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Sample records for progenitoras hematopoyeticas abo

  1. ABO incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    Transfusion reaction - hemolytic; Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction; AHTR; Blood incompatibility - ABO ... to another type of blood can cause a reaction. This is important when someone needs to receive ...

  2. Molecular genetics of ABO.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F

    2000-01-01

    This year commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner. His findings of red cell agglutination by serum and recognition of blood groups laid the scientific basis for safe practice of blood transfusion. Even though dozens of blood systems have been identified, the ABO system still remains to be one of the most important systems in transfusion medicine. In 1990, we elucidated the molecular genetic basis of three major alleles at the ABO locus. Since then we have witnessed the progress in our understanding of ABO genes and A and B glycosyltransferases specified by a variety of functional alleles at this locus. Mutations affecting the activity and specificity of the enzymes have been identified. Not only has ABO genotyping become possible, but it has also become possible to genetically engineer the activity and specificity of the enzymes. We are now at a point of embarking upon the quest of understanding the functional significance of ABO polymorphism.

  3. [ABO blood group typing in forensic autopsies].

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji

    2005-10-01

    In forensic science and medicine the ABO system has been a major focus, since the record of this blood system is a very prevalent one and A, B and O(H) antigens on erythrocytes are also associated with other cells and tissues throughout the body and are known to be considerably stable to the such violent conditions as heating or drying. However the determination of the ABO grouping from the body often encounters the difficulty due to haemolytic erythrocytes, and putrefaction, mummification or skeletonization of the body during post-mortem interval. In this presentation I review the merit and demerits of the ABO blood-grouping methods utilized in my division at the forensic autopsies according to the haemagglutination, absorption-elution and histochemical techniques and ABO genotyping method. It is important for ABO grouping to know the distribution of the ABO antigen in the body. I would like to emphasize that the species identification prior to ABO grouping is an important procedure because forensic materials such as from saliva, urine and seminal fluid might be contaminated with the fluid from animals, and DNA extracted from vertebrate species might be amplified with the primer for ABO genotyping and the amplified PCR products might be hybridized to those from human.

  4. [Genotyping of ABO loci in para-Bombay type individuals].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Qiang; Luo, Guang-Ping

    2004-08-01

    To study the molecular genetic basis of ABO alleles in para-Bombay type individuals, samples from five para-Bombay type individuals identified by serologic tests including absorption-elution tests, saliva neutralizing or inhibitor substances tests, were genotyped by using PCR-SSP based ABO genotyping. Exon 6 and exon 7 at the ABO locus for all 5 samples were sequenced. The results showed that the ABO genotypes of five para-Bombay samples were A102B1, A102B1, A102O1, A102B1, B1O1 respectively, the direct DNA sequencing results were in accordance with the results genotyped by PCR-SSP method, No novel nucleotide mutation was found at the exon 6 and exon 7 of ABO gene. In conclusion, the ABO genotyping assay by PCR-SSP provide a simple, rapid and accurate method for determining the ABO type of para-Bombay cases.

  5. [Mistyping of ABO grouping by polyagglutination].

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Ishimaru, K; Sekiguchi, S

    1997-09-01

    Polyagglutination is a phenomenon that a sample of patient's red blood cells is agglutinated by most of normal human sera. In patients with bacterial infection or hematological diseases, red cells may become agglutinable due to an exposure of antigens (cryptoantigen) that are usually hidden as submembrane structures of normal red cells. Most of normal sera contain natural antibodies to the corresponding antigens. Polyagglutination can cause apparent discrepancies between ABO antigen and antibody tests with the patient's sample, resulting in mistyping of ABO grouping. In some cases, polyagglutination is observed only by the minor test of cross-matching without showing the discrepancies. Recently polyagglutination has been rarely seen probably because of increasing use of monoclonal antibodies and dispensing minor test for cross-matching. Because no obvious case of adverse reaction by polyagglutination through transfusion is recently reported, clinical significance of polyagglutination seems extremely low. PMID:9301304

  6. Relationship between ABO blood groups and malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Chowdhuri, A. N. Rai

    1980-01-01

    A total of 736 patients with fever was tested for malaria and classified according to ABO blood group. Of these, 476 cases had patent parasitaemia at the time of investigation. The distribution of blood groups in this group was significantly different from that in 1300 controls from the same area. While group A was found to be more common in malaria cases than in normals, the reverse situation was found for group O. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:6971187

  7. ABO Incompatible Kidney Transplantation—Current Status and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Milljae; Kim, Sung-Joo

    2011-01-01

    In the past, ABO blood group incompatibility was considered an absolute contraindication for kidney transplantation. Progress in defined desensitization practice and immunologic understanding has allowed increasingly successful ABO incompatible transplantation during recent years. This paper focused on the history, disserted outcomes, desensitization modalities and protocols, posttransplant immunologic surveillance, and antibody-mediated rejection in transplantation with an ABO incompatible kidney allograft. The mechanism underlying accommodation and antibody-mediated injury was also described. PMID:22174989

  8. Standardization of ABO Antibody Titer Measurement at Laboratories in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seon Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of the ABO antibody (Ab) titer is important in ABO-incompatible transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, no standard protocol or external survey program to measure the ABO Ab titer has been established in Korea. We investigated the current status of ABO Ab titer measurements at various laboratories in Korea and the impact of the protocol provided to reduce interlaboratory variations in the methods and results of ABO Ab titers. Methods The Korean external quality assessment of blood bank laboratories sent external survey samples with a questionnaire to 68 laboratories across Korea for the measurement of ABO Ab titers in May 2012. After 6 months, a second set of survey samples were sent with a standard protocol to 53 of the previously surveyed laboratories. The protocol recommended incubation at room temperature only and use of the indirect antihuman globulin method for the tube test as well as and the column agglutination test (CAT). Results Several interlaboratory variations were observed in the results, technical procedures, and methods selected for measurement. We found that 80.4% laboratories hoped to change their protocol to the provisional one. Additionally, CAT showed significantly lower variation among laboratories (P=0.006) than the tube test. Conclusions Our study provides baseline data regarding the current status of ABO Ab titer measurement in Korea. The standard protocol and external survey were helpful to standardize the technical procedures and select methods for ABO Ab titer measurement. PMID:25368821

  9. ABO Blood Type and Personality Traits in Healthy Japanese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchimine, Shoko; Saruwatari, Junji; Kaneda, Ayako; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    There is no scientific consensus that a relationship exists between the ABO blood group and personality traits. However, a recent study hypothesized that the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene is in linkage with the ABO gene. The sample population consisted of 1,427 healthy Japanese subjects who completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Each subject’s ABO blood type was determined by genotyping the rs8176719 and rs8176746 ABO gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The relationships between the six ABO genotypes or four ABO phenotypes and personality traits were examined using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), controlling for age and sex. The MANCOVA data showed a significant difference in TCI scores among the ABO genotype groups (F [7, 1393] = 3.354, p = 0.001). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference in the mean scores for Persistence among the genotype groups (F = 2.680, partial η2 = 0.010, p = 0.020). Similarly, dividing the ABO blood type into four phenotypes revealed a significant difference among the phenotype groups (F [7, 1397] = 2.529, p = 0.014). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference among the phenotype groups in the mean scores for Persistence (F = 2.952, partial η2= 0.006, p = 0.032). We observed a significant association between ABO blood group genotypes and personality traits in a large number of healthy Japanese subjects. However, these results should be regarded as preliminary and should be interpreted with caution because it is possible that the association between ABO blood group genotype and the Persistence trait is relatively weak. PMID:25978647

  10. ABO Blood Type and Personality Traits in Healthy Japanese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimine, Shoko; Saruwatari, Junji; Kaneda, Ayako; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    There is no scientific consensus that a relationship exists between the ABO blood group and personality traits. However, a recent study hypothesized that the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene is in linkage with the ABO gene. The sample population consisted of 1,427 healthy Japanese subjects who completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Each subject's ABO blood type was determined by genotyping the rs8176719 and rs8176746 ABO gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The relationships between the six ABO genotypes or four ABO phenotypes and personality traits were examined using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), controlling for age and sex. The MANCOVA data showed a significant difference in TCI scores among the ABO genotype groups (F [7, 1393] = 3.354, p = 0.001). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference in the mean scores for Persistence among the genotype groups (F = 2.680, partial η2 = 0.010, p = 0.020). Similarly, dividing the ABO blood type into four phenotypes revealed a significant difference among the phenotype groups (F [7, 1397] = 2.529, p = 0.014). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference among the phenotype groups in the mean scores for Persistence (F = 2.952, partial η2= 0.006, p = 0.032). We observed a significant association between ABO blood group genotypes and personality traits in a large number of healthy Japanese subjects. However, these results should be regarded as preliminary and should be interpreted with caution because it is possible that the association between ABO blood group genotype and the Persistence trait is relatively weak. PMID:25978647

  11. Obsessional personality traits and ABO blood types.

    PubMed

    Rinieris, P; Stefanis, C; Rabavilas, A

    1980-01-01

    The relation of ABO blood types to obsessional personality traits, as measured by the Leyton Obsessional Inventory (LOI), was studied in a sample of 600 normal individuals. High scorers of the LOI trait portion demonstrated a significantly lower incidence of phenotype O and a significantly higher incidence of phenotypes AB, A and B, taken together, compared to those of a general population sample and the entire study group. Findings of the present study, in conjunction with previous findings concerning a lower incidence of phenotype O and a higher incidence of phenotype A in obsessive compulsive patients, could be interpreted as indicating that phenotype O may be associated with personality traits hindering the development of obsessive-compulsive symptomatology.

  12. Biological and clinical aspects of ABO blood group system.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Eiji

    2008-08-01

    The ABO blood group was discovered in 1900 by Austrian scientist, Karl Landsteiner. At present, the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) approves as 29 human blood group systems. The ABO blood group system consists of four antigens (A, B, O and AB). These antigens are known as oligosaccharide antigens, and widely expressed on the membranes of red cell and tissue cells as well as, in the saliva and body fluid. The ABO blood group antigens are one of the most important issues in transfusion medicine to evaluate the adaptability of donor blood cells with bone marrow transplantations, and lifespan of the hemocytes.This article reviews the serology, biochemistry and genetic characteristics, and clinical application of ABO antigens.

  13. The prognostic value of ABO blood group in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The antigens of the ABO system are expressed on red blood cell membranes as well as on the surface of several other normal and pathological cells and tissues. Following the first clinical observations more than 60 years ago, the role of ABO blood group in cancer biology has been intensely studied by several investigators, and it is now widely recognised that ABO antigens are associated with the risk of developing several types of tumours, namely pancreatic and gastric cancers. However, whether this association also affects the clinical outcome of cancer patients is less certain. In this narrative review, based on literature data, we discuss the role of ABO blood types as prognostic biomarkers in different types of cancers. The current knowledge of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of the association is also analysed. PMID:26674825

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of the human ABO gene.

    PubMed

    Calafell, Francesc; Roubinet, Francis; Ramírez-Soriano, Anna; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2008-09-01

    The ABO polymorphism has long been suspected to be under balancing selection. To explore this possibility, we analyzed two datasets: (1) a set of 94 23-Kb sequences in European- and African-Americans produced by the Seattle SNPs project, and (2) a set of 814 2-Kb sequences in O alleles from seven worldwide populations. A phylogenetic analysis of the Seattle sequences showed a complex pattern in which the action of recombination and gene conversion are evident, and in which four main lineages could be individuated. The sequence patterns could be linked to the expected blood group phenotype; in particular, the main mutation giving rise to the null O allele is likely to have appeared at least three times in human evolution, giving rise to allele lineages O02, O01, and O09. However, the genealogy changes along the gene and variations of both numbers of branches and of their time depth were observed, which could result from a combined action of recombination and selection. Several neutrality tests clearly demonstrated deviations compatible with balancing selection, peaking at several locations along the gene. The time depth of the genealogy was also incompatible with neutral evolution, particularly in the region from exons 6 to 7, which codes for most of the catalytic domain.

  15. Comparison of clinical outcomes between ABO-compatible and ABO-incompatible spousal donor kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo Yeong; Kang, Seong Sik; Park, Sung Bae; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyong Tae; Cho, Won Hyun; Han, Seungyeup

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (KT) is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease patients. The spouse is a major donor in living KT. Clinical outcomes of spousal donor KT are not inferior to those of living related donor KT. In this study, we compared clinical outcomes between ABO-compatible (ABOc) and ABO-incompatible (ABOi) spousal donor KTs. Methods Thirty-two cases of spousal donor KT performed from January 2011 to August 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-one ABOc KTs and 11 ABOi KTs were performed. We investigated patient survival, graft survival, acute rejection, graft function, and complications. Results During follow-up, patient and graft survival rates were 100% in both groups. There were no significant differences in the incidence of delayed graft function, acute rejection, and the change in graft function between the 2 groups. Medical and surgical complications were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion The clinical outcomes of ABOc and ABOi spousal donor KTs were equivalent. In ABOi KT, an emotionally motivated spousal donor KT may be a good alternative to the problem of the absolute shortage of kidney donations. PMID:27069858

  16. ABO blood group and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    de Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Gori, Alessia; Alfaioli, Barbara; Rossari, Susanna; Crocetti, Emanuele; Vocioni, Franco; Lotti, Torello

    2011-03-01

    Although, for several decades, the role of ABO blood group antigens has been suspected in the development of cancer, to our knowledge, the association between ABO blood group and the risk of malignant melanoma has not been evaluated yet. We, therefore, examined the relationship between ABO blood group and risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma. We retrospectively reviewed 445 patients with a histological diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Blood groups were obtained from medical records. The control group was represented by 38 321 patients. We evaluated the data by investigation with statistical analysis to show a statistically significant increased risk of developing a malignant melanoma in the O Rh-negative group (odds ratio = 1.4). We suggest focus on the melanoma cases belonging to the blood groups O Rh-negative in future studies, because all the clues of this study seem to show a correlation between blood groups and the risk of malignant melanoma among these groups.

  17. Management of ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: past and present trends.

    PubMed

    Raut, Vikram; Uemoto, Shinji

    2011-03-01

    Based on the concept that the liver is a "privileged organ," which resists acute rejection, Thomas Starzl introduced liver transplantation across the ABO blood group. However, with improved survival after liver transplantation came reports of an increased incidence of acute rejection, biliary and vascular complications, and decreased survival after ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. As a result, ABO-incompatible liver transplantations are performed only in emergencies when ABO-compatible grafts are unavailable. In living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), donors are restricted to family members; therefore, breaking ABO blood group barriers becomes inevitable. This inevitable situation has forced liver transplant surgeons to exploit many innovative techniques to overcome the challenges of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. This review looks at the history and current practices of ABO-incompatible LDLT to provide insight so that the protocol can be improved further.

  18. [ABO, rhesus and MN system blood groups and spinal osteochondrosis].

    PubMed

    Kolodchenko, V P

    1979-01-01

    Genetically conditioned traits: blood groups ABO, MN and Rh were studied in 695 patients with osteochondrosis and in the population. Among the patients blood groups AB, N and Rh-negative were more frequent than in the control. Blood groups can be regarded as risk factors in vertebral osteochondrosis. Sex and age differences were found.

  19. Significance of isoagglutinin titer in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Dahae; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Hee-jung; Kwon, Seog-Woon; Han, Duck-Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2014-10-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABO-i) kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged for overcoming the shortage of organ donors. Although this technique initially achieved only low graft survival due to isoagglutinin, recently developed desensitization protocols have improved survival to levels that are comparable to ABO-compatible KT. However, isoagglutinin is still regarded as a major obstacle to ABO-i KT. In this study, we evaluate the impact of isoagglutinin titer on clinical outcomes as well as factors that may influence isoagglutinin titers. In total, data from 95 patients who underwent ABO-i KT were analyzed. Preoperatively, rituximab administration and plasmapheresis were performed until the titer was reduced to ≤1:4. Retrospective analysis included blood group; timing and dosage of rituximab; isoagglutinin titer; number of plasmapheresis; and clinical outcomes including graft survival and serum creatinine. Graft survival was 95.8% (n = 91) and average serum creatinine at 1- and 1.5-year post-ABOi-KT was 1.3. Three patients died of sepsis. The identified predictors of titer-rebound after transplant were short interval (<7 days) between rituximab and first plasmapheresis (P = 0.004); high initial titer (≥256) (P = 0.023); low titer-reduction rate (P < 0.001); and blood group O (P < 0.001). One patient who experienced a rebound developed antibody-mediated rejection. With low-dose (200 mg) rituximab, the change in isoagglutinin titer-rebound was not significant and the infection rate was significantly decreased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, isoagglutinin titer-rebound within the first 2 weeks after KT may be a risk factor for rejection. The factors identified as affecting titer-rebound after KT were high initial isoagglutinin titer, low titer-reduction rate, short interval, and blood group O.

  20. [ABO BLOOD GROUPS AS RISK FACTOR IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION

    PubMed

    Gonzáles Flores, Pedro Alejandro; Díaz Ferrer, Javier Omar; Monge Salgado, Eduardo; Watanabe Varas T, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    TITLE: ABO blood groups as risk factor in Helicobacter pylori infection.OBJECTIVE: To asses the relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. METHODS: The present is a case and control study. A study population of dyspeptic patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was selected. Four biopsies were taken from the antrum and the body of the stomach and blood group was typified. Patients with gastrectomy, gastric cancer, treated for Hp infection in the previous six months or without blood group typification were excluded. The population sample was found using EPIINFO 5.1 program. We called case to every patient with Hp (+) biopsy and control all with Hp (-) biopsy. The risk of the infection was calculated with the OR (Odds ratio) and the study sample was compared with the blood bank control group using the Chi-square test (p<0.005).RESULTS: 367 patients were included (202 female). Age average was 45,06 years. 276 (75,2%) were Hp (+). There were not statistically significant differences in the distribution of ABO blood groups between the study population and the blood bank control. When we compared the ABO blood distribution between patients Hp (+) and Hp (-) we found significant differences for blood group O (p=0.004) and blood group A (p=0.03). Statistical analysis revealed an OR=2,22 for the blood group O and OR=0,5 for the blood group A.CONCLUSIONS: 1) The ABO blood group distribution is different in patients with Hp infection compared with those without Hp infection. 2) Blood group O would be a moderate risk factor for infection by Helicobacter pylori. PMID:12140571

  1. Abo Formation alluvial facies and Associated Basin Fill, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Outcrops of the Abo Formation (Wolfcampian to early Leonardian age) in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico record the evolution of a dry alluvial fan system as it was deposited off the pedernal uplift into the Orogrande basin. The location and orientation of present-day outcrops allow us to observe an inferred east-to-west transverse facies tract consisting of: (1) proximal alluvial fans (lower Abo), which are contiguous in places with underlying Laborcita Formation fan-deltaic sediments; (2) medial anastomosed streams (middle Abo); and (3) distal low-gradient mud-dominated flood basins characterized by either distributary streams (upper Abo) or clastic tidal flats (Lee Ranch Tongue of the Abo) with associated marine carbonates (Pendejo Tongue of the Hueco Formation). Tectonism in the Pedernal highlands, which climaxed during the Late Pennsylvanian, apparently continued well into the Wolfcampian in this region, as evidenced by a major basal Abo unconformity and distinct stacked megasequences of lower Abo alluvial fan lithofacies. However, by the middle Abo, tectonic activity had quiesced and the uplift began eroding and retreating to the north and east. By the late Abo, a pediment surface had formed that was subsequently onlapped by upper Abo and eventually Yeso Formation sediments.

  2. Structural Insights into Polymorphic ABO Glycan Binding by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Gideonsson, Pär; Subedi, Suresh; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Romaõ, Ema; Mendez, Melissa; Nordén, Jenny; Fallah, Mahsa; Rakhimova, Lena; Shevtsova, Anna; Lahmann, Martina; Castaldo, Gaetano; Brännström, Kristoffer; Coppens, Fanny; Lo, Alvin W; Ny, Tor; Solnick, Jay V; Vandenbussche, Guy; Oscarson, Stefan; Hammarström, Lennart; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2016-01-13

    The Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA binds mucosal ABO/Le(b) blood group (bg) carbohydrates. BabA facilitates bacterial attachment to gastric surfaces, increasing strain virulence and forming a recognized risk factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. High sequence variation causes BabA functional diversity, but the underlying structural-molecular determinants are unknown. We generated X-ray structures of representative BabA isoforms that reveal a polymorphic, three-pronged Le(b) binding site. Two diversity loops, DL1 and DL2, provide adaptive control to binding affinity, notably ABO versus O bg preference. H. pylori strains can switch bg preference with single DL1 amino acid substitutions, and can coexpress functionally divergent BabA isoforms. The anchor point for receptor binding is the embrace of an ABO fucose residue by a disulfide-clasped loop, which is inactivated by reduction. Treatment with the redox-active pharmaceutic N-acetylcysteine lowers gastric mucosal neutrophil infiltration in H. pylori-infected Le(b)-expressing mice, providing perspectives on possible H. pylori eradication therapies.

  3. Distribution of ABO blood groups in acute leukaemias and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Murali K; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Solomon, John; Rajaseharan, Annabelle

    2004-09-01

    We studied the distribution of ABO blood groups in Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, in children up to the age of 12 years, in a hospital-based retrospective study. Blood group data were recorded from the case records of all the patients in a tertiary care centre with the diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, during the period 1987-1997. There were 63 Hodgkin's lymphoma, 78 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 116 acute myeloid leukaemia and 522 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients. We assessed the distribution of ABO blood groups and the difference in the distribution from the source population. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, there were 45.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8-84.5] more patients with B blood group. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, there were 14.3% (95% CI: 3.2-25.2) more patients with O blood group. In Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, there were 56.5% (95% CI: 19.9-85.4) and 52.9% (95% CI: 18.1-82.6) less patients with A blood group, respectively. This shows that the relationship between the ABO blood groups and haematological malignancies merits further investigation in a population-based prospective study. This is the first study of its kind in any Indian population. PMID:15175895

  4. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos

    PubMed Central

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  5. Findings of graft biopsy specimens within 90 days after ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation compared with ABO-identical and non-identical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Masahiko; Koshino, Katsuhiro; Nobori, Syuji; Okajima, Hideaki; Masuzawa, Naoko; Urasaki, Koji; Yoshimura, Norio

    2010-07-01

    As immunosuppressive therapy has advanced, we have markedly improved the outcome of ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation. Consequently, graft survival at early phase after ABO-incompatible transplantation has been favorable than ABO-compatible transplantation in Japan. But in these days, it has been assumed that transplant glomerulopathy within one yr after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation might be significantly precipitated. That may be because of chronic, active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). We performed kidney graft biopsies at the early phase within 90 d after living donor kidney transplantation that involved the episode and protocol biopsies and studied findings of graft biopsy specimens when compared with ABO incompatible and compatible involving non-identical and identical transplantations. In ABO-incompatible transplant cases, the ratio occurring glomerulitis, especially severe injury of g 2-3, was significantly higher than that of identical and non-identical transplant cases (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in t score, i score, ptc score and v score between three transplant groups. The cases occurring AMR were concordant with the cases recognized with severe glomerulitis. AMR was difficult to be diagnosed by C4d analysis in ABO-incompatible transplant cases. Glomerular injury score, g score, may be considered as more significant and the injury should be cured thoroughly.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirushnan, B; Subbarao, B; Prabhu, P

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  7. The Classroom-Friendly ABO Blood Types Kit: Blood Agglutination Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Savittree Rochanasmita; Kruatong, Tussatrin; Dahsah, Chanyah; Suwanjinda, Duongdearn

    2012-01-01

    The classroom-friendly ABO blood type kit was developed by combining advantages of modelling and a simulation laboratory to teach the topics of ABO blood types and blood transfusion. Teachers can easily simulate the agglutination reaction on a blood type testing plate in the classroom, and show the students how this reaction occurs by using the…

  8. Abo1, a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, maintains global nucleosome occupancy and organisation.

    PubMed

    Gal, Csenge; Murton, Heather E; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Whale, Alex J; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Creamer, Kevin M; Partridge, Janet F; Allshire, Robin C; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct level and organisation of nucleosomes is crucial for genome function. Here, we uncover a role for a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, Abo1, in the maintenance of nucleosome architecture in fission yeast. Cells lacking abo1(+) experience both a reduction and mis-positioning of nucleosomes at transcribed sequences in addition to increased intragenic transcription, phenotypes that are hallmarks of defective chromatin re-establishment behind RNA polymerase II. Abo1 is recruited to gene sequences and associates with histone H3 and the histone chaperone FACT. Furthermore, the distribution of Abo1 on chromatin is disturbed by impaired FACT function. The role of Abo1 extends to some promoters and also to silent heterochromatin. Abo1 is recruited to pericentromeric heterochromatin independently of the HP1 ortholog, Swi6, where it enforces proper nucleosome occupancy. Consequently, loss of Abo1 alleviates silencing and causes elevated chromosome mis-segregation. We suggest that Abo1 provides a histone chaperone function that maintains nucleosome architecture genome-wide.

  9. Is ABO blood group truly a risk factor for thrombosis and adverse outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shan; Welsby, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABO blood type is one of the most readily available laboratory tests, and serves as a vital determinant in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO antigens are expressed not only on red blood cell membranes, determining the compatibility of transfusion, but also on the surface of other human cells, including epithelium, platelet and vascular endothelium, therefore extending the research into other involvements of cardiovascular disease and postoperative outcomes. ABO blood group has been recognized as a risk factor of venous thrombosis embolism since the 1960’s, effects now understood to be related to ABO dependent variations are procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. Levels of vWF, mostly genetically determined, are strongly associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). It mediates platelet adhesion aggregation and stabilizes FVIII in plasma. Moreover, many studies have tried to identify the relationship between ABO blood types and ischemic heart disease. Unlike the clear and convincing associations between VTE and ABO blood type, the link between ABO blood type and ischemic heart disease is less consistent and may be confusing. Other than genetic factors, ischemic heart disease is strongly related to diet, race, lipid metabolism and economic status. In this review, we’ll summarize the data relating race and genetics, including ABO blood type, to VTE, ischemic heart disease and postoperative bleeding after cardiac surgery. PMID:25276299

  10. A modified PCR-SSP method for the identification of ABO blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Downing, J; Darke, C

    2003-08-01

    The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate molecules synthesized by the glycosyltransferases encoded by the ABO gene on chromosome 9. Kidney transplantation across the ABO barrier generally leads to rapid humoral graft rejection due to the presence of naturally occurring antibodies to the A and B antigens. We have developed a method for ABO typing our cadaveric organ donors by the polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The method uses 12 primers in eight PCR mixtures and is performed under the same conditions as our routine HLA-A, B, C PCR-SSP typing. The PCR-SSP-based types of 166 regular blood donors and 148 cadaveric organ donors all showed total concordance with their serologically assigned ABO groups. Six individuals possessing the ABO A subgroups (A3, Ax and Aend) all typed as A1 by PCR-SSP, as expected. PCR-SSP is an appropriate method for ABO typing of cadaveric organ donors and, importantly, enables both ABO and HLA typing to be performed on the same DNA material.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kirushnan, B.; Subbarao, B.; Prabhu, P.

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  12. Risk factor for ischemic-type biliary lesion after ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jun Bae; Kim, Bong-Wan; Kim, Young Bae; Wang, Hee-Jung; Lee, Hyun Yeong; Sim, Joohyun; Kim, Taegyu; Lee, Kyeong Lok; Hu, Xu-Guang; Mao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk factors for ischemic-type biliary lesion (ITBL) after ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). METHODS: Among 141 ALDLTs performed in our hospital between 2008 and 2014, 27 (19%) were ABO-I ALDLT and 114 were ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT. In this study, we extensively analyzed the clinico-pathological data of the 27 ABO-I recipients to determine the risk factors for ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. All ABO-I ALDLT recipients underwent an identical B-cell depletion protocol with preoperative rituximab, plasma exchange (PE), and operative splenectomy. The median follow-up period after transplantation was 26 mo. The clinical outcomes of the 27 ABO-I ALDLT recipients were compared with those of 114 ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT recipients. RESULTS: ITBL occurred in four recipients (14.8%) between 45 and 112 d after ABO-I ALDLT. The overall survival rates were not different between ABO-I ALDLT and ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT (P = 0.303). Among the ABO-I ALDLT recipients, there was no difference between patients with ITBL and those without ITBL in terms of B-cell and T-cell count, serum isoagglutinin titers, number of PEs, operative time and transfusion, use of graft infusion therapy, or number of remnant B-cell follicles and plasma cells in the spleen. However, the perioperative NK cell counts in the blood of patients with ITBL were significantly higher than those in the patients without ITBL (P < 0.05). Preoperative NK cell count > 150/μL and postoperative NK cell count > 120/μL were associated with greater relative risks (RR) for development of ITBL (RR = 20 and 14.3, respectively, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: High NK cell counts in a transplant recipient’s blood are associated with ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. Further research is needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of NK cell involvement in the development of ITBL. PMID:27570428

  13. Cheiloscopy and its patterns in comparison with ABO blood groups

    PubMed Central

    Telagi, Neethu; Mujib, Ahmed; Spoorthi, BR; Naik, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the distribution of different lip print patterns among subjects having different ABO and Rh blood groups and to determine the correlation between their characters and blood groups. Materials and Methods: The present study was done on 150 individuals who were randomly selected and blood groups of these subjects were analyzed. Results: The results revealed no association between distribution of lip print (cheiloscopy) pattern and blood groups. Conclusion: Lip print pattern does not show any correlation between blood groups. PMID:22408325

  14. Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.; Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Carroll, M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of climate change are being revealed at alarming rates in the Arctic and Boreal regions of the planet. NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program has launched a major field campaign to study these effects over the next 5 to 8 years. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will challenge scientists to take measurements in the field, study remote observations, and even run models to better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing climate for areas of Alaska and western Canada. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has partnered with the Terrestrial Ecology Program to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud. The cloud combines traditional high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale climate analytics. The ABoVE Science Cloud utilizes (1) virtualized high-speed InfiniBand networks, (2) a combination of high-performance file systems and object storage, and (3) virtual system environments tailored for data intensive, science applications. At the center of the architecture is a large object storage environment, much like a traditional high-performance file system, that supports data proximal processing using technologies like MapReduce on a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). Surrounding the storage is a cloud of high performance compute resources with many processing cores and large memory coupled to the storage through an InfiniBand network. Virtual systems can be tailored to a specific scientist and provisioned on the compute resources with extremely high-speed network connectivity to the storage and to other virtual systems. In this talk, we will present the architectural components of the science cloud and examples of how it is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign. In our experience, the science cloud approach significantly lowers the barriers and risks to organizations

  15. [ABO system blood group ratios in patients with neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Rudometov, Iu P; Umanskiĭ, K G; Ashmarina, E E; Andreeva, L S

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the ABO blood groups in 2009 patients including 1441 ones suffering from etiologically diverse neuroinfections was studied. Certain correlations between the nosological forms and groups of the diseases on the one hand, and the blood factors on the other are demonstrated. The data obtained point to a certain role of hereditary predisposition in the genesis of the neuroinfections. This predisposition predetermines the risk of the illnesses and the gravity of their course, the fact, which is of a practical importance for the clinician.

  16. Genotyping of ABO blood group system by PCR and RFLP on mummies discovered at Taklamakan desert in 1912.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Kondo, T; Minamino, T; Sun, E; Liu, G; Ohshima, T

    1996-10-01

    ABO genotyping was carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method on the dried remains of nine human mummies which had been discovered at Taklamakan desert in 1912. In all the nine mummies, ABO genotype could be determined as BO type, and ABO phenotype of the eight mummies with hair specimen could be revealed as B type using absorption-elution method. These results mean that ABO phenotype estimated from its genotype by PCR-RFLP was consistent with that by absorption-elution method in all of the eight cases examined. And in the other one child mummy, ABO phenotype could not be examined because of no hair specimen. Although it is impossible to assess the allele frequency of ABO blood group system in the populations having lived in Gao Chang at that time, the present study shows a possibility of ABO genotyping from ancient human remains.

  17. ABO desensitization affects cellular immunity and infection control after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Stein, Maik; Reinke, Petra

    2015-10-01

    The impact of ABO desensitization on overall immunity, infectious control, and alloreactivity remains unknown. We compared 35 ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) to a control of 62 ABO compatible KTRs. Samples were collected before, at +1, +2, +3, +6, and +12 months post-transplantation. CMV-, BKV-specific, and alloreactive T cells were measured using an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. The extent of immunosuppression was quantified by enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokines. No differences were observed for 5-year allograft survival and function between both groups (P > 0.05). However, ABO-incompatible KTRs were more likely to develop CMV infection, BKV-associated nephropathy, and severe sepsis (P = 0.001). Interestingly, ABO-incompatible KTRs with poor HLA-match showed the highest rates of infections and inferior allograft function (P < 0.05). CD3+, CD4+ T-cell counts, interferon-γ and IL-10 levels were lower in ABO-incompatible KTRs early post-transplantation (P < 0.05). Likewise, ABO-incompatible KTRs showed impaired BKV- and CMV-specific T-cell immunity (P < 0.05). ABO-incompatible KTRs showed lower frequencies of alloreactive T cells (P < 0.05). Our data suggest T-cell depletion due to ABO desensitization, which may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections. Elimination of B cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, plays a significant role in both impaired infection control and reduced alloreactive T-cell activation.

  18. First Principles Studies of ABO3 Perovskite Surfaces and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam

    Perovskite-type complex oxides, with general formula ABO 3, constitute one of the most prominent classes of metal oxides which finds key applications in diverse technological fields. In recent years, properties of perovskites at reduced dimensions have aroused considerable interest. However, a complete atomic-level understanding of various phenomena is yet to emerge. To fully exploit the materials opportunities provided by nano-structured perovskites, it is important to characterize and understand their bulk and near-surface electronic structure along with the electric, magnetic, elastic and chemical properties of these materials in the nano-regime, where surface and interface effects naturally play a dominant role. In this thesis, state-of-the-art first principles computations are employed to systematically study properties of one- and two-dimensional perovskite systems which are of direct technological significance. Specifically, our bifocal study targets (1) polarization behavior and dielectric response of ABO3 ferroelectric nanowires, and (2) oxygen chemistry relevant for catalytic properties of ABO3 surfaces. In the first strand, we identify presence of novel closure or vortex-like polarization domains in PbTIO3 and BaTiO3 ferroelectric nanowires and explore ways to control the polarization configurations by means of strain and surface chemistry in these prototypical model systems. The intrinsic tendency towards vortex polarization at reduced dimensions and the underlying driving forces are discussed and previously unknown strain induced phase transitions are identified. Furthermore, to compute the dielectric permittivity of nanostructures, a new multiscale model is developed and applied to the PbTiO3 nanowires with conventional and vortex-like polarization configurations. The second part of the work undertaken in this thesis is comprised of a number of ab initio surface studies, targeted to investigate the effects of surface terminations, prevailing chemical

  19. ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Margaret A.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk of certain malignancies, including ovarian cancer; however, no prospective studies of the association with ovarian cancer risk are available. Using data from 49,153 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, we examined the association between ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer. Study participants reported their blood type and Rh factor in 1996, and 234 women were diagnosed with incident ovarian cancer during 10 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ovarian cancer for each blood group category. Compared to women with blood group O, women with blood group AB or B had a non-significant 38% increase in ovarian cancer incidence (95% CI=0.88–2.16 for blood group AB and 0.96–1.99 for blood group B), while blood group A was not associated with risk (RR=0.95, 95% CI=0.70–1.30). Combining blood groups AB and B, we observed a statistically significant positive association with presence versus absence of the B antigen overall (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.06–1.88) and for the serous invasive subtype (RR=1.53, 95% CI=1.08–2.17). In this large, prospective cohort of women, presence of the B antigen was positively associated with ovarian cancer incidence, while blood group A was not associated with risk. Additional studies are needed to confirm this association and to explore the mechanisms through which blood group may influence ovarian cancer risk. PMID:20309936

  20. Errors in ABO labeling of deceased donor kidneys: case reports and approach to ensuring patient safety.

    PubMed

    Friedman, A L; Lee, K C; Lee, G D

    2007-02-01

    Patient safety in transplantation depends on accurate testing, transcription and transmission of the ABO types of the donor and recipient. Similar to 'near-miss' transfusion labeling errors, three cases of mislabeled ABO types on deceased donor kidney containers were recognized through a pretransplant verification process. Six steps to confirming the organ and ABO identification were developed to ensure safety of the patient and prevent liability for the transplant team and facility. In each case, rapid recognition and documentation of the error source, on site confirmation of the ABO type of the accompanying blood specimen, and full disclosure to the patient and family permitted safe transplantation and avoided the need to pursue a more conservative course that would have required discarding the organs. We advocate following these measures in determining whether to persevere with transplantation of a mislabeled organ.

  1. ABO mismatch is associated with increased non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Aaron C.; Wang, Zhiyu; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Wong, Ruby M.; Lai, Tze; Negrin, Robert S.; Grumet, Carl; Logan, Brent R.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Spellman, Stephen R.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Miklos, David B.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated ABO associated outcomes in 1,737 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) at Stanford University between January 1986 and July 2011. Grafts were 61% ABO matched, 18% major mismatched (MM), 17% minor MM, and 4% bidirectional MM. Median follow-up was 6 years. In multivariate analysis, OS was inferior in minor MM HCT (median 2.1 vs 6.3 years; HR 1.56; 95%CI 1.19-2.05; p=0.001) in comparison with ABO matched grafts. ABO minor MM was associated with an increase in early NRM (18% vs 13%; HR 1.48, 95%CI 1.06-2.06; p=0.02). In an independent Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) analysis of 435 lymphoma patients receiving mobilized peripheral blood grafts, impairment of OS (HR 1.55; 95%CI 1.07 – 2.25; p=0.021) and increased NRM (HR 1.72; 95%CI 1.11 – 2.68; p=0.03) was observed in recipients of ABO minor MM grafts. A second independent analysis of a CIBMTR dataset including 5,179 patients with AML and MDS identified a non-significant trend toward decreased OS in recipients of ABO minor MM grafts and also found ABO major MM to be significantly associated with decreased OS (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08 – 1.31, p<0.001) and increased NRM (HR 1.23, 95%CI 1.08 – 1.4, p=0.002). ABO minor and major MM are risk factors for worse transplant outcomes, although the associated hazards may not be uniform across different transplant populations. Further study is warranted to determine which patient populations are at greatest risk, and whether this risk can be modified by anti-B-cell therapy or other peri-transplant treatments. PMID:25572032

  2. Distribution of ABO and Rh (D) blood groups among the Konda Kammaras of Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Veerraju, P

    1981-01-01

    The frequency distribution of ABO and Rh (D) blood groups among the Konda Kammaras, a tribal population of Andhra Pradesh has been presented. In the ABO system (n = 125) the adjusted frequencies were: p = 0.2202, q = 0.1802 and r = 0.5996. The gene frequency (n = 123) of the Rh (D) negative trait was 0.2017. The results are compared with those from the neighbouring tribal and caste populations.

  3. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  4. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  5. Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Given the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the surface of a wide range of human cells and tissues, the putative interplay of the ABO system in human biology outside the area of transfusion and transplantation medicine constitutes an intriguing byway of research. Thanks to evidence accumulated over more than 50 years, the involvement of the ABO system in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cardiovascular, infectious and neoplastic disorders, is now acknowledged. However, there is controversial information on the potential association between ABO blood type and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and related disorders (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction), venous thromboembolism, post-partum haemorrhage and gestational diabetes. To elucidate the role of ABO antigens in pregnancy-related complications, we performed a systematic review of the literature published in the past 50 years. A meta-analytical approach was also applied to the existing literature on the association between ABO status and pre-eclampsia. The results of this systematic review are presented and critically discussed, along with the possible pathogenic implications. PMID:27177402

  6. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (Ne ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  7. Micro gel column technique is fit for detecting mixed fields post ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Fang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-01

    How to choose suitable serologic method for assessment of the actual stages of ABO chimera is more important to establish transfusion strategy for patients post-ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reported ABO phenotypes of a patient post-ABO minor incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 1+ weak agglutination by tube method was obviously reaffirmed to mixed fields with 4+ positive reaction by micro gel column card. Hence, blood bank technologists must continually work together with hematologist to establish appropriate transfusion strategy, and micro gel column technique can be more appropriate for detecting mixed fields during the whole period of transplantation. PMID:25578650

  8. Expression of human histo-blood group ABO genes is dependent upon DNA methylation of the promoter region.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Y; Hata, Y; Takizawa, H; Tsuchiya, T; Tsukada, J; Yamamoto, F

    1999-12-24

    We have investigated the regulatory role of DNA methylation in the expression of the human histo-blood group ABO genes. The ABO gene promoter region contains a CpG island whose methylation status correlates well with gene expression in the cell lines tested. The CpG island was found hypomethylated in some cell lines that expressed ABO genes, whereas the other cell lines that did not express ABO genes were hypermethylated. Whereas constitutive transcriptional activity of the ABO gene promoter was demonstrated in both expressor and nonexpressor cell lines by transient transfection of reporter constructs containing the ABO gene promoter sequence, HhaI methylase-catalyzed in vitro methylation of the promoter region prior to DNA transfection suppressed the promoter activity when introduced into the expressor gastric cancer cell line KATOIII cells. On the other hand, in the nonexpressor gastric cancer cell line MKN28 cells, treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in demethylation of the ABO gene promoter and appearance of A-transferase messages, as well as A-antigens synthesized by A-transferase. Taken together, these studies suggest that DNA methylation of the ABO gene promoter may play an important role in the regulation of ABO gene expression. PMID:10601288

  9. Determination of ABO blood grouping and Rhesus factor from tooth material

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pooja Vijay; Vanishree, M; Anila, K; Hunasgi, Santosh; Suryadevra, Sri Sujan; Kardalkar, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to determine blood groups and Rhesus factor from dentin and pulp using absorption-elution (AE) technique in different time periods at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 cases, 30 patients each at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were included in the study. The samples consisted of males and females with age ranging 13–60 years. Patient's blood group was checked and was considered as “control.” The dentin and pulp of extracted teeth were tested for the presence of ABO/Rh antigen, at respective time periods by AE technique. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed in proportion. For comparison, Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for the small sample. Results: Blood group antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected in dentin and pulp up to 12 months. For both ABO and Rh factor, dentin and pulp showed 100% sensitivity for the samples tested at 0 month and showed a gradual decrease in the sensitivity as time period increased. The sensitivity of pulp was better than dentin for both the blood grouping systems and ABO blood group antigens were better detected than Rh antigens. Conclusion: In dentin and pulp, the antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected up to 12 months but showed a progressive decrease in the antigenicity as the time period increased. When compared the results obtained of dentin and pulp in ABO and Rh factor grouping showed similar results with no statistical significance. The sensitivity of ABO blood grouping was better than Rh factor blood grouping and showed a statistically significant result. PMID:27721625

  10. Interfacing with in-Situ Data Networks during the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, M.; Griffith, P. C.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Schnase, J. L.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is designed to improve understanding of the causes and impacts of ecological changes in Arctic/boreal regions, and will integrate field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. ABoVE will result in a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability and resilience to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal regions of western North America, and provide scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The studies sponsored by NASA during ABoVE will be coordinated with research and in-situ monitoring activities being sponsored by a number of national and international partners. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud (ASC). The ASC combines high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks identified by the ABoVE Science Definition Team. In this talk, we will present the scientific requirements driving the development of the ABoVE Science Cloud, discuss the necessary interfaces, both computational and human, with in-situ monitoring networks, and show examples of how the ASC is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign.

  11. Relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhabitants of China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Lu, Shan-Ming; Tian, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Hu; Xiao-YunLi; Li, De-Rui; Zheng, Zhi-Chao

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhabitants of China, which is a unique Littoral high-risk area of esophageal carcinoma in China. The poor communication and transportation in the past has made Chaoshan a relatively closed area and kept its culture and custure of old China thousand years ago. METHODS: Data on age, sex, ABO blood type and X-ray or pathological diagnose of the patients with carcinoma of esophagus or cardia were collected from the Tumor Hospital. First Affiliated Hospital, Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College; and the Central Hospital of Shantou and the Central Hospital of Jieyang. A total of 6685 patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC) and 2955 patients with cardiac cancer (CC) in Chaoshan district were retrospectively assessed for their association with ABO blood groups. RESULTS: The distribution of ABO blood groups in patients with EC or CC was similar to the normal local population in Chaoshan. However, blood group B in male patients with CC and in the patients with carcinoma in the upper third esophagus was 2.3% and 4.7% higher than the corresponding controls. The relative risk B∶O was 1.1415 (P < 0.05) and 1.2696 (P < 0.05), respectively. No relationship was found between ABO blood groups and tumor differentiation. CONCLUSION: ABO blood group B is associated with the incidence of CC in male individuals and carcinoma in the upper third esophagus. The distribution of ABO blood groups varies in the different geographical and ethnic groups. As a result, proper controls are very important for such studies. PMID:11819849

  12. Classification of ABO3 perovskite solids: a machine learning study.

    PubMed

    Pilania, G; Balachandran, P V; Gubernatis, J E; Lookman, T

    2015-10-01

    We explored the use of machine learning methods for classifying whether a particular ABO3 chemistry forms a perovskite or non-perovskite structured solid. Starting with three sets of feature pairs (the tolerance and octahedral factors, the A and B ionic radii relative to the radius of O, and the bond valence distances between the A and B ions from the O atoms), we used machine learning to create a hyper-dimensional partial dependency structure plot using all three feature pairs or any two of them. Doing so increased the accuracy of our predictions by 2-3 percentage points over using any one pair. We also included the Mendeleev numbers of the A and B atoms to this set of feature pairs. Doing this and using the capabilities of our machine learning algorithm, the gradient tree boosting classifier, enabled us to generate a new type of structure plot that has the simplicity of one based on using just the Mendeleev numbers, but with the added advantages of having a higher accuracy and providing a measure of likelihood of the predicted structure.

  13. Different sensitivity of rituximab-treatment to B-cells between ABO-incompatible kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ohira, Masahiro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Akita, Tomonori; Tanaka, Junko; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A desensitization protocol with rituximab is currently widely used for kidney transplantation (KT) and liver transplantation (LT) across the ABO blood group-incompatible (ABO-I) barrier. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rituximab is equally effective for B-cell and T-cell immune responses in both KT and LT recipients. To clarify these effects of rituximab, we enrolled 46 KT and 77 LT recipients in this study. The proportion of peripheral blood B-cells was determined at the perioperative period. T-cell responses to allostimulation were evaluated by a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. One week after rituximab administration, peripheral B-cells became undetectable in ABO-I KT recipients but remained detectable in some of the ABO-I LT recipients; B-cells were undetectable in both groups by week 2. B-cells remained below the detection limit throughout the first year in the ABO-I KT recipients, whereas they reappeared in the periphery after 6months in the ABO-I LT recipients. There were no significant differences in alloreactive T-cell responses based on MLR analyses between ABO-I and ABO-compatible groups. This study indicates that rituximab has differing B-cell sensitivity between KT and LT recipients and a minimal effect on the alloreactive T-cell responses in KT and LT recipients. PMID:27085793

  14. Frequency of ABO/Rhesus Blood Groups in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oner, Can; Dogan, Burcu; Telatar, Berrin; Celik Yagan, Canan Fidan; Oguz, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between ABO/Rh blood groups and diabetes mellitus is still controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between ABO/Rhesus blood groups and diabetes in Turkish population. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Istanbul Medeniyet University Göztepe Education and Training Hospital's Diabetes Units. The study group was composed of 421 patients with type-1 diabetes, 484 patients with type-2 diabetes and 432 controls. Blood samples were collected and tested for ABO/Rhesus blood groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 17.0. A significant association was found between blood groups and diabetes mellitus. The frequency of AB blood group was significantly higher in type-1 diabetics; and A blood group was significantly higher in type-2 diabetics. Furthermore, Rh negativity were significantly more frequent in type-2 diabetics.

  15. Distribution of ABO and rhesus blood groups in Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Odokuma, E I; Okolo, A C; Aloamaka, P C

    2007-01-01

    Blood group systems are determined early in intrauterine life, specific to the individual and therefore significant in management and identification. Seven hundred and ninety five volunteer students of the Abraka campus of Delta State University were analyzed in this 4-year retrospective study. Amongst ABO system, blood group O was most common followed by A, B and AB respectively. Rhesus positive was more common than Rhesus negative in the rhesus system. Gender had no significant effect on both blood group systems studied. In the combined ABO and Rhesus blood groups, O positive was most common followed by A positive, B positive, AB positive, O negative and A negative respectively. This study documents ABO and Rhesus blood group distribution patterns amongst south southern Nigerians. Findings will be useful in maintaining a register of possible donors, for effective management of medical emergencies.

  16. Plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible individuals: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIUHUI; HU, XINGBIN; XIA, AIJUN; YI, JING; AN, QUNXING; ZHANG, XIANQING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO blood type-incompatible patients. A small intestinal transplantation case between ABO-incompatible individuals is hereby presented and analyzed. The main treatment included plasma exchange, splenectomy and immunosuppression. The patient undergoing small intestinal transplantation exhibited stable vital signs. A mild acute rejection reaction developed ~2 weeks after the surgery, which the patient successfully overcame. The subsequent colonoscopy and pathological examination revealed no signs of acute rejection. In conclusion, plasma exchange in combination with anti-immune rejection therapy proved to be an effective scheme for the management of small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible patients. PMID:24649066

  17. The Effect of ABO Blood Incompatibility on Corneal Transplant Failure in Conditions with Low Risk of Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Steven P.; Stark, Walter J.; Doyle Stulting, R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Pavilack, Mark A.; Smith, Patricia W.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Mannis, Mark J.; Holland, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether corneal graft survival over a five-year follow-up period was affected by ABO blood type compatibility in participants in the Cornea Donor Study undergoing corneal transplantation principally for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, conditions at low risk for graft rejection. Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, clinical trial Methods ABO blood group compatibility was determined for 1,002 donors and recipients. During a five-year follow-up period, episodes of graft rejection were documented, and graft failures were classified as to whether or not they were due to immunologic rejection. Endothelial cell density was determined by a central reading center for a subset of subjects. Results ABO donor-recipient incompatibility was not associated with graft failure due to any cause including graft failure due to rejection, or with the occurrence of a rejection episode. The five-year cumulative incidence of graft failure due to rejection was 6% for recipients with ABO recipient-donor compatibility and 4% for those with ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.25, p=0.20). The five-year incidence for a definite rejection episode, irrespective of whether graft failure ultimately occurred, was 12% for ABO compatible compared with 8% for ABO incompatible cases (p=0.09). Among clear grafts at five years, percent loss of endothelial cells was similar in ABO compatible and incompatible cases. Conclusions In patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, ABO matching is not indicated since ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk of transplant failure due to graft rejection. PMID:19056078

  18. ABO alleles are linked with haplotypes of an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 with a few exceptions attributable to genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Sano, R; Takahashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Kubo, R; Kobayashi, M; Takahashi, K; Takeshita, H; Kominato, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigation of transcriptional regulation of the ABO genes has identified a candidate erythroid cell-specific regulatory element, named the +5·8-kb site, in the first intron of ABO. Six haplotypes of the site have been reported previously. The present genetic population study demonstrated that each haplotype was mostly linked with specific ABO alleles with a few exceptions, possibly as a result of hybrid formation between common ABO alleles. Thus, investigation of these haplotypes could provide a clue to further elucidation of ABO alleles.

  19. Short-Term Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation With Uniform Protocol: Significance of Baseline Anti-ABO Titer.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Park, J B; Oh, D K; Na, B G; Choi, J Y; Cho, W T; Lee, S H; Park, H J; Cho, D; Huh, W S; Kim, S J

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is one of the major causes of poor outcomes in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi KT). Studies investigating AMR risk factors found that anti-ABO titer is a major issue. However, the significance of antibody titer has been debated. This retrospective study analyzed AMR risk factors in 59 patients who underwent ABOi KT between August 2010 and January 2015. We also analyzed AMR risk factors in recipients with high anti-ABO baseline titers (≥1:64 on dithiothreitol at 37°C phase or ≥1:256 on antihuman globulin phase). The 2-year patient survival rate was 95.8%, and the 2-year graft survival rate was 94.9%. Nine patients (15.3%) experienced clinical (6 of 59 [10.2%]) or subclinical (3 of 59 [5.1%]) AMR. One patient experienced graft loss from hyperacute rejection. AMR risk factor analysis revealed that baseline antibody titer was associated with incidence of AMR. In patients with high baseline titers, low doses of rituximab (200-mg single-dose), an antibody against CD20, was predictive for AMR. Six patients who received pretransplant intravenous immunoglobulin did not experience AMR even when they had high baseline antibody titers. Our results indicate that a high baseline antibody titer affected the incidence of AMR. ABOi KT candidates with high baseline titers need to undergo an intensified preconditioning protocol, including high-dose rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) and intravenous immunoglobulin.

  20. Comparison of Lip Print Patterns in Two Indian Subpopulations and Its Correlation in ABO Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    Suragimath, Girish; Sande, Abhijeet R; Kulkarni, Prasad; Nimbal, Anand; Shankar, T.; Gowd, T. Snigdha; Shetty, Prajwal K

    2014-01-01

    Background: The study of lip-print pattern (cheiloscopy) is a scientific method for personal identification and plays a major role in forensic and criminal investigations. Objective: To compare the lip print patterns in Kerala and Maharashtra population and correlate between ABO blood groups. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects, 100 from Maharashtra and 100 from Kerala were considered for the study. Lip prints were recorded, analyzed according to Tsuchihashi classification. The lip print patterns were compared in the two populations, correlated in ABO blood groups. The data obtained was statistically analyzed with SPSS software using chi-square test. Results: In our study, predominant lip print pattern observed in Kerala population was type IV (53%) and Maharashtra population was type II (42%). The difference between the two population was statistically significant (p<0.001). Subjects with A+ and O- blood groups had type II lip print predominance. Subjects with B+, AB+ and O+ blood groups had type IV predominance. The lip print patterns do not show any correlation in ABO blood groups. Conclusion: Lip prints are unique to each individual and are different even in two persons. Lip print patterns were different in the two sub populations studied, and they showed no correlation in ABO blood groups. PMID:25478445

  1. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  2. What would Karl Landsteiner do? The ABO blood group and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heal, J M; Liesveld, J L; Phillips, G L; Blumberg, N

    2005-11-01

    ABO blood group antigens, of great importance in transplantation and transfusion, are present on virtually all cells, as well as in soluble form in plasma and body fluids. Naturally occurring plasma IgM and IgG antibodies against these antigens are ubiquitous. Nonetheless, the ABO blood group system is widely ignored by many transfusion services, except for purposes of red cell transfusion. We implemented a policy of transfusing only ABO identical platelets and red cells in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation or treatment for hematologic malignancies. Major bleeding episodes have occurred in about 5% of patients undergoing induction therapy for acute leukemia as compared with 15-20% in the literature. Overall survival times appear to be superior to that in historical cohorts. In 2002-2004, treatment-related mortality at 100 days in our Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit was 0.7% for autologous transplants (n=148), 13% for sibling allogeneic transplants (n=110), and 24% (n=62) for matched unrelated allogeneic transplants, suggesting that our approach is safe. We speculate that more rigorous efforts on the part of transfusion services to provide ABO identical blood components, and to remove incompatible supernatant plasma, when necessary, might yield reduced morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

  3. Distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups in Nepalese medical students: a report.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Pramanik, S

    2000-01-01

    The frequencies of ABO and rhesus blood groups vary from one population to another. We studied blood group distribution in 120 Nepalese students; 34% were blood group A, 29% group B, 4% group AB and 32.5% group O. The frequency of Rh-negative blood was 3.33% and Rh-positive 96.66%.

  4. The ABO and rhesus blood groups in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Viskum, K

    1975-12-01

    During the 3 year period 1970-1972 a total of 554 patients were notified for the first time as having bacillary or abacillary pulmonary tuberculosis in the Municipality of Copenhagen; 99 per cent of these patients were typed according to the ABO and rhesus system. The bacillary patients showed an excess of group O and AB and a deficit of A and B as compared to the general population. The deviations were statistically highly significant for group O and A. The distribution according to the rhesus system did not deviate from the expected pattern. The ABO and rhesus distribution of the abacillary patients did not differ significantly from the expected pattern. During a follow-up period of 2-5 years after the initial diagnosis 104 bacillary patients died; the ABO pattern among the survivors was now closer to the normal; this resulted from a high number of deaths from tuberculosis among patients of group O and a low number among those belonging to group A. More rhesus negative patients died from tuberculosis than rhesus positive. It is concluded that a study of the ABO and rhesus pattern among the tuberculosis patients becomes biased if a break-down by bacteriological findings and history is not made. It is also important that the study covers all patients who contract tuberculosis within a certain period, as the longevity of the patients is apparently to some extent dependent on their blood group.

  5. Clinical use of the ABO-Scoring Index: reliability and subtraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Lieber, William S; Carlson, Sean K; Baumrind, Sheldon; Poulton, Donald R

    2003-10-01

    This study tested the reliability and subtraction frequency of the study model-scoring system of the American Board of Orthodontists (ABO). We used a sample of 36 posttreatment study models that were selected randomly from six different orthodontic offices. Intrajudge and interjudge reliability was calculated using nonparametric statistics (Spearman rank coefficient, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests). We found differences ranging from 3 to 6 subtraction points (total score) for intrajudge scoring between two sessions. For overall total ABO score, the average correlation was .77. Intrajudge correlation was greatest for occlusal relationships and least for interproximal contacts. Interjudge correlation for ABO score averaged r = .85. Correlation was greatest for buccolingual inclination and least for overjet. The data show that some judges, on average, were much more lenient than others and that this resulted in a range of total scores between 19.7 and 27.5. Most of the deductions were found in the buccal segments and most were related to the second molars. We present these findings in the context of clinicians preparing for the ABO phase III examination and for orthodontists in their ongoing evaluation of clinical results.

  6. Study of ABO blood types by combining membrane electrophoresis with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Sun, Liqing; Shao, Yonghong; Lu, Peng; Shi, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Chen, Rong

    2012-12-01

    The molecular characterization of ABO blood types, which is clinically significant in blood transfusion, has clinical and anthropological importance. Polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) is one of the most commonly used methods for the analysis of genetic bases of ABO blood types. However, such methods as PCR-SBT are time-consuming and are high in demand of equipments and manipulative skill. Here we showed that membrane electrophoresis based SERS method employed for studying the molecular bases of ABO blood types can provide rapidand easy-operation with high sensitivity and specificity. The plasma proteins were firstly purified by membrane electrophoresis and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS detection. We use this method to classify different blood types, including blood type A (n=13), blood type B (n=9) and blood type O (n=10). Combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and liner discriminant analysis (LDA) was then performed on the SERS spectra of purified albumin, showing good classification results among different blood types. Our experimental outcomes represent a critical step towards the rapid, convenient and accurate identification of ABO blood types.

  7. Evolution of the human ABO polymorphism by two complementary selective pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Robert M.; Allan, Martin J.; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Gustafsson, Kenth

    2004-01-01

    The best-known example of terminal-glycan variation is the ABO histo-blood group polymorphism in humans. We model two selective forces acting on histo-blood group antigens that may account for this polymorphism. The first is generated by the invasion of opportunistic bacterial or other pathogens that interact with the epithelial-mucosal surfaces. The bacteria adapt to the microenvironments of common host phenotypes and so create frequency-dependent selection for rarer host alleles. The second is generated by intracellular viruses, and accounts for the observed differentials between the ABO-phenotype frequencies. It is thought that viruses acquire histo-blood group structures as part of their envelope from their previous host. The presence of host antigens on the viral envelope causes differential transmission of the virus between host types owing to the asymmetric action of ABO natural antibodies. Our model simulations show that these two forces acting together can account for the major features of the ABO polymorphism in humans. PMID:15293861

  8. Chimerism and mosaicism are important causes of ABO phenotype and genotype discrepancies.

    PubMed

    Cho, D; Lee, J S; Yazer, M H; Song, J W; Shin, M G; Shin, J H; Suh, S P; Jeon, M J; Kim, J Y; Park, J T; Ryang, D W

    2006-01-01

    Discrepancies between blood group genotype and RBC phenotype are important to recognize when implementing DNA-based blood grouping techniques. This report describes two such cases involving the ABO blood group in the Korean population. Propositus #1 was a 22-year-old healthy man undergoing pretransfusion testing for minor surgery. Propositus #2 was a 23- year-old male blood donor. RBCs from both propositi were determined to be group AB and demonstrated unusual agglutination patterns on forward typing, which were inconsistent with their ABO genotype determined by allele-specific (AS) PCR. RBCs from propositus #1 demonstrated mixed field agglutination with both anti-A and -B, while RBCs from propositus #2 demonstrated mixed field only with anti-A reagents. Both had B/O genotypes by AS-PCR. Cloning and sequencing of ABO exons 6 and 7 revealed three alleles in both propositi: propositus #1: A102/B101/O04; propositus #2: A102/B101/O01. A panel of nine short-tandem repeat (STR) loci was tested on DNA extracted from blood, buccal mucosal cells, and hair from the propositi and on DNA isolated from their parents' blood. In all tissues tested from propositus #1, three loci demonstrated a double paternal and a single maternal DNA contribution, indicating that he was a chimera or a mosaic; in those from propositus # 2, one STR locus demonstrated a double paternal DNA contribution, indicating that he was a tetragametic chimera. Chimerism and mosaicism are uncommon but important causes of ABO genotype and phenotype discrepancies. The evaluation of patients and donors with unusual or unexpected serology in pretransfusion testing and consensus ABO alleles may include the evaluation of STR loci to detect these phenomena.

  9. Ancestry runs deeper than blood: The evolutionary history of ABO points to cryptic variation of functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Ségurel, Laure; Gao, Ziyue; Przeworski, Molly

    2013-01-01

    The ABO histo-blood group, first discovered over a century ago, is found not only in humans but also in many other primate species, with the same genetic variants maintained for at least 20 million years. Polymorphisms in ABO have been associated with susceptibility to a large number of human diseases, from gastric cancers to immune or artery diseases, but the adaptive phenotypes to which the polymorphism contributes remain unclear. We suggest that variation in ABO has been maintained by frequency-dependent or fluctuating selection pressures, potentially arising from co-evolution with gut pathogens. We further hypothesize that the histo-blood group labels A, B, AB, and O do not offer a full description of variants maintained by natural selection, implying that there are unrecognized, functionally important, antigens beyond the ABO group in humans and other primates. PMID:23836453

  10. Determination of ABO blood group genotypes using the real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification method

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHAO; ZHU, JUANLI; YANG, JIANGCUN; WAN, YINSHENG; MA, TING; CUI, YALI

    2015-01-01

    ABO genotyping is commonly used in several situations, including blood transfusion, personal identification and disease detection. The present study developed a novel method for ABO genotyping, using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). This method allows the simultaneous determination of six ABO genotypes under 40 min at a constant temperature of 62°C. The genotypes of 101 blood samples were determined to be AA (n=6), AO (n=38), BB (n=12), BO (n =29), AB (n=8) and OO (n=8) by the LAMP assay. The results were compared with the phenotypes determined by serological assay and the genotypes determined by direct sequencing, and no discrepancies were observed. This novel and rapid method, with good accuracy and reasonably cost effective, provides a supplement to routine serological ABO typing and may also be useful in other point-of-care testing. PMID:26238310

  11. B-cell surface marker analysis for improvement of rituximab prophylaxis in ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Hiroto; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Haga, Hironori; Tsuji, Hiroaki; Yurugi, Kimiko; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Oike, Fumitaka; Fukuda, Akinari; Yoshizawa, Jun; Takada, Yasutsugu; Tanaka, Koichi; Maekawa, Taira; Ozawa, Kazue; Uemoto, Shinji

    2007-04-01

    Although the effectiveness of rituximab has been reported in ABO blood group (ABO)-incompatible (ABO-I) organ transplantation, the protocol is not yet established. We studied the impact of the timing of rituximab prophylaxis and the humoral immune response of patients undergoing ABO-I living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), focusing on clinicopathological findings and the B-cell subset. From July 2003 to December 2005, 30 adult patients were treated with hepatic artery infusion (HAI) protocol without splenectomy for ABO-I LDLT. A total of 17 patients were treated only with HAI (no prophylaxis), and the other 13 were treated with rituximab prophylaxis at various times prior to transplantation. For B-cell study of the spleen, another 4 patients undergoing ABO-I LDLT both with HAI after prophylaxis and eventual splenectomy, and 3 patients with ABO-compatible LDLT with splenectomy were enrolled. The mortality of the 30 patients with HAI, without splenectomy, and with/without rituximab prophylaxis was 33% and the main cause of death was sepsis. Peripheral blood B cells were completely depleted, anti-donor blood-type antibody titer was lower, and clinical and pathological antibody-mediated rejection was not observed in patients with prophylaxis earlier than 7 days before transplantation (early prophylaxis). Early rituximab prophylaxis significantly depleted B cells and memory B cells in the spleen but not in lymph nodes. On the other hand, B cells and memory B cells increased and memory B cells became dominant during antibody-mediated rejection. In conclusion, early prophylaxis with rituximab depletes B cells, including memory B cells, in the spleen and is associated with a trend toward lower humoral rejection rates and lower peak immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers in ABO-I LDLT patients.

  12. Allele-related variation in minisatellite repeats involved in the transcription of the blood group ABO gene.

    PubMed

    Irshaid, N M; Chester, M A; Olsson, M L

    1999-09-01

    Since the cloning in 1990 of cDNA corresponding to mRNA transcribed at the blood group ABO locus, polymorphisms at the ABO locus and phenotype-genotype correlation have been analysed by several investigators. An enhancer-active minisatellite motif reported to contain four 43-bp repeats has been analysed by PCR in blood samples from 160 random Swedish blood donors. Different sizes of the DNA fragments obtained led to further analysis by direct sequencing. Fragments with either one or four 43-bp repeats were identified. A nucleotide substitution (G-->A) at nt. 41 of 43 was found in all alleles with only one repeat. Correlation with the ABO genotypes of the samples, as determined by a panel of ABO genotyping techniques, revealed an allele-related variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR). The A1 and the infrequent O2 allele had only one repeat whilst A2, B, O1 and O1v had four repeats and thus generated longer (by 129 bp) fragments. A further 74 samples obtained from various geographical areas/ethnic groups indicated a widespread correlation with few exceptions. In conclusion, a novel ABO polymorphism located in the 5'-nontranslated region involved in transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene is reported and its relationship to common alleles at this locus defined.

  13. The ABO blood grouping of a minute hair sample by the immunohistochemical technique.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, S; Yoshino, M; Sato, H; Miyake, B; Seta, S

    1987-01-01

    The unlabeled antibody (PAP) immunoperoxidase technique was applied to the ABO blood grouping of human scalp hairs. Hair samples were subjected to longitudinal- or cross-sectioning, thus obtaining suitable samples for subsequent immunostaining. The immunostaining was carried out using rabbit anti-A and anti-B sera as the primary antibodies. With this technique, the group-specific staining which is revealed as a dark brown precipitate was clearly observed within the medullae of the hair shaft, and depending on the presence or absence of these precipitates, respective blood groups of unknown hair samples were determined. At the hair root, on the other hand, positive stainings were observed not only in medullary cells but also in some cortical cells of the keratogenous zone. From the present study, it can be safely said that this technique is of practical use for the ABO blood grouping from a minute (less than 3 mm) hair sample.

  14. ABO non-O type as a risk factor for thrombosis in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghui; Pise, Mayurika N; Overman, Michael J; Liu, Chang; Tang, Hongwei; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Abbruzzese, James L

    2015-11-01

    ABO blood type has previously been identified as a risk factor for thrombosis and pancreatic cancer (PC). The aim of the study is to demonstrate the associations between ABO blood type and other clinical factors with the risk of thromboembolism (TE) in patients with PC. We conducted a retrospective study in 670 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Clinical information was retrieved from medical records. ABO blood type was determined serologically and/or genetically. Logistic regression models, Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed in data analysis. The incidence of TE was 35.2% in 670 patients who did not have TE prior to cancer diagnosis. Pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) consisted 44.1% of the TE events. Non-O blood type, pancreatic body/tail tumors, previous use of antithrombotic medication, and obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2) ) were significant predictors for TE in general. Blood type A and AB, low hemoglobin level (≤ 10 g/dL), obesity, metastatic tumor, and pancreatic body/tail tumors were significant predictors for PE and DVT. Patients with metastatic tumor or pancreatic body/tail tumors had a much higher frequency of early TE events (≤ 3 months after cancer diagnosis); and early TE occurrence was a significant independent predictor for increased risk of death. These observations suggest that ABO non-O blood type is an independent predictor for TE in PC. A better understanding of the risk factors for TE in PC may help to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation therapy.

  15. Nanoscale Atomic Displacements Ordering for Enhanced Piezoelectric Properties in Lead-Free ABO3 Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Jørgensen, Mads R V; Diallo, Souleymane O; Christianson, Andrew D; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping; Lan, Si; Wang, Xun-Li

    2015-08-01

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffuse scattering and inelastic neutron scattering measurements from a prototype ABO3 ferroelectric single-crystal are used to elucidate how electric fields along a nonpolar direction can enhance its piezoelectric properties. The central mechanism is found to be a nanoscale ordering of B atom displacements, which induces increased lattice instability and therefore a greater susceptibility to electric-field-induced mechanical deformation.

  16. Facies and age of the Oso Ridge Member (new), Abo Formation, Zuni Mountains, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Stamm, R.G.; Kottlowski, F.E.; Mamet, B.L.; Dutro, J.T.; Weary, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Oso Ridge Member (new), at the base of the Abo Formation, nonconformably overlies Proterozoic rocks. The member consists of some 9m of conglomerate and arkose composed principally of fragments of the underlying Proterozoic metamorphic rocks; thin, fossiliferous limestone lenses are interbedded with the arkose. Biota from the lenses include a phylloid alga, foraminifers, conodonts, brachiopods, and molluscs. The age of the Oso Ridge Member is Virgilian Late Pennsylvanian) to Wolfcampian (Early Permian). -from Authors

  17. Association of ABO and Colton Blood Group Gene Polymorphisms With Hematological Traits Variation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Mashayekhi, Amir; Fatahi, Neda; Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hematological parameters are appraised routinely to determine overall human health and to diagnose and monitor certain diseases. In GWASs, more than 30 loci carrying common deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymorphisms have been identified related to hematological traits. In this study, we investigated the contribution of ABO rs2073823 along with AQP1 rs1049305 and rs10244884 polymorphisms in hematological traits variation in a cohort of Iranian healthy individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 168 healthy volunteer. Genotyping was performed by ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Complete blood analyses were conducted for the participants. Significant association was observed between AQP1 rs1049305 and the hematological traits including hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count (P = 0.012, 0.008, and 0.011, respectively). The AQP1 rs10244884 status was also significantly linked to hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in the study cohort (P = 0.015 and 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, ABO rs2073823 polymorphism was identified as a hemoglobin and hematocrit levels modifier (both with P = 0.004). AQP1 and ABO variants appear to predict hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but not other erythrocyte phenotype parameters including red blood cell counts and red blood cell indices. PMID:26632894

  18. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population.

    PubMed

    Bhateja, S; Arora, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis) confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P < 0.05) between control versus leukoplakia and OSMF. Interestingly, 24% gutka chewers who had higher number of grades of dysplasia were falling in "A" blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient's risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  19. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world - crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Bansal, S B; Sethi, S K; Jain, M; Sharma, R; Nandwani, A; Phanish, M K; Duggal, R; Tiwari, A K; Ghosh, P; Ahlawat, R; Kher, V

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool.

  20. ABO blood group. Related investigations and their association with defined pathologies.

    PubMed

    Jesch, Ursula; Endler, P Christian; Wulkersdorfer, Beatrix; Spranger, Heinz

    2007-08-10

    The ABO blood group system was discovered by Karl Landsteiner in 1901. Since then, scientists have speculated on an association between different pathologies and the ABO blood group system. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the significance between different blood types of the ABO blood group system and certain pathologies. We included 237 patients with known diagnosis, blood group, sex, and age in the study. As a statistical method, the Chi-square test was chosen. In some cases, a significant association between the blood groups and defined diseases could be determined. Carriers of blood group O suffered from ulcus ventriculi and gastritis (X(2)1 = 78.629, p < 0.001), colitis ulcerosa and duodenitis (X(2)1 = 5.846, p < 0.016), whereas male patients carrying blood group A tended to contract different types of tumours. In patients with intestinal tumours, females with blood group A were more likely to develop the pathology, whereas in males, the blood group O dominated. The development of cholelithiasis was found, above all, in patients with blood group O, which differed from other research where a correlation between this pathology and blood group A was found.

  1. Correlation of Lip Prints with Gender, ABO Blood Groups and Intercommissural Distance

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pradhuman; Sachdeva, Suresh K; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Saharan, Swati; Sachdeva, Kompal

    2013-01-01

    Background: In forensics, the mouth allows for a myriad of possibilities. Lip print on glass or cigarette butt found at crime scenes may link to a suspect. Hence, a dentist has to actively play his role in personal identification and criminal investigation. Aims: To investigate the uniqueness of the lip print patterns in relation to gender, ABO blood groups and intercommissural distance (ICD). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 208 randomly selected students. The lip print of each subject was obtained and pattern was analyzed according to Tsuchihashi classification. The blood group and ICD at rest position was recorded for each. Results: The study showed that Type II (branched) lip pattern to be most prominent. The B+ blood group was the most common in both genders and the ICD is higher in males. The lip print pattern does not show any correlation between ABO blood groups, gender, and ICD. Conclusions: The lip print pattern shows no correlation with gender, ABO blood groups, or ICD. Further studies with larger samples are required to obtain statistical significance of this correlation. PMID:24020053

  2. Occurrence of ABO And RhD Incompatibility with Rh Negative Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Izetbegovic, Sebija

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hemolytic disease of the newborn was first described in the medical literature 1609, when it was diagnosed in one French housewife. In 1932 Diamond and colleagues described the mutual relationship of fetal hydrops, jaundice, anemia and erythoblastosis, which was later called fetal erytroblastosis. Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) in the strict sense is considered disease whose basis is accelerated immune destruction of fetal/child erythrocytes that are bound to IgG antibodies of maternal origin. These antibodies are directed against antigens of father’s origin, which are present in the fetal/children’s erythrocytes and that the mother’s immune system recognizes them as foreign antigens. Goal: The goal is that in the period from January 1st 2011 to October 23st 2013 determine the frequency of ABO and Rh D incompatibilities in our sample of pregnant women/mothers, and to underscore the importance of regular check of ABO Rh D negative pregnant women and application specific Rh D protection. Material and methods: In the General Hospital “Prim. Dr. Abdulah Nakas” in Sarajevo by retrospective study are followed several relevant variables. Immune alloantibodies were detected in vivo by indirect Coombs test (ICT) with serum mother and O test erythrocytes, by direct Coombs test (DCT) with erythrocytes of a newborn. Results: The total number of births ABO Rh D negative was 596 (14%) and ABO Rh D positive mothers 4261 (86%). Of the total number of Rh D negative mothers there was A Rh D: negative mothers 42%; O Rh D negative 33%; B Rh D: negative 17% and AB Rh D: negative 8%. Most of immune antibodies appear in mothers with O Rh D: negative blood type. The emergence of immune antibodies in the Rh D negative mothers was 1%, the appearance of ABO incompatibilities amounted to 2.3% of our sample. Conclusion: In order to reduce the occurrence of alloimmunization of the mother to erythrocyte antigens of the newborn that can lead to major complications

  3. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  4. The ABO Blood Group is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients With Resected Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Koichi; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Usami, Noriyasu; Kawaguchi, Koji; Fukui, Takayuki; Ishiguro, Futoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Yokoi, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group is reported to be associated with the incidence and patient survival for several types of malignancies. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the prognostic significance of the ABO blood group in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 333 patients (218 men and 115 women) with resected NSCLC were included in this study. In addition to age, sex, smoking status, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, operative procedure, histology of tumors, pathological stage (p-stage), and adjuvant therapy, the association between the ABO blood group and survival was explored. Results The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 83.0% and 71.6% for blood group O, 67.2% and 62.3% for blood group A, 68.8% and 68.8% for blood group B and 69.2% and 65.3% for blood group AB, respectively. A multivariate analysis for overall survival showed the ABO blood group (group A vs. group O: HR 2.47, group AB vs. group O: HR 3.62) to be an independent significant prognostic factor, in addition to age, sex, smoking status, p-stage, and serum CEA level. A multivariate analysis for disease-free survival also showed the ABO blood group to be an independent significant prognostic factor. Conclusions The ABO blood group is an independent prognostic factor in patients with resected NSCLC. Studies of other larger cohorts are therefore needed to confirm the relationship between the ABO blood group and the prognosis among patients with resected NSCLC. PMID:25483106

  5. Risk Factors, Coronary Severity, Outcome and ABO Blood Group: A Large Chinese Han Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Xu, Rui-Xia; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-10-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to have ethnic difference and to be a pivotal genetic determinant of cardiovascular risk, whereas few prospective data regarding the impact on cardiovascular outcomes are available in a large cohort of patients with angiography-proven coronary artery disease, especially from the Chinese population. The objective of this study was to assess the prognostic role of blood type in future cardiovascular events (CVEs) in Chinese Han patients undergoing coronary angiography.The population of this prospective cohort study consisted of 3823 eligible patients, and followed annually to capture all CVEs. Baseline characteristics and ABO blood type were obtained. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the risk of ABO blood type on CVEs.New CVEs occurred in 348 patients [263 (10.3%) non-O and 85 (7.8%) O] during a median period of 24.6 months follow-up. Significantly, non-O blood group was related to the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis and several risk factors including inflammatory markers. The log-rank test revealed that there was a significant difference between non-O and O blood groups in event-free survival analysis (P = 0.026). In particular, the Cox proportional hazards models revealed that non-O blood type was associated with increased CVEs risk [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.320 (1.033-1.685)], even after adjusting for potential confounders [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) non-O: 1.289 (1.003-1.656); A: 1.083 (0.797-1.472); B: 1.481 (1.122-1.955); AB: 1.249 (0.852-1.831), respectively].Non-O blood type is associated with future CVEs in Chinese Han patients undergoing coronary angiography.

  6. ABO and Rh (D) group distribution and gene frequency; the first multicentric study in India

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Mehta, Nidhi; Bhattacharya, Prasun; Wankhede, Ravi; Tulsiani, Sunita; Kamath, Susheela

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The study was undertaken with the objective to provide data on the ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution and gene frequency across India. Materials and Methods: A total of 10,000 healthy blood donors donating in blood banks situated in five different geographical regions of the country (North, South, East and Center) were included in the study. ABO and Rh (D) grouping was performed on all these samples. Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups was reported in simple numbers and percentages. Results: The study showed that O was the most common blood group (37.12%) in the country closely followed by B at 32.26%, followed by A at 22.88% while AB was the least prevalent group at 7.74%. 94.61% of the donor population was Rh positive and the rest were Rh negative. Regional variations were observed in the distribution. Using the maximum likelihood method, the frequencies of the IA, IB and IO alleles were calculated and tested according to the Hardy Weinberg law of Equilibrium. The calculated gene frequencies are 0.1653 for IA (p), 0.2254 for IB (q) and 0.6093 for IO (r). In Indian Population, O (r) records the highest value followed by B (q) and A (p); O > B > A. Conclusion: The study provides information about the relative distribution of various alleles in the Indian population both on a pan-India basis as well as region-wise. This vital information may be helpful in planning for future health challenges, particularly planning with regards to blood transfusion services. PMID:25161353

  7. Distribution and clinal trends of the ABO and Rh genes in select Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Afshan, K; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the ABO and Rh blood group systems is important for blood transfusions and is also pertinent due to their potential association with certain morbidities and susceptibilities to infections. To investigate the diversity and differentiation of the ABO and Rh loci in Middle Eastern populations, data from twelve representative Middle Eastern populations were analyzed. Six populations were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at the ABO locus. The pooled heterozygosity at both loci was calculated to be highest in the sample from Jordan and lowest in Bahrain. Heterogeneity was pronounced in the Northern compared to the Southern Middle Eastern populations. Overall, the absolute gene diversity was 0.0046 and gene differentiation was calculated to be 0.0100. Genetic diversity of the studied loci across all populations (HT) was estimated to be 0.4594, while the diversity within the populations (HS) was 0.4548. Nei's genetic distance analyses revealed highest affinities between the populations of Kuwait and Qatar, Oman and Yemen, and between Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. These results were displayed through a UGPMA dendrogram and principal component analyses, which established clustering of certain populations. Clinal trends of the allelic systems were observed by generating contour maps that allow a detailed appreciation of the distributions of alleles across the geography of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. Taken together, these analyses are helpful in understanding the differentiation of blood group loci and for designing prospective studies for establishing the associations of these loci with health variables in the populations studied.

  8. [ABO/D discrepancies in the era of automation and molecular immunohematology].

    PubMed

    Hamouche, Elias; Bouix, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABO/D grouping errors are still causing fatalities despite the substantial decrease observed over the past thirty years. This risk reduction is due, in part, to the increased automation of immunohematology techniques, a better control of clerical errors and a better knowledge of group discrepancies. The first part of the text will summarize the etiologies of group discrepancies while the second part will expose briefly the historical and technical evolution in immunohematology. Finally in the third part, the role of molecular techniques in immunohematology will be discussed.

  9. Pressure as a probe of the physics of ABO{sub 3} relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-02-14

    Results on a variety of mixed ABO{sub 3} oxides have revealed a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxor crossover and the continuous evolution of the energetics and dynamics of the relaxation process with increasing pressure. These common features have suggested a mechanism for the crossover phenomenon in terms of a large decrease in the correlation length for dipolar interactions with pressure--a unique property of soft mode or highly polarizable host lattices. The pressure effects as well as the interplay between pressure and dc biasing fields are illustrated for some recent results on PZN-9.5 PT,PMN and PLZT 6/65/35.

  10. ABO and Rh blood groups in relation to sex ratio, mean number and mortality of sibs.

    PubMed

    Allan, T M

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented on the sex ratio, mean number and mortality of the sibs of 17,060 schoolchildren, and on the sex ratio and mean number of the sibs of 5,785 blood donors, in relation to the children's and donors' sex and ABO and Rh blood groups. The sex ratio is significantly higher for the sibs of AB + B than for those of A + O schoolboys, and for the sibs of Rh-negative than for those of Rh-positive male blood donors, but in both cases the mean number of sibs is exactly the same for the first-mentioned as for the second-mentioned category.

  11. [Analysis of the association of ABO blood groups and Rhesus factor with myasthenia].

    PubMed

    Gekht, B M; Agafonov, B V; Tsuman, V G; Shagal, D I; Sidorova, O P; Nalivkin, A E

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of ABO blood groups and rhesus factor was studied in patients with myasthenia as compared with the control. There was a statistically significant association of the diseases with the rhesus-negative phenotype and that of generalized myasthenia concurrent with thymoma with the B (III) blood group. The examination revealed no other determinants of the significant association with the disease. The values of a disease risk were obtained for persons having myasthenia-associated signs. It is concluded that the Rh-negative phenotype shows a 1.3-fold increase in the risk of the disease as compared with those having Rh-positive persons.

  12. Phenotypic and allelic distribution of the ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups in the Cameroonian population.

    PubMed

    Ndoula, S T; Noubiap, J J N; Nansseu, J R N; Wonkam, A

    2014-06-01

    Data on blood group phenotypes are important for blood transfusion programs, for disease association and population genetics studies. This study aimed at reporting the phenotypic and allelic distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) groups in various ethnolinguistic groups in the Cameroonians. We obtained ABO and Rhesus blood groups and self-identified ethnicity from 14,546 Cameroonian students. Ethnicity was classified in seven major ethnolinguistic groups: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Kordofanian/West Atlantic, Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Grassfield, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Mbam and Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Equatorial. ABO allelic frequencies were determined using the Bernstein method. Differences in phenotypic distribution of blood groups were assessed using the chi-square test; a P value <0.05 being considered as statistically significant. The frequencies of the antigens of blood groups O, A, B and AB were 48.62%, 25.07%, 21.86% and 4.45%, respectively. Rhesus-positive was 96.32%. The allelic frequencies of O, A and B genes were 0.6978, 0.1605 and 0.1416, respectively. Phenotypic frequencies of the blood groups in the general study population and in the different ethnolinguistic groups were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations (P > 0.05). The frequencies of O, A, and B blood phenotypes were significantly lower, respectively, in the Nilo-Saharan group (P = 0.009), the Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu groups (P = 0.021) and the Niger-Kordofanian/West-Atlantic group. AB blood group was most frequent in the Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui group (P = 0.024). Our study provides the first data on ethnic distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in the Cameroonian population and suggests that its general profile is similar to those of several sub-Saharan African populations. We found some significant differences in phenotypic distribution amongst major ethnolinguistic groups

  13. Gene frequencies of ABO and Rh (D) blood group alleles in a healthy infant population in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omotade, O O; Adeyemo, A A; Kayode, C M; Falade, S L; Ikpeme, S

    1999-01-01

    The ABO and Rhesus blood group systems remain the most important blood group systems clinically. In order to provide gene frequency values for the ABO and Rh (D) alleles in a healthy infant population in south west Nigeria, 4748 healthy infants were typed for ABO and Rh (D) blood groups over a five year period (1988-1992). Overall, 2575 (54.2%) were blood group O, 1023 (21.6%) were blood group A, 1017 (21.4%) were blood group B and 133 (2.8%) were blood group AB. The distribution of the ABO blood groups did not differ significantly from those expected under the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium (Goodness-of-fit X2 = 6.09, df = 3, p = 0.1075). The proportions of the infants belonging to the various ABO blood groups did not vary significantly over the period of the study (X2 = 14.53, df = 12, p = 0.268). Overall gene frequencies for the O, A and B genes were 0.7398, 0.1305 and 0.1298 respectively. For the Rh (D) gene, 4520 (95.2%) were Rh-positive while 228 (4.8%) were Rh-negative. However, the proportions of Rh (D) negative infants varied significantly over the period of the study, with a particular year (1991) having nearly twice the usual frequency of Rh-negative individuals (X2 = 31.17, df =, p < 0.001). The frequency of the Rh (D) gene was 0.7809. These figures are reported in the hope that they may find some use as reference for studies of ABO blood groups in health and disease, especially since they were obtained in an infant population in which it is expected that selection pressures should not have started to act to any significant extent.

  14. Discrepancy of B cell frequency between periphery and spleen after rituximab treatment in ABO-incompatible liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Iso, Yukihiro; Sawada, Tokihiko; Kita, Junji; Shiraki, Takayuki; Sakuraoka, Yuki; Kato, Masato; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Kubota, Keiichi

    2013-10-01

    ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation (ABO-LDLT) is generally more difficult to perform than ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. Despite introduction of rituximab, ABO-LDLT in non-responders is a still difficult issue. A 23-year-old woman with primary sclerosing cholangitis underwent LDLT. The recipient's blood type was 0(+) and the donor's was B(+). Rituximab was infused twice on preoperative day (POD) 14 and 7. Plasma exchange (PE) was performed on PODs 5, 3, 2, and 1. However, repeated PE failed to decrease the anti-B antibody titer. On the other hand, preoperative esophagogastroscopy revealed esophageal varices with red color sign. Therefore, simultaneous liver transplantation and Hassab operation were performed. The donor left lobe of the liver was orthotopically transplanted into the recipient following Hassab operation. Flow cytometry on the day of surgery showed that the frequencies of B cells (CD20+) and memory B cells (CD20+/CD27+) in the peripheral blood were 0.9% and 0.3%, respectively; flow cytometry of cells recovered from the spleen revealed that the frequencies of B cells and memory B cells were 2.5% and 2.4%, respectively. Acute cellular rejection occurred on POD 15, and was treated by steroid pulse therapy, leading to a decrease in the anti-B antibody titer. The liver was functioning well on POD 390 (AST 19, ALT 34). In non-responders to ABO-LDLT, anti-donor blood type antibody-producing cells remains in the spleen after the conventional preoperative regimen. Splenectomy is an option for ABO-LDLT non-responders.

  15. Distribution of ABO and Rh D blood groups in the population of Poonch District, Azad Jammu and Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Khan, M N; Khaliq, I; Bakhsh, A; Akhtar, M S; Amin-ud-Din, M

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) D blood groups in the population of Poonch district in Azad Jammu and Kashmir. The blood group phenotypes were detected by the classic slide method. The ABO blood group system in the total sample showed the same trend of prevalence as for the general Indian subcontinent (B > or = O > A > AB). The same trend was found among males, but among females the order of prevalence was different (O B > A > AB). However, the allelic frequencies in both sexes were in the order of O > B > A. The Rh positive and negative distribution trend in both sexes was also similar.

  16. [Serologic characteristics and population distribution of subtypes B2 and AB2 of ABO blood group].

    PubMed

    Duan, Fu-Cai; Wang, Ming-Lu; Zhou, Ke-Li; Li, Da-Yuan; Zhang, Qin-Yong; Ma, Ai-Ping; Yang, He-Ying; Li, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Fang; Gao, Ying-Xue

    2010-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the serologic characteristics, genetic background and population distribution of B2 and AB2 subtype in Chinese ABO blood group. The classic blood group serological technology was used to detect ABO blood group of the propositus and their family members, the anti-B1 serum prepared by yourself was used to investigate the distribution of B1/B2 and AB1/AB2 subtype of the blood donor. The results indicated that the antigen of propositus was AB2 subtype and that of his child was B2 subtype. The anti-B1 antibody was detected in blood serum of propositus; the antigen of 3 from 2318 blood donors with B blood group were found to be B2 subtype, the antigen of 2 from 826 blood donors with AB blood group were found to be AB2 subtype. The investigation on propositus and the 3 B2 blood donor families showed that B2 antigen displays genetic characteristics of blood group. It is concluded that B2/AB2 subtype is from family inheritance, while B2 subtype is amounted to 0.129% in B blood group, and AB2 subtype is amounted to 0.224% in AB blood group.

  17. Relative Susceptibilities of ABO Blood Groups to Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Afoakwah, Richmond; Aubyn, Edmond; Prah, James; Nwaefuna, Ekene Kwabena; Boampong, Johnson N.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical outcome of falciparum malaria in endemic areas is influenced by erythrocyte polymorphisms including the ABO blood groups. Studies have reported association of ABO blood group to resistance, susceptibility, and severity of P. falciparum malaria infection. Individuals with blood group “A” have been found to be highly susceptible to falciparum malaria whereas blood group “O” is said to confer protection against complicated cases. We analyzed samples from 293 young children less than six years old with malaria in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. It was observed that group O was present in about 16.1% of complicated cases weighed against 40.9% of uncomplicated controls. Individuals with complicated malaria were about twice likely to be of blood groups A and B compared to group O (A versus O, OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.59–2.26, P < 0.0001; B versus O, OR = 1.82. 95% CI = 1.57–2.23, P < 0.0001). Blood group O participants with complicated diseases had low parasitaemia compared to the other blood groups (P < 0.0001). This may give blood group O individuals a survival advantage over the other groups in complicated malaria as suggested. Participants with complicated falciparum malaria were generally anaemic and younger than those with uncomplicated disease. PMID:26981125

  18. Donor- and recipient-derived immunity in ABO incompatible living-related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Alexandra; Fiedler, Melanie; Beckebaum, Susanne; Cicinnati, Vito R; Herzer, Kerstin; Lenz, Veronika; Witzke, Oliver; Paul, Andreas; Roggendorf, Michael; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2015-09-01

    This report describes how donor- and recipient-derived immunity was influenced by immunosuppressive treatment of ABO incompatibility (rituximab and immunoadsorption/plasmaphereses) in the long-term. We present an 8-year course of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunity, isohemagglutinins and B cell numbers. Whereas cellular HBV immunity was transferred from the HBV vaccinated donor (blood group A1) to the HBV naïve recipient (blood group 0), humoral HBV specific immune transfer was lacking. Starting at month 17 after transplantation, the recipient was vaccinated six times against HBV. Anti-HBs did not appear until the sixth vaccination at month 44. Immunoadsorption prior to transplantation reduced anti-A1 IgG titers from 256 to 2. Titers after transplantation remained low (⩽64). B cell numbers were below standard values up to month 26, then normalized and exceeded normal values from year 7 to 8 post transplantation. In conclusion, donor-derived B cell immunity was lost but recipient-derived immunity persisted after ABO incompatible transplantation.

  19. The relationship between juvenile and non-juvenile periodontitis, ABO blood groups and haemoglobin types.

    PubMed

    Arowojolu, M O; Dosmu, E B; Adingbola, T S

    2002-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between juvenile and non-juvenile peridontitis (JP, non-JP), ABO blood groups and haemoglobin type. The heamoglobin electrophoresis was determined by routine technique using cellulose acetate paper and tris buffer at pH 8.5. Tile blood grouping was carried out on all specimens. Forty Nigerian adolescent individuals were investigated, twenty of which were diagnosed as having JP while the remaining 20 were diagnosed a having plaque-induced chronic periodontitis (non JP). This latter group was used as the control group. All the JP patients were either of blood group B/AB, rhesus positive while the non-JP subjects had B rhesus positive/negative, O rhesus positive/negative or AB rhesus positive. The differences between the results of the test and the control groups were statistically significant P < 0.05. All the forty subjects (JP and non-JP) had the haemoglobin type A and none of them exhibited the S and C haemoglobin types. There is a need to further investigate the relationship between juvenile periodontitis, ABO blood group and the common haemoglobin types (A, AS, S, C, and SS) at molecular level.

  20. [Geno- and phenotypic distribution by the ABO and Rhesus systems in the population of Minsk].

    PubMed

    Tolochko, G V; Ivanov, L V

    1978-03-01

    The distribution of blood groups of the ABO system is different in the rhesus-positive and rhesus-negative subpopulations. An increasing frequency of the phenotype A2 in the rhesus-negative subpopulation is observed. The calculation of the gene frequency reveals a deficiency of genes A1 and O, and the increasing frequency of genes A2 and B in the rhesus-negative part of the population. On the whole for the inhabitants of Minsk the ratio of the phenotypes A2/A1 differs significantly from the corresponding index for the republic as a whole, which is the evidence of a significant migration of the population in the capital of Byelorussia. The observed correlative dependences in the distribution of the genes of ABO system and of the rhesus system permit to recommend the accomplishment of a scientific search between the hereditary pathology and the susceptibility to different diseases and blood groups taking into consideration the rhesus appurtenance of the populations studied.

  1. Correlation Among Lip Print Pattern, Finger Print Pattern and Abo Blood Group

    PubMed Central

    N, Srilekha; A, Anuradha; Srinivas G, Vijay; Devi R, Sabitha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To study correlation between lip print pattern, finger print pattern and ABO blood group. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 27 males and 27 females who were aged between 20–40 years. Lip prints, finger prints and ABO and Rh blood groups of each individual were recorded. Lip prints were classified, based on Suzuki’s and Tsuchihashi’s classification and finger prints were classified, based on Michael’s and Kucken’s classification. The results were statistically analyzed by using Chi–square test. Results: Complete vertical lip print, loop finger print pattern, O+ blood group were predominant among individual groups. O+ blood group-type I lip print combination, loop finger print pattern-type IV lip print pattern combination, O+ blood group-loop finger print pattern combination and both B+ blood group-loop finger print pattern- type IV lip print pattern combination and O+ blood group-loop finger print pattern-type I lip print pattern were predominant. Conclusion: Though lip prints, finger prints and blood groups had their own specificities, correlation of the three parameters did not show any significance. PMID:24783079

  2. Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, John R.; Berger, Jonathan C.; Warren, Daniel S.; James, Nathan; Montgomery, Robert A.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2012-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation is an important modality to facilitate living donor transplant for incompatible pairs. To date, reports of the outcomes from this practice in the United States have been limited to single-center studies. Methods Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 738 patients who underwent live-donor ABOi kidney transplantation between January 1, 1995 and March 31, 2010. These were compared with matched controls that underwent ABO compatible (ABOc) live-donor kidney transplantation. Subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients were performed according to donor blood type, recipient blood type, and transplant center ABOi volume. Results When compared to ABOc matched controls, long-term patient survival of ABOi recipients was not significantly different between the cohorts (p=0.2). However, graft loss was significantly higher, particularly in the first 14 days post-transplant (SHR 2.34, 95% CI 1.43–3.84, p=0.001), with little to no difference beyond day 14 (SHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.99–1.54, p=0.058). In subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients, no differences in survival were seen by donor blood type, recipient blood type, or transplant center ABOi volume. Conclusions These results support the use and dissemination of ABOi transplantation when a compatible live donor is not available, but caution that the highest period of risk is immediately post-transplant. PMID:22290268

  3. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  4. ABO blood group system and the coronary artery disease: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Xu, Hao; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-03-18

    ABO blood group system, a well-known genetic risk factor, has clinically been demonstrated to be linked with thrombotic vascular diseases. However, the relationship between ABO blood group and coronary artery disease (CAD) is still controversial. We here performed an updated meta-analysis of the related studies and tried to elucidate the potential role of ABO blood group as a risk factor for CAD. All detectable case-control and cohort studies comparing the risk of CAD in different ABO blood groups were collected for this analysis through searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Ultimately, 17 studies covering 225,810 participants were included. The combined results showed that the risk of CAD was significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.26, p = 0.01) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94, p = 0.0008). Even when studies merely about myocardial infarction (MI) were removed, the risk of CAD was still significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.10, p = 0.03) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85 to 0.93, p < 0.00001). This updated systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that both blood group A and non-O were the risk factors of CAD.

  5. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia. PMID:26925291

  6. The 3' flanking region of the human ABO histo-blood group gene is involved in negative regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Keiko; Kubo, Rieko; Yazawa, Shin; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is driven by promoters, enhancers, silencers, and other cis-regulatory elements upstream and downstream of the gene. Previous studies of the regulation of human ABO gene transcription have focused mainly on the 5' region, including the core promoter and the region proximal to it. However, as the involvement of the 3' flanking region in transcriptional regulation has not yet been examined, we focused on this issue. The 3' region approximately 2.2kb downstream of the ABO gene was PCR-amplified and inserted into a cloning vector, followed by sequence determination and preparation of luciferase reporter vectors. Transient transfections into KATOIII and K562 cells were performed using various reporter plasmids containing the 3' region. The 3' region of the ABO gene, which was characterized by a high degree of sequence repetition, was effectively cloned by a single-copy cloning method. Transfections in KATOIII and K562 cells showed that negative elements were demonstrable within the 3' region. These observations suggest that negative regulatory elements seem to be present in the 3' region of ABO in both epithelial and erythroid lineages. As we had observed a negative region just upstream of the ABO promoter, transcription from ABO could be negatively regulated by repressive regions just upstream of the promoter and downstream of the gene. Further studies of the enhancer will be required for elucidating the molecular basis of ABO gene expression. PMID:21144789

  7. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

  8. Novel association of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and soluble P-selectin with the ABO blood group in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Qun; Zhuang, Yunlong; Chen, Yuanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that the ABO gene can affect circulating expression levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) in Caucasians. However, several factors may affect the association, including the distribution and variations of the ABO gene, ethnic diversity and the inflammatory response status. The aim of the present study was to investigate this issue in Asian subjects of various blood groups. A total of 800 blood samples were randomly selected from healthy blood donors. The ABO blood groups were examined using standard serological tests, and ABO genotypes of group A and group AB specimens were analyzed. Plasma concentrations of sICAM-1 and sP-selectin were detected by standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In healthy Chinese individuals, blood group A was detected to be significantly associated with lower circulating expression levels of sICAM-1 and sP-selectin, compared with group O. Individuals with ≥1 A1 allele had significantly lower expression levels of sICAM-1 and sP-selectin compared with all other ABO groups. The data indicate the significant association of ABO blood group antigens with sICAM-1 and sP-selectin expression levels in a healthy Chinese population, independent of the specific variations and distributions of ABO blood groups among ethnic populations. This result provides evidence for the previously unidentified role of ABO blood group antigens in the regulation of the inflammatory adhesion process. Accordingly, it can be proposed that ABO blood groups may require consideration when soluble adhesion molecules are identified as predictors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27446295

  9. Replication and Characterization of Association between ABO SNPs and Red Blood Cell Traits by Meta-Analysis in Europeans.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Stela; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Charoen, Pimphen; Wong, Andrew; Finan, Chris; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; Hersch, Micha; Podmore, Clara; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara J; Dale, Caroline E; Hypponen, Elina; Morris, Richard W; Casas, Juan P; Kumari, Meena; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gaunt, Tom R; Drenos, Fotios; Langenberg, Claudia; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Rueedi, Rico; Waeber, Gerard; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Walker, Ann P

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with one or more of these traits; further characterization of known loci and identification of new loci is necessary to better understand their role in health and disease and to identify potential molecular mechanisms. We performed meta-analysis of Metabochip association results for six RBC traits-hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red blood cell count (RCC)-in 11 093 Europeans from seven studies of the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium. We identified 394 non-overlapping SNPs in five loci at genome-wide significance: 6p22.1-6p21.33 (with HFE among others), 6q23.2 (with HBS1L among others), 6q23.3 (contains no genes), 9q34.3 (only ABO gene) and 22q13.1 (with TMPRSS6 among others), replicating previous findings of association with RBC traits at these loci and extending them by imputation to 1000 Genomes. We further characterized associations between ABO SNPs and three traits: hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count, replicating them in an independent cohort. Conditional analyses indicated the independent association of each of these traits with ABO SNPs and a role for blood group O in mediating the association. The 15 most significant RBC-associated ABO SNPs were also associated with five cardiometabolic traits, with discordance in the direction of effect between groups of traits, suggesting that ABO may act through more than one mechanism to influence cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27280446

  10. Replication and Characterization of Association between ABO SNPs and Red Blood Cell Traits by Meta-Analysis in Europeans.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Stela; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Charoen, Pimphen; Wong, Andrew; Finan, Chris; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; Hersch, Micha; Podmore, Clara; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara J; Dale, Caroline E; Hypponen, Elina; Morris, Richard W; Casas, Juan P; Kumari, Meena; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gaunt, Tom R; Drenos, Fotios; Langenberg, Claudia; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Rueedi, Rico; Waeber, Gerard; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Walker, Ann P

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with one or more of these traits; further characterization of known loci and identification of new loci is necessary to better understand their role in health and disease and to identify potential molecular mechanisms. We performed meta-analysis of Metabochip association results for six RBC traits-hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red blood cell count (RCC)-in 11 093 Europeans from seven studies of the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium. We identified 394 non-overlapping SNPs in five loci at genome-wide significance: 6p22.1-6p21.33 (with HFE among others), 6q23.2 (with HBS1L among others), 6q23.3 (contains no genes), 9q34.3 (only ABO gene) and 22q13.1 (with TMPRSS6 among others), replicating previous findings of association with RBC traits at these loci and extending them by imputation to 1000 Genomes. We further characterized associations between ABO SNPs and three traits: hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count, replicating them in an independent cohort. Conditional analyses indicated the independent association of each of these traits with ABO SNPs and a role for blood group O in mediating the association. The 15 most significant RBC-associated ABO SNPs were also associated with five cardiometabolic traits, with discordance in the direction of effect between groups of traits, suggesting that ABO may act through more than one mechanism to influence cardiometabolic risk.

  11. Replication and Characterization of Association between ABO SNPs and Red Blood Cell Traits by Meta-Analysis in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Stela; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Charoen, Pimphen; Wong, Andrew; Finan, Chris; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; Hersch, Micha; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara J.; Dale, Caroline E.; Hypponen, Elina; Morris, Richard W.; Casas, Juan P.; Kumari, Meena; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gaunt, Tom R.; Drenos, Fotios; Langenberg, Claudia; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Rueedi, Rico; Waeber, Gerard; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Price, Jacqueline F.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with one or more of these traits; further characterization of known loci and identification of new loci is necessary to better understand their role in health and disease and to identify potential molecular mechanisms. We performed meta-analysis of Metabochip association results for six RBC traits—hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red blood cell count (RCC)—in 11 093 Europeans from seven studies of the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium. We identified 394 non-overlapping SNPs in five loci at genome-wide significance: 6p22.1-6p21.33 (with HFE among others), 6q23.2 (with HBS1L among others), 6q23.3 (contains no genes), 9q34.3 (only ABO gene) and 22q13.1 (with TMPRSS6 among others), replicating previous findings of association with RBC traits at these loci and extending them by imputation to 1000 Genomes. We further characterized associations between ABO SNPs and three traits: hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count, replicating them in an independent cohort. Conditional analyses indicated the independent association of each of these traits with ABO SNPs and a role for blood group O in mediating the association. The 15 most significant RBC-associated ABO SNPs were also associated with five cardiometabolic traits, with discordance in the direction of effect between groups of traits, suggesting that ABO may act through more than one mechanism to influence cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27280446

  12. ABO blood groups in the primate species of Cebidae from the Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Corvelo, T C O; Schneider, H; Harada, M L

    2002-06-01

    The ABO blood groups were determined in blood and saliva collected from 40 Aotus infulatus, 74 Saimiri sciureus, and 96 Cebus apella from the Amazonian region along the Tocantins river. Saliva samples were tested for human ABH antigens by a standard hemagglutination inhibition test. Aotus infulatus showed monomorphism, exhibiting only the B blood group. Saimiri sciureus exhibited the A (67) and AB (7) phenotypes. All four phenotypes have been found in C. apella: O (8), A (52), B (19) and AB (17). The observed distribution was as expected assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The titers of ABH substances varied among the species and phenotypes. The B-like agglutinogen, common to all New World monkey species tested, was detected in the red blood cells. Sera were used to detect naturally occurring antibodies and the results showed discrepancies between serum and saliva phenotypes in all species studied. PMID:12190854

  13. [ABO system blood groups and the rhesus factor in tumors and tumorlike processes of the ovaries].

    PubMed

    Rybalka, A N; Andreeva, P V; Tikhonenko, L F; Koval'chuk, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under observation were 175 patients with ovarian tumors and cysts. The distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh factor in relation to this pathology was studied as compared with the control series (2000 healthy females). There was noted an increased probability of the incidence of the majority of the ovarian tumor types among AB blood group females compared with other groups (O, A and B), and just the opposite, the probability of the tumoriform processes incidence in AB group females is considerably less than in other groups. The probability of ovarian tumors malignification proved to be the least in B group females. There is noted a considerably increased relative ovarian tumor and cyst morbidity among Rh-positive females compared with Rh-negative ones.

  14. Genetic Characterization of Human Populations: From ABO to a Genetic Map of the British People

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    From 1900, when Landsteiner first described the ABO blood groups, to the present, the methods used to characterize the genetics of human populations have undergone a remarkable development. Concomitantly, our understanding of the history and spread of human populations across the earth has become much more detailed. As has often been said, a better understanding of the genetic relationships among the peoples of the world is one of the best antidotes to racial prejudices. Such an understanding provides us with a fascinating, improved insight into our origins as well as with valuable information about population differences that are of medical relevance. The study of genetic polymorphisms has been essential to the analysis of the relationships between human populations. The evolution of methods used to study human polymorphisms and the resulting contributions to our understanding of human health and history is the subject of this Perspectives. PMID:25657345

  15. Bortezomib in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nikki L; O'Connell, Philip; Chapman, Jeremy R; Nankivell, Brian; Kable, Kathy; Webster, A C; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    Positive B cell crossmatch accompanied by high levels of pre-transplant human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies are associated with adverse graft outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Targeting plasma cells, the main antibody producing cells, with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may be a promising desensitization strategy. We report using a combination of bortezomib and plasmapheresis to desensitize a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient for an ABO-incompatible living donor kidney transplant. The flow cytometric B cell crossmatch was positive on presentation. After treatment, the anti-A titres fell from 1:64 to 1:4, and a negative B flow cytometric crossmatch was achieved prior to transplantation. The combined approach of bortezomib to abrogate antibody production at the plasma cell level, followed by plasmapheresis and low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin to remove in-circulation alloantibodies, has proven to be effective in our case. Bortezomib may play a role in highly sensitized renal transplants.

  16. Effect of ABO blood group mismatching on corneal epithelial cells: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, J.; Dua, H.; Powell-Richards, A.; Jones, D; Harris, I.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To determine, in vitro, the effects of blood group ABO mismatching on corneal epithelial cells.
METHODS—Corneal epithelial cell cultures were established from 32 human cadaver donor eyes. Epithelial cells (100 µl of 4 × 102 cells per µl) were incubated for 4 hours with antibodies against blood group antigens A, B, and AB, with and without complement. Cell lysis was assayed by a chemiluminescent assay using Cytolite reagent. Live cells, remaining after incubation, were counted in a scintillation counter. The blood group of the donors was determined retrospectively, in a blinded manner.
RESULTS—Retrospective tracing of donor blood groups was possible for 20 donors. In all cases the blood group corresponded with that suggested by the cell lysis assay. Significant cell lysis was observed when known A group cells were incubated with anti-A and anti-AB antibody, B group cells were incubated with anti-B and AB antibody, and AB group cells were incubated with anti-AB antibody. Lysis occurred only in the presence of complement. No lysis of O group cells was observed with any of the antibodies. In all cases, lysis was observed only with neat (serum) antibody concentrations.
CONCLUSIONS—Blood group ABO mismatching results in significant lysis of corneal epithelial cells. The antibody concentration required for lysis equals that found in serum. Such levels of antibody are unlikely to be achieved in tears and/or aqueous. This may offer an explanation for the conflicting reports of the studies on the effect of blood group matching on corneal grafts. The variability in the outcome may reflect the levels of antibodies gaining access to the corneal cells and not the mismatching alone.

 PMID:11520765

  17. Maternal ABO and rhesus blood group phenotypes and hepatitis B surface antigen carriage.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Sahota, D S; Chung, M-K; Cheung, T K W; Cheng, Y K Y; Leung, T Y

    2014-11-01

    In view of a persistently high prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriage in our obstetric population, we examined the association between HBsAg carriage with maternal ABO and rhesus (Rh) blood group phenotypes determined at routine antenatal screening. In a retrospective study, the antenatal screening results of women booked for confinement between 1998 and 2011 in our hospital were examined for the relationship between HBsAg carriage with the ABO and rhesus blood groups, taking into account also the effects of advanced maternal age (≥ 35 years) and parity status (nulliparous or multiparous), and year of birth before or following the availability of the hepatitis B vaccine (1984). HBsAg carriage was found in 9.9%, 9.6%, 9.1% and 10.2% (P = 0.037) for group-A (n = 20 581 or 26.1%), -B (n = 20 744 or 26.4%), -AB (n = 5138 or 6.5%) and -O (n = 32 242 or 41.0%) among the 78705 women in the study cohort. Rhesus negativity was found in 0.6%, and HBsAg carriage was 12.3% and 9.8%, respectively, for the Rh-negative and Rh-positive women (P = 0.071). Carriage rate between group-O and non-O was influenced by nulliparity, age ≥ 35 years and Rh-positive status. Regression analysis indicated that group-B (P = 0.044, aOR = 1.062, 95% CI 1.002-1.127) and group-AB (P = 0.016, aOR = 1.134, 95% CI 1.024-1.256) were associated with HBsAg carriage. Blood groups-B and -AB are associated with increased hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in our population, and further studies are warranted to elucidate the implications of this on the sequelae of HBV infection.

  18. ABO Blood Groups and Genetic Risk Factors for Thrombosis in Croatian Population

    PubMed Central

    Jukić, Irena; Bingulac-Popović, Jasna; Đogić, Vesna; Babić, Ivana; Culej, Jelena; Tomičić, Maja; Vuk, Tomislav; Šarlija, Dorotea; Balija, Melita

    2009-01-01

    Aim To assess the association between ABO blood group genotypes and genetic risk factors for thrombosis (FV Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations) in the Croatian population and to determine whether genetic predisposition to thrombotic risk is higher in non-OO blood group genotypes than in OO blood group genotypes. Methods The study included 154 patients with thrombosis and 200 asymptomatic blood donors as a control group. Genotyping to 5 common alleles of ABO blood groups was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). FV Leiden was determined by PCR-SSP, while prothrombin and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase were determined by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results There was an association between non-OO blood group genotypes and the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-3.27). The strongest association with thrombotic risk was recorded for A1B/A2B blood group genotypes (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.10-6.74), followed by BB/O1B/O2B (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.25-4.21) and O1A1/O2A1 (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.15-3.31). FV Leiden increased the risk of thrombosis 31-fold in the group of OO carriers and fourfold in the group of non-OO carriers. There was no significant difference in the risk of thrombosis between OO and non-OO blood groups associated with prothrombin mutation. Non-OO carriers positive for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase had a 5.7 times greater risk of thrombosis than that recorded in OO carriers negative for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Conclusion Study results confirmed the association of non-OO blood group genotypes with an increased risk of thrombosis in Croatia. PMID:20017223

  19. Association between ABO blood/rhesus grouping and hepatitis B and C: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Abolfazl

    2014-06-01

    During past decades, a connection between hepatitis and the host ABO/Rh blood groups has been always under dispute, with no appropriately designed study yet. This study aimed to investigate possible association between ABO blood/Rh groups with both hepatitis B and C. In this case-control setting, 200 healthy individuals (controls), 200 patients with chronic Hepatitis-B infection (HB) and 200 patients with chronic Hepatitis-C infection (HC) were recruited from 2010 to 2013 in Tabriz Sina Hospital. ABO blood and Rh grouping was performed and the results were compared between the case and control groups. Both pair of the control and HB groups and the control and HC groups were matched for their subjects' age and sex. In the control group, 178 subjects (89%) were Rh+ and 22 subjects (11%) were Rh-. In the HB group, there were 180 Rh+ (90%) and 20 Rh- (10%) patients. In the HC group there were 168 Rh+ (84%) and 32 Rh-negative (16%) patients. Both pair of the control and HB groups (p = 0.74), as well as the control and HC groups (p = 0.14) were comparable for the status of Rh. In the control group there were 84 (42%), 32 (16%), 66 (33%) and 18 (9%) subjects with A, B, O and AB blood groups, respectively. The corresponding figures were 84 (42%), 34 (17%), 58 (29%) and 24 (12%) for the HB patients; and 80 (40%), 29 (14.5%), 85 (42.5%) and 6 (3%) for the HC patients. Comparing between the control and HB groups showed no significant difference in terms of the frequency of ABO blood groups (p = 0.70). However, with comparing the control and HC groups, the rate of O blood group was significantly higher in the HC group and concomitantly, the rate of AB blood group was significantly higher in the control group (p = 0.04). Although, there is not a significant association between ABO blood groups and HB, this association is significant between certain ABO blood groups and HC.

  20. A sequence of tests of minute human blood stains for human origin identification and ABO blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, K

    1986-01-01

    A series of examinations is presented for human origin identification and ABO blood grouping of doubtful minute human blood stains. A blood-stained thread (0.5 cm in length) was first tested to identify human origin by microprecipitation method and then the ABO blood type was determined by both a modified absorption-elution test and a modified mixed agglutination. In the continuous tests, the maximum limits of positive reactions of the microprecipitation method, the modified absorption-elution test, and the modified mixed agglutination were 1:640, 1:160, and 1:2,560 diluted blood, respectively. A and B agglutinogens were more sensitively determined than H agglutinogen. Hemagglutinogens of blood stains on cotton threads were more easily detected than those of polyester ones. PMID:3825313

  1. ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution and their implication for feto-maternal incompatibility among the Palestinian population.

    PubMed

    Dudin, A A; Rambaud-Cousson, A; Badawi, S; Da'na, N A; Thalji, A; Hannoun, A

    1993-01-01

    ABO and Rh(D) blood group distribution was evaluated among Palestinian women in the southern area of the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Eleven per cent of women were Rh(D) negative. The review of the last 12,169 deliveries at Makassed Hospital showed that 4.8% of Rh(D)-negative mothers gave birth to Rh(D)-positive infants with haemolytic disease of the newborn. Thirty per cent of A or B infants born to O Rh(D)-positive mothers had a positive direct antiglobulin test with the presence of allo-immune A or B antibody in infant serum. ABO incompatibility was a major reason for phototherapy during the 1st week of life. Results and possibilities for prevention are discussed.

  2. Distribution of ABO, Rhesus blood and haemoglobin electrophoresis among the undergraduate students of Niger Delta State University, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Egesie, U G; Egesie, O J; Usar, I; Johnbull, T O

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of ABO, Rhesus blood groups and haemoglobin electrophoresis among 200 undergraduate students of Niger Delta University, Bayelsa State, Nigeria randomly selected were studied. Blood samples were collected by venepuncture from the antecubital vein. The blood sample were transferred into EDTA bottle and mixed. The determination of the ABO, Rhesus (RhD) blood groups and haemoglobin electrophoresis was done. The results showed that blood group O had the highest percentage distribution of 49% followed by blood groups A and B with 22% respectively and the least percentage distribution of 7% was blood group AB. Rh-D positive rate was 98% and it was 2% for Rh-D negative. The percentage distribution for the haemoglobin electrophoresis pattern for HbAA, HbAS, HbSS, HbAC and HbSC were 66%, 26%, 2%, 2%, and 4% respectively. HbAA and HbAS occurred more frequently than other haemoglobin variants in this study.

  3. The role of ABO blood groups in Crohn’s disease and in monitoring response to infliximab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiao; Wang, Lingyun; Zhang, Shenghong; Feng, Ting; Li, Li; Chen, Baili; Chen, Minhu

    2016-01-01

    Background The variation in ABO blood groups is reported to be associated with multiple diseases. Infliximab (IFX) has been widely used in the treatment of Crohn’s disease (CD). We aim to investigate the distribution of ABO blood groups in Chinese patients with CD and to explore its impact on response to IFX. Materials and methods Patients with CD were consecutively recruited to the study between 2007 and 2014. CD patients receiving IFX therapy were followed for at least two years. Results In 293 patients with CD, most patients (40.6%) had blood type O (119/293). The odds ratio (OR) of CD in blood type O patients was 1.06 (95%CI: 0.6–1.86; p=0.84) compared to all other blood types. Among those CD patients, 107 patients received IFX treatment. One year after the first course of IFX, a significant association was found between the overall ABO system and outcomes of IFX treatment (p<0.001). CD patients with blood type AB (OR=4.42, 95% CI: 1.04–18.76; p=0.044) were more likely to achieve mucosal healing, while CD patients with blood type A had a high risk of losing response (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.15–0.96; p=0.040). Discussion ABO blood groups are not associated with prevalence of CD. Patients with blood type AB had a better response to IFX while those with blood type A appeared to have a risk of losing response to IFX. PMID:27136434

  4. ABO blood group system and the coronary artery disease: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Xu, Hao; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABO blood group system, a well-known genetic risk factor, has clinically been demonstrated to be linked with thrombotic vascular diseases. However, the relationship between ABO blood group and coronary artery disease (CAD) is still controversial. We here performed an updated meta-analysis of the related studies and tried to elucidate the potential role of ABO blood group as a risk factor for CAD. All detectable case-control and cohort studies comparing the risk of CAD in different ABO blood groups were collected for this analysis through searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Ultimately, 17 studies covering 225,810 participants were included. The combined results showed that the risk of CAD was significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.26, p = 0.01) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94, p = 0.0008). Even when studies merely about myocardial infarction (MI) were removed, the risk of CAD was still significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.10, p = 0.03) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85 to 0.93, p < 0.00001). This updated systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that both blood group A and non-O were the risk factors of CAD. PMID:26988722

  5. ABO and rhesus blood groups as prognostic factors in transitional cell carcinomas of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Krogh, J; Kvist, E

    1992-01-01

    In a study of 290 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract an excess of blood group A was found. Comparisons between blood group A versus O and rhesus-positive versus rhesus-negative in relation to tumor stages or grades of dysplasia showed no significant differences neither at presentation nor in actuarial survival rates. It is concluded that the blood group systems ABO and rhesus have no prognostic value in urothelial tumors of the upper urinary tract.

  6. Sample Acquisition and Analytical Chemistry Challenges to Verifying Compliance to Aviators Breathing Oxygen (ABO) Purity Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been developing and testing two different types of oxygen separation systems. One type of oxygen separation system uses pressure swing technology, the other type uses a solid electrolyte electrochemical oxygen separation cell. Both development systems have been subjected to long term testing, and performance testing under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. Testing these two systems revealed that measuring the product purity of oxygen, and determining if an oxygen separation device meets Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) specifications is a subtle and sometimes difficult analytical chemistry job. Verifying product purity of cryogenically produced oxygen presents a different set of analytical chemistry challenges. This presentation will describe some of the sample acquisition and analytical chemistry challenges presented by verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator - and verifying oxygen produced by cryogenic separation processes. The primary contaminant that causes gas samples to fail to meet ABO requirements is water. The maximum amount of water vapor allowed is 7 ppmv. The principal challenge of verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator is that it is produced relatively slowly, and at comparatively low temperatures. A short term failure that occurs for just a few minutes in the course of a 1 week run could cause an entire tank to be rejected. Continuous monitoring of oxygen purity and water vapor could identify problems as soon as they occur. Long term oxygen separator tests were instrumented with an oxygen analyzer and with an hygrometer: a GE Moisture Monitor Series 35. This hygrometer uses an aluminum oxide sensor. The user's manual does not report this, but long term exposure to pure oxygen causes the aluminum oxide sensor head to bias dry. Oxygen product that exceeded the 7 ppm specification was improperly accepted, because the sensor had biased. The bias is permanent - exposure to air does not cause the sensor to

  7. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in Mauritania: results of first nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Hamed, C T; Bollahi, M A; Abdelhamid, I; Med Mahmoud, M A; Ba, B; Ghaber, S; Habti, N; Houmeida, A

    2012-04-01

    There is no data available on the ABO/Rh(D) frequencies in the Mauritanian population. We retrospectively analysed records of a 5-year database that contained ABO/Rh phenotype and ethnic origin of 10 116 volunteers giving blood at the national blood transfusion centre to derive the frequencies of ABO/Rh(D) groups in the Mauritanian population. The two race categories in the country and their sub-ethnic groups: the Moors (whites and black) and the black Africans (Pulhars, Soninkes and Wolof) were included in this study. Globally, group O had the highest frequency (49.10%) followed by A (28.28%), B (18.56%) and AB (4.05%). This order more common in North African populations was found in four of the five ethnic groups composing our population. Allele frequencies were, respectively, 70.20%, 17.74% and 12.04% giving the same order of O > A > B. We observed no significant variation in these frequencies between the different ethnic groups. Rhesus study showed that with a percentage of 94.23% Rh(D) positive is by far the most prevalent, while Rh(D) negative is present only in 5.77% of the total population. This frequency distribution supports the mixed-race composition of the Mauritanian population.

  8. Is There a Relation between ABO Blood Groups and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Pemphigoid? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Toosi, Parviz; Azimi, Somayyeh; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Montazami, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Relationship between blood groups and dermatologic diseases remains controversial and was not yet fully elucidated nor explained clearly. The aim of this study was to examine if any relation exists between different types of pemphigoid diseases and ABO blood group. Methods. In this case-control study, 159 pemphigoid patients and 152 healthy matched-controls were evaluated. All blood group (including Rh status) data for the study was obtained from the hospital medical records. Statistical comparisons were completed with chi-square test and logistic regression. Results. Blood group “O” was found in 32.9% of patients and 38.2% of control group. Blood group “A” was found among 30.8% of patients and 34.2% of control group, while group “B” was reported in 27.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls and “AB” was identified among 8.9% of patients and 6.6% of control group. 84.9% of patients were Rh positive, while in the control group 86.2% of patients were Rh positive. No significant differences were found regarding ABO blood groups (P = 0.46) or Rh (P = 0.76) between pemphigoid patients and control group. Also, older females had the higher risk of developing bullous pemphigoid. Conclusion. We found no relationship between ABO blood groups and pemphigoid disease. PMID:27437000

  9. Correlation of Palatal Rugoscopy with Gender, Palatal Vault Height and ABO Blood Groups in Three Different Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, KG; Verma, P; Bansal, N; Basavaraju, S; Sachdeva, SK; Khosa, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palatal rugae (PR) are asymmetrical irregular elevations, recorded during maxillary cast fabrication, that can be used for identification purpose if previous comparative sources are available. Aim: This study investigated uniqueness of PR patterns in relation to gender, palatal vault forms, and ABO blood groups in three (North-East [N-E], Northern and Western) populations of India. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted on randomly selected 90 students, 30 from each sub population. Design - The palatal vault was recorded as Types I, II, and III. The maxillary casts were analyzed for each subject. The blood group of each subject was also recorded. Pearson's correlation coefficient tests were performed on cross-tabulations to evaluate significant relationship among different variables. Results: The PR number was more among females with an insignificant correlation among gender and mean rugae size on both sides. Types I and II hard palate vaults were seen associated with straight forwardly directed PR pattern, while Type III with curved forwardly directed PR. On the right side, straight rugae shape was most common type. On the left side, straight rugae shape was most common in Northern population while in N-E and Western populations curved rugae was the dominating type. A highly significant correlation was found between ABO blood groups and different PR patterns. Conclusions: PR possesses unique characteristics and can be used along with palatal vault forms as well as ABO blood groups for racial and individualistic soft tissue oral print in forensic cases. PMID:25328791

  10. Association between ABO blood group and osteoporosis among postmenopausal women of North India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Maninder

    2014-12-01

    The present study is an attempt to examine possible associations between ABO blood groups and the risk of osteoporosis among postmenopausal women of North India. This cross-sectional study involved 250 postmenopausal women from North India, ranging in age from 45 to 80 years. Four anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference and hip circumference), blood sample (ABO status and haemoglobin concentration) and grip strength (dominant as well as non-dominant hand) of all the participants were taken. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated by using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at lumbar spine (L1-L4) and proximal femur. Analysis of data revealed that at lumbar spine (L1-L4) osteoporosis was more prevalent among individuals with blood group A (31.58%), followed by those with blood group B (29.67%), AB (28.57%) and then blood group O (15%), whereas for proximal femur individuals with blood group AB (21.43%) showed the highest prevalence of osteoporosis followed by a decreasing trend from blood group A (17.54%) to B (12.08%) and then O (5%). Total prevalence of osteoporosis was 26.4% in lumbar spine and 13.2% in proximal femur, indicating that lumbar spine had an elevated risk for osteoporosis among postmenopausal women. All the anthropometric variables, haemoglobin concentration as well as grip strength of individuals with blood group O demonstrated non-significant differences with non-O blood group except for weight and body mass index, where differences were statistically significant. Women with blood group O exhibited significantly higher bone mineral density for lumbar spine (0.90 g/cm(2) vs. 0.85 g/cm(2), p<0.05) and proximal femur (0.87 g/cm(2) vs. 0.79 g/cm(2), p<0.05) as compared to those with non-O blood group, thereby suggesting an increasing risk of osteoporosis among individuals with non-O blood group.

  11. Recipient Outcomes after ABO-Incompatible Liver Transplantation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, SunYi; Xu, XiaoFeng; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, ShuSen

    2011-01-01

    Background ABO-incompatible live transplantation (ILT) is not occasionally performed due to a relative high risk of graft failure. Knowledge of both graft and patient survival rate after ILT is essential for donor selection and therapeutic strategy. We systematically reviewed studies containing outcomes after ILT compared to that after ABO-compatible liver transplantation (CLT). Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a comprehensive search strategy on MEDLINE (1966–July 2010), EMBASE (1980–July 2010), Biosis Preview (1969–July 2010), Science Citation Index (1981–July 2010), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Cochrane Library, issue 7, 2010) and the National Institute of Health (July 2010). Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of each study and abstracted outcome data. Fourteen eligible studies were included which came from various medical centers all over the world. Meta-analysis results showed that no significantly statistical difference was found in pediatric graft survival rate, pediatric and adult patient survival rate between ILT and CLT group. In adult subgroup, the graft survival rate after ILT was significantly lower than that after CLT. The value of totally pooled OR was 0.64 (0.55, 0.74), 0.92 (0.62, 1.38) for graft survival rate and patient survival rate respectively. The whole complication incidence (including acute rejection and biliary complication) after ILT was higher than that after CLT, as the value of totally pooled OR was 3.02 (1.33, 6.85). Similarly, in acute rejection subgroup, the value of OR was 2.02 (1.01, 4.02). However, it was 4.08 (0.90, 18.51) in biliary complication subgroup. Conclusions/Significance In our view, pediatric ILT has not been a contraindication anymore due to a similar graft and patient survival rate between ILT and CLT group. Though adult graft survival rate is not so satisfactory, ILT is undoubtedly life-saving under exigent condition. Most studies included in our analysis are

  12. Variant ABO Blood Group Alleles, Secretor Status and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Results from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Kraft, Peter; Xu, Mousheng; Steplowski, Emily; Olsson, Martin L.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Austin, Melissa A.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kooperberg, Charles; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Overvad, Kim; Patel, Alpa V.; Sanchéz, Maria-José; Sansbury, Leah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slimani, Nadia; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Watters, Joanne; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Hartge, Patricia; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Subjects with non-O ABO blood group alleles have increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Glycosyltransferase activity is greater for the A1 versus A2 variant, while O01 and O02 variants are nonfunctioning. We hypothesized: (1) A1 allele would confer greater risk than A2 allele, (2) protective effect of the O allele would be equivalent for O01 and O02 variants, (3) secretor phenotype would modify the association with risk. Methods We determined ABO variants and secretor phenotype from single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABO and FUT2 genes in 1533 cases and 1582 controls from 12 prospective cohort studies. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression. Results An increased risk was observed in participants with A1, but not A2 alleles. Compared to subjects with genotype O/O, genotypes A2/O, A2/A1, A1/O, and A1/A1 had ORs of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72–1.26), 1.46 (95%CI, 0.98–2.17), 1.48 (95%CI, 1.23–1.78), and 1.71 (95%CI, 1.18–2.47). Risk was similar for O01 and O02 variant O alleles. Compared to O01/O01, the ORs for each additional allele of O02, A1, and A2 were 1.00 (95%CI, 0.87–1.14), 1.38 (95%CI, 1.20–1.58), and 0.96 (95%CI, 0.77–1.20); P-value, O01 versus O02=0.94, A1 versus A2=0.004. Secretor phenotype was not an effect modifier (P-interaction=0.63). Conclusions Among participants in a large prospective cohort consortium, ABO allele subtypes corresponding to increased glycosyltransferase activity were associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. Impact These data support the hypothesis that ABO glycosyltransferase activity influences pancreatic cancer risk, rather than actions of other nearby genes on chromosome 9q34. PMID:20971884

  13. The Prevalence of Transfusion Transmitted Infections in ABO Blood Groups and Rh Type System.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Jitendra Singh; Singh, Savitri; Kaur, Viplesh; Giri, Sumit; Kaushal, Ravi Prakash

    2014-11-19

    Screening of blood and blood products is important to reduce the risk of transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs). The transfusion of unscreened or inadequately screened blood and blood products are the major source of TTIs. The aim of this paper is to find out the prevalence of TTIs in ABO blood groups and Rh type system. A total of 4128 blood donors were screened from January 2010 to April 2014. Serological tests were performed for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti hepatitis C virus (Anti-HCV), anti HIV-1 and 2, venereal disease research Laboratory test (VDRL) and malaria parasite (MP) antigen. In seroreactive donors, HBsAg, Anti-HCV, VDRL, MP antigen and anti HIV were positive in 40 cases, 26 cases, 19 cases, 6 cases and 2 cases, respectively. Highest percentage of HBsAg, Anti HCV, VDRL, MP antigen and anti HIV was observed in blood group A negative (2/50), O negative (1/66), B negative (1/91), AB positive (2/377) blood group respectively. In the present study, the total number of Rhnegative donors is lower when compared to Rh-positive blood donors, but Rh-negative blood donors show higher percentages of seroreactivity for TTIs. Larger scale studies at molecular level are required to improve the knowledge of this aspect.

  14. De novo mTOR inhibitor-based immunosuppression in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martina; Wiech, Thorsten; Marget, Matthias; Peine, Sven; Thude, Hansjörg; Achilles, Eike G; Fischer, Lutz; Lehnhardt, Anja; Thaiss, Friedrich; Nashan, Bjoern

    2015-11-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation (KTx) has become an accepted therapeutic option in renal replacement therapy for patients without a blood group-compatible living donor. Using different desensitization strategies, most centers apply B-cell depletion with rituximab and maintenance immunosuppression (IS) with tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid. This high load of total IS leads to an increased rate of surgical complications and virus infections in ABOi patients. Our aim was to establish ABOi KTx using an immunosuppressive regimen, which is effective in preventing acute rejection without increasing the risk for viral infections. Therefore, we selected a de novo immunosuppressive protocol with low-dose calcineurin inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus for our ABOi program. Here, we report the first 25 patients with a complete three-yr follow-up treated with this regimen. Three-yr patient survival and graft survival were 96% and 83%. The rate of acute T-cell-mediated rejections was low (12%). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was evident in one patient only (4%). Surgical complications were common (40%), but mild in 80% of cases. We demonstrate that ABOi KTx with a de novo mTOR inhibitor-based regimen is feasible without severe surgical or immunological complications and a low rate of viral infections.

  15. The use of ABO blood groups as markers for mosquito biting studies.

    PubMed

    Bryan, J H; Smalley, M E

    1978-01-01

    Discrepancies between malaria inoculation rates measured entomologically and parasitologically may be explained, at least in part, if infants and children receive less mosquito bites per night than do adults. We found that this problem could be studied by choosing women and children of different ABO blood groups. In preliminary laboratory studies it was found that the blood group of a mosquito's blood meal could be determined in parous and nulliparous mosquitoes for at least 24 hours, and, nullipares up to 34 hours, after feeding. An antiserum against the O group was necessary to distinguish non A or B red cells from those of animal origin. Cross reactions did occur, presumably as a result of the digestion by mosquitoes of the red cell surfaces, but in every case the strongest and earliest developing agglutination was that of the host. Field studies were made using women and children sleeping under mosquito nets, the holes in which made the nets a trapping device. The women, on average, received over seven times more bites per night than did the children. The migration of blood-fed mosquitoes from one net to another was negligible.

  16. ABO (H) secretor status of sickle cell disease patients in Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olorunshola, K V; Audu, L

    2013-01-01

    Certain individuals secrete ABO blood group antigens in body fluids and secretions while others do not. In this study, the presence of water soluble agglutinogens in body fluids such as blood, saliva and urine of 64 sickle cell disease patients and 75 AA genotype subjects who served as control were taken and tested by hem-agglutination inhibition method. Data obtained was expressed in percentages. Results revealed that 84.4% sickle cell patients were secretors while 15.6% were non secretors. Amongst the control, 97.3% were secretors while 3.1% were non secretors. 81.2% SS and 3.2% SS+F patients were secretors while 15.6% SS were non secretors, 68% AA were secretors and 29.3% AS were secretors while 2.7% AA were non secretors. The result showed that a non secretor is more likely to be an SS than a secretor and Secretor status is influenced by hemoglobin genotype. PMID:23955403

  17. A-site ion vibrational modes in ABO3 polar perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Jiri

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that Pb(B'B'')O3 family of complex perovskites contains materials with very useful dielectric, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The overall electromechanical response of these system is believed to be related to their characteristic micro- to nanoscale structural correlations (chemical clusters, polar nanoregions or nanotwins). At the level of the ABO3 unit cell, the remarkable polarizability of these materials originates from lead-ion displacements, and the anharmonic motion of these ions, loosely linked to the core oxygen octahedra network, largely dominates in the low-frequency phonon modes in the system. Therefore, the investigation of the low-frequency phonon modes in these systems is of a great importance. The aim of this contribution is to report recent experimental studies of such low-frequency vibrations by inelastic X-ray, neutron and light scattering techniques, in materials like lead zirconate titanate, lead magnesium niobium titanate or lead titanate. In particular, attention will be payed to our recent inelastic X-ray scattering studies of PZT lattice dynamics.

  18. ABO Blood Group, Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Herbert; Lu, Lingeng; Kidd, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Carriage of a non–O ABO blood group and colonization by Helicobacter pylori are thought to be risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We examined these associations in a population-based case–control study of 373 case patients and 690 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age. Control subjects were selected by random-digit dialing. Seropositivity for H pylori and its virulence protein CagA was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was associated with non–O blood group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.83, P = .034) and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.66, P = .025), but no association was observed for CagA seropositivity (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.16). An association between pancreatic cancer risk and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity was found among individuals with non–O blood type but not among those with O blood type (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.49 to 5.20, P = .0014; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.62 to 2.64, P = .51, respectively). This study demonstrates an association between pancreatic cancer and H pylori colonization, particularly for individuals with non–O blood types. PMID:20181960

  19. Electric-field-induced local structural phenomena in Pb-based ABO3-type relaxor ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Mihailova, Boriana; Maier, Bernd J; Steilmann, Thomas; Dul'kin, Evgeniy; Roth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lead-based ABO3-type relaxors and related systems have numerous applications in modern technical devices because of their remarkably high dielectric permittivity and piezoelectric/electroelastic and electro-optic coefficients. However, lead is not desired from an environmental point of view, and to switch to alternative alkali-, Ba-, or Bi-based relaxor systems, one must understand in great detail the structural mesoscopic order and coupling processes responsible for the outstanding performance and multifunctionality of the exemplar Pb-based compounds. To elucidate the type of ferroic coupling, three relaxor compounds PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 (PST), Pb0.78Ba0.22Sc0.5Ta0.5O3 (PST-Ba), and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 (PSN), were studied by polarized Raman scattering and acoustic emission at different temperatures and under an external electric field. The results reveal the coexistence of mesoscopic-scale ferroelectric and antiferroelectric coupling, which are predominantly related to B-site cations and A-site Pb cations, respectively. This suggests that the polar structural state of relaxors is frustrated ferrielectric. The presence of A-site cations with affinity to off-center is significant for the development of mesoscopic-scale antiferroelectric order coexisting with the mesoscopic-scale ferroelectric order. PMID:25585386

  20. Outcome after Desensitization in HLA or ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kauke, Teresa; Klimaschewski, Sandra; Schoenermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Dick, Andrea; Guba, Markus; Stangl, Manfred; Werner, Jens; Meiser, Bruno; Habicht, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Background The shortage of deceased donors led to an increase of living donor kidney (LDK) transplantations performed in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or ABO incompatibility (ABOi) using various desensitization protocols. Methods We herein analyzed 26 ABOi and 8 Luminex positive DSA patients who were successfully desensitized by anti-CD20, antigen-specific immunoadsorption and/or plasmapheresis to receive an LDK transplant. Twenty LDK recipients with non-donor-specific HLA-antibodies (low risk) and 32 without anti-HLA antibodies (no risk) served as control groups. Results 1-year graft survival rate and renal function was similar in all 4 groups (creatinine: 1.63 ± 0.5 vs 1.78 ± 0.6 vs 1.64 ± 0.5 vs 1.6 ± 0.3 mg/dl in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk group). The incidence of acute T-cell mediated rejections did not differ between the 4 groups (15% vs 12, 5% vs 15% vs 22% in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk), while antibody-mediated rejections were only found in the DSA (25%) and ABOi (7.5%) groups. Incidence of BK nephropathy (BKVN) was significantly more frequent after desensitization as compared to controls (5/34 vs 0/52, p = 0.03). Conclusion We demonstrate favorable short-term allograft outcome in LDK transplant recipients after desensitization. However, the desensitization was associated with an increased risk of BKVN. PMID:26730981

  1. Association of ABO blood group with fracture pattern and mortality in hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, RP; Khan, A; Aghedo, D; Venkatesan, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mechanism of falling has been proposed as the exclusive explanation for hip fracture pattern. Evidence exists that other genetic factors also influence proximal femoral fracture configuration. The ABO blood group serotype has been associated with other pathologies but any role in hip fracture has yet to be definitively characterised. Methods Our National Hip Fracture Database was interrogated over a four-year period. All patients had their blood group retrieved, and this was compared with hip fracture pattern and mortality rates. Confounding factors were accounted for using logistic regression and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results A total of 2,987 consecutive patients presented to our institution. Those with blood group A were significantly more likely to sustain intracapsular fractures than ‘non-A’ individuals (p=0.009). The blood group distribution of patients with intracapsular fractures was identical to that of the national population of England. However, blood group A was less common in patients with intertrochanteric fractures than in the general population (p=0.0002). Even after correction for age and sex, blood group A was associated with a decrease in the odds of suffering an intertrochanteric fracture to 80% (p=0.002). Blood group A had inferior survivorship correcting for age, sex and hip fracture pattern (hazard ratio: 1.14, p=0.035). This may be due to associated increased prevalence of co-morbid disease in this cohort. Conclusions Blood group is an independent predictor of hip fracture pattern, with group A patients more likely to sustain an intracapsular fracture and non-A individuals more likely to sustain an intertrochanteric fracture. The determinants of fracture pattern are likely to be related to complex interactions at a molecular level based on genetic susceptibility. The mechanism of fall may not be the only aetiological determinant of proximal femoral fracture configuration. PMID:25198976

  2. ABO Blood Group and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin-Hong; Liu, Li; Xie, Shuang-Shuang; Li, Wen-Wen; Yang, Xia; Fan, Wen-Bo; Gai, Zhong-Tao; Chen, Shi-Jun; Kato, Naoya

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have observed an association between the ABO blood group and risk of certain malignancies. However, no studies of the association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk are available. We conducted this hospital-based case-control study to examine the association with HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods From January 2004 to December 2008, a total of 6275 consecutive eligible patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were recruited. 1105 of them were patients with HBV-related HCC and 5,170 patients were CHB without HCC. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between the ABO blood group and HCC risk. Results Compared with subjects with blood type O, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for the association of those with blood type A and HCC risk was 1.39 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05–1.83] after adjusting for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV DNA. The associations were only statistically significant [AOR (95%CI) = 1.56(1.14–2.13)] for men, for being hepatitis B e antigen positive [AOR (95%CI) = 4.92(2.83–8.57)], for those with cirrhosis [AOR (95%CI), 1.57(1.12–2.20)], and for those with HBV DNA≤105copies/mL [AOR (95%CI), 1.58(1.04–2.42)]. Stratified analysis by sex indicated that compared with those with blood type O, those with blood type B also had a significantly high risk of HCC among men, whereas, those with blood type AB or B had a low risk of HCC among women. Conclusions The ABO blood type was associated with the risk of HCC in Chinese patients with CHB. The association was gender-related. PMID:22235351

  3. Distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups in the Benin area of Niger-Delta: Implication for regional blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Enosolease, Mathew Ebose; Bazuaye, Godwin Nosa

    2008-01-01

    ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are hereditary characters and are useful in population genetic studies, in resolving medico-legal issues and more importantly in compatibility test in blood transfusion practice. Data on frequency distribution of ABO and Rh-D in Niger-Delta region of Nigeria are not available; hence we made an attempt to retrospectively analyze the records on the blood donors, transfusion recipients and patients attending antenatal care or some other medical interventions. Over a twenty-year period between 1986 and 2005, a total of 160,431 blood samples were grouped for ABO and Rh-D at the blood bank of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Blood group distribution among these samples showed phenotypes A, B, AB and O as 23.72%, 20.09%, 2.97% and 53.22%, respectively. The Rh-D negative phenotype was found among 6.01% of the samples tested.

  4. Evaluation of the Secretor Status of ABO Blood Group Antigens in Saliva among Southern Rajasthan Population Using Absorption Inhibition Method

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Mamta; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ABO blood group system was the significant element for forensic serological examination of blood and body fluids in the past before the wide adaptation of DNA typing. A significant proportion of individuals (80%) are secretors, meaning that antigens present in the blood are also found in other body fluids such as saliva. Absorption inhibition is one such method that works by reducing strength of an antiserum based on type and amount of antigen present in the stains. Aim To check the efficacy of identifying the blood group antigens in saliva and to know the secretor status using absorption inhibition method among southern Rajasthan population. Materials and Methods Blood and saliva samples were collected from 80 individuals comprising 20 individuals in each blood group. The absorption inhibition method was used to determine the blood group antigens in the saliva and then the results were correlated with the blood group of the collected blood sample. The compiled data was statistically analysed using chi-square test. Results Blood groups A & O revealed 100% secretor status for both males and females. While blood groups B and AB revealed 95% secretor status. Conclusion Secretor status evaluation of the ABO blood group antigen in saliva using absorption inhibition method can be a useful tool in forensic examination. PMID:27042574

  5. ABO blood types and cancer risk—A cohort study of 339,432 subjects in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Wen, Chi-Pang; Lin, Jie; Wen, Christopher; Pu, Xia; Huang, Maosheng; Tsai, Min Kuang; Tsao, Chwen Keng; Wu, Xifeng; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The associations of laboratory-based ABO phenotypes with cancer risks and mortality have not been systematically determined. Methods The study subjects were 339,432 healthy individuals with laboratory-based blood types from a Taiwan cohort. Results Compared to blood type O, blood type A was significantly associated with an elevated risk of stomach cancer incidence (Hazard Ratio [HR], 1.38 [95% CI, 1.11–1.72]) and mortality (HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.02–1.86]) compared with blood type O, after adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, and body mass index. Non-O blood types were associated with an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, with blood type B reaching statistical significance for incidence (HR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.02–2.48]) and mortality (HR, 1.63 [95% CI, 1.02–2.60]). In contrast, kidney cancer risk was inversely associated with blood type AB (HR, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.18–0.93]) compared to type O. Conclusion Cancer risks vary in people with different ABO blood types, with elevated risks of stomach cancer associated with blood type A and pancreatic cancer associated with non-O blood types (A, B, and AB). PMID:25600007

  6. Paleomagnetism of Lower Permian Abo and Yeso Formation, Carizzo Arroyo, Lucero Uplift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronis, M. S.; Geissman, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    We report paleomagnetic data from Lower Permian hematite-cemented sandstones and siltstones from Carrizo Arroyo, on the eastern edge of the Lucero uplift along the west-side of the middle Rio Grande rift, to test the hypothesis that the rift margins have accommodated extensional strain via vertical axis rotation. In addition, we present a revised interpretation of the structural setting and deformation history of the area, were late-Tertiary transtensional stresses have produced the majority of the structures in the area. The paleomagnetic data are discussed in the context of this hypothesis. In the Rio Grande rift area, a mid-Cenozoic and younger extensional feature defining the eastern margin of the Colorado Plateau, relatively little work has been done to assess the magnitude and sense of vertical axis rotations of fault-bounded crustal blocks within and at the margins of the plateau. A growing body of evidence shows that the Colorado Plateau has experienced some degree of vertical axis rotation and some magnitude of northward translation, although the magnitudes of the rotation and translation have been subject to considerable debate. Eight to ten oriented samples from 50 sites have been fully demagnetized with all sites yielding interpretable results: 41 sites from three sections in the Lower Permian Abo Formation, and 9 sites in the Meseta Blanca Member of the overlying Yeso Formation. In most cases, progressive thermal demagnetization resulted in a nearly univectorial decay of the magnetization to the origin that is well grouped at the site level. After correcting for modest dip of strata, the 50 sites in Carrizo Arroyo yield an estimate group mean (D = 162.1°, I = -4.1°, α95 = 6.8°, k = 10.18). Overall, the data from this part of the west side of the rift are discordant, in a clockwise since, with Early Permian (about D = 140°, I = -2.0°) and mid-Permian (about D = 145°, I = -4.0°) expected directions. We interpret the paleomagnetic data from

  7. ABO/Rh Blood Groups and Risk of HIV Infection and Hepatitis B Among Blood Donors of Abidjan, Côte D'ivoire.

    PubMed

    Siransy, Liliane Kouabla; Nanga, Zizendorf Yves; Zaba, Flore Sandrine; Tufa, Nyasenu Yawo; Dasse, Sery Romuald

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B and HIV infection are two viral infections that represent real global public health problems. In order to improve their management, some hypotheses suggest that genetic predispositions like ABO and Rh blood groups would influence the occurrence of these diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and the susceptibility to HIV infection and hepatitis B. We conducted a cross-sectional and analytical study in a population of voluntary blood donors in the Blood Transfusion Center of Abidjan. All blood donors who donated blood between January and June 2014 were tested for HBs antigen and anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA tests) and were ABO typed. The total number of examined blood donors during this period was 45,538, of which 0.32% and 8.07% were respectively infected with HIV and hepatitis B virus. O-group donors were more infected than non-O donors. Our study is an outline concerning the search for a link between ABO and Rh blood groups and hepatitis B and HIV infection. Further studies should be conducted to confirm the interaction between these two infections and contribute to the search for new therapeutic approaches.

  8. ABO/Rh Blood Groups and Risk of HIV Infection and Hepatitis B Among Blood Donors of Abidjan, Côte D’ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Siransy, Liliane Kouabla; Nanga, Zizendorf Yves; Zaba, Flore Sandrine; Tufa, Nyasenu Yawo; Dasse, Sery Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and HIV infection are two viral infections that represent real global public health problems. In order to improve their management, some hypotheses suggest that genetic predispositions like ABO and Rh blood groups would influence the occurrence of these diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and the susceptibility to HIV infection and hepatitis B. We conducted a cross-sectional and analytical study in a population of voluntary blood donors in the Blood Transfusion Center of Abidjan. All blood donors who donated blood between January and June 2014 were tested for HBs antigen and anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA tests) and were ABO typed. The total number of examined blood donors during this period was 45,538, of which 0.32% and 8.07% were respectively infected with HIV and hepatitis B virus. O-group donors were more infected than non-O donors. Our study is an outline concerning the search for a link between ABO and Rh blood groups and hepatitis B and HIV infection. Further studies should be conducted to confirm the interaction between these two infections and contribute to the search for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26495131

  9. Pilot conversion trial from mycophenolic acid to everolimus in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with BK viruria and/or viremia.

    PubMed

    Belliere, Julie; Kamar, Nassim; Mengelle, Catherine; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Doumerc, Nicolas; Game, Xavier; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Esposito, Laure; Debiol, Benedicte; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-03-01

    Immunosuppression using everolimus (EVR) plus low-dose tacrolimus (Tac) is commonly used in organ transplantation. EVR has potential antiviral effects. Herein, the long-term outcomes and impacts of Tac-EVR on the BK virus are reported in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients. The initial immunosuppressive regimen combined steroids, Tac, and mycophenolic acid (MPA). At a median of 141 (34-529) days post-transplantation, seven stable ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients were converted from MPA to EVR because of active BK replication, and compared with a reference group of fourteen ABO-incompatible patients receiving classical Tac plus MPA. At 1 month before conversion, at 1, 3 months after, and at last follow-up, clinical and biological parameters were monitored. The median time from conversion to the last follow-up was 784 (398-866) days. Conversion to EVR caused no change to rejection episodes or immunological status (isoagglutinin titers, anti-HLA antibodies). At last follow-up, median eGFR was similar in the Tac-MPA versus Tac-EVR group (40 [range: 14-56] vs. 54.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [range: 0-128], P = 0.07). The major adverse event was dyslipidemia. Interestingly, conversion from MPA to EVR decreased BK viral load in five patients. ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with an active BK virus infection may benefit from conversion to EVR. PMID:26575959

  10. Ongoing higher infection rate in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipient: is it a serious problem? A single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Additional clinical experience and knowledge regarding the barrier to transplantation of ABO blood type incompatibility could reduce the higher rate of infectious complications in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. Methods A total of 79 ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOiKT) patients were compared with 260 ABO-compatible kidney transplantation (ABOcKT) patients for basic clinical characteristics, infectious complications, rejection episodes, and graft survival. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, rejection rates, or graft survival between the ABOiKT and ABOcKT patients. No significant difference in the infection rate was shown for cytomegalovirus (26.6% vs. 30.0%; P = 0.672), BK virus (19.0% vs. 21.5%; P = 0.752), herpes disease (10.1% vs. 5.0%; P = 0.082), pneumonia (5.3% vs. 3.8%; P = 0.746), or urinary tract infection (8.9% vs. 10.0%; P > 0.999). Female sex (hazard ratio [HR], 2.20; P = 0.003), advanced age (≥60 years) (HR, 2.5; P = 0.019), history of rejection episodes (HR, 2.28; P = 0.016), and history of surgical complications (HR, 4.64; P = 0.018) were significant risk factors for infection. ABO incompatibility demonstrated a tendency toward higher infection risk without statistical significance (HR, 1.74; P = 0.056). Conclusion In spite of immunosuppressant protocol modification, the rate of infectious complications following ABOiKT is still higher than with ABOcKT when a modified desensitization protocol is used. However, this was not sufficient to avoid ABOiKT. PMID:27433463

  11. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  12. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome in ABO and Rhesus D minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation: A prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    ElAnsary, Mervat; Hanna, Mariam Onsy F; Saadi, Gamal; ElShazly, Mostafa; Fadel, Fatina I; Ahmed, Hanan AbdElAziz; Aziz, Amr Mostafa; ElSharnouby, Amal; Kandeel, Mona MohiElDin T

    2015-06-01

    The increasing demand for solid organs has necessitated the use of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) D minor mismatched transplants. The passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) occurs when donor lymphocytes produce antibodies that react with host red blood cell (RBC) antigens and result in hemolysis. Our aim was to evaluate prospectively the role of PLS in post transplant anemia and hemolysis in ABO and RhD minor mismatched recipients of liver and kidney grafts and to study the association of PLS with donor lymphocyte microchimerism. We examined 11 liver and 10 kidney recipients at Day +15 for anemia, markers of hemolysis, direct antiglobulin test and eluates, and serum RBC antibodies. Microchimerism was determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes by genotyping of simple sequence length polymorphisms encoding short tandem repeats. Immune hemolytic anemia and anti-recipient RBC antibodies were observed in 2 out of 11 liver (18.2%) and 2 out of 10 kidney (20%) transplants. RBC antibody specificity reflected the donor to recipient transplant, with anti-blood group B antibodies identified in 2 cases of O to B and 1 case of A to AB transplants while anti-D antibodies were detected in 1 case of RhD-negative to RhD-positive transplant. Donor microchimerism was found in only 1 patient. In conclusion, passenger lymphocyte mediated hemolysis is frequent in minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation. Recognizing PLS as a potential cause of post transplant anemia may allow for early diagnosis and management to decrease the morbidity and mortality in some patients. PMID:25842056

  13. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome in ABO and Rhesus D minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation: A prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    ElAnsary, Mervat; Hanna, Mariam Onsy F; Saadi, Gamal; ElShazly, Mostafa; Fadel, Fatina I; Ahmed, Hanan AbdElAziz; Aziz, Amr Mostafa; ElSharnouby, Amal; Kandeel, Mona MohiElDin T

    2015-06-01

    The increasing demand for solid organs has necessitated the use of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) D minor mismatched transplants. The passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) occurs when donor lymphocytes produce antibodies that react with host red blood cell (RBC) antigens and result in hemolysis. Our aim was to evaluate prospectively the role of PLS in post transplant anemia and hemolysis in ABO and RhD minor mismatched recipients of liver and kidney grafts and to study the association of PLS with donor lymphocyte microchimerism. We examined 11 liver and 10 kidney recipients at Day +15 for anemia, markers of hemolysis, direct antiglobulin test and eluates, and serum RBC antibodies. Microchimerism was determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes by genotyping of simple sequence length polymorphisms encoding short tandem repeats. Immune hemolytic anemia and anti-recipient RBC antibodies were observed in 2 out of 11 liver (18.2%) and 2 out of 10 kidney (20%) transplants. RBC antibody specificity reflected the donor to recipient transplant, with anti-blood group B antibodies identified in 2 cases of O to B and 1 case of A to AB transplants while anti-D antibodies were detected in 1 case of RhD-negative to RhD-positive transplant. Donor microchimerism was found in only 1 patient. In conclusion, passenger lymphocyte mediated hemolysis is frequent in minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation. Recognizing PLS as a potential cause of post transplant anemia may allow for early diagnosis and management to decrease the morbidity and mortality in some patients.

  14. [Automatic reading of ABO and Rh groups on microplates using FMC medium and an IBG Systems reader].

    PubMed

    Mauri, J; Maymo, R M; Pérez, M A; Yusta, V; Mas, J; Puig, L

    1991-06-01

    We present in this paper our experience in the routine use of an automatic reader for microtiter plates (IBG Systems). A total of 2044 samples from blood donors have been tested for ABO (haematic and seric) and Rh (D antigen) blood group typing. The red blood cell samples have been tested against monoclonal anti-A, anti-B, anti-AB and anti-Rh 1 (D) sera (using two different anti-D reagents). As a negative control, 3% albumin solution was employed. In order to determine the seric groups, the plasma samples were tested against A1, A2, B and 0 cells. In all cases the red cells were suspended in Ficoll 400R-Methyl cellulose (FMC), and 0.01 Bromelin was added to red blood cell samples to be typed. The obstacles in the automatic readings were mainly solved by visual reading of the microplates. In the 2,044 samples analysed with the automatic reader, 19 discrepancies (0.94%) were found in ABO typing. In all cases the error was in the seric blood group. Three false positive reactions were found with 0 red cells. Two false negative with B red cells, interpreted by the automatic reader as doubtful results. Three positive readings were detected, in one case the positivity was due to alloantibodies (C + D specificities), the other two cases were autoagglutinations. False negative reactions were found, in 11 cases, 8 of them due to lipaemia and the remaining three were haemolysed plasma samples. It should be stressed that out of 19 cases of discrepancy, only 5 (0.24%) were due to the automatic reader while the remaining were due, to sample troubles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Association of ABO Blood Group and Rh factor with Periodontal Disease in a Population of Virajpet, Karnataka: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, S; Jain, Jithesh; Simon, Sequiera Peter; Battur, Hemanth; Supreetha, S; Haridas, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was an association between periodontal diseases and ABO blood groups. Materials & Methods: An epidemiological study was was carried out on 220 subjects who were randomly selected from individuals referred for periodontal treatment or for other reasons regarding Oral health at Coorg Institute of Dental Sciences. Results: The findings of our study revealed that subject’s blood group O (65.8) and Rh positive (73.33%) had a greater propensity for periodontitis. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed blood groups and Rh factor can act as a determinant of periodontitis. How to cite this article: Vivek S, Jain J, Simon SP, Battur H, Supreetha S, Haridas R. Association of ABO Blood Group and Rh factor with Periodontal Disease in a Population of Virajpet, Karnataka: A Cross-Sectional Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):30-34. PMID:24155617

  16. [Distribution of ABO blood groups and incidence of Rh factor (D) in various ethnic groups in the Hindu Kush region (Kafirs, Kalash Chitrali)].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, W

    1980-02-01

    With the aid of Eldon cards the distribution of the ABO blood groups and of the Rh factor (D) was investigated in different native ethnic groups (Kafirs, Kalash, Chitrali) in the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan and Pakistan. All studied groups are characterized by a relatively high frequency of blood group gene A and extremely low frequencies of B and O. This distribution differs appreciably from that of the rest of the Indian subcontinent as well as that of the adjacent Central Asiatic areas. The possible causes of the exceptional position of the native Hindu Kush groups in the ABO blood group system are discussed. It may be assumed that selection as a result of mother-child compatibility played a role as will be shown in a later paper. Concerning the studied traits of the Rhesus system, all investigated groups fit in the range of variation of the South Asian area. PMID:6773468

  17. Risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects is influenced by ABO blood group and cagA status

    PubMed Central

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Kato, Ikuko; Plummer, Martyn; Muñoz, Nubia; Stein, Angelika; van Doorn, Leen Jan; Franceschi, Silvia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-01-01

    A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For this study we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared with subjects carrying cagA− strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95%CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (P=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status. PMID:23319424

  18. Functional and structural changes in human erythrocyte surface after irradiation by uv waves of various wavelengths. Report 1: expression of ABO and Rhesus system antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Samoylova, K.A.; Klimova, K.N.; Priyezzheva, L.S.; Artsishevskaya, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of shortwave ultraviolet (SUV) radiation ad causes change in the external surface of human erythrocytes, modifying the expression of the ABO and Rh system antigens which are related to the surface of the cells was investigated. Erythrocytes in a structurally prepared erythrocyte mass from 23 donors stabilized by glugicir or heparin were examined. Three series of experiments were performed: (1) isolated erythrocytes, before irradiation thrice washed to remove plasma with isotonic NaC1 0.9%, erythrocytes diluted to 5 x s10 to the 7th power cells per milliliter and erythrocytes on the undiluted erythrocyte mass about 7 x 5 x 109 to the 9th power cells power milliliter. The agglutinating activity of the ABO and Rh antigens was studied. Two to three hours after exposure to 248, 620, 1240 and 2480 J/m2, the degree of hemolysis of isolated erythrocytes increased by 5,10,18 and 28%. Changes were also observed in agglutinating activity of ABO antigens. The agglutinating activity of A and B antigens increased by an average factor of 2 minus H antigens by a factor of 4. The SUV radiation did not cause any activation of the Rh antigen.

  19. Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance--Veterans' Group Life Insurance regulation update--ABO, VGLI application, SGLI 2-year disability extension. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-07-31

    This document amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) insurance regulations concerning Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) to reflect the statutory provisions of the Veterans' Benefits Act of 2010, which became law on October 13, 2010, and resulted in the need for amendments to change the SGLI Disability Extension period from 1 year to 2 years in duration; provide SGLI Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) retroactive coverage effective from October 7, 2001, for all qualifying injuries regardless of the geographic location and military operation in which the injuries were incurred; and remove the SGLI and Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) Accelerated Benefits Option (ABO) discount rate. This rule also clarifies that ``initial premium'' refers to ``initial Veterans' Group Life Insurance premium,'' updates the current address of the Office of Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (OSGLI), managed by Prudential Insurance Company of America, to reflect where the ABO application is mailed for processing, and corrects the OSGLI phone number. Finally, this rule removes the ABO application form from the regulation, and it corrects and clarifies language concerning the VGLI application period that was inadvertently incorrectly modified in a prior amendment of the regulations. PMID:25122940

  20. Increased risk of venous thrombosis by AB alleles of the ABO blood group and Factor V Leiden in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Most cases of a predisposition to venous thrombosis are caused by resistance to activated protein C, associated in 95% of cases with the Factor V Leiden allele (FVL or R506Q). Several recent studies report a further increased risk of thrombosis by an association between the AB alleles of the ABO blood group and Factor V Leiden. The present study investigated this association with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in individuals treated at the Hemocentro de Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil. A case-control comparison showed a significant risk of thrombosis in the presence of Factor V Leiden (OR = 10.1), which was approximately doubled when the AB alleles of the ABO blood group were present as well (OR = 22.3). These results confirm that the increased risk of deep vein thrombosis in the combined presence of AB alleles and Factor V Leiden is also applicable to the Brazilian population suggesting that ABO blood group typing should be routinely added to FVL in studies involving thrombosis. PMID:21637678

  1. Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance--Veterans' Group Life Insurance regulation update--ABO, VGLI application, SGLI 2-year disability extension. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-07-31

    This document amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) insurance regulations concerning Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) to reflect the statutory provisions of the Veterans' Benefits Act of 2010, which became law on October 13, 2010, and resulted in the need for amendments to change the SGLI Disability Extension period from 1 year to 2 years in duration; provide SGLI Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) retroactive coverage effective from October 7, 2001, for all qualifying injuries regardless of the geographic location and military operation in which the injuries were incurred; and remove the SGLI and Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) Accelerated Benefits Option (ABO) discount rate. This rule also clarifies that ``initial premium'' refers to ``initial Veterans' Group Life Insurance premium,'' updates the current address of the Office of Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (OSGLI), managed by Prudential Insurance Company of America, to reflect where the ABO application is mailed for processing, and corrects the OSGLI phone number. Finally, this rule removes the ABO application form from the regulation, and it corrects and clarifies language concerning the VGLI application period that was inadvertently incorrectly modified in a prior amendment of the regulations.

  2. Non-ABO blood group systems phenotyping in non-human primates for blood banking laboratory and xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcon, L; Quereda, J J; Mrowiec, A; Funes, C; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A; Majado, M J

    2013-04-01

    Some biomedical research procedures, such as organ xenotransplantation, usually require intensive hemotherapy. Knowledge of the whole phenotype of blood donor and graft could be useful in the field of xenotransplantation. Human and simian-type categories of blood groups have been established and they can be tested by standard methods used for human blood grouping. The aim of this work was to study the incidence of non-ABO blood group systems in different species of non-human primates, which are employed in biomedical research. The phenotype of Rh, Lewis, Kidd, Kell, MNSs, Lutheran, P and Duffy antigens was investigated in olive baboon (n = 48), chacma baboon (n = 9), Guinea baboon (n = 14), Rhesus macaque (n = 38) and squirrel monkey (n = 30) by using commercial microtyping cards. Kell, Lutheran, Kidd and Duffy antigens have been detected in all species, Rh in squirrel monkey, MNSs in rhesus macaque and squirrel monkey, and Lewis in baboon and rhesus macaque. There were differences in frequency and haemagglutination scores between species regardless of their gender and age. The main differences were found in squirrel monkey when compared with baboons and macaques. This typing system provides a tool to assess the presence of antigens in animals used for experimental procedures, such as xenotransplantation and xenotransfusion. PMID:23563364

  3. Distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups among blood donors in a tertiary care centre in South India.

    PubMed

    Das, P K; Nair, S C; Harris, V K; Rose, D; Mammen, J J; Bose, Y N; Sudarsanam, A

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups was studied among 150,536 blood donors screened at the Dr John Scudder Memorial Blood Bank, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, over a period of 11 years (April 1988 to March 1999). The most common blood group was found to be group O [58,330 (38.75%)], followed by group B [49,202 (32.69%)], and group A [28,372 (18.85%)]. The least common blood group was AB group [7,930 (5.27%)]. A2 or A2B groups were found in 3.01% and 1.43% of donors, respectively. The prevalence of Rh-D negative group was found in 8,225 (5.47%) donors. Bombay group (H negative non-secretor, genotype hh phenotype Oh) was found in six donors (0.004%). Although the incidence of Rh-D negative group was identical to previously published data from North India, the most common blood group was O group in our study as opposed to B group.

  4. A low diversity, seasonal tropical landscape dominated by conifers and peltasperms: Early Permian Abo Formation, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Chaney, D.S.; Nelson, W.J.; Lucas, S.G.; Looy, C.V.; Quick, K.; Jun, W.

    2007-01-01

    Walchian conifers (Walchia piniformis Sternberg, 1825) and peltasperms similar to Supaia thinnfeldioides White and cf. Supaia anomala White dominate floodplain deposits of a narrow stratigraphic interval of the middle Abo Formation, Lower Permian of central New Mexico. The plant fossils occur in thinly bedded units up to two meters thick, consisting of coarse siltstone to very fine sandstone with clay partings. Bedding is primarily tabular, thin, and bears rare ripple marks and trough cross beds. Bedding surfaces display mud cracks, raindrop imprints, horizontal and vertical burrows of invertebrates, and footprints of terrestrial vertebrates. These features indicate intermittent and generally unchannelized stream flow, with repeated exposure to air. Channels appear to have cannibalized one another on a slowly subsiding coastal plain. Conifers are dominant at three collecting sites and at three others Supaia dominates. Although each of these genera occurs in assemblages dominated by the other, there are no truly co-dominant assemblages. This pattern suggests alternative explanations. Landscapes could have consisted of a small-scale vegetational patchwork dominated almost monospecifically in any one patch, meaning that these plants could have coexisted across the landscape. On the other hand, conifer and supaioid dominance could have been temporally distinct, occurring during different episodes of sedimentation; although in the field there are no noticeable sedimentological differences between conifer-dominated and Supaia-dominated channel deposits, they may represent slightly different climatic regimes. The considerable morphological differences between conifers and Supaia suggest that the floristic patterns are not a taphonomic effect of the loss of a significant part of the original biodiversity. In general, the climate under which this vegetation developed appears to have been relatively warm and arid, based on the geology (pervasive red color [oxidation

  5. Distribution of ABO blood groups in the patients with intracranial aneurysm and association of different risk factors with particular blood type

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Shyamal Chandra; Bollam, Papireddy; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The association between ABO blood groups and intracranial aneurysms is not well-known. Many co-morbid factors are associated with intracranial aneurysms. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of different blood group in patients with intracranial aneurysm and to look for associations between risk factors and these groups. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study includes 1,491 cases who underwent surgical operations for intracranial aneurysms from 1993-2014. We have evaluated the information related to clinical history, ABO blood groups and associated risk factors in the patients both ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by chart review of the cases. Results: In our study, out of 1,491 cases, the most common ABO blood groups were group O (668 cases, 44.80%) and Group A (603 cases, 40.44%), and Rh(+) in 1,319 (88.4%) and Rh(-) in 147 (11.6%). Blood Group A (43% vs. 36%) and Group B (16.2% vs. 8.6%) were significantly higher in Caucasian and African Americans respectively. However, in general population, there was no significant difference in blood groups between Caucasians and African Americans. Rh(-) factor was significantly higher in Caucasians compared to African Americans. Incidence of smoking was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with O group compared to others. In addition, incidence of hypercholesterolemia was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with A group compared to others. Conclusion: The racial disparity in the distribution of blood groups, and risk factor association with blood groups in the development of intracranial aneurysm needs to be considered. The findings from our study may be useful in identifying patients at increased risk. Further study may be required to establish the risks from multiple centers studies around the world. PMID:26396600

  6. The Development of Severe Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia due to Anti-HPA-1a Antibodies Is Correlated to Maternal ABO Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Mette Kjær; Kjeldsen-Kragh, Jens; Olsson, Martin L.; Skogen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Background. Maternal alloantibodies against HPA-1a can cross placenta, opsonize foetal platelets, and induce neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). In a study of 100, 448 pregnant women in Norway during 1995–2004, 10.6% of HPA-1a negative women had detectable anti-HPA-1a antibodies. Design and Methods. A possible correlation between the maternal ABO blood group phenotype, or underlying genotype, and severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn was investigated. Results. We observed that immunized women with blood group O had a lower risk of having a child with severe NAIT than women with group A; 20% with blood group O gave birth to children with severe NAIT, compared to 47% among the blood group A mothers (relative risk 0.43; 95% CI 0.25–0.75). Conclusion. The risk of severe neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HPA-1a antibodies is correlated to maternal ABO types, and this study indicates that the observation is due to genetic properties on the maternal side. PMID:22110529

  7. Liver transplantation with deceased ABO-incompatible donors is life-saving but associated with increased risk of rejection and post-transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Trygve; Dahlgren, Ulrika S; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Grzyb, Krzysztof; Karlsen, Tom H; Boberg, Kirsten M; Rydberg, Lennart; Naper, Christian; Foss, Aksel; Bennet, William

    2015-07-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) liver transplantation (LT) with deceased donor organs is performed occasionally when no ABO-compatible (ABOc) graft is available. From 1996 to 2011, 61 ABOi LTs were performed in Oslo and Gothenburg. Median patient age was 51 years (range 13-75); 33 patients were transplanted on urgent indications, 13 had malignancy-related indications, and eight received ABOi grafts for urgent retransplantations. Median donor age was 55 years (range 10-86). Forty-four patients received standard triple immunosuppression with steroids, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, and forty-four patients received induction with IL-2 antagonist or anti-CD20 antibody. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 0-200). The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient survival (PS) and graft survival (GS) were 85/71%, 79/57%, 75/55%, and 59/51%, respectively, compared to 90/87%, 84/79%, 79/73%, and 65/60% for all other LT recipients in the same period. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year GS for A2 grafts were 81%, 67%, 62%, and 57%, respectively. In conclusion, ABOi LT performed with non-A2 grafts is associated with inferior graft survival and increased risk of rejection, vascular and biliary complications. ABOi LT with A2 grafts is associated with acceptable graft survival and can be used safely in urgent cases.

  8. ABO blood group but not haemostasis genetic polymorphisms significantly influence thrombotic risk: a study of 180 homozygotes for the Factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of additional genetic risk factors on the clinical manifestations of factor (F) V Leiden homozygotes. A retrospective multi-centre cohort study was performed to assess the role of the FII G20210A gene mutation, the protein C (PC) promoter CG haplotype, the combination of two PC polymorphisms (A-1641G, C-1654T), the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism, two thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor polymorphisms (Thr325Ile, Ala147Thr), two plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymorphisms (-675 4G/5G, A-844G), the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and the ABO blood group on the thrombotic phenotype in FV Leiden homozygotes. 127 subjects with venous thrombosis and 53 asymptomatic subjects were analysed. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was more frequent in symptomatic subjects than in asymptomatic ones (68% vs. 45%, P = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.8, after adjustment for potential confounders). For the other polymorphisms, no difference was observed between symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. The non-O blood group was more frequent among symptomatic carriers (84% vs. 57%, P = 0.0002; OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7-9.7). In conclusion, except for the ABO blood group, none of the polymorphisms studied contribute strongly to the thrombotic risk in FV Leiden homozygotes.

  9. The UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme in Blood Group Serology. ABO and D grouping and antibody screening 1982-1983.

    PubMed

    Holburn, A M; Prior, D

    1986-01-01

    In seven surveys of blood grouping the overall rates of major error were 0.12% and 0.37% for uncomplicated ABO and D grouping respectively. Of 17 errors of ABO grouping, 13 were errors of transposition or interpretation and four were apparently technical. Of 52 errors of D grouping, 20 appeared to be errors of transposition or interpretation and 32 were apparently technical. Of the 32 technical errors of D grouping, 31 were D-negative grouped as Du (29) or D-positive (2) and most of these errors were due to misgrouping in the antiglobulin test. Causes of error in D grouping by antiglobulin test include anti-Bg and other contaminating immune antibodies, residual unabsorbed anti-A and the inherently high rate of false positive results obtained in the antiglobulin test. In view of the lack of benefit of Du testing to blood recipients or to pregnant women and of the possible adverse consequences of misgrouping D-negative patients as Du or D-positive, it is recommended that Du testing be abandoned in these groups of patients. The surveys of antibody screening demonstrated lack of standardisation and error rates similar to those previously reported in the UK for compatibility testing.

  10. [Discovery of a novel A2 allel in ABO blood group system and investigation of its distribution in Han population of Chinese Fujian province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Chi, Quan; Ren, Ben-Chun

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of A2 subgroup in Han Population of Chinese Fujian province and its molecular mechanisms. One individual with serologic ABO blood grouping discrepancy was identified with commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and lectin: anti-A, anti-B, anti-AB, anti-A1, and anti-H reagents according to the routine laboratory methods. DNA sequences of exon 6, 7 and intron 6 of ABO gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using genomic DNA and direct DNA sequencing or sequencing after gene cloning. Red cells of 3 176 A or AB unrelated individuals were tested with anti-A1. The results showed that this individual was identified as A2 subgroup by serological technology, sequencing analysis indicated the A2 subgroup with novel A variant allele, the novel A allele being different from the allele A101 by 467C > T and 607G > A missense mutation in exon 7, no A2 subgroup was identified from the 3 176 individuals by using standard serological technology. It is concluded that a novel A allele responsible for A2 subgroup composing of 467C > T and 607G > A has been firstly confirmed, and the A2 subgroup is very rare in Chinese Fujian Han population.

  11. ABO and Rhesus Blood Groups and Risk of Endometriosis in a French Caucasian Population of 633 Patients Living in the Same Geographic Area

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Mélanie; Souza, Carlos; Santulli, Pietro; Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine; de Ziegler, Dominique; Chapron, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The identification of epidemiological factors increasing the risk of endometriosis could shorten the time to diagnosis. Specific blood groups may be more common in patients with endometriosis. Study Design. We designed a cross-sectional study of 633 Caucasian women living in the same geographic area. Study group included 311 patients with histologically proven endometriosis. Control group included 322 patients without endometriosis as checked during surgery. Frequencies of ABO and Rhesus groups in the study and control groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. We observed a higher proportion of Rh-negative women in the study group, as compared to healthy controls. Multivariate analysis showed that Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis (aOR = 1.90; 95% CI: 1.20–2.90). There was no significant difference in ABO group distribution between patients and controls. There was no difference when taking into account either the clinical forms (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, and deep infiltration endometriosis) or the rAFS stages. Conclusion. Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis. Chromosome 1p, which contains the genes coding for the Rhesus, could also harbor endometriosis susceptibility genes. PMID:25243164

  12. [A population-genetics approach to the problem of nonspecific biological resistance of the human body. III. The ABO and rhesus blood group systems of healthy and sick children and their mothers].

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, O L; Botvin'ev, O K; Altukhov, Iu P

    1984-04-01

    ABO and Rhesus blood types have been specified in 2047 diseased newborns, diseased infants and children who died before the age of one, as well as in their mothers. 527 healthy children and their mothers were investigated as a control group. A significant difference in the ABO phenotype frequencies has been revealed between: i) healthy and dead children, ii) mothers of diseased newborns and mothers of healthy children, iii) dead children and their mothers. The significant increase in the incidence of maternal Rhesus-negative phenotype, as compared with the control group, was shown in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children. In the same groups, mothers differ significantly from their children with respect to the frequency of Rhesus phenotypes. The incidence of Rhesus-incompatible mother-child pairs in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children was shown to be two times higher than the respective frequency in the control group and the expected frequency. A certain increase in the frequency of ABO-incompatible pairs was revealed in the groups of diseased newborns and dead children, but the difference, as compared to the control group, did not prove to be statistically significant. A hypothesis was advanced to the effect that the mother-child incompatibility for Rhesus and ABO antigens may result not only in fetal wastage and haemolytic disease of newborns, but also in the decrease of child's resistance to diseases of different origin.

  13. [Connection between the group factors of the blood systems ABO, MNSs, and rhesus and peculiarities of the vaccination process in children immunized against smallpox].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskiĭ, A P; Sokhin, A A; Frolov, V K; Frolov, A K; Lysakova, V I

    1975-12-01

    The ahthors present new data on the character of the vaccine process in children associated with the characteristics of the blood group ABO, MNSs and Rh systems. The greater frequency of occurrence and more manifest reactions were noted in children with blood groups A, B, AB, M and Rho (D) - in comparison with those having blood groups O, Rho (D) +, MN and N. There was a significant prevalence of chromosomal aberrations in the primarily immunized children with blood groups A in comparison with groups O, B and AB. The data obtained pointed to the negative effect of the mimi-rating antigens of the smallpox virus on the immunogenesis in smallpox. Search for methods of releasing the vaccine of these antigens is necessary for reduction of the reactogenic properties and increase of immunogenecity of the smallpox vaccines.

  14. Destruction of IgG anti-A sensitized erythrocytes by mononuclear leucocytes from normal and ABO haemolytic disease affected infants.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, E L; Rossi Devivo, M L; Soyano, A; Linares, J

    1984-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of mononuclear leucocytes (MNL) from cord and healthy adult blood and that from infants with ABO haemolytic disease. The ADCC levels of MNL from both types of newborn blood were found to be higher than that of MNL from adult blood. The extent of ADCC was positively related to the degree of antibody sensitization of the red cells and to the effector cell target cell ratio. The ADCC activity was effected mainly by the adherent cell fraction and could be inhibited by cytochalasin B, hydrocortisone and also by high concentrations (more than 0.5 mg/ml) of non-specific free human IgG. Phagocytosis was also demonstrated to be an important mechanism in the destruction of IgG anti-A coated red cells by the MNL. PMID:6538121

  15. Genetic and Mechanistic Evaluation for the Mixed-Field Agglutination in B3 Blood Type with IVS3+5G>A ABO Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood type B3 is the most common B subtype in the Chinese population with a frequency of 1/900. Although IVS3+5G>A (rs55852701) mutation of B gene has been shown to associate with the development of B3 blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the unique mixed-field agglutination phenotype has not yet been completely addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 16 cases of confirmed B3 individuals and found that IVS3+5G>A attributes to all cases of B3. RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 7 types of aberrant B3 splicing transcripts with most of the transcripts causing early termination and producing non-functional protein during translation. The splicing transcript without exon 3 that was predicted to generate functional B3 glycosyltransferase lacking 19 amino acids at the N-terminal segment constituted only 0.9% of the splicing transcripts. Expression of the B3 cDNA with exon 3 deletion in the K562 erythroleukemia cells revealed that the B3 glycosyltransferase had only 40% of B1 activity in converting H antigen to B antigen. Notably, the typical mixed-field agglutination of B3-RBCs can be mimicked by adding anti-B antibody to the K562-B3 cells. Conclusions/Significance This study thereby demonstrates that both aberrant splicing of B transcripts and the reduced B3 glycosyltransferase activity contribute to weak B expression and the mixed-field agglutination of B3, adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression. PMID:22624005

  16. Role of ABO blood group and of other risk factors on the presence of residual vein obstruction after deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dentali, Francesco; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Turato, Sara; Crestani, Silvia; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Bonfanti, Carlo; Di Minno, Giovanni; Ageno, Walter; Franchini, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    The presence of residual vein obstruction (RVO) has been consistently associated with an increased risk of post-thrombotic syndrome in patients with a previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and there is some evidence suggesting an increased risk of DVT recurrence. Only few studies have assessed potential risk factors for RVO. In this study, we evaluated whether ABO blood group with or without associated thrombophilic abnormalities is associated with RVO after a standard course of anticoagulation for a first DVT. Patients with a first DVT who underwent screening for thrombophilic abnormalities were eligible for this study. Information was collected on ABO blood group and on risk factors for DVT. Each patient underwent compression ultrasonography of the lower limbs for the detection of RVO at least 6months after a standard course of anticoagulant treatment. A total of 268 patients (mean age 50.3years, 120 women) were included. After 8.3±2.9months of anticoagulant treatment, 126 (47.0%) patients had RVO. At multivariate analysis, active malignancy (Odds Ratios [OR] 5.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.17, 14.13), non-O blood group (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.61, 8.56), and femoral involvement (OR 3.35 95% CI 1.94, 5.78) were significantly associated with RVO whereas an unprovoked index event was only marginally significant (OR 1.81 95% CI 0.98, 3.36 p 0.06) and severe thrombophilia was not associated with RVO (OR 1.32 95% CI 0.56, 3.11). After a standard course of anticoagulation for a first DVT, patients with non-O blood group are at increased risk of RVO.

  17. Intragraft expression of recipient-type ABO blood group antigens: long-term follow-up and histological features after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Haga, Hironori; Egawa, Hiroto; Okuno, Tomoko; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kambe, Michiyo; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Manabe, Toshiaki

    2005-05-01

    Several reports have shown detection of recipient-type ABO histo-blood group antigens (r-ABOAg) in the liver allograft, which may represent either true intragraft chimerism or other events such as cell injury. Little is known about factors that affect the timing and extent of r-ABOAg expression in the graft. We examined 65 recipients who underwent ABO nonidentical living donor liver transplantation (61 compatible, 4 incompatible). Ninety-seven postoperative specimens (71 episode biopsies, 16 protocol biopsies, and 10 explanted allografts) were available for evaluation with immunohistochemistry of ABH blood type antigens. The expression of r-ABOAg was assessed in relation to histological and clinical factors. Capillaries in the portal tracts were the primary sites of r-ABOAg expression. The percentage of specimens showing r-ABOAg expression increased with lengthening of the post-transplantation period. Only 1 (4%) of 28 specimens showed endothelium with r-ABOAg within 1 year after the procedure, but 10 (29%) of 35 did between 1 and 5 years after transplantation and 21 (62%) of 34 after more than 5 years. Proportional analysis found that chronic rejection was a significant factor (P = 0.006) for any r-ABOAg expression in the capillaries, and allograft portal fibrosis was a significant predictive factor for extensive r-ABOAg expression (seen in more than one third of the portal tracts) in the capillaries (P = 0.017). Sex mismatch, age of recipients, age of donors, graft/recipient body weight ratio, and histology other than chronic rejection and fibrosis did not correlate with the expression of r-ABOAg. In conclusion, these observations suggest that portal capillaries with r-ABOAg are the results of graft injury and repair, and some of them may be neovessels of recipient origin.

  18. An assessment of the clinical utility of routine antenatal screening of pregnant women at first clinic attendance for haemoglobin genotypes, haematocrit, ABO and Rh blood groups in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu

    2005-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to provide the frequencies of the haemoglobin genotypes, ABO and Rh blood groups and their effects on the haematocrit values among pregnant women in Port Harcourt. One hundred and eighty (180) pregnant women at their first clinic attendance and in their first pregnancy (parity - 0) participated in this study. The overall frequencies obtained for ABO and Rh blood groups were: 26.67% for group A, 18.33% for B, 2.22% for AB and 52.78% for O. Rh D positive was 95.56% while Rh D negative was 4.44%. The frequencies of haemoglobin genotypes were 70.00% for HbAA, 29.44% for HbAS and 0.56% for HbSS. HbAC and SC did not occur in this study population. The mean haematocrit value was 34.64%. This was found to be independent of the ABO and Rh blood groups (P > 0.05). On the other hand, haemoglobin genotypes were found to exert significant effects on the haematocrit values (F = 8.01, P = 0.0005). No significant relationship was found to exist between age and the haematocrit values. (F = 0.91, P > 0.05). Since pregnancy in sickle cell disease is associated with morbidity, proper antenatal monitoring and counselling will be necessary to prevent fatal outcomes.

  19. Contrasting patterns of polymorphisms at the ABO-secretor gene (FUT2) and plasma alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase gene (FUT6) in human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Koda, Y; Tachida, H; Pang, H; Liu, Y; Soejima, M; Ghaderi, A A; Takenaka, O; Kimura, H

    2001-01-01

    The coding sequences ( approximately 1 kb) of FUT2 [ABO-Secretor type alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase] and of FUT6 [plasma alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase] were analyzed for allelic polymorphism by direct sequencing in five populations. The nucleotide diversities of FUT2 estimated from pairwise sequence differences were 0.0045, 0.0042, 0.0042, 0.0009, and 0.0008 in Africans, European-Africans, Iranians, Chinese, and Japanese, respectively. The nucleotide diversities of FUT6 were 0.0024, 0.0016, 0.0015, 0.0017, and 0.0020 in Africans, European-Africans, Iranians, Chinese, and Japanese, respectively. At FUT2, excesses in pairwise sequence differences compared to the number of polymorphic sites as indicated by a significantly positive Tajima's D were observed in European-Africans and in Iranians. The data do not fit expectations of the equilibrium neutral model with an infinite number of sites. On the other hand, Tajima's D's at FUT6 in each of the five populations and at FUT2 in Africans, Chinese, and Japanese were not significantly different from zero. F(ST) between the Asians and the others measured at FUT2 was higher than at FUT6. These results suggest that natural selection was responsible for the generation of the FUT2 polymorphism in European-Africans and in Iranians. PMID:11404338

  20. Missense mutation of FUT1 and deletion of FUT2 are responsible for Indian Bombay phenotype of ABO blood group system.

    PubMed

    Koda, Y; Soejima, M; Johnson, P H; Smart, E; Kimura, H

    1997-09-01

    The Bombay phenotype fails to express the ABH antigens of ABO blood group system on red blood cells and in secretions because of a lack in activities of the H gene (FUT1)- and Secretor gene (FUT2)-encoded alpha (1,2)fucosyltransferases. In this study, we have examined the FUT1 and the FUT2 from three unrelated Indian individuals with the Bombay phenotype. These three individuals were found to be homozygous for a T725G mutation in the coding region of the FUT1, which inactivated the enzyme activity. In addition, we did not detect any hybridized band corresponding to the FUT2 by Southern blot analysis using the catalytic domain of the FUT2 as a probe, indicating that the three individuals were homozygous for a gene deletion in the FUT2. These results suggest that the T725G mutation of FUT1 and the gene deletion of FUT2 are responsible for the classical Indian Bombay phenotype.

  1. The Influence of Clinical and Biological Factors on Transfusion-Associated Non-ABO Antigen Alloimmunization: Responders, Hyper-Responders, and Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Gehrie, Eric A; Tormey, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In the context of transfusion medicine, alloimmunization most often refers to the development of antibodies to non-ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens following pregnancy, transfusion, or transplantation. The development of RBC alloantibodies can have important clinical consequences, particularly in patients who require chronic transfusions. It has been suggested that alloimmunization is more common in some clinical circumstances and patient populations than in others. As such, individuals that develop alloantibodies are frequently referred to as 'responders' in the medical literature. In contrast, individuals that do not develop alloantibodies despite repeated exposures to non-self blood group antigens have been referred to as 'non-responders'. The purpose of this article is to review the phenomenon of RBC alloimmunization in the context of responders and non-responders to: i) establish a basic framework for alloimmunization as reported across several diverse patient populations; ii) more fully explore literature reports which support the concept of responders/non-responders regarding blood group antigen alloimmunization; iii) summarize the mechanisms that have been shown to predispose an individual to alloimmunization to determine how these factors may differentiate 'responders' from 'non-responders'; and iv) briefly discuss some practical approaches to prevent alloimmunization in patients who may be prone to alloantibody development.

  2. [Population genetics and etho-historical considerations of the uniqueness of the Prasun Kafirs and the Kalash (central Hindu Kush) with regard to the ABO blood group system].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, W

    1980-06-01

    An attempt has been made to interpret the quite rare distribution pattern of ABO blood group genes (p > 0.5000, q < 0.1000 and r < 0.5000) among the Prasun Kafirs and the Kalsh of the central Hindu Kush from the point of view of population genetics and ethnohistory. If we consider the different age groups of the Prasun sample it will be observed that there is a marked increase in the frequency of blood group gene A and a corresponding decrease in blood group gene O as we proceed from older to younger age groups. These changes cna be readily explained on the basis of a prenatal selection through mother-child incompatibility. Because of the relatively small starting value of r < 0.5 a selection takes place against O, resulting in an increase of the blood group gene A. The differences in the gene frequencies among the various age groups are so large that apart from mother-child incompatibility other selective factors may have been involved, as for example the smallpox epidemics in the 1930's and in the beginning of the 1940's. Moreover, significant differences in blood group distribution were secured between the upper and lower valley samples which do not accord with the close marital relationships and the relatively long history of the settlement. It must be assumed therefore that particularly the greater frequency of the blood group gene B in the lower portion of the valley is to be attributed to marital relationships with other Kafir tribes or other ethnic groups (Pathans) which have become more frequent since the islamization at the end of the last century. In the case of the Kalash an age and regional differentiation is only possible to a limited extent. Nevertheless it must be assumed that the extremely high A frequency and the lower O and B frequencies are caused by the same genetic and ethnohistorical factors as it is the case with the Prasun Kafirs.

  3. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  4. Objective Evaluation of Motor Skills for Orthopedic Residents Using a Motion Tracking Drill System: Outcomes of an ABOS Approved Surgical Skills Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Pourkand, Ashkan; Salas, Christina; Regalado, Jasmin; Bhakta, Krishan; Tufaro, Rachel; Mercer, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedics is a motor skills-demanding surgical specialty requiring surgical skills training outside of the operating room. Unfortunately, limited quantitative techniques exist to determine the effectiveness of these surgical skills training programs. Using a variety of drill, surgeon, and specimen mounted sensors, we evaluated orthopedic surgery residents during a surgical skills training course approved by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons (ABOS). This evaluation consisted of quantitative measures of various kinematic and kinetic parameters with the goal of relating these to clinically-significant outcomes. Methods Seven experienced surgeons and 22 surgical residents participated in this study, each performing 5 surgical drilling trials, pre- and post-training. Utilizing arm and tool kinematics, applied force, tool and bone vibration, and drill RPM were measured using a combination of force, acceleration, and optical tracking sensors. Post hoc screw pullout testing and resident survey data were also evaluated. Overall, 25 measured parameters were expressed as scalars and their covariance calculated. Results Non-trivial direct correlations whose magnitude exceeded 0.5 were: maximum penetration distance with applied force, drill toggle with drill roll angle, and drill RPM with force. Surgeons applying a high drill RPM also yielded a large force which in turn gave an increase in tendency for over-penetration. As a whole, the differences between experienced and novice surgeons measured in these trials were not statistically significant. However, when looking at specific performance criterion individually (maintaining steady force, minimizing over-penetration, minimizing both the major and minor axis diameters, minimizing toggle and drill vibration), experienced surgeons tended to outperform their novice counterparts. Conclusions Objective assessment of surgical skills using sensor based technologies may help elucidate differences between

  5. Recovery and archiving key Arctic Alaska vegetation map and plot data for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Field Experiment (ABoVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Breen, A. L.; Broderson, D.; Epstein, H. E.; Fisher, W.; Grunblatt, J.; Heinrichs, T.; Raynolds, M. K.; Walker, M. D.; Wirth, L.

    2013-12-01

    Abundant ground-based information will be needed to inform remote-sensing and modeling studies of NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE). A large body of plot and map data collected by the Alaska Geobotany Center (AGC) and collaborators from the Arctic regions of Alaska and the circumpolar Arctic over the past several decades is being archived and made accessible to scientists and the public via the Geographic Information Network of Alaska's (GINA's) 'Catalog' display and portal system. We are building two main types of data archives: Vegetation Plot Archive: For the plot information we use a Turboveg database to construct the Alaska portion of the international Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA) http://www.geobotany.uaf.edu/ava/. High quality plot data and non-digital legacy datasets in danger of being lost have highest priority for entry into the archive. A key aspect of the database is the PanArctic Species List (PASL-1), developed specifically for the AVA to provide a standard of species nomenclature for the entire Arctic biome. A wide variety of reports, documents, and ancillary data are linked to each plot's geographic location. Geoecological Map Archive: This database includes maps and remote sensing products and links to other relevant data associated with the maps, mainly those produced by the Alaska Geobotany Center. Map data include GIS shape files of vegetation, land-cover, soils, landforms and other categorical variables and digital raster data of elevation, multispectral satellite-derived data, and data products and metadata associated with these. The map archive will contain all the information that is currently in the hierarchical Toolik-Arctic Geobotanical Atlas (T-AGA) in Alaska http://www.arcticatlas.org, plus several additions that are in the process of development and will be combined with GINA's already substantial holdings of spatial data from northern Alaska. The Geoecological Atlas Portal uses GINA's Catalog tool to develop a

  6. ABO exon and intron analysis in individuals with the AweakB phenotype reveals a novel O1v-A2 hybrid allele that causes four missense mutations in the A transferase

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Maaf, Bahram; Hellberg, Åsa; Rodrigues, Maria J; Chester, M Alan; Olsson, Martin L

    2003-01-01

    Background Since the cloning in 1990 of cDNA corresponding to mRNA transcribed at the blood-group ABO locus, polymorphisms due to ethnic and/or phenotypic variations have been reported. Some subgroups have been explained at the molecular level, but unresolved samples are frequently encountered in the reference laboratory. Results ABO blood grouping discrepancies were investigated serologically and by ABO genotyping [duplex polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) – restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR – allele-specific-primer (ASP) across intron 6] and DNA sequencing of the ABO gene and its proposed regulatory elements. Blood samples from five individuals living in Portugal, Switzerland, Sweden and the USA were analysed. These individuals were confirmed to be of Black ethnic origin and had the unusual AweakB phenotype but appeared to have the A2B genotype without previously reported mutations associated with weak A or B expression. Sequencing of this A allele (having 467C>T and 1061delC associated with the common A2 [A201] allele) revealed three mutations regularly encountered in the O1v [O02] allele: 106C>T (Val36Phe), 188G>A (Arg63His), 220C>T (Pro74Ser) in exons 3, 4 and 5, respectively. The additional presence of 46G>A (Ala16Thr) was noted, whilst 189C>T that normally accompanies 188G>A in O1v was missing, as were all O1v-related mutations in exons 6 and 7 (261delG, 297A>G, 646T>A, 681G>A, 771C>T and 829G>A). On screening other samples, 46G>A was absent, but two new O alleles were found, a Jordanian O1 and an African O1v allele having 188G>A but lacking 189C>T. Sequencing of introns 2, 3, 4 and 5 in common alleles (A1 [A101], A2, B [B101], O1, O1vand O2 [O03]) revealed 7, 12, 17 and 8 polymorphic positions, respectively, suggesting that alleles could be defined by intronic sequences. These polymorphic sites allowed definition of a breakpoint in intron 5 where the O1v-related sequence was fused with A2 to form the new hybrid. Intron 6 has

  7. Analysis of a Larger SNP Dataset from the HapMap Project Confirmed That the Modern Human A Allele of the ABO Blood Group Genes Is a Descendant of a Recombinant between B and O Alleles.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masaya; Sato, Mitsuharu; Kitano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The human ABO blood group gene consists of three main alleles (A, B, and O) that encode a glycosyltransferase. The A and B alleles differ by two critical amino acids in exon 7, and the major O allele has a single nucleotide deletion (Δ261) in exon 6. Previous evolutionary studies have revealed that the A allele is the most ancient, B allele diverged from the A allele with two critical amino acid substitutions in exon 7, and the major O allele diverged from the A allele with Δ261 in exon 6. However, a recent phylogenetic network analysis study showed that the A allele of humans emerged through a recombination between the B and O alleles. In the previous study, a restricted dataset from only two populations was used. In this study, therefore, we used a large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset from the HapMap Project. The results indicated that the A101-A201-O09 haplogroup was a recombinant lineage between the B and O haplotypes, containing the intact exon 6 from the B allele and the two critical A type sites in exon 7 from the major O allele. Its recombination point was assumed to be located just behind Δ261 in exon 6.

  8. ABO blood groups and susceptibility to brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Behzad; Hajibagheri, Katayon; Afrasiabian, Shahla; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghasembegloo, Saeideh

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between blood groups and some infections such as norovirus, cholera, and malaria has been reported. Despite the importance of brucellosis, there is a lack of data on the relationship between blood groups and brucellosis. Thus, in this study, we examined the relationship between blood groups and brucellosis. In this case-control study, the blood groups of 100 patients with brucellosis and 200 healthy individuals were studied. Exclusion criteria for the control group consisted of a positive Coombs Wright test or a history of brucellosis. The chi-square test was used to compare qualitative variables between the two groups. The variables that met inclusion criteria for the regression model were entered into the logistic regression model. A total of 43% patients were female and 57% male; 27% were urban and 73% rural. Regression analysis showed that the likelihood of brucellosis infection was 6.26 times more in people with blood group AB than in those with blood group O (P<0.001). However, Rh type was not associated with brucellosis infection. Thus, there is a relationship between blood group and brucellosis. People with blood group AB were susceptible to brucellosis, but no difference was observed for brucellosis infection in terms of blood Rh type.

  9. A new approach to the thermodynamic study of ABO antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Rouger, P; Salmon, C

    1979-01-01

    Enthalpy change was determined for natural anti-A (B, O subjects) and anti-B (A1, A2, O subjects). Entropy change, free energy change and association constant were calculated according to the law of mass action and the Wurmser method. The concentrations of allohaemagglutinins were measured by the Wilkie and Becker method using an autoanalyser. 2-Mercaptoethanol was used to estimate the proportions of IgG and IgM and their respective contribution to the thermodynamic properties. The following results and conclusions were obtained. Individual enthalpy and entrophy changes are different for each subject so that only the average values of these thermodynamic parameters represent a characteristic of the phenotype. There is a correlation between enthalpy and entropy changes and the relative proportion of anti-A or anti-B IgG. There is heterogeneity of the values of association constant. Free energy change is about 10 kcal mol-1 for all anti-A and anti-B; this result confirms the low energy binding between antigen and antibody. All these results confirm the role of environment and red-cell phenotype in the synthesis of allohaemagglutinins. PMID:500114

  10. Association of ABO blood groups with Chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh C V M; Nadimpalli, Mahathi; Vardhan, Vishnu R; Gopal, Sai D V R

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) an emerging arboviral infection of public health concern belongs to the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae. Blood group antigens are generally known to act as receptors for various etiological agents. The studies defining the relationship between blood groups and CHIKV is limited and hence it is necessary to study these parameters in detail. In the present study 1500 subjects were enrolled and demographic data (Age, Gender, Blood group, CHIKV infection status, and CHIKV infection confirmation mode) was collected from them. The risk of acquiring CHIKV disease and its association with factors such as blood group, age and gender was analyzed statistically. The data of this study showed a possible association between blood group, age and gender of the study population with CHIKV infection. It is observed that CHIKV infections were higher in individuals with Rh positive blood group when compared to their Rh negative counterparts.CHIKV infections were found to be higher in Rh positive individuals of AB and A blood groups than that of Rh negative counterparts. Results also indicated that infections were higher in adults belonging to the age group > 30 years and also higher in males as compared to females enrolled in this study. These data present further evidence for the association of the blood groups, age and gender to susceptibility to CHIKV infection. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. This is the second study showing the possible association of blood groups with chikungunya.

  11. ABO3 (A = La, Ba, Sr, K; B = Co, Mn, Fe) perovskites for thermochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babiniec, Sean M.; Coker, Eric N.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James E.

    2016-05-01

    The use of perovskite oxides as a medium for thermochemical energy storage (TCES) in concentrating solar power systems is reported. The known reduction/oxidation (redox) active perovskites LaxSr1-xCoyMn1-yO3 (LSCM) and LaxSr1-xCoyFe1-yO3 (LSCF) were chosen as a starting point for such research. Materials of the LSCM and LSCF family were previously synthesized, their structure characterized, and thermodynamics reported for TCES operation. Building on this foundation, the reduction onset temperatures are examined for LSCM and LSCF compositions. The reduction extents and onset temperatures are tied to the crystallographic phase and reaction enthalpies. The effect of doping with Ba and K is discussed, and the potential shortcomings of this subset of materials families for TCES are described. The potential for long-term stability of the most promising material is examined through thermogravimetric cycling, scanning electron microscopy, and dilatometry. The stability over 100 cycles (450-1050 °C) of an LSCM composition is demonstrated.

  12. Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reaction in a Patient with Bombay Phenotype: Implications for ABO Grouping.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Jain, Ashish; Sachdev, Suchet; Marwaha, Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Bombay blood group is a rare phenotype that is characterized serologically by absence of H, A and B antigens on red cell surface and presence of corresponding antibodies in the serum. We report a case of 45-year old patient having Bombay blood group phenotype who experienced an acute reaction due to transfusion of mismatched blood unit.

  13. Preparation, Magnetic Susceptibility, and Specific Heat on Interlanthanide Perovskites {ital AB}O

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kentaro; Tezuka, Keitaro; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2001-02-15

    The interlanthanide perovskites LaHoO{sub 3}, LaErO{sub 3}, LaTmO{sub 3}, LaYbO{sub 3}, LaLuO{sub 3}, CeTmO{sub 3}, CeYbO{sub 3}, CeLuO{sub 3}, PrYbO{sub 3}, and PrLuO{sub 3} were prepared by the coprecipitation method. Their magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out in the temperature range between 1.8 and 300 K, and it was found that LaYbO{sub 3}, CeYbO{sub 3}, and PrYbO{sub 3} had antiferromagnetic ordering with a weak ferromagnetism at 2.7 K. LaErO{sub 3} also showed antiferromagnetic ordering at 2.4 K. Specific heat measurements for LaErO{sub 3} and LaYbO{sub 3} showed the {lambda}-type anomaly at 2.4 and 2.7 K, respectively, which is in good agreement with the susceptibility measurements.

  14. ABO/Rh Blood-Typing Model: A Problem-Solving Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Carol

    2005-01-01

    An ARO/Rh Blood-Typing kit useful for students to visualize blood-typing activities and practice problem-solving skills with transfusion reactions is presented. The model also enables students to identify relationships between A, B, and Rh antigens and antibodies in blood and to understand molecular mechanisms involved in transfusion agglutination…

  15. [Blood-group systems ABO and RH in the Kenyan population].

    PubMed

    Lyko, J; Gaertner, H; Kaviti, J N; Kariithi, M W; Akoto, B

    1992-01-01

    The retrospective study was carried out in 38,898 healthy adult blood donors of both sexes, recruited mainly from Nairobi area in Kenya. The percentage proportions of blood groups were: group 0-47.4, group A-26.2, group B-22.0 and group AB-4.4. In all the samples, there were 96.1% Rh (D) positive blood donors. Among these were 0.75% subjects with Rh (D) variant antigen Du positive. Rh (D) negative was only 3.9% among the blood donors. There is a real preponderance of the blood group 0 over the blood groups A, B and especially AB as well as Rh (D) positive over Rh (D) negative. The authors found following frequencies of genes: p(A)0.168, q(B)0.142, r(0)0.690, D positive 0.804, D negative 0.196 and compare their own results with the data of other investigators concerning other Kenyan and African populations.

  16. Distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups in patients with HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sezik, M; Toyran, H; Yapar, E G

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the relationship between HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome and the maternal blood groups. Five hundred and forty-seven women with severe preeclampsia were included and divided into eight groups according to their blood groups: A Rh-positive (n=203), A Rh-negative (n=38), B Rh-positive (n=83), B Rh-negative (n=10), 0 Rh-positive (n=148), 0 Rh-negative (n=21), AB Rh-positive (n=39), and AB Rh-negative (n=5). The groups were controlled by analysis of variance and found to be homogeneous with respect to parity, gestational age, blood pressure, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet values, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, uric acid, and proteinuria. Incidence of HELLP syndrome was 24% in the overall study population whereas 48% of the patients with the blood group O Rh-negative had HELLP syndrome associated with an increase in risk by a factor of 3.1. To our knowledge this is the first report of such an association.

  17. [ABO determination in blood stains on stain carriers pretreated with usual household products].

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, R; Schilling, K

    1990-01-01

    Linen has been treated with 20 different remedies for clothes (impregnating agents, fabric softeners, detergents, finishes, and stainremovers; see tab. 2) in "normal" and "high" concentration. After short, intentionally incomplete washing and after successive drying 5 microliters and 10 microliters blood each of the six major ABH types have been applied. Stains have been ABH typed by the absorption-inhibition test according to Holzer, the absorption-elution test using stain extracts according to Chisum, and another absorptions-elution test performed in tubes. Only 3 of the 20 remedies had no effect on the results (tab.3). The AI-test showed no false results, but partly reduced absorption and haemolysis of the added red blood cells. Both AE-tests gave false-positive and false-negative results. Compared with the tube test the method described by Chisum was more reliable. The rate of false results depended on the concentration of the remedies used for the treatment of the linen. The majority of the incorrect results (but not all!) could have been recognized by processing controls analogously (see tab. 4 and 5; legend in English under tab. 5). PMID:2278508

  18. Local and distant charge compensation of iron ions in ABO3 ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malovichko, Galina; Petersen, Robert; Grachev, Valentin

    2011-10-01

    The determination of the lattice sites and charge compensators of non-isovalent impurities are vitally important for both fundamental science and tailoring material properties for various applications. Results of our study of Fe^3+ centers in LiNbO3, LiTaO3 and KTaO3 (LN, LT and KT) with the help of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) have shown significant difference in spectroscopic characteristics and, correspondingly, structures of these centers. Two Fe^3+ dominant centers in cubic KT crystals have axial <100> symmetry caused by the presence of local charge compensators (oxygen vacancy for Ta^5+ substitution and interstitial oxygen for K^+ substitution). In Li-deficient congruent LT and LN crystals the Fe^3+ ions substitute only for Li^+. Since no disorder in the nearest surrounding was found, the distant charge compensation by intrinsic defects in cation sublattice is supposed. In stoichiometric samples of LT and LN the iron ions randomly substitute for both Li^+ and Ta^5+ (Nb^5+) having average self-compensation of excess charges.

  19. Cohesion and Semantics. Reports on Text Linguistics. Meddelanden Fran Stiftelsens for Abo Akademi Forskningsinstitut, Nr 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostman, Jan-Ola, Ed.

    This collection of papers on semantics and cohesion is organized into two sections: Meaning and Semantics, and Textual Cohesion. Titles and authors are as follows: "Functional Text Semantics, Idioms, and Variability" (Jan-Ola Ostman); "On the Degree of Motivation in Signs Used in Metaphors Involving Plant Symbolism" (Ralf Norrman); "'Hence'--An…

  20. The hypothesis on function of glycosphingolipids and ABO blood groups revisited.

    PubMed

    Kościelak, Jerzy

    2012-06-01

    Twenty-five years ago the author proposed new ideas of glycoprotein (GPs) and glycosphingolipid (GSLs) functions at the cell membrane. The GPs, apart from their glycan carrying capacity, were assumed to have specific, protein associated, functions. In contrast, GSLs such as those of globo and neolacto/lacto series, were considered to be energetically cheap membrane packing substances, filling in membrane spaces not covered with functional GPs. The terminal carbohydrate structures of the neolacto/lacto GSLs, i.e., sialic acid residues and ABH glycotopes, were postulated to have either regulatory or protective functions, respectively. A special active role was ascribed to terminal β-galactosyl residues of GSLs and GPs. Gangliosides were considered to be functional GSLs. In the present review the author discusses these old ideas in context of the contemporary knowledge and comes to the conclusion that they have not aged.

  1. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 493.859 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency... for Laboratories Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High...

  2. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 493.859 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency... for Laboratories Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High...

  3. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty... testing was suspended during the time frame allotted for testing and reporting proficiency testing...

  4. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty... testing was suspended during the time frame allotted for testing and reporting proficiency testing...

  5. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty... testing was suspended during the time frame allotted for testing and reporting proficiency testing...

  6. Purification of heavy metal loaded wastewater from electroplating industry under synthesis of delafossite (ABO2) by "Lt-delafossite process".

    PubMed

    John, Melanie; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Ullrich, Aladin; Rettenwander, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    In this study we present a new, environmental friendly and economic method, called Lt-delafossite process to treat industrial wastewater (initial Cu(2+)-concentrations of 1-15.6 g/l) by subsequent synthesis of nano-crystalline (doped) delafossite (CuFeO2) solely by precipitation and ageing at temperatures between 50 °C and 90 °C. The reached water purification rates are exclusively ≥99.99% for both wastewater models and wastewaters from electroplating industry. We succeeded to synthesize a mixture of 3R and 2H delafossite at 50 °C after 90 h and ≥70 °C after 16 h of ageing directly from industrial wastewater without any additional phases. In all cases green rust (GR), a Fe(II-III) layered double hydroxysulphate, Cu2O (cuprite) and Fe10O14(OH)2 (ferrihydrite) precipitates first. During ageing of the residues the metastable phases transform to delafossite. The residues are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, VFTB and Mößbauer measurements.

  7. Development of a Laboratory Project to Determine Human ABO Genotypes--Limitations Lead to Further Student Explorations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific PCR analysis was developed to identify six "common" genotypes: AA, AO, BB, BO, OO, and AB. This project included a pre-laboratory exercise that provided active learning experiences and developed critical thinking skills. This laboratory resulted in many successful analyses, which were verified by student knowledge of…

  8. Stability of interlanthanide perovskites ABO3 (A ≡ La-Pr; B ≡ Y, Ho-Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artini, Cristina; Pani, Marcella; Lausi, Andrea; Costa, Giorgio A.

    2016-04-01

    The existence fields of the 11 known interlanthanide perovskites have been assessed as a function of temperature on the basis of experimental and literature data, and studied by means of the bond valence method using the software SPuDS. The role of geometrical factors in driving the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the Gibbs free energy of the phase is discussed, and a criterion is proposed to derive the formability likelihood of interlanthanide perovskites. The reliability of the software SPuDS has been checked by comparing the cell parameters and atomic distances optimized by the program to the ones experimentally obtained by high temperature in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction performed on perovskitic LaErO3, LaTmO3 and LaYbO3.

  9. Purification of heavy metal loaded wastewater from electroplating industry under synthesis of delafossite (ABO2) by "Lt-delafossite process".

    PubMed

    John, Melanie; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Ullrich, Aladin; Rettenwander, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    In this study we present a new, environmental friendly and economic method, called Lt-delafossite process to treat industrial wastewater (initial Cu(2+)-concentrations of 1-15.6 g/l) by subsequent synthesis of nano-crystalline (doped) delafossite (CuFeO2) solely by precipitation and ageing at temperatures between 50 °C and 90 °C. The reached water purification rates are exclusively ≥99.99% for both wastewater models and wastewaters from electroplating industry. We succeeded to synthesize a mixture of 3R and 2H delafossite at 50 °C after 90 h and ≥70 °C after 16 h of ageing directly from industrial wastewater without any additional phases. In all cases green rust (GR), a Fe(II-III) layered double hydroxysulphate, Cu2O (cuprite) and Fe10O14(OH)2 (ferrihydrite) precipitates first. During ageing of the residues the metastable phases transform to delafossite. The residues are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, VFTB and Mößbauer measurements. PMID:27179596

  10. Isolation, composition and reactivity of the neutral glycoproteins from human meconiums with specificities of the ABO and Lewis systems.

    PubMed Central

    Côté, R H; Valet, J P

    1976-01-01

    Blood-group-specific A1, B, AB, H and Lea neutral glycoproteins were isolated from suitable pools of human normal meconiums by a preliminary fractionation with a cationic detergent at pH5 and 9 (borate), followed by ion-exchange and gel chromatography. The ABH materials have sedimentation coefficients of about 10S-11S, whereas the Lea preparation, not strictly homogeneous, shows a coefficient of 7S. From the detailed analytical data collected, the following relations are deduced between these various substances; they all possess a common peptide core; there are stable ratios of N-acetylglucosamine/N-acetylgalactosamine in the B, H and Lea materials and of N-acetylglucosamine/galactose in A, H and Lea materials, from which the numbers of A and B determinants are estimated. In the ABH substances, the ratio of glucosamine to the sum of threonine and serine is stable. Presumably because of genetic factors, the amount of fucose varies among the different glycoproteins, but it is always definitely lower than in the average cyst substances. Various serological tests and precipitin methods were used to measure the potency, purity and integrity of the preparations, including comparisons between A1 and A2 substances from this source. The Leb activity did not appear as high as it is in glycoproteins from adults and a possible interpretation would be the immature Lewis system as observed on erythrocytes; this could explain their very strong inhibiting power towards iso-agglutinins. This family of substances with various specificities has common features with that prepared from ovarian cysts, but differs clearly on some points. PMID:1259715

  11. Selective Dissolution of A-Site Cations in ABO3 Perovskites: A New Path to High-Performance Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Si, Wenzhe; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua

    2015-06-26

    Selective dissolution is a common corrosion process in dealloying in which an alloy is immersed in acid to remove the active element, leaving behind an inert constituent. We introduce this technique into the treatment of oxide catalysts. A three-dimensionally ordered macroporous LaMnO3 perovskite has been prepared and treated with diluted HNO3 to selectively remove La cations, acquiring a novel γ-MnO2-like material. LaMnO3 is not a satisfactory catalyst on CO oxidation. Upon the removal of La cations, the obtained sample showed a significantly higher CO oxidation catalytic activity (T50=89 °C) than the initial precursor LaMnO3 (T50=237 °C) and ordinary γ-MnO2 (T50=148 °C). A large surface area, a high degree of mesoporosity, excellent low-temperature reducibility, and especially improved surface oxygen species are deduced to be responsible for CO oxidation at lower temperatures.

  12. Selective Dissolution of A-Site Cations in ABO3 Perovskites: A New Path to High-Performance Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Si, Wenzhe; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua

    2015-06-26

    Selective dissolution is a common corrosion process in dealloying in which an alloy is immersed in acid to remove the active element, leaving behind an inert constituent. We introduce this technique into the treatment of oxide catalysts. A three-dimensionally ordered macroporous LaMnO3 perovskite has been prepared and treated with diluted HNO3 to selectively remove La cations, acquiring a novel γ-MnO2-like material. LaMnO3 is not a satisfactory catalyst on CO oxidation. Upon the removal of La cations, the obtained sample showed a significantly higher CO oxidation catalytic activity (T50=89 °C) than the initial precursor LaMnO3 (T50=237 °C) and ordinary γ-MnO2 (T50=148 °C). A large surface area, a high degree of mesoporosity, excellent low-temperature reducibility, and especially improved surface oxygen species are deduced to be responsible for CO oxidation at lower temperatures. PMID:25967677

  13. Blood Typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: Blood Group; Rh Factor Formal name: ABO Group and Rh Type Related ... mother's and baby's ABO blood groups, not the Rh factor. However, ABO grouping cannot be used to predict ...

  14. Proceedings from the Nordic Conference for English Studies (2nd, Hanasaari/Hanaholmen, Finland, May 19-21, 1983). Meddelanden fran Stiftelsens for Abo Academi Forskningsinstitut Nr. 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringbom, Hakan, Ed.; Rissanen, Matti, Ed.

    The 50 papers on English language and literature included in this compilation are grouped under the following headings: Old English (editing "Judgment Day," the syntactic types "every man" and "each of men," and continuity and variation in psalm glosses); Present-Day English (speech rate and vowel quantity as compared with Finnish): neutralization…

  15. A systematic study of ideal and double layer reconstructions of ABO3(001) surfaces (A = Sr, Ba; B = Ti, Zr) from first principles.

    PubMed

    Iles, N; Finocchi, F; Khodja, K Driss

    2010-08-01

    We conducted a comparative study of various reconstructions for the (001) surfaces of SrTiO(3), BaTiO(3), SrZrO(3) and BaZrO(3) perovskites through calculations within the density functional theory. The atomic structure, the thermodynamic stability and the charge distribution of ideal AO or BO(2) terminations, as well as the so-called AO or BO(2) double layer reconstructions were analysed, and it was found that of all the BO(2) double layer reconstructions the most stable are the (2 × 2) and the (√2 × √2) ones. This is mainly due to stress release through the formation of long B-chains. On Ti-based perovskites, these double layer reconstructions were found to be thermodynamically stable, which was not the case for Zr-based perovskites, for which AO terminations dominated most of the stability domain. We also found that the BO(2) double layer reconstructions are accompanied by a substantial charge redistribution, with an almost neutral surface plane. This charge redistribution has important consequences for the reactivity and the behaviour of the electric field close to the surface.

  16. Let-7d miRNA Shows Both Antioncogenic and Oncogenic Functions in Osteosarcoma-Derived 3AB-OS Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Riccardo; Drago-Ferrante, Rosa; Pentimalli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Domenico; Forte, Iris Maria; Carlisi, Daniela; De Blasio, Anna; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Giordano, Antonio; Vento, Renza

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), an aggressive highly invasive and metastatic bone-malignancy, shows therapy resistance and recurrence, two features that likely depend on cancer stem cells (CSCs), which hold both self-renewing and malignant potential. So, effective anticancer therapies against OS should specifically target and destroy CSCs. We previously found that the let-7d microRNA was downregulated in the 3AB-OS-CSCs, derived from the human OS-MG63 cells. Here, we aimed to assess whether let-7d modulation affected tumorigenic and stemness properties of these OS-CSCs. We found that let-7d-overexpression reduced cell proliferation by decreasing CCND2 and E2F2 cell-cycle-activators and increasing p21 and p27 CDK-inhibitors. Let-7d also decreased sarcosphere-and-colony forming ability, two features associated with self-renewing, and it reduced the expression of stemness genes, including Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, Lin28B, and HMGA2. Moreover, let-7d induced mesenchymal-to-epithelial-transition, as shown by both N-Cadherin-E-cadherin-switch and decrease in vimentin. Surprisingly, such switch was accompanied by enhanced migratory/invasive capacities, with a strong increase in MMP9, CXCR4 and VersicanV1. Let-7d- overexpression also reduced cell sensitivity to apoptosis induced by both serum-starvation and various chemotherapy drugs, concomitant with decrease in caspase-3 and increase in BCL2 expression. Our data suggest that let-7d in 3AB-OS-CSCs could induce plastic-transitions from CSCs-to-non-CSCs and vice-versa. To our knowledge this is the first study to comprehensively examine the expression and functions of let-7d in OS-CSCs. By showing that let-7d has both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions in this context, our findings suggest that, before prospecting new therapeutic strategies based on let-7d modulation, it is urgent to better define its multiple functions. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1832-1841, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Let-7d miRNA Shows Both Antioncogenic and Oncogenic Functions in Osteosarcoma-Derived 3AB-OS Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Riccardo; Drago-Ferrante, Rosa; Pentimalli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Domenico; Forte, Iris Maria; Carlisi, Daniela; De Blasio, Anna; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Giordano, Antonio; Vento, Renza

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), an aggressive highly invasive and metastatic bone-malignancy, shows therapy resistance and recurrence, two features that likely depend on cancer stem cells (CSCs), which hold both self-renewing and malignant potential. So, effective anticancer therapies against OS should specifically target and destroy CSCs. We previously found that the let-7d microRNA was downregulated in the 3AB-OS-CSCs, derived from the human OS-MG63 cells. Here, we aimed to assess whether let-7d modulation affected tumorigenic and stemness properties of these OS-CSCs. We found that let-7d-overexpression reduced cell proliferation by decreasing CCND2 and E2F2 cell-cycle-activators and increasing p21 and p27 CDK-inhibitors. Let-7d also decreased sarcosphere-and-colony forming ability, two features associated with self-renewing, and it reduced the expression of stemness genes, including Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, Lin28B, and HMGA2. Moreover, let-7d induced mesenchymal-to-epithelial-transition, as shown by both N-Cadherin-E-cadherin-switch and decrease in vimentin. Surprisingly, such switch was accompanied by enhanced migratory/invasive capacities, with a strong increase in MMP9, CXCR4 and VersicanV1. Let-7d- overexpression also reduced cell sensitivity to apoptosis induced by both serum-starvation and various chemotherapy drugs, concomitant with decrease in caspase-3 and increase in BCL2 expression. Our data suggest that let-7d in 3AB-OS-CSCs could induce plastic-transitions from CSCs-to-non-CSCs and vice-versa. To our knowledge this is the first study to comprehensively examine the expression and functions of let-7d in OS-CSCs. By showing that let-7d has both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions in this context, our findings suggest that, before prospecting new therapeutic strategies based on let-7d modulation, it is urgent to better define its multiple functions. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1832-1841, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26679758

  18. Toxoplasmosis-Associated Difference in Intelligence and Personality in Men Depends on Their Rhesus Blood Group but Not ABO Blood Group

    PubMed Central

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Preiss, Marek; Klose, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Background The parasite Toxoplasma gondii influences the behaviour of infected animals and probably also personality of infected humans. Subjects with a Rhesus-positive blood group are protected against certain behavioural effects associated with Toxoplasma infection, including the deterioration of reaction times and personality factor shift. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we searched for differences in the toxoplasmosis-associated effects between RhD-positive and RhD-negative subjects by testing 502 soldiers with two personality tests and two intelligence tests. The infected subjects expressed lower levels of all potentially pathognomic factors measured with the N-70 questionnaire and in neurasthenia measured with NEO-PI-R. The RhD-positive, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed lower while RhD-negative, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed higher intelligence than their Toxoplasma-free peers. The observed Toxoplasma-associated differences were always larger in RhD-negative than in RhD-positive subjects. Conclusions RhD phenotype plays an important role in the strength and direction of association between latent toxoplasmosis and not only psychomotor performance, but also personality and intelligence. PMID:23593448

  19. The effectiveness of the Invisalign appliance in extraction cases using the the ABO model grading system: a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weihong; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess treatment outcomes of the Invisalign and compare results with braces. Methods: One hundred and fifty-two adult orthodontic patients, referred to two Orthodontic Specialist Clinics, were randomized to receive either invisalign or brace treatment. All patients were evaluated by using methods from the American Board of Orthodontics Phase III examination. The discrepancy index was used to analyze pretreatment records to control for initial severity of malocclusion. The objective grading system was used to systematically grade posttreatment records. The Wilcoxon 2-sample tests were used to evaluate treatment outcome of Invisalign and braces. Results: The total mean scores of the objective grading system categories were improved after treatment in both groups. The improvements were not statistically significant in scores for alignment, marginal ridges, occlusal relations, over jet, inter-proximal contacts, and root angulation. Invisalign scores were consistently lower than braces scores for buccolingual inclination and occlusal contacts. Conclusions: The overall improvement in OGS scores indicate that both Invisalign and fixed appliances were successful in treating Class I adult extraction cases in this sample. PMID:26221410

  20. Exporting analogue behavioral observation from research to clinical practice: useful or cost-defective?

    PubMed

    Mash, E J; Foster, S L

    2001-03-01

    The special section on analogue behavioral observation (ABO) provided an in-depth review of various ABO assessment procedures. Despite their availability, however, these procedures are rarely used in clinical practice. This may result in part from the traditions on which most ABO assessments are based, from distinctions between clinical and research assessment environments, and from the need for more information about the cost-effectiveness of ABO strategies for meeting specific needs of clinicians in applied settings. Suggestions for bridging the research-clinical gap involve investigating more thoroughly when ABO does and does not provide useful information for various purposes in applied settings and increasing accessibility and cost-effectiveness of ABO procedures for practitioners. PMID:11281042

  1. The American Board of Ophthalmology Tie.

    PubMed

    Wand, Martin

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the efforts of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) to recognize and celebrate the contributions of its volunteers to certification programs and processes. In recognition of service to the ABO, all directors and examiners received ties for men and scarves for women bearing the ABO logo and colors. This article briefly describes the rationale and the importance of these articles for those who receive them. PMID:27550002

  2. The History, Role, and Value of Public Directors on Certifying Boards: The American Board of Ophthalmology Experience.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Suzanne T; Nora, Lois M; McEntee, Christine W; Fitzgerald, Matthew E; Nugent, Samantha Guastella

    2016-09-01

    The mission of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) is to serve the public by improving the quality of ophthalmic practice through a continuing certification process that fosters excellence and encourages continual learning. Since 2001, achieving this mission has been enhanced by including public directors in the ABO governance. We review the evolution of including nonprofessional members on the governing boards of professional regulatory and self-regulatory organizations generally, provide history about the incorporation of non-professional public directors into the governance structure of the American Board of Medical Specialties and the ABO, and offer insights about the perceived impact of public directors on the ABO. PMID:27550003

  3. Effects of a Psychosocial Couple-Based Prevention Program on Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Roettger, Michael E.; Jones, Damon E.; Paul, Ian M.; Kan, Marni L.

    2015-01-01

    Although maternal stress and depression have been linked to adverse birth outcomes (ABOs), few studies have investigated preventive interventions targeting maternal mental health as a means of reducing ABOs. This randomized controlled study examines the impact of Family Foundations (FF)—a transition to parenthood program for couples focused on promoting coparenting quality, with previously documented impact on maternal stress and depression—on ABOs. We also examine whether intervention buffers birth outcomes from the negative effect of elevated salivary cortisol levels. We use intent-to-treat analyses to assess the main effects of the FF intervention on ABOs (prematurity, birth weight, pregnancy complications, Cesarean section, and days in hospital for mothers and infants) among 148 expectant mothers. We also test the interaction of cortisol with intervention condition status in predicting ABOs. FF participation was associated with reduced risk of C-section (OR .357, p < 0.05, 95 % CI 0.149, 0.862), but did not have main effects on other ABOs. FF significantly buffered (p < 0.05) the negative impact of maternal cortisol on birth weight, gestational age, and days in hospital for infants; that is, among women with relatively higher levels of prenatal cortisol, the intervention reduced ABOs. These results demonstrate that a psycho-educational program for couples reduces incidence of ABOs among higher risk women. Future work should test whether reduced maternal stress and depression mediate these intervention effects. PMID:24969352

  4. History of the American Board of Ophthalmology Oral Examination.

    PubMed

    Hamming, Nancy A; Kline, Lanning B; Keltner, John C; Orcutt, James C; Farber, Martha J

    2016-09-01

    The oral examination has been an integral part of certification by the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) since its founding in 1916. An overview is provided regarding the history, evolution, and application of new technology for the oral examination. This part of the certifying process allows the ABO to assess candidates for a variety of competencies, including communication skills and professionalism. PMID:27549997

  5. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Blepharospasm and Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Frei, Karen; Nahab, Fatta; Tagliati, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim was to elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of abobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. To date, most literature reviews for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm have examined the effectiveness of all botulinum neurotoxin type A products as a class. However, differences in dosing units and recommended schemes provide a clear rationale for reviewing each product separately. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and other comparative clinical studies of ABO in the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm published in English between January 1991 and March 2015. Medical literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE) were searched. A total of five primary publications that evaluated ABO for the management of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were identified and summarized. Results Data included 374 subjects with blepharospasm and 172 subjects with hemifacial spasm treated with ABO. Total ABO doses ranged between 80 and 340 U for blepharospasm and 25 and 85 U for hemifacial spasm, depending on the severity of the clinical condition. All studies showed statistically significant benefits for the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies. Adverse events considered to be associated with ABO treatment included: ptosis, tearing, blurred vision, double vision, dry eyes, and facial weakness. Discussion These data from 5 randomized clinical studies represents the available evidence base of ABO in blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Future studies in this area will add to this evidence base. PMID:26566457

  6. The role of hydrogen bonding in the phase behaviour of supramolecular liquid crystal dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Felipe, Alfonso; Imrie, Corrie T.

    2015-11-01

    The phase behaviour of equimolar mixtures of 4-octyloxybenzoic acid, OOBA, and either 1-(4-butylazobenzene-4‧-oxy)-6-(4-oxypyridine)pentane, BuABO5OPyr, or 1-(4-butylazobenzene-4‧-oxy)-6-(4-oxypyridine)hexane, BuABO6OPyr, is reported. OOBA exhibits enantiotropic smectic C and nematic phases, whereas BuABO5OPyr and BuABO6OPyr are not liquid crystalline. Both the OOBA/BuABO5OPyr and OOBA/BuABO6OPyr equimolar mixtures show an enantiotropic smectic A phase identified using X-ray diffraction and polarised light microscopy. The liquid crystallinty of the mixtures is attributed, in part, to the formation of a 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex between OOBA and either BuABO5OPyr or BuABO6OPyr. Differences in the transitional properties of the mixtures are accounted for in terms of the average shapes of these 1:1 complexes. Temperature dependent FTIR spectroscopy shows, however, that the formation of the complex is not quantitative in the mixtures but instead a complex mixture exists over the complete temperature range studied, involving the 1:1 complex, both cyclic and open acid dimers, free acid and hence, free BuABOnOPyr molecules.

  7. Effects of a psychosocial couple-based prevention program on adverse birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark E; Roettger, Michael E; Jones, Damon E; Paul, Ian M; Kan, Marni L

    2015-01-01

    Although maternal stress and depression have been linked to adverse birth outcomes (ABOs), few studies have investigated preventive interventions targeting maternal mental health as a means of reducing ABOs. This randomized controlled study examines the impact of Family Foundations (FF)-a transition to parenthood program for couples focused on promoting coparenting quality, with previously documented impact on maternal stress and depression-on ABOs. We also examine whether intervention buffers birth outcomes from the negative effect of elevated salivary cortisol levels. We use intent-to-treat analyses to assess the main effects of the FF intervention on ABOs (prematurity, birth weight, pregnancy complications, Cesarean section, and days in hospital for mothers and infants) among 148 expectant mothers. We also test the interaction of cortisol with intervention condition status in predicting ABOs. FF participation was associated with reduced risk of C-section (OR .357, p < 0.05, 95 % CI 0.149, 0.862), but did not have main effects on other ABOs. FF significantly buffered (p < 0.05) the negative impact of maternal cortisol on birth weight, gestational age, and days in hospital for infants; that is, among women with relatively higher levels of prenatal cortisol, the intervention reduced ABOs. These results demonstrate that a psycho-educational program for couples reduces incidence of ABOs among higher risk women. Future work should test whether reduced maternal stress and depression mediate these intervention effects.

  8. Abomasal or ruminal administration of flax oil and hulls on milk production, digestibility, and milk fatty acid profile of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kazama, R; Côrtes, C; da Silva-Kazama, D; Gagnon, N; Benchaar, C; Zeoula, L M; Santos, G T D; Petit, H V

    2010-10-01

    Four ruminally fistulated primiparous lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of the site of administration (rumen or abomasum) of flax oil and flax hulls on diet digestibility and milk fatty acid profile of dairy cows. The treatments were 1) oil and hulls administered in the rumen and abomasal infusion of water (RUM/RUM), 2) oil and hulls infused in the abomasum (ABO/ABO), 3) oil administered in the rumen and hulls infused in the abomasum (RUM/ABO), and 4) oil infused in the abomasum and hulls placed in the rumen (ABO/RUM). Cows on the ABO/ABO and RUM/RUM treatments had the highest and lowest amounts of basal dry matter eaten, respectively. Higher dry matter digestibility was obtained when flax oil bypassed the rumen (ABO/ABO and ABO/RUM) compared with when flax oil was administered directly in the rumen (RUM/ABO and RUM/RUM). Apparent digestibility of ether extract was higher when flax hulls were administered in the rumen (RUM/RUM and ABO/RUM) compared with when flax hulls were infused in the abomasum (ABO/ABO and RUM/ABO). The lowest digestibility of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber was obtained when both flax products were added in the rumen, which may be attributed to the high amount of oil present in the rumen (7.8% of total dry matter input). The lowest yield of 4% fat-corrected milk was obtained for cows on the RUM/RUM treatment, probably as a result of lower dry matter intake and digestibility of fiber. Milk concentrations of protein, fat, total solids, and lactose were similar among treatments. Administration of oil and hulls in the rumen resulted in the highest concentrations of intermediate products of biohydrogenation and total trans fatty acids in milk fat compared with the other treatments. All ratios of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids in milk fat were lower than the 4 to 1 ratio recommended to improve human health. These results suggest that the presence of both flax oil and flax hulls in

  9. A genome-wide association study of venous thromboembolism identifies risk variants in chromosomes 1q24.2 and 9q

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Petterson, Tanya M.; de Andrade, Mariza

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease-susceptibility genes. Patients/Methods We performed in silico genome wide association (GWAS) analyses using genotype data imputed to ~2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from adults with objectively-diagnosed VTE (n=1503), and controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n=1459; discovery population). SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance were replicated in a separate population (VTE cases, n=1407; controls, n=1418). Genes associated with VTE were resequenced. Results Seven SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10-8); four on chromosome 1q24.2 (F5 rs6025 [Factor V Leiden], BLZF1 rs7538157, NME7 rs16861990 and SLC19A2 rs2038024) and three on chromosome 9q34.2 (ABO rs2519093 [ABO intron 1], rs495828, rs8176719 [ABO blood type O allele]). The replication study confirmed a significant association of F5, NME7, and ABO with VTE. However, F5 was the main signal on 1q24.2 as only ABO SNPs remained significantly associated with VTE after adjusting for F5 rs6025. This 1q24.2 region was shown to be inherited as a haplotype block. ABO resequencing identified 15 novel single nucleotide variations (SNV) in ABO intron 6 and the ABO 3’ UTR that were strongly associated with VTE (P < 10-4) and belonged to three distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks; none were in LD with ABO rs8176719 or rs2519093. Our sample size provided 80% power to detect odds ratios=2.0 and 1.51 for minor allele frequencies=0.05 and 0.5, respectively (α=1 × 10-8; 1% VTE prevalence). Conclusions Aside from F5 rs6025, ABO rs8176719 and rs2519093, and F2 rs1799963, additional common and high VTE-risk SNPs among whites are unlikely. PMID:22672568

  10. Genetic polymorphisms at three loci in two populations of Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maishnam Rustam; Singh, T Shyamacharan

    2008-06-01

    The Phayengs and Khurkhuls are sections of the Meiteis, the largest community in Manipur, India. Racially they are Mongoloids, and marry mostly among themselves. The present study reveals the frequencies of ABO blood groups as A1 (36.54%), B (28.85%), O (25.96%) and A1B (8.65%) in the Phayengs (n = 124) and A1 (39.84%), B (21.14%), O (22.76%) and A1B (16.26 %) in the Khurkhuls (n = 123). The subtype A2 is completely absent in both. The gene frequencies are ABO*A1 = 0.262, ABO*B = 0.212 and ABO*O = 0.526 for the Phayeng and ABO*A1 = 0.334, ABO*B = 0.206, ABO*O = 0.526 among the Khurkhuls. The Phayengs show a frequency of Rh negatives as 1.92%, the frequency of the RH*d allele being 0.139. The incidence of HB E is 38.46% resulting into the frequency of HB*E = 0.266. This is the highest value so far reported from Manipur State. No Rh(D) negative individuals have been encountered among the Khurkhuls, and the incidence of HB E is 16.26%, the frequency of HB*E being 0.085.

  11. The Higher Frequency of Blood Group B in a Brazilian Population with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Onsten, Tor Gunnar Hugo; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia Maria; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the frequency of and odds for and against HIV infection based on ABO blood type in a large sample of blood donors. Background: Coevolution between pathogens and hosts may explain the ABO system of polymorphisms. HIV-infected cells add ABO(H) blood group antigens to the viral envelope. Naturally occurring antibodies against ABO(H) antigens that are present in normal human sera are able to neutralize ABO-expressing HIV in vitro. Blood donors are ideal for studying blood groups and HIV infection in vivo because all donors are routinely typed and tested. Methods: All blood donors who donated blood between 1994 and 2010 were tested for HIV (ELISA antibody tests and Western blot test or immunofluorescence testing) and were ABO typed (direct and reverse grouping tests). HIV infection based on the ABO blood group was analyzed using the chi-square test and game theory. Results: The total number of examined blood donors during this period was 271,410, of whom 389 were infected with HIV. B-group donors were more infected than non-B donors (p= 0.006). Conclusions: A more restricted antigen recognition capacity of anti-Galα1-3Gal in blood groups AB and B and a weaker antigen-binding capacity of anti-A antibodies may contribute to a higher frequency of HIV infection in blood group B. PMID:24222813

  12. Atomistic theory of hybrid improper ferroelectricity in perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Íñiguez, Jorge; Ren, Wei; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the so-called hybrid improper ferroelectricity (HIF) appearing in A'BO3/A''BO3 perovskite superlattices. By means of straightforward analytical derivations and/or associated graphical analysis, we demonstrate that two previously-proposed elemental interatomic couplings between the O6 octahedral rotations and the displacements of the A-site cations [Bellaiche and Íñiguez, Phys. Rev. B 88, 014104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.014104] naturally reproduce and explain HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices composed of layers that are only one unit cell thick. Further, we show that our approach permits an easy treatment of superlattices of arbitrary stacking direction and layer thickness. In particular, this allows us to predict (i) other previously overlooked types of HIF in (A'BO3)1/(A''BO3)1 superlattices and (ii) original and striking effects, such as the possibility of discretizing the magnitude of the spontaneous polarization in (A'BO3)m/(A''BO3)n systems when varying the m and n layer thicknesses. We further show first-principles results confirming the latter predictions.

  13. Lead-free and lead-based ABO3 perovskite relaxors with mixed-valence A-site and B-site disorder: Comparative neutron scattering structural study of (Na1/2Bi1/2)TiO3 and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenwei; Devreugd, Christopher P.; Phelan, D.; Zhang, Qinhui; Ahart, Muhtar; Li, Jiefang; Luo, Haosu; Boatner, Lynn A.; Viehland, Dwight; Gehring, Peter M.

    2013-11-01

    We report the results of neutron elastic-scattering measurements made between -250 °C and 620 °C on the lead-free relaxor (Na1/2Bi1/2)TiO3 (NBT). Strong, anisotropic, elastic diffuse scattering intensity decorates the (100), (110), (111), (200), (210), and (220) Bragg peaks at room temperature. The wave-vector dependence of this diffuse scattering is compared to that in the lead-based relaxor Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) to determine if any features might be common to relaxors. Prominent ridges in the elastic diffuse scattering intensity contours that extend along ⟨110⟩ are seen that exhibit the same zone dependence as those observed in PMN and other lead-based relaxors. These ridges disappear gradually on heating above the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition temperature TCT = 523 °C, which is also near the temperature at which the dielectric permittivity begins to deviate from Curie-Weiss behavior. We thus identify the ⟨110⟩-oriented ridges as a relaxor-specific property. The diffuse scattering contours also display narrower ridges oriented along ⟨100⟩ that are consistent with the x-ray results of Kreisel [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.68.014113 68, 014113 (2003)]; these vanish near 320 °C, indicating that they have a different physical origin. The ⟨100⟩-oriented ridges are not observed in PMN. We observe no equivalent relaxor-specific elastic diffuse scattering from the homovalent relaxor analogues K0.95Li0.05TiO3 (A-site disordered) and KTa0.95Nb0.05O3 (B-site disordered). This suggests that the ⟨110⟩-oriented diffuse scattering ridges are correlated with the presence of strong random electric fields and invites a reassessment of what defines the relaxor phase. We find that doping NBT with 5.6% BaTiO3, a composition close to the morphotropic phase boundary with enhanced piezoelectric properties, increases the room-temperature correlation length along [11¯0] from 40 to 60 Å while doubling the associated integrated diffuse scattering. Similar behavior was reported by Matsuura [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.74.144107 74, 144107 (2006)] for morphotropic compositions of PMN doped with PbTiO3. Finally, we comment on the recent observation of monoclinicity in NBT at room temperature by placing a strict bound on the strength of the (½½½) superlattice reflection associated with the Cc space group based on the atomic coordinates published in the x-ray study by Aksel [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.3573826 98, 152901 (2011)] for NBT. We show that a skin effect, analogous to that reported in the relaxors PZN-xPT and PMN-xPT, can reconcile our neutron single-crystal data with the x-ray powder data of Aksel [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.3573826 98, 152901 (2011)]. Our finding of a skin effect in a lead-free, A-site disordered, heterovalent relaxor supports the idea that it arises in the presence of strong random electric fields.

  14. Development of a microblood-typing system using assembly-free process based on virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Yonggoo; Lee, Gyoo-Whung; Lim, Geunbae; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2005-02-01

    ABO typing is the first test done on blood that is to be used for transfusion. A person must receive ABO-matched blood, as ABO incompatibility is the major cause of fatal transfusion reactions. Until now, this blood typing has been done manually, and there is therefore a need for an automated typing machine that uses a very small volume of blood. In this paper, we present a new micro blood-typing system with a fully 3-dimentional geometry, which was realized using micro-stereolithography. This system was fabricated with a novel integration process based on a virtual environment and blood typing experiments using this system were successfully performed.

  15. A case of nearly mistaken AB para-Bombay blood group donor transplanted to a group ‘O’ recipient

    PubMed Central

    Townamchai, Natavudh; Watanaboonyongcharoen, Phandee; Chancharoenthana, Wiwat; Avihingsanon, Yingyos

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional ABO mismatch kidney transplantation can cause detrimental hyperacute rejection. We report the first successful ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from an AB para-Bombay donor to O recipient. At the initial evaluation, the donor's ABO type was discordance on the cell typing and serum typing, which typed to be ‘O’ as cell typing and ‘AB’ as serum typing. At the second investigation, it was confirmed that the donor had a unique, rare but not uncommon blood type AB para-Bombay which was incompatible with the recipient's blood group. The kidney transplantation was successfully performed by an ABO incompatible preconditioning, double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) and rituximab. The serum creatinine at 12 months post-transplantation was 1.3 mg/dL. The pathology of the kidney biopsy showed no signs of rejection. PMID:25362187

  16. A case of nearly mistaken AB para-Bombay blood group donor transplanted to a group 'O' recipient.

    PubMed

    Townamchai, Natavudh; Watanaboonyongcharoen, Phandee; Chancharoenthana, Wiwat; Avihingsanon, Yingyos

    2014-10-31

    Unintentional ABO mismatch kidney transplantation can cause detrimental hyperacute rejection. We report the first successful ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from an AB para-Bombay donor to O recipient. At the initial evaluation, the donor's ABO type was discordance on the cell typing and serum typing, which typed to be 'O' as cell typing and 'AB' as serum typing. At the second investigation, it was confirmed that the donor had a unique, rare but not uncommon blood type AB para-Bombay which was incompatible with the recipient's blood group. The kidney transplantation was successfully performed by an ABO incompatible preconditioning, double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) and rituximab. The serum creatinine at 12 months post-transplantation was 1.3 mg/dL. The pathology of the kidney biopsy showed no signs of rejection.

  17. Close Encounter With 'Fired Up' J-2X Engine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a spillway view of the 550-second, full-duration test of the J-2X engine on Feb. 27 at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Data from the test will provide critical information abo...

  18. NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Heavy Rainfall in Hurricane Odile

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM Satellite measured rainfall in Odile on Sept. 15. Odile contained intense thunderstorms around the eye above 12.5 km (about 7.8 miles) high dropping rain at a rate of over 188.4 mm (abo...

  19. 42 CFR 493.857 - Condition: Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty for Laboratories... subspecialties for the purposes of proficiency testing: ABO group and D (Rho) typing; unexpected...

  20. 42 CFR 493.857 - Condition: Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty for Laboratories... subspecialties for the purposes of proficiency testing: ABO group and D (Rho) typing; unexpected...

  1. 42 CFR 493.857 - Condition: Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing by Specialty and Subspecialty for Laboratories... subspecialties for the purposes of proficiency testing: ABO group and D (Rho) typing; unexpected...

  2. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients 2014 Data Report: Intestine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junchao; Wu, Guosheng; Qing, Annie; Everly, Matthew; Cheng, Elaine; Terasaki, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As of September 19, 2014, 2441 cases of intestinal transplantation have been performed in 46 centers (2400 deceased, 41 living). Eight centers did more than 100 transplants. Annual case numbers peaked in 2007 (N = 198) and steadily decreased to 109 cases in 2013. Short gut syndrome (68%) and functional bowel problems (15%) are two major indications for intestinal transplantation. The 3 major types of transplants involving the intestine include: isolated intestine transplant (I); simultaneous intestine, liver, and pancreas transplant (I+L+P); and, combined intestine and liver (I+L) transplant. Graft survival has significantly improved in recent years, mainly due to improved first year graft survival. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year graft survivals were: 74%, 42%,and 26%, respectively (I); 70%, 50%, and 40%, respectively (I+L+P); and 61%, 46%, and 40%, respectively (I+L). The longest graft survivals for I, l+L+P, and l+L were 19 years, 16 years, and 23 years, respectively. Steroids, Thymoglobulin, and rituximab are 3 major induction agents used in recent years. Prograf, steroids, and Cellcept are 3 major maintenance agents. Induction recipients (68% of all patients) had a significantly lower acute rejection rate than nonrecipients before discharge (60% versus 75%, p < 0.001). Most of the patients received 2 (53%) or 3 (25%) maintenance immunosuppressants. Acute rejection episodes were usually treated with one (60%) or two agents (27%). Steroids were most commonly used (50-60%). OKT3 has been replaced with antithymocyte globulin (since 1999) and rituximab (since 2006). During 1990-2000, 94% (N = 445) of patients received ABO identical intestinal transplants, while 6% (N = 29) received ABO compatible transplants. ABO identical transplant recipients had a significantly higher 5-year graft survival rate than ABO compatible recipients (39% versus 21%, p < 0.0001). In recent years (2001- 2012), more patients received ABO compatible (N = 188, 11%) than in the early decade (p < 0

  3. Blood groups and HLA antigens in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Norrgård, O; Cedergren, B; Angquist, K A; Beckman, L

    1984-01-01

    Frequencies of blood groups (ABO, Rh, MNSs, P, Kell, Lewis and Duffy) and HLA antigens were studied in a series of patients from northern Sweden with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The following significant differences from the controls were found: a decreased frequency of the Rh-negative blood group and increased frequencies of the Kell-positive and MN blood groups. Previously reported associations with the ABO and Rh systems were not confirmed.

  4. Excellence in Ophthalmology: Continuous Certification.

    PubMed

    Siatkowski, R Michael

    2016-09-01

    Over the course of a century, American medical specialty boards including the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) have developed significant expertise in assessing physician competence on completion of postgraduate training and, more recently, in defining appropriate criteria for continuous learning and quality improvement in practicing physicians. This article explores why maintaining career-long excellence is an evolving challenge, but one that is at the heart of the ABO's mission to protect the public by improving patient care. PMID:27549998

  5. Amycolatopsis tucumanensis sp. nov., a copper-resistant actinobacterium isolated from polluted sediments.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Alonso-Vega, Pablo; Trujillo, Martha E; Amoroso, María Julia; Abate, Carlos Mauricio

    2010-02-01

    A novel actinomycete strain, ABO(T), isolated from copper-polluted sediments showed remarkable copper resistance as well as high bioaccumulation abilities. Classical taxonomic methods, including chemotaxonomy and molecular techniques, were used to characterize the isolate. Strain ABO(T) developed a honey-yellow substrate mycelium on all ISP media tested. Abundant, white, aerial mycelium was only formed on ISP 2, 5 and 7 and MM agar. Both types of hyphae fragmented into squarish rod-shaped elements. The aerial mycelium displayed spore-like structures with smooth surfaces in long, straight to flexuous chains. The organism has a type-IV cell wall lacking mycolic acids and type-A whole-cell sugar pattern (meso-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose and galactose) in addition to a phospholipid type-II profile. 16S rRNA gene sequence studies indicated that this organism is a member of the family Pseudonocardiaceae and that it forms a monophyletic clade with Amycolatopsis eurytherma NT202(T). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain ABO(T) to A. eurytherma DSM 44348(T) was 39.5 %. It is evident from these genotypic and phenotypic data that strain ABO(T) represents a novel species in the genus Amycolatopsis, for which the name proposed is Amycolatopsis tucumanensis sp. nov. The type strain is ABO(T) (=DSM 45259(T) =LMG 24814(T)). PMID:19651731

  6. Implementation of post treatment critical evaluation improved the quality of orthodontic care in postgraduate orthodontic clinic: A 10 years comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rashmi; Utreja, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal; Jena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of post- treatment critical evaluation on the quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Materials and Methods: Orthodontic treatment outcome of 109 consecutively treated cases was evaluated in Phase-I evaluation. Following Phase-I evaluation, PTCE of each case was made mandatory. After 6-years of implementation of compulsory PTCE for each case, orthodontic treatment outcome of all consecutively treated cases (n = 126) was evaluated (Phase-II). The treatment outcome was evaluated by American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO MGS) and Subjective evaluation (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS). Results: Based on the ABO scores, the cases were divided into three grades, that is, Grade-I, Grade-II, and Grade-III. The mean total ABO score was improved significantly in Phase-II evaluation (P < 0.01). The total number of cases in ABO Grade-II were increased significantly (P < 0.01) whereas cases in ABO Grade-I remained comparable. The VAS score was improved from 5.66 ± 0.77 at Phase-I to 6.02 ± 0.99 at Phase-II evaluation (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The implementation of PTCE significantly improved the quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Clinical Significance: Grading one's own treatment improves the quality of future treatment. PMID:26392728

  7. Neonatal BO Incompatibility Is Associated With a Positive Cord Blood Direct Antiglobulin Test in Infants of Black Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Özgönenel, Bülent; Kukreja, Geetika; O'Malley, Barbara; Bluth, Martin H

    2015-11-01

    ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn occurs almost exclusively in infants of blood group A and B who are born to group O mothers. Positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT) can identify those infants who are at risk of developing the ABO hemolytic disease. Earlier studies have suggested that BO incompatibility is associated with a positive DAT in black infants. In this study we sought to determine whether ABO incompatibility type could be associated with a higher rate of DAT positivity or clinical hemolytic disease. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all ABO-incompatible births over a 2-year period. There were 1537 ABO-incompatible births during the study period. DAT was more commonly positive among BO incompatible (21.5% in BO vs. 14.8% in AO, P=0.001) and black (18.8% in blacks vs. 10.8% in nonblacks, P=0.003) infants. DAT positivity was significantly associated with both severe hyperbilirubinemia (P=0.028) and hemolytic anemia (P<0.001). BO incompatibility was significantly associated with hemolytic anemia, but not severe hyperbilirubinemia, in the infants tested. PMID:26422285

  8. Climbing the Slope of Enlightenment during NASA's Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Duffy, D.; McInerney, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is a new field campaign sponsored by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program and designed to improve understanding of the vulnerability and resilience of Arctic and boreal social-ecological systems to environmental change (http://above.nasa.gov). ABoVE is integrating field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Office (CCEO) to create a high performance science cloud for this field campaign. The ABoVE Science Cloud combines high performance computing with emerging technologies and data management with tools for analyzing and processing geographic information to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage for "big data" with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks. The ABoVE Science Cloud is a collaboration that is accelerating the pace of new Arctic science for researchers participating in the field campaign. Specific examples of the utilization of the ABoVE Science Cloud by several funded projects will be presented.

  9. The active-bridge oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Active-Bridge Oscillator (ABO), a new concept in high-stability oscillator design. The ABO is ab ridge-type oscillator design that is easly to design and overcomes many of the operational and design difficulties associated with standard bridge oscillator designs. The ABO will oscillate with a very stable output amplitude over a wide range of operating conditions without the use of an automatic-level-control (ALC). A standard bridge oscillator design requires an ALC to maintain the desired amplitude of oscillation. for this and other reasons, bridge oscilaltors are not used in mainstream designs. Bridge oscillators are generally relegated to relatively low-volume, high-performance applications. The Colpitts and Pierce designs are the most popular oscillators but are typically less stable than a bridge-type oscillator.

  10. Phase behavior and dynamics of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.; Dabrowski, R.; Dziaduszek, J.; Urban, S.

    2014-02-21

    The synthesis, equation of state, phase diagram, and dielectric relaxation properties are reported for a new liquid crystal, 4{sup ′}-butyl-4-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*), which exhibits a cholesteric phase at ambient temperature. The steepness of the intermolecular potential was characterized from the thermodynamic potential parameter, Γ = 4.3 ± 0.1 and the dynamic scaling exponent, γ = 3.5 ± 0.2. The difference between them is similar to that seen previously for nematic and smectic liquid crystals, with the near equivalence of Γ and γ consistent with the near constancy of the relaxation time of 4ABO5* at the cholesteric to isotropic phase transition (i.e., the clearing line). Thus, chirality does not cause deviations from the general relationship between thermodynamics and dynamics in the ordered phase of liquid crystals. The ionic conductivity of 4ABO5* shows strong coupling to the reorientational dynamics.

  11. Ab initio calculations of SrTiO3, BaTiO3, PbTiO3, CaTiO3, SrZrO3, PbZrO3 and BaZrO3 (001), (011) and (111) surfaces as well as F centers, polarons, KTN solid solutions and Nb impurities therein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglitis, R. I.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the review of recent results of calculations of surface relaxations, energetics, and bonding properties for ABO3 perovskite (001), (011) and (111) surfaces using mostly a hybrid description of exchange and correlation is presented. Both AO and BO2-terminations of the nonpolar (001) surface and A, BO, and O terminations of the polar (011) surface, as well as B and AO3-terminations of the polar (111) surface were considered. On the AO-terminated (001) surface, all upper-layer A atoms relax inwards, while all second layer atoms relax outwards. For the BO2-terminated (001) surface, in most cases, the largest relaxations are on the second-layer metal atoms. For almost all ABO3 perovskites, the surface rumpling is much larger for the AO-terminated than for the BO2-terminated (001) surface, but their surface energies are always quite similar. In contrast, different terminations of the (011) ABO3 surface lead to very different surface energies for the O-terminated, A-terminated, and BO-terminated (011) surface, respectively. A considerable increase in the Ti-O or Zr-O, respectively, chemical bond covalency near the (011) surface as compared both to the bulk and to the (001) surface in ABO3 perovskites were predicted. According to the results of ab initio calculations for Nb doped SrTiO3, Nb is a shallow donor; six nearest O ions are slightly displaced outwards from the Nb ion. The F center in ABO3 perovskites resembles electron defects in the partially-covalent SiO2 crystal rather than usual F centers in ionic crystals like MgO and alkali halides. The results of calculations for several perovskite KNbxTa1-xO3 (KTN) solid solutions, as well as hole and electron polarons in ABO3 perovskites are analyzed.

  12. [Study of molecular mechanism for a blood sample with A3 phenotype].

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Yang, Liang; Mei, Chuanliang; Xu, Deyi; Deng, Gang; He, Yunlei; Liu, Yiyu; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the molecular mechanism for a blood sample with mixed-field hemagglutination upon determination of ABO blood group. METHODS Serological techniques were employed to identify the erythrocyte phenotype. The A and B antigens were detected by flow cytometry. The preliminary genotype of ABO gene was assayed with sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSP). Exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were amplified with PCR and analyzed by direct sequencing. Haplotypes of the ABO gene were analyzed by cloning sequencing as well. RESULTS The serological reaction pattern has supported an O phenotype when all the tubes were centrifuged for the first time. However, a mixed-field hemagglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) with anti-A antibodies was present after the tube was centrifuged five times later. A antigens were detected on the surface of partial red blood cells of the sample by flow cytometry. PCR- SSP results have shown that the preliminary ABO genotype was A/O. Analysis of the fragments of exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene has indicated that heterozygosis lied as follows: 261G/A, 425T/T, 467C/T, 646A/T, 681A/G, 745C/T, 771C/T, 829A/G, conjecturing the genotype to be A307/O02, which was confirmed by haplotype sequence analysis. Compared with A101 allele, A307 allele has two missense mutations, 467C> T and 745C> T, which have resulted in substitutions Pro156Leu and Arg249Trp in the A glycosyltransferase polypeptide chain. CONCLUSION A variant allele (A307) has been identified for the first time in mainland China, which is responsible for the formation of A3 phenotype. PMID:26418996

  13. Microcirculation of gills and accessory respiratory organs from the air-breathing snakehead fish, Channa punctata, C. gachua, and C. marulius.

    PubMed

    Olson, K R; Roy, P K; Ghosh, T K; Munshi, J S

    1994-01-01

    Snakehead fish of the genus Channa have well-developed air-breathing organs (ABO) yet retain their gill arches for respiratory and non-respiratory functions. Alterations in the macrocirculation accompany inclusion of the ABO and appear to enhance gas exchange efficiency (Munshi et al., 1994. Anat. Rec. 238:77-91). In the present study, the microcirculatory anatomy of gill and ABO from two facultative air-breathing Channa, C. punctata and C. gachua, and one obligate air-breather, C. marulius, were examined in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of vascular corrosion replicas and fixed whole-sectioned tissue. The results show that the circulation in the filaments from the first, second, and third gill arches is similar to that found in water-breathing teleosts. Fourth gill arch microcirculation of C. punctata is not different from the other three, whereas in C. marulius, it has been greatly modified into a network of low-resistance vascular shunts, although remnants of an intralamellar filamental microcirculation remain. The vascular shunts are formed from extensions of afferent and efferent lamellar arterioles and the complete, or nearly complete, loss of a lamellar sinus. The vasculature of the ABO has been highly modified in all species into a coiled-spiral capillary network with a constricted aperture guarding a dilated capillary dome at the epithelial surface. Microvilli are found congregated on the aperture endothelium of C. punctata but they are virtually absent from C. marulius endothelium. Less than 15% of the ABO capillary surface appears to face the epithelium and thereby contributes directly to gas exchange. These findings suggest that the microvascular modifications observed in Channa entail more than a simple increase in the contact surface between ABO vessels and air and they may serve other unknown physiological functions.

  14. Upper Limb Neurodynamic Test 1 on Healthy Individuals: Intra- and Intersession Reliability of the Angle between Pain Onset and Submaximal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of nerve trunk mechanosensitivity using the upper limb neurodynamic test 1 (ULNT1) often includes measurement of the angle of occurrence in the range of pain onset (PO) and submaximal pain (SP). A measurement that better fits the idea of mechanosensitivity could be the angle between PO and SP (AbOS). This study investigated the intra- and intersession reliability of AbOS, PO, and SP during the ULNT1. Forty-four healthy volunteers underwent three ULNT1 to the point of PO and SP, twice in the first session and once in the second. AbOS, PO, and SP angles of occurrence reliability were examined using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC 3,1) and Bland-Altman plots. The intra- and intersession ICC values for AbOS were 0.71 (95% CI: 0.47; 0.85) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.60; 0.89), respectively. The intra- and intersession mean difference and 95% limits of agreement (±1.96 SD) in the Bland-Altman plots were 2.3° (−18.3°; 23.1°) and 2.8° (−14.7°; 20.4°), respectively. The intra- and intersession reliability of the AbOS during the ULNT1 in healthy individuals is high and higher than the reliability of PO and SP angles of occurrence. The AbOS could be a preferable variable in the assessment of neural mechanosensitivity. PMID:27746681

  15. Bone marrow processing for transplantation using Cobe Spectra cell separator.

    PubMed

    Veljković, Dobrila; Nonković, Olivera Šerbić; Radonjić, Zorica; Kuzmanović, Miloš; Zečević, Zeljko

    2013-06-01

    Concentration of bone marrow aspirates is an important prerequisite prior to infusion of ABO incompatible allogeneic marrow and prior to cryopreservation and storage of autologous marrow. In this paper we present our experience in processing 15 harvested bone marrow for ABO incompatible allogeneic and autologous bone marrow (BM) transplantation using Cobe Spectra® cell separator. BM processing resulted in the median recovery of 91.5% CD34+ cells, erythrocyte depletion of 91% and volume reduction of 81%. BM processing using cell separator is safe and effective technique providing high rate of erythrocyte depletion and volume reduction, and acceptable recovery of the CD34+ cells.

  16. A Brief History of Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    FARHUD, Dariush D; ZARIF YEGANEH, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of human blood groups, without doubt, has a history as old as man himself. There are at least three hypotheses about the emergence and mutation of human blood groups. Global distribution pattern of blood groups depends on various environmental factors, such as disease, climate, altitude, humidity etc. In this survey, the collection of main blood groups ABO and Rh, along with some minor groups, are presented. Several investigations of blood groups from Iran, particularly a large sampling on 291857 individuals from Iran, including the main blood groups ABO and Rh, as well as minor blood groups such as Duffy, Lutheran, Kell, KP, Kidd, and Xg, have been reviewed. PMID:23514954

  17. Para Bombay phenotype--a case report.

    PubMed

    Mathai, J; Sulochana, P V; Sathyabhama, S

    1997-10-01

    Bombay phenotype is peculiar in that red cells are not agglutinated by antisera A, B or H; while serum contains anti A, B and H. Existence of modifying genes at independent loci with variable expression of ABO genes is postulated. We report here a case of partial suppression where antigens could be detected by elution tests and unlike classical Bombay type, normal amount of appropriate blood group substances were present in saliva. This case of para Bombay phenotype was detected as a result of discrepancy in cell and serum group ng. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse grouping in ABO testing.

  18. Anti-A and anti-B: what are they and where do they come from?

    PubMed

    Branch, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is made from thousands of donors having a variety of blood groups. All of the donors being used for IVIG production, with the exception of group AB donors, have in their plasma antibodies of variable titer commonly known as isohemagglutinins or ABO antibodies. As blood groups O and A are the most commonly found in the world population, most of the plasma used in IVIG production is from donors having these blood groups, with group B and group AB donors being fewer in number. Consequently, all batches of IVIG contain antibodies that are reactive with individuals of group A, group B, and group AB. These antibodies were originally discovered by Dr Karl Landsteiner in the early 1900s and are now known to consist of immunoglobulin (Ig)M, IgG, and IgA classes. As the process for producing IVIG results in almost exclusively IgG, isohemagglutinins contained in IVIG are of this immunoglobulin class. ABO antibodies are highly clinically significant and, because of this, blood bank cross-matching is done to ensure that blood of the correct type is transfused into recipients to avoid a so-called major mismatch or major incompatibility that can cause significant morbidity and often death. Administration of IVIG, which contains ABO antibodies, is often infused into individuals who have the corresponding ABO antigens, commonly called a minor mismatch, and although not as significant as a major mismatch, the isohemagglutinins contained in the IVIG have some risk for a significant transfusion reaction due to the ABO incompatibility. Indeed, currently there is no way to match IVIG to recipients according to blood type, so when IVIG is administered to group A, B, or AB recipients, there is potential for transfusion reactions analogous to a blood transfusion mismatch. For this reason, strict guidelines have been put into place to restrict the titers of the ABO antibodies contained in IVIG. This review will provide background information about the

  19. 42 CFR 493.959 - Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (Rho) typing, and unexpected antibody detection; (3) Those that in addition to paragraph (a)(2) of this... section antibody identification. (b) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for... Test Procedure ABO group (excluding subgroups) D (Rho) typing Unexpected antibody...

  20. 25 CFR 290.5 - Who approves tribal revenue allocation plans?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who approves tribal revenue allocation plans? 290.5... REVENUE ALLOCATION PLANS § 290.5 Who approves tribal revenue allocation plans? The ABO will review and approve tribal revenue allocation plans for compliance with IGRA....

  1. Effects of the Case-Based Instruction Method on the Experience of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiri Farahani, Leila; Heidari, Tooba

    2014-01-01

    This semi-experimental study was conducted with twenty-seven midwifery students who were randomly allocated to either case-based instruction or lecture-based instruction groups. The selected subjects -- foetal intrapartum assessment, foetal antepartum assessment, ABO and Rh blood group system mismatch -- were presented in four ninety-minute…

  2. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... matrix. (g) The package label or package insert shall state the blood group antigens that have been... accompanying antigenic constitution matrix. Cells for ABO Serum Grouping are exempt from this requirement. The package insert or antigen constitution matrix shall list each of the antigens tested with only one...

  3. Pressure as a Probe of the Physics of Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, George A.

    1999-08-09

    Pressure studies have provided new insights into the physics of compositionally-disordered ABO{sub 3} oxide relaxors. Specifically results are presented and discussed on a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxor crossover phenomenon, the continuous evolution of the energetics and dynamics of the relaxation process, and the interplay between pressure and electric field in determining the dielectric response.

  4. Conversion Ratio between Botox®, Dysport®, and Xeomin® in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin has revolutionized the treatment of spasticity and is now administered worldwide. There are currently three leading botulinum neurotoxin type A products available in the Western Hemisphere: onabotulinum toxin-A (ONA) Botox®, abobotulinum toxin-A (ABO), Dysport®, and incobotulinum toxin A (INCO, Xeomin®). Although the efficacies are similar, there is an intense debate regarding the comparability of various preparations. Here we will address the clinical issues of potency and conversion ratios, as well as safety issues such as toxin spread and immunogenicity, to provide guidance for BoNT-A use in clinical practice. INCO was shown to be as effective as ONA with a comparable adverse event profile when a clinical conversion ratio of 1:1 was used. The available clinical and preclinical data suggest that a conversion ratio ABO:ONA of 3:1—or even lower—could be appropriate for treating spasticity, cervical dystonia, and blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. A higher conversion ratio may lead to an overdosing of ABO. While uncommon, distant spread may occur; however, several factors other than the pharmaceutical preparation are thought to affect spread. Finally, whereas the three products have similar efficacy when properly dosed, ABO has a better cost-efficacy profile. PMID:26959061

  5. On the Science of Sustainability Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is widely associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: “… development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs…” Hence, sustainability is abo...

  6. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  7. 76 FR 60866 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease NMNM 113399

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease NMNM 113399... Title IV, Public Law 97-451, the Bureau of Land Management received a petition for reinstatement of oil and gas lease NMNM 113399 from the lessees Three Rivers Acquisition LLC, ABO Petro Corp,...

  8. CO2-caused change in plant species composition rivals the shift in vegetation between mid-grass and tallgrass prairies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric CO2 enrichment usually changes the contributions of plant species to biomass production of grasslands, but the types of species favored and mechanisms by which change is mediated differ among ecosystems. We measured changes in the contributions of C3 perennial forbs and C4 grasses to abo...

  9. Cross reactive cellular immune responses in chickens previously exposed to low pathogenic avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) infection in poultry can result in high morbidity and mortality, and negatively affect international trade. Because most AI vaccines used for poultry are inactivated, our knowledge of immunity against AI is based largely on humoral immune responses. In fact, little is known abo...

  10. A serological and histological study of the Egyptian mummy 'Iset Iri Hetes' from the Ptolemaic period III-I B.C.

    PubMed

    Kłys, M; Opolska-Bogusz, B; Próchnicka, B

    1999-01-25

    Serological and histological examinations of the muscles of the calf of an Egyptian mummy dated between the third and first centuries B.C. were performed. Human protein was identified, the ABO phenotype was determined as type B, and morphological disruption of the cells was observed.

  11. [Karl Landsteiner (1868–1943) and the discovery of blood groups].

    PubMed

    Aymard, J-P

    2012-11-01

    Karl Landsteiner, a Viennese M.D. and pathologist, discovered in the years 1900–1901 the first human blood groups, ABO groups. Furthermore, he made numerous significant contributions to various fields of the biomedical science. In this paper I report on his life and work in Vienna, The Hague and New York.

  12. [Karl Landsteiner discovers the blood groups].

    PubMed

    Lefrère, J-J; Berche, P

    2010-02-01

    The discovery of ABO blood group was a major step in mastering transfusion therapy. Karl Landsteiner (1868-1843) was the author of this discovery. This paper retraces the hard career of this American scientist of Austrian origin, and describes the circumstances that led his research to the discoveries, which were turning points in the history of the immunology.

  13. Incidence of important blood groups in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M

    1975-04-01

    Different blood groups were determined in the Bengalee population. The prominent blood group was B in the ABO system, Rh. D negative was only 2.56% whereas Kell was 0.8%. These results have been compared with the Caucasians, Chinese and the Negroes.

  14. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  15. Association mapping analysis of the response to Macrophomina phaseolina in the Andean Diversity Panel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Andean Diversity Panel was evaluated for response to inoculation with charcoal rot in a field trial in Isabela, Puerto Rico in 2012. The trial was inoculated with backpack sprayers at flowering and a visual evaluation was conducted three weeks later. There was a broad range of response, with abo...

  16. Susceptibility of children to sapovirus infections, Nicaragua, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Bucardo, Filemón; Carlsson, Beatrice; Nordgren, Johan; Larson, Göran; Blandon, Patricia; Vilchez, Samuel; Svensson, Lennart

    2012-11-01

    We describe the genetic diversity of sapovirus (SaV) in children in Nicaragua and investigate the role of host genetic factors and susceptibility to SaV infections. Our results indicate that neither ABO blood group, Lewis phenotype, nor secretor status affects susceptibility to SaV infection in Nicaragua.

  17. Susceptibility of Children to Sapovirus Infections, Nicaragua, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Carlsson, Beatrice; Nordgren, Johan; Larson, Göran; Blandon, Patricia; Vilchez, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We describe the genetic diversity of sapovirus (SaV) in children in Nicaragua and investigate the role of host genetic factors and susceptibility to SaV infections. Our results indicate that neither ABO blood group, Lewis phenotype, nor secretor status affects susceptibility to SaV infection in Nicaragua. PMID:23092588

  18. [The pretransfusion bedside agglutination test is not a "Gold Standard"].

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    2008-11-01

    ABO-incompatible transfusions remain frequent in Europe despite the technological progresses in relation with the potential number of human errors during the control procedures of the transfusion chain. The agglutination bedside-test is only one step of this chain and the amelioration of the security will be achieved by its replacement by an electronical check.

  19. It's just grass, isn't it?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theme of the Calvin Sperling Memorial Lectureship is "biodiversity" specifically with regard to crop germplasm. Could any other theme be nearer to the heart and soul of a plant breeder or geneticist? In 40 years of working on crop germplasm biodiversity, I've (hopefully) learned some lessons abo...

  20. 76 FR 22711 - Announcement of the Re-Approval of the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... accreditation provisions of CLIA on July 31, 1992 (57 FR 33992). Under those provisions, CMS may grant deeming... specialty and subspecialty areas: General Immunology; Histocompatibility; and ABO/Rh typing. We have... for the subspecialty of General Immunology, the specialty of Histocompatibility, and the...

  1. 42 CFR 493.959 - Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Rho) typing, and unexpected antibody detection; (3) Those that in addition to paragraph (a)(2) of this... section antibody identification. (b) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for... Test Procedure ABO group (excluding subgroups) D (Rho) typing Unexpected antibody...

  2. 42 CFR 493.959 - Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Rho) typing, and unexpected antibody detection; (3) Those that in addition to paragraph (a)(2) of this... section antibody identification. (b) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for... Test Procedure ABO group (excluding subgroups) D (Rho) typing Unexpected antibody...

  3. 42 CFR 493.959 - Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (Rho) typing, and unexpected antibody detection; (3) Those that in addition to paragraph (a)(2) of this... section antibody identification. (b) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for... Test Procedure ABO group (excluding subgroups) D (Rho) typing Unexpected antibody...

  4. 42 CFR 493.959 - Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (Rho) typing, and unexpected antibody detection; (3) Those that in addition to paragraph (a)(2) of this... section antibody identification. (b) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for... Test Procedure ABO group (excluding subgroups) D (Rho) typing Unexpected antibody...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1271 - Standard: Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by following the manufacturer's instructions, if provided, and as applicable, 21 CFR 606.151(a) through (e). (2) The laboratory must determine ABO group by concurrently testing unknown red cells with... CFR 606.100(b)(12); 606.160(b)(3)(ii) and (b)(3)(v); 610.40; 640.5(a), (b), (c), and (e); and...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1271 - Standard: Immunohematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by following the manufacturer's instructions, if provided, and as applicable, 21 CFR 606.151(a) through (e). (2) The laboratory must determine ABO group by concurrently testing unknown red cells with... CFR 606.100(b)(12); 606.160(b)(3)(ii) and (b)(3)(v); 610.40; 640.5(a), (b), (c), and (e); and...

  7. Content and Language Integrated Learning: Teachers' and Teacher Educators' Experiences of English Medium Teaching. Publication No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoholm, Kaj, Ed.; Bjorklund, Mikaela, Ed.

    The publication on the integration of content area and second language instruction, focusing on the situation in Finland, consists of nine essays and a bibliography. The essays include: "Education in a Second or Foreign Language. An Overview" (Kaj Sjoholm); "Foreign Language Content Teaching in Teacher Education at Abo Akademi University" (Kaj…

  8. Connecting stakeholders and climate science: A summary of farmer, rancher, and forester climate data needs and climate change attitudes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mission of the USDA Southwest Regional Climate Hub is to provide farmers, ranchers and forest land owners and managers with information and resources to cope with the impacts of climate change. As such, a clear understanding of landowner needs for weather and climate data and their attitudes abo...

  9. Academic Administration: Planning, Budgeting, and Decision Making with Multiple Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang M.; Van Horn, James C.

    A systematic approach to the management of higher education institutions is described. The methodology combines administration by objectives (ABO), a management technique that helps academic administrators structure decisions in a systematic manner, with goal programming (GP), a decision-science tool that is ideally suited to the analysis of…

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND THE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES IN AN UNDERGROUND SCHOOL, A WINDOWLESS SCHOOL AND CONVENTIONAL SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COOPER, JAMES G.; IVEY, CARL H.

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE INTO THE EFFECTS OF AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-FALLOUT SHELTER UPON THE EDUCATIONAL CLIMATE WITHIN THAT SCHOOL AS COMPARED TO THE CLIMATES OF WINDOWLESS OR CONVENTIONAL SCHOOLS. THE ABO SCHOOL IN ARTESIA, NEW MEXICO, WAS BUILT WITHOUT WINDOWS AND ENTIRELY BELOW GROUND EXCEPT FOR THE ENTRY. INITIAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS WERE ABOUT…

  11. A serological and histological study of the Egyptian mummy 'Iset Iri Hetes' from the Ptolemaic period III-I B.C.

    PubMed

    Kłys, M; Opolska-Bogusz, B; Próchnicka, B

    1999-01-25

    Serological and histological examinations of the muscles of the calf of an Egyptian mummy dated between the third and first centuries B.C. were performed. Human protein was identified, the ABO phenotype was determined as type B, and morphological disruption of the cells was observed. PMID:10098261

  12. Effects of Coastal Acidification on the Life Cycle and Fitness of the Mysid Shrimp Americamysis Bahia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most studies of animal responses to CO2-induced ocean acidification focus on isolated individuals or uniformly aged and conditioned cohorts that lack the complexities typical of wild populations. These studies have become the primary data source for meta-analytic predictions abo...

  13. Using Sustainability Metrics and Indicators to Design Sustainable Supply Chains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is widely associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: “… development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs…” Hence, sustainability is abo...

  14. 25 CFR 290.13 - Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... distribute per capita payments? You may make per capita payments only after the ABO approves your tribal... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments? 290.13 Section 290.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  15. 25 CFR 290.13 - Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... distribute per capita payments? You may make per capita payments only after the ABO approves your tribal... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments? 290.13 Section 290.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  16. 25 CFR 290.13 - Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... distribute per capita payments? You may make per capita payments only after the ABO approves your tribal... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments? 290.13 Section 290.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  17. 25 CFR 290.13 - Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... distribute per capita payments? You may make per capita payments only after the ABO approves your tribal... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments? 290.13 Section 290.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  18. 25 CFR 290.13 - Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distribute per capita payments? You may make per capita payments only after the ABO approves your tribal... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what conditions may an Indian tribe distribute per capita payments? 290.13 Section 290.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  19. Heat treatment effect on crystal structure and design of highly sensitive room temperature CO2 gas sensors using anodic Bi2O3 nanoporous formed in a citric acid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahila, M.; Dhanalakshmi, J.; Celina Selvakumari, J.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of annealing temperature on the crystal structure of anodic bismuth trioxide (ABO) layers prepared via anodization in a citric acid-based electrolyte was studied. The samples were annealed in air at temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 600 °C. Characterization of nanoporous ABO layers was carried out through x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV–visible (UV–Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL). Effects of heat treatment on crystallinity, morphology and gas-sensing properties were investigated in detail. The XRD measurements showed that a gradual phase change from beta to gamma occurs with an increase in annealing temperature. The beta to gamma transformation occurred between 500 and 600 °C. The changes in the average crystallite sizes of beta and gamma occurring during heat treatment of the ABO layers are correlated with the mechanism of gamma-phase nucleation. During the growth of the gamma phase, the grain size gets enlarged with a reduction in the total area of grain boundary. The pores’ formation and the pore diameter of both anodized and annealed samples were found to be in the range of 50 to 150 nm. The band gap of the ABO layer crystallines was determined using the diffuse reflectance technique according to the Kubelka–Munk theory. Results showed that the band gap of the ABO layer decreased from 4.09 to 2.42 eV when the particle size decreased from 58 to 24 nm. The CO2 sensing properties of the ABO were investigated at room temperature for 0–100 ppm concentration. The variations in the electrical resistances were measured with the exposure of CO2 as a function of time. The maximum value of the response magnitude of 77% was obtained for 100 ppm of CO2. These experimental results show that the ABO layer of nanoporous is a promising material for CO2 sensors at room temperature.

  20. NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment: A large-scale study of environmental change in Western North America and its implications for ecological systems and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Hayes, D. J.; Griffith, P. C.; Larson, E. K.; Wickland, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change in high northern latitudes is unfolding faster than anywhere else on Earth, resulting in widespread changes in landscape structure and ecosystem function in the Arctic-Boreal Region (ABR). Recognizing its sensitivity, vulnerability and global importance, national- and international-level scientific efforts are now advancing our ability to observe, understand and model the complex, multi-scale processes that drive the ABR's natural and social systems. Long at the edge of our mental map of the world, environmental change in the ABR is increasingly becoming the focus of numerous policy discussions at the highest levels of decision-making. To improve our understanding of environmental change and its impacts in the ABR, the Terrestrial Ecology Program of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning its next major field campaign for Western Canada and Alaska. The field campaign will be based on the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) concept as described in the Revised Executive Summary from the ABoVE Scoping Study Report. The original Scoping Study Report provided the proof-of-concept demonstration of scientific importance and feasibility for this large-scale study. In early 2013, NASA announced the selection of the ABoVE Science Definition Team, which is charged with developing the Concise Experiment Plan for the campaign. Here, we outline the conceptual basis for ABoVE and present the compelling rationale explaining the scientific and societal importance of the study. We present the current status of the planning process, which includes development of the science questions to drive ABoVE research; the study design for the field campaign to address them; and the interagency and international collaborations necessary for implementation. The ABoVE study will focus on 1) developing a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability to climate change in the ABR, and 2) providing the scientific information required to

  1. The Effect of Awareness of American Board of Orthodontics Criteria on Treatment Outcomes in a Postgraduate Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu Nur; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ozdemir, Fulya

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the posttreatment outcomes in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic following a course on American Board of Orthodontics Cast and Radiograph Evaluation (ABO-CRE); to compare the outcomes of postgraduate students who took the course before and after finishing treatment of their cases; and to assess if the need for orthodontic treatment as determined by the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) at the beginning of treatment affected students' final scores. A course on ABO-CRE was given to second- (group A), third- (group B), and fourth- (group C) year postgraduate students at Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2012. Pre- and posttreatment plaster models of 253 cases (group A) were treated by students in 2011-12. An additional 251 (group B, 2012-13) and 341 (group C, 2013-14) cases were evaluated in the first and second years after the course, respectively. The models were graded retrospectively using the ABO-CRE and IOTN. The results showed that the total mean scores on the posttreatment plaster models were significantly higher in the pre-course group than the first- and second-year post-course group (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). The borderline cases (grade 3) received a lower score on the ABO-CRE than the cases with need (grade 4) (p<0.01) and severe need (grade 5) (p<0.01) for orthodontic treatment. Increasing awareness by giving information about the ABO-CRE significantly improved the posttreatment success of these postgraduate students. After the course, treatment outcomes in the following year were better than two years later, suggesting it may be useful to teach the course annually to refresh students' knowledge. PMID:27587576

  2. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    PubMed Central

    Sode, Birgitte F.; Allin, Kristine H.; Dahl, Morten; Gyntelberg, Finn; Nordestgaard, Børge G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction in the general population. Methods: We used data from 2 Danish studies that followed members of the general public from 1977 through 2010. We obtained the genotype of 66 001 white participants for ABO blood type, factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and population attributable risk. Our main outcome measures were venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction. Results: The multivariable adjusted HR for venous thromboembolism was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.5) for non-O blood type (v. O blood type). For the factor V Leiden R506Q mutation, the adjusted HR was 2.2 (95% CI 2.0–2.5) for heterozygous participants and 7.0 (95%CI 4.8–10) for homozygous participants (v. participants without the mutation). For prothrombin G20210A, the adjusted HR was 1.5 (95%CI 1.2–1.9) for heterozygous participants and 11 (95% CI 2.8–44) for homozygous participants (v. participants without the mutation). When we combined ABO blood type and factor V Leiden R506Q or prothrombin G20210A genotype, there was a stepwise increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (trend, p < 0.001). The population attributable risk of venous thromboembolism was 20% for ABO blood type, 10% for factor V Leiden R506Q and 1% for prothrombin G20210A. Multivariable adjusted HRs for myocardial infarction by genotypes did not differ from 1.0. Interpretation: ABO blood type had an additive effect on the risk of venous thromboembolism when combined with factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A mutations; blood type was the most important risk factor for venous thromboembolism in

  3. Analysis of electrostatic stability and ordering in quaternary perovskite solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Clovis; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2016-04-01

    There are three distinct classes of perovskite structured metal oxides, defined by the charge states of the cations: AIBVO3,AIIBIVO3 , and AIIIBIIIO3 . We investigated the stability of cubic quaternary solid solutions A B O3-A'B'O3 using a model of point-charge lattices. The mixing enthalpies were calculated and compared for the three possible types of combinations of the compounds, both for the random alloys and the ground-state-ordered configurations. The mixing enthalpy of the (I,V)O3-(III,III)O3 alloy is always larger than the other alloys. We found that, different from homovalent alloys, for these heterovalent alloys a lattice constant mismatch between the constituent compounds could contribute to stabilize the alloy. At low temperatures, the alloys present a tendency to spontaneous ordering, forming superlattices consisting of alternated layers of AB O 3 and A'B'O3 along the [110 ] direction.

  4. Blood groups of the mantled howler monkey (Alouatta palliata).

    PubMed

    Froehlich, J W; Socha, W W; Wiener, A S; Moor-Jankowski, J; Thorington, R W

    1977-01-01

    Fifty-two howler monkeys were tested for their human-type A-B-O blood groups. All were group B, as shown by the presence of B and H in their saliva, and anti-A in serum. The B-like agglutinogen of their red cells is common to all New World monkey species tested, and is of different origin and significance than their true A-B-O blood group. Differences among the B-like agglutinogens of the red cells of howler monkeys, marmosets, rabbits and humans group B were demonstrated, and limited tests have also been performed to study the biochemical basis of the anti-B reactions. PMID:412971

  5. Remote Sensing of Arctic-Boreal Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems - Recent Progress and Current and Future Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Goetz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA is in the process of starting its next major terrestrial field campaign, the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), with field-based research beginning in 2016 at sites in high northern latitude regions of western North America. In this presentation, we will review the research that is being planned for ABoVE that involves the use of remotely-sensed data, including the development of information products required by end users to assess the societal impacts of environmental change. These plans included taking advantage of recent advances in mapping of key surface and atmospheric characteristics using both airborne and spaceborne remote sensing data. We will also identify current and future challenges for the collection and analysis of additional data needed to assess key ecosystem changes, including the need for use of medium resolution optical and SAR data, and fine resolution optical data.

  6. Study of blood groups and rhesus isoimmunization in antenatal cases.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, D P; Bhutani, B

    1980-06-01

    The present study has been conducted on 1500 pregnant women of Patiala. All the cases were examined for ABO and Rh(D) blood groups; the Rh(D)-negative cases also for evidence of Rh-immunization. The distribution of ABO blood groups reveals 40.20% blood group B, 29.27% blood group O, 22.80% blood group A, and 7.73% blood group AB. Rh(D) blood types reveal 94.40% positive cases and 5.60% negative cases. Incidence of immunization was found to be 1.33% in the total sample and 23.80% in Rh(D)-negative cases. Comparison of these frequencies has been sought with some other studies.

  7. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya--a blood group study in chikungunya affected families.

    PubMed

    Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; Sarojamma, Vemula; Ramakrishna, Vadde

    2009-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antigens, the individuals were kept in four groups - A (108), B (98), AB (20) and O (243). The result obtained was showed all Rh positive blood group individuals are susceptible to chikungunya fever. Among ABO group, the blood group O +ve individuals are more susceptible to chikungunya than other blood groups. No blood group with Rh negative was affected with chikungunya, it indicates Rh -ve more resistance to chikungunya.

  8. Blood-type distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beom Jun; Myeong Lee, Dong; Hun Lee, Sung; Gim, Wan-Suk

    2007-01-01

    We statistically verify the Hardy-Weinberg principle in genetics by investigating the independence of ABO-blood types of married couples. The allelic frequencies derived from the phenotypic frequencies in ethnic groups via the Hardy-Weinberg principle are used to define a genetic distance (called the blood distance in this work) between two groups. The blood distances are compared with the geographic distances, and then used to construct a network of ethnic groups. We also investigate the relationship between the ABO blood types and the human personalities, gauged by the Myers-Briggs-type indicator (MBTI) psychological test. The statistical χ2-test reveals the independence between the blood types and MBTI results with an exception of type B males. A psychological implication is discussed.

  9. Amplification refractory mutation system-PCR is essential for the detection of chimaeras with a minor allele population: a case report.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Park, Hye Ryoen; Park, Tae Sung; Oh, Seung Hwan; Shin, Myung Geun; Shin, Jong Hee; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Park, Jong Tae; Cho, Duck

    2013-05-01

    Blood chimaera is a rare but important issue for immunohaematology laboratories. Several molecular approaches, such as ABO genotyping, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing and DNA short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, have been used to identify chimaerism. Unfortunately, the minor allele population can be overlooked by PCR-based methods, which preferentially amplify the major allele population. A case with AweakB (AwB), demonstrating a mixed-field pattern, was sent to our laboratory for further evaluation. Direct sequencing of ABO exons 6 and 7 revealed a B101/O02 genotype. Analysis of the 12 STR loci and HLA typing did not provide any evidence of chimaerism. However, amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR identified the minor A102 allele in addition to B101/O02. Three alleles of the chimaera were confirmed by cloning and sequencing. Thus, ARMS-PCR is essential, especially in the case of a chimaera with a minor allele population.

  10. Cation Ordering within the Perovskite Block of a Six-layer Ruddlesden-Popper Oxide from Layer-by-layer Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Niu, H. J.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    The (AO)(A BO3)n Ruddlesden-Popper structure is an archetypal complex oxide consisting of two distinct structural units, an (AO) rock salt layer separating an n-octahedra thick perovskite block. Conventional high-temperature oxide synthesis methods cannot access members with n > 3 , butlowtemperaturelayer - by - layerthinfilmmethodsallowthepreparationofmaterialswiththickerperovskiteblocks , exploitinghighsurfacemobilityandlatticematchingwiththesubstrate . Thispresentationdescribesthegrowthofann = 6 memberCaO / (ABO 3)n (ABO 3 : CaMnO 3 , La 0.67 Ca 0.33 MnO 3 orCa 0.85 Sm 0.15 MnO 3) epitaxialsinglecrystalfilmsonthe (001) SrTiO 3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition with the assistance of a reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED).

  11. Lectins as markers of endothelial cells: comparative study between human and animal cells.

    PubMed

    Roussel, F; Dalion, J

    1988-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells were labelled with 10 vegetal lectins and 3 more monoclonal antibodies antiblood group ABO substances, in major organs of 14 common laboratory animals. After fixation in PLPa and paraffin embedding, cells were examined to determine their likeness to human cells. The most interesting reactive used was EEA, whose positivity defines upper mammalians. Blood B substance positivity and CSA negativity defines primates among which man is unique and defined by UEA I positivity and variability in ABO substance. CSA positivity defines non-primate upper mammalians. Rodents and birds were negative with all reactives tested. From the histochemical point of view, the animals closest to humans are monkeys, followed by swine and oxen, then by cat and dog and lastly by sheep. Rodents appear unrelated to humans in this system.

  12. Blood Type Influences Pancreatic Cancer Risk | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    A variation in the gene that determines ABO blood type influences the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) for this highly lethal disease. The genetic variation, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), was discovered in a region of chromosome 9 that harbors the gene that determines blood type, the researchers reported August 2 online in Nature Genetics. |

  13. [Frequency of phenotypes and genes of the polymorphic blood systems in a population as dependent on the age factor].

    PubMed

    Mozalevskiĭ, A F; Iushchenko, G K; Dudina, E A

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of blood groups ABO, Rh, MNS, P, haptoglobin as well as distribution of phenotypic combinations of two different loci are compared in groups of children and adults. The frequency of phenotype O, Rh-negative and P-positive people is revealed to increase in adults, that testifies to the influence of the age factor on the distribution of the human polymorphic blood systems.

  14. Amish burn ointment and burdock leaf dressings: assessments of antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Rieman, Mary T; Neely, Alice N; Boyce, Steven T; Kossenjans, William J; Durkee, Paula J; Zembrodt, Jacquelyn M; Puthoff, Barbara K; Kagan, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Amish burn wound ointment (ABO) contains honey, lanolin, oils, glycerin, bees wax, and other natural additives. Although there are many anecdotal reports that this ointment covered with a burdock leaf (BL) dressing promotes burn wound healing, little scientific testing of this treatment has occurred. The goal of this study was to evaluate in vitro some of the components of this treatment modality for antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The ABO was tested for sterility using standard microbiological techniques. Because of the semisolid, lipid-based nature of the salve, the at-use product could not be tested in bioassays. Samples of BL and the dry ingredients (DI) used in the ointment were provided by the Amish vendor. Aqueous extracts of the DI and of the BL were prepared and freeze dried. The freeze-dried extracts were reconstituted, filtered, and tested separately on keratinocyte and fibroblast cell cultures for cytotoxicity (growth inhibition assay) and against a panel of susceptible and resistant microbes for antimicrobial activity (Nathan's agar-well diffusion assay) in a series of concentrations (% wt/vol). Neither DI nor BL extracts demonstrated antimicrobial activity against any of organisms tested. The DI extract inhibited growth of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts at the 0.1% concentration. The 0.1 and 0.03% concentrations of the BL extract were cytotoxic to both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Although tests for microbial growth from the at-use preparation of the ABO were negative, extracts of the DI and BL did not demonstrate any antimicrobial activity. Additionally, both extracts inhibited the growth of skin cells in vitro at higher concentrations. These results suggest caution in the use of ABO and BL dressings if there is more than a minimal risk of complications from the burn injury. PMID:24043243

  15. [Teaching design and practice of human blood type traits in genetics comprehensive laboratory course].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Hu, Dongmei; Yu, Dade; Dong, Mingliang; Li, Yun; Fan, Yingming; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive laboratory courses, which enable students to aptly apply theoretic knowledge and master experiment skills, play an important role in the present educational reform of laboratory courses. We utilized human ABO blood type as the experimental subject, and designed the experiment--"Molecular Genotyping of Human ABO Blood Type and Analysis of Population Genetic Equilibrium". In the experiment, DNA in mucosal cells is extracted from students' saliva, and each student's genotype is identified using a series of molecular genetics technologies, including PCR amplification of target fragments, enzymatic digestion, and electrophoretic separation. Then, taking the whole class as an analogous Mendel population, a survey of genotype frequency of ABO blood type is conducted, followed with analyses of various population genetic parameters using Popgene. Through the open laboratory course, students can not only master molecular genetic experimental skills, but also improve their understanding of theoretic knowledge through independent design and optimization of molecular techniques. After five years of research and practice, a stable experimental system of molecular genetics has been established to identify six genotypes of ABO blood types, namely I(A)I(A), I(A)i, I(B)I(B), I(B)i, I(A)I(B) and ii. Laboratory courses of molecular and population genetics have been integrated by calculating the frequencies of the six genotypes and three multiple alleles and testing population genetic equilibrium. The goal of the open laboratory course with independent design and implementation by the students has been achieved. This laboratory course has proved effective and received good reviews from the students. It could be applied as a genetics laboratory course for the biology majors directly, and its ideas and methods could be promoted and applied to other biological laboratory courses.

  16. A genetic investigation of Korean mummies from the Joseon Dynasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Park, Myung Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Two Korean mummies (Danwoong-mirra and Yoon-mirra) found in medieval tombs in the central region of the Korean peninsula were genetically investigated by analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) and the ABO gene. Danwoong-mirra is a male child mummy and Yoon-mirra is a pregnant female mummy, dating back about 550 and 450 years, respectively. DNA was extracted from soft tissues or bones. mtDNA, Y-STR and the ABO gene were amplified using a small size amplicon strategy and were analyzed according to the criteria of ancient DNA analysis to ensure that authentic DNA typing results were obtained from these ancient samples. Analysis of mtDNA hypervariable region sequence and coding region single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information revealed that Danwoong-mirra and Yoon-mirra belong to the East Asian mtDNA haplogroups D4 and M7c, respectively. The Y-STRs were analyzed in the male child mummy (Danwoong-mirra) using the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler PCR Amplification Kit and an in-house Y-miniplex plus system, and could be characterized in 4 loci with small amplicon size. The analysis of ABO gene SNPs using multiplex single base extension methods revealed that the ABO blood types of Danwoong-mirra and Yoon-mirra are AO01 and AB, respectively. The small size amplicon strategy and the authentication process in the present study will be effectively applicable to future genetic analyses of various forensic and ancient samples. PMID:20306303

  17. Rapid migration of /sup 111/indium-labeled granulocytes to sites of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.; Schiffer, C.A.; Johnston, G.S.

    1981-03-05

    Results are reported of studies with homologous, ABO-matched, /sup 111/In-labeled granulocytes given to 14 granulocytopenic patients with specific, known sites of infection. In 13 of these patients, radioactivity was noted at the site of infection after only 30 minutes. Subsequent scans at four hours or 24 hours or both were all positive at the same site. This technique provides a method for rapid diagnosis of occult infection in this patient population.

  18. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  19. Antitumor agents. 289. Design, synthesis, and anti-breast cancer activity in vivo of 4-amino-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one and 4-amino-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one analogues with improved water solubility.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yizhou; Nakagawa-Goto, Kyoko; Lai, Chin-Yu; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Bastow, Kenneth F; Kim, Yoon; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-03-23

    Previously, we reported that 4-amino-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one (ABO) and 4-amino-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one (ATBO) analogues, which were developed from the lead natural product neo-tanshinlactone, are potent cytotoxic agents. In order to improve on their water solubility, the diamino analogues and related salts were designed. All synthesized compounds were assayed for cytotoxicity, and selected compounds were evaluated for in vivo anti-mammary epithelial proliferation activity in wild-type mice and mice predisposed for mammary tumors due to Brca1/p53 mutations. The new derivatives 10, 16 (ABO), 22, and 27 (ATBO) were the most active analogues, with IC(50) values of 0.038-0.085 μM in the cytotoxicity assay. Analogue 10 showed around 50-fold improved water solubility compared with the prior lead ABO compound 4-[(4'-methoxyphenyl)amino]-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one (3). Compounds 3, 4, 10, and 22 significantly reduced overall numbers of mammary cells, as indicated by the reduction of mammary gland branching in mutant mice. A one-week treatment with 10 resulted in 80% reduction in BrdU-positive cells in the cancer prone mammary gland. These four compounds had differential effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis in wild-type mouse and a mouse model of human breast cancers. Compound 10 merits further development as a promising anticancer clinical trial candidate.

  20. Autoxidation of methyl linoleate initiated by the ozonide of allylbenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.C.; Cosgrove, J.P.; Giamalva, D.H.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Allylbenzene ozonide (ABO), a model for polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ozonides, initiates the autoxidation of methyl linoleate (18:2 ME) at 37 degrees C under 760 torr of oxygen. This process is inhibited by d-alpha-tocopherol (alpha-T) and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). The autoxidation was followed by the appearance of conjugated diene (CD), as well as by oxygen-uptake. The rates of autoxidation are proportional to the square root of ABO concentration, implying that the usual free radical autoxidation rate law is obeyed. Activation parameters for the thermal decomposition of ABO were determined under N2 in the presence of radical scavengers and found to be Ea = 28.2 +/- 0.3 kcal mol-1 and log A = 13.6 +/- 0.2; kd (37 degrees C) is calculated to be (5.1 +/- 0.3) X 10(-7) sec-1. Autoxidation data are also reported for ozonides of 18:2 ME and methyl oleate (18:1 ME).

  1. Severe immune haemolysis in a group A recipient of a group O red blood cell unit.

    PubMed

    Barjas-Castro, M L; Locatelli, M F; Carvalho, M A; Gilli, S O; Castro, V

    2003-08-01

    Haemolysis caused by passive ABO antibodies is a rare transfusional complication. We report a case of severe haemolytic reaction in a 38-year-old man (blood group A) with lymphoma who had received one red blood cell (RBC) unit group O. After transfusion of 270 mL, the patient experienced fever, dyspnoea, chills and back pain. On the following morning he was icteric and pale. Haptoglobin was inferior to 5.8 mgdL(-1), haemoglobin was not increased and lactate dehydrogenase was elevated. Haemolysis was evident on observation of the patient's post-transfusion samples. The recipient's red cells developed a positive direct antiglobulin test and Lui elution showed anti-A coated the cells. Fresh donor serum had an anti-A titre of 1024, which was not reduced by treating the serum with dithiothreitol. Donor isoagglutinin screening has been determined by microplate automated analyser and showed titre higher than 100. Physicians should be aware of the risk of haemolysis associated with ABO-passive antibodies. There is generally no agreement justifying the isoagglutinin investigation prior to transfusion. However, automated quantitative isoagglutinin determination could be part of the modern donor testing process, mainly in blood banks where identical ABO group units (platelets or phenotyped RBCs) are not available owing to limited supply.

  2. Distinct patterns of autophagy evoked by two benzoxazine derivatives in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Dong, ZhiWu; Huang, Bin; Zhao, BaoXiang; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing

    2010-11-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved, bulk-destruction process in eukaryotes. During this process, the cytoplasm containing long-lived proteins and organelles is engulfed into double-membrane autophagosomes, and ultimately undergoes enzymatic degradation within lysosomes. Autophagy serves as a prosurvival machinery, or it may contribute to cell death. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and intervention of various human diseases. Pharmacological autophagy modulators are arousing interest from biologists and clinical physicians in light of their potential for disease therapy and increasing our understanding of the mechanism of autophagy. In this study, we identified two autophagy enhancers, 6-amino-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzoxazine (ABO) and 6,8-dichloro-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzoxazine (DBO), in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC s) by autophagy assays, and demonstrate that ABO and DBO could stimulate autophagy in an mtor-independent and mtor-dependent manner, respectively; ABO-stimulated autophagy was attributed to the elevation of the Ca2+ channel annexin A7 (ANXA7), whereas DBO's effect was due to the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we found that ANXA7 was essential for autophagy induction via modulating the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HUVEC s. In summary, our work introduced two distinct autophagy enhancers and highlighted the critical role of ANXA7 in endothelial autophagy.

  3. Tracking performance with two breathing oxygen concentrations after high altitude rapid decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Samuel G.; Oakley, Carolyn J.

    1992-01-01

    Current military aircraft Liquid Oxygen (LOX) systems supply 99.5 pct. gaseous Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) to aircrew. Newer Molecular Sieve Oxygen Generation Systems (MSOGS) supply breathing gas concentration of 93 to 95 pct. O2. The margin is compared of hypoxia protection afforded by ABO and MSOGS breathing gas after a 5 psi differential rapid decompression (RD) in a hypobaric research chamber. The barometric pressures equivalent to the altitudes of 46000, 52000, 56000, and 60000 ft were achieved from respective base altitudes in 1 to 1.5 s decompressions. During each exposure, subjects remained at the simulated peak altitude breathing either 100 or 94 pct. O2 with positive pressure for 60 s, followed by a rapid descent to 40000 ft. Subjects used the Tactical Life Support System (TLSS) for high altitude protection. Subcritical tracking task performance on the Performance Evaluation Device (PED) provided psychomotor test measures. Overall tracking task performance results showed no differences between the MSOGS breathing O2 concentration of 94 pct. and ABO. Significance RMS error differences were found between the ground level and base altitude trials compared to peak altitude trials. The high positive breathing pressures occurring at the peak altitudes explained the differences.

  4. The association of some genetic factors with pulmonary tuberculosis in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups.

    PubMed

    Khukhunaishvili, R; Tskvitinidze, S; Nagervadze, M; Akhvlediani, L; Koridze, M

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the major public health problems. Over the last half decade the significant problem is an increased ratio of drug-resistant TB cases. TB is as well the most significant infectious disease in the country of Georgia. Pulmonary tuberculosis is assessed as a complex infectious disease affected by both, environmental and genetic factors. Present study was undertaken to find out the correlation between pulmonary tuberculosis and erythrocyte blood groups antigens determinant alleles (ABO - r, p, q; Rh D+, Rh D- and MN - p, q) in two different, Georgian and Azeri, ethno groups. Immune-serological methods, direct reaction of universal monoclonal antibodies were used. Materials processed by biostatistician methods. The study had shown different correlation of pulmonary tuberculosis to erythrocyte blood groups determinant alleles in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups. In Georgian ethno group pulmonary TB correlates with ABO-r and p, Rh-D,+' and MN-p alleles, whether ABO-q, Rh-D,-' and MN-p in Azeri ethno group. PMID:25020171

  5. RED1 is necessary for phytochrome B-mediated red light-specific signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, D; Hoecker, U; Quail, P H

    1997-01-01

    Seedlings of a transgenic Arabidopsis line (ABO) that overexpresses phytochrome B (phyB) display enhanced deetiolation specifically in red light. To identify genetic loci necessary for phytochrome signal transduction in red light, we chemically mutagenized ABO seeds and screened M2 seedlings for revertants of the enhanced deetiolation response. One recessive, red light-specific extragenic revertant, designated red1, was isolated. The mutant phenotype was expressed in the original ABO background as well as in the nontransgenic Nossen (No-0) progenitor background. red1 is also deficient in several other aspects of red light-induced responses known to be mediated by phyB, such as inhibition of petiole elongation and the shade avoidance response. red1 was mapped to the bottom of chromosome 4 at a position distinct from all known photoreceptor loci. Together with complementation analysis, the data show that red1 is a novel photomorphogenic mutant. The evidence suggests that red1 represents a putative phytochrome signal transduction mutant potentially specific to the phyB pathway. PMID:9165750

  6. [Risk and crisis management by anesthesiologists regarding 'Guidelines for Actions Against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage' published by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists and the Japan Society of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy].

    PubMed

    Irita, Kazuo; Yoshimura, Hayashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiro; Takamatsu, Chihiro; Tokuda, Kentaro

    2008-09-01

    According to a survey of anesthesia-related critical incidents by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists, hemorrhage was the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. To deal with critical hemorrhage swiftly, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also the linkage of operating rooms with transfusion management divisions and the blood center is important. It is desirable for the hospital transfusion committee to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these guidelines by simulated drills. When critical hemorrhage occurs, a person in charge is appointed, and an emergency is declared (call for manpower and notification of the emergency to the transfusion management divisions). A person in charge comprehensively assesses the hemostatic condition, hemodynamics, laboratory data, and blood product supply system, and consults the operator regarding the continuation of surgery or changing surgical procedures. When time is short, the cross-matching test is omitted, and the ABO-identical blood is used. When a supply of the identical ABO-type blood is not available, compatible blood type is used. The evolving concept of hemostatic resuscitation seems to be important to prevent coagulopathy, which easily develops during massive hemorrhage. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the risk of such an emergency transfusion and procedures to be taken to switch to transfusion of the ABO-identical blood. Establishment of a hospital emergency transfusion system depends on the overall capability of the critical and crisis management systems of the hospital. PMID:18807897

  7. [Present status of critical hemorrhage and its management in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Irita, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhage is a major cause of cardiac arrest in the operating room. Many human factors, including surgical procedures, transfusion practices, blood supply, and anesthetic management, are involved in the process that leads to hemorrhage developing into a critical situation. It is desirable for hospital transfusion committees to prepare hospital-based regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these regulations with simulated drills. If intraoperative hemorrhage may become critical, a state of emergency should immediately be declared to the operating room staff, the blood transfusion service staff, and blood bank staff in order to organize a systematic approach to the ongoing problem and keep all responsible staff working outside the operating room informed of events developing in the room. To rapidly deal with critical hemorrhage, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also linkage of operating rooms with blood transfusion services and a blood bank are important. When time is short, cross-matching tests are omitted, and ABO-identical red blood cells are used. When supplies of ABO-identical red blood cells are not available, ABO-compatible, non-identical red blood cells are used. Because a systematic, not individual, approach is required to prevent and manage critical hemorrhage, whether or not a hospital can establish a procedure to deal with it depends on the overall capability of critical and crisis management of the hospital. (Review).

  8. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  9. Orthotopic liver transplantation in fulminant and subfulminant hepatitis. The Paul Brousse experience.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, H; Samuel, D; Castaing, D; Adam, R; Saliba, F; Johann, M; Azoulay, D; Ducot, B; Chiche, L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report on the experience of orthotopic liver transplantation in fulminant hepatitis at Paul Brousse Hospital. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation is a breakthrough in the treatment of patients with fulminant hepatitis. However, the indications, the timing for transplantation, the type of transplantation, and the use of ABO incompatible grafts in this setting still are debated. METHODS: Transplantation was indicated in patients with confusion or coma and factor V less than 20%, younger than 30 years of age, and confusion or coma and factor V less than 30% older than 30 years of age. RESULTS: Among 139 patients who met the aforementioned criteria for transplantation, 1 recovered, 22 died before transplantation, and 116 underwent transplants with a 1-year survival of 68%. Survival was 83% in patients with grade 1 and 2 comas at transplantation versus 56% (p < 0.001) in those with grade 3 comas; it was 51% versus 81% (p < 0.001) in those transplanted with high risk (ABO-incompatible, split, or steatotic) and low-risk grafts, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, steatotic and partial grafts were predictive of poorer patient survival, and ABO incompatibility was predictive of poorer graft survival. CONCLUSIONS: Orthotopic liver transplantation is an effective treatment in fulminant hepatitis. Use of high-risk grafts permitted transplantation of 83% of patients, but was responsible for higher mortality. PMID:7639578

  10. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  11. Evidence-based review and assessment of botulinum neurotoxin for the treatment of urologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B; Elovic, Elie; Esquenazi, Alberto; Naumann, Markus; Segal, Karen R; Schiavo, Giampietro; Smith, Christopher P; Ward, Anthony B

    2013-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) can be injected to achieve therapeutic benefit across a large range of clinical conditions. To assess the efficacy and safety of BoNT injections for the treatment of certain urologic conditions, including detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD), lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and detrusor overactivity (both neurogenic [NDO] and idiopathic [IDO]), an expert panel reviewed evidence from the published literature. Data sources included English-language studies identified via MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Current Contents, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Evidence tables generated in the 2008 Report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) review of the use of BoNT for autonomic disorders were also reviewed and updated. The panel evaluated evidence at several levels, supporting BoNT as a class, for the serotypes BoNT-A and BoNT-B, as well as for the four individual commercially available formulations: abobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo), onabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona), incobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco), and rimabotulinumtoxinB (B/Rima). The panel ultimately made recommendations on the use of BoNT for the management of these urologic conditions based upon the strength of clinical evidence and following the AAN classification scale. For the treatment of DSD, the evidence supported a Level B recommendation for the use of A/Ona; A/Abo, A/Inco, and B/Rima received a Level U recommendation. For the treatment of NDO, there was sufficient clinical evidence to support a Level A recommendation for BoNT-A as well as for both A/Ona and A/Abo; no published data were identified for either A/Inco or B/Rima (Level U). For the treatment of IDO, the evidence supported a Level A recommendation for A/Ona; A/Inco, A/Abo, and B/Rima received a Level U recommendation. For the management of BPH, the evidence supported a Level B recommendation for BoNT and A/Ona; no

  12. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  13. The role of blood groups in the development of diabetes mellitus after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karagoz, Hatice; Erden, Abdulsamet; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Bulut, Kadir; Mutlu, Hasan; Simsek, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common condition that is defined as glucose intolerance of varying degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects approximately 5% of all pregnancies all over the world. GDM is not only associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as macrosomia, dystocia, birth trauma, and metabolic complications in newborns, but it is also a strong predictor of transitioning to overt DM postpartum. The association of ABO blood groups with DM has been observed before in several epidemiological and genetic studies and resulted with inconsistent findings, but still there are not enough studies in the literature about the association of ABO blood groups with GDM. In this study, we aimed at investigating any possible relationship between the ABO blood group system and GDM and also the transitioning of GDM to overt DM postpartum, in Turkey. Patients and methods A total of 233 patients with GDM from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. The cases that have serologically determined blood groups and Rh factor in the hospital records were included in the study, and the patients with unknown blood groups were excluded. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). GDM was diagnosed based on the glucose cut-points of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Society Groups. The distributions of blood groups of the patients with GDM were compared with the distribution of blood groups of 17,314 healthy donors who were admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in 2012. Results There was a significant difference between the patients with GDM and control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups. Blood group AB was found to be higher in the patients with GDM compared to the control group (P=0.029). When the patients were compared according to the development of DM, the ratio

  14. Living related liver transplantation: histopathologic analysis of graft dysfunction in 304 patients.

    PubMed

    Minamiguchi, S; Sakurai, T; Fujita, S; Okuno, T; Haga, H; Mino, M; Kanehira, K; Matsushiro, H; Nakashima, Y; Inomata, Y; Tanaka, K; Yamabe, H

    1999-12-01

    Between June 1990 and August 1997, 304 mainly pediatric patients underwent a total of 311 orthotopic living related liver transplantations (LRLTs) under tacrolimus immunosuppression at Kyoto University Hospital. Congenital biliary atresia was the most common underlying disease. The donor was a parent, and the left lateral segments were used as grafts in most cases. The average number of loci of HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches between the donor and the recipient were 2.1. Forty-three transplants were ABO-incompatible. Liver histology at the time of abnormal liver function after transplantation was analyzed. Preservation injury was rare and mild. Acute cellular rejection (ACR) occurred in 36% of transplants during the first 6 months. Average rejection activity index (the Banff schema) was 4.2 and severe rejection was rarely seen. The number of mismatching HLA loci and immunosuppression regimens affected the incidence of ACR. Chronic rejection (CR) occurred in 2% of transplants. Concerning humoral rejection, no hyperacute rejection was seen. However, hepatic artery thrombosis (delayed hyperacute rejection) was seen in an ABO-incompatible transplant. Acute hepatitis, including those related to cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, occurred in 17% of transplants. Chronic hepatitis, including hepatitis B and C, developed in 3%. Acute or chronic cholangitis occurred in 16%, and a significantly higher incidence of cholangitis was found in ABO-incompatible transplants. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease developed in 2%. In LRLT, milder preservation injury and less frequent ACR and CR were suggested, probably because of the short cold-ischemia time and the advantages of HLA histocompatibility, respectively. PMID:10667427

  15. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  16. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Enzymatic Depolymerization of Polylactic Acid and Other Polyesters by Microbial Carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Hai, Tran; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Golyshin, Peter N; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2016-06-13

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biodegradable polyester derived from renewable resources, which is a leading candidate for the replacement of traditional petroleum-based polymers. Since the global production of PLA is quickly growing, there is an urgent need for the development of efficient recycling technologies, which will produce lactic acid instead of CO2 as the final product. After screening 90 purified microbial α/β-hydrolases, we identified hydrolytic activity against emulsified PLA in two uncharacterized proteins, ABO2449 from Alcanivorax borkumensis and RPA1511 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Both enzymes were also active against emulsified polycaprolactone and other polyesters as well as against soluble α-naphthyl and p-nitrophenyl monoesters. In addition, both ABO2449 and RPA1511 catalyzed complete or extensive hydrolysis of solid PLA with the production of lactic acid monomers, dimers, and larger oligomers as products. The crystal structure of RPA1511 was determined at 2.2 Å resolution and revealed a classical α/β-hydrolase fold with a wide-open active site containing a molecule of polyethylene glycol bound near the catalytic triad Ser114-His270-Asp242. Site-directed mutagenesis of both proteins demonstrated that the catalytic triad residues are important for the hydrolysis of both monoester and polyester substrates. We also identified several residues in RPA1511 (Gln172, Leu212, Met215, Trp218, and Leu220) and ABO2449 (Phe38 and Leu152), which were not essential for activity against soluble monoesters but were found to be critical for the hydrolysis of PLA. Our results indicate that microbial carboxyl esterases can efficiently hydrolyze various polyesters making them attractive biocatalysts for plastics depolymerization and recycling.

  17. Assessment of clinical outcomes of Roth and MBT bracket prescription using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mahesh; Varghese, Joseph; Mascarenhas, Rohan; Mogra, Subraya; Shetty, Siddarth; Dhakar, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is always a need to assess whether small changes in bracket prescription can lead to visually detectable differences in tooth positions. However, with little clinical evidence to show advantages of any of the popularly used bracket systems, orthodontists are forced to make clinical decisions with little scientific guidance. Aim: To compare the orthodontic cases finished with Roth and MBT prescription using American Board of Orthodontics-Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS). Settings and Design: Department of Orthodontics, Post-graduate dental college, retrospective cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Forty patients selected were divided into two groups of 20 patients each finished with straight wire appliance using Roth and MBT prescription, respectively. The examiner ability was assessed and calibrated by one of the ABO certified clinician to grade cases using the OGS. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired student t-test was used and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: MBT bracket group had a lower score of 2.60 points in buccolingual inclination and lower score of 1.10 points in occlusal contact category that was statistically significant when compared with Roth group. The difference in total ABO-OGS score was 2.65 points showing that the outcome for the MBT prescription was better than that of the Roth prescription, which is statistically significant, but with little or no clinical significance. It can be concluded that use of either one of the Roth and MBT bracket prescriptions have no impact to the overall clinical outcome and quality of treatment entirely depends on clinician judgment and experience. PMID:24124295

  18. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  19. Are the blood groups of women with preeclampsia a risk factor for the development of hypertension postpartum?

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Deniz; Karagoz, Hatice; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Bulut, Kadir; Aykas, Fatma; Cetinkaya, Ali; Uslu, Emine; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Erden, Abdulsamet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by hypertension (HT) and proteinuria noticeable after 20 weeks of gestation. PE is now considered as a cardiovascular disease risk factor and a number of studies have shown that experiencing PE increases the prevalence of various cardiovascular risk factors, such as metabolic syndrome and HT. In this study, we aimed to investigate any possible relationship between the ABO/Rh blood group system and PE in Turkey. In the second part of the study, we examined the relationship between the ABO blood group system and development of HT after PE. Patients and methods A total of 250 patients with PE from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). Results There was a significant difference between the patients with PE and the control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups and the percentage of group AB was found to be higher in patients with PE compared to the control group (P=0.029). The risk of developing PE was significantly higher in group AB than other blood groups (P=0.006). The risk of developing HT after PE was significantly higher in group O than other blood groups (P=0.004). Discussion In this study, we found that the patients with blood group AB have a higher risk for PE. The patients with PE of blood group O are at high risk of developing HT, and Rh factor was identified as another risk at this point and these patients should be closely followed postpartum. PMID:27143904

  20. Evasion of Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum: Rosettes of Blood Group A Impair Recognition of PfEMP1

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Kirsten; Palmkvist, Mia; Ch'ng, Junhong; Kiwuwa, Mpungu Steven; Wahlgren, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The ABO blood group antigens are expressed on erythrocytes but also on endothelial cells, platelets and serum proteins. Notably, the ABO blood group of a malaria patient determines the development of the disease given that blood group O reduces the probability to succumb in severe malaria, compared to individuals of groups A, B or AB. P. falciparum rosetting and sequestration are mediated by PfEMP1, RIFIN and STEVOR, expressed at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC). Antibodies to these antigens consequently modify the course of a malaria infection by preventing sequestration and promoting phagocytosis of pRBC. Here we have studied rosetting P. falciparum and present evidence of an immune evasion mechanism not previously recognized. We find the accessibility of antibodies to PfEMP1 at the surface of the pRBC to be reduced when P. falciparum forms rosettes in blood group A RBC, as compared to group O RBC. The pRBC surrounds itself with tightly bound normal RBC that makes PfEMP1 inaccessible to antibodies and clearance by the immune system. Accordingly, pRBC of in vitro cloned P. falciparum devoid of ABO blood group dependent rosetting were equally well detected by anti-PfEMP1 antibodies, independent of the blood group utilized for their propagation. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the severe forms of malaria may in patients of blood group A depend on the ability of the parasite to mask PfEMP1 from antibody recognition, in so doing evading immune clearance. PMID:26714011

  1. Changes in sex and non-sex hormones and distribution of erythrocyte antigens in reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus in Adjara.

    PubMed

    Nakashidze, I; Kotrikadze, N; Diasamidze, A; Nagervadze, M; Ramishvili, L

    2013-04-01

    The aim the research was to study the hormonal state of reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus. The quantitative changes of sex steroid hormones: progesterone (P), estradiol (E), testosterone (T), gonadotropine -Luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were investigated. Distribution of ABO blood group antigens and Rh-Hr systems genetic variants in the blood of women living in Adjara Region was also studied. For study was used reproductive age women's blood with benign (fibromioma) and malignant (endometrial cancer) tumors of body of uterus (the middle age was 20-45 years). The determination of hormones was made by the enzymatic analysis method (ELAIZA). For the research of blood groups, were used the immunoserologic methods. The study have revealed that in blood of reproductive age women with benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus, level of estradiol was increased while levels of progesterone and testosterone were sharply reduced. Amount of Follicle-stimulating hormone and Luteinizing hormone were also increased. It's significant that, both hormones were sharply increased in case of cancer of body of uterus, in comparison with control group and benign tumor. According to distribution of ABO blood group phenotypes - O (I) phenotypic group of ABO system has its highest frequency in blood of women with cancer of body of uterus. Cancer of body of uterus is associated with O (I) phenotypic groups; benign tumor of body of uterus - with A(II) and AB(IV) phenotypic groups. Women with cc and EE genetic variants of Rh-Hr system have sensitivity to the development of benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus; women with ee genetic variant have lower sensitivity towards body of uterus cancer and sharply expressed sensitivity to uterus benign tumors. In women with malignant tumors of body of uterus the frequency of distribution of Rh-Hr system CC genetic variant was sharply reduced. PMID:23676481

  2. Cloning and characterization of tuberous sclerosis determining genes on 9q and 16p

    SciTech Connect

    Slegtenhorst, M. van; Hermans, C.; Ouweland, A. van den

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder, characterized by the widespread development of hamartomata. TSC is genetically heterogeneous, with trait causing loci on 9q34 and 16p13.3. Last year the TSC2 gene on 16p13.3 has been identified by the European Chromosome 16 TSC Consortium. The TSC2 gene acts as a tumour suppressor gene and encodes a 198 kD protein (tuberin) with a small region of homology to the rap1-GTPase-activating-protein. Allowing for heterogeneity, we have performed a linkage analysis on 14 Dutch and British families. Combined analysis (ICA) of both chromosomal regions revealed an overall lod score (under heterogeneity) of 8.92. We assigned the TSC1 locus to a region in between the Abelson oncogene and the ABO bloodgroup locus. On chromosome 16 the peak lod score was obtained at marker 16AC2.5. This finding confirms the accuracy of the imaginary chromosome approach (ICA), since 16AC2.5 is known to be at less than 200 kb from TSC2. The proportion of ABO linked families (TSC1) was estimated to be 65%. In the ABO region we have mapped about 200 cosmids in 6 contigs ranging from 40 to more than 300 kb. With respect to TSC2 we focused on the construction of a full length cDNA clone and the generation of antibodies against fusion proteins and synthetic peptides. These are being utilized in studies on the cellular localization, the tissue distribution and the normal and impaired function of tuberin.

  3. Erythrina lectins detect the H/HI blood groups.

    PubMed

    Sudakevitz, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Levene, C; Sela, R; Bhattacharyya, L

    1991-08-01

    The lectin purified from Erythrina corallodendron seeds which binds N-acetyllactosamine greater than N-acetyl-D-galactosamine greater than alpha and beta galactosides greater than D-galactose was examined for its ABO(H) blood group specificity. It has been shown that this lectin causes the strongest hemagglutination of O(H) and weakest of Oh(Bombay) red blood cells, and interacts with the H antigen in association with the I antigen. The reactions of Erythrina corallodendron and Erythrina indica lectins (which are similar in sugar specificity) with erythrocytes of different ABO(H) and Ii blood groups (the I bloods were all from adults and the i from either cord or adult bloods) revealed the following order of activity: O(H)I greater than A2 I greater than O(H)i adult greater than A2BI greater than BI greater than O(H)i cord greater than A1I greater than A1i adult greater than Bi cord greater than A1BI greater than Ai cord greater than ABi cord greater than OhI. The Erythrina indica lectin showed a lower differentiation between the agglutination of O(H) and Oh erythrocytes. Both Erythrina lectins exhibited H/HI blood group preference but were not inhibited by the saliva from ABO(H) "secretors". Thus they may be classified with the Cytisus sessilifolius, Lotus tetragonolobus and Laburnum alpinum lectins which are inhibited by lactose but not by H blood group substances in secretions.

  4. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Enzymatic Depolymerization of Polylactic Acid and Other Polyesters by Microbial Carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Hai, Tran; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Golyshin, Peter N; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2016-06-13

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biodegradable polyester derived from renewable resources, which is a leading candidate for the replacement of traditional petroleum-based polymers. Since the global production of PLA is quickly growing, there is an urgent need for the development of efficient recycling technologies, which will produce lactic acid instead of CO2 as the final product. After screening 90 purified microbial α/β-hydrolases, we identified hydrolytic activity against emulsified PLA in two uncharacterized proteins, ABO2449 from Alcanivorax borkumensis and RPA1511 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Both enzymes were also active against emulsified polycaprolactone and other polyesters as well as against soluble α-naphthyl and p-nitrophenyl monoesters. In addition, both ABO2449 and RPA1511 catalyzed complete or extensive hydrolysis of solid PLA with the production of lactic acid monomers, dimers, and larger oligomers as products. The crystal structure of RPA1511 was determined at 2.2 Å resolution and revealed a classical α/β-hydrolase fold with a wide-open active site containing a molecule of polyethylene glycol bound near the catalytic triad Ser114-His270-Asp242. Site-directed mutagenesis of both proteins demonstrated that the catalytic triad residues are important for the hydrolysis of both monoester and polyester substrates. We also identified several residues in RPA1511 (Gln172, Leu212, Met215, Trp218, and Leu220) and ABO2449 (Phe38 and Leu152), which were not essential for activity against soluble monoesters but were found to be critical for the hydrolysis of PLA. Our results indicate that microbial carboxyl esterases can efficiently hydrolyze various polyesters making them attractive biocatalysts for plastics depolymerization and recycling. PMID:27087107

  5. An examination of co-infection in acute gastroenteritis and histo-blood group antigens leading to viral infection susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    FURUYA, KENTA; NAKAJIMA, HITOSHI; SASAKI, YOUSUKE; URITA, YOSHIHISA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract in terms of viruses, bacteria and the ABO blood group. We hypothesized that a combination of norovirus (NV) and bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract could affect the likelihood of an individual to contracting NV. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are considered to act as receptors that can lead to NV susceptibility. In addition to genetics, co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract may be associated with this mechanism. A total of 370 patients with acute gastroenteritis presenting with diarrhea (14–89 years) were recruited. The male/female ratio was 20/17. Single infection (bacteria or virus), co-infection with two viruses, and co-infection with one virus and one bacterium were statistically analyzed. In total, 88 of the 376 subjects (23.4%) were positive for one virus, and 50 (13.3%) were positive for one bacterium. Co-transfection with bacteria and a virus were detected in 46 (47.9%) of the 96 bacterial gastroenteritis cases. Statistical analysis revealed that co-infection of bacteria and NV was not significant in all viral infections (P=0.768). In terms of the ABO histo-blood group type and NV infection, the frequency in the O type was not significantly increased (P=0.052). Co-infection of bacteria and a virus occurred frequently in the gastrointestinal tract. The ABO blood phenotype expression was not a significant factor in NV infection in the present case series and the results did not suggest an affinity of NV for specific bacteria. PMID:26998270

  6. Bioassay analysis of efficacy of phytoremediation in decontamination of coal mine effluent.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Sandhya; Banerjee, Tarun Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Phytoremediation efficacy of Lemna minor and Azolla pinnata in decontaminating metals from coal mine effluent (CME) was analyzed using bioassays. Catfish Heteropneustes fossilis were exposed to both the phytoremediated CMEs for the metal bioaccumulation analysis and biochemical alteration in seven vital tissues. Gross concentration of metals accumulated in liver, kidneys, air breathing organs (ABO), skin and muscle were greater in fish exposed to A. pinnata remediated CME (AP-CME) than those exposed to L. minor remediated CME (LP-CME). Total protein concentrations of all the tissues were greater in fish exposed to LP-CME than to AP-CME. Glycogen concentrations were greater in muscle, brain, ABO and skin of LP-CME exposed fish. In remaining tissues (liver, kidneys and gills) concentrations of glycogen were more in AP-CME exposed ones. Total lipid and total DNA concentrations were greater in most of the tissues of fish exposed to LP-CME than to AP-CME. The total RNA concentrations were elevated only in muscle, liver, kidneys and brain of LP-CME exposed fish; in rest of the tissues (gills, ABO and skin) it was greater in AP-CME exposed fish. The values of condition factor (K) and organosomatic index (OSI) of fish exposed to LP-CME and AP-CME were insignificant to those of wild fish. However, the improvements in the biomolecules concentration of tissues of fish exposed to either of the phytoremediated effluent were not equivalent to their concentration in the wild fish. Thus, decontamination of CME by either of these macrophytes was not complete and prolonged exposure of even phytoremediated CMEs exerts deleterious effects on the fish.

  7. Biofunctionalizing nanofibers with carbohydrate blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Barr, Katie; Kannan, Bhuvaneswari; Korchagina, Elena; Popova, Inna; Ryzhov, Ivan; Henry, Stephen; Bovin, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and simple method of biofunctionalising nylon, cellulose acetate, and polyvinyl butyral electrospun nanofibers with blood group glycans was achieved by preparing function-spacer-lipid constructs and simply contacting them to fibers with a piezo inkjet printer. A series of water dispersible amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs were synthesized representing a range ABO and related blood group antigens. After immediate contact of the amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs with nanofiber surfaces they self-assembled and were detectable by enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27388774

  8. [Experience of mismatched blood transfusion for an rh negative patient and reconsideration of emergency blood transfusion manual in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Nishikawa, Masashi; Aya, Daisuke; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yokouchi, Takako; Tanaka, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    We report a B Rh negative patient undergoing total pelvic exenteration, who received both ABO and Rh incompatible packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. After this experience, we revised the manual of emergency blood transfusion. We defined level of severity to share information with surgeon, nurses, anesthesiologists and the member of the blood center. We changed anesthesia information management system for showing blood type including Duffy blood group system and checking out whether we can transfuse Rh positive blood to Rh negative patient in an emergency situation at the timeout of surgery.

  9. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks.

  10. Demographics and epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer affects 44,000 Americans and at least 250,000 individuals worldwide annually. The incidence is slowly increasing after a recent period of decline. Cases are predicted to increase globally because of increased longevity and the widespread adoption of cancer-causing behaviors, such as cigarette smoking, dietary indiscretion, and a global increase in diabetes. Well-known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are advancing age, tobacco smoking, obesity, certain inherited familial disorders, second-hand smoke exposure, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. Associations with human immunodeficiency virus, ABO blood group, hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Helicobacter pylori have also been identified.

  11. First-principles calculations of the OH- adsorption energy on perovskite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzuku, Hideo; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Yamada, Ikuya; Yagi, Shunsuke

    2016-08-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) that occurs during water oxidation is of considerable importance as an essential energy conversion reaction for rechargeable metal-air batteries and direct solar water splitting. ABO3 perovskite oxides have been extensively studied because of their high catalytic OER activity. In the present study, the OH- adsorption process on the perovskite surface about different B site cations was investigated by the first-principles calculations. We concluded that the adsorption energy of SrFeO3 surface is larger than that of SrTiO3.

  12. DNA-Based Methods in the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Denomme, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Although hemagglutination serves the immunohematology reference laboratory well, when used alone, it has limited capability to resolve complex problems. This overview discusses how molecular approaches can be used in the immunohematology reference laboratory. In order to apply molecular approaches to immunohematology, knowledge of genes, DNA-based methods, and the molecular bases of blood groups are required. When applied correctly, DNA-based methods can predict blood groups to resolve ABO/Rh discrepancies, identify variant alleles, and screen donors for antigen-negative units. DNA-based testing in immunohematology is a valuable tool used to resolve blood group incompatibilities and to support patients in their transfusion needs. PMID:21257350

  13. Immunogenetics of HLA.

    PubMed

    Bach, F H

    1991-01-01

    The enormous contributions of Professor Karl Landsteiner are summarized focusing on his discovery of the ABO, MN, and P blood group systems as well as his conceptualization of the hapten concept. The HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex in humans, is discussed from the point of view of its genetic organization, the polymorphism that is recognized by T lymphocytes and the presently defined molecular polymorphism. The structure-function relationship of T cell recognition of class II molecules, based on the known crystallographic structure of an HLA class I molecule, is presented.

  14. DNA-based methods in the immunohematology reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Reid, Marion E; Denomme, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Although hemagglutination serves the immunohematology reference laboratory well, when used alone, it has limited capability to resolve complex problems. This overview discusses how molecular approaches can be used in the immunohematology reference laboratory. In order to apply molecular approaches to immunohematology, knowledge of genes, DNA-based methods, and the molecular bases of blood groups are required. When applied correctly, DNA-based methods can predict blood groups to resolve ABO/Rh discrepancies, identify variant alleles, and screen donors for antigen-negative units. DNA-based testing in immunohematology is a valuable tool used to resolve blood group incompatibilities and to support patients in their transfusion needs.

  15. [Lan antigen of erythrocytes and clinical significance of anti-Lan antibody].

    PubMed

    Kuśnierz-Alejska, G; Wiecek, B

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the actual knowledge on Lan antigen, the first example of anti-Lan in Polish population was described. This alloantibody found in the serum of Lan negative mother was responsible for the haemolytic disease of her newborn. Family study revealed two Lan negative members: the father and the brother of the proposita. This paper emphasizes the importance of screening for immune alloantibodies, performed in the sera of all women independently of their ABO and Rh blood groups, at early period of pregnancy.

  16. A family showing inheritance of the Anton blood group antigen AnWj and independence of AnWj from Lutheran.

    PubMed

    Poole, J; Levene, C; Bennett, M; Sela, R; van Alphen, L; Spruell, P J

    1991-12-01

    A 43-year-old Arab woman was found to be negative for the high incidence AnWj antigen and her serum contained anti-AnWj. Two of her seven siblings were also AnWj-negative, which provides evidence for the first time that the AnWj-negative phenotype may be an inherited character. Blood groups of the family, in which the parents of the proposita are consanguineous, show that AnWj is not part of the ABO, Rh, MNSs, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, Xg and, notably, Lutheran blood group systems and neither is it X or Y linked.

  17. Genetic studies among Ramgarhias and Ramdasias of Punjab, North India.

    PubMed

    Sehajpal, P K; Khanna, A K; Singh, G; Sharma, V K

    1981-02-01

    This study reports results of investigations on ABO, Rh, haptoglobin and transferrin types in the two hitherto uninvestigated endogamous groups of Punjab, North India. Frequencies for the A, B, and O genes were found to be 0.1711, 0.2566, and 0.5723 in Ramdasias, and 0.1737, 0.2960, and 0.5303 in Ramgarhias. In all 13 Rhesus-negative individuals were encountered. The Hp2 allele shows a high frequency of 0.8060 for Ramdasias, and 0.7860 for Ramgarhias.

  18. Analysis of 4000 kidney transplantations in a single center: Across immunological barriers.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, Ji Yoon; Sung, Shin; Jung, Joo Hee; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck Jong

    2016-08-01

    Kidney transplant (KT) is the optimal renal replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The demand for kidneys, however, continues to exceed the supply. To overcome this problem, efforts to extend the donor pool by including human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- and ABO-incompatible (ABOi) KTs are increasing. The aim of this article was to retrospectively review data on recipients, donor profiles, and clinical outcomes in 4000 cases of KT. In addition, we analyzed clinical outcomes in ABOi and flow-cytometric crossmatch (FCXM) positive KT in a subgroup analysis.This was a retrospective, observational study using data extracted from medical records. A total of 4000 consecutive patients who underwent KT at our institution from January 1990 to February 2015 were included in this study. KTs across immunological barriers such as ABO incompatible (276 cases, 6.9%), FCXM positive (97 cases, 2.4%), and positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) XM KT (16 cases, 0.4%) were included.From a Kaplan-Meier analysis, overall patient survival (PS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.9%, 95.1%, 92.0%, and 88.9%, respectively. The overall graft survival (GS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.3%, 88.9%, 81.2%, and 67.4%, respectively. Our subgroup analysis suggested that overall PS, GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS in ABOi KT showed no significant differences in comparison with ABO-compatible KT if adequate immunosuppressive treatment was performed. The overall PS rate in patients who underwent FCXM positive KT did not differ significantly from that of the control group during the 3-year follow-up (P = 0.34). The overall GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS also did not differ significantly between the FCXM KT and control groups (P = 0.99, 0.42, and 88).The outcomes of KTs continually improved during the study period, while the annual number of KTs increased. ABO or FCXM positive KTs can be performed

  19. Risk Factors for Graft Failure and Death following Geriatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyungjin; Yu, Hoon; Shin, Eunhye; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Su-Kil; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Population aging is a major health concern in Asian countries and it has affected the age distribution of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a consequence, the need for kidney transplantation in the geriatric population has increased, but the shortage of donors is an obstacle for geriatric renal transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and death in geriatric renal transplantation. Methods Kidney transplantations performed in a tertiary hospital in South Korea from May 1995 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Recipients younger than 60 years of age or who underwent other organ transplantations were excluded. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess patient and graft survival. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors for graft failure and patient death. Results A total of 229 kidney transplantation patients were included. Graft survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.2%, 82.9%, and 61.2% respectively. Patient survival at 1, 5, and 10 years were 94.6%, 86.9%, and 68.8%, respectively. According to the Cox multivariate analysis, ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio [HR] 3.91, p < 0.002), DGF (HR 3.544, p < 0.004), CMV infection (HR 2.244, p < 0.011), and HBV infection (HR 6.349, p < 0.015) were independent risk factors for graft survival. Recipient age (HR 1.128, p < 0.024), ABO incompatibility (HR 3.014, p < 0.025), CMV infection (HR 2.532, p < 0.010), and the number of HLA mismatches (HR 1.425, p < 0.007) were independent risk factors for patient death. Conclusion Kidney transplantation in the geriatric population showed good clinical outcomes. ABO incompatibility, DGF, CMV infection, and HBV infection were risk factors for graft failure and the recipient age, ABO incompatibility, CMV infection, and the number of HLA mismatches were risk factors for patient death in geriatric renal transplantation. PMID:27074003

  20. Universal collaborative couplings between oxygen-octahedral rotations and antiferroelectric distortions in perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaiche, L.; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    We identify two elemental interatomic couplings that control the collaborative (as opposed to competing) interaction between the O6 octahedral rotations (usually called antiferrodistortive or AFD modes) and the antiferroelectric (AFE) displacement patterns of the A-site cations in oxides with the ABO3 perovskite structure. Straightforward analytical derivations allow us to reproduce and explain the origin of various long-range AFE orders that have been previously found in different phases of several perovskite compounds, all possessing simple or even complex long-range AFD patterns. Our analysis also leads to the prediction of original peculiar combinations of AFD and AFE orders that are awaiting to be observed.

  1. Trapping of Oxygen Vacancies at Crystallographic Shear Planes in Acceptor-Doped Pb-Based Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M

    2015-12-01

    The defect chemistry of the ferroelectric material PbTiO3 after doping with Fe(III) acceptor ions is reported. Using advanced transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray and neutron diffraction, we demonstrate that even at concentrations as low as circa 1.7% (material composition approximately ABO2.95), the oxygen vacancies are trapped into extended planar defects, specifically crystallographic shear planes. We investigate the evolution of these defects upon doping and unravel their detailed atomic structure using the formalism of superspace crystallography, thus unveiling their role in nonstoichiometry in the Pb-based perovskites.

  2. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks. PMID:23559776

  3. Analysis of 4000 kidney transplantations in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, Ji Yoon; Sung, Shin; Jung, Joo Hee; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck Jong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kidney transplant (KT) is the optimal renal replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The demand for kidneys, however, continues to exceed the supply. To overcome this problem, efforts to extend the donor pool by including human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- and ABO-incompatible (ABOi) KTs are increasing. The aim of this article was to retrospectively review data on recipients, donor profiles, and clinical outcomes in 4000 cases of KT. In addition, we analyzed clinical outcomes in ABOi and flow-cytometric crossmatch (FCXM) positive KT in a subgroup analysis. This was a retrospective, observational study using data extracted from medical records. A total of 4000 consecutive patients who underwent KT at our institution from January 1990 to February 2015 were included in this study. KTs across immunological barriers such as ABO incompatible (276 cases, 6.9%), FCXM positive (97 cases, 2.4%), and positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) XM KT (16 cases, 0.4%) were included. From a Kaplan–Meier analysis, overall patient survival (PS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.9%, 95.1%, 92.0%, and 88.9%, respectively. The overall graft survival (GS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.3%, 88.9%, 81.2%, and 67.4%, respectively. Our subgroup analysis suggested that overall PS, GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS in ABOi KT showed no significant differences in comparison with ABO-compatible KT if adequate immunosuppressive treatment was performed. The overall PS rate in patients who underwent FCXM positive KT did not differ significantly from that of the control group during the 3-year follow-up (P = 0.34). The overall GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS also did not differ significantly between the FCXM KT and control groups (P = 0.99, 0.42, and 88). The outcomes of KTs continually improved during the study period, while the annual number of KTs increased. ABO or FCXM positive KTs can be

  4. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  5. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  6. Mucosal Blood Group Antigen Expression Profiles and HIV Infections: A Study among Female Sex Workers in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia Musimbi; Mwanda, Walter; Oyugi, Julius; Anzala, Omu

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate moieties expressed on human red blood cells however; these antigens can also be expressed on some other cells particularly the surface of epithelial cells and may be found in mucosal secretions. In many human populations 80% secrete ABO antigens (termed ‘secretors’) while 20% do not (termed ‘non-secretors’). Furthermore, there are disease conditions that are associated with secretor status. Objective To investigate correlations between secretor status and HIV infection among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya. Methodology This cross-sectional study recruited 280 female sex workers aged 18–65 years from the Pumwani Majengo cohort, Kenya. Blood typing was determined by serological techniques using monoclonal antibodies to the ABO blood group antigens. Secretor phenotyping was determined using anti-H specific lectins specific to salivary, vaginal and cervical blood group H antigen using the agglutination inhibition technique and correlated to individual HIV sero-status. Participants were additionally screened for Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis. Results Out of the 280 participants, 212 (75.7%) were secretors and 68 (24.3%) were non-secretors. The incidence of all infections: HIV, Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher among secretors compared to non-secretors. However, this difference was only statistically significant for HIV infection incidence rates: HIV infected secretors (83.7%) versus HIV un-infected secretors (71.8%) (p = 0.029) Based on ABO phenotype stratification, the incidence of HIV infection was higher among blood group A secretors (26/52 = 50%), in comparison to B (12/39 = 33.3%: p = 0.066), AB (3/9 = 33.3%: p = 0.355), and O secretors (36/112 = 32.1%: p = 0.028). Conclusion This is the first report to document the variable expression of the ABH blood group antigens profiling secretor and non-secretor phenotypes

  7. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization.

    PubMed

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive. PMID:26880872

  8. [Para-Bombay phenotype caused by combined heterozygote of two bases deletion on fut1 alleles].

    PubMed

    Ma, Kan-Rong; Tao, Shu-Dan; Lan, Xiao-Fei; Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Xu, Xian-Guo; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Lü, Hang-Jun; Yan, Li-Xing

    2011-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the molecular basis of a para-Bombay phenotype for screening and identification of rare blood group. ABO and H phenotypes of the proband were identified by serological techniques. The exon 6 to exon 7 of ABO gene and full coding region of α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (fut1) gene of the proband were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the amplified fragments. The haplotype of compound heterozygote of fut1 was also identified by cloning sequencing. The results indicated that a rare para-Bombay phenotype was confirmed by serological techniques. Two deletion or insertion variant sites near nucleotide 547 and 880 were detected in fut1 gene. The results of cloning sequence showed that one haplotype of fut1 gene was two bases deletion at 547-552 (AGAGAG→AGAG), and another one was two bases deletion at position 880-882 (TTT→T). Both two variants caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. It is concluded that a rare para-Bombay phenotype is found and confirmed in blood donor population. The molecular basis of this individual is compound heterozygote of two bases deletion on fut1 gene which weaken the activity of α-1, 2-fucosyltransferase.

  9. Kidney paired donation: a plea for a Swiss National Programme.

    PubMed

    Hadaya, Karine; Fehr, Thomas; Rüsi, Barbara; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Jean, Villard; Ferrari, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Growing incidence of end-stage renal disease, shortage of kidneys from deceased donors and a better outcome for recipients of kidneys from living donor have led many centres worldwide to favour living donor kidney transplantation programmes. Although criteria for living donation have greatly evolved in recent years with acceptance of related and unrelated donors, an immunological incompatibility, either due to ABO incompatibility and/or to positive cross-match, between a living donor and the intended recipient, could impede up to 40% of such procedures. To avoid refusal of willing and healthy living donors, a number of strategies have emerged to overcome immunological incompatibilities. Kidney paired donation is the safest way for such patients to undergo kidney transplantation. Implemented with success in many countries either as national or multiple regional independent programmes, it could include simple exchanges between any number of incompatible pairs, incorporate compatible pairs and non-directed donors (NDDs) to start a chain of compatible transplantations, lead to acceptance of ABO-incompatible matching, and integrate desensitising protocols. Incorporating all variations of kidney paired donation, the Australian programme has been able to facilitate kidney transplantation in 49% of registered incompatible pairs. This review is a plea for implementing a national kidney paired donation programme in Switzerland. PMID:25742633

  10. A₁A₂BO and Rh gene frequencies among six populations of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Mohd; Hussain, Ruqaiya; Shah, Ahsana; Afzal, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    A study was undertaken to record gene frequencies of ABO blood groups, their subtypes and Rh antigen for six different endogamous groups including a tribal population. The ABO phenotypic frequency varies among six different populations showing significant difference (p<0.0005). Gujjar and Bakarwal (a tribal population) shows highest (42.29%) of B blood phenotypes. A1 is the highest among Syeds (39.31%), O blood group frequency highest among Mughals (43.23%) and A1B and A2B are rare phenotypes showing very low frequency among all populations. The pattern of allele frequencies (p<0.025) is in order of I(O)>I(B)>I(A1)>I(A2), except Syeds (I(O)>I(A1)>I(B)>I(A2)). The rhesus protein (Rh) phenotypic frequency (p<0.01) shows significant increase in Rh(D) positive (87.86% in Syed to 96.03% in Khan) among all populations. The Rh allele (p<0.05) and genotype (p<0.02) frequencies shows a significant difference. Heterozygosity for Rh protein is less than homozygosity among six populations. The result from this study provides information on the genetic variation in blood antigens and rhesus protein among human populations inhabiting Jammu and Kashmir.

  11. Can Rh antigens be a risk factor in noise-induced hearing loss?

    PubMed

    Ayçiçek, Abdullah; Sargin, Ramazan; Kenar, Fethullah; Dereköy, F Sefa

    2009-03-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most common occupational problems and is one of the main causes of deafness. Many factors cause NIHL. Individual susceptibility is one of them. Rhesus (Rh) antigens and ABO blood groups can be factors in determining individual susceptibility. We aim to investigate the relationship between the Rh antigens and NIHL. The study was conducted in 438 factory workers who had been exposed to a noise level more than 85 dB for 8 h a day for a period of >/=15 years. The audiologic results and blood groups were obtained from the individual health records of the factory workers. We determined NIHL in 236 (53.9%) workers. Two hundred and nineteen (55.4%) of Rh-positive workers and seventeen (39.5%) of Rh-negative workers have NIHL, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05), whereas no statistically significant difference was determined between the NIHL and ABO blood groups. In conclusion, we suggest that the people with Rh-positive blood group are more prone to develop NIHL.

  12. Features and ethical considerations associated with living kidney and liver transplantations in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H

    2014-12-01

    When the Organ Transplantation Act came into effect in 2000 in South Korea, living organ donations were legalized and the Korean Network for Organ Sharing (KONOS) had a duty to approve the application of donation. The number of living organ donors has increased and the waiting time of recipients has been steady or decreased. The Organ Transplantation Act mainly focuses on the informed consent process of donations, so unrelated directed donations are permitted unless there is a suspicion of organ trafficking. But the annual reports show that directed donations of unrelated and related donors may have an ethical concern about organ sales. The donations of family members show another ethical concern. The numbers of ABO-incompatible transplantations have steadily increased since 2008, and lineal descendants, including minors, comprised 61% of living liver donors in 2012. Addressing the unethical practices without inhibiting living organ donations is the current task in South Korea. Private agencies have actively operated the living organ donations programs. The web-based computerized organ exchange program has been cooperatively run by hospital-based organizations. The strict legal regulations that could decrease living organ donations are hard to adopt. In the current situation, the functions of the official system need to be more developed. A national organ exchange program run by KONOS could be an option which could reduce ABO-incompatible transplantations and relieve the ethical concern of organ sales in unrelated directed donations. PMID:25498104

  13. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (P<.001), knot tying (P=.017), casting and splinting (P<.001), arthrocentesis (P=.01), basics of internal fixation (P<.001), and compartment syndrome evaluation (P=.004). After the camp, PGY-1 and -2 scores in task-specific measures were not significantly different. A 3-month simulation-based boot camp instituted early in orthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents.

  14. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  15. Blood groups and red cell acid phosphatase types in a Mixteca population resident in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Buentello, L.; García, P.; Lisker, R.; Salamanca, F.; Peñaloza, R.

    1999-01-01

    Several blood groups, ABO, Rh, Ss, Fy, Jk, and red cell acid phosphatase (ACP) types were studied in a native Mixteca population that has resided in Mexico City since 1950. Gene frequencies were obtained and used to establish admixture estimates with blacks and whites. The subjects came from three different geographical areas: High Mixteca, Low Mixteca, and Coast Mixteca. All frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The difference in the ABO frequencies was statistically significant when subjects from the three areas were compared simultaneously. Rh frequencies differed only between the High and the Low Mixteca populations. The ACP frequencies were similar between the Low Mixteca population and a previously reported Mestizo population. However, there were significant differences between the High Mixteca group and a Mestizo population, all the subjects being from Oaxaca. This is the first report of Ss, Fy, Jk, and ACP frequencies in a Mixteca population. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 11:525-529, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. [Study on the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype].

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Shao, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Xian-Guo; Hu, Qing-Fa; Wu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Fu, Qi-Hua; Yan, Li-Xing

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype, the red blood cell phenotype of the proband was characterized by standard serological techniques. Exon 6 and 7 of ABO gene, the entire coding region of FUT1 gene and FUT2 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA of the proband respectively. The PCR products were purified by agarose gels and directly sequenced. The PCR-SSP and genescan were performed to confirm the mutations detected by sequencing. The results showed that the proband ABO genotype was A(102)A(102). Two heterozygous mutations of FUT1 gene, an A to G transition at position 682 and AG deletion at position 547-552 were detected in the proband. A682G could cause transition of Met-->Val at amino acid position 228, AG deletion at position 547-552 caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. The FUT2 genotype was heterozygous for a functional allele Se(357) and a weakly functional allele Se(357), 385 (T/T homozygous at position 357 and A/T heterozygous at 385 position). It is concluded that the compound heterozygous mutation--a novel A682G missense mutation and a 547-552 del AG is the molecular mechanism of this para-Bombay phenotype.

  17. Bombay phenotype is associated with reduced plasma-VWF levels and an increased susceptibility to ADAMTS13 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, James S; McKinnon, Thomas A J; Crawley, James T B; Lane, David A; Laffan, Michael A

    2005-09-15

    ABO blood group is an important determinant of plasma von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) levels, with lower levels in group O. Previous reports have suggested that ABO(H) sugars affect the susceptibility of VWF to ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type-1 repeats-13) cleavage. To further test this hypothesis, we collected plasma from individuals with the rare Bombay blood group. VWF:Ag levels were significantly lower in Bombay patients (median, 0.69 IU/mL) than in groups AB, A, or B (P < .05) and lower than in group O individuals (median, 0.82 IU/mL). Susceptibility of purified VWF fractions to recombinant ADAMTS13 cleavage, assessed using VWF collagen-binding assay (VWF:CB), was increased in Bombays compared with either group O or AB. Increasing urea concentration (0.5 to 2 M) increased the cleavage rate for each blood group but eliminated the differences between groups. We conclude that reduction in the number of terminal sugars on N-linked glycan increases susceptibility of globular VWF to ADAMTS13 proteolysis and is associated with reduced plasma VWF:Ag and VWF:CB levels.

  18. Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: the Indian experience with kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    According to the Indian chronic kidney disease registry, in 2010 only 2% of end stage kidney disease patients were managed with kidney transplantation, 37% were managed with dialysis and 61% were treated conservatively without renal replacement therapy. In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. The most common reason to decline a donor for directed living donation is ABO incompatibility, which eliminates up to one third of the potential living donor pool. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. In transplant centres with a large living donor kidney transplantation program KPD does not require extra infrastructure, decreases waiting time, avoids transplant tourism and prevents commercial trafficking. Although KPD is still underutilized in India, it has been performed more frequently in recent times. To substantially increase donor pool and transplant rates, transplant centres should work together towards a national KPD program and frame a uniform acceptable allocation policy. PMID:24995599

  19. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women under combined oral contraceptive. The PILl Genetic RIsk Monitoring (PILGRIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Suchon, Pierre; Al Frouh, Fadi; Henneuse, Agathe; Ibrahim, Manal; Brunet, Dominique; Barthet, Marie-Christine; Aillaud, Marie-Françoise; Venton, Geoffroy; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying women at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue. The objective of this study was to identify environmental and genetic determinants of VTE risk in a large sample of women under combined oral contraceptives (COC). A total of 968 women who had had one event of VTE during COC use were compared to 874 women under COC but with no personal history of VTE. Clinical data were collected and a systematic thrombophilia screening was performed together with ABO blood group assessment. After adjusting for age, family history, and type and duration of COC use, main environmental determinants of VTE were smoking (odds ratio [OR] =1.65, 95% confidence interval [1.30-2.10]) and a body mass index higher than 35 kg.m⁻² (OR=3.46 [1.81-7.03]). In addition, severe inherited thrombophilia (OR=2.13 [1.32-3.51]) and non-O blood groups (OR=1.98 [1.57-2.49]) were strong genetic risk factors for VTE. Family history poorly predicted thrombophilia as its prevalence was similar in patients with or without first degree family history of VTE (29.3% vs 23.9%, p=0.09). In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of smoking and obesity and shows for the first time the impact of ABO blood group on the risk of VTE in women under COC. It also confirms the inaccuracy of the family history of VTE to detect inherited thrombophilia.

  20. Relation between fingerprints and different blood groups.

    PubMed

    Fayrouz, I Noor Eldin; Farida, Noor; Irshad, A H

    2012-01-01

    Fingerprint is one of the oldest, reliable and mature biometric technologies and is considered one of the best, cheapest and legitimate proofs of identification. A correlation between physical characteristics like fingerprints and blood group was demonstrated in previous studies. This study was carried out in 2010 on 305 Libyan medical students of Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi, University, Zawia, Libya and were selected randomly having different ABO blood groups, with the objective to a) Study distribution of fingerprint pattern among the subjects having different ABO and Rh blood group b) Correlate any relation between their characters and blood group. The data from the study showed that male: female ratio was 1.2:1. Majority of subjects (48.9%) in this study were of blood group O followed by blood group A (33.1%), B (12.8%) and AB (5.2%). Rh-positive cases constitute about 87.2% of all studied cases. The general distribution of pattern of finger showed high frequency of Loops registering 50.5%; followed by whorls (35.1%) and arches (14.4%). In Rh+ve cases of blood group A and O loops incidences were the highest (52% and 54.3% respectively) then whorls (33.4% and 30.6% respectively), while in blood group B whorls were predominance in both Rh+ve and Rh-ve cases. In all blood groups there were high frequency of loops in thumb, index and little fingers.

  1. BOOGIE: Predicting Blood Groups from High Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Scalzotto, Marta; Leonardi, Emanuela; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an incredible growth in the amount of available genotype data due to high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques. This information may be used to predict phenotypes of medical relevance, and pave the way towards personalized medicine. Blood phenotypes (e.g. ABO and Rh) are a purely genetic trait that has been extensively studied for decades, with currently over thirty known blood groups. Given the public availability of blood group data, it is of interest to predict these phenotypes from HTS data which may translate into more accurate blood typing in clinical practice. Here we propose BOOGIE, a fast predictor for the inference of blood groups from single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases. We focus on the prediction of thirty blood groups ranging from the well known ABO and Rh, to the less studied Junior or Diego. BOOGIE correctly predicted the blood group with 94% accuracy for the Personal Genome Project whole genome profiles where good quality SNV annotation was available. Additionally, our tool produces a high quality haplotype phase, which is of interest in the context of ethnicity-specific polymorphisms or traits. The versatility and simplicity of the analysis make it easily interpretable and allow easy extension of the protocol towards other phenotypes. BOOGIE can be downloaded from URL http://protein.bio.unipd.it/download/. PMID:25893845

  2. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive. PMID:26880872

  3. Expression of blood group genes by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Richard; Schnaidt, Martina; Klaffschenkel, Roland A.; Siegel, Georg; Schüle, Michael; Rädlein, Maria Anna; Hermanutz-Klein, Ursula; Ayturan, Miriam; Buadze, Marine; Gassner, Christoph; Danielyan, Lusine; Kluba, Torsten; Northoff, Hinnak; Flegel, Willy A.

    2011-01-01

    Incompatible blood group antigens are highly immunogenic and can cause graft rejections. Focusing on distinct carbohydrate- and protein-based membrane structures, defined by blood group antigens, we investigated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in human serum. The presence of H (CD173), ABO, RhD, RhCE, RhAG, Kell, urea transporter type B (SLC14A1, previously known as JK), and Duffy antigen receptor of chemokines (DARC) was evaluated at the levels of genome, transcriptome and antigen. Fucosyltransferase-1 (FUT1), RHCE, KEL, SLC14A1 (JK) and DARC mRNA were transcribed in MSCs. FUT1 mRNA transcription was lost during differentiation. The mRNA transcription of SLC14A1 (JK) decreased during chondrogenic differentiation, while that of DARC increased during adipogenic differentiation. All MSCs synthesized SLC14A1 (JK) but no DARC protein. However, none of the protein antigens tested occurred on the surface, indicating a lack of associated protein function in the membrane. As A and B antigens are neither expressed nor adsorbed, concerns of ABO compatibility with human serum supplements during culture are alleviated. The H antigen expression by GD2dim+ MSCs identified two distinct MSC subpopulations and enabled their isolation. We hypothesize that GD2dim+H+ MSCs retain a better “stemness”. Because immunogenic blood group antigens are lacking, they cannot affect MSC engraftment in vivo, which is promising for clinical applications. PMID:21418181

  4. A₁A₂BO and Rh gene frequencies among six populations of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Mohd; Hussain, Ruqaiya; Shah, Ahsana; Afzal, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    A study was undertaken to record gene frequencies of ABO blood groups, their subtypes and Rh antigen for six different endogamous groups including a tribal population. The ABO phenotypic frequency varies among six different populations showing significant difference (p<0.0005). Gujjar and Bakarwal (a tribal population) shows highest (42.29%) of B blood phenotypes. A1 is the highest among Syeds (39.31%), O blood group frequency highest among Mughals (43.23%) and A1B and A2B are rare phenotypes showing very low frequency among all populations. The pattern of allele frequencies (p<0.025) is in order of I(O)>I(B)>I(A1)>I(A2), except Syeds (I(O)>I(A1)>I(B)>I(A2)). The rhesus protein (Rh) phenotypic frequency (p<0.01) shows significant increase in Rh(D) positive (87.86% in Syed to 96.03% in Khan) among all populations. The Rh allele (p<0.05) and genotype (p<0.02) frequencies shows a significant difference. Heterozygosity for Rh protein is less than homozygosity among six populations. The result from this study provides information on the genetic variation in blood antigens and rhesus protein among human populations inhabiting Jammu and Kashmir. PMID:24485956

  5. Rhesus positivity and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: a new link?

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Yildirir, Aylin; Ulus, Taner; Bilgi, Muhammet; Kucuk, Alparslan; Muderrisoglu, Haldun

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of ABO and Rh blood groups with lipid profile in patients with established multivessel coronary artery disease in a population with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The records of 978 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease, in whom coronary bypass surgery was performed, were investigated. Coronary risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and obesity were noted for each patient. Serum lipid profiles: total cholesterol, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 59.3 +/- 9.7 years (range, 25-84 years) and 80% were male. The risk factors and lipid profiles of ABO blood types were similar. Rh-negative patients had higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (46.9 +/- 9.9 vs. 41.6 +/- 10.4 mg.dL(-1), p = 0.001) and a lower total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (4.8 +/- 1.3 vs. 5.2 +/- 1.6, p = 0.029) compared to Rh-positive patients. The other lipid levels and risk factors had no association with Rh typing. These results indicate a significant association between rhesus positivity and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease.

  6. Blood groups and filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, H; Santhanam, S

    1989-01-01

    Only a little is known about the studies done with filariasis in relation to blood groups. The present communication reports the results of a preliminary study carried out to investigate any relationship of ABO and Rho(D) blood groups in persons with circulating microfilariae (mf) in blood and with disease manifestations compared with healthy normal controls within a population in similar epidemiological and ecological conditions. Blood groups ABO and Rho(D) were investigated among 271 persons with filarial disease and 172 normal subjects from an endemic area of bancroftian filariasis. No relationship was observed between infection and blood groups. It appeared that blood groups and filarial infection were independent of each other. Also the sex of the individual and stage of the infection, i.e. persons with circulating mf only without manifestations and persons with established manifestation without mf, has no bearing on blood group inheritance. There were 95.05% of Rh-positive and 4.95% of Rh-negative persons in the whole studied population. The observations are similar to other studies.

  7. The middle-Norway eye-screening study. III. The prevalence of capsular glaucoma is influenced by blood-group antigens.

    PubMed

    Ringvold, A; Blika, S; Elsås, T; Guldahl, J; Juel, E; Brevik, T; Hesstvedt, P; Hoff, K; Høisen, H; Kjørsvik, S

    1993-04-01

    The association between blood groups (ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy) and pseudo-exfoliation syndrome, simple, and capsular glaucoma have been evaluated. The findings were: 1). No statistically significant abnormalities regarding blood group distribution in persons with pseudo-exfoliation syndrome. 2). In contrast to simple glaucoma, capsular glaucoma showed an abnormal distribution in the ABO- and the Kell-system. There was less glaucoma prevalence in the capsular A1-group compared to the O-group (p = 0.013), and less in the K1 negative group compared to the K1 positive one (p = 0.005). This trend was even escalated when combining the two systems: Among the K1 negative persons the glaucoma prevalence was lower in the A1-group compared to the O-group (p = 0.003). In the K1 negative group only 9 of 61 A1-persons developed glaucoma, in contrast to the K1 positive group where 4 of 4 A1-persons had glaucoma. This difference gave p < or = 0.00038, whereas the corresponding difference for the O-groups showed p = 0.65. It is concluded that once a person with blood group A1 has developed pseudo-exfoliation syndrome, the risk that capsular glaucoma will occur is about 7 times higher when that person is K1 positive compared to K1 negative. Perhaps this observation may be used as a prognostic factor for non-glaucomatous PE positive persons.

  8. Blood groups and histocompatibility antigens in habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Carapella-de Luca, E; Purpura, M; Coghi, I; Nicotra, M; Bottini, E

    1980-01-01

    Forty-six couples with at least two consecutive abortions were examined. The morphological and the functional clinical check-ups were constantly negative. In all the couples a karyotype analysis was carried out including an investigation of C and/or G bands. The phenotypes of ABO, Rh, MNSs and HLA-systems were also determined. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of ABO phenotypes between males and females, or between subjects with abortions and controls. Regarding the Rh system, the most important findings are the absence of phenotypes with the E allele in double dose, the reduction of the frequency of the CCDee phenotype and the increase in the frequency of the ccDEe phenotype. Concerning MNSs system, an increase in the frequency of the phenotypes with the S allele in double dose is observed. Females with habitual abortions show a higher incidence of Bw35 as compared both to males and to the controls. No significant differences were observed for other antigens. The persistence of a genetic disequilibrium both in the Rh and the MNSs systems suggests that the selection might act against certain antigenic combinations, independently from the state of materno-foetal compatibility. Though preliminary, our data seem to give some support to this hypothesis. They also suggest that Bw35 antigen may be important in human reproduction.

  9. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D C; Rai, Sunita; Mehra, Aakash; Kaur, M M; Sao, Satya; Gaur, Ajay; Sapra, Rahul

    2007-07-01

    This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET) with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh) HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates's and mother's blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb's cross-matched compatible with neonates' and mother's serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET) was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01%) in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions.

  10. Genetic structure of Mongolic-speaking Kalmyks.

    PubMed

    Galushkin, S K; Spitsyn, V A; Crawford, M H

    2001-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of blood groups ABO and RH D, serum proteins HP, TF, and GC, and red cell enzymes ACP1, PGM1, ESD, GLO1, and SOD-A have been reported for three tribes (Torguts, Derbets, and Buzavs) of the Volga's Kalmyk-Oyrats. The Kalmyks exhibit genetic markers that are characteristic of Central Asian populations, namely, high allelic frequencies for ABO*B, TF*C2, GC*IF, ESD*2, and GLO1*2, and the rare incidence of individuals with the RH-negative phenotype. Genetic distance measures reveal that close genetic affinities exist between the Derbets and Buzavs, but both populations differ significantly from the Torguts. Collectively as an ethnic group, the Kalmyks genetically resemble the contemporary Buryats of the Baikal region of southeastern Siberia and the Mongols of Mongolia. The transplantation of the Kalmyk-Oyrats from their homeland near Lake Baikal to their current residence (4500 km) near the Caspian Sea and their subsequent isolation for more than 300 years have not appreciably altered the gene frequencies from the parental populations for frequencies of standard genetic markers.

  11. Partial purification and properties of a laundry detergent compatible alkaline protease from a newly isolated Bacillus species Y.

    PubMed

    Mala, M; Srividya, S

    2010-09-01

    Alkaline protease production by a newly isolated Bacillus species from laundry soil was studied for detergent biocompatibility. From its morphological and nucleotide sequence (about 1.5 kb) of its 16S rDNA it was identified as Bacillus species with similarity to Bacillus species Y (Gen Bank entry: ABO 55095), and close homology with Bacillus cohnii YN-2000 (Gen Bank entry: ABO23412). Partial purification of the enzyme by ammonium sulfate (50-70% saturation) yielded 8-fold purity. Casein zymography and Sodium dodecylsulphate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the partially purified enzyme revealed two isozymes of molecular sizes approximately 66 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively. The enzyme was most active at pH 12 and 50°C. At pH 12 the enzyme was stable for 5 h and retained 60% activity. The enzyme retained 44% activity at 50°C up to 2 h. The protease showed good hydrolysis specificity with different substrates tested. The presence of Mn(2+), Co(2+) and ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) showed profound increase in protease activity. The protease of Bacillus species Y showed excellent stability and compatibility with three locally available detergents (Kite, Tide and Aerial) up to 3 h retaining almost 70-80% activity and 10-20% activity at room temperature (30°C) and 50°C, respectively, indicating the potential role of this enzyme for detergent application.

  12. Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreak with a Secretor-independent Susceptibility Pattern, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Kindberg, Elin; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Matussek, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is recognized as the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis among adults. Susceptibility to disease has been associated with histo-blood group antigens and secretor status; nonsecretors are almost completely resistant to disease. We report a foodborne outbreak of GI.3 NoV gastroenteritis that affected 33/83 (40%) persons. Symptomatic disease was as likely to develop in nonsecretors as in secretors (odds ratio [OR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46–4.36 vs. OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.23–2.18, p = 0.57). Moreover, no statistical difference in susceptibility was found between persons of different Lewis or ABO phenotypes. The capsid gene of the outbreak strain shares high amino acid homology with the Kashiwa645 GI.3 strain, previously shown to recognize nonsecretor saliva, as well as synthetic Lewis a. This norovirus outbreak affected persons regardless of secretor status or Lewis or ABO phenotypes. PMID:20031047

  13. [Exploration on human blood type case in teaching practice of genetics].

    PubMed

    Pi, Yan; Li, Xiao-Ying; Huai, Cong; Wang, Shi-Ming; Qiao, Shou-Yi; Lu, Da-Ru

    2013-08-01

    Blood type, which harbors abundant genetics meaning, is one of the most common phenotypes in human life. With the development of science and technology, its significance is unceasingly updated and new finding is increasingly emerging, which constantly attracts people to decipher the heredity mechanism of blood type. In addition to four main associated contents, i.e., Mendelian inheritance, genetic linkage, gene mutations, and chromosome abnormalities, the blood type case also covers many other aspects of the genetics knowledge. Based on the genetic knowledge context, we can interest the students and improve the teaching output in genetic teaching practice by combining with explaining ABO blood type case and heredity mechanism, expanding leucocyte groups, and introducing infrequent blood type such as Bombay blood, Rh and MN. By carrying out the related experimental teaching, we could drive the student to integrate theory with practice. In genetic experimental teaching, 80% of the students chose this optional experiment, molecular identification of ABO blood type, and it greatly interested them. Using appropriate blood type case in teaching related knowledge, organizing PPT exhi-bition and the debating discussion activities, it could provide opportunities for student to propose their own opinions, guide the student to thinking deeply, and develop their abilities to analyze and solve problem. Afterwards, students will gain in-depth comprehension about the fundamental knowledge of genetics.

  14. Mapping growth windows in quaternary perovskite oxide systems by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Lapano, Jason; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Requisite to growing stoichiometric perovskite thin films of the solid-solution A'1-xAxBO3 by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy is understanding how the growth conditions interpolate between the end members A'BO3 and ABO3, which can be grown in a self-regulated fashion, but under different conditions. Using the example of La1-xSrxVO3, the two-dimensional growth parameter space that is spanned by the flux of the metal-organic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide and composition, x, was mapped out. The evolution of the adsorption-controlled growth window was obtained using a combination of X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is found that the stoichiometric growth conditions can be mapped out quickly with a single calibration sample using RHEED. Once stoichiometric conditions have been identified, the out-of-plane lattice parameter can be utilized to precisely determine the composition x. This strategy enables the identification of growth conditions that allow the deposition of stoichiometric perovskite oxide films with random A-site cation mixing, which is relevant to a large number of perovskite materials with interesting properties, e.g., high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance, that emerge in solid solution A'1-xAxBO3.

  15. Transfusion medicine and solid organ transplant – Update and review of some current issues

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, R.S.; Philip, J.; Yadav, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion medicine holds a place of prime importance in organ transplant surgeries. There is a huge demand of organs worldwide with long waiting periods before the organ is available for transplant. Currently the dependency on ABO and HLA matching has decreased considerably with the use of modern immunosuppressant drugs and transplant techniques. The greatest advance in clinical implementation of ABO-incompatible transplants came about through desensitization and isoagglutinin elimination techniques with immunoadsorption and anti-CD20 antibodies becoming the norm, and spleenectomy fading out. The implications and practices of transfusion medicine in organ transplant are also undergoing drastic changes. The practice of infusion of one unit of donor's blood preoperatively for immunomodulation is no longer practiced. Use of leuco-reduced products has shown decreasing trends of alloimmunization and graft rejection in cases of multiple surgeries related to organ transplants. Worldwide donor and recipient registry programmes are being setup and existing ones are being upgraded. Such a registry system has been opened in India for kidney transplant cases very recently. Due to such registry programmes the dependency on siblings and directed donations have decreased considerably. This review deals with some of the current issues contributing to the successful outcome of mismatched transplants and the changing concepts of transfusion medicine related to it. PMID:24600091

  16. Cheiloscopy and blood groups: Aid in forensic identification★

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Bushra; Gupta, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Every person has certain features that make them radically distinct from others. One such feature is lip prints. Lip prints remain the same throughout life and are uninfluenced by injuries, diseases, or environmental changes. Different individuals have specific blood groups according to the various antigen–antibody reactions in their bloodstream. Aim To determine the distribution of different patterns of lip prints among subjects having different ABO and Rh blood groups. Objective To determine the correlation between respective characteristics of subjects. Methodology In this study, lip prints were obtained from 122 subjects (62 males and 60 females), and associated blood-group matching was performed to determine the predominant lip print type and to determine any correlation between lip print types and blood groups. Tsuchihashi’s classification of type I (complete vertical grooves), type I′ (incomplete vertical grooves), type II (forking grooves), type III (intersecting grooves), type IV (reticular grooves), and type V (indeterminate grooves) was used to compare with the ABO and Rh blood grouping systems. Result No correlation was found between lip prints and blood groups. Conclusion No significant correlation exists between blood group and lip prints. Lip prints play a vital role in identification because they are unique. PMID:25382951

  17. Nonmyeloablative Stem Cell Transplantation with Alemtuzumab/Low-Dose Irradiation to Cure and Improve the Quality of Life of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Santosh L; Oh, Annie L; Patel, Pritesh R; Jalundhwala, Yash; Sweiss, Karen; Koshy, Matthew; Campbell-Lee, Sally; Gowhari, Michel; Hassan, Johara; Peace, David; Quigley, John G; Khan, Irum; Molokie, Robert E; Hsu, Lewis L; Mahmud, Nadim; Levinson, Dennis J; Pickard, A Simon; Garcia, Joe G N; Gordeuk, Victor R; Rondelli, Damiano

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is rarely performed in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We utilized the chemotherapy-free, alemtuzumab/total body irradiation 300 cGy regimen with sirolimus as post-transplantation immunosuppression in 13 high-risk SCD adult patients between November 2011 and June 2014. Patients received matched related donor (MRD) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, including 2 cases that were ABO incompatible. Quality-of-life (QoL) measurements were performed at different time points after HSCT. All 13 patients initially engrafted. A stable mixed donor/recipient chimerism was maintained in 12 patients (92%), whereas 1 patient not compliant with sirolimus experienced secondary graft failure. With a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 12 to 44 months) there was no mortality, no acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and no grades 3 or 4 extramedullary toxicities. At 1 year after transplantation, patients with stable donor chimerism have normalized hemoglobin concentrations and improved cardiopulmonary and QoL parameters including bodily pain, general health, and vitality. In 4 patients, sirolimus was stopped without rejection or SCD-related complications. These results underscore the successful use of a chemotherapy-free regimen in MRD HSCT for high-risk adult SCD patients and demonstrates a high cure rate, absence of GVHD or mortality, and improvement in QoL including the applicability of this regimen in ABO mismatched cases (NCT number 01499888). PMID:26348889

  18. In-house preparation of lectin panel and detection of Tn polyagglutination.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Polyagglutination is a condition in which red cells are agglutinated by ABO-compatible adult human sera, but not by cord blood sera and may be acquired or inherited. Lectins are invaluable reagents in the investigation of red cells polyagglutination. We prepared in-house lectin panel and confirmed Tn polyagglutination in a pregnant lady. The lady was anemic and refused blood transfusion elsewhere due to serological discrepancy. We found ABO discrepancy and an incompatible minor cross-match in the initial investigation and suspected polyagglutination. Confirmation of polyagglutination was done using adult and cord sera. We then used the in-house lectin panels to detect the type of polyagglutination. The agglutination pattern with the various lectins was suggestive of Tn polyagglutination, which was further supported by the enzyme study. Most blood banks in India lack commercial lectin panels because of cost and procurement difficulty. Lectins play an important role in the diagnosis and differentiation of polyagglutination and immunohematological management of patient. The important and basic lectins can be prepared in-house using specific raw seeds following standardized protocol. PMID:25722587

  19. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies MicroRNAs from Posterior Intestine of Loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) and Their Response to Intestinal Air-Breathing Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Songqian; Cao, Xiaojuan; Tian, Xianchang; Wang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert important roles in animal growth, immunity, and development, and regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Knowledges about the diversities of miRNAs and their roles in accessory air-breathing organs (ABOs) of fish remain unknown. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing to identify known and novel miRNAs from the posterior intestine, an important ABO, in loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) under normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited conditions. A total of 204 known and 84 novel miRNAs were identified, while 47 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two small RNA libraries (i.e. between the normal and intestinal air-breathing inhibited group). Potential miRNA target genes were predicted by combining our transcriptome data of the posterior intestine of the loach under the same conditions, and then annotated using COG, GO, KEGG, Swissprot and Nr databases. The regulatory networks of miRNAs and their target genes were analyzed. The abundances of nine known miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The relative expression profiles of six known miRNAs and their eight corresponding target genes, and two novel potential miRNAs were also detected. Histological characteristics of the posterior intestines in both normal and air-breathing inhibited group were further analyzed. This study contributes to our understanding on the functions and molecular regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in accessory air-breathing organs of fish.

  1. Blood transfusion in bimaxillary orthognathic operations: need for testing of type and screen.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Matthias; Kessler, Peter; Holst, Stefan; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Holst, Alexandra Ioana

    2009-12-01

    We prospectively evaluated the incidence of blood transfusion in 105 consecutively treated patients (45 men and 60 women) having bimaxillary orthognathic operations, to find out whether type and screen testing are adequate in clinical practice. All patients had Le Fort I osteotomy combined with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the ramus. The preoperative routine was restricted to type and screen testing and verification of ABO/Rhesus (Rh) status. Autologous blood donation or routine cross-matching of allogeneic units of blood was not done. Intraoperative haemoglobin concentrations and the need for blood transfusion in patients having bimaxillary osteotomies were recorded in a prospective database. The mean duration of operation was 196 min (range 115-325). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (range 4-16). The mean (SD) reduction in haemoglobin during operation was 34 (16)g/L in men and 32 (10)g/L in women (p=0.32). No patients had an allogeneic blood transfusion. We found that type and screen testing and verification of ABO/Rh status seems to be an adequate precaution to manage blood loss. As reflected by the low rate of transfusion in the present study, severe haemorrhage that requires transfusion of allogeneic blood has become the exception rather than the rule in bimaxillary orthognathic operations. PMID:19608311

  2. Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: the Indian experience with kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    According to the Indian chronic kidney disease registry, in 2010 only 2% of end stage kidney disease patients were managed with kidney transplantation, 37% were managed with dialysis and 61% were treated conservatively without renal replacement therapy. In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. The most common reason to decline a donor for directed living donation is ABO incompatibility, which eliminates up to one third of the potential living donor pool. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. In transplant centres with a large living donor kidney transplantation program KPD does not require extra infrastructure, decreases waiting time, avoids transplant tourism and prevents commercial trafficking. Although KPD is still underutilized in India, it has been performed more frequently in recent times. To substantially increase donor pool and transplant rates, transplant centres should work together towards a national KPD program and frame a uniform acceptable allocation policy.

  3. Drilling Fluids and Lost Circulation in Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G. Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320 C (608 F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred. Several techniques were attempted to solve these problems but have met with varying degrees of success.

  4. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot dry rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.; Baroid, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo Formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred.

  5. Depositional model for the San Andres Formation, Roberts unit, Wasson field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, E.P. )

    1992-04-01

    The Permian San Andres reservoir at Roberts unit produces from approximately 250 ft of anhydritic dolostones. The reservoir interval, which is more than 500 ft below the top of the San Andres Formation, consists of fossiliferous and pelletal/peloidal dolowackestones and dolopackstones. They were deposited in a shallow-marine environment with local shoaling conditions. Toward the top of the reservoir, intertidal and supratidal deposits interfinger with the subtidal units and form the lateral and overlying seals. A sponge-bryozoan bank lithofacies is recognized within the subtidal deposits at Roberts unit. The banks consist of dolomitized mud-rich boundstones dominated by bryozoans, sponges, and crinoids. Interbedded fossiliferous dolowackestones, dolopackstones, and dolograinstones are common. The restricted nature of the San Andres in the western part of Roberts unit (i.e., shoreward of the banks) indicates that the banks baffled wave energy and inhibited current circulation on the platform, resulting in a mud-dominated, restricted lagoonal facies with very low faunal diversity. The sponge-bryozoan banks occur within a narrow belt across the central part of Roberts unit and continue into the adjacent Willard unit. Their distribution has a distinct northeast-soutwest trend that parallels the subjacent Abo shelf margin reef trend, suggesting that the Abo reef trend influenced subsequent bank development.

  6. A review of current status of living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gil-Chun; Song, Gi-Won; Moon, Deok-Bog

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has become an inevitable procedure in Asia due to its shortage of deceased donor under the influence of the religion and native cultures. Through a broad variety of experience, LDLT has been evolved and extended its indication. Although there have been many surgical and ethical efforts to prevent donor risk, concerns of donor’s safety still are remaining questions due to its strict selection criteria. Therefore, dual grafts LDLT or ABO incompatible (ABO-I) LDLT may be effective means in its application and safety aspect. Many Asian LDLT centers have pointed out the useful extended criteria of LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the applicability of extended criteria should be validated and standardized by worldwide prospective studies based on the Milan criteria. Recent struggling efforts have been reported to surmount extensive portal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome which were previously contraindicated to LDLT. There is no doubt that LDLT is a surely complicated therapy to be performed successfully and requires devoted efforts by surgeons and co-workers. Nonetheless, comprehensive increasing understandings of partial graft LT and improvements of surgical techniques with challenges to obstacles in LDLT will make its prosperity with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27115004

  7. Measurement of RBC agglutination with microscopic cell image analysis in a microchannel chip.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ju Yeon; Nyeck, Agnes E; Lim, Chae Seung; Hur, Dae Sung; Chung, Chanil; Chang, Jun Keun; An, Seong Soo A; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-01-01

    Since Landsteiner's discovery of ABO blood groups, RBC agglutination has been one of the most important immunohematologic techniques for ABO and RhD blood groupings. The conventional RBC agglutination grading system for RhD blood typings relies on macroscopic reading, followed by the assignment of a grade ranging from (-) to (4+) to the degree of red blood cells clumping. However, with the new scoring method introduced in this report, microscopically captured cell images of agglutinated RBCs, placed in a microchannel chip, are used for analysis. Indeed, the cell images' pixel number first allows the differentiation of agglutinated and non-agglutinated red blood cells. Finally, the ratio of agglutinated RBCs per total RBC counts (CRAT) from 90 captured images is then calculated. During the trial, it was observed that the agglutinated group's CRAT was significantly higher (3.77-0.003) than that of the normal control (0). Based on these facts, it was established that the microchannel method was more suitable for the discrimination between agglutinated RBCs and non-agglutinated RhD negative, and thus more reliable for the grading of RBCs agglutination than the conventional method.

  8. Designing rules and probabilistic weighting for fast materials discovery in the Perovskite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, I. E.; Jacobsen, K. W.

    2014-07-01

    High-throughput electronic-structure calculations are becoming increasingly popular in materials science and in the design of new compounds. Electronic-structure theory, for example, in the form of density-functional theory, can be used to calculate stabilities and electronic properties as bandgaps of new compounds. However, in practice, the methods are often limited to rather small atomic-scale systems or periodic crystals with only a limited number of atoms in the unit cell. It is therefore of interest to be able to derive generally useful information from simple systems to be applied in other, more complex, crystals. Here, we consider a large database of calculated stabilities and bandgaps of oxides and oxynitrides in the perovskite structure. We use the database as a testing ground for existing ideas about the behavior of these types of compounds and we derive some new simple chemical-based rules which combine structural information, like the ionic radii of the chemical elements, with electronic data, like the number of electrons and the valences of the pure elements. The rules extracted from the ABO3 cubic perovskite are then tested using the ABO2N and A2BO4 stoichiometry in the cubic and layered perovskite structure, respectively. These rules allow a saving in computer time of around 80%.

  9. Complement Interception Across Humoral Incompatibility in Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The humoral barrier in transplant biology is the result of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), directed either against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or non-HLA antigens such as blood group (ABO) molecules. The term "sensitization" applies to patients carrying these antibodies. Transplantation is widely accepted as a life-saving opportunity for patients with terminal end-organ disease. However, in sensitized patients, transplant outcome is hampered by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) as a consequence of DSA exposure. Furthermore, sensitized patients have limited access to "matched" organs from the both living and deceased donor pool.Considering the crucial role of the complement system in the pathophysiology of AMR and the availability of complement intervention therapeutics, there is a growing interest in complement-targeting strategies. This review highlights the emerging importance of monitoring and modulation of the complement system in the context of enabling transplantation across humoral incompatibility in sensitized recipients with preformed anti-HLA or natural anti-ABO antibodies. It also discusses the significance of the complement system in the induction of accommodation and further emphasizes current and future perspectives of novel complement therapeutics.

  10. Genotyping of the c.1423C>T (p.P475S) polymorphism in the ADAMTS13 gene by APLP and HRM assays: Northeastern Asian origin of the mutant.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mayumi; Matsusue, Aya; Umetsu, Kazuo; Iino, Morio; Ishikawa, Takaki; Yuasa, Isao

    2016-07-01

    ADAMTS13 is a von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease. The mutant types of p.P475S (c.1423C>T) polymorphism in ADAMTS13 have a reduced activity in comparison with the wild type. In the present study, we investigated the frequency of the C-to-T substitution in 2584 genomic DNA samples from 25 Asian, European, and African populations using APLP (amplified product length polymorphism) and/or HRM (high-resolution melting) assays. Allele T (ADAMTS13(∗)T) was detected only in Asian populations and its frequency was observed to decrease gradually from north to south in 24 East Asian populations. Almost all ADAMTS13(∗)T were associated with ABO(∗)O. These results suggested that ADAMTS13(∗)T had occurred on a chromosome with ABO(∗)O in a northern part of East Asia. This SNP is useful as an ancestry-informative marker, and the present genotyping techniques are applicable to the investigation of an association between this SNP and aortic dissection (Kobayashi et al., 2012). PMID:27497325

  11. Effects of Phyllanthus sellowianus Müll Arg. extracts on the rheological properties of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Buszniez, Patricia; Di Sapio, Osvaldo; Riquelme, Bibiana

    2014-11-01

    Phyllanthus sellowianus extracts have been used in Argentina since colonial times in the treatment of diabetes. The in vitro biorheological and hemoagglutinant action of different extracts of P. sellowianus bark on human erythrocytes (RBC) were studied. RBCs were incubated in vitro with four aqueous extracts: Maceration; Controlled Digestion (PD); Decoction; and Infusion. Biorheological parameters (deformability, membrane surface viscosity, elastic modulus, and dynamic viscolelasticity) were determined with an Erythrodeformeter, and erythrocyte adhesion was characterized by image digital analysis. Immunohematological assays in RBC incubated with all the extracts showed large globular aggregates and agglutination in human ABO blood group system. Isolated cell coefficient showed the increase of cell adhesion. Aggregated shape parameters were significantly higher than normal and they changed with the concentration, particularly of PD extracts. Rheological results showed that the extract biorheological action varies with the temperature used in the extract preparations. The results obtained are useful to study the action mechanism of extracts from P. sellowianus bark in order to evaluate its use as therapeutic agent in diabetes. Immunohematological Tests using ABO system showed its agglutinant power, which is of special interest in Immunohematology to be used as hemoclassifier.

  12. Blood group antigen distribution in Lao blood donors.

    PubMed

    Keokhamphoui, C; Urwijitaroon, Y; Kongphaly, D; Thammavong, T

    2012-01-01

    Blood group antigens can be distributed differently within different nationalities. Therefore, information about the prevalence of blood group antigens in the Lao population will be useful for providing better blood transfusion services in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of blood group antigens in Lao blood donors. Blood samples from 464 Lao national volunteer blood donors were typed for antigens in various blood group systems including ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, Lewis, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego. The results show similar antigen prevalence to that among Northeast Thais for ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, and Duffy systems. In the ABO system, 0 was the highest at 37.72 percent,followed by 35.56 percent B, 19.83 percent A1, 6.47 percent A1B,and 0.43 percent A2B. The common phenotypes were D+C+E-ce+at 60.43 percent, M+N-S-s+ at 46.55 percent, Fy(a+b-) at 80.82 percent, Jk(a+b+) at 39.44 percent, and kk at 99.72 percent.Interestingly, Le(a-b-) was found at 50.43 percent, which was significantly higher than previous reports in Thais and Taiwanese.The P1 antigen was found in only 18.97 percent, which is much lower than in Whites and Blacks. Rare phenotypes were Fy(a-b+)and Jk(a-b-), found at 0.22 percent and 4.31 percent, respectively.In terms of negative antigens the study shows 0.22 percent Fy(a-), 35.34 percent Jk(a-), 29.53 percent Jk(b-), 3.04 percent C-, 2.39 percent e-, and 5.17 percent M-. The high prevalence of C, e, and Fy" and immunogenicity of these antigens may induce alloimmunization in transfusion-dependent patients, creating difficulties providing blood from Lao donors. The information obtained from this study will be useful for improving transfusion therapy in the country, especially for estimation of the availability of compatible blood for patients who have produced antibodies. PMID:23421543

  13. Functionalization and Characterization of Metal Oxide Coatings of Stainless Steel and Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaney, Anne Margaret

    The development of tolerogens, fabricated devices eliciting tolerance toward incompatible donor ABO antigens in implant patients, is the ultimate goal of this project. This would permit ABO incompatible organ transplants, increase the donor pool for patients, increase efficiency in the use of available organs, reduce waitlist times and reduce mortality rates of patients. Stainless steel stents and silica nanoparticles were chosen as platforms for the stationary and circulating tolerogens. Stainless steel was coated with silica by solgel dip-coating, electrodeposition, and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The coatings were evaluated by CV, EIS, SEM, AFM, VASE, FTIR, XPS, and AES. Of the silica films, those deposited by ALD provided superior insulating, conformal, and thin coatings. These silica ALD films outperformed even titania ALD films upon stressing. Silica ALD films were subsequently functionalized with mixtures of silane derivatives of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), to prevent nonspecific protein binding, and monosaccharides (MS) or trisaccharide and tetrasaccharide (TS) antigens. Functionalizations were characterized by FTIR, XPS and UV-Vis following enzyme-linked lectin assays (ELLAs) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Effective functionalization allowing biological availability and activity even after incubation in blood plasma was confirmed. Microarray microscope slides were similarly developed with all ABO antigen subtypes, characterized by ToF-SIMS and ELISA, and proved useful in detecting antibodies in human blood samples. Silica nanoparticles, including fluorescent and magnetic varieties, in a range of sizes were prepared by sol-gel synthesis. The nanoparticles were evaluated by SEM, DLS, zeta potential measurements, fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry, two-photon excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and TEM. Different dye incorporation methods were used for effective detection of NPs, and additional silica layers improved

  14. Medición de los parámetros cosmológicos q0, ΩM, y ΩΛ, usando supernovas de Tipo Ia distantes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clocchiatti, A.; High-Z Sne Search Team

    Las supernovas de tipo Ia son una herramienta de gran precisión para la medición de distancias de interés cosmológico. Los métodos recientes de calibración de su luminosidad intrínseca, que hacen uso de la forma de las curvas de luz en varios colores y permiten diferenciar entre supernovas distantes, intrínsecamente débiles, u oscurecidas por extinción, reducen la dispersión del método que las asume de magnitud absoluta constante de 0.50 mag a 0.15 mag, e incrementa el valor de la constante de Hubble de ~55 km s-1 Mpc-1, a 65 km s-1 Mpc-1. A partir de la calibración de las supernovas cercanas, con redshifts menores que 0.1, se pueden obtener distancias precisas a supernovas que explotan a alto redshift. Hemos aplicado estos métodos a 16 supernovas con 0.16 < Z < 0.97, encontrando que sus distancias son, en promedio, entre 10% y 13% (dependiendo del método empleado) mayores que las que uno esperaría en un universo con poca masa (Ω = 0.2), sin una constante cosmológica. Todos los métodos de ajuste de curvas de luz, y selección de subgrupos de la muestra de supernovas observadas, favorecen consistentemente modelos del universo que se expanden eternamente y que tienen una constante cosmológica positiva (ΩΛ > 0), y una aceleración de la expansión al presente (q0 < 0). Hay distintas fuentes de posibles errores sistemáticos que merecen ser analizadas, entre ellas: evolución de la metalicidad y estrellas progenitoras, extinción, bias en la elección de la muestra, amplificación por gravitational lensing, y contaminación de la muestra. Ninguno de estos efectos alcanza para reconciliar los datos con ΩΛ = 0, o q0 > 0.

  15. The history of blood transfusion prior to the 20th century--part 2.

    PubMed

    Learoyd, P

    2012-12-01

    Although there are a number of descriptions of 'blood infusion' in antiquity, it was the publication of the discovery of the circulation of blood in 1628 by William Harvey and the work of Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle in 1663 on the infusion of different materials into dogs that paved the way to the possible practical attempts at actual blood transfusion. Although these early experiments, principally by Richard Lower in England and Jean Denis in France provided valuable information regarding inter-species incompatibility and the problems of blood coagulation, it was not until the work of James Blundell in the early part of the 19th century that blood transfusion was used as a means of blood replacement. However, blood transfusion was not to become an accepted therapeutic possibility until the discovery of practical anticoagulation and the ABO blood groups at the start of the 20th century.

  16. Influence of transition metal electronegativity on the oxygen storage capacity of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Taylor, Daniel D; Rodriguez, Efrain E; Zachariah, Michael R

    2016-08-16

    The selection of highly efficient oxygen carriers (OCs) is a key step necessary for the practical development of chemical looping combustion (CLC). In this study, a series of ABO3 perovskites, where A = La, Ba, Sr, Ca and B = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, are synthesized and tested in a fixed bed reactor for reactivity and stability as OCs with CH4 as the fuel. We find that the electronegativity of the transition metal on the B-site (λB), is a convenient descriptor for oxygen storage capacity (OSC) of our perovskite samples. By plotting OSC for total methane oxidation against λB, we observe an inverted volcano plot relationship. These results could provide useful guidelines for perovskite OC design and their other energy related applications. PMID:27478888

  17. Static ferroelectric memory transistor having improved data retention

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric FET structure in which the ferroelectric layer is doped to reduce retention loss. A ferroelectric FET according to the present invention includes a semiconductor layer having first and second contacts thereon, the first and second contacts being separated from one another. The ferroelectric FET also includes a bottom electrode and a ferroelectric layer which is sandwiched between the semiconductor layer and the bottom electrode. The ferroelectric layer is constructed from a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4 in sufficient concentration to impede shifts in the resistance measured between the first and second contacts with time. The ferroelectric FET structure preferably comprises Pb in the A-site. The first and second elements are preferably Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred B-site dopants are Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten at concentrations between 1% and 8%.

  18. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation.

  19. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  20. Raman scattering in La1-xSrxFeO3-δ thin films: annealing-induced reduction and phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad A; Xie, Yujun; Scafetta, Mark D; May, Steven J; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2015-04-22

    Raman scattering in thin film La0.2Sr0.8FeO3-δ on MgO(0 0 1) collected at 300 K after different stages of annealing at selected temperatures T (300 K < T < 543 K, to 10 h) and analysis reveal changes in spectral characteristics due to a loss of oxygen, onset of oxygen vacancy-induced disorder, and activation of Raman-inactive modes that are attributed to symmetry lowering. The interpretation is further supported by carrier transport measurements under identical conditions showing orders of magnitude increase in the resistivity induced by oxygen loss. After prolonged annealing in air, evolution of the spectrum signals the appearance of a possible topotactic transformation of the crystal structure from that of the rhombohedral ABO3 perovskites to that of Brownmillerite-like structure consisting of octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated Fe atoms.

  1. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  2. An experience of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue Innova) in a regional acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk Wah; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova) in a hospital blood bank by considering the performance and workflow as compared with manual methods. The turnaround time was found to be 45% faster than the manual method. The concordance rate was found to be 100% for both ABO/Rh(D) typing and antibody screening in both of the systems and there was no significant difference in detection sensitivity for clinically significant antibodies. The Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova automated blood banking system streamlined the routine pre-transfusion testing in hospital blood bank with high throughput, equivalent sensitivity and reliability as compared with conventional manual method.

  3. Detection of hemagglutinins in dried saliva stains and their potential use in blood typing.

    PubMed

    Harrington, J J; Martin, R; Kobilinsky, L

    1988-05-01

    Since 1928, hemagglutinins have been known to exist in saliva; however, they have not been utilized as evidence in criminal investigations because in the past, techniques for measuring them have not been sufficiently sensitive. In this paper we describe improved techniques for detecting salivary hemagglutinins and report initial results obtained with these methods. The stability of salivary hemagglutinins at several different temperatures was examined in liquid samples and in dried stains on filter paper, cigarette butts, and envelope flaps. Our observations indicate that salivary hemagglutinins may be sufficiently stable, over periods of one to several days at ambient room temperatures, to be of value to forensic science investigators. The results of the hemagglutinin assay are not affected by the age or sex of the sample donor. Because salivary hemagglutinins can be used to determine ABO blood type, analyses of this kind can serve as an important confirmatory test which the forensic serologist can use in conjunction with salivary agglutinogen determinations. PMID:3385376

  4. Single-Crystalline SrRuO3 Nanomembranes: A Platform for Flexible Oxide Electronics.

    PubMed

    Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Sichel-Tissot, Rebecca; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Stan, Liliana; Fong, Dillon D

    2016-01-13

    The field of oxide electronics has benefited from the wide spectrum of functionalities available to the ABO3 perovskites, and researchers are now employing defect engineering in single crystalline heterostructures to tailor properties. However, bulk oxide single crystals are not conducive to many types of applications, particularly those requiring mechanical flexibility. Here, we demonstrate the realization of an all-oxide, single-crystalline nanomembrane heterostructure. With a surface-to-volume ratio of 2 × 10(7), the nanomembranes are fully flexible and can be readily transferred to other materials for handling purposes or for new materials integration schemes. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we find that the nanomembranes can bond to other host substrates near room temperature and demonstrate coupling between surface reactivity and electromechanical properties in ferroelectric nanomembrane systems. The synthesis technique described here represents a significant advancement in materials integration and provides a new platform for the development of flexible oxide electronics.

  5. The non-Mendelian inheritance of Lewis-c blood group substance, as demonstrated in the case of a Bombay, Le(a-b-c-) saliva.

    PubMed

    Savvas, R S

    1975-01-01

    A Bombay, Le(a-b-) saliva was shown to lack Pneumococcus type XIV activity, an unusual situation, since this sample should be rich in this precursor to the ABO blood group substances. However, the sample was found to contain a new serological specificity, Le-c. It is argued that simple Mendelian inheritance does not occur with Le-c and single gene control cannot be demonstrated. Failure to repress a fetal gene at birth, as implicated by the similarity in structure between Le-c and carcinoembryonic antigen [SIMMONS and PERLMANN], has been excluded as the mechanism of inheritance of this blood group substance, due to the inability to detect carcinoembryonic antigen in the test saliva.

  6. Emergency dilatation and curettage in a patient with Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Asghar; Sohaib, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    Bombay blood group is a rare autosomal recessive phenotype within the ABO blood group. It represents genetically suppressed A, B and H genes. When considering such patients for transfusion, only blood of identical Bombay type can be safely transfused. We are reporting a patient having Bombay phenotypic blood, underwent emergency dilatation and curettage with active per vaginal bleeding due to retained products of placenta. There are numerous anaesthetic considerations, including emergency surgery with hemodynamic instability due to ongoing blood loss, dilutional coagulopathy as well as presence of Bombay phenotype that severely limit the possibility of red blood cell transfusion. Only four donors were registered with the blood bank of the institution and none was traceable. It becomes a real challenge for the anesthesiologist to manage such type of patients without having units of red packed cell which management is described hereby.

  7. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease. PMID:25352340

  8. Accomplishment of highly porous-lithium lanthanum titanate through microwave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, D.; Nalini, B.; Abhilash, K. P.; Selvin, P. Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Perovskite structured (ABO3) lithium lanthanum titanate (LLTO) is a successful electrolyte reported by several scientists in the recent past. It is believed that intercalation and de-intercalation of Li ions inside solid electrolyte can be improved by increasing the porosity of the material. Hence in this research work, an attempt is made to increase the porosity of the LLTO electrolyte by rapid-microwave synthesis route. The microwave prepared LLTO is compared with the sol-gel synthesized LLTO. The prepared samples are analyzed with XRD, SEM, PL and cyclic Voltammetry studies. Morphological analysis proves that microwave synthesized LLTO contains much pores compared to the Sol-gel LLTO. A remarkable difference in its electrochemical property is also demonstrated and analysed with cyclic voltammetric studies and the results are presented.

  9. Demographics, epidemiology, and inheritance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) will affect 48,960 persons in the United States and will result in 40,560 deaths in 2015, according to the American Cancer Society. On a global basis, at least 337,000 persons will be diagnosed with PC. The incidence of PC has increased slightly in the United States, though worldwide cases are likely to increase substantially due to the influence of cigarette smoking, rising obesity and type II diabetes. The development of PC is related to a state of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Well-established environmental and personal risk factors for PC include advancing age, cigarette smoking, second-hand tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, inherited familial cancer syndromes, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, chronic pancreatitis, dietary factors, and diabetes. Other identified associations are human immunodeficiency virus infection, ABO blood group polymorphisms, hepatitis B virus, and Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Dynamic force spectroscopy of the Helicobacter pylori BabA-Lewis b binding.

    PubMed

    Björnham, Oscar; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Schedin, Staffan

    2009-07-01

    The binding strength of the Helicobacter pylori adhesin-receptor complex BabA-ABO/Lewis b has been analyzed by means of dynamic force spectroscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces were performed in situ on single bacterial cells, expressing the high-affinity binding BabA adhesin, by the use of force measuring optical tweezers. The resulting force spectra revealed the mechanical properties of a single BabA-Leb bond. It was found that the bond is dominated by one single energy barrier and that it is a slip-bond. The bond length and thermal off-rate were assessed to be 0.86+/-0.07 nm and 0.015+/-0.006 s(-1), respectively.

  11. Blood group gene frequency in a selected north Indian population.

    PubMed

    Nanu, A; Thapliyal, R M

    1997-09-01

    Gene frequencies have been calculated from 6334 blood donors who were tested at a referral hospital in north India, for ABO & Rh and from > 350 donors who were tested for other blood groups. The Hardy Weinberg equation for 2 allel systems and the Bernstein method for 3 or more allel systems have been employed for calculating gene frequencies. The predominance of blood group B (37.39%), Rh D negative frequency of 4.63 per cent, predominance of M gene (0.6383) and M s haplotype (0.4464) and S gene frequency below 0.3 (0.2069) agrees with earlier data. The new findings include the presence of the allels Fy (a-b-) (0.44%) in the Duffy group, S- s- (1.16%) in the Ss group and JK (a-b-) (0.54%) in the Kidd blood group system. These have not been reported in the Indian population. PMID:9378531

  12. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Y; Ohsawa, M; Hai, E; Jomura, H; Ueda, M

    2003-12-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological technology was used to resolve the issue. Liver biopsy was performed on two patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. During sample transfer or tissue processing, the biopsy specimens were mixed up. Because the ABO blood group of the two patients was identical (type AB), the specimens were subsequently identified by analysing the HCV genotypes. RNA extracted from the paraffin wax embedded liver specimens was examined by a polymerase chain reaction based HCV genotype assay. This enabled the correct identification of the specimens, and each patient received the appropriate treatment on the basis of the accurate diagnosis.

  13. Blood groups systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  14. Electrochemical properties of mixed conducting La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (M = Sr,Ca,Ba) perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Pederson, L.R.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    At elevated temperatures, some ABO{sub 3} perovskite type oxides having Co and Fe as B site cations exhibit substantial mixed (anionic and electronic) conductivity. Because of this behavior, they are candidate materials for applications such as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen separation membranes. The purpose of the present study is to increase the understanding of the effects of composition, temperature, and environment on the electrochemical properties of selected materials within the La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (M=Sr,Ca,Ba) system in order to evaluate their applicability for the above-mentioned applications. Characterization techniques include XRD, SEM, TGA, dc conductivity, dilatometry, oxygen permeation measurements, and iodometric titration.

  15. [Genetic evidence corroborates Negme's hypothesis about the greater mildness of American trypanosomiasis in Chile].

    PubMed

    Acuña, M; Rothhammer, F; Moreno, R; Barton, S; Arribada, A; Apt, W; Llop, E

    1992-03-01

    Chagas disease is present in northern and central Chile. Not more than 25% of infected individuals have had a pathologic condition presumably due to Trypanosoma cruzi. The majority of individuals with chronic infectious Chagas disease in Chile are asymptomatic in contrast to what has been observed in other South American countries. Historic and paleopathologic evidences suggest that this particular behavior could be explained by a genetic adaptation of Chilean aborigines to T cruzi. Associations between ethnic admixture, presence of Chagas disease, associated cardiac pathology and 4 blood groups (ABO, MNSs, Rh and Duffy) were investigated among inhabitants of San Pedro de Atacama in northern Chile. Cardiac pathology was determined by positive serologic reactions in individuals with abnormal electrocardiographic findings. Individuals with negative serologic results had a significantly greater aboriginal admixture (88%) compared to those with positive serology (66%). This findings supports the hypothesis of genetic adaptation explaining mildness of Chagas disease in Chile.

  16. Trend of blood group distribution among the Jirels of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Chapagain, R H; Subba, B; Kunwar, C B; Subedi, J; Blengero, J; Williams, S; Towne, B

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to find out the trend of blood group distribution among the Jirels, a small tribe, descended from Kirat tribe and to compare with other castes within Nepal and with people of other continents. Blood group distribution (ABO grouping and Rh typing) was studied among 2093 Jirels (Male-1057 and Female-1036). The frequency of distribution of A, B, O and AB was 55.05%, 14.72%, 21.64% and 8.6% respectively. The group A was found to be most common among the Jirels where as O is most common in the world. Only 0.14%of the Jirels were was found to be Rhesus Negative (Rh -ve).

  17. Clinical evaluation of Rho(D) immune globulin (human) in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bryant, E C; Hart, G D; Cairns, D; Gamarra, J A; de Veber, L L; Holland, C G; Hutchison, J L

    1969-12-13

    -During 1966, clinical trials were conducted in three Canadian centres to determine the safety and efficacy of Rh(0)(D) immune globulin (human) in preventing isoimmunization by the Rh(0)(D) antigen in Rh-negative women delivering ABO-compatible Rh-positive infants.The candidates were randomly divided into control and treated groups; the treated mothers received an intramuscular injection of 300 mug. of anti-Rh(0)(D) within 72 hours of delivery. Follow-up antibody screening tests were conducted on the sera of all patients six to nine months post partum.Of the 175 control patients, 11 or 6.2% became actively immunized to the Rh antigen, whereas complete protection against maternal Rh immunization was observed in the 191 treated patients.

  18. A survey of blood groups.

    PubMed

    Afzal, M; Ziaur-Rehman; Hussain, F; Siddiqi, R

    1977-11-01

    A survey was conducted to investigate into the frequency of different blood groups in Punjab. A total of 1415 persons were included in this survey. The slide method was used for determination of ABO and AB blood groups as well as Rh factor. The frequency of blood group A was 21.20%; B, 36.16%; AB, 9.05% and O, 34.14%. Distribution of blood groups among various castes revealed the incidence of blood group A, 13.57% to 30%; B, 28.125% to 50%; O, 16.67% to 40%; and AB, zero to 25%. Only 2.76% cases were found to be Rh negative. Rh negative frequency was much higher in Baluchs, Awans and Gujjars than Rajputs, Jats and Arains.

  19. Blood group gene frequency in a selected north Indian population.

    PubMed

    Nanu, A; Thapliyal, R M

    1997-09-01

    Gene frequencies have been calculated from 6334 blood donors who were tested at a referral hospital in north India, for ABO & Rh and from > 350 donors who were tested for other blood groups. The Hardy Weinberg equation for 2 allel systems and the Bernstein method for 3 or more allel systems have been employed for calculating gene frequencies. The predominance of blood group B (37.39%), Rh D negative frequency of 4.63 per cent, predominance of M gene (0.6383) and M s haplotype (0.4464) and S gene frequency below 0.3 (0.2069) agrees with earlier data. The new findings include the presence of the allels Fy (a-b-) (0.44%) in the Duffy group, S- s- (1.16%) in the Ss group and JK (a-b-) (0.54%) in the Kidd blood group system. These have not been reported in the Indian population.

  20. Relationship between blood groups and sex ratio of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Rex-Kiss, B

    1991-01-01

    The examinations prove that due to the foetomaternal blood group incompatibility the sex ratio of the newborn will be higher. The most probable explanation for this fact is that the foetomaternal blood group incompatibility exerts a negative effect on the X chromosome, in consequence of which the elimination rate of the zygotes fertilized by Y chromosome-carrying spermia decrease and thus the sex ratio will be higher. The highest sex ratio was found among the D-negative newborns of D-positive mothers (172.7), whereas the lowest one among the D-positive children of D-positive mothers (113.5). The incompatibility existing in the other antigens of Rh-system and in the ABO-system also elevated the sex ratio to a minor degree.

  1. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  2. In situ growth of nanoparticles through control of non-stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Dragos; Tsekouras, George; Miller, David N; Ménard, Hervé; Irvine, John T S

    2013-11-01

    Surfaces decorated with uniformly dispersed catalytically active nanoparticles play a key role in many fields, including renewable energy and catalysis. Typically, these structures are prepared by deposition techniques, but alternatively they could be made by growing the nanoparticles in situ directly from the (porous) backbone support. Here we demonstrate that growing nano-size phases from perovskites can be controlled through judicious choice of composition, particularly by tuning deviations from the ideal ABO3 stoichiometry. This non-stoichiometry facilitates a change in equilibrium position to make particle exsolution much more dynamic, enabling the preparation of compositionally diverse nanoparticles (that is, metallic, oxides or mixtures) and seems to afford unprecedented control over particle size, distribution and surface anchorage. The phenomenon is also shown to be influenced strongly by surface reorganization characteristics. The concept exemplified here may serve in the design and development of more sophisticated oxide materials with advanced functionality across a range of possible domains of application.

  3. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. PMID:26085552

  4. The state of the science of whole blood: lessons learned at Mayo Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, James R.; Zielinski, Martin D.; Jenkins, Donald

    2016-01-01

    AABB Standards specify that ABO group-specific whole blood is the only acceptable choice for whole blood transfusions. Although universal donor group O stored whole blood (SWB) was used extensively by the military during the wars of the mid-twentieth century, its use has fallen out of favor and has never been used to great extent in the civilian trauma population. Interest in the use of whole blood has been renewed, particularly in light of its potential value in far-forward military and other austere environments. Evidence of preserved platelet function in SWB has heightened enthusiasm for a “one stop shop” resuscitation product providing volume, oxygen carrying capacity, and hemostatic effects. Experience with universal donor group O SWB is required to ascertain whether its use will be an advance in trauma care. Described here is the process of establishing a universal donor group O SWB at a civilian trauma center in the United States. PMID:27100754

  5. Specific features of nonvalent interactions in orthorhombic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Pushkin, D. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.

    2014-07-01

    It is established that isostructural orthorhombic perovskites ABO3 (sp. gr. Pnma in different systems, no. 62, Z = 4), depending on the specificity of nonvalent interactions (which determine the combinatorial-topological type of the Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra (VDPs) of four basis atoms), are divided into ten different stereotypes. It is shown by the example of 259 perovskites belonging to the DyCrO3 stereotype that VDP characteristics can be used to quantitatively estimate the distortion of BO6 octahedra, including that caused by the Jahn-Teller effect. It is found that one of the causes of the distortion of the coordination polyhedra of atoms in the structure of orthorhombic perovskites is heteroatomic metal-metal interactions, for which the interatomic distances are much shorter than the sum of the Slater radii of A and B atoms.

  6. A study of paired necro kidney grafts.

    PubMed

    Lamm, L U

    1979-01-01

    The comparison of the fate of kidney pairs originating from the same donor offers an opportunity to control variability in primary kidney graft survival due to characteristics of the donor. The present study on 1,303 pairs was made possible by combining the information in the Scandiatransplant registry and the EDTA follow-up file. The analysis showed that, contrary to expectation, the main variability in kidney graft survival is not donor dependent but rather due to post-nephrectomy factors. By the present approach it was possible to demonstrate a significant effect of presensitisation, HLA-A,B matching and recipient age. In contrast, transportation, and differences in sex and ABO blood group combinations seem to be of no importance for kidney graft survival.

  7. Direct measurement of oxygen octahedral rotations in improper ferroelectric superlattices by STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapano, Jason; Haislmaier, Ryan; Stone, Gregory; Gopalan, Venkat; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    Complex ABO3 perovskites are an intensely studied class of materials due to their numerous magnetic and electronic functionalities. Using strain and A-site cation, can induce new high temperature functionality known as improper ferroelectricity1. Visualizing the interplay between strain, cation ordering and octahedral rotations in improper ferroelectics is crucial to understand how this property manifests itself in thin films2. A series of CaTiO3n/SrTiO3n with periodicities n =2-10 were grown on (La,Sr)(Al,Ta)O3 by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. I will discuss how strain and layering affects the cation and oxygen sublattices, and how these distortions propagate through the layers, with direct imaging of the oxygen cations by annular bright field (ABF) STEM. I will then relate these back to understanding how improper ferroelectricity evolves in these films. National Science Foundation MRSEC.

  8. Good ethics requires good science: why transplant programs should not disclose misattributed parentage.

    PubMed

    Ross, L F

    2010-04-01

    In 1996, I argued that the recommendation by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to inform women when tests reveal misattributed paternity and not to disclose this information to the women's partners was morally wrong. I argued in favor of disclosure to both parties. It is a position that I still hold. But claims of misattributed paternity are not 'incidental findings' as it was called in the old genetics literature, but a rather serious indictment of biological infidelity. In this paper I argue that the tests used by transplant programs for living donor-recipient compatibility are inadequate to accurately determine misattributed paternity. Further I argue that it is not the responsibility of the transplant community to undertake such serious forensic evaluations. Genetic inconsistencies in ABO and HLA inheritance should be reported as variations. Families who want further clarification should be referred to a genetic professional.

  9. Genetic polymorphism of blood groups and erythrocytes enzymes in population groups of the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Efremovska, Lj; Schmidt, H D; Scheil, H G; Gjorgjevic, D; Nikoloska Dadic, E

    2007-12-01

    This study presents the results of an examination of 3 blood-group systems (ABO, Rhesus, and P1) and erythrocyte enzymes (ADA, AK, ALADH, PGD, SAHH, PGM1, PGM3, GPT, GOT, ACP, UMPK, ESD and GLO) in populations that reside in R. Macedonia. Four population samples from the Republic of Macedonia (129 Macedonians from Skopje, 98 Albanians from Skopje, 95 Aromanians from Krusevo, 102 Aromanians from Stip) were included in the study. A comparison of the obtained results with data from literature on other Balkan populations has been made. The results of the comparison of the studied alleles indicate relatively small genetic distances among the studied populations. The obtained dendrograms indicate a larger homogeneity in the large Balkan populations, and a manifest trend of separating the Aromanian population of the Stip region. A larger separation is characteristic in the Greek population of Thrace.

  10. Site Redistribution, Partial Frozen-in Defect Chemistry, and Electrical Properties of Ba1-x(Zr,Pr)O3-δ.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Isabel; Mikhalev, Sergey; Mather, Glenn Christopher; Kharton, Vladislav Vadimovich; Figueiras, Fábio Gabriel; Alves, Adriana; Rodrigues, Joana; Correia, Maria Rosário; Frade, Jorge Ribeiro; Fagg, Duncan Paul

    2016-09-01

    Changes in nominal composition of the perovskite (ABO3) solid solution Ba1-x(Zr,Pr)O3-δ and adjusted firing conditions at very high temperatures were used to induce structural changes involving site redistribution and frozen-in point defects, as revealed by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Complementary magnetic measurements allowed quantification of the reduced content of Pr. Weak dependence of oxygen stoichiometry with temperature was obtained by coulometric titration at temperatures below 1000 °C, consistent with a somewhat complex partial frozen-in defect chemistry. Electrical conductivity measurements combined with transport number and Seebeck coefficient measurements showed prevailing electronic transport and also indicated trends expected for partial frozen-in conditions. Nominal Ba deficiency and controlled firing at very high temperatures allows adjustment of structure and partial frozen-in defect chemistry, opening the way to engineer relevant properties for high-temperature electrochemical applications. PMID:27509311

  11. Demographics, epidemiology, and inheritance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) will affect 48,960 persons in the United States and will result in 40,560 deaths in 2015, according to the American Cancer Society. On a global basis, at least 337,000 persons will be diagnosed with PC. The incidence of PC has increased slightly in the United States, though worldwide cases are likely to increase substantially due to the influence of cigarette smoking, rising obesity and type II diabetes. The development of PC is related to a state of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Well-established environmental and personal risk factors for PC include advancing age, cigarette smoking, second-hand tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, inherited familial cancer syndromes, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, chronic pancreatitis, dietary factors, and diabetes. Other identified associations are human immunodeficiency virus infection, ABO blood group polymorphisms, hepatitis B virus, and Helicobacter pylori. PMID:25726048

  12. Local-site cation ordering of Eu3+ ion in doped PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-González, Y.; Pentón-Madrigal, A.; Peláiz-Barranco, A.; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; de Oliveira, L. A. S.; Concepción-Rosabal, B.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and scanning electron microscopy experiments were carried out in the (Pb0.88Eu0.08)TiO3 ferroelectric compound with a perovskite type structure. Qualitative EXAFS analysis has shown that Eu3+ ions substitute to Pb2+ and Ti4+ ions at A and B sites of the ABO3 structure, respectively. The XRD pattern refinement was consistent with the Eu3+ substitution at both A and B sites, which provides the formation of donor and acceptor-type defects. The shape of the observed X-ray lines profiles has shown features, which are known for this kind of ferroelectric material to be typical of the ferroelectric domains microstructure. A phenomenological model has been used for fitting the diffraction profiles by the Rietveld method.

  13. Sub-micro-liter Electrochemical Single-Nucleotide-Polymorphism Detector for Lab-on-a-Chip System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fiorini, Paolo; Peeters, Sara; Majeed, Bivragh; Sterken, Tom; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Hayashi, Miho; Yaku, Hidenobu; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2012-04-01

    A sub-micro-liter single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) detector for lab-on-a-chip applications is developed. This detector enables a fast, sensitive, and selective SNP detection directly from human blood. The detector is fabricated on a Si substrate by a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor/micro electro mechanical systems (CMOS/MEMS) process and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molding. Stable and reproducible measurements are obtained by implementing an on-chip Ag/AgCl electrode and encapsulating the detector. The detector senses the presence of SNPs by measuring the concentration of pyrophosphoric acid generated during selective DNA amplification. A 0.5-µL-volume detector enabled the successful performance of the typing of a SNP within the ABO gene using human blood. The measured sensitivity is 566 pA/µM.

  14. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  15. Single-Crystalline SrRuO3 Nanomembranes: A Platform for Flexible Oxide Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Dillon D.; Paskiewicz, Deborah M.; Sichel-Tissot, Rebecca; Stan, Liliana; Karapetrova, Evguenia

    2016-01-01

    The field of oxide electronics has benefited from the wide spectrum of functionalities available to the ABO3 perovskites, and researchers are now employing defect engineering in single crystalline heterostructures to tailor properties. However, bulk oxide single crystals are not conducive to many types of applications, particularly those requiring mechanical flexibility. Here, we demonstrate the realization of an all-oxide, single-crystalline nanomembrane heterostructure. With a surface-to-volume ratio of 2 × 107 , the nanomembranes are fully flexible and can be readily transferred to other materials for handling purposes or for new materials integration schemes. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we find that the nanomembranes can bond to other host substrates near room temperature and demonstrate coupling between surface reactivity and electromechanical properties in ferroelectric nanomembrane systems. The synthesis technique described here represents a significant advancement in materials integration and provides a new platform for the development of flexible oxide electronics.

  16. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation. PMID:26262113

  17. Measurement of chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys using human-specific short tandem repeat-based assay.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Edip; Keary, Jodie M; Kurlander, Roger; Hale, Douglas A

    2005-01-27

    Preclinical testing of a mixed chimerism mediated organ transplant tolerance strategy, in a cynomolgus macaque model, would be facilitated by the establishment of a reliable technique for quantitative assessment of chimerism. Among various techniques used for measurement of chimerism in humans, microsatellite DNA profiling has been considered the most versatile one that can discriminate between two individuals. We adopted a commercially available short tandem repeat profiling methodology to cynomolgus monkeys using two human specific alleles, TPOX and CSF1PO. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify these alleles, and the analysis of the PCR products was performed by capillary electrophoresis. Of 54 cynomolgus macaques investigated, only one pair with the same ABO blood type demonstrated identity at both alleles. This implies that this technique should interfere minimally with the assignment of donor-recipient pairs based upon molecular tissue typing or mixed lymphocyte cultures.

  18. Summary of field operations, well TRN-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, J.E.; Thomas, E.; McCord, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    TRN-1 was drilled near the SE corner of Kirtland Air Force Base to a depth of 510 feet. This well is in the Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization task field program, which is part of Sandia`s Environmental Restoration Project. After drilling, the borehole was logged, plugged to a depth of 352 ft, and completed as a monitoring well. Sand pack interval is from 305 to 352 ft and the screen interval is from 320 to 340 ft. During field operations, important subsurface geologic and hydrologic data were obtained (drill cuttings, geophysical logs of alluvial cover). Identification of the Abo formation in the subsurface will be useful. The subsurface hydrologic data will help define the local hydrostratigraphic framework within the bedrock. Future aquifer testing will be conducted for transmissivity, etc.

  19. Blood Group Discrepancy-First Sign of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Reddy, Mahua; Basu, Sabita; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    A 12-year-old male child was presented in the emergency with features of anemia and mild icterus on day+67 of HSCT. The child was suffering from Fanconi anemia and undergone HSCT from ABO-matched, fully HLA matched sibling donor. The diagnosis of mixed type AIHA due to cytomegalovirus reactivation was made in the immunohematology laboratory and blood group discrepancy was the first sign of AIHA in this patient. Though the cold agglutinin titer was not significant but the clinical symptoms and laboratory evidences were suggestive of significant hemolysis due to underlying IgG autoantibody. In addition the high complement avidity of IgM autoantibody might also be a contributing factor for clinically significant hemolysis in this case. The patient was successfully treated with phenotype matched blood transfusion, rituximab and oral steroid therapy. PMID:27408394

  20. Strain Accommodation By Facile WO6 Octahedral Distortion and Tilting During WO3 Heteroepitaxy on SrTiO3(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Varga, Tamas; Wang, Chong M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-27

    In this paper, we show that compared to other BO6 octahedra in ABO3 structured perovskite oxides, the WO6 octahedra in tungsten trioxide (WO3) can withstand a much larger degree of distortion and tilting to accommodate interfacial strain, which in turn strongly impact the nucleation, structure, and defect formation during the epitaxial growth of WO3 on SrTiO3(001). A meta-stable tetragonal phase can be stabilized by epitaxy and a thickness dependent phase transition (tetragonal to monoclinic) is observed. In contrast to misfit dislocations to accommodate the interfacial stain, the facial WO6 octahedral distortion and tilting give rise to three types of planar defects that affect more than 15 monolayers from the interface. These atomically resolved, unusual interfacial defects may significantly alter the electronic, electrochromic, and mechanical properties of the epitaxial films.

  1. A sulfated polysaccharide, fucans, isolated from brown algae Sargassum vulgare with anticoagulant, antithrombotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dore, Celina Maria P Guerra; das C Faustino Alves, Monique Gabriela; Will, Luiza Sheyla E Pofírio; Costa, Thiago G; Sabry, Diego A; de Souza Rêgo, Leonardo Augusto R; Accardo, Camila M; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre O; Filgueira, Luciana Guimarães A; Leite, Edda Lisboa

    2013-01-01

    Fucan (SV1) sulfated polysaccharides from the brown algae Sargassum vulgare were extracted, fractionated in acetone and examined with respect to chemical composition, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic effects and cellular proliferation. These polysaccharides contain low levels of protein, high level of carbohydrate and sulfate. Monosaccharides analysis revealed that SV1 was composed of fucose, galactose, xylose, glucuronic acid and mannose. SV1 polysaccharide prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and exhibited high antithrombotic action in vivo, with a concentration ten times higher than heparin activity. PSV1, a purified form in gel filtration showed very low biological activities. SV1 stimulated the enzymatic activity of FXa. Its action on DPPH radical scavenging activity was 22%. This polymer has no cytotoxic action (hemolytic) on ABO and Rh blood types in different erythrocyte groups. It displays strong anti-inflammatory action at all concentrations tested in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, demonstrated by reduced edema and cellular infiltration. PMID:23044157

  2. Glycosyltransferases A and B: Four Critical Amino Acids Determine Blood Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Natisha L.; Palcic, Monica M.; Evans, Stephen V.

    2005-12-01

    Human A, B, and O blood type is determined by the presence or absence of distinct carbohydrate structures on red blood cells. Type O individuals have α-fucose(1→2)galactose disaccharides [O(H) structures] on their cell surfaces while in type A or B individuals, the O antigen is capped by the addition of an α- N -acetylgalactosamine or α-galactose residue, respectively. The addition of these monosaccharides is catalyzed by glycosyltransferase A (GTA) or glycosyltransferase B (GTB). These are homologous enzymes differing by only 4 amino acids out of 354 that change the specificity from GTA to GTB. In this review the chemistry of the blood group ABO system and the role of GTA, GTB, and the four critical amino acids in determining blood group status are discussed. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  3. Off-centering of rare-earth ion in (Ba,R)(Ti,Mg)O3 (R = Gd, Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Honda, Atsushi; Inoue, Noriyuki; Higai, Shin'ichi; Ando, Akira

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the off-centering behavior of rare-earth ions that were partially substituted for A site ions in ABO3-type crystals, accurate crystal structure analyses of (Ba,R)(Ti,Mg)O3 (R = Gd, Dy) were performed by high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction analysis and the maximum entropy method (MEM)/Rietveld method. The R ions were observed at the six equivalent off-center sites in the <100> directions from the corner of a unit cell in the cubic phase. In the tetragonal phase, the R ions occupied one off-center site along the [001] direction. The R off-centering can be attributed to the covalent nature of the bond between the R and O ions in (Ba,R)(Ti,Mg)O3 crystals.

  4. Imaging diagnosis of neonatal anemia: report of two unusual etiologies.

    PubMed

    Grover, Shabnam Bhandari; Preethi, G Rajalakshmi; Saluja, Sumita; Bhargava, Ankit

    2013-01-01

    Anemia in neonatal period is rare, with the common causes being Rh and ABO blood group incompatibility, hemorrhagic disease of newborn, congenital hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinopathies, and TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus) infections. Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis (OP) are among the rare causes of neonatal anemia. A review of the literature shows approximately 200 reported cases of congenital leukemia. Articles describing the imaging features of congenital leukemia are still rarer. Infantile OP, another rare disorder with a reported incidence of 1 in 250,000 has characteristic imaging features, which are diagnostic of the disease. We report a case each, of two rare diseases: Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis. Additionally, our report highlights the radiological and imaging features of congenital leukemia and infantile OP and their crucial role in arriving at an early diagnosis. PMID:24605254

  5. Blood groups systems.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  6. Raman scattering in La1-xSrxFeO3-δ thin films: annealing-induced reduction and phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad A; Xie, Yujun; Scafetta, Mark D; May, Steven J; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2015-04-22

    Raman scattering in thin film La0.2Sr0.8FeO3-δ on MgO(0 0 1) collected at 300 K after different stages of annealing at selected temperatures T (300 K < T < 543 K, to 10 h) and analysis reveal changes in spectral characteristics due to a loss of oxygen, onset of oxygen vacancy-induced disorder, and activation of Raman-inactive modes that are attributed to symmetry lowering. The interpretation is further supported by carrier transport measurements under identical conditions showing orders of magnitude increase in the resistivity induced by oxygen loss. After prolonged annealing in air, evolution of the spectrum signals the appearance of a possible topotactic transformation of the crystal structure from that of the rhombohedral ABO3 perovskites to that of Brownmillerite-like structure consisting of octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. PMID:25812551

  7. High-Throughput Density Functional Theory Categorization of Ferroelectric Ternary Perovskite Oxides for Use as High-Performance Piezoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armiento, Rickard; Kozinsky, Boris; Fornari, Marco; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2011-03-01

    We present a nearly exhaustive density functional theory (DFT) survey over the chemical space of perovskite compounds on ABO3 form, with the aim of identifying alloy end points for new piezoelectric materials. Our screening criteria on the DFT results selects 85 relevant compounds, among which all well known alloy end points for high performance piezoelectrics are present. We analyze the compounds with respect to macroscopic polarization, born effective charges, and energy differences between different structure distortions. We discuss the energy features that cause the high piezoelectric performance of the well known piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT), and to what extent these features are rare among the found compounds. The results are used to discuss relevant isovalent alloys of the selected compounds.

  8. Screening for high-performance piezoelectrics using high-throughput density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armiento, Rickard; Kozinsky, Boris; Fornari, Marco; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2011-07-01

    We present a large-scale density functional theory (DFT) investigation of the ABO3 chemical space in the perovskite crystal structure, with the aim of identifying those that are relevant for forming piezoelectric materials. Screening criteria on the DFT results are used to select 49 compositions, which can be seen as the fundamental building blocks from which to create alloys with potentially good piezoelectric performance. This screening finds all the alloy end points used in three well-known high-performance piezoelectrics. The energy differences between different structural distortions, deformation, coupling between the displacement of the A and B sites, spontaneous polarization, Born effective charges, and stability is analyzed in each composition. We discuss the features that cause the high piezoelectric performance of the well-known piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT), and investigate to what extent these features occur in other compositions. We demonstrate how our results can be useful in the design of isovalent alloys with high piezoelectric performance.

  9. Fluorination of epitaxial oxides: synthesis of perovskite oxyfluoride thin films.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yujun; Laird, Eric D; Keavney, David J; Li, Christopher Y; May, Steven J

    2014-02-12

    While the synthesis of ABO3 perovskite films has enabled new strategies to control the functionality of this material class, the chemistries that have been realized in thin film form constitute only a fraction of those accessible to bulk chemists. Here, we report the synthesis of oxyfluoride films, where the incorporation of F may provide a new means to tune physical properties in thin films by modifying electronic structure. Fluorination is achieved by spin coating a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) solution onto oxygen-deficient films. The film/polymer bilayer is then annealed, promoting the diffusion of F into the film. We have used this method to synthesize SrFeO(3-α)Fγ films, as confirmed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:24443775

  10. Bone marrow processing on the Haemonetics V50 cell separator.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N A; Cornish, J M; Godwin, V; Gunstone, M J; Oakhill, A; Pamphilon, D H

    1990-01-01

    We have processed 27 bone marrow (BM) harvests using the Haemonetics V50 cell separator with a paediatric plasmapheresis set and programmed for lymphocyte collection. The mean starting volume of 843 mL was processed in 6-8 cycles to a buffy coat (BC) with a mean volume of 230 mL. The mean starting mononuclear cell (MNC) count was 1.22 x 10 8/kg recipient weight, and recovery was 92%. Clonogenic potential of the BC was assessed using CFU-GM assays and recovery was measured after cryopreservation or purging. On 4 occasions where major ABO incompatibility existed between donor and recipient, both BM and BC were consecutively diluted in compatible blood and processed twice. This achieved a calculated reduction in donor erythrocytes of 98%. The procedure was efficient and yielded a BC fraction suitable for cryopreservation and purging. Adequate stem-cells were retained as verified by CFU-GM assays and documentation of stable engraftment.

  11. [A family with an "Hm" phenotype transmitted over 3 generations].

    PubMed

    Salmon, C; Juszczak, G; Liberge, G; Lopez, M; Cartron, J P; Kling, C

    1978-02-01

    Hm phenotype represents a dissociation between a normal salivary expression of H substance and a very weakened expression of the antigen on red blood cells. Genetic analysis of the reported family reveals a dominant inheritance: Some members (Marie K..., Francette, Carmen) present a phenotype marked by a normal H enzyme but a deficient H antigen in erythrocyte membrane. Others Alice, Mathilde) have no expression of A1 antigen due to H substrate deficiency. H substance in salivary secretion is normal. In the other branch of this pedigree without consanguinity, Herbert presents an H substance deficiency, though quite different, as A1 antigen is expressed. In this family, Hm phenotype can be explained, without resorting to a Zm allele, by the expression of an exceptional allele at the H locus (like Am is an ABO allele). This hypothesis supports the possible polymorphism of H locus.

  12. Solid-phase techniques in blood transfusion serology.

    PubMed

    Beck, M L; Plapp, F V; Sinor, L T; Rachel, J M

    1986-01-01

    For nearly a century, erythrocyte agglutination has persisted as the most widely used method for the demonstration of antigen-antibody reaction in immunohematology. So far, no other system has been developed which can match its simplicity, versatility, and general reliability. The major disadvantage of agglutination reactions is the lack of an objective endpoint, which has severely hindered attempts to automate routine pretransfusion tests. To overcome this problem, we have designed a series of solid-phase assays for ABO and Rh grouping, antibody screening, compatibility, and hepatitis tests. Each of these solid-phase assays shares a common endpoint of red cell adherence, which is easily interpreted visually or spectrophotometrically. Computer interface permits the automatic interpretation and recording of results. We believe this solid-phase system should finally bring the blood bank laboratory into the age of automation.

  13. An enzymatic method for determination of azide and cyanide in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Wan, Nan-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-11-20

    A halohydrin dehalogenase (HHDH-PL) from Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1 was characterized and applied to determine azide and cyanide in the water. In this methodology, HHDH-PL catalysed azide and cyanide to react with butylene oxide and form corresponding β-substituted alcohols 1-azidobutan-2-ol (ABO) and 3-hydroxypentanenitrile (HPN) that could be quantitatively detected by gas chromatograph. The detection calibration curves for azide (R(2)=0.997) and cyanide (R(2)=0.995) were linear and the lower limits of detection for azide and cyanide were 0.1 and 0.3mM, respectively. Several other nucleophiles were identified having no effect on the analysis of azide and cyanide, excepting nitrite which influenced the detection of cyanide. This was the first report of a biological method to determine the inorganic azide and cyanide by converting them to the measurable organics.

  14. New Generation Perovskite Thermal Barrier Coating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.; Jarligo, M. O.; Mack, D. E.; Pitzer, D.; Malzbender, J.; Vaßen, R.; Stöver, D.

    2008-12-01

    Advanced ceramic materials of perovskite structure have been developed for potential application in thermal barrier coating systems, in an effort to improve the properties of the pre-existing ones like yttria-stabilized zirconia. Yb2O3 and Gd2O3 doped strontium zirconate (SrZrO3) and barium magnesium tantalate (Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3) of the ABO3 and complex A(B'1/3B''2/3)O3 systems, respectively, have been synthesized using ball milling prior to solid state sintering. Thermal and mechanical investigations show desirable properties for high-temperature coating applications. On atmospheric plasma spraying, the newly developed thermal barrier coatings reveal promising thermal cycle lifetime up to 1350 °C.

  15. Successful Long-term Graft Survival of a Renal Transplantation Patient with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kotaro; Sumida, Maki; Motoyoshi, Yaeko; Ogawa, Yuichi; Miki, Katsuyuki; Iwadoh, Kazuhiro; Sannomiya, Akihito; Murakami, Toru; Koyama, Ichiro; Kitajima, Kumiko; Nakajima, Ichiro; Morio, Tomohiro; Fuchinoue, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare X-linked hereditary syndrome, is characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia, and eczema. The underlying T-cell defect renders renal transplantation and immunosuppressive treatments uncertain. The present case exhibited the mild clinical manifestation, regarded as X-linked thrombocytopenia. He successfully underwent a living-donor ABO-compatible renal transplantation and splenectomy in 2002, and thereafter experiencing no severe rejection, serious infection, or malignancy for more than 10 years. Though IgA nephropathy was detected 8 months after transplantation, the patient's renal function and proteinuria were stable without any treatment. The present case showed a successful long-term graft survival and the importance of splenectomy added to renal transplantation. PMID:27374679

  16. Investigation of a shallow aquifer near the Fenton Hill hot dry rock site using DC resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    A shallow aquifer in the base of the Tertiary volcanic sequence was investigated using a series of 9 DC Schlumberger soundings taken within 10 km of the Fenton Hill hot dry rock geothermal site. The aquifer dips to the southwest following the top of the Abo formation, which acts as an aquiclude. Depth increases from 130 m in the eastern part of the study area to 260 m at 1.5 km west of the Fenton Hill site. Aquifer resistivities varied from 13..cap omega..-m to 126..cap omega..-m, which could be caused by variable permeability in the aquifer. Using results from empirical studies permeabilities ranging from 40 darcies to less than 0.3 darcies were estimated with the highest values occurring nearest to the Fenton Hill site.

  17. Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.; Sinha, Shyama P.; Kosynkin, Valery D.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral loparite (Ce, NA, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3 is the principal ore of the light-group rare-earth elements (LREE) in Russia. The complex oxide has a perovskite (ABO3) structure with coupled substitutions, polymorphism, defect chemistry and a tendency to become metamict. The A site generally contains weakly bonded, easily exchanged cations of the LREE, Na and Ca. The B site generally contains smaller, highly charged cations of Ti, Nb or Fe+3. Mine production is from Russia's Kola Peninsula. Ore is beneficiated to produce a 95% loparite concentrate containing 30% rare-earth oxides. Loparite concentrate is refined by either a chlorination process or acid decomposition process to recover rare-earths, titanium, niobium and tantalum. Rare-earths are separated by solvent extraction and selective precipitation/dissolution. The concentrate is processed at plants in Russia, Estonia and Kazakstan.

  18. Beyond the Pediatric end-stage liver disease system: solutions for infants with biliary atresia requiring liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Mary Elizabeth M; Harpavat, Sanjiv; Shepherd, Ross W; Hiremath, Girish S; Brandt, Mary L; Fisher, Amy; Goss, John A

    2014-08-28

    Biliary atresia (BA), a chronic progressive cholestatic disease of infants, is the leading cause for liver transplant in children, especially in patients under two years of age. BA can be successfully treated with the Kasai portoenterostomy; however most patients still require a liver transplant, with up to one half of BA children needing a transplant by age two. In the current pediatric end-stage liver disease system, children with BA face the risk of not receiving a liver in a safe and timely manner. In this review, we discuss a number of possible solutions to help these children. We focus on two general approaches: (1) preventing/delaying need for transplantation, by optimizing the success of the Kasai operation; and (2) expediting transplantation when needed, by performing techniques other than the standard deceased-donor, whole, ABO-matched organ transplant. PMID:25170195

  19. The history of blood transfusion prior to the 20th century--part 2.

    PubMed

    Learoyd, P

    2012-12-01

    Although there are a number of descriptions of 'blood infusion' in antiquity, it was the publication of the discovery of the circulation of blood in 1628 by William Harvey and the work of Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle in 1663 on the infusion of different materials into dogs that paved the way to the possible practical attempts at actual blood transfusion. Although these early experiments, principally by Richard Lower in England and Jean Denis in France provided valuable information regarding inter-species incompatibility and the problems of blood coagulation, it was not until the work of James Blundell in the early part of the 19th century that blood transfusion was used as a means of blood replacement. However, blood transfusion was not to become an accepted therapeutic possibility until the discovery of practical anticoagulation and the ABO blood groups at the start of the 20th century. PMID:23016954

  20. Isolation and properties of a lectin from the seeds of the Indian bean or lablab (Dolichos lablab L.).

    PubMed Central

    Güran, A; Tichá, M; Filka, K; Kocourek, J

    1983-01-01

    The lectin of the Indian bean or lablab (Dolichos lablab L.) was purified by affinity chromatography on two types of affinity carriers: O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-Separon and Separon-bound ovomucoid. The lectin is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge: S20, w = 6.14 S, Mr = 110 000; the molecule appears to comprise two pairs of two types of subunits (Mr 16 000 and 40 000), and contains 2% neutral sugar and 0.2 Mn and 0.5 Zn atom respectively. The lectin agglutinates human erythrocytes non-specifically with regard to ABO grouping at a limit concentration of 8 micrograms/ml, and this activity is inhibited most effectively by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and ovomucoid, but not by free D-mannose. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6870786

  1. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-10-29

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease.

  2. Computational Database of Metal-Oxide Surface Reactivities for Catalyst Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2014-03-01

    We study surface reactivity of low index facets of MO, MO2 and ABO3 oxide groups using small atoms and molecules (O, OH, CO, NO, CH3, NH3). The computed database of adsorption and activation energies will be used to identify possible correlations with other quantities such as surface energies or electronic structure in order to establish scaling relations for future high-throughput screening efforts. A comparison will be made between DFT functionals of various levels of accuracy, e.g., GGA, GGA+U, GGA+vdW and GGA-hybrid, meta-GGA and hybrid meta-GGA, and compared to available experiments. This effort is part of the ``Predictive Theory of Transition Metal Oxide Catalysis'' funded through the DOE Materials Genome Project. This work is supported by DOE under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  3. Tuning bipolar resistive switching by forming defect dipoles in A-site-deficient perovskite calcium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Hu, Wei; Zou, Lilan; Chen, Ruqi; Li, Baojun; Bao, Dinghua

    2015-04-01

    If we intentionally make the A-site in an ABO3 perovskite structure deficient, it is possible to tune the resistive switching effect by forming defect dipoles. In this study, an A-site-deficient calcium titanate (Ca0.95TiO3, CTO) thin film was fabricated on a Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate as an active layer for resistive random-access memory. The Pt/CTO/Pt device exhibited stable bipolar resistive switching performance with good endurance and long retention. The resistive switching may be attributable to the formation and rupture of the conduction filaments due to the O vacancies and defect dipoles resulting from the interaction between the Ca and O vacancies.

  4. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds.

  5. Clinical application of therapeutic erythrocytapheresis (TEA).

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Bruni, R

    2000-06-01

    Therapeutic erythrocytapheresis (TEA) has been used in different diseases such as polycythemia vera (PV), secondary erythrocytosis or hemochromatosis as a process of the less cumbersome but more expensive phlebotomy. TEA is preferred in emergency conditions such as thrombocytosis or in conditions such as porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) or erythropoietic porphyria when plasma exchange (PEX) is often combined with TEA to reduce extracellular levels of uroporphyrin which contribute to plasma hyperviscosity. TEA is often combined with drug therapy that varies from etoposide in PV to EPO and desferoxamine which are used to mobilize and reduce iron stores in hemochromatosis. Benefits from this combination may be more long lasting than expected. Nonetheless for TEA, there is no standard protocol and, clinical experience with this therapy remains highly anecdotal. Therapeutic red cell-exchange (TREX) has been used with much interest over the years, starting with the management of hemolytic disease of the newborn and later used to correct severe anemia in thalassemia patients thereby preventing iron overload. It has also been used for the management of complications of sickle cell disease such as priapism, chest syndrome, stroke, retinal, bone, splenic and hepatic infarction or in preparation for surgery by reducing HbS to less than 30%. Automated apheresis has also favored the use of TREX in conditions such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and aniline poisoning, arsenic poisoning, Na chlorate intoxications and CO intoxications, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, reactions due to ABO incompatibility, in preparation for ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation or for preventing anti-D immunization after the transfusion of D(+) cells to D(-) recipients. Another field of application has been in the emergency management of intraerythrocytic parasite infections such as malaria and babesiosis. Application of TREX may be wide but its real use remains limited

  6. A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Leebeek, Frank W.; Paré, Guillaume; de Andrade, Mariza; Tzourio, Christophe; Psaty, Bruce M.; Basu, Saonli; Ruiter, Rikje; Rose, Lynda; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Lumley, Thomas; Heckbert, Susan R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Lathrop, Mark; Rice, Kenneth M.; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Glazer, Nicole L.; Pankow, James S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Amouyel, Philippe; Bis, Joshua C.; Bovill, Edwin G.; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Tracy, Russell P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I.; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Loth, Daan W.

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended CHARGE VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (p≤0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG) (p<5.0×10−13 for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (p<5.0×10-6) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations. PMID:23650146

  7. Evaluation of additive element to improve PZT piezoelectricity by using first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasoda, Yutaka; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Recently, piezoelectric material has a very important potential for functional material which configure Bio-MEMS (Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) actuator and sensor. Specifically, in implementation of piezoelectric material for Bio-MEMS, thin film fabrication by sputtering method is made from the viewpoint of miniaturization. Furthermore, in piezoelectric material, perovskite type material composed of ABO3 has a high piezoelectricity. Then, PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) as the perovskite type piezoelectric material is widely used since it is easy to produce and has high piezoelectricity. PZT has zirconium or titanium in the B site of ABO3 structure. PZT has the features such as physical properties to greatly change by change in the B site composition ratio of zirconium and titanium. Thus, the B site greatly influences physical properties and therefore function improvement by additive element is tried widely. However, experimental method to lack in economy and quantitativeness is mainstream. Therefore, application of the result is difficult and new evaluation method of B site additive element for sputtering fabrication is necessary. Accordingly, in this research, search of an additive element at low cost and quantitative from the viewpoint of energy by first-principles calculation. First of all, the additive elements which capable of substituting for a B site of PZT were searched. Next, change of piezoelectricity was evaluated by change of crystal structure in a PZT system was introduced an additive element that substitution of the B site was possible. As a result, additive elements for the PZT B site capable of improving piezoelectricity were determined.

  8. Generalized trends in the formation energies of perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-28

    Generalized trends in the formation energies of several families of perovskite oxides (ABO3) and plausible explanations to their existence are provided in this study through a combination of DFT calculations, solid-state physics analyses and simple physical/chemical descriptors. The studied elements at the A site of perovskites comprise rare-earth, alkaline-earth and alkaline metals, whereas 3d and 5d metals were studied at the B site. We also include ReO3-type compounds, which have the same crystal structure of cubic ABO3 perovskites except without A-site elements. From the observations we extract the following four conclusions for the perovskites studied in the present paper: for a given cation at the B site, (I) perovskites with cations of identical oxidation state at the A site possess close formation energies; and (II) perovskites with cations of different oxidation states at the A site usually have quite different but ordered formation energies. On the other hand, for a given A-site cation, (III) the formation energies of perovskites vary linearly with respect to the atomic number of the elements at the B site within the same period of the periodic table, and the slopes depend systematically on the oxidation state of the A-site cation; and (IV) the trends in formation energies of perovskites with elements from different periods at the B site depend on the oxidation state of A-site cations. Since the energetics of perovskites is shown to be the superposition of the individual contributions of their constituent oxides, the trends can be rationalized in terms of A-O and B-O interactions in the ionic crystal. These findings reveal the existence of general systematic trends in the formation energies of perovskites and provide further insight into the role of ion-ion interactions in the properties of ternary compounds. PMID:23579382

  9. Correlation between 'H' blood group antigen and Plasmodium falciparum invasion.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    The ABO blood group system is the most important blood group system in clinical practice. The relationship between Plasmodium falciparum and ABO blood groups has been studied for many years. This study was undertaken to investigate the abilities of different blood group erythrocytes to support in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasites. P. falciparum parasites of four different strains (3D7, 7G8, Dd2 and RKL9) were co-cultured with erythrocytes of blood group 'A', 'B', 'O' (n = 10 for each) and 'O(h)' (Bombay group) (n = 7) for 5 days. Statistically significant differences were observed on the fourth day among the mean percent parasitemias of 'O', non-'O' ('A' and 'B') and 'O(h)' group cultures. The parasitemias of four strains ranged from 12.23 to 14.66, 11.68 to 13.24, 16.89 to 22.3, and 7.37 to 11.27 % in 'A', 'B', 'O' and Bombay group cultures, respectively. As the expression of H antigen decreased from 'O' blood group to 'A' and 'B' and then to Bombay blood group, parasite invasion (percent parasitemia) also decreased significantly (p < 0.01) and concomitantly, indicating the association of parasite invasion with the amount of H antigen present on the surface of erythrocyte. Thus, the question arises, could H antigen be involved in P. falciparum invasion? To evaluate erythrocyte invasion inhibition, 'O' group erythrocytes were virtually converted to Bombay group-like erythrocytes by the treatment of anti-H lectins extracted from Ulex europaeus seeds. Mean percent parasitemia of lectin-treated cultures on the fourth day was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of non-treated cultures and was found to be similar with the mean percent parasitemia demonstrated by the Bombay group erythrocyte cultures, thus further strengthening the hypothesis.

  10. Intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow predicts early hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marín-Gómez, L M; Bernal-Bellido, C; Alamo-Martínez, J M; Porras-López, F M; Suárez-Artacho, G; Serrano-Diaz-Canedo, J; Padillo-Ruiz, J; Gómez-Bravo, M A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatic artery complications after orthotopic liver transplantation are associated with a high rate of graft loss and mortality (23% to 35%) because they can lead to liver ischemia. The reported incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) after adult liver transplantation is 2.5% to 6.8%. Typically, these patients are treated with urgent surgical revascularization or emergent liver retransplantation. Since January 2007, we have recorded the postanastomotic hepatic artery flow after revascularization. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hepatic blood flow on revascularization and early HAT. Retrospectively, we reviewed perioperative variables from 110 consecutive liver transplantation performed at the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital (Seville, Spain) between January 2007 and October 2010. We evaluated the following preoperative (donor and recipient) and intraoperative variables: donor and recipient age, cytomegalovirus serology, ABO-compatibility, anatomical variations of the donor hepatic artery, number of arterial anastomoses, portal and hepatic artery flow before closure, cold ischemia time, and blood transfusion. These variables were included in a univariate analysis. Of the 110 patients included in the study, 85 (77.7%) were male. The median age was 52 years. ABO blood groups were identical between donor and recipient in all the patients. The prevalence of early HAT was 6.36% (7 of 110). Crude mortality with/without HAT was 22% versus 2% (P = .001), respectively. Crude graft loss rate with/without HAT was 27% versus 4% (P = .003), respectively. Early HAT was shown to be primarily associated with intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow (93.3 mL/min recipients with HAT versus 187.7 mL/min recipients without HAT, P < .0001). No retransplantation showed early HAT. In our experience, intraoperative hepatic artery blood flow predicts early HAT after liver transplantation.

  11. Pseudo Jahn-Teller origin of ferroelectric instability in BaTiO3 type perovskites: The Green's function approach and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polinger, V.; Garcia-Fernandez, P.; Bersuker, I. B.

    2015-01-01

    The local origin of dipolar distortions in ABO3 perovskite crystals is reexamined by means of a novel approach, the Green's function method augmented by DFT computations. The ferroelectric distortions are shown to be induced by the pseudo Jahn-Teller effect (PJTE). The latter involves vibronic hybridization (admixture) of the ground state to same-spin opposite-parity excited electronic bands. Similar to numerous molecular calculations, the PJT approach provides a deeper insight into the nature of chemical bonding in the octahedral cluster [BO6] and, in particular, reveals the local origin of its polar instability. This allows predicting directly which transition ions can create ferroelectricity. In particular, the necessary conditions are established when an ABO3 perovskite crystal with an electronic dn configuration of the complex ion [BO6] can possess both proper ferroelectric and magnetic properties. Distinguished from the variety of cluster approaches to local properties, the Green's function method includes the influence of the local vibronic-coupling perturbation on the whole crystal via the inter-cell interaction responsible for creation of electronic and vibrational bands. Calculated Green's functions combined with the corresponding numeric estimates for the nine electronic bands, their density of states, and the local adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) confirm the eight-minimum form of this surface and feasibility of the PJT origin of the polar instability in BaTiO3. We show also that multicenter long-range dipole-dipole interactions critically depend on the PJTE largely determining the magnitude of the local dipoles. DFT calculations for the bulk crystal and its clusters confirm that the dipolar distortions are of local origin, but become possible only when their influence on (relaxation of) the whole lattice is taken into account. The results are shown to be in full qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the experimental data for this

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Alev; Sadıç, Murat; İkbal Atılgan, Hasan; Baskın, Aylin; Koca, Gökhan; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT). Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA). Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years) of whom 62 (12.4%) were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6%) were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was positive in 245 (49%) cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34%) had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51%) had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8%) children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family. PMID:26316471

  13. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Flórez, Alvaro; Barbosa-Lis, Diana María; Zapata-Noreña, Oscar Arturo; Marín-Velásquez, Julissa Andrea; Afanador-Bayona, Sergio Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG) consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old) treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old) selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG). Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048), respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8) (p = 0.009) and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6) (p = 0.007). Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8) (p = 0.62) and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9) (p = 0.65). Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system. PMID:27275620

  14. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity.

  15. Genetic markers in the blood of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Marković, S; Bozicević, D; Simić, D; Brzović, Z

    1991-01-01

    Poligenetically determined predisposition to multiple sclerosis (MS) defines the way of immunological reaction to environmental factors and leads to clinically manifest disease. Although the connection between MS and some loci of the HLA system has been established, the hereditary predisposition to MS remains to be elucidated. We determined the phenotypes of monogenic hereditary characteristics linked to the surface of red blood cells that were obtained from 45 MS patients and 458 healthy subjects. The antigens on the erythrocytic surface of the ABO, Rh, MN, Ss, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, P and Lewis system were analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the MS patients differ from the normal subjects with regard to the Rh, ABO and Lewis erythrocytic antigens. The Rh positive factor was present in 95.55% of the MS patients compared to 84.29% of the controls, whereas the Rh negative factor was found in only 4.45% of the MS patients and 15.71% of the healthy subjects. The blood group O was demonstrated in 22.22% of the MS patients compared to 40.42% of the healthy persons. The MS patients had the blood group A in 15.11% of the cases as opposed to 43.99% of the subjects in the control groups. The blood group B was found in 22.22% of the MS patients compared to 11.10% of the controls. The distribution of the Lewis system in the MS patients was also demonstrated to be different from that in the general population. The MS patients were found to have less frequently the Le a+b- phenotype (11.12%) and more frequently Le a- b- (13.33%) compared to the healthy subjects who had the Le a+b- phenotype in 12.00% of the cases and Le a- b- in 5.00%.

  16. NOAA Atmospheric Baseline Observatories in the Arctic: Alaska & Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel, B. A.; Butler, J. H.; Schnell, R. C.; Crain, R.; Haggerty, P.; Greenland, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates two year-round, long-term climate research facilities, known as Atmospheric Baseline Observatories (ABOs), in the Arctic Region. The Arctic ABOs are part of a core network to support the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's mission to acquire, evaluate, and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and solar radiation in a manner that allows the causes of change to be understood. The observatory at Barrow, Alaska (BRW) was established in 1973 and is now host to over 200 daily measurements. Located a few kilometers to the east of the village of Barrow at 71.3° N it is also the northernmost point in the United States. Measurement records from Barrow are critical to our understanding of the Polar Regions including exchange among tundra, atmosphere, and ocean. Multiple data sets are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, ozone, meteorology, and numerous others. The surface, in situ carbon dioxide record alone consists of over 339,000 measurements since the system was installed in July 1973. The observatory at Summit, Greenland (SUM) has been a partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Polar Programs since 2004, similar to that for South Pole. Observatory data records began in 1997 from this facility located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet at 72.58° N. Summit is unique as the only high-altitude (3200m), mid-troposphere, inland, Arctic observatory, largely free from outside local influences such as thawing tundra or warming surface waters. The measurement records from Summit help us understand long-range transport across the Arctic region, as well as interactions between air and snow. Near-real-time data are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, meteorology, ozone, and numerous others. This poster will highlight the two facilities

  17. Gene-centric approach identifies new and known loci for FVIII activity and VWF antigen levels in European Americans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Cushman, Mary; Green, David; Rich, Stephen S; Lange, Leslie A; Yang, Qiong; Tracy, Russell P; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Basu, Saonli; Wilson, James G; Keating, Brendan J; Weng, Lu-Chen; Taylor, Herman A; Jacobs, David R; Delaney, Joseph A; Palmer, Cameron D; Young, Taylor; Pankow, James S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Reiner, Alexander P; Folsom, Aaron R

    2015-06-01

    Coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (VWF) are key proteins in procoagulant activation. Higher FVIII coagulant activity (FVIII :C) and VWF antigen (VWF :Ag) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and venous thromboembolism. Beyond associations with ABO blood group, genetic determinants of FVIII and VWF are not well understood, especially in non European-American populations. We performed a genetic association study of FVIII :C and VWF:Ag that assessed 50,000 gene-centric single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18,556 European Americans (EAs) and 5,047 African Americans (AAs) from five population-based cohorts. Previously unreported associations for FVIII :C were identified in both AAs and EAs with KNG1 (most significantly associated SNP rs710446, Ile581Thr, Ile581Thr, P = 5.10 × 10(-7) in EAs and P = 3.88 × 10(-3) in AAs) and VWF rs7962217 (Gly2705Arg,P = 6.30 × 10(-9) in EAs and P = 2.98 × 10(-2) in AAs. Significant associations for FVIII :C were also observed with F8/TMLHE region SNP rs12557310 in EAs (P = 8.02 × 10(-10) ), with VWF rs1800380 in AAs (P = 5.62 × 10(-11) ), and with MAT1A rs2236568 in AAs (P51.69 × 10(-6) ). We replicated previously reported associations of FVIII :C and VWF :Ag with the ABO blood group, VWF rs1063856(Thr789Ala), rs216321 (Ala852Gln), and VWF rs2229446 (Arg2185Gln). Findings from this study expand our understanding of genetic influences for FVIII :C and VWF :Ag in both EAs and AAs.

  18. Complex-oxide multilayers by design: a treasure trove of unusual ferroic functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhmanson, Serge

    2015-03-01

    While inheriting most of the traits of their parents, layered variations of ABO3 perovskites allow for a number of additional channels for property manipulation and fine-tuning. Their remarkable flexibility toward structural and chemical modification can be exploited for the design of new and advanced functionalities not originally present in the parent ABO3 compounds. With the help of first-principles-based computational techniques, we have predicted intriguing electroactive behavior in layered-perovskite compounds of the Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) type. Specifically, we showed that Goldstone-like states (collective, close to zero frequency excitations, requiring practically no consumption of energy) can be induced in a PbSr2Ti2O7 RP superlattice, manifesting themselves as easy rotations of the in-plane polarization vector. Examination of a fictitious epitaxial Ba2TiO4 RP compound demonstrated that it exhibits an assortment of competing incommensurate distortions, including ones that promote in-plane polarization. In this presentation we highlight the unusual behavior of a RP Ba2ZrO4 structure, which has already been synthesized as a bulk ceramic. An investigation of the properties of a (fictitious) epitaxial thin-film variant of this material reveals that under compression it undergoes a transition into an incommensurate state, while under tension it shows hints of a Goldstone-like polar instability, which surprisingly occurs without the presence of a lone-pair active ions like Pb or Sn. In both cases, we observe anomalies in the planar static dielectric susceptibility of the system, with large dielectric response predicted for the phase displaying the Goldstone-like instability.

  19. Analysis of storage lipid accumulation in Alcanivorax borkumensis: Evidence for alternative triacylglycerol biosynthesis routes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Golyshin, Peter N; Sabirova, Julia S; Ferrer, Manuel; Timmis, Kenneth N; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, like Alcanivorax borkumensis, play a globally important role in bioremediation of petroleum oil contamination in marine ecosystems. Accumulation of storage lipids, serving as endogenous carbon and energy sources during starvation periods, might be a potential adaptation mechanism for coping with nutrient limitation, which is a frequent stress factor challenging those bacteria in their natural marine habitats. Here we report on the analysis of storage lipid biosynthesis in A. borkumensis strain SK2. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters (WEs), but not poly(hydroxyalkanoic acids), are the principal storage lipids present in this and other hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species. Although so far assumed to be a characteristic restricted to gram-positive actinomycetes, substantial accumulation of TAGs corresponding to a fatty acid content of more than 23% of the cellular dry weight is the first characteristic of large-scale de novo TAG biosynthesis in a gram-negative bacterium. The acyltransferase AtfA1 (ABO_2742) exhibiting wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) activity plays a key role in both TAG and WE biosynthesis, whereas AtfA2 (ABO_1804) was dispensable for storage lipid formation. However, reduced but still substantial residual TAG levels in atfA1 and atfA2 knockout mutants compellingly indicate the existence of a yet unknown WS/DGAT-independent alternative TAG biosynthesis route. Storage lipids of A. borkumensis were enriched in saturated fatty acids and accumulated as insoluble intracytoplasmic inclusions exhibiting great structural variety. Storage lipid accumulation provided only a slight growth advantage during short-term starvation periods but was not required for maintaining viability and long-term persistence during extended starvation phases. PMID:17122340

  20. A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Teichert, Martina; Chasman, Daniel I; Heit, John A; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Li, Guo; Pankratz, Nathan; Leebeek, Frank W; Paré, Guillaume; de Andrade, Mariza; Tzourio, Christophe; Psaty, Bruce M; Basu, Saonli; Ruiter, Rikje; Rose, Lynda; Armasu, Sebastian M; Lumley, Thomas; Heckbert, Susan R; Uitterlinden, André G; Lathrop, Mark; Rice, Kenneth M; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Glazer, Nicole L; Pankow, James S; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Amouyel, Philippe; Bis, Joshua C; Bovill, Edwin G; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Tracy, Russell P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Loth, Daan W; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Ridker, Paul M; Folsom, Aaron R; Smith, Nicholas L

    2013-07-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to approximately 2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (P ≤ 0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG; P < 5.0 × 10(-13) for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (P < 5.0 × 10(-6) ) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations.