or unintentionally ingested can pose an immediate threat to life. Rapid intervention coupled with the appropriate antidote is required to mitigate the threat. Many antidotes are biological products and their cost, methods of production, potential for eliciting immunogenic responses, the time needed to generate them, and stability issues contribute to their limited availability and effectiveness. These factors exacerbate a world-wide challenge for providing treatment. In this review we evaluate a number of polymer constructs that may serve as alternative antidotes. The range of toxins investigated includes those from sources such as plants, animals and bacteria. The development of polymeric heavy metal sequestrants for use as antidotes to heavy metal poisoning faces similar challenges, thus recent findings in this area have also been included. Two general strategies have emerged for the development of polymeric antidotes. In one, the polymer acts as a scaffold for the presentation of ligands with a known affinity for the toxin. A second strategy is to generate polymers with an intrinsic affinity, and in some cases selectivity, to a range of toxins. Importantly, in vivo efficacy has been demonstrated for each of these strategies, which suggests that these approaches hold promise as an alternative to biological or small molecule based treatments.

  17. MCEARD - CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Waterborne cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and the ecosystem....

  18. MCEARD - CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Waterborne cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and the ecosystem....

  19. SWI/SNF in cardiac progenitor cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Cardiogenesis requires proper specification, proliferation, and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The differentiation of CPCs to specific cardiac cell types is likely guided by a comprehensive network comprised of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic complexes. In this review, we describe how the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complexes work synergistically with transcription and epigenetic factors to direct specific cardiac gene expression during CPC differentiation. Furthermore, we discuss how SWI/SNF may prime chromatin for cardiac gene expression at a genome-wide level. A detailed understanding of SWI/SNF-mediated CPC differentiation will provide important insight into the etiology of cardica defects and help design novel therapies for heart disease. PMID:23606236

  20. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides.

  1. Antibody microarrays for native toxin detection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Victor C; Havenstrite, Karen L; Herr, Amy E

    2005-04-15

    We have developed antibody-based microarray techniques for the multiplexed detection of cholera toxin beta-subunit, diphtheria toxin, anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen, Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B, and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked samples. Two detection schemes were investigated: (i) a direct assay in which fluorescently labeled toxins were captured directly by the antibody array and (ii) a competition assay that employed unlabeled toxins as reporters for the quantification of native toxin in solution. In the direct assay, fluorescence measured at each array element is correlated with labeled toxin concentration to yield baseline binding information (Langmuir isotherms and affinity constants). Extending from the direct assay, the competition assay yields information on the presence, identity, and concentration of toxins. A significant advantage of the competition assay over reported profiling assays is the minimal sample preparation required prior to analysis because the competition assay obviates the need to fluorescently label native proteins in the sample of interest. Sigmoidal calibration curves and detection limits were established for both assay formats. Although the sensitivity of the direct assay is superior to that of the competition assay, detection limits for unmodified toxins in the competition assay are comparable to values reported previously for sandwich-format immunoassays of antibodies arrayed on planar substrates. As a demonstration of the potential of the competition assay for unlabeled toxin detection, we conclude with a straightforward multiplexed assay for the differentiation and identification of both native S. aureus enterotoxin B and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked dilute serum samples.

  2. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-05

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  3. Toxins as Weapons: A Historical Review.

    PubMed

    Pita, R; Romero, A

    2014-07-01

    This review article summarizes the use of toxins as weapons dating from the First World War until today, when there is a high concern of possible terrorist attacks with weapons of mass destruction. All through modern history, military programs and terrorist groups have favored toxins because of their high toxicity. However, difficulties of extraction or synthesis, as well as effective dissemination to cause a large number of casualties, have been the most important drawbacks. Special emphasis is focused on ricin and botulinum toxin, the most important toxins that have attracted the attention of military programs and terrorist groups. Other toxins like trichothecenes, saxitoxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are also discussed. A short section about anthrax is also included: Although Bacillus anthracis is considered a biological weapon rather than a toxin weapon, it produces a toxin that is finally responsible for the anthrax disease. Copyright © 2014 Central Police University.

  4. Antibody-based bacterial toxin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Heitz, Jonathon M.; Anis, Nabil A.; Thompson, Roy G.

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a one step assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin or Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled toxins. In the two-step assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified antitoxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or antitoxin IgG in a dose-dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  5. Nephrotoxic mechanisms of drugs and environmental toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    This book contains 39 contributions divided into five sections each with its own editor and introductory chapter. The first section of nine chapters is concerned with the pathophysiology of acute renal failure. The second section is concerned with the growing problem of renal failure due to the use of antimicrobial agents such as the aminoglycosides. The various causes of tubulointerstitial nephropathy, notably analgesic drugs and environmental toxins such as mycotoxins and lead, are covered in the third section. Environmental and industrial nephrotoxins, such as cadmium, and halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, such as chloroform, are the subject of the fourth section. The last section of nine chapters is concerned mainly with a relatively new area of research into immunological mechanisms of nephrotoxicity and the evidence that drugs and other environmental chemicals can serve as antigens for immune complex formation.

  6. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    PubMed

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  7. 2D and 3D Stem Cell Models of Primate Cortical Development Identify Species-Specific Differences in Progenitor Behavior Contributing to Brain Size.

    PubMed

    Otani, Tomoki; Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H; Simons, Benjamin D; Livesey, Frederick J

    2016-04-07

    Variation in cerebral cortex size and complexity is thought to contribute to differences in cognitive ability between humans and other animals. Here we compare cortical progenitor cell output in humans and three nonhuman primates using directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in adherent two-dimensional (2D) and organoid three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Clonal lineage analysis showed that primate cortical progenitors proliferate for a protracted period of time, during which they generate early-born neurons, in contrast to rodents, where this expansion phase largely ceases before neurogenesis begins. The extent of this additional cortical progenitor expansion differs among primates, leading to differences in the number of neurons generated by each progenitor cell. We found that this mechanism for controlling cortical size is regulated cell autonomously in culture, suggesting that primate cerebral cortex size is regulated at least in part at the level of individual cortical progenitor cell clonal output.

  8. 2D and 3D Stem Cell Models of Primate Cortical Development Identify Species-Specific Differences in Progenitor Behavior Contributing to Brain Size

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Tomoki; Marchetto, Maria C.; Gage, Fred H.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Livesey, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Variation in cerebral cortex size and complexity is thought to contribute to differences in cognitive ability between humans and other animals. Here we compare cortical progenitor cell output in humans and three nonhuman primates using directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in adherent two-dimensional (2D) and organoid three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Clonal lineage analysis showed that primate cortical progenitors proliferate for a protracted period of time, during which they generate early-born neurons, in contrast to rodents, where this expansion phase largely ceases before neurogenesis begins. The extent of this additional cortical progenitor expansion differs among primates, leading to differences in the number of neurons generated by each progenitor cell. We found that this mechanism for controlling cortical size is regulated cell autonomously in culture, suggesting that primate cerebral cortex size is regulated at least in part at the level of individual cortical progenitor cell clonal output. PMID:27049876

  9. Six2 and Wnt regulate self-renewal and commitment of nephron progenitors through shared gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Seop; Ma, Wenxiu; O’Brien, Lori L.; Chung, Eunah; Guo, Jin-Jin; Cheng, Jr-Gang; Valerius, M. Todd; McMahon, Jill A.; Wong, Wing Hung; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A balance between Six2-dependent self-renewal and canonical Wnt signaling-directed commitment regulates mammalian nephrogenesis. Intersectional studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional profiling identified direct target genes shared by each pathway within nephron progenitors. Wnt4 and Fgf8 are essential for progenitor commitment; cis-regulatory modules flanking each gene are co-bound by Six2 and β-catenin, and dependent on conserved Lef/Tcf binding sites for activity. In vitro and in vivo analyses suggest that Six2 and Lef/Tcf factors form a regulatory complex that promotes progenitor maintenance while entry of β-catenin into this complex promotes nephrogenesis. Alternative transcriptional responses associated with Six2 and β-catenin co-binding events occur through non-Lef/Tcf DNA binding mechanisms highlighting the regulatory complexity downstream of Wnt signaling in the developing mammalian kidney. PMID:22902740

  10. Nemertean toxin genes revealed through transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2014-11-27

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63-74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Nemertean Toxin Genes Revealed through Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Santos, Scott R.; Halanych, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63–74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. PMID:25432940

  12. Tarantula Toxins Interact with Voltage Sensors within Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Milescu, Mirela; Vobecky, Jan; Roh, Soung H.; Kim, Sung H.; Jung, Hoi J.; Kim, Jae Il; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-activated ion channels are essential for electrical signaling, yet the mechanism of voltage sensing remains under intense investigation. The voltage-sensor paddle is a crucial structural motif in voltage-activated potassium (Kv) channels that has been proposed to move at the protein–lipid interface in response to changes in membrane voltage. Here we explore whether tarantula toxins like hanatoxin and SGTx1 inhibit Kv channels by interacting with paddle motifs within the membrane. We find that these toxins can partition into membranes under physiologically relevant conditions, but that the toxin–membrane interaction is not sufficient to inhibit Kv channels. From mutagenesis studies we identify regions of the toxin involved in binding to the paddle motif, and those important for interacting with membranes. Modification of membranes with sphingomyelinase D dramatically alters the stability of the toxin–channel complex, suggesting that tarantula toxins interact with paddle motifs within the membrane and that they are sensitive detectors of lipid–channel interactions. PMID:17938232

  13. Diversification of β-Augmentation Interactions between CDI Toxin/ Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Robert P.; Willett, Julia L.E.; Johnson, Parker M.; Zheng, Mandy; Credali, Alfredo; Iniguez, Angelina; Nowick, James S.; Hayes, Christopher S.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a widespread mechanism of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion proteins. CdiA effectors carry diverse C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CT), which are delivered into neighboring target cells to inhibit growth. CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that bind specifically to cognate CdiA-CT toxins and protect the cell from auto-inhibition. Here, we compare the structures of homologous CdiA-CT/CdiI complexes from Escherichia coli EC869 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis YPIII to explore the evolution of CDI toxin/immunity protein interactions. Both complexes share an unusual β-augmentation interaction, in which the toxin domain extends a β-hairpin into the immunity protein to complete a six-stranded anti-parallel sheet. However, the specific contacts differ substantially between the two complexes. The EC869 β-hairpin interacts mainly through direct H-bond and ion-pair interactions, whereas the YPIII β-hairpin pocket contains more hydrophobic contacts and a network of bridging water molecules. In accord with these differences, we find that each CdiI protein only protects target bacteria from its cognate CdiA-CT toxin. The compact β-hairpin binding pocket within the immunity protein represents a tractable system for the rationale design of small molecules to block CdiA-CT/ CdiI complex formation. We synthesized a macrocyclic peptide mimic of the β-hairpin from EC869 toxin and solved its structure in complex with cognate immunity protein. These latter studies suggest that small molecules could potentially be used to disrupt CDI toxin/immunity complexes. PMID:26449640

  14. Toxin Transport by A-B Type of Toxins in Eukaryotic Target Cells and Its Inhibition by Positively Charged Heterocyclic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Benz, Roland; Barth, Holger

    2017-07-04

    A-B types of toxins are among the most potent bacterial protein toxins produced by gram-positive bacteria. Prominent examples are the tripartite anthrax toxin of Bacillus anthracis and the different A-B type clostridial toxins that are the causative agents of severe human and animal diseases and could serve as biological weapons. The components of all these toxins comprise one binding/transport (B) subunit and one or two separate, non-linked enzymatically active (A) subunits. The A and B subunits are separately produced and secreted by the pathogenic gram-positive bacteria and must assemble on the surface of eukaryotic target cells to form biologically active toxin complexes. The B components are cleaved by proteases to generate the biologically active species that binds to receptors on the surface of the target cells and form there oligomers which bind the A subunits. The AB complexes are internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis and reach early or late endosomes that become acidified. Subsequently, the B components form channels in endosomal membranes that are indispensable for the transport of the enzymatic subunits across these membranes into the cytosol of target cells via the trans-membrane channels. In addition to the channels formed by the B components, host cell factors including chaperones and further folding helper enzymes are involved in the import of the enzymatic subunits into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Positively charged heterocyclic molecules, such as chloroquine and related aminoquinolinium and azolopyridinium salts have been shown in recent years to bind with high affinity to the channels formed by the B components of binary toxins. Since binding to the B components is also a prerequisite for transport of the A components across the endosomal membranes the channel blockers also prevent transport of the A subunits into the host cell cytosol. The inhibition of toxin uptake into cells by such pharmacological compounds should also be of

  15. Single Degenerate Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bours, Madelon; Toonen, Silvia; Nelemans, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    There is a general agreement that Type Ia supernovae correspond to the thermonuclear runaway of a white dwarf (WD) in a compact binary. The details of these progenitor systems are still unclear. Using the population synthesis code SeBa and several assumption for the WD retention efficiency, we estimate the delay times and supernova rates for the single degenerate scenario.

  16. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Pulecio, Julian; Alejo-Valle, Oriol; Capellera-Garcia, Sandra; Vitaloni, Marianna; Rio, Paula; Mejía-Ramírez, Eva; Caserta, Ilaria; Bueren, Juan A; Flygare, Johan; Raya, Angel

    2016-10-11

    Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs) derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41(+), display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  17. The Progenitors of Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tout, C. A.

    2005-08-01

    Type Ia supernovae are identified as exploding degenerate stars. Their luminosity is due to the radioactive decay of about a solar mass of 56Ni through 56Co to 56Fe. As such they are a major source of iron in the inter-stellar medium. Although it is generally accepted that a degenerate carbon/oxygen white dwarf explodes as it accretes material from a binary companion, the progenitors of type Ia supernovae have not been categorically identified. We discuss the various possible progenitors in detail and indicate theoretical and observational difficulties with each possibility. It may well be that the true nature of the progenitors has not yet even been conceived of. We look at why population synthesis fails to help distinguish and consider how the advent of population nucleosynthesis may change this. When used as universal standard candles SNe Ia are calibrated with the Phillips relation between absolute luminosity and light curve shape. This must therefore be valid at all redshifts and so both the absolute luminosity and the light curve decay must only depend on a single major property of the progenitors. We report on the latest understanding of this relation and find little to justify its universality beyond the local empirical evidence. A major effect on the absolute luminosities is the neutron to proton ratio at the time of the explosion because this determines the fraction of iron group elements made up of 56Ni.

  18. Targeting human oligodendrocyte progenitors for myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karen C; Polanco, Jessie J; Pol, Suyog U; Sim, Fraser J

    2016-09-01

    Oligodendrocyte development has been studied for several decades, and has served as a model system for both neurodevelopmental and stem/progenitor cell biology. Until recently, the vast majority of studies have been conducted in lower species, especially those focused on rodent development and remyelination. In humans, the process of myelination requires the generation of vastly more myelinating glia, occurring over a period of years rather than weeks. Furthermore, as evidenced by the presence of chronic demyelination in a variety of human neurologic diseases, it appears likely that the mechanisms that regulate development and become dysfunctional in disease may be, in key ways, divergent across species. Improvements in isolation techniques, applied to primary human neural and oligodendrocyte progenitors from both fetal and adult brain, as well as advancements in the derivation of defined progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells, have begun to reveal the extent of both species-conserved signaling pathways and potential key differences at cellular and molecular levels. In this article, we will review the commonalities and differences in myelin development between rodents and man, describing the approaches used to study human oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, as well as heterogeneity within targetable progenitor pools, and discuss the advances made in determining which conserved pathways may be both modeled in rodents and translate into viable therapeutic strategies to promote myelin repair.

  19. Lung stem and progenitor cells in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Kristen T; Fillmore, Christine M; Kim, Carla F

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian lung is a complex organ containing numerous putative stem/progenitor cell populations that contribute to region-specific tissue homeostasis and repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances in identifying and studying these cell populations in the context of lung homeostasis and disease. Genetically engineered mice now allow for lineage tracing of several lung stem and progenitor cell populations in vivo during different types of lung injury repair. Using specific sets of cell surface markers, these cells can also be isolated from murine and human lung and tested in 3D culture systems and in vivo transplant assays. The pathology of devastating lung diseases, including lung cancers, is likely in part due to dysregulation and dysfunction of lung stem cells. More precise characterization of stem cells with identification of new, unique markers; improvement in isolation and transplant techniques; and further development of functional assays will ultimately lead to new therapies for a host of human lung diseases. In particular, lung cancer biology may be greatly informed by findings in normal lung stem cell biology as evidence suggests that lung cancer is a disease that begins in, and may be driven by, neoplastic lung stem cells. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  1. Insecticidal Activity of the Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki and tenebrionis Adsorbed and Bound on Pure and Soil Clays

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1995-01-01

    The release of transgenic plants and microorganisms expressing truncated genes from various subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis that encode active insecticidal toxins rather than inactive protoxins could result in the accumulation of these active proteins in soil, especially when bound on clays and other soil particles. Toxins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki and B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis, either free or adsorbed at equilibrium or bound on pure clay minerals (montmorillonite or kaolinite) or on the clay size fraction of soil, were toxic to larvae of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), respectively. The 50% lethal concentrations (LC(inf50)) of free toxins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were higher than those of both bound and adsorbed complexes of these toxins with clays, indicating that adsorption and binding of these toxins on clays increase their toxicity in diet bioassays. The LC(inf50) of the toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis that was either free or adsorbed on montmorillonite were comparable, whereas the toxin bound on this clay had higher LC(inf50) and the toxin bound on kaolinite had lower LC(inf50) than when adsorbed on this clay. Results obtained with the clay size fraction separated from unamended soil or soil amended with montmorillonite or kaolinite were similar to those obtained with the respective pure clay minerals. Therefore, insecticidal activity of these toxins is retained and sometimes enhanced by adsorption and binding on clays. PMID:16535020

  2. Gas phase characterization of the noncovalent quaternary structure of cholera toxin and the cholera toxin B subunit pentamer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan P; Smith, Daniel C; Green, Brian N; Marsden, Brian D; Jennings, Keith R; Roberts, Lynne M; Scrivens, James H

    2006-05-01

    Cholera toxin (CTx) is an AB5 cytotonic protein that has medical relevance in cholera and as a novel mucosal adjuvant. Here, we report an analysis of the noncovalent homopentameric complex of CTx B chain (CTx B5) using electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry and the analysis of the noncovalent hexameric holotoxin usingelectrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry over a range of pH values that correlate with those encountered by this toxin after cellular uptake. We show that noncovalent interactions within the toxin assemblies were maintained under both acidic and neutral conditions in the gas phase. However, unlike the related Escherichia coli Shiga-like toxin B5 pentamer (SLTx B), the CTx B5 pentamer was stable at low pH, indicating that additional interactions must be present within the latter. Structural comparison of the CTx B monomer interface reveals an additional alpha-helix that is absent in the SLTx B monomer. In silico energy calculations support interactions between this helix and the adjacent monomer. These data provide insight into the apparent stabilization of CTx B relative to SLTx B.

  3. FACS Fractionation and Differentiation of Skeletal-Muscle Resident Multipotent Tie2+ Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arpita A; Goldhamer, David J

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle niche is complex and heterogeneous. Over the past few decades, various groups have reported the existence of multiple adult stem cell populations within this environment. Techniques commonly used to identify and assess the differentiation capacities of these cellular fractions, oftentimes rare populations, include the use of lineage tracers, immunofluorescence and histochemistry, flow cytometry, gene expression assays, and phenotypic analysis in culture or in vivo. In 2012, our lab identified and characterized a skeletal-muscle resident Tie2+ progenitor that exhibits adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials (Wosczyna et al., J Bone Miner Res 27:1004-1017, 2012). This Tie2+ progenitor also expresses the markers PDGFRα and Sca-1 which in turn label a population of muscle-resident fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) (Joe et al., Nat Cell Biol 12:153-163, 2010; Uezumi et al., Nat Cell Biol 12:143-152, 2010), suggesting similar identities or overlap in the two mesenchymal progenitor populations. Our study demonstrated that these Tie2-expressing mesenchymal progenitors contribute robustly to BMP-induced heterotopic ossification (HO) in mice, and therefore could represent a key cellular target for therapeutic intervention in HO treatment (Wosczyna et al., J Bone Miner Res 27:1004-1017, 2012). In this chapter, we provide a detailed description of our updated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) strategy and describe cell culture methods for differentiation of Tie2+ progenitors to adipogenic and osteogenic fates. This strategy is easily adaptable for the prospective isolation of other rare subpopulations resident in skeletal muscle.

  4. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  5. Cellular Uptake of Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin Requires Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of an enzyme component (C2I) and a binding component (C2II). Activated C2II (C2IIa) binds to a cell receptor, giving rise to lipid raft-dependent oligomerization, and it then assembles with C2I. The whole toxin complex is then endocytosed into the cytosol, resulting in the destruction of the actin cytoskeleton and cell rounding. Here, we showed that C2 toxin requires acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) activity during internalization. In this study, inhibitors of ASMase and lysosomal exocytosis blocked C2 toxin-induced cell rounding. C2IIa induced Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular medium to cells. C2 toxin-induced cell rounding was enhanced in the presence of Ca(2+) ASMase was released extracellularly when cells were incubated with C2IIa in the presence of Ca(2+) Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of ASMase reduced C2 toxin-induced cell rounding. ASMase hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide on the outer leaflet of the membrane at acidic pH. Ceramide was detected in cytoplasmic vesicles containing C2IIa. These results indicated that ASMase activity is necessary for the efficient internalization of C2 toxin into cells. Inhibitors of ASMase may confer protection against infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Iron Specifically Protects Corn Protoplasts from T-Toxin of Cochliobolus heterostrophus1

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, W. Donald; Yoder, O. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ferric ion reduced the damaging effects of T-toxin, a series of linear β-polyketols produced by the pathogenic fungus Cochliobolus heterostrophus, on leaf mesophyll protoplasts from susceptible T-cytoplasm corn. Of nine metals tested, only ferric and ferrous ions had this effect. Despite the presence of 12 available oxygen atoms in each T-toxin molecule, there was no evidence for the formation of an aqueous Fe2+- or Fe3+-T-toxin complex. The protective effect of iron was eliminated by a molar excess of EDTA. Iron had no effect on the sensitivity of T-cytoplasm mitochondria to T-toxin, even at a 1000-fold molar excess, nor did it protect roots of T-cytoplasm corn seedlings from inhibition by T-toxin. The mechanism by which iron specifically protects protoplasts from T-toxin is not understood, but time lapse experiments suggest that iron acts on some intracellular site to modify T-toxin sensitivity and not on a transport system at the cell surface. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16665594

  7. Tetrodotoxin-Producing Bacteria: Detection, Distribution and Migration of the Toxin in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Magarlamov, Timur Yu.; Melnikova, Daria I.; Chernyshev, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    This review is devoted to the marine bacterial producers of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a potent non-protein neuroparalytic toxin. In addition to the issues of the ecology and distribution of TTX-producing bacteria, this review examines issues relating to toxin migration from bacteria to TTX-bearing animals. It is shown that the mechanism of TTX extraction from toxin-producing bacteria to the environment occur through cell death, passive/active toxin excretion, or spore germination of spore-forming bacteria. Data on TTX microdistribution in toxic organs of TTX-bearing animals indicate toxin migration from the digestive system to target organs through the transport system of the organism. The role of symbiotic microflora in animal toxicity is also discussed: despite low toxin production by bacterial strains in laboratory conditions, even minimal amounts of TTX produced by intestinal microflora of an animal can contribute to its toxicity. Special attention is paid to methods of TTX detection applicable to bacteria. Due to the complexity of toxin detection in TTX-producing bacteria, it is necessary to use several methods based on different methodological approaches. Issues crucial for further progress in detecting natural sources of TTX investigation are also considered. PMID:28513564

  8. Functional interactions between anthrax toxin receptors and the WNT signalling protein LRP6.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Kunz, Béatrice; Deuquet, Julie; Bafico, Anna; Davidson, Gary; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2008-12-01

    To exert its activity, anthrax toxin must be endocytosed and its enzymatic toxic subunits delivered to the cytoplasm. It has been proposed that, in addition to the anthrax toxin receptors (ATRs), lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), known for its role in Wnt signalling, is also required for toxin endocytosis. These findings have however been challenged. We show that LRP6 can indeed form a complex with ATRs, and that this interaction plays a role both in Wnt signalling and in anthrax toxin endocytosis. We found that ATRs control the levels of LRP6 in cells, and thus the Wnt signalling capacity. RNAi against ATRs indeed led to a drastic decrease in LRP6 levels and a subsequent drop in Wnt signalling. Conversely, LRP6 plays a role in anthrax toxin endocytosis, but is not essential. We indeed found that toxin binding triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of LRP6, induced its redistribution into detergent-resistant domains, and its subsequent endocytosis. RNAis against LRP6 strongly delayed toxin endocytosis. As the physiological role of ATRs is probably to interact with the extracellular matrix, our findings raise the interesting possibility that, through the ATR-LRP6 interaction, adhesion to the extracellular matrix could locally control Wnt signalling.

  9. Why do we study animal toxins?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun

    2015-07-18

    Venom (toxins) is an important trait evolved along the evolutionary tree of animals. Our knowledges on venoms, such as their origins and loss, the biological relevance and the coevolutionary patterns with other organisms are greatly helpful in understanding many fundamental biological questions, i.e., the environmental adaptation and survival competition, the evolution shaped development and balance of venoms, and the sophisticated correlations among venom, immunity, body power, intelligence, their genetic basis, inherent association, as well as the cost-benefit and trade-offs of biological economy. Lethal animal envenomation can be found worldwide. However, from foe to friend, toxin studies have led lots of important discoveries and exciting avenues in deciphering and fighting human diseases, including the works awarded the Nobel Prize and lots of key clinic therapeutics. According to our survey, so far, only less than 0.1% of the toxins of the venomous animals in China have been explored. We emphasize on the similarities shared by venom and immune systems, as well as the studies of toxin knowledge-based physiological toxin-like proteins/peptides (TLPs). We propose the natural pairing hypothesis. Evolution links toxins with humans. Our mission is to find out the right natural pairings and interactions of our body elements with toxins, and with endogenous toxin-like molecules. Although, in nature, toxins may endanger human lives, but from a philosophical point of view, knowing them well is an effective way to better understand ourselves. So, this is why we study toxins.

  10. Why do we study animal toxins?

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Venom (toxins) is an important trait evolved along the evolutionary tree of animals. Our knowledges on venoms, such as their origins and loss, the biological relevance and the coevolutionary patterns with other organisms are greatly helpful in understanding many fundamental biological questions, i.e., the environmental adaptation and survival competition, the evolution shaped development and balance of venoms, and the sophisticated correlations among venom, immunity, body power, intelligence, their genetic basis, inherent association, as well as the cost-benefit and trade-offs of biological economy. Lethal animal envenomation can be found worldwide. However, from foe to friend, toxin studies have led lots of important discoveries and exciting avenues in deciphering and fighting human diseases, including the works awarded the Nobel Prize and lots of key clinic therapeutics. According to our survey, so far, only less than 0.1% of the toxins of the venomous animals in China have been explored. We emphasize on the similarities shared by venom and immune systems, as well as the studies of toxin knowledge-based physiological toxin-like proteins/peptides (TLPs). We propose the natural pairing hypothesis. Evolution links toxins with humans. Our mission is to find out the right natural pairings and interactions of our body elements with toxins, and with endogenous toxin-like molecules. Although, in nature, toxins may endanger human lives, but from a philosophical point of view, knowing them well is an effective way to better understand ourselves. So, this is why we study toxins. PMID:26228472

  11. Targeting the latent cytomegalovirus reservoir with an antiviral fusion toxin protein

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Spiess, K.; Poole, E. L.; Lau, B.; Voigt, S.; Kledal, T. N.; Rosenkilde, M. M.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in transplant recipients can cause life-threatening disease. Consequently, for transplant recipients, killing latently infected cells could have far-reaching clinical benefits. In vivo, myeloid cells and their progenitors are an important site of HCMV latency, and one viral gene expressed by latently infected myeloid cells is US28. This viral gene encodes a cell surface G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds chemokines, triggering its endocytosis. We show that the expression of US28 on the surface of latently infected cells allows monocytes and their progenitor CD34+ cells to be targeted and killed by F49A-FTP, a highly specific fusion toxin protein that binds this viral GPCR. As expected, this specific targeting of latently infected cells by F49A-FTP also robustly reduces virus reactivation in vitro. Consequently, such specific fusion toxin proteins could form the basis of a therapeutic strategy for eliminating latently infected cells before haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28148951

  12. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children. PMID:27335961

  13. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Michal; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs). The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article. PMID:22069631

  14. Exfoliative toxins of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michal; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs). The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  15. [Molecular model of anthrax toxin translocation into target-cells].

    PubMed

    Noskov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is formed from three components: protective antigen (PA), lethal (LF) and edema (EF) factors. PA83 is cleaved by cell surface protease furin to produce a 63-kDa fragment (PA63). PA63 and LF/EF molecules are assembled to anthrax toxin complexes: oligomer PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 3. Assembly is occurred during of binding with cellular receptor or near surface of target-cell. This toxin complex forms pore and induces receptor-mediated endocytosis. Formed endosome consists extracellular liquid with LF/EF and membrane-associated ferments (H+ and K+/Na+-ATPases) and proteins (receptors and others). H+ concentration is increased into endosome as result of K/Na-ATPase-dependent- activity of H+-ATPase. Difference of potentials (between endosome and intracellular liquid) is increased and LF/EF molecules are moved to pore and bound with PA63-oligomer to PA63 x 7 + LF/EF x 7 and full block pore (ion-selective channel). Endosome is increased in volume and induces increasing of PA63-oligomer pore to.size of effector complex: LF/EF x 7 + PAl7 x 7 = 750 kDa. Effector complex is translocated from endosome to cytosol by means high difference of potentials (H+) and dissociates from PA47 x 7 complex after cleavage of FFD315-sait by intracellular chymotrypsin-like proteases in all 7 molecules PA63. PA47 x 7 complex (strongly fixed in membrane with debris of hydrophobic loops) return into endosome and pore is destroyed. Endosome pH is decreased rapidly and PA47 x 7 complex is destroyed by endosomal/lysosomal proteases. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is ended by endosome recycling in cell-membrane.

  16. An update on uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Neirynck, N; Vanholder, R; Schepers, E; Eloot, S; Pletinck, A; Glorieux, G

    2013-02-01

    In the last decade, uremic toxicity as a potential cause for the excess of cardiovascular disease and mortality observed in chronic kidney disease gained more and more interest. This review focuses on uremic toxins with known cardiovascular effects and their removal. For protein-bound solutes, for example, indoxylsulfate and the conjugates of p-cresol, and for small water-soluble solutes, for example, guanidines, such as ADMA and SDMA, there is a growing evidence for a role in cardiovascular toxicity in vitro (e.g., affecting leukocyte, endothelial, vascular smooth muscle cell function) and/or in vivo. Several middle molecules (e.g., beta-2-microglobulin, interleukin-6, TNF-alpha and FGF-23) were shown to be predictors for cardiovascular disease and/or mortality. Most of these solutes, however, are difficult to remove during dialysis, which is traditionally assessed by studying the removal of urea, which can be considered as a relatively inert uremic retention solute. However, even the effective removal of other small water-soluble toxins than urea can be hampered by their larger distribution volumes. Middle molecules (beta-2-microglobulin as prototype, but not necessarily representative for others) are cleared more efficiently when the pore size of the dialyzer membrane increases, convection is applied and dialysis time is prolonged. Only adding convection to diffusion improves the removal of protein-bound toxins. Therefore, alternative removal strategies, such as intestinal adsorption, drugs interfering with toxic biochemical pathways or decreasing toxin concentration, and extracorporeal plasma adsorption, as well as kinetic behavior during dialysis need further investigation. Even more importantly, randomized clinical studies are required to demonstrate a survival advantage through these strategies.

  17. Foodborne pathogens and their toxins.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Tamara; Andjelković, Uroš; Gajdošik, Martina Šrajer; Rešetar, Dina; Josić, Djuro

    2016-09-16

    Foodborne pathogens, mostly bacteria and fungi, but also some viruses, prions and protozoa, contaminate food during production and processing, but also during storage and transport before consuming. During their growth these microorganisms can secrete different components, including toxins, into the extracellular environment. Other harmful substances can be also liberated and can contaminate food after disintegration of food pathogens. Some bacterial and fungal toxins can be resistant to inactivation, and can survive harsh treatment during food processing. Many of these molecules are involved in cellular processes and can indicate different mechanisms of pathogenesis of foodborne organisms. More knowledge about food contaminants can also help understand their inactivation. In the present review the use of proteomics, peptidomics and metabolomics, in addition to other foodomic methods for the detection of foodborne pathogenic fungi and bacteria, is overviewed. Furthermore, it is discussed how these techniques can be used for discovering biomarkers for pathogenicity of foodborne pathogens, determining the mechanisms by which they act, and studying their resistance upon inactivation in food of animal and plant origin. Comprehensive and comparative view into the genome and proteome of foodborne pathogens of bacterial or fungal origin and foodomic, mostly proteomic, peptidomic and metabolomic investigation of their toxin production and their mechanism of action is necessary in order to get further information about their virulence, pathogenicity and survival under stress conditions. Furthermore, these data pave the way for identification of biomarkers to trace sources of contamination with food-borne microorganisms and their endo- and exotoxins in order to ensure food safety and prevent the outbreak of food-borne diseases. Therefore, detection of pathogens and their toxins during production, transport and before consume of food produce, as well as protection against

  18. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jeffrey M.; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP. PMID:25877869

  19. Neutralising Antibodies against Ricin Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Julie; Panigai, Laetitia; Lamourette, Patricia; Sauvaire, Didier; Devilliers, Karine; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Créminon, Christophe; Simon, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC50 of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD50). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention. PMID:21633505

  20. Novel Class of Spider Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Vassilevski, Alexander A.; Fedorova, Irina M.; Maleeva, Ekaterina E.; Korolkova, Yuliya V.; Efimova, Svetlana S.; Samsonova, Olga V.; Schagina, Ludmila V.; Feofanov, Alexei V.; Magazanik, Lev G.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2010-01-01

    Venom of the yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium (Miturgidae) was found unique in terms of molecular composition. Its principal toxic component CpTx 1 (15.1 kDa) was purified, and its full amino acid sequence (134 residues) was established by protein chemistry and mass spectrometry techniques. CpTx 1 represents a novel class of spider toxin with modular architecture. It consists of two different yet homologous domains (modules) each containing a putative inhibitor cystine knot motif, characteristic of the widespread single domain spider neurotoxins. Venom gland cDNA sequencing provided precursor protein (prepropeptide) structures of three CpTx 1 isoforms (a–c) that differ by single residue substitutions. The toxin possesses potent insecticidal (paralytic and lethal), cytotoxic, and membrane-damaging activities. In both fly and frog neuromuscular preparations, it causes stable and irreversible depolarization of muscle fibers leading to contracture. This effect appears to be receptor-independent and is inhibited by high concentrations of divalent cations. CpTx 1 lyses cell membranes, as visualized by confocal microscopy, and destabilizes artificial membranes in a manner reminiscent of other membrane-active peptides by causing numerous defects of variable conductance and leading to bilayer rupture. The newly discovered class of modular polypeptides enhances our knowledge of the toxin universe. PMID:20657014

  1. Shiga Toxin Therapeutics: Beyond Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Gregory; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    Ribotoxic Shiga toxins are the primary cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC), a pathogen class responsible for epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease around the globe. HUS is a leading cause of pediatric renal failure in otherwise healthy children, resulting in a mortality rate of 10% and a chronic morbidity rate near 25%. There are currently no available therapeutics to prevent or treat HUS in STEC patients despite decades of work elucidating the mechanisms of Shiga toxicity in sensitive cells. The preclinical development of toxin-targeted HUS therapies has been hindered by the sporadic, geographically dispersed nature of STEC outbreaks with HUS cases and the limited financial incentive for the commercial development of therapies for an acute disease with an inconsistent patient population. The following review considers potential therapeutic targeting of the downstream cellular impacts of Shiga toxicity, which include the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). Outcomes of the UPR and RSR are relevant to other diseases with large global incidence and prevalence rates, thus reducing barriers to the development of commercial drugs that could improve STEC and HUS patient outcomes. PMID:28925976

  2. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice.

  3. Bt Toxin Modification for Enhanced Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Deist, Benjamin R.; Rausch, Michael A.; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Adang, Michael J.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2014-01-01

    Insect-specific toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide a valuable resource for pest suppression. Here we review the different strategies that have been employed to enhance toxicity against specific target species including those that have evolved resistance to Bt, or to modify the host range of Bt crystal (Cry) and cytolytic (Cyt) toxins. These strategies include toxin truncation, modification of protease cleavage sites, domain swapping, site-directed mutagenesis, peptide addition, and phage display screens for mutated toxins with enhanced activity. Toxin optimization provides a useful approach to extend the utility of these proteins for suppression of pests that exhibit low susceptibility to native Bt toxins, and to overcome field resistance. PMID:25340556

  4. Structure of a Bimodular Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex Provides Insights into Its Oral Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Le, Thi Tuc Nghi; Cheng, Luisa W.; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Yao, Guorui; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the fatal disease botulism, a flaccid paralysis of the muscle. BoNTs are released together with several auxiliary proteins as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs) to become highly potent oral poisons. Here, we report the structure of a ∼760 kDa 14-subunit large PTC of serotype A (L-PTC/A) and reveal insight into its absorption mechanism. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and functional studies, we found that L-PTC/A consists of two structurally and functionally independent sub-complexes. A hetero-dimeric 290 kDa complex protects BoNT, while a hetero-dodecameric 470 kDa complex facilitates its absorption in the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. BoNT absorption is mediated by nine glycan-binding sites on the dodecameric sub-complex that forms multivalent interactions with carbohydrate receptors on intestinal epithelial cells. We identified monosaccharides that blocked oral BoNT intoxication in mice, which suggests a new strategy for the development of preventive countermeasures for BoNTs based on carbohydrate receptor mimicry. PMID:24130488

  5. A chimeric toxin vaccine protects against primary and recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Sun, Xingmin; Zhang, Yongrong; Li, Shan; Chen, Kevin; Shi, Lianfa; Nie, Weijia; Kumar, Raj; Tzipori, Saul; Wang, Jufang; Savidge, Tor; Feng, Hanping

    2012-08-01

    The global emergence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has contributed to the recent surge in severe antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colonic inflammation. C. difficile produces two homologous glucosylating exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, both of which are pathogenic and require neutralization to prevent disease occurrence. However, because of their large size and complex multifunctional domain structures, it has been a challenge to produce native recombinant toxins that may serve as vaccine candidates. Here, we describe a novel chimeric toxin vaccine that retains major neutralizing epitopes from both toxins and confers complete protection against primary and recurrent CDI in mice. Using a nonpathogenic Bacillus megaterium expression system, we generated glucosyltransferase-deficient holotoxins and demonstrated their loss of toxicity. The atoxic holotoxins induced potent antitoxin neutralizing antibodies showing little cross-immunogenicity or protection between TcdA and TcdB. To facilitate simultaneous protection against both toxins, we generated an active clostridial toxin chimera by switching the receptor binding domain of TcdB with that of TcdA. The toxin chimera was fully cytotoxic and showed potent proinflammatory activities. This toxicity was essentially abolished in a glucosyltransferase-deficient toxin chimera, cTxAB. Parenteral immunization of mice or hamsters with cTxAB induced rapid and potent neutralizing antibodies against both toxins. Complete and long-lasting disease protection was conferred by cTxAB vaccinations against both laboratory and hypervirulent C. difficile strains. Finally, prophylactic cTxAB vaccination prevented spore-induced disease relapse, which constitutes one of the most significant clinical issues in CDI. Thus, the rational design of recombinant chimeric toxins provides a novel approach for protecting individuals at high risk of developing CDI.

  6. Periodontal Bioengineering: A Discourse in Surface Topographies, Progenitor Cells and Molecular Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangaria, Smit J.

    2011-12-01

    uniquely derived from pre-implantation green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled progenitors. Together, these studies illustrate the capacity of natural extracellular surface topographies to instruct PDLPs to fully regenerate complex cellular and structural morphologies of tissues once lost to disease. We suggest that our strategy could be used for the replantation of teeth lost due to trauma or as a novel approach for tooth replacement using tooth-shaped replicas.

  7. ADP-Ribosylation of NLRP3 by Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Regulates Inflammasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Jesus A.; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Chang, Te-Hung; Baseman, Joel B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inflammasome is a major regulator of inflammation through its activation of procaspase-1, which cleaves prointerleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) into its mature form. IL-1β is a critical proinflammatory cytokine that dictates the severity of inflammation associated with a wide spectrum of inflammatory diseases. NLRP3 is a key component of the inflammasome complex, and multiple signals and stimuli trigger formation of the NLRP3 inflammasome complex. In the current study, we uncovered a yet unknown mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome activation by a pathogen-derived factor. We show that the unique bacterial ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin produced by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and designated community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by colocalizing with the NLRP3 inflammasome and catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of NLRP3. Mutant full-length CARDS toxin lacking ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) activity and truncated CARDS toxins unable to bind to macrophages and be internalized failed to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. These studies demonstrate that CARDS toxin-mediated ADP-ribosylation constitutes an important posttranslational modification of NLRP3, that ADPRT activity of CARDS toxin is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and that posttranslational ADPRT-mediated modification of the inflammasome is a newly discovered mechanism for inflammasome activation with subsequent release of IL-1β and associated pathologies. PMID:25538194

  8. Synergy between toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Margaret C; Jiannino, Joshua A; Federici, Brian A; Walton, William E

    2004-09-01

    Synergistic interactions among the multiple endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis de Barjac play an important role in its high toxicity to mosquito larvae and the absence of insecticide resistance in populations treated with this bacterium. A lack of toxin complexity and synergism are the apparent causes of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus Neide in particular Culex field populations. To identify endotoxin combinations of the two Bacillus species that might improve insecticidal activity and manage mosquito resistance to B. sphaericus, we tested their toxins alone and in combination. Most combinations of B. sphaericus and B. t. subsp. israelensis toxins were synergistic and enhanced toxicity relative to B. sphaericus, particularly against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae resistant to B. sphaericus and Aedes aegypti (L.), a species poorly susceptible to B. sphaericus. Toxicity also improved against susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus. For example, when the CytlAa toxin from B. t. subsp. israelensis was added to Bin and Cry toxins, or when native B. t. subsp. israelensis was combined with B. sphaericus, synergism values as high as 883-fold were observed and combinations were 4-59,000-fold more active than B. sphaericus. These data, and previous studies using cytolytic toxins, validate proposed strategies for improving bacterial larvicides by combining B. sphaericus with B. t. subsp. israelensis or by engineering recombinant bacteria that express endotoxins from both strains. These combinations increase both endotoxin complexity and synergistic interactions and thereby enhance activity and help avoid insecticide resistance.

  9. Botulinum toxin for masseter hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Al-Muharraqi, Mohammed A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Al Bareeq, Jaffer; Al Bareeq, Reem; Nasser, Mona

    2009-01-21

    Benign masseter muscle hypertrophy is an uncommon clinical phenomenon of uncertain aetiology which is characterised by a soft swelling near the angle of the mandible. The swelling may on occasion be associated with facial pain and can be prominent enough to be considered cosmetically disfiguring. Varying degrees of success have been reported for some of the treatment options for masseter hypertrophy, which range from simple pharmacotherapy to more invasive surgical reduction. Injection of botulinum toxin type A into the masseter muscle is generally considered a less invasive modality and has been advocated for cosmetic sculpting of the lower face. Botulinum toxin type A is a powerful neurotoxin which is produced by the anaerobic organism Clostridium botulinum and when injected into a muscle causes interference with the neurotransmitter mechanism producing selective paralysis and subsequent atrophy of the muscle. To assess the effects of botulinum toxin type A in the management of benign bilateral masseter hypertrophy. We searched the following databases in August 2008: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2008, issue 3); MEDLINE (via PubMed) (1950 to August 2008); EMBASE (via embase.com) (1980 to August 2008); and LILACS via BIREME. We searched two bibliographic databases of regional journals which may be expected to contain relevant trials (IndMED and Iranmedex) using free text terms appropriate for this review. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing intra-masseteric injections of botulinum toxin versus placebo administered for cosmetic facial sculpting in individuals of any age with bilateral benign masseter hypertrophy, which had been self-evaluated and confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. We excluded participants with unilateral or compensatory contralateral masseter hypertrophy resulting from head and neck radiotherapy. Two review authors

  10. Galactic constraints on supernova progenitor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharova, I. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Mishurov, Yu. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: To estimate the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected per each type of supernovae (SNe) event from observations of the elemental abundance patterns in the Galactic disk and constrain the relevant SNe progenitor models. Methods: We undertake a statistical analysis of the radial abundance distributions in the Galactic disk within a theoretical framework for Galactic chemical evolution which incorporates the influence of spiral arms. This framework has been shown to recover the non-linear behaviour in radial gradients, the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected during SNe explosions to be estimated, and constraints to be placed on SNe progenitor models. Results: (i) The mean mass of oxygen ejected per core-collapse SNe (CC SNe) event (which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ~0.27 M⊙; (ii) the mean mass of iron ejected by tardy Type Ia SNe (SNeIa, whose progenitors are older/longer-lived stars with ages ≳100 Myr and up to several Gyr, which do not concentrate within spiral arms) is ~0.58 M⊙; (iii) the upper mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa (SNe whose progenitors are younger/shorter-lived stars with ages ≲100 Myr, which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ≤0.23 M⊙ per event; (iv) the corresponding mean mass of iron produced by CC SNe is ≤0.04 M⊙ per event; (v) short-lived SNe (core-collapse or prompt SNeIa) supply ~85% of the Galactic disk's iron. Conclusions: The inferred low mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe event implies a low upper mass limit for the corresponding progenitors of ~23 M⊙, otherwise the Galactic disk would be overabundant in oxygen. This inference is the consequence of the non-linear dependence between the upper limit of the progenitor initial mass and the mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe explosion. The low mean mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa, relative to the mass produced by tardy SNeIa (~2.5 times lower), prejudices the idea that both sub-populations of SNeIa have the same physical nature. We

  11. New therapy targeting differential androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer stem/progenitor vs. non-stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Ok; Ma, Zhifang; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Luo, Jie; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Yamashita, Shinichi; Liang, Liang; Tian, Jing; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Niu, Yuanjie; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    The androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to systematically suppress/reduce androgens binding to the androgen receptor (AR) has been the standard therapy for prostate cancer (PCa); yet, most of ADT eventually fails leading to the recurrence of castration resistant PCa. Here, we found that the PCa patients who received ADT had increased PCa stem/progenitor cell population. The addition of the anti-androgen, Casodex®, or AR-siRNA in various PCa cells led to increased stem/progenitor cells, whereas, in contrast, the addition of functional AR led to decreased stem/progenitor cell population but increased non-stem/progenitor cell population, suggesting that AR functions differentially in PCa stem/progenitor vs. non-stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, the current ADT might result in an undesired expansion of PCa stem/progenitor cell population, which explains why this therapy fails. Using various human PCa cell lines and three different mouse models, we concluded that targeting PCa non-stem/progenitor cells with AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9® and targeting PCa stem/progenitor cells with 5-azathioprine and γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant suppression of the tumors at the castration resistant stage. This suggests that a combinational therapy that simultaneously targets both stem/progenitor and non-stem/progenitor cells will lead to better therapeutic efficacy and may become a new therapy to battle the PCa before and after castration resistant stages. PMID:22831834

  12. Sall1 in renal stromal progenitors non-cell autonomously restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Kaku, Yusuke; Fujimura, Sayoko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2015-10-29

    The mammalian kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud, the former of which contains nephron progenitors. The third lineage, the stroma, fills up the interstitial space and is derived from distinct progenitors that express the transcription factor Foxd1. We showed previously that deletion of the nuclear factor Sall1 in nephron progenitors leads to their depletion in mice. However, Sall1 is expressed not only in nephron progenitors but also in stromal progenitors. Here we report that specific Sall1 deletion in stromal progenitors leads to aberrant expansion of nephron progenitors, which is in sharp contrast with a nephron progenitor-specific deletion. The mutant mice also exhibited cystic kidneys after birth and died before adulthood. We found that Decorin, which inhibits Bmp-mediated nephron differentiation, was upregulated in the mutant stroma. In contrast, the expression of Fat4, which restricts nephron progenitor expansion, was reduced mildly. Furthermore, the Sall1 protein binds to many stroma-related gene loci, including Decorin and Fat4. Thus, the expression of Sall1 in stromal progenitors restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors in a non-cell autonomous manner, and Sall1-mediated regulation of Decorin and Fat4 might at least partially underlie the pathogenesis.

  13. Sall1 in renal stromal progenitors non-cell autonomously restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Kaku, Yusuke; Fujimura, Sayoko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud, the former of which contains nephron progenitors. The third lineage, the stroma, fills up the interstitial space and is derived from distinct progenitors that express the transcription factor Foxd1. We showed previously that deletion of the nuclear factor Sall1 in nephron progenitors leads to their depletion in mice. However, Sall1 is expressed not only in nephron progenitors but also in stromal progenitors. Here we report that specific Sall1 deletion in stromal progenitors leads to aberrant expansion of nephron progenitors, which is in sharp contrast with a nephron progenitor-specific deletion. The mutant mice also exhibited cystic kidneys after birth and died before adulthood. We found that Decorin, which inhibits Bmp-mediated nephron differentiation, was upregulated in the mutant stroma. In contrast, the expression of Fat4, which restricts nephron progenitor expansion, was reduced mildly. Furthermore, the Sall1 protein binds to many stroma-related gene loci, including Decorin and Fat4. Thus, the expression of Sall1 in stromal progenitors restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors in a non-cell autonomous manner, and Sall1-mediated regulation of Decorin and Fat4 might at least partially underlie the pathogenesis. PMID:26511275

  14. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2002-02-01

    Botulinum toxin injection has been used for a variety of indications in humans, including blepharospasm and hyperfunctional facial lines. This article describes a novel formulation of botulinum toxin, which supplies immediate feedback to the injecting physician. Additionally, recent findings are described that indicate the immediate injection of botulinum toxin into the muscles underlying a wound can improve the cosmetic outcome of the facial cutaneous scar. Future applications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Medical Defense Against Protein Toxin Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    greatly expanded the accessible delivery vehicles for protein toxins to include, for example, natural or genetically modified bacteria and engineered...01 OCT 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Medical defense against protein toxin weapons: review and perspective...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The term " toxin weapon" has been used to describe poisons, classically of natural origin but increasingly

  16. Dinoflagellate Toxins Responsible for Ciguatera Food Poisoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-10

    AD____ AD-A 194 466 DNOFLACU.ATh TOXINS RESIONSIBLE FOR CIGUATERA FOOD POISONING Annual Summary Report 0 Donald M. Miller 10 December 1987 Supported...21701-5012 62770A 162770A87] AA 7 7 A11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) DINOFLAGELLATE TOXINS RESPONSIBLE FOR CIGUATERA FOOD POISONING .12...occurring in humans who have become intoxicated from eating poison fish. Fish spontaneously accumulate the toxin through the food chain or directly from

  17. A defined, controlled culture system for primary bovine chromaffin progenitors reveals novel biomarkers and modulators.

    PubMed

    Masjkur, Jimmy; Levenfus, Ian; Lange, Sven; Arps-Forker, Carina; Poser, Steve; Qin, Nan; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    We present a method to efficiently culture primary chromaffin progenitors from the adult bovine adrenal medulla in a defined, serum-free monolayer system. Tissue is dissociated and plated for expansion under support by the mitogen basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The cultures, although not homogenous, contain a subpopulation of cells expressing the neural stem cell marker Hes3 that also propagate. In addition, Hes3 is also expressed in the adult adrenal medulla from where the tissue is taken. Differentiation is induced by bFGF withdrawal and switching to Neurobasal medium containing B27. Following differentiation, Hes3 expression is lost, and cells acquire morphologies and biomarker expression patterns of chromaffin cells and dopaminergic neurons. We tested the effect of different treatments that we previously showed regulate Hes3 expression and cell number in cultures of fetal and adult rodent neural stem cells. Treatment of the cultures with a combination of Delta4, Angiopoietin2, and a Janus kinase inhibitor increases cell number during the expansion phase without significantly affecting catecholamine content levels. Treatment with cholera toxin does not significantly affect cell number but reduces the ratio of epinephrine to norepinephrine content and increases the dopamine content relative to total catecholamines. These data suggest that this defined culture system can be used for target identification in drug discovery programs and that the transcription factor Hes3 may serve as a new biomarker of putative adrenomedullary chromaffin progenitor cells.

  18. Cellular and Systemic Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin and Edema Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) are the major virulence factors of anthrax and can replicate the lethality and symptoms associated with the disease. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of anthrax toxin effects in animal models and the cytotoxicity (necrosis and apoptosis) induced by LT in different cells. A brief reexamination of early historic findings on toxin in vivo effects in the context of our current knowledge is also presented. PMID:19638283

  19. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    PubMed

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-09

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications.

  20. Natural toxins and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, V K

    2010-03-01

    Plants have been extensively investigated for exploring their therapeutic potentials, but there are comparatively scanty reports on drugs derived from animal kingdom, except for hormones. During last decade, the toxins that are used for defense by the animals, have been isolated and found useful tools for physiological and pharmacological studies, besides giving valuable leads to drug development. Toxins with interesting results have been isolated from the venoms of snakes, scorpions, spiders, snails, lizards, frogs and fish. The present review describe about some toxins as drugs and their biological activities. Some fungal, bacterial and marine toxins have also been covered in this article.

  1. CHEMOKINES REGULATE THE MIGRATION OF NEURAL PROGENITORS TO SITES OF NEUROINFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Tran, Phuong B.; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have shown that transplanted or endogenous neural progenitor cells will migrate towards damaged areas of the brain. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is not clear. Here we report that, using hippocampal slice cultures, grafted neural progenitor cells (NPs) migrate towards areas of neuroinflammation, and that chemokines are a major regulator of this process. Migration of NPs was observed after injecting an inflammatory stimulus into the area of the fimbria, and transplanting green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled NPs into the dentate gyrus (DG) of cultured hippocampal slices. 3–7 days following transplantation, EGFP-NPs in control slices showed little tendancy to migrate and had differentiated into neurons and glia. In contrast, in slices injected with inflammatory stimuli, EGFP-NPs migrated towards the site of the injection. NPs in these slices also survived less well. The inflammatory stimuli used were either a combination of the cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ, the bacterial toxin LPS, the HIV-1 coat protein gp120 or a β-amyloid expressing adenovirus. We showed that these inflammatory stimuli increased the synthesis of numerous chemokines and cytokines by hippocampal slices. When EGFP-NPs from CCR2 ko mice were transplanted into slices they exhibited little migration towards sites of inflammation. Similarly, wild type EGFP-NPs exhibited little migration towards inflammatory sites when transplanted into slices prepared from MCP-1 ko mice. These data indicate that factors secreted by sites of neuroinflammation are attractive to neural progenitors and suggest that chemokines such as MCP-1 play an important role in this process. PMID:16554469

  2. Botulinum toxin for neuropathic pain and spasticity: an overview.

    PubMed

    Brown, E Alexandra; Schütz, Sonja G; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, a large body of data has surfaced reporting the therapeutic benefit of botulinum toxin injection in multiple conditions. The aim of this review is: to summarize the highest quality literature pertaining to clinical application of botulinum toxin in neuropathic pain conditions including postherpetic neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic polyneuropathy, post-traumatic neuralgia, carpal tunnel syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb and stump pain, and occipital neuralgia; to provide an overview of the clinical trials using botulinum toxin in adult spasticity; and to assign levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. In summary, there is level A evidence for established efficacy in postherpetic neuralgia and adult spasticity; level B evidence for probable efficacy in trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia; level B evidence for probable lack of efficacy in carpal tunnel syndrome; level C evidence for possible efficacy in diabetic polyneuropathy; and level U (insufficient) evidence in complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb and stump pain, and occipital neuralgia.

  3. Failure of botulinum toxin injection for neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Switch of toxin versus second injection of the same toxin.

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Manunta, Andréa; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Marque, Philippe; Rischmann, Pascal; Gamé, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a second injection of the same toxin versus switching to a different botulinum toxin A after failure of a first detrusor injection in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The charts of all patients who underwent detrusor injections of botulinum toxin A (either abobotulinumtoxinA or onabotulinumtoxinA) for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Patients in whom a first detrusor injection had failed were included in the present study. They were managed by a second injection of the same toxin at the same dosage or by a new detrusor injection using a different botulinum toxin A. Success was defined as a resolution of urgency, urinary incontinence and detrusor overactivity in a patient self-catheterizing seven times or less per 24 h. A total of 58 patients were included for analysis. A toxin switch was carried out in 29 patients, whereas the other 29 patients received a reinjection of the same toxin at the same dose. The success rate was higher in patients who received a toxin switch (51.7% vs. 24.1%, P = 0.03). Patients treated with a switch from abobotulinumtoxinA to onabotulinumtoxinA and those treated with a switch from onabotulinumtoxinA to abobotulinumtoxinA had similar success rates (52.9% vs. 50%, P = 0.88). After failure of a first detrusor injection of botulinum toxin for neurogenic detrusor overactivity, a switch to a different toxin seems to be more effective than a second injection of the same toxin. The replacement of onabotulinumtoxin by abobotulinumtoxin or the reverse provides similar results. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies.

  6. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  7. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  8. Osr1 acts downstream of and interacts synergistically with Six2 to maintain nephron progenitor cells during kidney organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyue; Liu, Han; Park, Joo-Seop; Lan, Yu; Jiang, Rulang

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian kidney organogenesis involves reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that drive iterative cycles of nephron formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that the Six2 transcription factor acts cell autonomously to maintain nephron progenitor cells, whereas canonical Wnt signaling induces nephron differentiation. How Six2 maintains the nephron progenitor cells against Wnt-directed commitment is not well understood, however. We report here that Six2 is required to maintain expression of Osr1, a homolog of the Drosophila odd-skipped zinc-finger transcription factor, in the undifferentiated cap mesenchyme. Tissue-specific inactivation of Osr1 in the cap mesenchyme caused premature depletion of nephron progenitor cells and severe renal hypoplasia. We show that Osr1 and Six2 act synergistically to prevent premature differentiation of the cap mesenchyme. Furthermore, although both Six2 and Osr1 could form protein interaction complexes with TCF proteins, Osr1, but not Six2, enhances TCF interaction with the Groucho family transcriptional co-repressors. Moreover, we demonstrate that loss of Osr1 results in β-catenin/TCF-mediated ectopic activation of Wnt4 enhancer-driven reporter gene expression in the undifferentiated nephron progenitor cells in vivo. Together, these data indicate that Osr1 plays crucial roles in Six2-dependent maintenance of nephron progenitors during mammalian nephrogenesis by stabilizing TCF-Groucho transcriptional repressor complexes to antagonize Wnt-directed nephrogenic differentiation.

  9. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  10. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Antiradiation Vaccine: Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Current medical management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include immune prophylaxis based on the Antiradiation Vaccine. Existing principles for the treatment of acute radiation syndromes are based on the replacement and supportive therapy. Haemotopoietic cell transplantation is recomended as an important method of treatment of a Haemopoietic form of the ARS. Though in the different hospitals and institutions, 31 pa-tients with a haemopoietic form have previously undergone transplantation with stem cells, in all cases(100%) the transplantants were rejected. Lethality rate was 87%.(N.Daniak et al. 2005). A large amount of biological substances or antigens isolated from bacterias (flagellin and derivates), plants, different types of venom (honeybees, scorpions, snakes) have been studied. This biological active substances can produce a nonspecific stimulation of immune system of mammals and protect against of mild doses of irradiation. But their radioprotection efficacy against high doses of radiation were not sufficient. Relative radioprotection characteristics or adaptive properties of antioxidants were expressed only at mild doses of radiation. However antioxidants demonstrated a very low protective efficacy at high doses of radiation. Some ex-periments demonstrated even a harmful effect of antioxidants administered to animals that had severe forms of the ARS. Only Specific Radiation Toxins roused a specific antigenic stim-ulation of antibody synthesis. An active immunization by non-toxic doses of radiation toxins includes a complex of radiation toxins that we call the Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD). Immunization must be provided not less than 24 days before irradiation and it is effective up to three years and more. Active immunization by radiation toxins significantly reduces the mortality rate (100%) and improves survival rate up to 60% compare with the 0% sur-vival rate among the irradiated animals in control groups

  12. Apatite Microtopographies Instruct Signaling Tapestries for Progenitor-Driven New Attachment of Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Dangaria, Smit J.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Yin, LeiLei; Valdré, Giovanni; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-01-01

    Dimension and structure of extracellular matrix surfaces have powerful influences on cell shape, adhesion, and gene expression. Here we show that natural tooth root topographies induce integrin-mediated extracellular matrix signaling cascades in tandem with cell elongation and polarization to generate physiological periodontium-like tissues. In this study we replanted surface topography instructed periodontal progenitors into rat alveolar bone sockets for 8 and 16 weeks, resulting in complete reattachment of tooth roots to the surrounding alveolar bone with a periodontal fiber apparatus closely matching physiological controls along the entire root surface. Displacement studies and biochemical analyses confirmed that progenitor-based engineered periodontal tissues were similar to control teeth and uniquely derived from preimplantation green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled progenitors. Together, these studies illustrate the capacity of natural extracellular surface topographies to instruct progenitor cell populations to fully regenerate complex cellular and structural morphologies of tissues once lost to disease. We suggest that our strategy could be used for the replantation of teeth lost due to trauma or as a novel approach for tooth replacement using tooth-shaped replicas. PMID:20795795

  13. Live-animal tracking of individual haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in their niche

    PubMed Central

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Fleming, Heather E.; Wu, Juwell W.; Zhao, Cher X.; Miake-Lye, Sam; Fujisaki, Joji; Côté, Daniel; Rowe, David W.; Lin, Charles P.; Scadden, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells reside in a specialized, regulatory environment termed the niche that dictates how they generate, maintain and repair tissues1,2. We have previously documented that transplanted haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations localize to subdomains of bone-marrow microvessels where the chemokine CXCL12 is particularly abundant3. Using a combination of high-resolution confocal microscopy and two-photon video imaging of individual haematopoietic cells in the calvarium bone marrow of living mice over time, we examine the relationship of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to blood vessels, osteoblasts and endosteal surface as they home and engraft in irradiated and c-Kit-receptor-deficient recipient mice. Osteoblasts were enmeshed in microvessels and relative positioning of stem/progenitor cells within this complex tissue was nonrandom and dynamic. Both cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors influenced primitive cell localization. Different haematopoietic cell subsets localized to distinct locations according to the stage of differentiation. When physiological challenges drove either engraftment or expansion, bone-marrow stem/progenitor cells assumed positions in close proximity to bone and osteoblasts. Our analysis permits observing in real time, at a single cell level, processes that previously have been studied only by their long-term outcome at the organismal level. PMID:19052546

  14. Live-animal tracking of individual haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in their niche.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Fleming, Heather E; Wu, Juwell W; Zhao, Cher X; Miake-Lye, Sam; Fujisaki, Joji; Côté, Daniel; Rowe, David W; Lin, Charles P; Scadden, David T

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells reside in a specialized, regulatory environment termed the niche that dictates how they generate, maintain and repair tissues. We have previously documented that transplanted haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations localize to subdomains of bone-marrow microvessels where the chemokine CXCL12 is particularly abundant. Using a combination of high-resolution confocal microscopy and two-photon video imaging of individual haematopoietic cells in the calvarium bone marrow of living mice over time, we examine the relationship of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to blood vessels, osteoblasts and endosteal surface as they home and engraft in irradiated and c-Kit-receptor-deficient recipient mice. Osteoblasts were enmeshed in microvessels and relative positioning of stem/progenitor cells within this complex tissue was nonrandom and dynamic. Both cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors influenced primitive cell localization. Different haematopoietic cell subsets localized to distinct locations according to the stage of differentiation. When physiological challenges drove either engraftment or expansion, bone-marrow stem/progenitor cells assumed positions in close proximity to bone and osteoblasts. Our analysis permits observing in real time, at a single cell level, processes that previously have been studied only by their long-term outcome at the organismal level.

  15. Combinatorial microenvironmental regulation of liver progenitor differentiation by Notch ligands, TGFβ, and extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kaylan, Kerim B.; Ermilova, Viktoriya; Yada, Ravi Chandra; Underhill, Gregory H.

    2016-01-01

    The bipotential differentiation of liver progenitor cells underlies liver development and bile duct formation as well as liver regeneration and disease. TGFβ and Notch signaling are known to play important roles in the liver progenitor specification process and tissue morphogenesis. However, the complexity of these signaling pathways and their currently undefined interactions with other microenvironmental factors, including extracellular matrix (ECM), remain barriers to complete mechanistic understanding. Utilizing a series of strategies, including co-cultures and cellular microarrays, we identified distinct contributions of different Notch ligands and ECM proteins in the fate decisions of bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) progenitor cells. In particular, we demonstrated a cooperative influence of Jagged-1 and TGFβ1 on cholangiocytic differentiation. We established ECM-specific effects using cellular microarrays consisting of 32 distinct combinations of collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, we demonstrated that exogenous Jagged-1, Delta-like 1, and Delta-like 4 within the cellular microarray format was sufficient for enhancing cholangiocytic differentiation. Further, by combining Notch ligand microarrays with shRNA-based knockdown of Notch ligands, we systematically examined the effects of both cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic ligand. Our results highlight the importance of divergent Notch ligand function and combinatorial microenvironmental regulation in liver progenitor fate specification. PMID:27025873

  16. NRAGE mediates p38 activation and neural progenitor apoptosis via the bone morphogenetic protein signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Stephen E; Battelli, Chiara; Irwin, Sarah; Mitchell, Jane G; Glackin, Carlotta A; Verdi, Joseph M

    2005-09-01

    Understanding the molecular events that govern neural progenitor lineage commitment, mitotic arrest, and differentiation into functional progeny are germane to our understanding of neocortical development. Members of the family of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play pivotal roles in regulating neural differentiation and apoptosis during neurogenesis through combined actions involving Smad and TAK1 activation. We demonstrate that BMP signaling is required for the induction of apoptosis of neural progenitors and that NRAGE is a mandatory component of the signaling cascade. NRAGE possesses the ability to bind and function with the TAK1-TAB1-XIAP complex facilitating the activation of p38. Disruption of NRAGE or any other member of the noncanonical signaling cascaded is sufficient to block p38 activation and thus the proapoptotic signals generated through BMP exposure. The function of NRAGE is independent of Smad signaling, but the introduction of a dominant-negative Smad5 also rescues neural progenitor apoptosis, suggesting that both canonical and noncanonical pathways can converge and regulate BMP-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these results establish NRAGE as an integral component in BMP signaling and clarify its role during neural progenitor development.

  17. NRAGE Mediates p38 Activation and Neural Progenitor Apoptosis via the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Stephen E.; Battelli, Chiara; Irwin, Sarah; Mitchell, Jane G.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Verdi, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the molecular events that govern neural progenitor lineage commitment, mitotic arrest, and differentiation into functional progeny are germane to our understanding of neocortical development. Members of the family of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play pivotal roles in regulating neural differentiation and apoptosis during neurogenesis through combined actions involving Smad and TAK1 activation. We demonstrate that BMP signaling is required for the induction of apoptosis of neural progenitors and that NRAGE is a mandatory component of the signaling cascade. NRAGE possesses the ability to bind and function with the TAK1-TAB1-XIAP complex facilitating the activation of p38. Disruption of NRAGE or any other member of the noncanonical signaling cascaded is sufficient to block p38 activation and thus the proapoptotic signals generated through BMP exposure. The function of NRAGE is independent of Smad signaling, but the introduction of a dominant-negative Smad5 also rescues neural progenitor apoptosis, suggesting that both canonical and noncanonical pathways can converge and regulate BMP-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these results establish NRAGE as an integral component in BMP signaling and clarify its role during neural progenitor development. PMID:16107717

  18. Transient, afferent input-dependent, postnatal niche for neural progenitor cells in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Oshima, Kazuo; Sinkkonen, Saku T.; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Most, Sam P.; Chai, Renjie; Jan, Taha A.; van Amerongen, Renée; Cheng, Alan G.; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN), the first central relay of the auditory pathway, the survival of neurons during the first weeks after birth depends on afferent innervation from the cochlea. Although input-dependent neuron survival has been extensively studied in the CN, neurogenesis has not been evaluated as a possible mechanism of postnatal plasticity. Here we show that new neurons are born in the CN during the critical period of postnatal plasticity. Coincidently, we found a population of neural progenitor cells that are controlled by a complex interplay of Wnt, Notch, and TGFβ/BMP signaling, in which low levels of TGFβ/BMP signaling are permissive for progenitor proliferation that is promoted by Wnt and Notch activation. We further show that cells with activated Wnt signaling reside in the CN and that these cells have high propensity for neurosphere formation. Cochlear ablation resulted in diminishment of progenitors and Wnt/β-catenin-active cells, suggesting that the neonatal CN maintains an afferent innervation-dependent population of progenitor cells that display active canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:23940359

  19. Transient, afferent input-dependent, postnatal niche for neural progenitor cells in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Oshima, Kazuo; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Corrales, C Eduardo; Most, Sam P; Chai, Renjie; Jan, Taha A; van Amerongen, Renée; Cheng, Alan G; Heller, Stefan

    2013-08-27

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN), the first central relay of the auditory pathway, the survival of neurons during the first weeks after birth depends on afferent innervation from the cochlea. Although input-dependent neuron survival has been extensively studied in the CN, neurogenesis has not been evaluated as a possible mechanism of postnatal plasticity. Here we show that new neurons are born in the CN during the critical period of postnatal plasticity. Coincidently, we found a population of neural progenitor cells that are controlled by a complex interplay of Wnt, Notch, and TGFβ/BMP signaling, in which low levels of TGFβ/BMP signaling are permissive for progenitor proliferation that is promoted by Wnt and Notch activation. We further show that cells with activated Wnt signaling reside in the CN and that these cells have high propensity for neurosphere formation. Cochlear ablation resulted in diminishment of progenitors and Wnt/β-catenin-active cells, suggesting that the neonatal CN maintains an afferent innervation-dependent population of progenitor cells that display active canonical Wnt signaling.

  20. Radial glia and neural progenitors in the adult zebrafish central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Than-Trong, Emmanuel; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2015-08-01

    The adult central nervous system (CNS) of the zebrafish, owing to its enrichment in constitutive neurogenic niches, is becoming an increasingly used model to address fundamental questions pertaining to adult neural stem cell (NSC) biology, adult neurogenesis and neuronal repair. Studies conducted in several CNS territories (notably the telencephalon, retina, midbrain, cerebellum and spinal cord) highlighted the presence, in these niches, of progenitor cells displaying NSC-like characters. While pointing to radial glial cells (RG) as major long-lasting, constitutively active and/or activatable progenitors in most domains, these studies also revealed a high heterogeneity in the progenitor subtypes used at the top of neurogenic hierarchies, including the persistence of neuroepithelial (NE) progenitors in some areas. Likewise, dissecting the molecular pathways underlying RG maintenance and recruitment under physiological conditions and upon repair in the zebrafish model revealed shared processes but also specific cascades triggering or sustaining reparative NSC recruitment. Together, the zebrafish adult brain reveals an extensive complexity of adult NSC niches, properties and control pathways, which extends existing understanding of adult NSC biology and gives access to novel mechanisms of efficient NSC maintenance and recruitment in an adult vertebrate brain.

  1. Genetic Tagging During Human Mesoderm Differentiation Reveals Tripotent Lateral Plate Mesodermal Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Jia; Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Evseenko, Denis; Zhu, Yuhua; He, Chong Bin; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M

    2016-05-01

    Although clonal studies of lineage potential have been extensively applied to organ specific stem and progenitor cells, much less is known about the clonal origins of lineages formed from the germ layers in early embryogenesis. We applied lentiviral tagging followed by vector integration site analysis (VISA) with high-throughput sequencing to investigate the ontogeny of the hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal lineages as they emerge from human embryonic mesoderm. In contrast to studies that have used VISA to track differentiation of self-renewing stem cell clones that amplify significantly over time, we focused on a population of progenitor clones with limited self-renewal capability. Our analyses uncovered the critical influence of sampling on the interpretation of lentiviral tag sharing, particularly among complex populations with minimal clonal duplication. By applying a quantitative framework to estimate the degree of undersampling we revealed the existence of tripotent mesodermal progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells, and the subsequent bifurcation of their differentiation into bipotent endothelial/hematopoietic or endothelial/mesenchymal progenitors. Stem Cells 2016;34:1239-1250.

  2. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  3. The cerebrospinal fluid provides a proliferative niche for neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Maria K.; Zappaterra, Mauro W.; Chen, Xi; Yang, Yawei J.; Hill, Anthony; Lun, Melody; Maynard, Thomas; Gonzalez, Dilenny; Kim, Seonhee; Ye, Ping; D’Ercole, A. Joseph; Wong, Eric T.; LaMantia, Anthony S.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical development depends on the active integration of cell autonomous and extrinsic cues, but the coordination of these processes is poorly understood. Here, we show that the apical complex protein Pals1 and Pten have opposing roles in localizing the Igf1R to the apical, ventricular domain of cerebral cortical progenitor cells. We found that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which contacts this apical domain, has an age-dependent effect on proliferation, much of which is attributable to Igf2, but that CSF contains other signaling activities as well. CSF samples from patients with glioblastoma multiforme show elevated Igf2 and stimulate stem cell proliferation in an Igf2-dependent manner. Together, our findings demonstrate that the apical complex couples intrinsic and extrinsic signaling, enabling progenitors to sense and respond appropriately to diffusible CSF-borne signals distributed widely throughout the brain. The temporal control of CSF composition may have critical relevance to normal development and neuropathological conditions. PMID:21382550

  4. EVOLUTION OF PROGENITORS FOR ELECTRON CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi E-mail: umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We provide progenitor models for electron capture supernovae (ECSNe) with detailed evolutionary calculation. We include minor electron capture nuclei using a large nuclear reaction network with updated reaction rates. For electron capture, the Coulomb correction of rates is treated and the contribution from neutron-rich isotopes is taken into account in each nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) composition. We calculate the evolution of the most massive super asymptotic giant branch stars and show that these stars undergo off-center carbon burning and form ONe cores at the center. These cores become heavier up to the critical mass of 1.367 M{sub Sun} and keep contracting even after the initiation of O+Ne deflagration. Inclusion of minor electron capture nuclei causes convective URCA cooling during the contraction phase, but the effect on the progenitor evolution is small. On the other hand, electron capture by neutron-rich isotopes in the NSE region has a more significant effect. We discuss the uniqueness of the critical core mass for ECSNe and the effect of wind mass loss on the plausibility of our models for ECSN progenitors.

  5. Endothelial Progenitors: A Consensus Statement on Nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Medina, Reinhold J; Barber, Chad L; Sabatier, Florence; Dignat-George, Francoise; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Ohneda, Osamu; Randi, Anna M; Chan, Jerry K Y; Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Yoder, Mervin C; Stitt, Alan W

    2017-03-10

    Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) nomenclature remains ambiguous and there is a general lack of concordance in the stem cell field with many distinct cell subtypes continually grouped under the term "EPC." It would be highly advantageous to agree standards to confirm an endothelial progenitor phenotype and this should include detailed immunophenotyping, potency assays, and clear separation from hematopoietic angiogenic cells which are not endothelial progenitors. In this review, we seek to discourage the indiscriminate use of "EPCs," and instead propose precise terminology based on defining cellular phenotype and function. Endothelial colony forming cells and myeloid angiogenic cells are examples of two distinct and well-defined cell types that have been considered EPCs because they both promote vascular repair, albeit by completely different mechanisms of action. It is acknowledged that scientific nomenclature should be a dynamic process driven by technological and conceptual advances; ergo the ongoing "EPC" nomenclature ought not to be permanent and should become more precise in the light of strong scientific evidence. This is especially important as these cells become recognized for their role in vascular repair in health and disease; and, in some cases, progress toward use in cell therapy. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  6. Transient nuclear Prospero induces neural progenitor quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Sen-Lin; Doe, Chris Q

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells can self-renew, differentiate, or enter quiescence. Understanding how stem cells switch between these states is highly relevant for stem cell-based therapeutics. Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) have been an excellent model for studying self-renewal and differentiation, but quiescence remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that when neuroblasts enter quiescence, the differentiation factor Prospero is transiently detected in the neuroblast nucleus, followed by the establishment of a unique molecular profile lacking most progenitor and differentiation markers. The pulse of low level nuclear Prospero precedes entry into neuroblast quiescence even when the timing of quiescence is advanced or delayed by changing temporal identity factors. Furthermore, loss of Prospero prevents entry into quiescence, whereas a pulse of low level nuclear Prospero can drive proliferating larval neuroblasts into quiescence. We propose that Prospero levels distinguish three progenitor fates: absent for self-renewal, low for quiescence, and high for differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03363.001 PMID:25354199

  7. Diversification of a single ancestral gene into a successful toxin superfamily in highly venomous Australian funnel-web spiders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spiders have evolved pharmacologically complex venoms that serve to rapidly subdue prey and deter predators. The major toxic factors in most spider venoms are small, disulfide-rich peptides. While there is abundant evidence that snake venoms evolved by recruitment of genes encoding normal body proteins followed by extensive gene duplication accompanied by explosive structural and functional diversification, the evolutionary trajectory of spider-venom peptides is less clear. Results Here we present evidence of a spider-toxin superfamily encoding a high degree of sequence and functional diversity that has evolved via accelerated duplication and diversification of a single ancestral gene. The peptides within this toxin superfamily are translated as prepropeptides that are posttranslationally processed to yield the mature toxin. The N-terminal signal sequence, as well as the protease recognition site at the junction of the propeptide and mature toxin are conserved, whereas the remainder of the propeptide and mature toxin sequences are variable. All toxin transcripts within this superfamily exhibit a striking cysteine codon bias. We show that different pharmacological classes of toxins within this peptide superfamily evolved under different evolutionary selection pressures. Conclusions Overall, this study reinforces the hypothesis that spiders use a combinatorial peptide library strategy to evolve a complex cocktail of peptide toxins that target neuronal receptors and ion channels in prey and predators. We show that the ω-hexatoxins that target insect voltage-gated calcium channels evolved under the influence of positive Darwinian selection in an episodic fashion, whereas the κ-hexatoxins that target insect calcium-activated potassium channels appear to be under negative selection. A majority of the diversifying sites in the ω-hexatoxins are concentrated on the molecular surface of the toxins, thereby facilitating neofunctionalisation leading to new toxin

  8. Synthesis and biology of cyclic imine toxins, an emerging class of potent, globally distributed marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Stivala, Craig E; Benoit, Evelyne; Aráoz, Rómulo; Servent, Denis; Novikov, Alexei; Molgó, Jordi; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    From a small group of exotic compounds isolated only two decades ago, Cyclic Imine (CI) toxins have become a major class of marine toxins with global distribution. Their distinct chemical structure, biological mechanism of action, and intricate chemistry ensures that CI toxins will continue to be the subject of fascinating fundamental studies in the broad fields of chemistry, chemical biology, and toxicology. The worldwide occurrence of potent CI toxins in marine environments, their accumulation in shellfish, and chemical stability are important considerations in assessing risk factors for human health. This review article aims to provide an account of chemistry, biology, and toxicology of CI toxins from their discovery to the present day.

  9. Burn sepsis and burn toxin

    PubMed Central

    Allgöwer, Martin; Städtler, Karl; Schoenenberger, Guido A

    1974-01-01

    The salient steps of a 20-year programme of research into the nature of burn disease are described. By burn disease we mean the late mortality and morbidity following burns. We have isolated a burn toxin which is derived from a thermal polymerization of cell membrane lipoproteins within the dermis and have studied its influence on the effects of sepsis. We have also used it in the development of active and passive immunization therapy of severe burns. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4429330

  10. Tremorgenic Toxin from Penicillium verruculosum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, R. J.; Kirksey, J. W.; Moore, J. H.; Blankenship, B. R.; Diener, U. L.; Davis, N. D.

    1972-01-01

    A new mycotoxin that produces severe tremors and acute toxicity when administered orally or intraperitoneally (ip) to mice and 1-day-old cockerels was obtained from a strain of Penicillium verruculosum Peyronel isolated from peanuts. The ip 50% lethal dose (LD50) of this tremorgen was 2.4 mg/kg in mice and 15.2 mg/kg in chickens. Orally administered LD50 values for the toxin were 126.7 mg/kg in mice and 365.5 mg/kg in chickens. The trivial name „verruculogen” is proposed for this tremorgenic mycotoxin. Physical and chemical characteristics of the mycotoxin are described. PMID:4341967

  11. Tremorgenic toxin from Penicillium veruculosum.

    PubMed

    Cole, R J; Kirksey, J W; Moore, J H; Blankenship, B R; Diener, U L; Davis, N D

    1972-08-01

    A new mycotoxin that produces severe tremors and acute toxicity when administered orally or intraperitoneally (ip) to mice and 1-day-old cockerels was obtained from a strain of Penicillium verruculosum Peyronel isolated from peanuts. The ip 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) of this tremorgen was 2.4 mg/kg in mice and 15.2 mg/kg in chickens. Orally administered LD(50) values for the toxin were 126.7 mg/kg in mice and 365.5 mg/kg in chickens. The trivial name "verruculogen" is proposed for this tremorgenic mycotoxin. Physical and chemical characteristics of the mycotoxin are described.

  12. Botulinum toxin: The Midas touch

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, P. S.; Kaul, Rachna; Sultana, Nishat; Bhat, Suraksha

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin (BT) is a natural molecule produced during growth and autolysis of bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. Use of BT for cosmetic purposes has gained popularity over past two decades, and recently, other therapeutic uses of BT has been extensively studied. BT is considered as a minimally invasive agent that can be used in the treatment of various orofacial disorders and improving the quality of life in such patients. The objective of this article is to review the nature, mechanism of action of BT, and its application in various head and neck diseases. PMID:24678189

  13. Adrenomedullary progenitor cells: Isolation and characterization of a multi-potent progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rubin de Celis, Maria Fernandez; Pellegata, Natalia S; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-15

    The adrenal is a highly plastic organ with the ability to adjust to physiological needs by adapting hormone production but also by generating and regenerating both adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tissue. It is now apparent that many adult tissues maintain stem and progenitor cells that contribute to their maintenance and adaptation. Research from the last years has proven the existence of stem and progenitor cells also in the adult adrenal medulla throughout life. These cells maintain some neural crest properties and have the potential to differentiate to the endocrine and neural lineages. In this article, we discuss the evidence for the existence of adrenomedullary multi potent progenitor cells, their isolation and characterization, their differentiation potential as well as their clinical potential in transplantation therapies but also in pathophysiology.

  14. Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms Share Print ...

  15. Identification and characterization of toxins in the venom gland of the Chinese bird spider, Haplopelma hainanum, by transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ting-Cai; Long, Ren-Wen; Wu, Yu-Qian; Guo, You-Bing; Liu, Duo-Lian; Peng, Li; Li, Dai-Qin; Yang, Dai-Wen; Xu, Xin; Liu, Feng-Xiang; Xia, Qing-You

    2016-06-01

    Tarantula venoms provide a model system for studying toxin selectivity, structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution of peptide toxins. Previous studies have identified a large number of peptide toxins in the venom of the Chinese bird spider Haplopelma hainanum, generally regarded as a highly venomous spider. However, the lack of available RNA-seq transcriptomic and genomic data is an obstacle to understanding its venom at the molecular level. In this study, we investigated the venom gland transcriptome of H. hainanum by RNA-seq, in the absence of an available genomic sequence. We identified 201 potential toxins among 57 181 de novo assembled transcripts, including knottins, Kunitz-type toxins, enzymes and other proteins. We systematically identified most of the knottins and Kunitz-type toxins, some of which showed strongly biased expression in the venom gland, including members of the huwentoxin-1, huwentoxin-2 and magi-1 families. We also discovered several novel potential toxins. These data demonstrate the high molecular and structural diversity in the venom toxins of H. hainanum. This study offers a useful strategy for exploring the complex components of spider venoms. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Structure and Proposed Activity of a Member of the VapBC Family of Toxin-Antitoxin Systems: VapBC-5 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miallau, L.; Faller, M.; Chiang, J.; Arbing, M.; Guo, F.; Cascio, D.; Eisenberg, D.

    2009-03-02

    In prokaryotes, cognate toxin-antitoxin pairs have long been known, but no three-dimensional structure has been available for any given complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we report the crystal structure and activity of a member of the VapBC family of complexes from M. tuberculosis. The toxin VapC-5 is a compact, 150 residues, two domain {alpha}/{beta} protein. Bent around the toxin is the VapB-5 antitoxin, a 33-residue {alpha}-helix. Assays suggest that the toxin is an Mg-enabled endoribonuclease, inhibited by the antitoxin. The lack of DNase activity is consistent with earlier suggestions that the complex represses its own operon. Furthermore, analysis of the interactions in the binding of the antitoxin to the toxin suggest that exquisite control is required to protect the bacteria cell from toxic VapC-5.

  17. Multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) Toxins of Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxins are a heterogeneous group of toxins found in a number of Vibrio species and other Gram-negative bacteria. The toxins are composed of conserved repeat regions and an autoprocessing protease domain that together function as a delivery platform for transfer of cytotoxic and cytopathic domains into target eukaryotic cell cytosol. Within the cells, the effectors can alter biological processes such as signaling or cytoskeletal structure, presumably to the benefit of the bacterium. Ten effector domains are found in the various Vibrio MARTX toxins, although any one toxin carries only two to five effector domains. The specific toxin variant expressed by a species can be modified by homologous recombination to acquire or lose effector domains, such that different strains within the same species can express distinct variants of the toxins. This review examines the conserved structural elements of the MARTX toxins and details the different toxin arrangements carried by Vibrio species and strains. The catalytic function of domains and how the toxins are linked to pathogenesis of human and animals is described. PMID:26185092

  18. Multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) Toxins of Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F

    2015-06-01

    Multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxins are a heterogeneous group of toxins found in a number of Vibrio species and other Gram-negative bacteria. The toxins are composed of conserved repeat regions and an autoprocessing protease domain that together function as a delivery platform for transfer of cytotoxic and cytopathic domains into target eukaryotic cell cytosol. Within the cells, the effectors can alter biological processes such as signaling or cytoskeletal structure, presumably to the benefit of the bacterium. Ten effector domains are found in the various Vibrio MARTX toxins, although any one toxin carries only two to five effector domains. The specific toxin variant expressed by a species can be modified by homologous recombination to acquire or lose effector domains, such that different strains within the same species can express distinct variants of the toxins. This review examines the conserved structural elements of the MARTX toxins and details the different toxin arrangements carried by Vibrio species and strains. The catalytic function of domains and how the toxins are linked to pathogenesis of human and animals is described.

  19. Recent insights into Pasteurella multocida toxin and other G-protein-modulating bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda A; Ho, Mengfei

    2010-08-01

    Over the past few decades, our understanding of the bacterial protein toxins that modulate G proteins has advanced tremendously through extensive biochemical and structural analyses. This article provides an updated survey of the various toxins that target G proteins, ending with a focus on recent mechanistic insights in our understanding of the deamidating toxin family. The dermonecrotic toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) was recently added to the list of toxins that disrupt G-protein signal transduction through selective deamidation of their targets. The C3 deamidase domain of PMT has no sequence similarity to the deamidase domains of the dermonecrotic toxins from Escherichia coli (cytotoxic necrotizing factor [CNF]1-3), Yersinia (CNFY) and Bordetella (dermonecrotic toxin). The structure of PMT-C3 belongs to a family of transglutaminase-like proteins, with active site Cys-His-Asp catalytic triads distinct from E. coli CNF1.

  20. Regulation of the nascent brain vascular network by neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Devi; Huang, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Neural progenitors are central players in the development of the brain neural circuitry. They not only produce the diverse neuronal and glial cell types in the brain, but also guide their migration in this process. Recent evidence indicates that neural progenitors also play a critical role in the development of the brain vascular network. At an early stage, neural progenitors have been found to facilitate the ingression of blood vessels from outside the neural tube, through VEGF and canonical Wnt signaling. Subsequently, neural progenitors directly communicate with endothelial cells to stabilize nascent brain vessels, in part through down-regulating Wnt pathway activity. Furthermore, neural progenitors promote nascent brain vessel integrity, through integrin αvβ8-dependent TGFβ signaling. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for, as well as questions that remain, regarding these novel roles of neural progenitors and the underlying mechanisms in their regulation of the nascent brain vascular network.

  1. Formation and Control of Cyanobacterial Toxins

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will cover the formation of harmful algal blooms and the control of their toxins. Data will be presented from current ORD projects on the treatment of cyanobacterial toxins through drinking water treatment facilities. The results will demonstrate that current c...

  2. Plant insecticidal toxins in ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Gallet, Christiane; Després, Laurence

    2012-04-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play a key role in plant-insect interactions, whether constitutive or induced, C- or N-based. Anti-herbivore defences against insects can act as repellents, deterrents, growth inhibitors or cause direct mortality. In turn, insects have evolved a variety of strategies to act against plant toxins, e.g., avoidance, excretion, sequestration and degradation of the toxin, eventually leading to a co-evolutionary arms race between insects and plants and to co-diversification. Anti-herbivore defences also negatively impact mutualistic partners, possibly leading to an ecological cost of toxin production. However, in other cases toxins can also be used by plants involved in mutualistic interactions to exclude inadequate partners and to modify the cost/benefit ratio of mutualism to their advantage. When considering the whole community, toxins have an effect at many trophic levels. Aposematic insects sequester toxins to defend themselves against predators. Depending on the ecological context, toxins can either increase insects' vulnerability to parasitoids and entomopathogens or protect them, eventually leading to self-medication. We conclude that studying the community-level impacts of plant toxins can provide new insights into the synthesis between community and evolutionary ecology.

  3. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  4. The Ins and Outs of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Sarah; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Bürgi, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a severe, although rather rare, infectious disease that is caused by the Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The infectious form is the spore and the major virulence factors of the bacterium are its poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule and the tripartite anthrax toxin. The discovery of the anthrax toxin receptors in the early 2000s has allowed in-depth studies on the mechanisms of anthrax toxin cellular entry and translocation from the endocytic compartment to the cytoplasm. The toxin generally hijacks the endocytic pathway of CMG2 and TEM8, the two anthrax toxin receptors, in order to reach the endosomes. From there, the pore-forming subunit of the toxin inserts into endosomal membranes and enables translocation of the two catalytic subunits. Insertion of the pore-forming unit preferentially occurs in intraluminal vesicles rather than the limiting membrane of the endosome, leading to the translocation of the enzymatic subunits in the lumen of these vesicles. This has important consequences that will be discussed. Ultimately, the toxins reach the cytosol where they act on their respective targets. Target modification has severe consequences on cell behavior, in particular on cells of the immune system, allowing the spread of the bacterium, in severe cases leading to host death. Here we will review the literature on anthrax disease with a focus on the structure of the toxin, how it enters cells and its immunological effects. PMID:26978402

  5. Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: C. Difficile Toxin A A A What's in this ... Q